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Sample records for broadband seismic stations

  1. Ambient seismic noise cross-correlations at Romanian broadband stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Bogdan; Tataru, Dragos; Neagoe, Cristian; Panza, Giuliano; Raileanu, Victor; Radulian, Mircea; Popa, Mihaela; Ionescu, Constantin

    2010-05-01

    In the last years the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania, has developed its real-time broadband seismic network. At present, NIEP operates 34 stations with both broadband velocity sensors (CMG3ESP, CMG40T, KS2000, STS2) and accelerometer sensors (2gEpi). The data are continuously recorded and transmitted to the Romanian Data Centre where Antelope 4.11 is running for acquisition and processing. The density of the stations produces 560 inter-station pairs for ambient noise cross-correlation analysis. In this study, we used seismic data recorded during a period of 12 months, between January 2009 and December 2009. A nonlinear procedure is applied to lower the influence of the earthquake-related signals and to obtain a symmetric noise cross-correlation function (for details see Cho et al., 2007). The results show good cross-correlation functions for almost all pair of stations. As the vertical components of ambient noise are cross-correlated, only the fundamental mode of the Rayleigh wave is obtained. The FTAN analysis is used to extract the group velocities from the estimated dispersive waves at periods between 6 and 30 sec. This work provides very useful data for future tomographic studies in Romania at crustal level, considering that new data from other broadband stations deployed on the Romanian territory will become available. References: Cho, K.H., R. B. Herrmann, C. J. Ammon and K. Lee. Imaging the Upper Crust of the Korean Peninsula by Surface-Wave Tomography, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2007) 97, 198-207.

  2. New Seismic Noise Models Obtained Using Very Broadband Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd el-aal, Abd el-aziz Khairy; Soliman, Mahmoud Sami

    2013-11-01

    It has been two decades since the last comprehensive standard model of ambient earth noise was published Peterson (Observations and modelling of seismic background noise, US Geological Survey, open-file report 93-322, 1993). The PETERSON model was updated by analyzing the absolute quietest conditions for stations within the GSN ( Berger et al. in J Geophys Res 109, 2005; Mcnamara and Buland in Bull Seism Soc Am 94:1517-1527, 2004; Ringler et al. in Seismol Res Lett 81(4) doi:10.1785/gssrl.81.4.605, 2010). Unfortunately, both the original model and the updated models did not include any deployed station in North Africa and Middle East, which reflects the noise levels within the desert environment of those regions. In this study, a survey was conducted to create a new seismic noise model from very broadband stations which recently deployed in North Africa. For this purpose, 1 year of continuous recording of seismic noise data of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) was analyzed in order to create a new noise model. Seasonal and diurnal variations in noise spectra were recorded at each station. Moreover, we constructed a new noise model for each individual station. Finally, we obtained a new cumulative noise model for all the stations. We compared the new high-noise model (EHNM) and new low-noise model (ELNM) with both the high-noise model (NHNM) and low-noise model (NLNM) of Peterson (Observations and modelling of seismic background noise, US Geological Survey, open-file report 93-322, 1993). The obtained noise levels are considerably lower than low-noise model of Peterson (Observations and modelling of seismic background noise, US Geological Survey, open-file report 93-322, 1993) at ultra long period band (ULP band), but they are still below the high-noise model of Peterson (Observations and modelling of seismic background noise, US Geological Survey, open-file report 93-322, 1993). The results of this study could be considered as a first step to create

  3. Autonomous, continuously recording broadband seismic stations at high-latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B.; Parker, T.; Bonnett, B.; Tytgat, G.; Anderson, K.; Fowler, J.

    2009-04-01

    IRIS PASSCAL is in the third year of an NSF funded development and acquisition effort to establish a pool of cold-hardened seismic stations specifically for high-latitude broadband deployments. We have two complete years of field trials and have successfully recorded continuous seismic data during both years with data recovery rates of ~90%. Our design is premised on a 2W autonomous system recording to local media, capable of lasting two years without service. The system is composed of four new design elements: a heavily insulated station enclosure; a state-of-health (SOH) Iridium modem; a light weight, easily deployed solar panel mount; and a power system that includes power switching between primary (Lithium Thionyl Chloride) and secondary batteries. The station enclosures have proved most critical in keeping our data acquisition systems operating within manufacturer specifications and primary batteries within a 50-70% efficiency range. Enclosures with 2.5cm-thick vacuum panels and 5cm of foam insulation have kept interior enclosure temperatures 25-30°C above background (typically below -50°C). This austral summer we are deploying version three of our enclosures. Significant changes in the design include thicker vacuum panels (5cm), more robust construction, and simplified cable routing. An important aspect of our station design is easy installation and minimal weight. To simplify installation our station enclosures are packed with datalogger, SOH communications and batteries in the lab or base camp, so that access to the internal components is not necessary at the remote site. Bulkhead connectors allow a user to fully interact with the system without ever having to open the enclosure. Solar panel mounts are also fully constructed prior to deployment. Once on site, digging two large holes (one for the enclosure and one for the broadband seismometer) and constructing the site takes roughly 2 hours. A station designed to record continuously for 12-14 months is

  4. Unexpected non seismic signals recorded by broadband seismic stations during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.; Grad, M.; Jóźwiak, W.

    2015-12-01

    Broadband seismometer is a very complicated and sensitive device designed to record ground motion with resolutions as low as nm/s. While short period geophone is only mass in a coil the broadband sensor is sophisticated combination of feedback circuits. Experience shows that broadband sensors are very sensitive to ground motion and its orientation, especially tilt. On March 17, 2015 an amazing, strong event was simultaneously recorded by all stations at Z component, with very long period - not typical for seismic events. Records at the same time suggested geomagnetic storm. In this study broadband seismometer response to electromagnetic wave caused by geomagnetic storms is shown and analyzed. Main observation was done using network of 13 broadband stations in northern Poland. Same signal was recorded on all stations on area of 120 km in diameter. Time and shape of recording was exactly the same as recording of magnetic anomaly in permanent magnetic station HEL located about 50 km from the nearest seismic station. The first small event was recorded at about 5 am, and following it strong event started at about 4 pm UTC. An increase of signal amplitude is observed with geomagnetic latitude in the range 52.26 - 53.27o (corresponding geographic 53.69 - 54.54oN). Seismic and magnetic records are compared for other permanent stations in the area, as well as for other recent storms. In this study circumstances needed for recording magnetic anomalies with seismic stations are discussed based on years of seismic recording by Polish permanent stations and temporary passive experiments "13BB star" and PASSEQ. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  5. Broadband Seismic Station Deployment at Hadabat Al-Marhi, Halban, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Lewis, J P; Al-Amri, A

    2002-02-11

    A broadband three-component seismic station was deployed on the Arabian Shield near the town of Halban in central Saudi Arabia. This site is near the proposed site of a primary seismic array (PS38) of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The purpose of this deployment was to collect calibration data for the primary array to be deployed in the future.

  6. Weather-related Ground Motions Recorded by Taiwan Broadband Seismic Network Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. F.; Chi, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Broadband seismometers record ground motions, which can be induced by weather-related processes. Analyzing such signals might help to better understand those natural processes. Previously, abnormal seismic signals have been detected during rainfall and snowmelt events. The amplitudes of those seismic signals correlated with the variations of the discharge in a nearby river and scientists have proposed that such signals were generated by bed load transport. Here, we used the continuous seismic data from the Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology (BATS) to analyze the weather-related ground motions during rainfall events. The sampling rate for seismic data is 100 samples per second. We compared the seismic data with the precipitation data from the rain gauge stations in Taiwan in three select rainfall periods, Typhoon Kalmaegi in 2008, Typhoon Morakot in 2009 and the East Asian rainy season in 2012. During raining, the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of high frequency (> 1 Hz) seismic noises is apparently high, and the amplitude of the seismic noise also correlates with the local precipitation, especially at the stations in the drainage basins, and the PSD decreased gradually after peaks of precipitation. At some seismic stations, we observed vertical ground motions at several bands of frequencies: 0-1 Hz, 1-5 Hz, and 5-45 Hz. However, on horizontal components we found the 5-45 Hz energy splits into two bands: 5-25 Hz and 30-45 Hz. For stations near the ridge tops or on the coastal plain, the 30-45 Hz band energy is weaker or missing. Preliminary results show that the amplitudes of the seismic waves correlate with the stream flow discharge. Next, we plan to study the sources of the different bands of energy to examine if we can monitor and quantify natural processes, like precipitation and river discharge, using seismic signals.

  7. Significant technical advances in broadband seismic stations in the Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglade, A.; Lemarchand, A.; Saurel, J.-M.; Clouard, V.; Bouin, M.-P.; De Chabalier, J.-B.; Tait, S.; Brunet, C.; Nercessian, A.; Beauducel, F.; Robertson, R.; Lynch, L.; Higgins, M.; Latchman, J.

    2015-04-01

    In the last few years, French West Indies observatories from the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), in collaboration with The UWI Seismic Research Centre (SRC, University of West Indies), have modernized the Lesser Antilles Arc seismic and deformation monitoring network. 15 new, permanent stations have been installed that strengthen and expand its detection capabilities. The global network of the IPGP-SRC consortium is now composed of 20 modernized stations, all equipped with broadband seismometers, strong motion sensors, Global Positioning System (GPS) sensors and satellite communication for real-time data transfer. To enhance the sensitivity and reduce ambient noise, special efforts were made to improve the design of the seismic vault and the original Stuttgart shielding of the broadband seismometers (240 and 120s corner period). Tests were conducted for several months, involving different types of countermeasures, to achieve the highest performance level of the seismometers. GPS data, realtime and validated seismic data (only broadband) are now available from the IPGP data centre (http://centrededonnees.ipgp.fr/index.php?&lang=EN). This upgraded network feeds the Caribbean Tsunami Warning System supported by UNESCO and establishes a monitoring tool that produces high quality data for studying subduction and volcanic processes in the Lesser Antilles arc.

  8. A deployment of broadband seismic stations in two deep gold mines, South Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, Arthur F.; Boettcher, Margaret S.; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Johnston, Malcolm J.; Durrheim, R.; Spottiswoode, S.; Milev, A.

    2009-01-01

    In-mine seismic networks throughout the TauTona and Mponeng gold mines provide precise locations and seismic source parameters of earthquakes. They also support small-scale experimental projects, including NELSAM (Natural Earthquake Laboratory in South African Mines), which is intended to record, at close hand, seismic rupture of a geologic fault that traverses the project region near the deepest part of TauTona. To resolve some questions regarding the in-mine and NELSAM networks, we deployed four portable broadband seismic stations at deep sites within TauTona and Mponeng for one week during September 2007 and recorded ground acceleration. Moderately large earthquakes within our temporary network were recorded with sufficiently high signal-to-noise that we were able to integrate the acceleration to ground velocity and displacement, from which moment tensors could be determined. We resolved the questions concerning the NELSAM and in-mine networks by using these moment tensors to calculate synthetic seismograms at various network recording sites for comparison with the ground motion recorded at the same locations. We also used the peak velocity of the S wave pulse, corrected for attenuation with distance, to estimate the maximum slip within the rupture zone of an earthquake. We then combined the maximum slip and seismic moment with results from laboratory friction experiments to estimate maximum slip rates within the same high-slip patches of the rupture zone. For the four largest earthquakes recorded within our network, all with magnitudes near 2, these inferred maximum slips range from 4 to 27 mm and the corresponding maximum slip rates range from 1 to 6 m/s. These results, in conjunction with information from previous ground motion studies, indicate that underground support should be capable of withstanding peak ground velocities of at least 5 m/s.

  9. Five Years of Data at the Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband Seismic Station (MOBB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, D.; Romanowicz, B.; McGill, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Uhrhammer, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present an overview of the results obtained at MOBB in the past 5.5 years of its continuous operation. In particular we focus on the observations of the long-period ocean surface gravity waves (infragravity waves; 0.002 to 0.05 Hz) and different methods to remove the long-period background and signal-generated noise from the seismic observations. MOBB was installed 40 km offshore in the Monterey Bay at a water depth of 1000 m in April 2002 in collaboration between Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). It is located west of the San Gregorio Fault and represents the first step towards extending the onshore broadband seismic network in northern California westward of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. MOBB comprises a three- component broadband seismometer Guralp CMG-1T, sensitive over a wide frequency range, from 50 Hz to 2.8 mHz (360 s), a water current meter measuring current speed and direction, and a differential pressure gauge. At present, the station is autonomous and the data are on average retrieved every 4 months using MBARI's remotely operated vehicle Ventana. Work is under way to connect it to the MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System) cable so that it will contribute continuous real time data to the northern California earthquake monitoring system. Lessons learned from the MOBB deployment as well as noise removal techniques that are specific to the ocean bottom installation will provide us reference for future installations of broadband seismic stations in the oceans. When compared to the quiet land stations, ocean bottom seismic station MOBB shows increased background noise in the band pass of interest for the study of regional and teleseismic signals. This is mainly due to deformation of the seafloor under the pressure forcing by infragravity waves. Also observed is additional signal- generated noise which is due to the reverberations in the shallow sedimentary layers as well as in the

  10. Near real-time noise removal for the Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband (MOBB) seismic station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinois, M.; Zheng, Z.; Taira, T.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband (MOBB) observatory, located 40 km offshore central California, at a water depth of 1000 m, provides important complementary coverage of the San Andreas Fualt system to the land-based network. First installed in 2002, it is arguably the longest lived ocean bottom broadband seismic station. It includes a three-component broadband Guralp CMG-1T seismometer and a collocated differential pressure gauge (DPG) to measure the local water pressure continuously, as well as a current meter. After 7 years of autonomous operation, in February 2009, MOBB was successfully connected to the MARS cable (http://www.mbari.org/mars), and the data have been available in real time at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (Romanowicz et al., 2009). However, the usage of MOBB data has been limited because of the noisy character of the data, in particular at periods of interest for regional moment tensor studies (20-100 sec), due to the ocean infragravity waves. Crawford and Webb (2000) demonstrated that there is a strong correlation between the water pressure and the vertical component of seafloor ground velocity in the infragravity wave band. Applying this to MOBB vertical component data, a transfer function (TF) was determined and utilized to successfully deconvolve the pressure-correlated noise from the vertical component of MOBB seismograms (Dolenc et al., 2007) in the period band 20-200 sec. Romanowicz et al. (2003, 2009) presented examples of how the cleaned MOBB data contribute to the determination of source parameters and regional structure. These past efforts, however, have been mostly case studies for illustration purpose. In this study, we systematically process all the available MOBB data since 2009 (because the cable was trawled, about a year of data is missing from February 2010 to June 2011). We calculate the TF over time and find that it is generally very stable, except for one change in 2010 due to an instrument replacement. Two

  11. The GEOSCOPE broadband seismic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douet, Vincent; Vallée, Martin; Zigone, Dimitri; Bonaimé, Sébastien; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Maggi, Alessia; Pardo, Constanza; Bernard, Armelle; Leroy, Nicolas; Pesqueira, Frédéric; Lévêque, Jean-Jacques; Thoré, Jean-Yves; Bes de Berc, Maxime; Sayadi, Jihane

    2016-04-01

    The GEOSCOPE observatory has provided continuous broadband data to the scientific community for the past 34 years. The 31 operational GEOSCOPE stations are installed in 17 countries, across all continents and on islands throughout the oceans. They are equipped with three component very broadband seismometers (STS1, T240 or STS2) and 24 or 26 bit digitizers (Q330HR). Seismometers are installed with warpless base plates, which decrease long period noise on horizontal components by up to 15dB. All stations send data in real time to the IPGP data center, which transmits them automatically to other data centers (FDSN/IRIS-DMC and RESIF) and tsunami warning centers. In 2016, three stations are expected to be installed or re-installed: in Western China (WUS station), in Saint Pierre and Miquelon Island (off the East coast of Canada) and in Walis and Futuna (SouthWest Pacific Ocean). The waveform data are technically validated by IPGP (25 stations) or EOST (6 stations) in order to check their continuity and integrity. Scientific data validation is also performed by analyzing seismic noise level of the continuous data and by comparing real and synthetic earthquake waveforms (body waves). After these validations, data are archived by the IPGP data center in Paris. They are made available to the international scientific community through different interfaces (see details on http://geoscope.ipgp.fr). Data are duplicated at the FDSN/IRIS-DMC data center and a similar duplication at the French national data center RESIF will be operational in 2016. The GEOSCOPE broadband seismic observatory also provides near-real time information on global moderate-to-large seismicity (above magnitude 5.5-6) through the automated application of the SCARDEC method (Vallée et al., 2011). By using global data from the FDSN - in particular from GEOSCOPE and IRIS/USGS stations -, earthquake source parameters (depth, moment magnitude, focal mechanism, source time function) are determined about 45

  12. Data quality control of ADSN Broadband stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alili, Azouaou; Yelles-chaouche, Abd el karim; Allili, Toufik; Messemen, Walid

    2014-05-01

    In this work we present the analysis of continuous waveform of the Algerian digital seismic network recorded during five years from 2008 to 2013 for twenty broadband stations using the power spectral densities (PSDs) and their corresponding probability density functions (PDFs) algorithm of McNamara, and Buland (2004). ADSN Broadband stations data quality is one main concern and interest of ADSN technical team. Indeed, the quality of the data from broadband stations is continuously controlled in quasi-realtime using "PQLX" (Pascal Quick Look eXtended) software to compute the PDFs and PSDs during the operation of the stations at different frequency range. At each station the level of noise is shown, which we can see diurnal and seasonal variation. From the data analysis, most of the ADSN Broadband stations display good records in the several frequency domains in relation with their site installation. However some of stations near the urban areas could present some noisy disturbances. This led sometimes to generate some ghost events. In the low frequency, some stations could be still influenced by the temperature variations. This long period of records from 2008 to 2013, led us to analyze and control the several stations year by year taking into account the seasons and to know about their work during five years. This analysis is also very important to improve in the future quality of station installation and choose the optimal station design in aim to reduce cultural noise and large fluctuation of temperature and pressure. Key words: PQLX, PDFs, PSDs, Broad Band

  13. The 2007 eruptions and caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island) from tilt analysis at a single very broadband seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Roult, Geneviève; Michon, Laurent; Barruol, Guilhem; Muro, Andrea Di

    2014-04-01

    Seismic records from La Réunion Island very broadband Geoscope station are investigated to constrain the link between the 2007 eruptive sequence and the related caldera collapse of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Tilt estimated from seismic records reveals that the three 2007 eruptions belong to a single inflation-deflation cycle. Tilt trend indicates that the small-volume summit eruption of 18 February occurred during a phase of continuous inflation that started in January 2007. Inflation decelerated 24 days before a second short-lived, small-volume eruption on 30 March, almost simultaneous with a sudden, large-scale deflation of the volcano. Deflation rate, which had stabilized at relatively low level, increased anew on 1 April while no magma was erupted, followed on 2 April by a major distal eruption and on 5 April by a summit caldera collapse. Long-term tilt variation suggests that the 2007 eruptive succession was triggered by a deep magma input.

  14. Mammoth Mountain, California broadband seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. B.; Pitt, A. M.; Wilkinson, S. K.; Chouet, B. A.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Prejean, S. G.; Read, C.; Shelly, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a young cumulo-volcano located on the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Current volcanic processes beneath Mammoth Mountain are manifested in a wide range of seismic signals, including swarms of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes, upper and mid-crustal long-period earthquakes, swarms of brittle-failure earthquakes in the lower crust, and shallow (3-km depth) very-long-period earthquakes. Diffuse emissions of C02 began after a magmatic dike injection beneath the volcano in 1989, and continue to present time. These indications of volcanic unrest drive an extensive monitoring effort of the volcano by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program. As part of this effort, eleven broadband seismometers were deployed on Mammoth Mountain in November 2011. This temporary deployment is expected to run through the fall of 2013. These stations supplement the local short-period and broadband seismic stations of the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) and provide a combined network of eighteen broadband stations operating within 4 km of the summit of Mammoth Mountain. Data from the temporary stations are not available in real-time, requiring the merging of the data from the temporary and permanent networks, timing of phases, and relocation of seismic events to be accomplished outside of the standard NCSN processing scheme. The timing of phases is accomplished through an interactive Java-based phase-picking routine, and the relocation of seismicity is achieved using the probabilistic non-linear software package NonLinLoc, distributed under the GNU General Public License by Alomax Scientific. Several swarms of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes, spasmodic bursts of high-frequency earthquakes, a few long-period events located within or below the edifice of Mammoth Mountain and numerous mid-crustal long-period events have been recorded by the network. To date, about 900 of the ~2400 events occurring beneath Mammoth Mountain since November 2011 have

  15. Broadband Seismic Study of the Dominican Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, J.; Polanco Rivera, E.; Pujols Guridy, R.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; Lopez, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Northeast Caribbean Plate Boundary Zone (NCPBZ) is characterized by oblique subduction of oceanic crust belonging to the North American Plate, a broad zone of deformation to accommodate strain, and the development of transform and normal faults on and around the island of Hispaniola. Other features may include the formation of a new microplates, rearrangement and aggregation of crustal fragments into new islands, and rotations of the microplates. Numerous issues regarding the nature and timing of formation of the features described above, their roles in regional tectonics and even whether they exist at all, remain unresolved. Our short-term goal is to better constraint lithospheric structure and identify active earthquake faults with a temporary broadband seismic network in the Dominican Republic. The oblique-subduction-to-strike-slip transition found in the NCPBZ is representative of numerous locales around the world, so lessons learned here may inform our understanding of plate tectonics broadly. In 2013-2014 we installed sixteen broadband seismic stations in the Dominican Republic. The temporary network will remain in place for two years. Data acquired by the temporary network will be integrated with data recorded by existing seismic facilities in the region and the combined dataset will be used for a series of analyses that will, collectively, allow us to image lithospheric structure and aid seismic hazard assessment for the island of Hispaniola. Preliminary results will be presented from the deployment, including regional earthquake locations and improved 1D Earth structure as well as plans for collaborations between regional seismic networks and local capacity-building.

  16. Dynamics of the 2007 Eruptions of Piton de la Fournaise and the Related Caldera Collapse from a Single Very Broad-band Seismic Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Roult, Geneviève; Michon, Laurent; Barruol, Guilhem; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Di Muro, Andrea; Reymond, Dominique; Peltier, Aline; Staudacher, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Seismic records from the RER very broad-band seismic station (La Réunion Island) belonging to the GEOSCOPE network are investigated to understand the eruptive succession (February to May) of Piton de la Fournaise and the caldera collapse episode of April 2007. Data first indicate that the short-lived, small volume, summit eruption of February 18 occurred during a phase of continuous inflation initiated in January 2007. Inflation decelerated around 2 weeks before a second short-lived small volume eruption on March 30-31 on the SE flank, almost simultaneous with a sudden, large deflation of the edifice. Deflation rate, which had stabilized at a relatively low level, increased anew on April 1 while no magma was emitted, followed on April 2 by a more distant and one of the most voluminous eruptions of the last two centuries at La Réunion Island. The RER station shows that very long period (VLP) and ultra long period (ULP) events developed during this period. Seven ULP events preceded the caldera collapse and 48 ones occurred during the caldera collapse over 9 days, most of which during the first 30 hours. A thorough examination of the seismic signals corrected for tide effects shows that each collapse event was coeval with VLP and ULP signals. Each individual collapse showed similar ULP and VLP signals characterized by periods of ~ 500 s and ~ 7 s, respectively. The back-azimuth of most ULP signals related to the caldera collapse points clearly toward the Dolomieu caldera. The strikingly constant duration of the VLP signals (around 20 s) related to the collapse events and their occurrence before the collapse initiation suggest a physical control of the volcanic edifice. Waveforms and spectrograms of the various caldera collapse events show very homogeneous patterns, suggesting a similar and repeating volcano-tectonic process for the formation of the VLP signals events. Although tilt may be responsible of part of the ULP signals observed during the collapse events, we

  17. Analysis of the ambient seismic noise at Bulgarian seismic stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Liliya; Nikolova, Svetlana

    2010-05-01

    Modernization of Bulgarian National Seismological Network has been performed during a month in 2005. Broadband seismometers and 24-bits digital acquisition systems with dynamic range more than 132dB type DAS130-01 produced by RefTek Inc. were installed at the seismic stations from the existing analog network. In the present study the ambient seismic noise at Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network (BNDSN) stations is evaluated. In order to compare the performance of the network against international standards the detail analysis of the seismic noise was performed using software and models that are applied in the international practice. The method of McNamara and Bulland was applied and the software code PDFSA was used to determine power spectral density function (PSD) of the background noise and to evaluate the probability density function (PDF). The levels of the ambient seismic noise were determined and the full range of the factors influencing the quality of the data and the performance of a seismic station was analyzed. The estimated PSD functions were compared against two models for high (NHNM) and low (NLNM) noise that are widely used in seismological practice for seismic station monitoring qualities assessment. The mode PDF are used to prepare annual, seasonal, diurnal and frequency analyses of the noise levels at BNDSN stations. The annual analysis shows that the noise levels at the Northern Bulgarian stations are higher than the ones at Central and Southern stations for the microseisms' periods (1sec -7sec). It is well observable at SS PRV and PSN located near Black sea. This is due to the different geological conditions of the seismic stations as well. For the periods of "cultural" noise the power distribution depends on the type of noise sources and as a rule is related to human activities at or near the Earth surface. Seismic stations MPE, VTS and MMB have least mode noise levels and the noisiest stations are PGB, PVL и JMB. The seasonal

  18. Seismic Station Functionality Improvements of Seismic Network of Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sincic, Peter; Tasic, Izidor; Mali, Marko; Pancur, Luka; Vidrih, Renato

    2010-05-01

    The Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, the Office of Seismology and Geology is responsible for the fast and reliable information about earthquakes, originating in the area of Slovenia and nearby. The Seismic Network of Slovenia, which covers the entire Slovenian territory, involving an area of 20,256 km2, consists of 26 seismic stations equipped with broadband seismometers (CMG-40T, CMG-3ESPC, CMG-3T and STS2) and Quanterra Q730 data loggers. The seismic data is transmitted in real-time to the Data Center in Ljubljana (DCL). Leased lines, xDSL and satellite communication are used for data transfer from stations to DCL. When an event occurs main earthquake parameters (magnitude and the location of the epicenter) can be evaluated at sufficient accuracy only if data from several seismic stations is available. In case of temporary communication failure loss of important seismic data can occur. The duration of communication failure, which exceeds 2 hours can cause data loss. This is due to low memory storage of Quanterra Q730 acquisition unit. In this paper our solution for extending storage capabilities of particular seismic station to several months is presented (momentarily the storage capabilities of particular seismic station lies between 1 and 2 hours). To extend storage capabilities we used a special Industrial Computer (JetBox 8100), which runs on Linux. To collect seismic data from the Q730 unit the acquisition software SeiComP is used. The combination of Q730 and JetBox 8100 assures that in case of temporary communication failure there will be no data loss. Seismic data is simply retrieved from JetBox 8100 (from ring buffer that is generated by SeiComP acquisition software) after communication is once again established. Moreover, an advanced state of health system was build and installed on JetBox 8100, that makes identifying, predicting and solving of different problems quick and effective. With combining Q730 data logger and JetBox 8100 we did

  19. The improved broadband Real-Time Seismic Network in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neagoe, C.; Ionescu, C.

    2009-04-01

    Starting with 2002 the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) has developed its real-time digital seismic network. This network consists of 96 seismic stations of which 48 broad band and short period stations and two seismic arrays are transmitted in real-time. The real time seismic stations are equipped with Quanterra Q330 and K2 digitizers, broadband seismometers (STS2, CMG40T, CMG 3ESP, CMG3T) and strong motions sensors Kinemetrics episensors (+/- 2g). SeedLink and AntelopeTM (installed on MARMOT) program packages are used for real-time (RT) data acquisition and exchange. The communication from digital seismic stations to the National Data Center in Bucharest is assured by 5 providers (GPRS, VPN, satellite communication, radio lease line and internet), which will assure the back-up communications lines. The processing centre runs BRTT's AntelopeTM 4.10 data acquisition and processing software on 2 workstations for real-time processing and post processing. The Antelope Real-Time System is also providing automatic event detection, arrival picking, event location and magnitude calculation. It provides graphical display and reporting within near-real-time after a local or regional event occurred. Also at the data center was implemented a system to collect macroseismic information using the internet on which macro seismic intensity maps are generated. In the near future at the data center will be install Seiscomp 3 data acquisition processing software on a workstation. The software will run in parallel with Antelope software as a back-up. The present network will be expanded in the near future. In the first half of 2009 NIEP will install 8 additional broad band stations in Romanian territory, which also will be transmitted to the data center in real time. The Romanian Seismic Network is permanently exchanging real -time waveform data with IRIS, ORFEUS and different European countries through internet. In Romania, magnitude and location of an earthquake are now

  20. Background noise model development for seismic stations of KMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Youngsoo

    2010-05-01

    The background noise recorded at seismometer is exist at any seismic signal due to the natural phenomena of the medium which the signal passed through. Reducing the seismic noise is very important to improve the data quality in seismic studies. But, the most important aspect of reducing seismic noise is to find the appropriate place before installing the seismometer. For this reason, NIMR(National Institution of Meteorological Researches) starts to develop a model of standard background noise for the broadband seismic stations of the KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration) using a continuous data set obtained from 13 broadband stations during the period of 2007 and 2008. We also developed the model using short period seismic data from 10 stations at the year of 2009. The method of Mcmara and Buland(2004) is applied to analyse background noise of Korean Peninsula. The fact that borehole seismometer records show low noise level at frequency range greater than 1 Hz compared with that of records at the surface indicate that the cultural noise of inland Korean Peninsula should be considered to process the seismic data set. Reducing Double Frequency peak also should be regarded because the Korean Peninsula surrounded by the seas from eastern, western and southern part. The development of KMA background model shows that the Peterson model(1993) is not applicable to fit the background noise signal generated from Korean Peninsula.

  1. Geyser's Eruptive Activity in Broadband Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim

    2010-05-01

    A geyser is a spring characterized by intermittent discharge of water ejected turbulently and accompanied by a vapor phase (steam). The formation of geysers is due to particular hydrogeological conditions, which exist in only a few places on Earth, so they are a fairly rare phenomenon. The reasons of geyser periodicity and specifics of the activity for every particular geyser are not completely clear yet. So almost for all known geysers it is necessary to develop the personal model. In given study we first use seismic method for detection of possible hidden feature of geyser's eruptive activity in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. Broadband seismic records of geyser generated signals were obtained in hydrothermal field. The Valley of the Geysers belongs to Kronotskiy State Natural Biosphere Reserve and the UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site "Volcanoes of Kamchatka". Neither seismological nor geophysical investigations were carried out here earlier. In September, 2009 seismic observation was organized in geyser's field by 24-bit digital output broadband seismometers (GURALP CMG-6TD flat velocity response 0.033-50 Hz). Four geysers were surveyed: the fountain type Big and Giant geysers; the cone type Pearl geyser and the short-period Gap geyser. Seismometers were set as possible close to the geyser's surface vent (usually at the distance near 3-5 m). Main parameters of the eruptions for the investigated geysers: - The Giant geyser is the most powerful among the regular active geysers in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. The height of the fountain reaches 30 meters, the mass of water erupted is about 40-60 tons. The main cycle of activity varies significantly: in 1945 the intervals between eruptions was near 3 hours, nowadays it is 5-6 hours. As a geyser of fountain type, the Giant geyser erupts from the 2*3 m2 pool of water. - The Big geyser was flooded by the lake after the natural catastrophe (giant mud-stone avalanche, formed by landslide, bed into Geiyzernaya

  2. Considerations of broadband seismic observation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Y.; Kurita, K.; Araya, A.; Hori, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Shiraishi, H.; Kakuma, H.; Ishihara, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The surface of Mars has been extensively investigated and huge amount of data have been acquired such as high Res images. On the other hand interior of the Mars has been only weakly constrained by the mean density, the moment of inertia and gravity data. The size of core is poorly constrained and negatively correlated with the core density. High dissipation state is reported for the mantle by tidal interaction (Bills et al 2006), which is against a conventional view of small,cool planet. To clarify these points seismic observation on Mars is deadly needed. Japan Mars exploration project(MELOS) is now under discussion and it includes seismic measurements for determination the interior structure of Mars such as the core size, its state and attenuation in the mantle. Our plan is to install broadband high sensitivity seismometers,which are intended to detect continuous excitation of free oscillation by atmospheric turbulence. In this presentation we would like to show a basic design of broadband high sensitivity seismometer as well as environment protection designs. The basic parts are composed of a long period pendulum, laser interferometry and its control feedback electricity. As for the environment protection design,the following factors are important. 1. Surface condition. Martian surface is composed of stones gravels and sand. Drift is expected to occur due to the sudden change in ground slope. We need a device for self adjustment to keep the horizontal. 2. Temperature. Surface temperature at Martian equator is expected to vary between 190 to 300K. We have to consider changes in spring tension, thermal expansion of components and changes in circuit constants. 3. Surface wind. Inhomogeneously heated surface and topographic effect generate wind over 20m per second. We have to consider to lessen the effect of seismometer,even if we install the seismometer on the ground. 4. Radiation. Radiation that rains down on Mars is stronger because of thin atmosphere. Radiation

  3. Understanding the Dynamics of the February-April 2007 Eruptions of the Piton de la Fournaise and the Related Caldera Collapse from a Single Very Broad-band Seismic Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, F. R.; Roult, G. C.; Michon, L.; Barruol, G.; Ferrazzini, V.; di Muro, A.; Reymond, D.; Peltier, A.; Staudacher, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic records from the RER very broad-band seismic station (La Réunion Island) belonging to the GEOSCOPE network are investigated to understand the eruptive succession (February to May) of Piton de la Fournaise and the caldera collapse episode of April 2007. Data first indicate that the short-lived, small volume, summit eruption of February 18 occurred during a phase of continuous inflation initiated in end of January 2007. Inflation decelerated around 2 weeks before a second short-lived small volume eruption on March 30-31 on the SE flank, which was coeval with a sudden, large deflation of the edifice. Deflation rate, which was stabilized at a relatively low level, increased anew on April 1 while no magma was emitted, followed on April 2 by a distant and one of the most voluminous eruptions of the last two centuries at La Réunion Island. The RER station shows that very long period (VLP) and ultra long period (ULP) events developed during this period. Seven ULP events preceded the caldera collapse and 48 ones occurred during the caldera collapse over 9 days, most of which during the first 30 hours. A thorough examination of the seismic signal corrected from the tide effects shows that each collapse event was coeval with VLP and ULP signals. Each repeating individual collapse showed similar ULP and VLP signals characterized by periods of ~ 500 s and ~ 7 s, respectively. Polarization measurements (back-azimuth) of the ULP clearly point toward a source located beneath the Dolomieu crater. The strikingly constant duration of the VLP signals (around 20 s) related to the collapse events and occurring before the collapse initiation suggests a physical control of the volcanic edifice. Waveforms and spectrograms of the various caldera collapse events show very homogeneous patterns, suggesting a similar and repeating volcano-tectonic process for the formation of the VLP signals events. Although tilt may be responsible of part of the ULP signals observed during the

  4. Gran Canaria temporary broadband seismic network: an study of the seismicity and Earth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendros, Javier; de Lis Mancilla, Flor; Martinez-Arevalo, Carmen; Carmona, Enrique; Sanchez, Nieves; Heit, Benjamin; Garcia, Alicia; Martin-Leon, Rosa; Buontempo, Luisa; Yuan, Xiahoui

    2010-05-01

    The present project is a joint effort between different institutions to deploy a dense seismic network at Gran Canaria island (Canary Islands, Spain). The interstation distance is around 20 km. The broadband seismic network is composed of one permanent (Guralp CMG-3T 120 s) and five temporary stations (Guralp CMG-3ESP 60 s). The permanent station is a 120 s Guralp CMG-3T and belongs to the Canary Island Seismic Network, run by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) of Spain. The temporary stations are 60 s Guralp CMG-3ESP, provided by the GFZ seismic pool. The deployment was carried out in December 2009. The stations will be recording during two years. The improvement of the seismic network allow us to tackle the following issues: the detection and analysis of any local seismicity of tectonic and/or volcanic origin at Gran Canaria island; to contribute to the understanding of the regional seismicity with special interest in the oceanic channel between Tenerife and Gran Canaria Island in collaboration with a project running a dense temporary seismic network in Tenerife; to study the crustal and upper mantle structure, under Gran Canaria to constrain the crustal structure, the source of the volcanism, and better sample the mantle discontinuities and anisotropy. To study the Earth structure, we use receiver function analysis, ambient seismic noise and SKS anisotropy techniques, This project is part of a long-term research of the crustal and the mantle structure of the Canary Islands, which has started with Gran Canaria and Tenerife Islands and will eventually continue with the rest of the archipelago. The origin of the Canary Islands is generally attributed to a broad mantle upwelling under a slow moving plate, resulting in spatially and temporally distributed volcanic activity and a large number of seamounts and islands. A controversial discussion has been going on about the factors that control the evolution of the volcanic edifices, the type of the melting

  5. Geyser's Eruptive Activity in Broadband Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim

    2010-05-01

    A geyser is a spring characterized by intermittent discharge of water ejected turbulently and accompanied by a vapor phase (steam). The formation of geysers is due to particular hydrogeological conditions, which exist in only a few places on Earth, so they are a fairly rare phenomenon. The reasons of geyser periodicity and specifics of the activity for every particular geyser are not completely clear yet. So almost for all known geysers it is necessary to develop the personal model. In given study we first use seismic method for detection of possible hidden feature of geyser's eruptive activity in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. Broadband seismic records of geyser generated signals were obtained in hydrothermal field. The Valley of the Geysers belongs to Kronotskiy State Natural Biosphere Reserve and the UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site "Volcanoes of Kamchatka". Neither seismological nor geophysical investigations were carried out here earlier. In September, 2009 seismic observation was organized in geyser's field by 24-bit digital output broadband seismometers (GURALP CMG-6TD flat velocity response 0.033-50 Hz). Four geysers were surveyed: the fountain type Big and Giant geysers; the cone type Pearl geyser and the short-period Gap geyser. Seismometers were set as possible close to the geyser's surface vent (usually at the distance near 3-5 m). Main parameters of the eruptions for the investigated geysers: - The Giant geyser is the most powerful among the regular active geysers in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. The height of the fountain reaches 30 meters, the mass of water erupted is about 40-60 tons. The main cycle of activity varies significantly: in 1945 the intervals between eruptions was near 3 hours, nowadays it is 5-6 hours. As a geyser of fountain type, the Giant geyser erupts from the 2*3 m2 pool of water. - The Big geyser was flooded by the lake after the natural catastrophe (giant mud-stone avalanche, formed by landslide, bed into Geiyzernaya

  6. Near real-time detection and characterization of landslides using broadband seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manconi, Andrea; Coviello, Velio; De Santis, Francesca; Picozzi, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    Broadband seismic networks at regional, national, and global scale are usually deployed for a specific purpose, i.e. earthquake monitoring. However, it has been recently demonstrated that these networks are also capable to efficiently detect failure and transport processes related to landslide phenomena. Indeed, stations located several tens of kilometers away from the source areas can record the ground vibrations produced by large mass movements. In this work, we propose an integrated approach for the near real-time detection, location, and characterization of landslides, by considering data acquired from the Italian broadband seismic networks and available in the European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA). We use an automatic picking of first arrivals to identify significant seismic events recorded by the monitoring network. Secondly, waveforms relevant to landslide phenomena are selected by analyzing the spectral characteristics of seismic signals, which significantly differ from those related to earthquake events. Afterwards, in order to locate the landslide, we use a modified version of the real-time evolutionary location algorithm proposed for earthquakes, which relies on geometrical characteristics of the seismic network and on the relationships between triggered stations and not-triggered stations. Indeed, a first landslide location is roughly estimated as soon as the first station is triggered. The progressive increase over time in the number of triggered stations allows improving the accuracy on the most likely landslide location. Finally, we analyze the seismic energy released to infer an approximate value of the landslide volume in near real time. Here we present few examples relevant to recent well-known landslides where our method was successfully applied. Our results show how it is possible to extract precious information for landslide hazard assessment from seismic monitoring data, which in the field of earthquake warning would be discarded. Moreover

  7. National Seismic Stations transducers and filters

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, P.W.; Hummell, M.

    1981-01-13

    The National Seismic Stations (NSS) instruments are being developed for seismic monitoring of regional and teleseismic events. They consist of two 3-component, broadband, borehole seismometers: the KS-36000 and the S-700, which is the backup for the KS-36000. Output is divided into frequency bands to reduce data loss due to saturation. Complete block diagrams of the KS-36000 and S-700 NSS seismometers and filters are presented. Both open-loop and closed-loop steady-state amplitude and phase curves are given. Without band-pass filters (but with shaping filters) the KS-36000 has a flat (i.e., between the -3dB points) velocity sensitivity from 0.03 to 23 Hz. With its shaping filters, the S-700 is flat from 0.2 to 40 Hz. The structure of the three band-pass filters (LP, MP, and SP) is superimposed on these velocity sensitivities. Passbands of the resulting overall velocity sensitivity for the KS-36000 are as follows: LP band = 0.01-0.05 Hz, MP band = 0.02-1.3 Hz, and SP band = 1-10 Hz. Step-function responses and phase and group delays are given for each of the bands. The MP-band step response is oscillatory due to its sharp, high-frequency cutoff, but an MP-band filter with a less abrupt cutoff eliminates the oscillation. To generate typical NSS output seismograms, velocity inputs from four representative seismic events were used: an underground nuclear test (..delta.. approx. = 3.6/sup 0/), a regional earthquake (..delta.. approx. = 20/sup 0/), a local earthquake (..delta.. approx. = 1.5/sup 0/), and a teleseismic earthquake (..delta.. approx. = 123/sup 0/). The velocity inputs for these events were obtained from the LLNL digital seismic network (DSS) around the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The seismograms resulting from each of the bands were satisfactory, although the low-frequency corner of the MP band should be increased in frequency to 0.08 Hz.

  8. Broadband seismology and small regional seismic networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrmann, Robert B.

    1995-01-01

    In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Missouri. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/Central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This Professional Paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

  9. Seismicity in West Iberia: small scale seismicity recording from a Dense Seismic Broadband Deployment in Portugal (WILAS Project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso Dias, Nuno; Custódio, Susana; Silveira, Graça; Carrilho, Fernando; Haberland, Christian; Lima, Vânia; Rio, Inês; Góngora, Eva; Marreiros, Célia; Morais, Iolanda; Vales, Dina; Fonseca, João; Caldeira, Bento; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Over the last years several projects targeted the lithospheric structure and its correlation with the surface topography, e.g. EarthSCOPE/USArray or TOPO-EUROPE. Two projects focused on the Iberian Peninsula, one giving particular attention to the southern collision margin (TOPO-MED) and the other to the central cratonic Massif (TOPO-IBERIA/IBERArray). These projects mostly rely on deployed dense seismic broadband (BB) networks with an average inter-station spacing of 60km, which strongly increases the available network spatial coverage. The seismicity recording in such networks is critical to access current rates of lithospheric deformation. Within the scope of project WILAS - West Iberia Lithosphere and Astenosphere Structure (PTDC/CTE-GIX/097946/2008), a 3-year project funded by the Portuguese Science & Technology Foundation (FCT), we deployed a temporary network of 30 BB stations in Portugal between 2010 and 2012, doubling the total number of operating BB stations. Together with the permanent and TOPO-IBERIA stations, the resulting networks provided a full and dense coverage of the Iberian Peninsula. The majority of the permanent stations in Portugal, aimed at the seismic surveillance, are located in the southern part of the country in result of the active tectonic convergence between Iberia and Africa. Therefore, the temporary stations were mainly deployed in the north of Portugal. These temporary stations allowed an improvement of the earthquake detection threshold. The detection of seismic events was based on the analysis of daily spectrograms of the entire network, the new events detected being analysed and included in the catalogue. The new detected events are located mainly in the north, with magnitudes as low as 0.5 ML and in the offshore in the Estremadura Spur. Some additional events were also located south of Portugal, between the Gorringe Bank and the Gulf of Cadiz, in this case the lower magnitudes being ~2.0ML. Focal mechanisms will also be

  10. Development of the new very broadband compliance ocean bottom station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Celia; Dahm, Torsten; Bulow, Joachim; Winter, Sven

    2010-05-01

    In the frame of the EMSEIS Project* the University of Hamburg has developed two broadband compliance ocean bottom stations (BCSs). The objective was to create a station capable of acquire pressure and velocity data on the seafloor in the frequency range where compliance and infragravity waves are studied (30 - 500s). A triaxial seismometer STS-2, a differential pressure gauge, an absolute pressure sensor, and a MLS Geolon recorder were installed on a Hamburg free-fall ocean bottom station. The whole system works in a broad frequency range (between 0.005 Hz and 25 Hz) with a sampling frequency of 50 Hz. The maximum deployment depth is 6000 meters. The BCSs were created to acquire compliance data during short time deployments (20-100 hours). However, laboratory tests and field experiences indicate that instruments can continuously work during about 30 days. To secure the correct leveling of the seismic sensor, a two stage active leveling process was designed. In the first stage the mechanical leveling is performed and during the second stage the internal leveling is done and the masses are re-centered. Two electronic circuits were designed and connected to the recorder and the seismometer to control the complete process. The tasks of the circuits are: 1) determinate the number of cycles during a measurement which depend on the number of leveling signals sent by the recorder, 2) to generate the impulse to initiate the mechanical leveling phase, 3) to send the signal to produce the internal leveling and 4) to sent the signal to lock and unlock the masses to protect the equipment. To perform the mechanical leveling process the STS2 was mounted in a glass sphere on two gimbaled rings made of aluminum. Additionally, a retractile cube connected to a small motor was built-in the seismometer bottom. With the help of the motor, the cube can be extended to fix the seismometer to the sphere or can be retracted to allow the free pendulum motion of the seismometer in the sphere

  11. The performance of the stations of the Romanian seismic network in monitoring the local seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeleanu, Luminita Angela; Neagoe, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    The seismic survey of the territory of Romania is mainly performed by the national seismic network operated by the National Institute for Earth Physics of Bucharest. After successive developments and upgrades, the network consists at present of 123 permanent stations equipped with high quality digital instruments (Kinemetrics K2, Quantera Q330, Quantera Q330HR, PS6-24 and Basalt digitizers) - 102 real time and 20 off-line stations - which cover the whole territory of the country. All permanent stations are supplied with 3 component accelerometers (episenzor type), while the real time stations are in addition provided with broadband (CMG3ESP, CMG40T, KS2000, KS54000, KS2000, CMG3T, STS2) or short period (SH-1, S13, Mark l4c, Ranger, GS21, L22_VEL) velocity sensors. Several communication systems are currently used for the real time data transmission: an analog line in UHF band, a line through GPRS (General Packet Radio Service), a dedicated line through satellite, and a dedicated line provided by the Romanian Special Telecommunication Service. During the period January 1, 2006 - June 30, 2013, 5936 shallow depth seismic events - earthquakes and quarry blasts - with local magnitude ML ≥ 1.2 were localized on the Romanian territory, or in its immediate vicinity, using the records of the national seismic network; 1467 subcrustal earthquakes (depth ≥ 60 km) with magnitude ML ≥ 1.9 were also localized in the Vrancea region, at the bend of the Eastern Carpathians. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the individual contribution of the real time seismic stations to the monitoring of the local seismicity. The performance of each station is estimated by taking into consideration the fraction of events that are localised using the station records, compared to the total number of events of the catalogue, occurred during the time of station operation. Taking into account the nonuniform space distribution of earthquakes, the location of the site and the recovery

  12. "13 BB star" - broadband seismic array at the edge of East European Craton in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Suchcicki, Jerzy; Arant, Tadeusz

    2014-05-01

    "13 BB star" is a dense array of 13 Reftek 151-120 broadband seismometers located in unpopulated forests in northern Poland - just on the edge of East European Craton. The shape of array was designed as a "star" with one central station and 12 station located on two circles (radius of about 30 and 60 km) around it. This geometry allows us to study seismic waves (in particular surface waves) incoming from all azimuths. Our "13 BB star" array stations are self powered (solar panels and batteries), equipped with local storage system and on-line transmission of seismic and auxiliary data using 2G and 3G cellular network. We also developed on-line application for monitoring array status (transmission, connections, power, temperature, etc.) and on-line data visualization. Main advantages of our array are: 1) 120s broadband seismometers recording with 100Hz sampling, 2) density of array - distances between neighboring stations does not exceed 30 km, 3) station placement in underground wells, 4) stations located in forests far (usually 2-3 km) from industries, roads, villages and other human activity. "13 BB star" started operating in July 2013 and since that time recorded several local, regional, and teleseismic events proving good array functionality. The scientific aim of the "13 BB star" project is development of a quantitative model of the lithosphere-asthenosphere-structure in the marginal zone of the East European Craton in northern Poland. New acquired data will be analyzed using integrated seismic methods, which will yield images of lithosphere-asthenosphere system hitherto unknown for this area. The knowledge of detailed structure of the cratonic lithosphere-asthenosphere system is crucial for the better understanding of the regional, as well as global mantle dynamics and evolution of the Earth's interior. This work was supported by NCN-grant DEC 2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  13. Insight into landslide kinematics from a broadband seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-Horng

    2015-01-01

    The kinematic features of the 2009 Hsiaolin landslide were analyzed using a broadband seismic network in Taiwan. Both the final impact velocity and acceleration of the landslide were calculated based on the traveling distance and time of the landslide. A distance of approximately 2,500 m was observed on the surface, and the time from the initial collapse to the final impact was of 60.38 s according to broadband seismic data recorded nearby. The initial collapse time was determined using very-long-period seismic signals (20 to 50 s) created by the elastic rebound of the shallow crust as the overlying landslide initially moved downhill. The final impact time was determined by detecting the largest amplitudes of high-frequency seismic signals (1 to 10 Hz). The final impact velocity of approximately 298 km/h exhibited by this landslide had never before been recorded and thus might mark a world record; these speeds can be attributed mainly to a low friction coefficient (approximately 0.12) and a long run-out (approximately 2,500 m) along a gentle dip-slope surface (approximately 15°).

  14. Seismic Earth: Array Analysis of Broadband Seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Nolet, Guust

    Seismology is one of the few means available to Earth scientists for probing the mechanical structure of the Earth's interior. The advent of modern seismic instrumentation at the end of the 19th century and its installation across the globe was shortly followed by mankind's first general understanding of the Earth's interior: The Croatian seismologist Andrija Mohorovičić discovered the crust-mantle boundary in central Europe in 1909, the German Beno Gutenberg determined the radius of the Earth's core in 1913, Great Britian's Sir Harold Jeffreys established its fluid character by 1926, and the Dane Inge Lehman discovered the solid inner core in 1936. It is notable that seismology, even in its earliest days, was an international science. Unlike much of the Earth sciences, seismology has its roots in physics, notably optics (many university seismology programs are, or initially were, attached to meteorology, astronomy, or physics departments), and draws from the literatures of imaging systems and statistical communications theory developed by, or employed in, astronomy, electrical engineering, medicine, ocean acoustics, and nondestructive materials testing. Seismology has close ties to petro-physics and mineral physics, the measurements of the disciplines being compared to infer the chemical and physical structure of the Earth's interior.

  15. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  16. Tsunami Observations on Hydrophones and Island Seismic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, J. A.; Bowman, J. R.; Reasoner, C. L.; Shields, G.

    2007-12-01

    The tsunami generated by the great Indonesian earthquake of 26 December 2004 was recorded across a myriad of technologies, many of which had not been designed, nor expected, to record tsunami signals. We reported on the tsunami signals from this event observed at hydrophones, intended for nuclear test monitoring, and broadband seismometers that are part of the global seismic network (GSN). Our observations led us to examine more recently reported tsunamis and other historic tsunamis. The great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.1) produced high-frequency (greater than 5 mHz) dispersed tsunami signals, in addition to the destructive wave, recorded by hydrophone stations offshore from Diego Garcia and Cape Leeuwin, Australia, and by many seismic stations in the Indian Ocean and on the coast of Antarctica. Dispersed energy was observed to 60 mHz. The details within the dispersed signal provided source information to which tide gauge data are insensitive. The source of high-frequency signals could be determined using event- to-station distances estimated from the dispersion. Fine structure in the tsunami signal indicated a possible secondary high-frequency source. The dispersion observations and modeling also identified individual reflector sources over basin-wide distances. Two other recent tsunamis were observed in the Indian Ocean. The 28 March 2005 earthquake (Mw 8.6) produced high-frequency tsunami waves (to 20 mHz) observed at the Diego Garcia hydrophone station and the AIS seismic station. In addition, the lower frequency, non-dispersed tsunami waves were seen at four other seismic stations. The Mw 7.7 earthquake on 17 July 2006 south of Java also generated high frequency tsunami waves (to 10 mHz). Clear, dispersed signals were observed on hydrophone stations and seismic stations at the Cocos-Keeling Islands, and Casey, Antarctica. The first arriving energy is consistent with a source located at the earthquake epicenter. However, the strongest signals at Cocos

  17. Sensor Emplacement Techniques and Seismic Noise Analysis for USArray Transportable Array Seismic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassetto, A.; Busby, R. W.; Hafner, K.; Woodward, R.; Sauter, A.

    2013-12-01

    In preparation for the upcoming deployment of EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has supported exploratory work on seismic station design, sensor emplacement, and communication concepts appropriate for this challenging high-latitude environment. IRIS has installed several experimental stations to evaluate different sensor emplacement schemes both in Alaska and in the lower-48 of the U.S. The goal of these tests is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint and the weight of the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where there are few roads, cellular communications are scarce, most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, and permafrost underlies much of the state. We will review the methods used for directly emplacing broadband seismometers in comparison to the current methods used for the lower-48 TA. These new methods primarily focus on using a portable drill to make a bored hole three to five meters, beneath the active layer of the permafrost, or by coring 1-2 meters deep into surface bedrock. Both methods are logistically effective in preliminary trials. Subsequent station performance has been assessed quantitatively using probability density functions summed from power spectral density estimates. These are calculated for the continuous time series of seismic data recorded for each channel of the seismometer. There are five test stations currently operating in Alaska. One was deployed in August 2011 and the remaining four in October 2012. Our results show that the performance of seismometers in Alaska with auger-hole or core-hole installations can sometimes exceed that of the quietest TA stations in the lower-48, particularly horizontal components at long periods. A

  18. Lithospheric Structure of East Antarctica: Results From the First Year of the SSCUA Broadband Seismic Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, A. M.

    2004-12-01

    Recent geological and geochronological work has changed our concept of the former Gondwana continents surrounding a central Archaean craton, East Antarctica. The revised tectonic framework shows mobile belts and tectonic province boundaries which correlate well with East Antarctica's former neighbours in the supercontinent and trend perpendicular to the present day Antarctic coastline. Constraints are however restricted to those areas where the rock is exposed above the ice. Indirect, geophysical methods are required to map the extent of tectonic provinces in the continental interior and provide information on the deep structure. Following a pilot deployment in 2001/02, a set of 6 remote broadband earthquake recording stations were deployed in the Lambert Glacier region, East Antarctica, from the coast at 65°S deep into the interior to a latitude of 75°S. The aim was to determine the Seismic Structure of the Continent Under Antarctica (SSCUA) using a variety of seismological techniques. The stations were solar-powered and hence shut down during the Antarctic winter to re-commence recording after the return of daylight in the austral spring. After one year, 3 stations were relocated to further test contemporary terrane models of the lithosphere in this region. At the present time (December 2004) recording continues across the deployment with most stations due to be uplifted at the end of the 2004/05 summer season. Results of receiver function inversions for seismic structure beneath the recording stations of the first main deployment are presented. To the west of the Lambert Glacier, the Rayner province extends from Mawson Station to Beaver Lake with a fairly deep Moho at 42 km. To the east, seismic velocity profiles have a different character, showing slower crustal velocities. A province boundary exists between the Reinbolt Hills and the northern Mawson Escarpment where the crust is shallower at 34 km. These results are the first determinations of the seismic

  19. A New Design of Seismic Stations Deployed in South Tyrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melichar, P.; Horn, N.

    2007-05-01

    When designing the seismic network in South Tyrol, the seismic service of Austria and the Civil defense in South Tyrol combined more that 10 years experience in running seismic networks and private communication systems. In recent years the high data return rate of > 99% and network uptime of > 99.% is achieved by the combination of high quality station design and equipment, and the use of the Antelope data acquisition and processing software which comes with suite of network monitoring & alerting tools including Nagios, etc. The new Data Center is located in city of Bolzano and is connected to the other Data Centers in Austria, Switzerland, and Italy for data back up purposes. Each Data Center uses also redundant communication system if the primary system fails. When designing the South Tyrol network, new improvements were made in seismometer installations, grounding, lighting protection and data communications in order to improve quality of data recorded as well as network up-time, and data return. The new 12 stations are equipped with 6 Channels Q330+PB14f connected to STS2 + EpiSensor sensor. One of the key achievements was made in the grounding concept for the whole seismic station - and aluminum boxes were introduced which delivered Faraday cage isolation. Lightning protection devices are used for the equipment inside the aluminum housing where seismometer and data logger are housed. For the seismometer cables a special shielding was introduced. The broadband seismometer and strong-motion sensor are placed on a thick glass plate and therefore isolated from the ground. The precise seismometer orientation was done by a special groove on the glass plate and in case of a strong earthquake; the seismometer is tide up to the base plate. Temperature stability was achieved by styrofoam sheets inside the seismometer aluminum protection box.

  20. Seismic source and structure estimation in the western Mediterranean using a sparse broadband network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thio, Hong Kie; Song, Xi; Saikia, Chandan K.; Helmberger, Donald V.; Woods, Bradley B.

    1999-01-01

    We present a study of regional earthquakes in the western Mediterranean geared toward the development of methodologies and path calibrations for source characterization using regional broadband stations. The results of this study are useful for the monitoring and discrimination of seismic events under a comprehensive test ban treaty, as well as the routine analysis of seismicity and seismic hazard using a sparse array of stations. The area consists of several contrasting geological provinces with distinct seismic properties, which complicates the modeling of seismic wave propagation. We started by analyzing surface wave group velocities throughout the region and developed a preliminary model for each of the major geological provinces. We found variations of crustal thickness ranging from 45 km under the Atlas and Betic mountains and 37 km under the Saharan shield, to 20 km for the oceanic crust of the western Mediterranean Sea, which is consistent with earlier works. Throughout most of the region, the upper mantle velocities are low which is typical for tectonically active regions. The most complex areas in terms of wave propagation are the Betic Cordillera in southern Spain and its north African counterparts, the Rif and Tell Atlas mountains, as well as the Alboran Sea, between Spain and Morocco. The complexity of the wave propagation in these regions is probably due to the sharp velocity contrasts between the oceanic and continental regions as well as the the existence of deep sedimentary basins that have a very strong influence on the surface wave dispersion. We used this preliminary regionalized velocity model to correct the surface wave source spectra for propagation effects which we then inverted for source mechanism. We found that this method, which is in use in many parts of the world, works very well, provided that data from several stations are available. In order to study the events in the region using very few broadband stations or even a single station

  1. Broadband seismic observation at Kusatsu-Shirane volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, T.; Aoyama, H.; Terada, A.; Nogami, K.

    2011-12-01

    Kusatsu-Shirane volcano, central part of Japan, has repeated phreatic explosions with an interval of several decades. More than 25 years have passed since the last eruption in 1983. Currently persistent seismic and fumarolic activities are observed. Recently, a long tremor was observed in May 2011, for the first time in the last 3 years. The high-frequency tremor lasted for about 7 minutes and were observed by borehole seismometers. It was accompanied by a notable crustal deformation which lasted for about 4 minutes and observed by borehole tiltmeters. The source of the crustal deformation was estimated about 0.5 km to the southeast of Yugama, the main crater lake of the volcano. The location is at the margin of the observation network, which makes it difficult to locate the source precisely. The seismic network of the volcano has consisted of short-period seismometers. Thus very low frequency seismic events, which have often been observed at volcanoes with broadband seismometers, have not been investigated. In order to constrain such pressure sources, to understand better the relationships between high frequency tremor and low frequency deformation, and to investigate very low frequency events, we deployed 3-component seimometers at 3 points, surrounding the deformation source area. Two broadband seismometers, CMG-40T (f0=0.033 Hz) by Güralp Systems were installed to the north and east of the deformation source. And a short-period seismometer, L-4C (f0=1 Hz) by Mark Products, was installed to the south. The seismic data are continuously recorded. One and a half month passed at the time of abstract submission. Neither tremor nor very low frequency event have occurred to date.

  2. Sensor Emplacement Techniques and Seismic Noise Analysis for USArray Transportable Array Seismic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, Robert; Frassetto, Andy; Hafner, Katrin; Woodward, Robert; Sauter, Allan

    2013-04-01

    In preparation for deployment of EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska beginning in 2014, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is supporting exploratory work on seismic station design, sensor emplacement and communication concepts appropriate for the challenging high-latitude environment that is proposed for deployment. IRIS has installed several experimental stations to evaluate different sensor emplacement schemes both in Alaska and the lower-48 U.S. The goal of these tests is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint and the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where there are few roads, cellular communications are scarce, most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, and permafrost underlies much of the northern tundra. In this study we review our methods used for directly emplacing of broadband seismometers in comparison to the current methods used to deploy TA stations. These primarily focus on using an auger to drill three to five meters, beneath the active layer of the permafrost, or coring directly into surface bedrock to one meter depth using a portable drill. Both methods have proven logistically effective in trials. Subsequent station performance can be quantitatively assessed using probability density functions summed from power spectral density estimates. These are calculated for the continuous time series of seismic data recorded for each channel of the seismometer. There are five test stations currently operating in Alaska. One was deployed in August 2011 and the remaining four in October 2012. Our results show that the performance of seismometers in Alaska with auger-hole or core-hole installations equals or exceeds that of the quietest TA stations in the lower-48, particularly at long periods, and

  3. The North East Italy (NI) broadband seismic network run by OGS: experience in improving the long period performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, D.

    2009-04-01

    The NI broadband seismic network is designed to monitor regional seismic activity of North East Italy and surroundings as well as to provide high quality data for various research projects in regional and global broadband seismology, like moment tensor determination. The network, grown during the last 30 years within local Civil Defence agencies and neighbouring scientific institutions cooperation, currently consists of 11 digital broadband stations equipped with Streckeisen STS-2 and STS-1, Nanometrics Trillium 40 and Guralp CMG-3T seismometers with 120 and 40 seconds long period corners; most of the seismic stations are also equipped with accelerometers. Waveforms and parametric data of the NI seismic network are transmitted in real time to the Friuli-Venezia Giulia,Veneto and Provincia di Trento Civil Defence Agencies, to the Italian National Institute for Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) and to the Earth Science Department (DST) of the Trieste University in Italy, to the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in Vienna, Austria and to the Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia (ARSO) in Ljubljana, Slovenia to support emergency management and seismological studies in the whole Alps-Dinarides junction zone. The commercial Antelope software suite from BRTT has been chosen as the common basis for real time data exchange, rapid location of earthquakes and alerting. In order to guarantee high quality installations, we sustain a continuous effort that involves searches for appropriate sites, away from sources of long period noise, improvements in installation procedures and insulation techniques, maintenance of transfer function files and routine monitoring of noise conditions at individual existing station. The quality of the seismic data is checked through the noise Power Spectral Density (PSD) analysis. The insulation equipment that we designed for our network is a local adaptation of the pressure-thermal insulation

  4. The MOBB experiment: A prototype permanent off-shore ocean bottom broadband station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, Barbara; Stakes, Debra; Uhrhammer, Robert; McGill, Paul; Neuhauser, Doug; Ramirez, Tony; Dolenc, David

    Technical accomplishments of the past 10 years in the design and deployment of sea floor broadband seismic systems are now making it possible to start addressing the issue of the limited coverage of the Earth that can be achieved through land-based installations, at the regional or global scale. In particular, the September 2002 Ocean Mantle Dynamics (OMD) workshop in Snowbird, Utah [OMD Workshop Committee, 2003] proposed the development of two “leap-frogging arrays” of about 30 broadband sea floor instruments to fill geophysically important target holes in ocean coverage for deployment periods of 1 to 2 years. The rationale for an off-shore (“Webfoot”) component of the SArray/Earth-scope “Bigfoot” array was also highlighted at this meeting, pointing out that the study of the North American continent should not stop at the ocean margin.The ocean floor environment is challenging for broadband seismology for several reasons. Broadband seismometers cannot be simply “dropped off” a ship with the expectation that they will produce useable data, particularly on the horizontal components. Several pilot experiments, [e.g., Montagner et al., 1994; OSN1, 1998; Suyehiro et al., 2002] have addressed the issue of optimal installation of ocean bottom stations, and in particular, have carried out comparisons between borehole, sea floor, and buried sea floor installations.

  5. Temporal variations in Global Seismic Stations ambient noise power levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, A.T.; Gee, L.S.; Hutt, C.R.; McNamara, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent concerns about time-dependent response changes in broadband seismometers have motivated the need for methods to monitor sensor health at Global Seismographic Network (GSN) stations. We present two new methods for monitoring temporal changes in data quality and instrument response transfer functions that are independent of Earth seismic velocity and attenuation models by comparing power levels against different baseline values. Our methods can resolve changes in both horizontal and vertical components in a broad range of periods (∼0.05 to 1,000 seconds) in near real time. In this report, we compare our methods with existing techniques and demonstrate how to resolve instrument response changes in long-period data (>100 seconds) as well as in the microseism bands (5 to 20 seconds).

  6. Seismic interferometry with antipodal station pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fan-Chi; Tsai, Victor C.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we analyze continuous data from all Global Seismographic Network stations between year 2000 and 2009 and demonstrate that several body wave phases (e.g., PP, PcPPKP, SKSP, and PPS) propagating between nearly antipodal station pairs can be clearly observed without array stacking using the noise/coda cross-correlation method. Based on temporal correlations with global seismicity, we show that the observed body waves are clearly earthquake related. Moreover, based on single-earthquake analysis, we show that the earthquake coda energy observed between ~10,000 and 30,000 s after a large earthquake contributes the majority of the signal. We refine our method based on these observations and show that the signal can be significantly improved by selecting only earthquake coda times. With our improved processing, the PKIKP phase, which does not benefit from the focusing effect near the antipode, can now also clearly be observed for long-distance station pairs.

  7. Site selection for the future stations of the french permanent broadband network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jérôme; Charade, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    RESIF (REseau SIsmologique et géodésique Français) is a new French research infrastructure dedicated to the observation of earth deformation based on seismic and geodetic instruments mainly located in France. One of its major component, called RESIF-CLB (Construction Large Bande), is devoted to the evolution of the permanent seismic broadband network in metropolitan France with the objective to complement the 45 existing stations with ~155 new stations within the next eight years. This network will be used for various scientific objectives including deep structures imaging and national seismicity monitoring. The chosen network topology consists in a backbone of homogeneously distributed stations (long wavelength array) completed by additional stations in seismically active regions. Management of the RESIF-CLB project is carried out by the technical division of INSU (Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers) who will rely on eight regional observatories and the CEA-LDG for the construction and operation of the stations. To optimize the performance of the network, we put a strong emphasis on the standardization of the stations in term of vault types, scientific and technical instrumentation and operation procedures. We also set up a procedure for site selection requiring that every potential site has to be tested for at least 3 weeks with a minimalist installation. Analysis of the continuous ambient noise records is then included in a standardized report submitted to all committed partners for acceptance. During the last two years, about 60 potential new sites have been tested, spanning various places and environments. We present a review of the seismic noise measurements at these sites and discuss the influence of different types of noise sources depending on the frequency band of interest. For example, we show that regional population distribution can be used as a proxy to infer the noise level at frequencies higher than 1 Hz. Based on similar noise analyses

  8. The Future of the Very Broadband Seismic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingate, S. F.; Berger, J.; Collins, J.; Farrell, W.; Fowler, J.; Herrington, P.; Hutt, C. R.; Romanowicz, B.; Sacks, S.; Vernon, F.; Wielandt, E.

    2004-05-01

    Few fundamental advances have been made in seismometers since the introduction of the broadband feedback systems nearly 1/4 century ago. In the intervening period, academic (and to a lesser extent industrial) research and developments on seismographic instrumentation has declined. Today, adequate sensors to meet the scientific requirements are in short supply. This is particularly true of the GSN; the cornerstone of GSN instrumentation is the STS-1 seismometer, which is no longer in production. Further, the pool of trained scientists working on seismographic instrumentation has dwindled to near zero. A 2.5 day workshop was held in Tahoe in March, 2004. Over 40 participants from government, universities, and corporate sectors participated in a mixture of oral, poster and discussion sessions. Through this workshop, the geoscience community interacted with research and development groups involved in sensor technology, material sciences and nanotechnology to assess emerging technologies that have applications in inertial sensors. A goal of this workshop was to consider whether and how such advances might be applied to the design and manufacture of a new-generation, ultra-quiet, mHz - 20 Hz seismic sensors. Key items included an examination of partnerships and technology transfer, new and innovative designs, testing standards and testing facilities, funding strategies and an educational perspective including new University programs. One product of this workshop is the formulation of a plan to revitalize research and development of techniques in broadband seismometry and related seismographic instrumentation.

  9. MOBB: a permanent ocean floor broadband seismic observatory in Monterey Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrhammer, R.; Romanowicz, B.; Stakes, D.; Neuhauser, D.; McGill, P.; Ramirez, T.

    2003-04-01

    The Monterey ocean bottom broadband station (MOBB) was installed on the seafloor in Monterey Bay, 40 km offshore, and at a depth of 1000m from the sea surface, on April 9-11, 2002. Its success capitalizes on the experience gained in the 1997 International MOISE experiment, conducted under similar conditions. The deployment took place during 3 dives on consecutive days and made use of MBARI's Point Lobos ship and ROV Ventana. The station is currently recording data autonomously. Eventually, it will be linked to the planned (and recently funded) MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System; \\url {http://www.mbari.org/mars/}) cable and provide real-time, continuous seismic data to be merged with the rest of the northern California real-time seismic system. The data are archived at the NCEDC for on-line availability, as part of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN). The ocean-bottom MOBB station currently comprises a three-component seismometer package, a current-meter, a DPG, and recording and battery packages. The seismic package contains a low-power (2.2W), three-component CMG-1T broadband seismometer system, built by Guralp, Inc., with a three-component 24-bit digitizer, a leveling system, and a precision clock. The seismometer package is mounted on a cylindrical titanium pressure vessel 54cm in height and 41 cm in diameter, custom built by the MBARI team and outfitted for underwater connection. Data recovery dives, during which the recording and battery package will be exchanged are planned every three months for the next 3 years. Three such dives have already taken place, on 06/27/02, 09/20/02 and on 01/07/03. Due to a software problem, data were lost during the time period 07/01/02 and 09/20/02. Many regional and teleseismic earthquakes have been well recorded and the mass position signals indicate that the instruments have progressively settled. Preliminary analysis of data retrieved during the 2002 summer and winter dives will be presented. In particular

  10. Broadband seismic monitoring of active volcanoes using deterministic and stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Nakano, M.; Maeda, T.; Yepes, H.; Palacios, P.; Ruiz, M. C.; Arrais, S.; Vaca, M.; Molina, I.; Yamashina, T.

    2009-12-01

    We systematically used two approaches to analyze broadband seismic signals observed at active volcanoes: one is waveform inversion of very-long-period (VLP) signals in the frequency domain assuming possible source mechanisms; the other is a source location method of long-period (LP) and tremor using their amplitudes. The deterministic approach of the waveform inversion is useful to constrain the source mechanism and location, but is basically only applicable to VLP signals with periods longer than a few seconds. The source location method uses seismic amplitudes corrected for site amplifications and assumes isotropic radiation of S waves. This assumption of isotropic radiation is apparently inconsistent with the hypothesis of crack geometry at the LP source. Using the source location method, we estimated the best-fit source location of a VLP/LP event at Cotopaxi using a frequency band of 7-12 Hz and Q = 60. This location was close to the best-fit source location determined by waveform inversion of the VLP/LP event using a VLP band of 5-12.5 s. The waveform inversion indicated that a crack mechanism better explained the VLP signals than an isotropic mechanism. These results indicated that isotropic radiation is not inherent to the source and only appears at high frequencies. We also obtained a best-fit location of an explosion event at Tungurahua when using a frequency band of 5-10 Hz and Q = 60. This frequency band and Q value also yielded reasonable locations for the sources of tremor signals associated with lahars and pyroclastic flows at Tungurahua. The isotropic radiation assumption may be valid in a high frequency range in which the path effect caused by the scattering of seismic waves results in an isotropic radiation pattern of S waves. The source location method may be categorized as a stochastic approach based on the nature of scattering waves. We further applied the waveform inversion to VLP signals observed at only two stations during a volcanic crisis

  11. Passive, broad-band seismic measurements for geothermal exploration : The GAPSS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccorotti, Gilberto; Piccinini, Davide; Zupo, Maria; Mazzarini, Francesco; Cauchie, Lena; Chiarabba, Claudio; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Passive seismological imaging techniques based on either transient (earthquakes) or sustained (background noise) signals can provide detailed descriptions of subsurface attributes as seismic velocity, attenuation, and anisotropy. However, the correspondence between these parameters and the physical properties of crustal fluids is still ambiguous. Moreover, the resolving capabilities and condition of applicability of emerging techniques such as the Ambient Noise Tomography are still to be investigated thoroughly. Following these arguments, a specific project (GAPSS-Geothermal Area Passive Seismic Sources) was planned, in order to test passive exploration methods on a well-known geothermal area, namely the Larderello-Travale Geothermal Field (LTGF). This geothermal area is located in the western part of Tuscany (Italy), and it is the most ancient geothermal power field of the world. Heat flow in this area can reach local peaks of 1000 mW/m3. The deep explorations in this area showed a deeper reservoir (3000 to 4000 m depth) located within the metamorphic rocks in the contact aureole of the Pliocene-Quaternary granites; it is characterized by a wide negative gravimetric anomaly, interpreted as partially molten granite at temperatures of 800°C. From seismic surveys the K-marker K (pressurized horizons) was found at depths between 3 and 7 km. The structural grain of the geothermal field is characterized by N-W trending and N-E dipping normal faults whose activity lasts since the Pliocene. GAPSS lasted from early May, 2012, through October, 2013. It consisted of up to 20 temporary seismic stations, complemented by two permanent stations from the National Seismic Network of Italy. The resulting array has an aperture of about 50 Km, with station spacings between 2 and 50 km. Stations are equipped with either broadband (40s and 120s) or intermediate-period (5s), 3-components seismometers. LTGF is seismically active. During the first 10 months of measurements, we located

  12. Broadband calibration of R/V Ewing seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, M.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Chapp, E.; Holmes, R. C.; Rawson, M.

    2004-07-01

    The effects of anthropogenic sound sources on marine mammals are of increasing interest and controversy [e.g., Malakoff, 2001]. To understand and mitigate better the possible impacts of specific sound sources, well-calibrated broadband measurements of acoustic received levels must be made in a variety of environments. In late spring 2003 an acoustic calibration study was conducted in the northern Gulf of Mexico to obtain broad frequency band measurements of seismic sources used by the R/V Maurice Ewing. Received levels in deep water were lower than anticipated based on modeling, and in shallow water they were higher. For the marine mammals of greatest concern (beaked whales) the 1-20 kHz frequency range is considered particularly significant [National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration and U. S. Navy, 2001; Frantzis et al., 2002]. 1/3-octave measurements show received levels at 1 kHz are ~20-33 dB (re: 1 μPa) lower than peak levels at 5-100 Hz, and decrease an additional ~20-33 dB in the 10-20 kHz range.

  13. Reducing magnetic field induced noise in broad-band seismic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbriger, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Seismic broad-band sensors are known to be sensitive to the magnetic field. Magnetic storms and man-made disturbances of the magnetic field can produce significant noise in seismic recordings. I show that variations in the magnetic field translate directly into apparent acceleration of the seismic sensor within the period range from 60 to 1200s for all leaf-spring sensors under investigation. For a Streckeisen STS-1V this is shown even for periods down to 1s. The sensitivity is quantified in magnitude and direction. Both are quite stable over many time windows and signal periods. The sensitivities obtained by linear regression of the acceleration signal on magnetic field recordings during a magnetic storm can effectively be applied to reduce noise in seismic signals. The sensitivity varies in magnitude from sensor to sensor but all are in the range from 0.05 to 1.2ms-2T-1. Seismograms from sensors at Black Forest Observatory (BFO) and stations of the German Regional Seismic Network were investigated. Although these are mainly equipped with leaf-spring sensors, the problem is not limited to this type of instrument. The effect is not observable on the horizontal component STS-1s at BFO while it is significant in the recordings of the vertical STS-1. The main difference between these instruments is the leaf-spring suspension in the vertical component that appears to be the source of the trouble. The suspension springs are made of temperature compensated Elinvar alloys that inherently are ferromagnetic and may respond to the magnetic field in various ways. However, the LaCoste Romberg ET-19 gravimeter at BFO, which uses this material too, does not respond to magnetic storms at a similar magnitude neither do the Invar-wire strainmeters. An active shielding, composed of three Helmholtz coils and a feedback system, is installed at station Stuttgart and provides an improvement of signal-to-noise ratio by almost a factor of 20 at this particular station. The passive

  14. The European Virtual Broadband Seismic Network (VEBSN) and ORFEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eck, Torild; Sleeman, Reinoud; van den, Gert-Jan Hazel; Networks, Contributing

    2010-05-01

    Since 2002 ORFEUS has been coordinating the VEBSN concept, in which (near) real-time data is exchanged between Seismological observatory networks and the Orfeus Data Center (ODC). Seismological observatories in and around Europe have usually as primary objective the monitoring and analysis of current local and regional seismicity and seismic hazard. The data gathered by the observatories is, however, also valuable for fundamental research within global and European scale seismology; and therefore a primary data source for Academic seismological research. Within the VEBSN concept, the ODC provides and improves Quality control procedures for the observatories and the observatories provide real-time data for long-term secure waveform data archives at the ODC accessible for seismological research. In this concept the data remains ownership of the contributing network, while the ODC provides a secure back-up archive of waveform data. By facilitating a few data exchange mechanism with emphasis on SeedLink, the VEBSN strategy also enables observatories to exchange data between each other, thus enhancing the capabilities of the local or regional network and improving its performance for their monitoring and hazard objectives More recently, the ODC has been enlarged into the European Distributed waveform Data Archive (EIDA) in which currently GFZ/GEOFON, INGV and RESIF participate in an effort to extend the accessible waveform archive beyond only the VEBSN data. Currently the VEBSN consists of more then 450 3-component stations, each channel well defined with a full up-to-date SEED volume, providing all relevant metadata for a full reconstruction of the true ground motion. This encompases only about 45% of the operational BB stations in the European-Mediterranean area and our goal is to enlarge this.

  15. Crustal thickness in central Europe from single-station seismic noise autocorrelation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Gesa; Knapmeyer-Endrun, Brigitte

    2016-04-01

    The InSight mission to Mars will place a single three-component seismometer on the planet's surface, requiring the application of single-station methods. In addition, seismicity on Mars is likely less abundant than on Earth, making it important to also use the available seismic noise. For these reasons different approaches of seismic noise autocorrelation have been tested with broadband three-component datasets from 12 stations across central Europe. These stations cover varying Moho depths of ca. 25-50 km depth. With the help of the autocorrelations, reflected body waves are extracted in order to estimate the crustal thickness at each station. This is of special relevance for Mars, where average crustal thickness is uncertain by a factor of two. The different approaches used are waterlevel normalized autocorrelation, with and without application of a short-term and long-term average filter to the spectrum of the data prior to autocorrelation, and phase autocorrelation. These approaches are compared and analyzed. Estimates for the Moho depths are made from the lag times of the reflected P-waves and compared to available Moho depth values at the stations. Due to the availability of three-component data these estimates can be cross-validated and in some cases not only P-wave reflections, but also possible S-wave and multiple reflections can be identified. The estimates compare well with the general trend of Moho depth expected for these stations. The consistency of results is further investigated by comparing different stations of the GERES array (aperture 2 km), which also allows to examine results for closely located broad-band and short-period stations side by side.

  16. Swiss AlpArray: deployment of the Swiss AlpArray temporary broad-band stations and their noise characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Irene; Kissling, Edi; Clinton, John; Hetényi, György; Šipka, Vesna; Stipćević, Josip; Dasović, Iva; Solarino, Stefano; Wéber, Zoltán; Gráczer, Zoltán; Electronics Lab, SED

    2016-04-01

    One of the main actions of the AlpArray European initiative is the deployment of a dense seismic broad-band network, that complements the existing permanent stations. This will ensure a spatially homogeneous seismic coverage of the greater Alpine area for at least two years, allowing a great number of innovative scientific works to be carried out. Our contribution to the AlpArray Seismic Network consists in the deployment of 24 temporary broad-band stations: three in Switzerland, twelve in Italy, three in Croatia, three in Bosnia and Herzegovina and three in Hungary. This deployment is lead by ETH Zurich and founded by the Swiss-AlpArray Sinergia programme by SNSF, and is the result of a fruitful collaboration between five research institutes. Stations were installed between Autumn and Winter 2015. Our installations are both free field and in-house and consist of 21 STS-2 and 3 Trillium Compact sensors equipped with Taurus digitizers and 3G telemetry sending data in real time to the ETH EIDA node. In this work, we present sites and stations setting and we discuss in details the characteristics in terms of site effects and noise level of each station. In particular we analyse the power spectral density estimates investigating the major source of noise and the background noise related to seasons, time of the day, human activities and type of installation. In addition we will show examples of data usage - i.e. earthquake locations, noise cross correlations, measures of surface wave dispersion curves. We thanks the Swiss AlpArray Field Team: Blanchard A., Erlanger E. D., Jarić D., Herak D., M. Herak, Hermann M., Koelemeijer P. J., Markušić S., Obermann A., Sager K., Šikman S., Singer J., Winterberg S. SED Electronic Lab: Barman S., Graf P., Hansemann R., Haslinger F., Hiemer S., Racine R., Tanner R., Weber F.

  17. Broadband seismic experiment at Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia: very-long-period pulses embedded in multiphase earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, D.; Voight, B.; Langston, C.; Ratdomopurbo, A.; Ebeling, C.

    2000-07-01

    Multiphase (MP) and low frequency (LF) earthquakes with spectral peak amplitudes at 3-4 and 1 Hz, respectively, are two common types of shallow volcanic earthquakes previously recognized at Merapi Volcano. Their mechanisms are poorly understood but MPs have been temporally associated with lava dome growth. We conducted a seismic experiment in January-February 1998, using four broadband seismographs to investigate the nature of seismic activity associated with dome growth. During our experiment, Merapi experienced mild dome growth with low-level seismic activity. We compare our data to that recorded on a local short-period (SP) network, with the following preliminary results. MP and LF events as recorded and classified on the short-period network instruments were recognized on the broadband network. Frequency spectrograms revealed similar patterns in the near summit region at widely separated broadband stations. Higher frequency spectra than previously recognized were identified for both MP and LF events, and were strongly attenuated as a function of radial distance from the source. Thus the spectral characteristics of these events as recorded on far-field stations are not fully indicative of the source processes. In particular, many events classified as LF-type appear to have much high frequency energy near the source. This aspect of these so-called LF earthquakes, and their association with very-long-period (VLP) pulses, suggests that many events identified in the far-field as LF events are in actuality a variety of the MP event and involve similar source processes. Broadband records indicated that simple large-amplitude VLP pulses were embedded in MP and LF wavetrains. From event to event these pulses were similar in their waveforms and had periods of 4 s. VLP events embedded in LF and MP earthquakes were located using particle motions. The epicenters were clustered in a central region of the dome complex, and preliminary source depths were within about 100 m of

  18. Direct Burial Broadband Seismic Instrumentation that are Rugged and Tilt Tolerant for Polar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Tim; Winberry, Paul; Huerta, Audrey; Bainbridge, Geoff; Devanney, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The integrated broadband Meridian Posthole and Compact seismic systems have been engineered and tested for extreme polar environments. Ten percent of the Earth's surface is covered in glacial ice and the dynamics of these environments is a strategic concern for all. The development for these systems was driven by researchers needing to densify observations in ice covered regions with difficult and limited logistics. Funding from an NSF MRI award, GEOICE and investment from the vendor enabled researchers to write the specifications for a hybrid family of instruments that can operate at -55C autonomously with very little power, 1 watt for the Meridian Compact system and 1.5 watts for the Meridian 120PH. Tilt tolerance in unstable ice conditions was a concern and these instruments have a range of up to +/-5 degrees. The form factor, extreme temperature tolerance and power load of the instruments has reduced the bulk of a complete station by 1/2 and simplified installation greatly allowing more instruments to be deployed with limited support and a lighter logistical load. These systems are being tested in the Antarctic at SouthPole Station and McMurdo for the second year and the investment has encouraged other instrument and power system vendors to offer polar rated equipment including telemetry for ancillary support.

  19. Seismic evidence for an ancient rift beneath the cumberland plateau, Tennessee: A detailed analysis of broadband teleseismic P waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.J.; Zandt, G.; Taylor, S.R.

    1984-09-10

    Broadband receiver functions developed from teleseismic P waveforms recorded on the midperiod passband of Regional Seismic Test Network station RSCP are inverted for vertical velocity structure beneath the Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee. The detailed broadband receiver functions are obtained by stacking source-equalizd horizontal components of teleseismic P waveforms. The resulting receiver functions are most sensitive to the shear velocity structure near the station. A time domain inversion routine utilizes the radial receiver function to determine this structure assuming a crustal model parameterized by many thin, flat-lying, homogeneous layers. Lateral changes in structure are identified by examining azimuthal variations in the vertical structure. The results reveal significant rapid lateral changes in the midcrustal structure beneath the station that are interpreted in relation to the origin of the East Continent Gravity High located northeast of RSCP. The results from events arriving from the northeast show a high-velocity midcrustal layer not present in results from the southeast azimuth. This velocity structure can be shown to support the idea that this feature is part of a Keweenawan rift system. Another interesting feature of the derived velocity models is the indication that the crust-mantle boundary beneath the Cumberland Plateau is a thick, probably laminated transition zone between the depths of 40 and 55 km, a result consistent with interpretations of early refraction work in the area.

  20. MC Kernel: Broadband Waveform Sensitivity Kernels for Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähler, Simon C.; van Driel, Martin; Auer, Ludwig; Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    2016-04-01

    We present MC Kernel, a software implementation to calculate seismic sensitivity kernels on arbitrary tetrahedral or hexahedral grids across the whole observable seismic frequency band. Seismic sensitivity kernels are the basis for seismic tomography, since they map measurements to model perturbations. Their calculation over the whole frequency range was so far only possible with approximative methods (Dahlen et al. 2000). Fully numerical methods were restricted to the lower frequency range (usually below 0.05 Hz, Tromp et al. 2005). With our implementation, it's possible to compute accurate sensitivity kernels for global tomography across the observable seismic frequency band. These kernels rely on wavefield databases computed via AxiSEM (www.axisem.info), and thus on spherically symmetric models. The advantage is that frequencies up to 0.2 Hz and higher can be accessed. Since the usage of irregular, adapted grids is an integral part of regularisation in seismic tomography, MC Kernel works in a inversion-grid-centred fashion: A Monte-Carlo integration method is used to project the kernel onto each basis function, which allows to control the desired precision of the kernel estimation. Also, it means that the code concentrates calculation effort on regions of interest without prior assumptions on the kernel shape. The code makes extensive use of redundancies in calculating kernels for different receivers or frequency-pass-bands for one earthquake, to facilitate its usage in large-scale global seismic tomography.

  1. Monitoring of slow seismic events from Arctics using the data of the POLENET/LAPNET broadband temporary array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring of slow glacial seismic events from Greenland at regional distances was one of the major targets of the POLENET/LAPNET passive seismic experiment in northern Fennoscandia (northern parts of Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russian Karelia) during the IPY 2007-2009. The POLENET/LAPNET array, with the average spacing between stations of 70 km, recorded high-frequency continuous data of 37 temporary stations, which were in operation during the time frame from 01.05.2008 to 31.09.2009, and of 21 stations of selected permanent networks in the Fennoscandia. Most stations of the array were equipped by broadband STS-2 seismometers. Glacial events from Greenland were identified using manual analysis of the continuous POLENET/LAPNET data filtered by a bandpass filter from 35 s to 140 s frequency band. The detected events were located using standard array techniques. Our study proves that glacial earthquakes in Greenland show a strong seasonality, with most of events occurring during summer months in 2007, 2008 and 2009. The detected slow events have their origins not only at marine-terminated glaciers, but also in offshore areas of Greenland. As the epicentres of these events are located mainly in the areas with high speed of ice flow, they could be due to interaction of ice sheet with solid bedrock. However, they could also be tectonic events. We also identified and located a number of slow evens originating from marine-terminated glaciers in Svalbard. In addition, the array detected a number of slow earthquakes from northern part of Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the vicinity of Svalbard, Jan Mayen Island and Arctic Canada. However, no slow earthquakes from Iceland were recorded during the POLENET/LAPNET data acquisition period. Our result shows that analysis of recordings of broadband stations in low frequency band can provide new information not only about temporary changes in Greenland Ice Sheet, but also about seismicity and spreading processes in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and

  2. Rationale for Seismic Measurements on Mars by a Single Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lognonne, P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2003-01-01

    We present here some of the scientific objectives which can be achieved by a single seismic station on Mars, equipped with a 3 axis VBB seismometer and a 3 axis Short Period Seismometer. We assume that this station is also equipped with meteorological sensors, including infra-sound and pressure, in order to perform a complete meteorological noise correction. The science objectives are listed in order of increasing difficulty.

  3. Broadband analysis of landslides seismic signal : example of the Oso-Steelhead landslide and other recent events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibert, C.; Stark, C. P.; Ekstrom, G.

    2014-12-01

    Landslide failures on the scale of mountains are spectacular, dangerous, and spontaneous, making direct observations hard to obtain. Measurement of their dynamic properties during runout is a high research priority, but a logistical and technical challenge. Seismology has begun to help in several important ways. Taking advantage of broadband seismic stations, recent advances now allow: (i) the seismic detection and location of large landslides in near-real-time, even for events in very remote areas that may have remain undetected, such as the 2014 Mt La Perouse supraglacial failure in Alaska; (ii) inversion of long-period waves generated by large landslides to yield an estimate of the forces imparted by the bulk accelerating mass; (iii) inference of the landslide mass, its center-of-mass velocity over time, and its trajectory.Key questions persist, such as: What can the short-period seismic data tell us about the high-frequency impacts taking place within the granular flow and along its boundaries with the underlying bedrock? And how does this seismicity relate to the bulk acceleration of the landslide and the long-period seismicity generated by it?Our recent work on the joint analysis of short- and long-period seismic signals generated by past and recent events, such as the Bingham Canyon Mine and the Oso-Steelhead landslides, provides new insights to tackle these issues. Qualitative comparison between short-period signal features and kinematic parameters inferred from long-period surface wave inversion helps to refine interpretation of the source dynamics and to understand the different mechanisms for the origin of the short-period wave radiation. Our new results also suggest that quantitative relationships can be derived from this joint analysis, in particular between the short-period seismic signal envelope and the inferred momentum of the center-of-mass. In the future, these quantitative relationships may help to constrain and calibrate parameters used in

  4. Seismic noise study for a new seismic station at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaka, S. I.

    2012-04-01

    We have carried out a seismic noise study in order to understand the noise level at three selected locations at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The main purpose is to select a suitable site with low seismic noise and good signal-to-noise ratio for our new broadband seismic station. There are several factors involved in the selection of a site location for a new station. Most importantly, we need to strike a balance between a logistically convenient site versus a technically suitable site. As a starting point, we selected six potential sites due to accessibility and proximity to the seismic processing center laboratory in the Department of Earth Sciences (ESD) at KFUPM. We then eliminated two sites that are relatively close to possible low-frequency noise sources. We have considered many possible noise sources which include: vehicle traffic / heavy machinery, the direct path of air flowing from air conditioning vent, tall trees / power poles and metal doorways. One more site was eliminated because the site was located in the open where it experiences maximum wind speed which is considered a major source of noise. All three potential sites are situated within the Dammam Dome where both lower middle and upper Rus Formations are exposed. The upper Rus is mainly made up of fine grained chalky limestone and the lower Rus is made up of alternation of marls and thin dolomitic limestone. The area is not known for any major faults and considered very low seismicity and hence the identification of seismoteconic features is not required. Before conducting the noise study, we calibrated and tested the seismic recording system, which was recently acquired by the ESD at KFUPM. The system includes a seismic recorder and a sensor with a GPS device. We deployed the system in order to measure the low-frequency background noise. Knowing the low frequency noise will help in predicting the high-frequency noise. The recording systems were

  5. Extraction of Broadband Basin-Scale Green's Functions from the Ambient Seismic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viens, L.; Koketsu, K.; Miyake, H.; Sakai, S.; Hirata, N.

    2015-12-01

    Many large cities in the world, including Tokyo and Los Angeles, are located atop sedimentary basins that have the potential to significantly amplify ground motions. The Kanto sedimentary basin, which underlies the Tokyo Metropolitan area, is filled by soft sediments and has a resonance period of 7-10 s, similar to the natural period of some tall buildings. To assess seismic hazard in this particularly seismically active area, we use the information carried by the ambient seismic field continuously recorded by more than 600 seismic stations that have been deployed in the basin. These stations equipped with three-component seismometers are a part of different networks, including the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net), Hi-net and F-net of NIED, and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) network. We extracted the 9 components of the Green's function tensors from the ambient seismic field using deconvolution for each pair of stations, regarding one as the virtual source and the other one as the receiver. We show that the extracted Green's functions contain body and surface waves having phase and amplification similar to the ones of earthquake records that occurred close to the virtual sources. For inter-station distances shorter than 30 km, time-frequency analyses suggest that Green's functions with energy higher than 1 Hz can be recovered. We use this dense array to investigate the effect of inter-station distance variations and azimuth dependences on the Green's function retrieval. Results show that the ambient seismic field recorded by stations situated at less than a few kilometers from each other can provide insights on seismic hazard assessment over a broad period range.

  6. Broadband Waveform Sensitivity Kernels for Large-Scale Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, T.; Stähler, S. C.; van Driel, M.; Hosseini, K.; Auer, L.; Sigloch, K.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic sensitivity kernels, i.e. the basis for mapping misfit functionals to structural parameters in seismic inversions, have received much attention in recent years. Their computation has been conducted via ray-theory based approaches (Dahlen et al., 2000) or fully numerical solutions based on the adjoint-state formulation (e.g. Tromp et al., 2005). The core problem is the exuberant computational cost due to the large number of source-receiver pairs, each of which require solutions to the forward problem. This is exacerbated in the high-frequency regime where numerical solutions become prohibitively expensive. We present a methodology to compute accurate sensitivity kernels for global tomography across the observable seismic frequency band. These kernels rely on wavefield databases computed via AxiSEM (abstract ID# 77891, www.axisem.info), and thus on spherically symmetric models. As a consequence of this method's numerical efficiency even in high-frequency regimes, kernels can be computed in a time- and frequency-dependent manner, thus providing the full generic mapping from perturbed waveform to perturbed structure. Such waveform kernels can then be used for a variety of misfit functions, structural parameters and refiltered into bandpasses without recomputing any wavefields. A core component of the kernel method presented here is the mapping from numerical wavefields to inversion meshes. This is achieved by a Monte-Carlo approach, allowing for convergent and controllable accuracy on arbitrarily shaped tetrahedral and hexahedral meshes. We test and validate this accuracy by comparing to reference traveltimes, show the projection onto various locally adaptive inversion meshes and discuss computational efficiency for ongoing tomographic applications in the range of millions of observed body-wave data between periods of 2-30s.

  7. The Broad-Band Seismic Noise Wavefield at the Larderello-Travale Geothermal Field (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupo, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Piccinini, D.

    2013-12-01

    Cross-correlation of ambient noise wave-field between a pair of receivers (NCF), provides an estimate of the Green's Function between the two sites, thus allowing extraction of the associated group velocity dispersion curve. This is valid under the assumption that noise sources and/or scatterers are isotropically distributed and uncorrelated each other. These conditions are usually met once the cross-correlations are averaged over long time intervals. At frequencies lower than 1 Hz, ambient noise wavefield is essentially composed by surface waves that are mostly associated with oceanic sources; as a consequence, the noise wavefield may exhibit marked directional properties over short (day) to intermediate (weeks) time scales. A detailed assessment of the nature and duration of these sources is therefore required in order to define the optimal conditions for retrieving the Green's functions from NCF analysis. This study presents ambient noise analysis for the Larderello-Travale Geothermal Field (Italy). We use data collected by a temporary seismic array consisting of 20 broad-band instruments, with station spacing ranging from 6 to 50 Km. Below 1 Hz, the most energetic sources are those associated with both primary and secondary microseisms, with dominant spectral peaks spanning the 0.05-0.5 Hz frequency range. Focusing on the secondary microseism sources (f > 0.1 Hz), we test the validity of the isotropic-wavefield assumption by determining the kinematic properties of the wavefield using frequency-domain beamforming. For the May-November 2012 time span, our results show that the most energetic and persistent wavefield components propagate from WNW (Gulf of Marseille and Genova) and SW (Sardinia channel). In the late part of the observation period, additional wavefield components are observed to propagate from the NE-SE azimuthal range, corresponding to sources located throughout the Adriatic sea. This suggests that the conditions for the application of the NCF

  8. Preliminary results of receiver function analysis of seismic data recorded from a broadband deployment across the Gulf Coast Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, H.; Pratt, K. W.; Pulliam, J.; Dunbar, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    In summer of 2010, 21 broadband seismographs were installed at 16-18 km spacing along a transect running from Johnson City, TX, (on the Edwards Plateau), to Matagorda Island to study the current structure of this rifted passive margin. The large magnetic anomaly that parallels the coast throughout the Gulf region moves on-shore beneath our transect such that we will be able to investigate the source of this anomaly. A second important target that will be imaged in this Balcones fault which is associated with the Ouachita front. This project is funded by a grant from the Norman Hackerman Advanced Research Program (NHARP), a biannual competition among Texas Universities to support research, and makes use of Texas Tech, Baylor, and UT Austin equipment. As a result, the deployment includes a less uniform array of seismic equipment, (10 Trillium compact seismometers and 10 Guralps; including 40Ts, 3Ts and 3ESPs), than projects supported by the IRIS PASSCAL center. Our vault construction was similar to Flexible array vaults, but Gulf Coast provides a more challenging environment for deployment than most encountered in the western US. The shallow water table and loose sediment can become almost fluid when storms deluge the area with rain. In dry periods, mud cracks near the vaults cause the vaults to tilt. As a result, even high quality, shallow seismic vaults can "float" or shift sufficiently to cause one or two components of the seismic stations to drift against their stops in days or weeks. As a result, the only data consistently available from all our stations, are vertical components. Horizontal component data from the summer of 2010 can be hit and miss due to the tilting of the vaults. These issues have been reduced in the summer of 2011 due to the drought. To address the data's shortcomings, we will average the vertical components from our stations and nearby EarthScope TA stations, (up 300 km away), to isolate the cleanest representation of the incoming P

  9. An Application Of The Coda Methodology For Moment-Rate Spectra Using Turkish Broadband Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eken, T.; Mayeda, K.; Hofstetter, A.; Orgulu, G.; O'Boyle, J. L.; Turkelli, N.

    2003-04-01

    We successfully tested an empirical magnitude calibration method developed by Mayeda et al., (2003) on both local and regional distance earthquakes that occurred along the North Anatolian Fault Zone as well as throughout the broader region of Turkey. The method is based on source spectra that are derived from time-domain amplitude measurements of coda envelopes for 14 consecutive narrow frequency bands ranging between 0.02-8.0 Hz. Previous application of the methodology to earthquakes in the western United States and Dead Sea Rift regions (Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Mayeda et al., 2003) show that the moment magnitudes, Mw(coda), based on coda envelopes are significantly more stable and unbiased than conventional narrowband regional magnitudes which are obtained from direct phase measurements (e.g., mb(Pg), mb(Pn), mb(Lg), Ms, ML, Md). Coda envelopes have a number of properties that make it a desirable choice for sparse station monitoring: 1) The coda envelopes are nearly insensitive to the radiation pattern and directivity of the earthquake source; 2) the coda is not as sensitive to lateral crustal heterogeneity because of the crustal averaging due to scattering; 3) we can use clipped data by fitting the envelopes after the clipped portion of the seismogram. The empirical calibration approach includes all frequency-dependent propagation, site, and S-to-coda transfer function effects without requiring any theoretical model that defines scattering mechanism and anelastic attenuation processes of the Earth's lithosphere. In this study, we used waveform data of three broadband stations, ISP, ISK and MALT in Turkey. We first applied the methodology to 182 events recorded by both ISP and ISK between 1998 and 2001. The locations of these events were mostly from the North Anatolian Fault zone near the Marmara Sea region. Next, we tested the method on 137 earthquakes recorded by ISP and MALT between 2000 and 2002. The events for this pair of stations are distributed over the

  10. Estimation of background noise level on seismic station using statistical analysis for improved analysis accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S. M.; Hahm, I.

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the background noise level of seismic stations in order to collect the observation data of high quality and produce accurate seismic information. Determining of the background noise level was used PSD (Power Spectral Density) method by McNamara and Buland (2004) in this study. This method that used long-term data is influenced by not only innate electronic noise of sensor and a pulse wave resulting from stabilizing but also missing data and controlled by the specified frequency which is affected by the irregular signals without site characteristics. It is hard and inefficient to implement process that filters out the abnormal signal within the automated system. To solve these problems, we devised a method for extracting the data which normally distributed with 90 to 99% confidence intervals at each period. The availability of the method was verified using 62-seismic stations with broadband and short-period sensors operated by the KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration). Evaluation standards were NHNM (New High Noise Model) and NLNM (New Low Noise Model) published by the USGS (United States Geological Survey). It was designed based on the western United States. However, Korean Peninsula surrounded by the ocean on three sides has a complicated geological structure and a high population density. So, we re-designed an appropriate model in Korean peninsula by statistically combined result. The important feature is that secondary-microseism peak appeared at a higher frequency band. Acknowledgements: This research was carried out as a part of "Research for the Meteorological and Earthquake Observation Technology and Its Application" supported by the 2015 National Institute of Meteorological Research (NIMR) in the Korea Meteorological Administration.

  11. The ANSS Station Information System: A Centralized Station Metadata Repository for Populating, Managing and Distributing Seismic Station Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. I.; Yu, E.; Acharya, P.; Jaramillo, J.; Chowdhury, F.

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining and archiving accurate site metadata is critical for seismic network operations. The Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) Station Information System (SIS) is a repository of seismic network field equipment, equipment response, and other site information. Currently, there are 187 different sensor models and 114 data-logger models in SIS. SIS has a web-based user interface that allows network operators to enter information about seismic equipment and assign response parameters to it. It allows users to log entries for sites, equipment, and data streams. Users can also track when equipment is installed, updated, and/or removed from sites. When seismic equipment configurations change for a site, SIS computes the overall gain of a data channel by combining the response parameters of the underlying hardware components. Users can then distribute this metadata in standardized formats such as FDSN StationXML or dataless SEED. One powerful advantage of SIS is that existing data in the repository can be leveraged: e.g., new instruments can be assigned response parameters from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Nominal Response Library (NRL), or from a similar instrument already in the inventory, thereby reducing the amount of time needed to determine parameters when new equipment (or models) are introduced into a network. SIS is also useful for managing field equipment that does not produce seismic data (eg power systems, telemetry devices or GPS receivers) and gives the network operator a comprehensive view of site field work. SIS allows users to generate field logs to document activities and inventory at sites. Thus, operators can also use SIS reporting capabilities to improve planning and maintenance of the network. Queries such as how many sensors of a certain model are installed or what pieces of equipment have active problem reports are just a few examples of the type of information that is available to SIS users.

  12. Broadband seismic measurements of degassing activity associated with lava effusion at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip; Asch, Guenter

    2008-01-01

    From November 1999 through July 2000, a broadband seismic experiment was carried out at Popocatépetl Volcano to record seismic activity over a wide period range (0.04–100 s). We present an overview of the seismicity recorded during this experiment and discuss results of analyses of long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) seismic signals recorded at stations nearest to the crater over a four-month interval December 1999–March 2000. Three families of LP signals (Types-I, II, and III) are identified based on distinctive waveform features observed periods shorter than 1 s, periods longer than 15 s, and within the period range 0.5–2.5 s. Type-I LP events have impulsive first arrivals and exhibit a characteristic harmonic wave train with dominant periods in the 1.4–1.9 s range during the first 10 s of signal. These events are also associated with a remarkable VLP wavelet with period near 30 s. Type-II LP events represent pairs of events occurring in rapid succession and whose signatures are superimposed. These are typically marked by slowly emergent first arrivals and by a characteristic VLP wave train with dominant period near 30 s, made of two successive wavelets whose shapes are quasi-identical to those of the VLP wavelets associated with Type-I events. Type-III LP events represent the most energetic signals observed during our experiment. These have an emergent first arrival and display a harmonic signature with dominant period near 1.1 s. They are dominated by periods in the 0.25–0.35 s band and contain no significant energy at periods longer than 15 s. Hypocentral locations of the three types of LP events obtained from phase picks point to shallow seismic sources clustered at depths shallower than 2 km below the crater floor. Observed variations in volcanic eruptive activity correlate with defined LP families. Most of the observed seismicity consists of Type-I events that occur in association with 1–3-min-long degassing bursts (

  13. Broadband recording of Strombolian explosions and associated very-long-period seismic signals on Mount Erebus Volcano, Ross Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. A.; Aster, R. C.; Kyle, P. R.; Schlue, J. W.; Dibble, R. R.

    In December 1996 and January 1997, broadband seismometers were deployed on the summit plateau of Mount Erebus at radial distances of 0.7, 1.4 and 1.9 km from the central crater and lava lake. Strombolian explosions at Erebus previously have been observed to produce seismic and acoustic energy between 1 and 6 Hz. New observations document significant energy with spectral peaks as grave as 20 s. Nearly identical very-long-period (VLP) signals begin ∼1.5 s prior to explosions, have dilatational onsets and persist for up to 150 s. Similar VLP waveforms were recorded at all three stations, indicating that the seismograms are essentially source-dominated. Particle motions suggest an initial depth for the VLP source of up to several hundred meters, migrating deeper in the course of ∼15 s. Such explosion-associated VLP signals may indicate a nondestructive lossy resonance or nonlinear fluid-flow excitation within the shallow magmatic system.

  14. Potential improvements in horizontal very broadband seismic data in the IRIS/USGS component of the Global Seismic Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Steim, J.M.; Zandt, T; Hutt, Charles R.; Wilson, David; Storm, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    The Streckeisen STS‐1 has been the primary vault‐type seismometer used in the over‐150‐station Global Seismographic Network (GSN). This sensor has long been known for its outstanding vertical, very long‐period (e.g., >100  s period), and low‐noise performance, although the horizontal long‐period noise performance is less well known. The STS‐1 is a limited, important resource, because it is no longer made or supported by the original manufacturer. We investigate the incoherent noise of horizontal‐component sensors, where coherent signals among sensors have been removed, giving an upper bound on the self‐noise of both the STS‐1 and STS‐2 horizontal components. Our findings suggest that a well‐installed STS‐2 could potentially produce data with similar or better incoherent noise levels to that of a horizontal‐component STS‐1. Along with our experimental investigation, we compare background noise levels for a calendar year at Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology/U.S. Geological Survey network stations, which comprise approximately two‐thirds of the GSN, with collocated STS‐1 and STS‐2 seismometers. The use of an STS‐2‐class of sensor (flat to velocity to 120 s period) to acquire low‐frequency data in surface‐vault installations would allow network operators to focus more attention on improving vertical data. In order to deal with the difference in instrument response shapes between the two instruments, we detail two different time‐domain filters that would allow users to convert broadband STS‐2 data into very broadband data with a response similar to that of an STS‐1 (flat to velocity to 360 s period). We conclude that the complexity of the current primary horizontal vault sensors in the GSN may not be necessary until we are better able to isolate surface horizontal sensors from various noise sources.

  15. Real-time detection, location, and characterization of rockslides using broadband regional seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manconi, Andrea; Picozzi, Matteo; Coviello, Velio; De Santis, Francesca; Elia, Luca

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new real-time approach to detect, locate, and estimate the volume of rockslides by analyzing waveforms acquired from broadband regional seismic networks. The identification of signals generated by rockslides from other sources, such as natural and/or induced earthquakes, is accomplished by exploiting the ratio between local magnitudes (ML) and duration magnitudes (MD). We found that signals associated with rockslides have ML/MD < 0.8, while for earthquakes ML/MD ≅ 1. In addition, we derived an empirical relationship between MD and rockslide volumes, obtaining a preliminary characterization of rockslide volume within seconds after their occurrence. The key points of this study are presented by testing the hypothesis on a recent rockslide event that occurred in northern Italy. We discuss also the potential evolution of the methodology for early warning and/or rapid response purposes.

  16. Geologic interpretations of seismic data, relocation of Route 116, Stations 7-135 in Cheshire, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, Max E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    Three segments of the proposed relocation of Route 116, stations 7 to 135, in Cheshire, Mass. require shallow cuts. For the purpose of obtaining information on the depths to bedrock, and on the nature of the overlaying materials, seismic and geologic studies were made of the segments in October 1949. The work was done as part of the cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey. On seismic transverse was made between stations 7 and 15, 1 between stations 80 and 82, 3 between stations 85 and 90, and 4 between stations 125 and 135.

  17. An Application of the Coda Methodology for Moment-Rate Spectra Using Broadband Stations in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Eken Tuna, Kevin Mayeda, Abraham Hofstetter, Rengin Gok, Gonca Orgulu, Niyazi Turkelli

    2004-07-11

    A recently developed coda magnitude methodology was applied to selected broadband stations in Turkey for the purpose of testing the coda method in a large, laterally complex region. As found in other, albeit smaller regions, coda envelope amplitude measurements are significantly less variable than distance-corrected direct wave measurements (i.e., L{sub g} and surface waves) by roughly a factor 3-to-4. Despite strong lateral crustal heterogeneity in Turkey, they found that the region could be adequately modeled assuming a simple 1-D, radially symmetric path correction. After calibrating the stations ISP, ISKB and MALT for local and regional distances, single-station moment-magnitude estimates (M{sub W}) derived from the coda spectra were in excellent agreement with those determined from multistation waveform modeling inversions, exhibiting a data standard deviation of 0.17. Though the calibration was validated using large events, the results of the calibration will extend M{sub W} estimates to significantly smaller events which could not otherwise be waveform modeled. The successful application of the method is remarkable considering the significant lateral complexity in Turkey and the simple assumptions used in the coda method.

  18. NX-2G : autonomous BBOBS-NX for a highly mobile broadband seismic observation at the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, Hajime; Sugioka, Hiroko; Ito, Aki; Shinohara, Masanao

    2016-04-01

    We had developed the broadband ocean bottom seismometer (BBOBS) and its new generation system (BBOBS-NX), and, with them, several practical observations have been performed to create and establish a new category of the ocean floor broadband seismology, since 1999. Now, our BBOBS and BBOBS-NX data is proved to be at acceptable level for broadband seismic analyses. Especially, the BBOBS-NX is able to obtain the low noise horizontal data comparable to the land station in periods longer than 10 s, which is adequate for modern analyses of the mantle structure. Moreover, the BBOBS(T)-NX is under practical evaluation for the mobile tilt observation at the seafloor, which will enable dense geodetic monitoring. The BBOBS-NX system must be a powerful tool, although, the current system has intrinsic limitation in opportunity of observations due to the necessary use of the submersible vehicle for the deployment and recovery. If we can use this system with almost any kind of vessels, like as the BBOBS (self pop-up system), it should lead us a true breakthrough of seafloor observations in geodynamics. Hereafter, we call the new autonomous BBOBS-NX as NX-2G in short. There are two main problems to be cleared to realize the NX-2G system. The first one is a tilt of the sensor unit on landing, which is larger than the acceptable limit of the sensor (±8°) in 47 % after our 15 free-fall deployments of the BBOBS-NX. As we had no evidence at which moment the tilt occurred, so it was observed during the BBOBS-NX deployment in the last year by attaching a video camera and an acceleration logger those were originally developed for this purpose. The only one result shows that the tilt on landing seemed determined by the final posture of the BBOBS-NX system just before the penetration into the sediment. The second problem is a required force to extract the sensor unit from the sticky clay sediment, which was about 80 kgf in maximum with the current BBOBS-NX system from in-situ measurements

  19. Dynamics of the Oso-Steelhead landslide from broadband seismic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibert, C.; Stark, C. P.; Ekström, G.

    2015-06-01

    We carry out a combined analysis of the short- and long-period seismic signals generated by the devastating Oso-Steelhead landslide that occurred on 22 March 2014. The seismic records show that the Oso-Steelhead landslide was not a single slope failure, but a succession of multiple failures distinguished by two major collapses that occurred approximately 3 min apart. The first generated long-period surface waves that were recorded at several proximal stations. We invert these long-period signals for the forces acting at the source, and obtain estimates of the first failure runout and kinematics, as well as its mass after calibration against the mass-centre displacement estimated from remote-sensing imagery. Short-period analysis of both events suggests that the source dynamics of the second event is more complex than the first. No distinct long-period surface waves were recorded for the second failure, which prevents inversion for its source parameters. However, by comparing the seismic energy of the short-period waves generated by both events we are able to estimate the volume of the second. Our analysis suggests that the volume of the second failure is about 15-30% of the total landslide volume, giving a total volume mobilized by the two events between 7 × 106 and 10 × 106 m3, in agreement with estimates from ground observations and lidar mapping.

  20. Microseismic Monitoring Using Surface and Borehole Seismic Stations in an Oil Field, North Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hussain, I.; Al-Hashmi, S.; Al-Shijbi, Y.; Al-Saifi, M.; Al-Toubi, K.; Al-Lazki, A.; Al-Kindy, F.

    2009-05-01

    Five shallow borehole seismic stations were installed to monitor microearthquake activities in a carbonate oil field in northern Oman since 1999. This shallow network of seismic station operated continuously until 2002 after which intermittent seismic recording took place due to lack of maintenance and failure of some stations. The objectives of the study are to determine the microseismic parameters in the oil field and to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of these events to evaluate possible triggering mechanism. Well over 400 microearthquakes per year were recorded in the first three years of operation and after that the level of seismic recording fell to less than 200 microearthquakes per year due to failure of some stations. In March 2008, temporary seismic experiment consisting of five near surface seismic stations were installed in the oil field to augment the shallow network station and to evaluate surface installment of seismic instrument to monitor microseismic activities. It has been recognized that microearthquakes data such as size, spatial, and temporal distribution provide information on the pressure waves initiated by either production of or injection of fluids into reservoirs. A total of 44 local microearthquake events were analyzed and located during the temporary seismic stations deployment using a non-linear location software that allows the use of variable accurate velocity model of the subsurface. The events location is confined to oil field reservoir boundary during the recording period and more events occurring at shallow depth. The correlation coefficient between gas production and number of events is the higher compared with the oil production or water injection. The focal plane solution for the largest event in the sequence indicates normal faulting with extensional stress consistent with the existing mapped normal faults in the oil field. Microseismic signal clearly detected by the collocated sensors of the near surface

  1. Complex force history of a calving-generated glacial earthquake derived from broadband seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Amandine; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Walter, Fabian; Moretti, Laurent; Castelnau, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    The force applied to the Earth by the calving of two icebergs at Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland, has been quantified. The source force history was recovered by inversion of regional broadband seismograms without any a priori constraint on the source time function, in contrast with previous studies. For periods 10-100 s, the three-component force can be obtained from distant stations alone and is proportional to the closest station seismograms. This inversion makes it possible to quantify changes of the source force direction and amplitude as a function of time and frequency. A detailed comparison with a video of the event was used to identify four forces associated with collision, then bottom-out and top-out rotation of the first and second icebergs, and ice mélange motion. Only the two iceberg rotations were identified in previous studies. All four processes are found here to contribute to the force amplitude and variability. Such a complete time-frequency force history provides unique dynamical constraints for mechanical calving models.

  2. A New Seismic Broadband Sensor Designed for Easy and Rapid Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guralp, Cansun; Pearcey, Chris; Nicholson, Bruce; Pearce, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    Properly deploying digital seismic broadband sensors in the field can be time consuming and logistically challenging. On active volcanoes the time it takes to install such instruments has to be particularly short in order to minimize the risk for the deployment personnel. In addition, once a seismometer is installed it is not always feasible to pay regular visits to the deployment site in order to correct for possible movements of the seismometer due to settling, sliding or other external events. In order to address those issues we have designed a new type of versatile and very robust three component feedback sensor which can be easily installed and is capable of self correcting changes of its tilt and measuring orientation changes during deployment. The instrument can be installed by direct burial in soil, in a borehole, in glacial ice and can even be used under water as an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS). It components are fitted above each other in a cylindrical stainless steel casing with a diameter of 51 mm. Each seismic sensor has a flat response to velocity between 30s to 100 Hz and a tilt tolerance of up to 20 degrees. A tilt sensor and a two axis magnetometer inside the casing capture changes in tilt and horizontal orientation during the course of the deployment. Their output can be fed into internal motors which in turn adjust the actual orientation of each sensor in the casing. First production models of this instrument have been deployed as OBS in an active submarine volcanic area along the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the NE Pacific. We are currently finishing units to be deployed for volcano monitoring in Icelandic glaciers. This instrument will be offered as an analogue version or with a 24-bit-digitizer fitted into the same casing. A pointy tip can be added to the casing ease direct burial.

  3. Broadband Sound Pressure Field Characteristics of Marine Seismic Sources Used by R/V Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Boebel, O.; El Naggar, S.; Jokat, W.; Kuhn, G.; Niessen, F.; Schenke, H.; Werner, B.; Diebold, J.

    2006-05-01

    Single airguns and airgun arrays of different size and volume are used as sound sources for scientific marine seismic reflection and refraction surveys conducted by R/V Polarstern in the Arctic and Antarctic Ocean. To ensure that these research activities do not affect marine wildlife and particularly marine mammals in the Antarctic Treaty Area south of 60°S knowledge of the sound pressure field of the seismic sources is essential. Therefore, a broadband marine seismic source characterization study was conducted at the Heggernes Acoustic Range in the Herdlefjord, Norway in October 2003. The objectives were (1) to determine the spatial distribution of the sound pressure levels emitted by Polarstern's seismic sources, (2) to compute the source levels assuming a spherical amplitude decay, (3) to determine mitigation radii, within which at least some species of marine mammals might possibly experience behavioral or physiological disturbance due to the received sound pressure levels. The thresholds currently in use to determine mitigation radii are 160 dBRMS re 1 μPa for potential behavioral disturbance and 180 dBRMS re 1 μPa for potential physiological and hearing effects like temporary threshold shifts. To determine the spatial distribution of the sound pressure levels each airgun (array) was shot along a line of 2- 3 km length running between 2 hydrophone chains with receivers in 35, 100, 198 and 267 m depth. A GI-Gun (2.4 l), a G-Gun (8.5 l) and a Bolt PAR CT800 (32.8 l) were deployed as single sources, and 3 GI-Guns (7.4 l), 3 G-Guns (25.6 l) and 8 VLF-Guns (24 l) as arrays. The measurements are complemented by a modeling approach for an 8 G-Gun (68.2 l) and 8 G-Gun+1 Bolt PAR CT800 array (100.1 l). The data analysis includes a determination of peak-peak, zero-peak and RMS-amplitudes, sound exposure levels and amplitude spectra as function of source-receiver distance. The amplitude vs distance graphs, analyzed for the 4 hydrophone depths, show the typical

  4. Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Fragility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra, M. K.; Hardy, G. S.; Hashimoto, P. S.; Griffin, M. J.

    1987-03-01

    This Fragility Analysis is the third of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 1 is the Summary Report of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 2, Systems Analysis, documents the results of the systems screening for the review. The three volumes are part of the Seismic Margins Program initiated in 1984 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to quantify seismic margins at nuclear power plants. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

  5. A broadband multicomponent seismic landstreamer for underground infrastructure planning projects - An example from the Varberg tunnel, southwest Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Zhang, Fengjiao; Lundberg, Emil; Dehgahnnejad, Mahdieh; Friberg, Olof; Brodic, Bojan; Dose, Christin; Place, Joachim; Svensson, Mats; Moller, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Over the past few years, demand for infrastructures has continuously increased in Sweden. The authorities are expected to invest significantly on infrastructures especially those that are environmentally friendly and aim at reducing CO2 emission. Due to limited surface accessibility, the country will particularly move towards developing more and more subways, train tunnels, underground highways and bypasses. The focus will then obviously be in major cities where the underground infrastructures have to be constantly developed or expanded to facilitate the daily life and transportation. The degree to which we can understand geological conditions where these structures are going to be constructed also has great economical and environmental effects. What, however, makes urban environment challenging target for geophysical investigations is the various sources of noise and restriction both in time and space, which require the equipment to be versatile and to produce minimal disruption as well as fast to set up and pack. As a part of a nation-wide, an academia-industry partnership, project (TRUST, TRansparent Underground STructure), we have developed a multicomponent broadband digital-based sensor seismic landstreamer system that is particularly geared for noisy environments and areas where high-resolution images of the subsurface are needed. The streamer has been tested for its reliability in various locations (e.g., part of the Stockholm Bypass) and for various targets one which was a planned underground train tunnel in the city of Varberg, southwest Sweden that is the focus of this presentation. Potential targets were bedrock surface, fracture zones, weak and shear zones. During nearly three weeks, totally about 7.5 km long, comprising 25 seismic profiles using a source and receiver spacing of 2-4 m, was acquired. A novel approach in the data acquisition was to combine the landstreamer with wireless sensors in areas where accessibility was restricted and, to provide

  6. Seismic Station Installation Orientation Errors at ANSS and IRIS/USGS Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam T.; Hutt, Charles R.; Persfield, K.; Gee, Lind S.

    2013-01-01

    Many seismological studies depend on the published orientations of sensitive axes of seismic instruments relative to north (e.g., Li et al., 2011). For example, studies of the anisotropic structure of the Earth’s mantle through SKS‐splitting measurements (Long et al., 2009), constraints on core–mantle electromagnetic coupling from torsional normal‐mode measurements (Dumberry and Mound, 2008), and models of three‐dimensional (3D) velocity variations from surface waves (Ekström et al., 1997) rely on accurate sensor orientation. Unfortunately, numerous results indicate that this critical parameter is often subject to significant error (Laske, 1995; Laske and Masters, 1996; Yoshizawa et al., 1999; Schulte‐Pelkum et al., 2001; Larson and Ekström, 2002). For the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS; ANSS Technical Integration Committee, 2002), the Global Seismographic Network (GSN; Butler et al., 2004), and many other networks, sensor orientation is typically determined by a field engineer during installation. Successful emplacement of a seismic instrument requires identifying true north, transferring a reference line, and measuring the orientation of the instrument relative to the reference line. Such an exercise is simple in theory, but there are many complications in practice. There are four commonly used methods for determining true north at the ANSS and GSN stations operated by the USGS Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL), including gyroscopic, astronomical, Global Positioning System (GPS), and magnetic field techniques. A particular method is selected based on site conditions (above ground, below ground, availability of astronomical observations, and so on) and in the case of gyroscopic methods, export restrictions. Once a north line has been determined, it must be translated to the sensor location. For installations in mines or deep vaults, this step can include tracking angles through the one or more turns in the access tunnel leading to

  7. Broadband Seismic Observations of Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A.; Hurwitz, S.; Johnson, H. E., III; Manga, M.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Geysers are natural phenomena that episodically erupt water and steam. Geophysical observations at geysers are analyzed to shed light on subsurface multi-phase mass and heat exchange processes and geometries controlling geyser eruptions, which are still are not completely understood. Lone Star Geyser (LSG) in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA erupts every ~3 hours, with brief episodes (~5-10 min) of water and steam fountaining (preplays) leading up to the main eruption (~28 min), and the discharge evolves from a water-dominated phase to a steam-dominated phase as the main eruption proceeds in time. We describe observations from multiple seismometers deployed around LSG as part of a comprehensive geophysical survey conducted in April 2014. 3-component seismograms were continuously recorded at 250 samples per second by 6 Nanometrics Trillium 120 P/PA broadband seismometers (lower corner frequency at 120 seconds) and Taurus dataloggers at distances ~10 to 25 m from the geyser cone for a period of 3 days. We identify distinct episodes of hydrothermal tremor associated with preplay events and main eruptions. We find that the dominant tremor frequencies during main eruptions are consistently higher (> 10.0 Hz) than those during preplays (> 1.0 Hz) indicating slightly different source locations or processes controlling the two phenomena. Unlike seismic observations at the Old Faithful Geyser, we also observe subtle harmonic tremor and spectral gliding in the frequency range ~1.0-8.0 Hz towards the end of both main eruption and preplay tremor episodes. We interpret long-period pulses on horizontal components of the seismometers located close to the geyser and synchronous with preplays, as pseudo-tilts resulting from deformation of the sinter terrace. We also compare the evolution of hydrothermal tremor in time with synchronous changes in temperature, acoustic emission and discharge for interpretation of the possible tremor source processes.

  8. Mikhnevo: from seismic station no. 1 to a modern geophysical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adushkin, V. V.; Ovchinnikov, V. M.; Sanina, I. A.; Riznichenko, O. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The Mikhnevo seismic station was founded in accordance with directive no. 1134 RS of the Council of Ministers of the Soviet Union of February 6, 1954. The station, installed south of Moscow, began its operations on monitoring nuclear tests in the United States and England in 1954. For dozens of years this station was the leading experimental base for elaborating new technical solutions and methods for monitoring nuclear explosions, equipped with modern seismological instruments. At present, the focus of activities has been moved from military applications to fundamental geophysical research. The station preserves its leading position in seismological observations due to the development of national high-performance digital instruments and creation of the small-aperture seismic array, the only one in the central part of European Russia, which is capable of recording weak seismic events with M L ≥ 1.5 within a distance of 100 km.

  9. Estimating Seismic Moment From Broadband P-Waves for Tsunami Warnings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshorn, B. F.

    2006-12-01

    The Richard H. Hagemeyer Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), located in Ewa Beach, Oahu, Hawaii, is responsible for issuing local, regional, and distant tsunami warnings to Hawaii, and for issuing regional and distant tsunami warnings to the rest of the Pacific Basin, exclusive of the US West Coast. The PTWC must provide these tsunami warnings as soon as technologically possible, based entirely on estimates of a potentially tsunamigenic earthquake's source parameters. We calculate the broadband P-wave moment magnitude, Mwp, from the P or pP wave velocity seismograms [Tsuboi et al., 1995, 1999]. This method appears to work well for regional and teleseismic events [ Tsuboi et al (1999], Whitmore et al (2002), Hirshorn et al (2004) ]. Following Tsuboi, [1995], we consider the displacement record of the P-wave portion of the broadband seismograms as an approximate source time function and integrate this record to obtain the moment rate function, Mo(t), and the moment magnitude [Hanks and Kanamori, 1972] as a function of time, Mw(t). We present results for Mwp for local, regional, and teleseismic broad band recordings for earthquakes in the Mw 5 to 9.3 range. As large Hawaii events are rare, we tested this local case using other Pacific events in the magnitude 5.0 to 7.5 range recorded by nearby stations. Signals were excluded, however, if the epicentral distance was so small (generally less than 1 degree) that there was contamination by the S-wave too closely following the P-waves. Scatter plots of Mwp against the Harvard Mw for these events shows that Mwp does predict Mw well from seismograms recorded at local, regional, and teleseismic distances. For some complex earthquakes, eg. the Mw 8.4(HRV) Peru earthquake of June 21, 2001, Mwp underestimates Mw if the first moment release is not the largest. Our estimates of Mwp for the Mw 9.3 Summatra-Andaman Island's earthquake of December 26, 2004 and for the Mw 8.7 (HRV) Summatra event of March 28, 2005, were Mwp 8

  10. Performance of an island seismic station for recording T-phases

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J. A., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    As part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) a worldwide hydroacoustic network consisting of 6 hydrophone and 5 island seismic stations has been planned which will monitor for underwater or low altitude atmospheric explosions. Data from this network is to be integrated with other IMS networks monitoring the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. The seismic (T-phase) stations are significantly less sensitive than hydrophones to ocean borne acoustic waves. T-phase signal strength at seismic stations depends on the amplitude of the signal in the water column, the hydroacoustic-seismic conversion efficiency, and loss on the seismic portion of the path through the island. In order to understand how these factors influence the performance of T-phase stations seismic and hydroacoustic data are examined from instruments currently deployed on or around Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. T-phase recordings for the last 3 years have been collected from the GSN seismic station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surrounding the island are 5 hydrophones which are part of the U.S. Air Force Missile Impact Locating System (MILS). Data from this system have been obtained for some of the events observed at ASCN. Four of the hydrophones are located within 30 km of the coast while the fifth instrument is 100 km to the south. Amplitude spectral estimates of the signal-to-noise levels (SNL) are computed and generally peak between 3 and 8 Hz for both the seismometer and hydrophone data. The seismic SNL generally decays to 1 between 10 and 15 Hz while the hydrophone SNL is still large well above 20 Hz. The ratios of the hydrophone-to-seismometer SNL, at their peak in energy, range between 10 and 100 (20-40 dB) unless a hydrophone is partially blocked by the Ascension Island landmass.

  11. The "Jerk" Method for Predicting Intrusions and Eruptions of Piton De La Fournaise (La Réunion Island) from the Analysis of the Broadband Seismological Rer Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roult, G. C.; Beauducel, F.; Ferrazzini, V.; Boissier, P.; Villeneuve, N.

    2014-12-01

    The predictability of volcanic eruptions remains a challenging problem and forecast of volcano behavior (intrusion versus eruption) is a difficult task. Since 1979, the Volcano Observatory of Piton de la Fournaise (OVPF) maintains SP and BB seismic stations, tiltmeters, extensometers and GPS stations. In addition, the RER GEOSCOPE broadband station was installed in 1986, 8.5 km north of the summit crater. The analysis of 83 seismic crises from December 1985 to December 2010 (preceding 54 eruptions, 26 intrusions, 2 summit pit craters,1 caldera collapse) allowed us to identify short-term long period seismic transients (period > 100 s) for most events (Roult et al., 2012). These precursors observed on the horizontal components are tilt signals induced by the inflation/deflation of the volcano. We analyzed 17 eruptions and 7 intrusions spanning the 2005-2010 period with the aim of distinguishing whether an injection of magma will stop or if it can evolve towards an eruption. Transient signature is an acceleration step that can be large or not, with slopes more or less steep according to the acceleration rate. We show a clear differentiation between the acceleration rate of the intrusions (low rate) and the acceleration rate of the eruptions (high rate). With a ratio estimated to 7, the acceleration rate allows to determine a threshold value and to discriminate between intrusive and eruptive events. The real-time calculation of the ground acceleration of the horizontal components of the RER station after removal of the theoretical tide effect is integrated since April 2014 to the Piton de la Fournaise volcano monitoring. In June 2014, the "JERK"method predicted an eruption 50 minutes before the eruption onset. We applied the "material failure prediction" of Voight and Cornelius (1991) with the aim to predict the onset time of the eruptions. Preliminary tests on the 17 eruptions of the 2005-2010 period have shown that the summit eruptions were relatively well predicted

  12. Teleseismic SKS splitting beneath East Antarctica using broad-band stations around Soya Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Y.; Kanao, M.

    2006-12-01

    We observed shear wave splitting of SKS waves from digital seismographs that are recorded at 5 stations around Soya Coast in the Lutzow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. Their recording systems are composed of a three-component broadband seismometer (CMG-40T), a digital recording unit and a solar power battery supply. The events used were selected from 1999 to 2004 and phase arrival times were calculated using the IASPEI91 earth model (Kennet, 1995). In general, we chose the data from earthquakes with m>6.0 and a distance range 85° < Δ < 130° for the most prominent SKS waves We used the methods of Silver and Chan (1991) for the inversion of anisotropy parameters and estimated the splitting parameters φ (fast polarization direction) and δt (delay time between split waves) assuming a single layer of hexagonal symmetry with a horizontal symmetry axis. The weighted averages of all splitting parameters (φ, δt) for each station are AKR (30±4, 1.30±0.2), LNG (58±6, 1.27±0.2), SKL (67±10, 0.94±0.2), SKV (40±6, 1.28±0.3) and TOT (52±8, 1.26±0.3), where the weights are inversely proportional to the standard deviations for each solution. As compared to typical delay times of SKS waves which show 1.2s (Silver and Chan 1991; Vinnik et al., 1992), the result shows generally the same value. In previous study, Kubo and Hiramatsu (1998) estimate the splitting parameter for Syowa station (SYO), where is located near our using stations in East Antarctica, and the results are (49±3, 0.70±0.1). Although it is consistent with our results for fast polarization direction, δt for our results are large relatively to those of SYO. The difference may be due to either different incident angle or more complex anisotropic structure. We found that fast polarization direction is systematically parallel to coast line in the Lutzow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica, which is consistent with NE-SW paleo compressional stress. The absolute plate motion based on the HS2-NUVEL1 (Gripp and Gordon

  13. Detection of Seismic Sources Associated with Ice Movement in Antarctica using POLENET Seismic Array, AGAP Seismic Array, and GSN Seismic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, A. C.; Barcheck, C. G.; Wiens, D. A.; Barklage, M. E.; Nyblade, A.; Aster, R. C.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Huerta, A. D.; Wilson, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Antarctica has the fewest reported seismic events of all the continents. In 2009 and 2010 only four Antarctic events were located by the ISC bulletin. The lack of seismicity is partly due to limited station coverage (only 9 permanent stations). Over 40 temporary stations have been installed beginning in 2007 as part of the IPY POLENET and AGAP projects. These stations greatly increase coverage, especially in the Antarctic interior, and allow us to locate events too small to be recorded at coastal stations. Recent interest in long period glacial sources (due to calving or ice movement) has led to the development and implementation of new detection algorithms. Traditional detections rely on high frequency impulsive signals typical of fast slipping earthquakes. These detectors miss 'slow' events (often associated with ice motion such as calving or slip events such as the tidally controlled periodic slip of the Whillans Ice Stream) that do not generate high frequency P phases and thus are absent from global catalogs. This study analyzes seismic data from 2009-2011 filtered in both long period (33-75s) and short period (0.1-2s) bands from over 50 stations. We detect, associate, and locate events in short period bands by identifying first arriving P and S phases using both automated STA/LTA detection and visual inspection. We also use a modified time reversal to identify 'slow' events. Long period envelopes are shifted by Rayleigh wave propagation times and stacked at equidistantly spaced source locations. The source is the location displaying the greatest amplitude stack. We find the Vanderford glacier region is highly seismic in both bands (one high frequency event being large enough to be included in the ISC bulletin). The David and Mullock glacier regions of the Transantarctic Mountains frequently produce magnitude 3-4 events (detected in the high frequency band) associated with ice movements. Several tectonic earthquakes have been detected in the interior of the

  14. Using Seismic Signals as a Quality Assessment Tool of USArray stations at the Array Network Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astiz, L.; Eakins, J. A.; Martynov, V. G.; Vernon, F. L.; Newman, R. L.; Reyes, J. C.; Cox, T. A.; Karasu, G. H.

    2009-12-01

    Full deployment of the 400 Transportable Array (TA) stations of the USArray Earthscope project was reached in September 2007. The original array footprint has rolled eastward at a rate of 200 stations per year. The Array Network Facility (ANF) is responsible for the delivery of all TA data (seismic, state of health and metadata) to the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). In addition, the ANF provides station command and control; verification and distribution of metadata; remotely accessible world wide web interfaces for Array Operations Facility (AOF) personnel to access network and station state of health information; and quality control for all seismic data. ANF seismic analysts review individual seismic events recorded by the USArray, and to-date have produced over 2.5 million arrival picks from more than 40,000 local, regional and teleseismic events since April 2004. In the last two years, as the TA has moved away from the seismically active west coast of the United States, most of the local and regional events recorded are man-made events. The arrival picks are available in IMS format at the DMC and as compressed CSS3.0 relational databases from the ANF website. The eyes-on-data approach of these seismic signals by ANF analysts in quasi-real time allows for data quality monitoring of all deployed TA stations. This approach also allows the ANF to quickly discover problems at the stations as the network evolves given that the USArray currently records about 25 seismic events per day and that large teleseismic earthquakes (M > 6.5) are recorded at nearly all USArray stations. We use an empirical approach to compare body and surface wave recordings at a particular station with the robust stack of the nearest neighbors’ recordings to monitor continuing station performance. Using this empirical approach we will compare particle motion of P and S waves of the largest 30 shallow & deep earthquakes recorded by USArrray stations to verify sensor orientation. We will

  15. Analysis of seismic events in and near Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D B; Mayeda, K M; Rodgers, A J; Ruppert, S D

    1999-05-11

    Seismic data for events in and around Kuwait were collected and analyzed. The authors estimated event moment, focal mechanism and depth by waveform modeling. Results showed that reliable seismic source parameters for events in and near Kuwait can be estimated from a single broadband three-component seismic station. This analysis will advance understanding of earthquake hazard in Kuwait.

  16. Could the IMS Infrasound Stations Support a Global Network of Small Aperture Seismic Arrays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J, Gibbons, Steven; Kværna, Tormod; Mykkeltveit, Svein

    2015-04-01

    The infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System are arrays consisting of up to 15 sites and with apertures of up to 3 km. The arrays are distributed remarkably uniformly over the globe and provide excellent coverage of South America, Africa, and Antarctica. This is to say that there are many infrasound arrays in regions many thousands of kilometers from the closest seismic array. Several infrasound arrays are in the immediate vicinity of existing 3-component seismic stations and these provide us with examples of how typical seismic signals look at these locations. We can make idealized estimates of the predicted performance of seismic arrays, consisting of seismometers at each site of the infrasound arrays, by duplicating the signals from the 3-C stations at all sites of the array. However, the true performance of seismic arrays at these sites will depend both upon Signal-to-Noise Ratios of seismic signals and the coherence of both signal and noise between sensors. These properties can only be determined experimentally. Recording seismic data of sufficient quality at many of these arrays may require borehole deployments since the microbarometers in the infrasound arrays are often situated in vaults placed in soft sediments. The geometries of all the current IMS infrasound arrays are examined and compared and we demonstrate that, from a purely geometrical perspective, essentially all the array configurations would provide seismic arrays with acceptable slowness resolution for both regional and teleseismic phase arrivals. Seismic arrays co-located with the infrasound arrays in many regions would likely enhance significantly the seismic monitoring capability in parts of the world where only 3-component stations are currently available. Co-locating seismic and infrasound sensors would facilitate the development of seismic arrays that share the infrastructure of the infrasound arrays, reducing the development and operational costs. Hosting countries might

  17. A very low-cost and adaptable DIY seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez Chazara, Nahum; Castiñeiras, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    . Obviously, there can be also different configurations to fit different needs: From horizontal geophones, to the use of accelerometers to substitute the geophone and miniaturize even less the size of the seismic station. Also, the data can be gathered only by an Arduino board, but then it needs a card reader/writer and a real-time clock (RTC) circuit in order to correctly timestamp the data. In the first semester of 2016, we plan to build several units and deploy them in the field over the Bajo Segura Fault (Spain) and test them over different conditions to better assess the quality of the data.

  18. Sequential dome-collapse nuées ardentes analyzed from broadband seismic data, Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brodscholl, A.; Kirbani, S.B.; Voight, B.

    2000-01-01

    The broadband data were evaluated using the assumption that avalanches with the same source areas and descent paths exhibit a linear relation between source volume and recorded seismic-amplitude envelope area. A result of the analysis is the determination of the volume of selected individual events. From the field surveys, the total volume of the collapsed dome lava is 2.6 Mm3. Discounting the volumetric influence of rockfalls, the average size of the 44 nuées ardentes is therefore about 60,000 m3. The largest collapse event at 10:54 is estimated to involve 260,000 m3, based on an analysis of the seismicity. The remaining 23 phase I events averaged 60,000 m3, with the total volume of all phase I events accounting for 63% of the unstable dome. The 20 phase II events comprised 37% of the total volume and averaged 47,000 m3. The methods described here can be put to practical use in real-time monitoring situations. Broadband data were essential in this study primarily because of the wide dynamic range.

  19. Seismic Tomography of Siyazan - Shabran Oil and Gas Region Of Azerbaijan by Data of The Seismic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetirmishli, Gurban; Guliyev, Ibrahim; Mammadov, Nazim; Kazimova, Sabina; Ismailova, Saida

    2016-04-01

    The main purpose of the research was to build a reliable 3D model of the structure of seismic velocities in the earth crust on the territory of Siyazan-Shabran region of Azerbaijan, using the data of seismic telemetry stations spanning Siyazan-Shabran region (Siyazan, Altiagaj, Pirgulu, Guba, Khinalig, Gusar), including 7 mobile telemetry seismic stations. Interest to the problem of research seismic tomography caused by applied environmental objectives, such as the assessment of geological risks, engineering evaluation (stability and safety of wells), the task of exploration and mining operations. In the study region are being actively developed oil fields, and therefore, there is a risk of technogenic earthquakes. It was performed the calculation of first arrival travel times of P and S waves and the corresponding ray paths. Calculate 1D velocity model which is the initial model as a set of horizontal layers (velocity may be constant or changed linearly with depth on each layer, gaps are possible only at the boundaries between the layers). Have been constructed and analyzed the horizontal sections of the three-dimensional velocity model at different depths of the investigated region. By the empirical method was proposed density model of the sedimentary rocks at depths of 0-8 km.

  20. Placement of Base Stations in Broadband Power Line Communications Access Networks by Means of Multi-criteria Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidine, Abdelfatteh; Lehnert, Ralf

    Broadband Power Line Communications (B-PLC) technology is an alternative for broadband access networks, allowing bit rates up to currently 200Mbps. This technique uses the wiring of the low-voltage grid in order to offer to the users the telecommunications services, such as Internet, VoIP, VoD, etc. The B-PLC design process is sub-divided into two parts: the Generalized Base Station Placement (GBSP) problem and the PLC Channel Allocation Problem (P-CAP). This paper focuses on GBSP that is modeled as multi-criteria combinatorial optimization problem. Based on our published mathematical modeling, this paper supplies more numerical experiments for the evaluation of Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms (MOEAs) in solving GBSP. Their performance is compared with the single-objective optimization.

  1. Station corrections for the Katmai Region Seismic Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2003-01-01

    Most procedures for routinely locating earthquake hypocenters within a local network are constrained to using laterally homogeneous velocity models to represent the Earth's crustal velocity structure. As a result, earthquake location errors may arise due to actual lateral variations in the Earth's velocity structure. Station corrections can be used to compensate for heterogeneous velocity structure near individual stations (Douglas, 1967; Pujol, 1988). The HYPOELLIPSE program (Lahr, 1999) used by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) to locate earthquakes in Cook Inlet and the Aleutian Islands is a robust and efficient program that uses one-dimensional velocity models to determine hypocenters of local and regional earthquakes. This program does have the capability of utilizing station corrections within it's earthquake location proceedure. The velocity structures of Cook Inlet and Aleutian volcanoes very likely contain laterally varying heterogeneities. For this reason, the accuracy of earthquake locations in these areas will benefit from the determination and addition of station corrections. In this study, I determine corrections for each station in the Katmai region. The Katmai region is defined to lie between latitudes 57.5 degrees North and 59.00 degrees north and longitudes -154.00 and -156.00 (see Figure 1) and includes Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Mount Martin, Mount Mageik, Snowy Mountain, Mount Trident, and Mount Griggs volcanoes. Station corrections were determined using the computer program VELEST (Kissling, 1994). VELEST inverts arrival time data for one-dimensional velocity models and station corrections using a joint hypocenter determination technique. VELEST can also be used to locate single events.

  2. A multievent study of broadband electrons observed by the DMSP satellites and their relation to red aurora observed at midlatitude stations

    SciTech Connect

    Shiokawa, K.; Meng, C.; Reeves, G.D.; Rich, F.J.; Yumoto, K.

    1997-07-01

    Broadband electrons during magnetic storms are characterized by an unusually intense flux of precipitating electrons in the broadband energy range from 30 eV to 30 keV near the equatorward edge of the auroral oval (47{degree}{endash}66{degree} magnetic latitude). Broadband electrons were first reported by {ital Shiokawa} {ital et al.} [1996]. In this paper, we report a multievent study of broadband electrons, using particle data obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites during 23 magnetic storms from January 1989 through May 1992. Twelve broadband electron events are identified. Most of them are observed in the night sector, but some are observed in the morning sector. Particle data for successive polar passes of the DMSP multisatellites are used to show that broadband electrons generally last for less than 30 min and that for some events, they precipitate over a wide range of local times simultaneously. On the basis of a quantitative calculation of optical emissions from electrons in the neutral atmosphere, we conclude that broadband electrons are a possible cause of red auroras observed at midlatitude ground stations. We suggest that broadband electrons are associated with certain substorms during the main phase of magnetic storms. This conjecture comes from observations of H component positive bays and Pi 2 pulsations observed at low-latitude magnetic stations and from magnetic field variations observed at geosynchronous satellites. We conclude that the magnetospheric source of broadband electrons lies within the inner part of the plasma sheet. This conclusion is based on the facts that broadband electrons appear in latitudes where plasma sheet particles were observed before the event and that broadband electrons are observed poleward of the subauroral ion drifts, a position that corresponds to the inner edge of the injected particle layer during storms. (Abstract Truncated)

  3. Seismic response analysis of NAGRA-Net stations using advanced geophysical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggi, Valerio; Edwards, Benjamin; Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Keller, Lorenz; Fäh, Donat

    2015-04-01

    In cooperation with the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), the Swiss Seismological Service (SED) has recently completed the installation of ten new seismological observation stations, three of them including a co-located borehole sensor. The ultimate goal of the project is to densify the existing Swiss Digital Seismic Network (SDSNet) in northern Switzerland, in order to improve the detection of very-low magnitude events and to improve the accuracy of future location solutions. This is strategic for unbiased monitoring of micro seismicity at the locations of proposed nuclear waste repositories. To further improve the quality and usability of the recordings, a seismic characterization of the area surrounding the installation area was performed at each site. The investigation consisted of a preliminary geological and geotechnical study, followed by a seismic site response analysis by means of state-of-the-art geophysical techniques. For the borehole stations, in particular, the characterization was performed by combining different types of active seismic methods (P-S refraction tomography, surface wave analysis, Vertical Seismic Profiling - VSP) with ambient vibration based approaches (wavelet decomposition, H/V spectral ratio, polarization analysis, three-component f-k analysis). The results of all analyses converged to the definition of a mean velocity profile for the site, which was later used for the computation of engineering parameters (travel time average velocity and quarter-wavelength parameters) and the analytical SH-wave transfer function. Empirical site-amplification functions are automatically determined for any station connected to the Swiss seismic networks. They are determined based on building statistical models of systematic site-specific effects in recordings of small earthquakes when compared to the Swiss stochastic ground-motion model. Computed site response is validated through comparison with these empirical

  4. Seismo-acoustic analysis of the ocean swell sources observed with Romanian infrasound array and seismic stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Grecu, Bogdan; Popa, Mihaela

    2015-04-01

    Romanian Plostina infrasound array (IPLOR) is deployed in the central part of the country, in Vrancea region. Presently, IPLOR array configuration includes 6 elements equipped with Chaparral Physics sensors and with aperture of about 2.5 km. For the purpose of assessing the IPLOR performance in observing various types of infrasound sources, over five years of data (since June 2009 to present) were processed. Signal interactive analysis was performed using WinPMCC software. The detection results show that the station response was gradually improved, as the number of array elements increased from three to six, and wind noise reduction conditions were enhanced. A larger number of detected signals and a better array resolution at lower frequency were noticed as well. Microbaroms - the interaction of ocean swell with the atmosphere - represent a relevant type of infrasonic source present in the IPLOR detection plots, for which the signal characterization has been enhanced with the array upgrading process. IPLOR detection capability related to this energetic long-period infrasound waves, which propagate over large distances, shows an alternating behavior, being strongly influenced by the upper atmospheric winds, i.e. seasonally dependent stratospheric winds. The ocean swell can be considered as a seismo-acoustic source, leaving an imprint on both seismic and infrasonic recordings. The interaction with the atmosphere generates infrasound (microbarom), while the interaction with the sea floor emits seismic signal (microseism). Microbaroms have a sinusoidal wave character with a dominant period of 5 s. Due to low damping at this period in stratospheric wave duct, microbaroms are observed over large distance ranges up to a few thousand kilometres. Microseisms occur as an increasing of seismic background noise between 2 and 20 s; in this range, primary and secondary peaks, at 5 and 14 s, are observed. Common broad-band seismic data, recorded with Romanian dense seismic

  5. Real-time forecast of aftershocks from a single seismic station signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippiello, E.; Cirillo, A.; Godano, G.; Papadimitriou, E.; Karakostas, V.

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation of seismic hazard in the hours following large earthquakes is strongly affected by biases due to difficulties in determining earthquake location. This leads to the huge incompleteness of instrumental catalogs. Here we show that if, on the one hand, the overlap of aftershock coda waves hides many small events, on the other hand, it leads to a well-determined empirical law controlling the decay of the amplitude of the seismic signal at a given site. The fitting parameters of this law can be related to those controlling the temporal decay of the aftershock number, and it is then possible to obtain short-term postseismic occurrence probability from a single recorded seismic signal. We therefore present a novel procedure which, without requiring earthquake location, produces more accurate and almost real-time forecast, in a site of interest, directly from the signal of a seismic station installed at that site.

  6. A method to establish seismic noise baselines for automated station assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.; Hutt, C.R.; Gee, L.S.; Benz, H.M.; Buland, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for quantifying station noise baselines and characterizing the spectral shape of out-of-nominal noise sources. Our intent is to automate this method in order to ensure that only the highest-quality data are used in rapid earthquake products at NEIC. In addition, the station noise baselines provide a valuable tool to support the quality control of GSN and ANSS backbone data and metadata. The procedures addressed here are currently in development at the NEIC, and work is underway to understand how quickly changes from nominal can be observed and used within the NEIC processing framework. The spectral methods and software used to compute station baselines and described herein (PQLX) can be useful to both permanent and portable seismic stations operators. Applications include: general seismic station and data quality control (QC), evaluation of instrument responses, assessment of near real-time communication system performance, characterization of site cultural noise conditions, and evaluation of sensor vault design, as well as assessment of gross network capabilities (McNamara et al. 2005). Future PQLX development plans include incorporating station baselines for automated QC methods and automating station status report generation and notification based on user-defined QC parameters. The PQLX software is available through the USGS (http://earthquake. usgs.gov/research/software/pqlx.php) and IRIS (http://www.iris.edu/software/ pqlx/).

  7. Analysis of Background Seismic Noise Recorded at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Aster, R.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Butler, R.

    2006-12-01

    A small array of high frequency seismometers was recently placed around the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in order to characterize seismic noise generated by the station during operations. This week long experiment, titled, "South Pole Analysis of Machines" or SPAM was conducted in January of 2006 using equipment provided by IRIS PASSCAL to sample the high frequency noise sources generated at the NSF's research base. These data will be correlated to those observed at the ultra quiet GSN seismic station (QSPA) located 5 miles from the base. The purpose of the experiment is to show that although the QSPA sensors are 5 miles away and nearly 1000 feet deep in the ice, there is still a risk of contamination of the signals by cultural noise from the South Pole research base. A Quiet Sector was established around the QSPA station in order to minimize vibrational noise sources, but there is interest in moving some experiments out into the Quiet Sector. Characterizing the noise sources will help us determine the potential reduction in data quality expected at the QSPA station as experiments move closer to the site. Sensors were placed next to the power generators, aircraft taxiway, large antenna towers, as well as at the base of the new station itself. Sensors were also placed between the research base and the QSPA station to get an idea of the propagation of the noise toward the QSPA station. Several high frequency noise sources are clearly seen on all array elements with a number of very clear spectral lines above 1 Hz. These are primarily associated with snow moving tractors and power generators. Smaller signals are seen that may be related to wind loading on the new South Pole elevated station along with harmonics that appear to be correlated with large air handling equipment in the station. Also evident are air operations with landings, takeoffs, taxi and idling C-130's evident. Although greatly attenuated, almost all of these signals are observed at the QSPA

  8. Data from deployment of temporary seismic stations in northern Norway and Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Maercklin, N; Mykkeltveit, S; Schweitzer, J; Harris, D B; Rock, D W

    2005-02-11

    This short contribution is a description of data now available in NORSAR's data archives from a temporary deployment during 2002-2004 of six seismic stations in northern Norway and Finland. Explosions in underground as well as open-pit mines in the Khibiny massif of the Kola Peninsula of northwestern Russia are conducted on a frequent and relatively regular basis. It was decided to supplement the network of permanent stations in northern Fennoscandia and northwest Russia with temporarily deployed stations, in order to record these explosions, as well as other mining explosions and natural events occurring in this general area. As shown in Fig. 6.4.1, the six temporary stations were deployed along two profile lines, extending westwards from the Khibini massif. The rationale for this deployment was to collect data to examine distance as well as azimuthal dependence of seismic discriminants. As can be seen from Fig. 6.4.1 the southernmost of the two profile lines runs through the permanent seismic array ARCES in northern Norway.

  9. Calibration of Regional Seismic Stations in the Middle East with Shots in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Toksoz, M N; Kuleli, S; Gurbuz, C; Kalafat, D; Nekler, T; Zor, K; Yilmazer, M; Ogutcu, Z; Schultz, C A; Harris, D B

    2003-07-21

    The objective of this project is to calibrate regional travel-times and propagation characteristics of seismic waves in Turkey and surrounding areas in the Middle East in order to enhance detection and location capabilities in the region. Important data for the project will be obtained by large calibration shots in central and eastern Turkey. The first, a two-ton shot, was fired in boreholes near Keskin in central Anatolia on 23 November 2002. The explosives were placed in 14 holes, each 80 m deep, arranged in concentric circular arrays. Ninety temporary seismic stations were deployed within a 300 km radius around the shot. The permanent stations of the Turkish National Seismic Network provided a good azimuthal coverage as well as three radial traverses. Most stations within a radius of 200 km recorded the shot. Travel-time data have been analyzed to obtain a detailed crustal model under the shot and along the profiles. The model gives a 35 km thick crust, characterized by two layers with velocities of 5.0 and 6.4 km/s. The P{sub n} velocity was found to be 7.8 km/s. The crustal thickness decreases to the north where the profile crosses the North Anatolian fault. There is a slight increase in crustal velocities, but no change in crustal thickness to the west. Data analysis effort is continuing to refine the regional velocity models and to obtain station corrections.

  10. Engineering for Autonomous Seismic Stations at the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Carpenter, P.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Parker, T.; Hebert, J.; Childs, D.; Chung, P.; Reusch, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The NSF funded Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) through New Mexico Tech operates the PASSCAL Instrument Center (PIC) in Socorro New Mexico. The engineering effort at the PIC seeks to optimize seismic station operations for all portable experiments, include those in extremely remote and harsh polar environments. Recent advances have resulted in improved station design, allowing improved operational efficiencies, data quality return and reduction in station logistics associated with installation, maintenance and decommissioning of stations. These include: Battery and power system designs. Incorporating primary Lithium Thionyl Chloride (LTC) technology with rechargeable Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) batteries allows systems to operate in areas with long-term solar autonomy (high latitudes). Development includes charge controller systems to switch between primary and secondary technologies efficiently. Enclosures: Engineered solutions to efficiently manage waste heat, maintain operational environment and provide light-weight and durable housing for seismic instrumentation. Communications: In collaboration with Xeos Technologies Inc., we deliver Iridium-based SOH/Command and Control telemetry as well as full bandwidth seismic data communications in high latitude environments at low power requirements. Smaller-lighter-instrumentation: Through the GEOICE MRI, we are working with Nanometrics on next generation "all-in-one" seismic systems that can be deployed in polar environments - easing logistics, minimizing installation time and improving data quality return for these expensive deployments. All autonomous station designs are openly and freely available at the IRIS PASSCAL webpage (www.passcal.nmt.edu/polar/design-drawings). More information on GEOICE and data quality from various seismometer emplacements will be presented in other posters at this AGU meeting.

  11. A Discussion on Low Seismicity in 2012 in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, T. S.; Wu, Y. M.

    2014-12-01

    In Taiwan, a significant seismic quiescence before the 1999 MW 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake was reported by Wu and Chiao (2006). Recently, a low seismicity is also observed in 2012. There are nine months within 2012 with monthly seismicity rates low than the one standard deviation. It is worth to check that this is a seismic quiescence period before a big earthquake or other reasons. The first we checked the seismic network condition. We found some new seismic stations including the Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology (BATS) were incorporated within the Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network (CWBSN) since 2012. Most of those stations are located on hard rock sites which may affect the magnitude estimation. In order to reduce the impact of site effect, we collected the earthquake catalog data during the period from 1994 to 2012 to calculate the station correction for each station. There is a strong correlation between station corrections determined in this study and geological settings. Stations located on soil sites have high amplifications with negative station corrections. On the other hand, stations located on hard rock sites have low amplifications with positive station corrections. After applied the station corrections to revise ML estimation, seismicity rate obviously increases in 2012 and without low seismicity anomaly. Therefore, the reason low seismicity in 2012 is that new adding seismic stations which are installed on rock sites and lead to underestimate of the magnitude determination.

  12. Simulation Of Broadband Seismic Wave Propagation In A Deep Mine in Sudbury Ontario Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, R.; Chen, H.; Milkereit, B.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    In an active underground mine, amplitudes and travel times of seismic events are critical parameters that have to be determined at various locations. These parameters are useful to better understand the process of spatial and temporal stress distributions in a mine. In this study, variations of travel time and amplitude of seismic waves derived from the conventional constant velocity models are compared to the ones derived from 3D variable velocity model. The results show a significant variation in seismic energy distribution at the mine due to presence of very strong elastic contrast, and the observed complexity of the propagated seismic waves require the use of a variable velocity model. An active deep mine located in Sudbury Ontario Canada hosted this study. Dense 3D arrays of geophones, which are distributed around ore-bodies, have been monitoring controlled production blasts and microseismic events since the mine has started production. It is shown here that the conventional empirical method used to calculate peak particle velocities and accelerations (PPVs/PPAs), tends to underestimate the intensity of seismic waves in stopes or areas close to blast sites. This could be corrected if a more realistic model was implemented. Comparing the travel time information from recorded events in the past few years showed the temporal changes in the mine velocity model as mining progressed, thus updating the velocity model of the mine is needed if better accuracy of event location is required. In this study, a 2D/3D finite difference modeling method is used.

  13. Waveform spectral analysis to determining the CTBTO's seismic stations noise characteristics in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, B. A.; Heryandoko, N.; Rohadi, S.

    2016-05-01

    All we analysed recording waveform of six seismograph stations which is part of CTBTO's seismic network in Indonesia. The analysis using the spectral analysis method conducted to determine the characteristics response of each seismographic station. We analysed background noise level of sites using Power Spectral Density (PSD) and Probability of Density Function (PDF). The result of spectral analysis indicates that PSI station (Parapat, Sumatera) has the lowest background noise level, so it has highest Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). This station has best recording of nuclear explosion and earthquake event compare to recording of other station. This good quality of recording signal because the seismometer located on the representative bedrock and the site good protected from the ambient or environmental noise. Otherwise, LEM station (Lembang, Bandung) has the highest background noise level and has lowest SNR. LEM station located near the Tangkuban Perahu Mountain that one of active volcano in Bandung. Activity of the volcano may create disturbance noise to the recording signal in Lembang station (LEM). The significance noise also may because of human activity around this site.

  14. Seismic Anisotropy beneath the African Plate using Shear Wave Splitting Measurements from AfricaArray Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunley, M. E.; Weeraratne, D.; Nyblade, A.

    2011-12-01

    The African continental plate is made up of a series of cratons and fold belts with activation ages ranging from present to Archean. Recent studies have shown that this tectonic assemblage occurred over a long history of accretion and rifting cycles that likely left behind the complex crust and lithospheric fabric that we see today. Here we study seismic anisotropy beneath the African continent using a large array of permanent AfricaArray and Global Seismic Network seismic stations located throughout Africa. We supply shear wave splitting techniques to teleseismic earthquake events using the eigenvalue method where the second eigenvalue is minimized to determine anisotropy. Stations located in the Ethiopian rift zone yield a NE-SW fast direction with the largest delay times of 1.5s. One station (KOWA) located in the west African craton displays a NW-SE fast direction. Stations located near Cameroon, at the coastal edge of the central African shear zone, produce NW-SE fast directions oriented perpendicular to the shear zone axis. . A group of stations located on Archean crust in central Africa skirt the Congo craton and display consistent NNE fast directions and delay times of 1.0s. Two stations, LSZ and TEZI are located in the Damara suture belt between the Congo and Kaapvaal cratons display a NE-SW fast direction parallel to the suture axis. In the Kaapvaal craton region the average anisotropic direction is NNE with a 1.0s delay time. New stations available south of the Kaapvaal craton reveal a NE fast direction with delay times that vary from 0.5 to 1.3 s. Several splitting measurements are made for the southern station HVD which display backazimuth dependence producing NW-SE fast directions for ray paths coming from the east and are consistent with observations at GRM located east of HVD. These results show that seismic anisotropy across the continent is not uniform and shows significant variation between tectonic regions. While mantle flow and lithospheric

  15. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling of Broadband Signals - Analysis of Potential Disturbances during CTBT On-Site Inspection Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Altmann, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    For the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) the precise localisation of possible underground nuclear explosion sites is important. During an on-site inspection (OSI) sensitive seismic measurements of aftershocks can be performed, which, however, can be disturbed by other signals. To improve the quality and effectiveness of these measurements it is essential to understand those disturbances so that they can be reduced or prevented. In our work we focus on disturbing signals caused by airborne sources: When the sound of aircraft (as often used by the inspectors themselves) hits the ground, it propagates through pores in the soil. Its energy is transferred to the ground and soil vibrations are created which can mask weak aftershock signals. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is still incomplete. However, it is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. We present our recent advances in this field. We performed several measurements to record sound pressure and soil velocity produced by various sources, e.g. broadband excitation by jet aircraft passing overhead and signals artificially produced by a speaker. For our experimental set-up microphones were placed close to the ground and geophones were buried in different depths in the soil. Several sensors were shielded from the directly incident acoustic signals by a box coated with acoustic damping material. While sound pressure under the box was strongly reduced, the soil velocity measured under the box was just slightly smaller than outside of it. Thus these soil vibrations were mostly created outside the box and travelled through the soil to the sensors. This information is used to estimate characteristic propagation lengths of the acoustically induced signals in the soil. In the seismic data we observed interference patterns which are likely caused by the

  16. Seismo-volcano source localization with triaxial broad-band seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inza, L. A.; Mars, J. I.; Métaxian, J. P.; O'Brien, G. S.; Macedo, O.

    2011-10-01

    Seismo-volcano source localization is essential to improve our understanding of eruptive dynamics and of magmatic systems. The lack of clear seismic wave phases prohibits the use of classical location methods. Seismic antennas composed of one-component (1C) seismometers provide a good estimate of the backazimuth of the wavefield. The depth estimation, on the other hand, is difficult or impossible to determine. As in classical seismology, the use of three-component (3C) seismometers is now common in volcano studies. To determine the source location parameters (backazimuth and depth), we extend the 1C seismic antenna approach to 3Cs. This paper discusses a high-resolution location method using a 3C array survey (3C-MUSIC algorithm) with data from two seismic antennas installed on an andesitic volcano in Peru (Ubinas volcano). One of the main scientific questions related to the eruptive process of Ubinas volcano is the relationship between the magmatic explosions and long-period (LP) swarms. After introducing the 3C array theory, we evaluate the robustness of the location method on a full wavefield 3-D synthetic data set generated using a digital elevation model of Ubinas volcano and an homogeneous velocity model. Results show that the backazimuth determined using the 3C array has a smaller error than a 1C array. Only the 3C method allows the recovery of the source depths. Finally, we applied the 3C approach to two seismic events recorded in 2009. Crossing the estimated backazimuth and incidence angles, we find sources located 1000 ± 660 m and 3000 ± 730 m below the bottom of the active crater for the explosion and the LP event, respectively. Therefore, extending 1C arrays to 3C arrays in volcano monitoring allows a more accurate determination of the source epicentre and now an estimate for the depth.

  17. A High-Sensitivity Broad-Band Seismic Sensor for Shallow Seismic Sounding of the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, W. Thomas; Standley, Ian M.; Banerdt, W. Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The recently undertaken Space Exploration Initiative has prompted a renewed interest in techniques for characterizing the surface and shallow subsurface (0-10s of meters depth) of the Moon. There are several reasons for this: First, there is an intrinsic scientific interest in the subsurface structure. For example the stratigraphy, depth to bedrock, density/porosity, and block size distribution all have implications for the formation of, and geological processes affecting the surface, such as sequential crater ejecta deposition, impact gardening, and seismic settling. In some permanently shadowed craters there may be ice deposits just below the surface. Second, the geotechnical properties of the lunar surface layers are of keen interest to future mission planners. Regolith thickness, strength, density, grain size and compaction will affect construction of exploration infrastructure in terms of foundation strength and stability, ease of excavation, radiation shielding effectiveness, as well as raw material handling and processing techniques for resource extraction.

  18. Geologic interpretation of seismic data, relocation of Route 2, Stations 138-155 in Lancaster, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    The proposed relocation of the Concord-Westminster Highway, Route 2, in Lancaster, Mass., requires a long, deep cut between stations 138 and 155. A preliminary seismic survey was made of the site in October 1949. At that time five transverses were made along the base-line, and three transverse to it. This work showed an anomalous situation in the vicinity of shot point E. In order to obtain the required additional data to resolve these anomalies, four more seismic transverses were made in November 1949. Two of these were run along the base-line between station 138+52 and station 145+12 in such a way as to yield, in conjugation with the preliminary survey, depth data of a 660-foot transverse. One of the primary functions of this long line was to obtain a reliable bedrock velocity. The other two transverses were transverse to the long transverse. This report comprises all of the seismic and geologic work performed at this site. The work was done as a part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  19. Verifying single-station seismic approaches using Earth-based data: Preparation for data return from the InSight mission to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Mark P.; Beucler, Éric; Drilleau, Mélanie; Mocquet, Antoine; Lognonné, Philippe; Banerdt, W. Bruce

    2015-03-01

    The planned InSight mission will deliver a single seismic station containing 3-component broadband and short-period sensors to the surface of Mars in 2016. While much of the progress in understanding the Earth and Moon's interior has relied on the use of seismic networks for accurate location of sources, single station approaches can be applied to data returned from Mars in order to locate events and determine interior structure. In preparation for the data return from InSight, we use a terrestrial dataset recorded at the Global Seismic Network station BFO, located at the Black Forest Observatory in Germany, to verify an approach for event location and structure determination based on recordings of multiple orbit surface waves, which will be more favorable to record on Mars than Earth due to smaller planetary radius and potentially lower background noise. With this approach applied to events near the threshold of observability on Earth, we are able to determine epicentral distance within approximately 1° (corresponding to ∼60 km on Mars), and origin time within ∼30 s. With back azimuth determined from Rayleigh wave polarization, absolute locations are determined generally within an aperture of 10°, allowing for localization within large tectonic regions on Mars. With these locations, we are able to recover Earth mantle structure within ±5% (the InSight mission requirements for martian mantle structure) using 1D travel time inversions of P and S travel times for datasets of only 7 events. The location algorithm also allows for the measurement of great-circle averaged group velocity dispersion, which we measure between 40 and 200 s to scale the expected reliable frequency range of the InSight data from Earth to Mars data. Using the terrestrial data, we are able to resolve structure down to ∼200 km, but synthetic tests demonstrate we should be able to resolve martian structure to ∼400 km with the same frequency content given the smaller planetary size.

  20. Broadband calibration of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth four-string seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, M.; Diebold, J.; Doermann, L.; Nooner, S.; Webb, S. C.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Crone, T. J.; Holmes, R. C.

    2009-08-01

    The R/V Marcus G. Langseth is the first 3-D seismic vessel operated by the U.S. academic community. With up to a four-string, 36-element source and four 6-km-long solid state hydrophone arrays, this vessel promises significant new insights into Earth science processes. The potential impact of anthropogenic sound sources on marine life is an important topic to the marine seismic community. To ensure that operations fully comply with existing and future marine mammal permitting requirements, a calibration experiment was conducted in the Gulf of Mexico in 2007-2008. Results are presented from deep (˜1.6 km) and shallow (˜50 m) water sites, obtained using the full 36-element (6600 cubic inches) seismic source. This array configuration will require the largest safety radii, and the deep and shallow sites provide two contrasting operational environments. Results show that safety radii and the offset between root-mean-square and sound exposure level measurements were highly dependent on water depth.

  1. Pattern recognition applied to seismic signals of Llaima volcano (Chile): An evaluation of station-dependent classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curilem, Millaray; Huenupan, Fernando; Beltrán, Daniel; San Martin, Cesar; Fuentealba, Gustavo; Franco, Luis; Cardona, Carlos; Acuña, Gonzalo; Chacón, Max; Khan, M. Salman; Becerra Yoma, Nestor

    2016-04-01

    Automatic pattern recognition applied to seismic signals from volcanoes may assist seismic monitoring by reducing the workload of analysts, allowing them to focus on more challenging activities, such as producing reports, implementing models, and understanding volcanic behaviour. In a previous work, we proposed a structure for automatic classification of seismic events in Llaima volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in the Southern Andes, located in the Araucanía Region of Chile. A database of events taken from three monitoring stations on the volcano was used to create a classification structure, independent of which station provided the signal. The database included three types of volcanic events: tremor, long period, and volcano-tectonic and a contrast group which contains other types of seismic signals. In the present work, we maintain the same classification scheme, but we consider separately the stations information in order to assess whether the complementary information provided by different stations improves the performance of the classifier in recognising seismic patterns. This paper proposes two strategies for combining the information from the stations: i) combining the features extracted from the signals from each station and ii) combining the classifiers of each station. In the first case, the features extracted from the signals from each station are combined forming the input for a single classification structure. In the second, a decision stage combines the results of the classifiers for each station to give a unique output. The results confirm that the station-dependent strategies that combine the features and the classifiers from several stations improves the classification performance, and that the combination of the features provides the best performance. The results show an average improvement of 9% in the classification accuracy when compared with the station-independent method.

  2. Cerreto di Spoleto (Umbria-Italy): Seismic amplification at the ENEA local array stations

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldis, Dario

    2008-07-08

    The Nerina valley, where Borgo Cerreto is located, is surrounded by the Apennine mount chain at the top of which lies the historical centre of Cerreto di Spoleto. The study is part of a research project aiming at analysing natural disasters and their impact on the Italian cultural heritage. Within the framework of this research project, local seismic records were analysed for both the carbonate ridge and the bordering alluvial valley. The choice of Cerreto di Spoleto as a test site derives from the analysis of Italian seismic hazard maps, obtained in terms of peak ground velocity and taking into account regional geology. The maps highlight the considerable seismic hazard which characterises the Apennine belt and its possible increase due to the effect of alluvial deposits. To this aim, ENEA installed in the 80's an accelerometric array (CODISMA up to 2000 and, in the following years, ETNA; for more detailed description see [1]. The 14 October event, was recorded both at the roof of CSM and at BCT stations. This is important to check the features observed comparing the FAS of acceleration at CSM and BCT during the 26 September events. Unfortunately the station at CSM basement did not record the above mentioned events but several aftershocks were recorded at each array station. Velocimetric records of both ambient noise and small-magnitude earthquakes were analysed in order to identify amplification conditions. The analysis was carried out in the time domain, through directional energy evaluation, and in the frequency domain, through H/V spectral ratios and spectral ratios with respect to a reference station.

  3. Infrasound and seismic signals from Baikonur spaceport rocket launches recorded by Kazakh stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexandr; Sokolova, Inna; Mikhailova, Natalya

    2015-04-01

    The monitoring network of the Institute of Geophysical Researches, Kazakhstan consists of 2 infrasound arrays, 8 seismic arrays and 7 3C stations. 5 of these stations are a part of IMS CTBTO. The Institute of Geophysical Researches monitors round-the-clock many sorts of seismoacoustic events. Tens of rockets are launched every year from Baikonur spaceport located in Central Kazakhstan. Baikonur rockets fly over several regions of Kazakhstan. Kazakh monitoring stations record launches, rocket stage falls, satellite recovery and sometimes accidents. A catalog of events associated with such activity is built. Some waveform features are collected. The catalog also contains some kinematic and dynamic parameters of the events sources. The signals from accidents of Dnepr rocket of July 26, 2006 and Proton rocket of September 5, 2007 and of July 2, 2013 were studied in details. Discrimination of the events associated with spaceport activity and its exclusion from seismic bulletins allows improving the bulletins quality. And in case of accident this information helps to estimate the event parameters and to start recovery procedures in proper time.

  4. Broad-band calibration of marine seismic sources used by R/V Polarstern for academic research in polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, Monika; Boebel, Olaf; El Naggar, Saad; Jokat, Wilfried; Werner, Berthold

    2008-08-01

    Air guns and air-gun arrays of different volumes are used for scientific seismic surveys with R/V Polarstern in polar regions. To assess the potential risk of these research activities on marine mammal populations, knowledge of the sound pressure field of the seismic sources is essential. Therefore, a broad-band (0-80 kHz) calibration study was conducted at the Heggernes Acoustic Range, Norway. A GI (2.4 l), a G (8.5 l) and a Bolt gun (32.8 l) were deployed as single sources, 3 GI (7.4 l), 3 G (25.6 l) and 8 VLF™ Prakla-Seismos air guns (24.0 l) as arrays. Each configuration was fired along a line of 3-4 km length running between two hydrophone chains with receivers in 35, 100, 198 and 263 m depth. Peak-to-peak, zero-to-peak, rms and sound exposure levels (SEL) were analysed as functions of range. They show the typical dipole-like directivity of marine seismic sources with amplitude cancellation close to the sea surface, higher amplitudes in greater depths, and sound pressure levels which continuously decrease with range. Levels recorded during the approach are lower than during the departure indicating a shadowing effect of Polarsterns's hull. Backcalculated zero-to-peak source levels range from 224-240 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m. Spectral source levels are highest below 100 Hz and amount to 182-194 dB re 1 μPa Hz-1. They drop off continuously with range and frequency. At 1 kHz they are ~30 dB, at 80 kHz ~60 dB lower than the peak level. Above 1 kHz amplitude spectra are dominated by Polarstern's self-noise. From the rms and sound exposure levels of the deepest hydrophone radii for different thresholds are derived. For a 180 dB rms-level threshold radii maximally vary between 200 and 600 m, for a 186 dB SEL threshold between 50 and 300 m.

  5. Improving the Accuracy of Automatic Detections at Seismic Stations via Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggelsen, Carsten; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    We present a Machine Learning approach aiming for improving the accuracy of automatic detections of noise and signal at 3-component seismic stations. Using supervised learning in conjunction with the multivariate framework of Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs) we make use of historical data obtained from the LEB bulletin to train a classifier to capture the intrinsic characteristics of signal and noise patterns appearing in seismic data streams. On a per station basis this yields generative statistical models that essentially summarize and generalize the information implicitly contained in the LEB allowing for classifying future an previously unseen seismic data of the same kind. Also, the system provides a numerical value reflecting the classification confidence potentially aiding the analyst is correcting or identifying events that are non-typical. The system has the potential for being implemented in real time: both feature computation/extraction as well as classification work on data segments/windows and seismic patterns of varying length, e.g., 12 sec. Various features are considered including spectral features, polarization information and statistical moments and moment ratios. All features are derived from a time-frequency-(amplitude) decomposition of the raw waveform data for each component, taking the 6 frequency bands currently in use at IDC into account. These different feature sets give rise to different DBN structures (model-feature scenarios) that probabilistically relate the features to each other depending on empirical observations and physical knowledge available. 1 week of waveform data is considered for training both the signal and noise classes. The performance of the classifier is measured on a separate test set from the same week of data but also on a 1-month data set, where 4 weeks of data is distributed over a one year period. In the system evaluation both a static approach as well as a sliding-window approach is taken. Binary classification

  6. The RING and Seismic Network: Data Acquisition of Co-located Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, L.; Avallone, A.; Cattaneo, M.; Cecere, G.; Cogliano, R.; D'Agostino, N.; D'Ambrosio, C.; D'Anastasio, E.; Selvaggi, G.

    2007-12-01

    The plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia represents an interesting geodynamical region characterized by a complex pattern of deformation. First-order scientific problems regarding the existence of rigid blocks within the plate boundary, the present-day activity of the Calabrian subduction zone and the modes of release of seismic deformation are still awaiting for a better understanding. To address these issues, the INGV (Istituto Nazionale Geofisica e Vulcanlogia) deployed a permanent, integrated and real-time monitoring GPS network (RING) all over Italy. RING is now constituted by about 120 stations. The CGPS sites, acquiring at 1Hz and 30s sampling rate, are integrated either with broad band or very broad band seismometers and accelerometers for an improved definition of the seismically active regions. Most of the sites are connected to the acquisition centre (located in Rome and duplicated in Grottaminarda) through a satellite system (VSAT), while the remaining sites transmit data by Internet and classical phone connections. The satellite data transmission and the integration with seismic instruments makes this network one of the most innovative CGPS networks in Europe. The heterogeneity of the installed instrumentation, the transmission types and the increasing number of stations needed a central monitoring and acquisition system. A central acquisition system has been developed in Grottaminarda in southern Italy. Regarding the seismic monitoring we chose to use the open source system Earthworm, developed by USGS, with which we store waveforms and implement automatic localization of the seismic events occurring in the area. As most of the GPS sites are acquired by means of Nanometrics satellite technology, we developed a specific software (GpsView), written in Java, to monitor the state of health of those CGPS. This software receives GPS data from NaqsServer (Nanometrics acquisition system) and outputs information about the sites (i.e. approx position

  7. Seismic risk assessment as applied to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J.

    1984-08-01

    To assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its licensing and evaluation role, the NRC funded the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of developing tools and data bases to evaluate the risk of earthquake caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. This paper describes the SSMRP risk assessment methodology and the results generated by applying this methodology to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station. In addition to describing the failure probabilities and risk values, the effects of assumptions about plant configuration, plant operation, and dependence will be given.

  8. Extracting seismic attenuation coefficients from cross-correlations of ambient noise at linear triplets of stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri

    2015-11-01

    We develop and apply an algorithm for deriving interstation seismic attenuation from cross-correlations of ambient noise recorded by linear arrays. Theoretical results on amplitude decay due to attenuation are used to form a linear least-square inversion for interstation QR values of Rayleigh surface waves propagating along linear arrays having three or more stations. The noise wave field is assumed stationary within each day and the interstation distances should be greater than the employed wavelength. The inversion uses differences of logarithmic amplitude decay curves measured at different stations from cross-correlation functions within a given frequency band. The background attenuation between noise sources and receivers is effectively cancelled with this method. The site amplification factors are assumed constant (or following similar patterns) in the frequency band of interest. The inversion scheme is validated with synthetic tests using ambient noise generated by ray-theory-based calculations with heterogeneous attenuation and homogenous velocity structure. The interstation attenuation and phase velocity dispersion curves are inverted from cross-correlations of the synthetic data. The method is then applied to triplets of stations from the regional southern California seismic network crossing the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault, and a dense linear array crossing the southern San Jacinto Fault zone. Bootstrap technique is used to derive empirical mean and confidence interval for the obtained inverse Q values. The results for the regional stations yield QR values around 25 for a frequency band 0.2-0.36 Hz. The results for the San Jacinto fault zone array give QR values of about 6-30 for frequencies in the range 15-25 Hz.

  9. Eruption dynamics at Mount St. Helens imaged from broadband seismic waveforms: Interaction of the shallow magmatic and hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, G.P.; Chouet, B.A.; Dawson, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    The current eruption at Mount St. Helens is characterized by dome building and shallow, repetitive, long-period (LP) earthquakes. Waveform cross-correlation reveals remarkable similarity for a majority of the earthquakes over periods of several weeks. Stacked spectra of these events display multiple peaks between 0.5 and 2 Hz that are common to most stations. Lower-amplitude very-long-period (VLP) events commonly accompany the LP events. We model the source mechanisms of LP and VLP events in the 0.5-4 s and 8-40 s bands, respectively, using data recorded in July 2005 with a 19-station temporary broadband network. The source mechanism of the LP events includes: 1) a volumetric component modeled as resonance of a gently NNW-dipping, steam-filled crack located directly beneath the actively extruding part of the new dome and within 100 m of the crater floor and 2) a vertical single force attributed to movement of the overlying dome. The VLP source, which also includes volumetric and single-force components, is 250 m deeper and NNW of the LP source, at the SW edge of the 1980s lava dome. The volumetric component points to the compression and expansion of a shallow, magma-filled sill, which is subparallel to the hydrothermal crack imaged at the LP source, coupled with a smaller component of expansion and compression of a dike. The single-force components are due to mass advection in the magma conduit. The location, geometry and timing of the sources suggest the VLP and LP events are caused by perturbations of a common crack system.

  10. The seismic wave absorption in the crust and upper mantle in the vicinity of the Kislovodsk seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, V. A.; Pavlenko, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    The Q-factor estimates of the Earth's crust and upper mantle as the functions of frequency ( Q( f)) are obtained for the seismic S-waves at frequencies up to 35 Hz. The estimates are based on the data for 40 earthquakes recorded by the Kislovodsk seismic station since 2000. The magnitudes of these events are M W > 3.8, the sources are located in the depth interval from 1 to 165 km, and the epicentral distances range from 100 to 300 km. The Q-factor estimates are obtained by the methods developed by Aki and Rautian et al., which employ the suppression of the effects of the source radiation spectrum and local site responses in the S-wave spectra by the coda waves measured at a fixed lapse time (time from the first arrival). The radiation pattern effects are cancelled by averaging over many events whose sources are distributed in a wide azimuthal sector centered at the receiving site. The geometrical spreading was specified in the form of a piecewise-continuous function of distance which behaves as 1/ R at the distances from 1 to 50 km from the source, has a plateau at 1/50 in the interval from 50-70 km to 130-150 km, and decays as 1 {√ R } beyond 130-150 km. For this geometrical spreading model and some of its modifications, the following Q-factor estimates are obtained: Q( f) 85 f 0.9 at the frequencies ranging from 1 to 20 Hz and Q( f) 75 f 1.0 at the frequencies ranging from 1 to 35 Hz.

  11. Streaky noise in seismic normal mode band observed at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, H.; Shibuya, K.; Doi, K.; Aoyama, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Background free oscillations are known as continuous and global signals on noise level in seismic normal mode band. These were found from record of superconducting gravimeter (SG) at Syowa Station, Antarctica in 1998 [Nawa et al. 1998], and then were confirmed at various sites. Other unknown slightly broad spectrum peaks were also found as streak on spectrogram of Syowa SG data in seismic normal mode band. But the feature is not found in gravimeter and seismometer records from any other sites, including IDA gravimeter record at SPA station, Antarctica. New SG (SG058), that is the third generation at Syowa Station, has started to observe since January 2010. The second generation SG (CT43, 2004-2009) had strong drift. The auxiliary barometer was less resolution (0.1 hPa) and its pressure record had a lot of steps and spikes occurring frequently by housing problem. To study in seismic normal mode band, high quality pressure data is needed to remove atmospheric pressure effect to gravity from SG data because a nominal admittance factor for its effect is -3 nm/s^2/hPa. The new barometer of SG058 system has a resolution of 0.001 hPa, and the housing problem has been fixed. In this study, we investigated the unknown streaky noise in seismic normal mode band using spectrograms of the new SG and other data observed at Syowa Station. The slightly broad spectrum peaks are clearly found at 2.5, 3.5, 7.6, 8.2 13.2, 16.7 mHz from the SG data during January - May 2010. Strength of these peaks shows time variation and it is not necessarily for phase to agree with each others. These unknown peaks are not intrinsic noise of the first generation SG (TT70, 1993 - 2003) but are local or regional signal (noise) around Syowa Station. The atmospheric pressure doesn’t have this steaky feature. The sea level variation causes noise level of Syowa SG data to be high by the effect of attraction and loading [Nawa et al. 2003]. Because the noise spectral peaks less than 3 mHz are removed by

  12. Passive seismic experiment - A summary of current status. [Apollo-initiated lunar surface station data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The data set obtained from the four-station Apollo seismic network including signals from approximately 11,800 events, is surveyed. Some refinement of the lunar model will result, but its gross features remain the same. Attention is given to the question of a small, molten lunar core, the answer to which remains dependent on analysis of signals from a far side impact. Seventy three sources of repeating, deep moonquakes have been identified, thirty nine of which have been accurately located. Concentrated at depths from 800 to 1000 km, the periodicities of these events have led to the hypothesis that they are generated by tidal stresses. Lunar seismic data has also indicated that the meteoroid population is ten times lower than originally determined from earth based observations. Lunar seismic activity is much lower and mountainous masses show no sign of sinking, in contrast to earth, as a result of the lunar crust being four times thicker. While much work remains to be done, significant correlation between terrestrial and lunar observations can be seen.

  13. Fault Characterization in the Sea of Marmara (Turkey) Using OBS and Land Seismic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinar, Ali; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Comoglu, Mustafa; Polat, Remzi; Turhan, Fatih; Takahashi, Narumi; Kalafat, Dogan; Citak, Seckin

    2016-04-01

    The fault segments of the North Anatolian fault (NAF) occurring between Tekirdag basin and Kumburgaz basin are investigated using 15 Ocean Bottom Seismic (OBS) stations. The OBS stations were deployed closely around the fault trace of NAF. During the observation period from September, 2014 until July, 2015 more than one thousand microearthquakes were determined. No uniform seismicity pattern was observed along strike and along dip of the fault segments in an area spanning 100 km from East to West of Marmara Sea. The western fault segments exhibit relatively higher and deeper seismic activity while the eastern segment show shallower and relatively lower seismic activity. Integrating the first motion polarity data from the land based stations of Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) with the polarity data acquired from the OBS stations the focal mechanisms of 173 micro-earthquakes were determined. Most of the fault plane solutions indicate predominantly strike-slip mechanism. Several clusters of events are identified along the E-W extending NAF. We derive a focal mechanism for the individual events whenever the number of the polarities are sufficient. In addition, simultaneous inversion of the polarities in a cluster are done to retrieve a stress tensor along with focal mechanisms of the individual events in a cluster. A unique cluster of focal mechanisms was obtained from the events taking place in Western High (WH) region located between Tekirdag Basin (TB) and Central Basin (CB). Several features of this cluster are noticeable; 1) the site is the most seismically active part in Marmara Sea, 2) the site is the locus of the deepest events in the Sea of Marmara, 3) the shallower part of this segment is seismically less active, 4) two subgroups of P-axes of focal mechanisms exist; one oriented NW-SE and other oriented in N-S direction despite the proximity of the location of the events giving clues on the faulting dynamics. The N-S oriented P

  14. Geologic interpretation of seismic data, relocation Route 1 cut, Stations 25-36 Ballard Estate in Topsfield, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the surface and subsurface conditions between stations 25 and 36 of the proposed relocation of the Newburyport Turnpike, Route 1, Topsfield, Mass. Reconnaissance seismic work was performed at the site in September 1949. Because that work showed bedrock near the surface over an extensive area where a deep cut was to be made, a more detailed program of seismic work was performed in September, October, and November 1949. This report comprises all of the seismic work performed at the site. It was done as part of a cooperative project of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  15. Basin-scale Green's functions from the ambient seismic field recorded by MeSO-net stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viens, Loïc.; Koketsu, Kazuki; Miyake, Hiroe; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2016-04-01

    Seismic waves propagating through the Earth can be significantly affected by velocity structures such as sedimentary basins. We investigate the propagation characteristics of seismic waves across the Kanto basin, Japan, using Green's functions extracted from the ambient seismic field. We use two stations situated on the eastern and southern edges of the basin as virtual sources, and approximately 420 stations, which are mainly a part of the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net), as receivers. Using seismometers aligned along two straight lines with the virtual sources, we find that several types of waves can be recovered, each with different sensitivities to the layers that compose the basin. We also show that after amplitude calibration, the extracted Green's functions can accurately simulate the seismic waves of two moderate Mw 4-5 shallow earthquakes that occurred close to the virtual sources. Furthermore, we find that the distribution of the 5% damped pseudovelocity response at a period of 6 s computed from the records of each event and the Green's function waveforms have similar amplification patterns. This study supports the fact that dense networks recording continuously the ambient seismic field in metropolitan areas can be used to accurately assess seismic hazard at high spatial resolution.

  16. Chances and limits of single-station seismic event clustering by unsupervised pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, Benjamin; Guggenmos, Matthias; Joswig, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    Automatic classification of local seismic events which are only recorded at single stations poses great challenges because of weak hypocentre constraints. This study investigates how single-station event clusters relate to geographic hypocentre regions and common source processes. Typical applications arise in local seismic networks where reliable ground truth by a dense temporal network precedes or follows a sparse (permanent) installation. The seismic signals for this study comprise a 3-month subset from a field campaign to map subduction below northern Chile (PISCO '94). Due to favourable ground noise conditions in the Atacama desert, the data set contains an abundance of shallow and deeper earthquakes, and many quarry explosions. Often event signatures overlap, posing a challenge to any signal processing scheme. Pattern recognition must work on reduced seismograms to restrict parameter dimensionality. Continuous parameter extraction based on noise-adapted spectrograms was chosen instead of discrete representation by, for example, amplitudes, onset times or spectral ratios to ensure consideration of potentially hidden features. Visualization of the derived feature vectors for human inspection and template matching algorithms was hereby possible. Because event classes shall comprise earthquake regions regardless of magnitude, clustering based on amplitudes is prevented by proper normalization of feature vectors. Principal component analysis is applied to further reduce the number of features used to train a self-organizing map (SOM). The SOM will topologically arrange prototypes of each event class in a 2-D map. Overcoming the restrictions of this black-box approach, the arranged prototypes could be transformed back to spectrograms to allow for visualization and interpretation of event classes. The final step relates prototypes to ground-truth information, confirming the potential of automated, coarse-grain hypocentre clustering based on single-station

  17. Geologic interpretation of seismic data relocation route 1: proposed cut at stations 127-135 in Danvers, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    The layout for the reconstruction of the Newburyport Turnpike (Route 1) proposed cit at stations 127-135, in Danvers, Mass., shows a deep cut through the western end of a hill between stations 127 and 135. Because of the depth of this cut seismic work was done at the site in September 1949. The work constitutes part of the cooperative program of the Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  18. SCARS operations final report for the NORESS and ARCESS arrays. [System Control And Receiving Station (SCARS), Norwegian Experimental Seismic System (NORESS), Arctic Experimental Seismic System (ARCESS)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, S.J.

    1992-05-01

    This SCARS (System Control and Receiving Station) Operations Final Report for the Norwegian Experimental Seismic System (NORESS) and Arctic Experimental Seismic System (ARCESS) Arrays is a history of the operations of these projects. It is intended for those who were directly involved in the NORESS and ARCESS projects, as well as for those who are involved in similar projects. Included is a description of the locations and configuration of each array, the function and performance of the field systems, and a summation of the wide range of tasks performed at SCARS.

  19. Siting of USArray Seismic Stations in North Carolina and southern Virginia: Experience of NC-1 Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Howard, J.; Horne, T.

    2012-12-01

    The USArray component of the EarthScope, a transportable array of 400 seismometers installed in a grid about 70 km apart, is in the next two years entering its final stage with station deployment along the Atlantic coast of the United States. Here, we present the experience of the student-faculty team from North Carolina Central University (NCCU) in finding and documenting the suitable sites for the twenty five USArray stations in North Carolina and southern Virginia. The ideal sites are easily accessible yet far from traffic and other sources of noise, with good cell phone coverage, sun exposure and out of flood-prone areas. Although the initial selection of potential locations was done using geospatial mapping and analysis software provided by EarthScope, finding and finalizing the sites involved driving more then 1,000 miles each week for over two months inspecting possible site locations. Aside from driving, the majority of time was spent talking about the EarthScope project and hosting of USArray stations to mostly reluctant landowners. In addition to facing various challenges in finding appropriate sites due to land use issues, such as suburban sprawl of central North Carolina, or topography factors, such as low lying flood prone coastal areas, by far the major challenge was finding the landowners willing to host the seismic station for the necessary three years. In addition to involving students from an HBCU in seismology related project and increasing the visibility of NCCU geophysics program in the University and local community through publicity releases in local media and on university web site, the project had an important outreach component. As North Carolina is located along the seismically quiet, passive Atlantic margin, most residents are not familiar with earthquakes and seismology and the siting experience provided students an opportunity to practice explaining the earthquake research to the general public. The dialog also highlighted science

  20. Seismic reflection exploration of geothermal reservoir at Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alay G., Gebregiorgis

    The Primary objective of this study is to increase geologic and tectonic understanding of the geothermal resources at the Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada. The seismic reflection method is employed to study faults, fractures and other tectonic structures in the subsurface in order to identify geothermal drill targets. The efficiency of geothermal systems is strongly dependent on water circulation. Discrete faults may be permeable and provide pathways for water flow depending on the fracture density. It is therefore desirable to detect and map faults and fracture zones and characterize their physical properties when evaluating a geothermal prospect. The seismic data for this project were provided by the NAS environmental research program in Ridgecrest, CA. However, the data collection information was not available so the work includes determining the line geometry and mapping shot points to field files in order to process the data. ProMAX 2D(TM) is the software used to determine the geometry and to process the data. Data processing includes eliminating noise, datum and refraction statics, trace muting, bandpass filter, automatic gain control, amplitude recovery, CMP sorting, velocity analysis and NMO correction, stacking and migration. The results of this study indicate the presence of thick basin fill including Tertiary and Quaternary sediments underlain by Tertiary basalts which are interpreted to be capping rocks for the geothermal reservoirs. This seismic reflection study also reveals the presence of strongly fractured pre-Tertiary basement complex with their top at about 1500m on the north and west and about 900 m on the eastern and southern part of the study area.

  1. SEISMIC DATA FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING IN THE ARABIAN PENINSULA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2004-07-08

    We report results from the third and final year of our project (ROA0101-35) to collect seismic event and waveform data recorded in and around the Arabian Peninsula. This effort involves several elements. We are working with King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology to collect data from the Saudi National Seismic Network, that consists of 38 digital three-component stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period). We have an ongoing collaboration with the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, which runs the eight station Kuwait National Seismic Network. We installed two temporary broadband stations in the United Arab Emirates (funded by NNSA NA-24 Office of Non-Proliferation & International Security). In this paper we present a summary of data collected under these efforts including integration of the raw data into LLNL's Seismic Research Database and preliminary analysis of souce parameters and earth structure.

  2. Seismic-monitoring changes and the remote deployment of seismic stations (seismic spider) at Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005: Chapter 7 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McChesney, Patrick J.; Couchman, Marvin R.; Moran, Seth C.; Lockhart, Andrew B.; Swinford, Kelly J.; LaHusen, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    The instruments in place at the start of volcanic unrest at Mount St. Helens in 2004 were inadequate to record the large earthquakes and monitor the explosions that occurred as the eruption developed. To remedy this, new instruments were deployed and the short-period seismic network was modified. A new method of establishing near-field seismic monitoring was developed, using remote deployment by helicopter. The remotely deployed seismic sensor was a piezoelectric accelerometer mounted on a surface-coupled platform. Remote deployment enabled placement of stations within 250 m of the active vent.

  3. Seismic structural fragility investigation for the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (Project I); SONGS-1 AFWS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.

    1982-04-01

    An evaluation of the seismic capacities of several of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS-1) structures was conducted to determine input to the overall probabilistic methodology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Seismic structural fragilities to be used as input consist of median seismic capacities and their variabilities due to randomness and uncertainty. Potential failure modes were identified for each of the SONGS-1 structures included in this study by establishing the seismic load-paths and comparing expected load distributions to available capacities for the elements of each load-path. Particular attention was given to possible weak links and details. The more likely failure modes were screened for more detailed investigation.

  4. The installation campaign of 9 seismic stations around the KTB site to test anisotropy detection by the Receiver Function Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, I.; Anselmi, M.; Apoloner, M. T.; Qorbani, E.; Gribovski, K.; Bokelmann, G.

    2015-09-01

    The project at hand is a field test around the KTB (Kontinentale Tiefbohrung) site in the Oberpfalz, Southeastern Germany, at the northwestern edge of the Bohemian Massif. The region has been extensively studied through the analysis of several seismic reflection lines deployed around the drilling site. The deep borehole had been placed into gneiss rocks of the Zone Erbendorf-Vohenstrauss. Drilling activity lasted from 1987 to 1994, and it descended down to a depth of 9101 m. In our experiment, we aim to recover structural information as well as anisotropy of the upper crust using the receiver function technique. This retrieved information is the basis for comparing the out-coming anisotropy amount and orientation with information of rock samples from up to 9 km depth, and with high-frequency seismic experiments around the drill site. For that purpose, we installed 9 seismic stations, and recorded seismicity continuously for two years from June 2012 to July 2014.

  5. Characterizing the ambient seismic wavefield for upper crustal imaging: energy sources and station deployment protocols in an ocean island setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, A. M.; Heckscher, N.; Graham, L.; Arroucau, P.; Rawlinson, N.

    2009-12-01

    Techniques using ambient seismic energy have become powerful tools in the imaging of the Earth's lithosphere. In this work we investigate the potential for using ambient energy to image the upper crust at the highest possible resolution. Such images are sought-after in deducing regional-scale 3D geological structure. They are critical to activities which use the Earth's crust (e.g. hot dry rock geothermal energy production, carbon sequestration) as well as placing fundamental constraints on the crustal architecture which defines tectonic structure and evolution. We have deployed a line of variously spaced seismic stations in a region of relatively well-constrained regional geology in Eastern Tasmania. Located south of mainland Australia, in the 'roaring 40's' southerly latitudes, the ambient seismic energy is of considerable amplitude. We are able to characterise the ambient seismic wavefield: investigating the influence of station deployment geometry, deployment and processing protocols, and ocean and atmospheric conditions on the amplitude and frequency content of the signals derived from correlated waveforms. We also investigate the potential of using diffuse seismic sources from a highway and railway using ambient energy techniques. We find that, in this ocean-dominated island setting, a correlated signal of sufficient strength to model for structure is obtained in a few days. The relationship between station separation and the dominant wavelengths in the correlated signals places a minimum limit on station separations which are usable with standard modelling techniques. Hence, in this environment, crustal imaging may be best carried out using deployments with overlapping, frequently moved (or numerous and short-deployed), sets of station pairs. The potential for using cultural noise sources is limited by the dominance of the natural noise sources in the ambient wavefield.

  6. Single-station cross-correlation analysis of ambient seismic noise: application to stations in the surroundings of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobiger, Manuel; Wegler, Ulrich; Shiomi, Katsuhiko; Nakahara, Hisashi

    2014-07-01

    We introduce the single-station cross-correlation (SC) technique of processing ambient seismic noise and compare its results with the established cross-correlation (CC) and autocorrelation (AC) techniques. While CC is the correlation of the signals of two seismic stations with each other and AC is the correlation of a signal with itself, SC is the correlation of two different components of a single three-component seismic sensor. The comparison of the three different correlation techniques shows that CCs give the best results at frequencies below 0.5 Hz and that SCs give the best results at higher frequencies. In all three processing techniques, ambient seismic noise is correlated in order to reconstruct the Green's function describing the wave propagation between the first and the second sensor. By relating the coda parts of the daily Green's functions with the long-term reference Green's functions, shear wave velocity changes are determined. Here, we apply this technique to the data of 20 seismic stations in the surroundings of the fault zone of the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake (MW = 6.9), which occurred on 2008 June 13, UTC (2008 June 14, Japan Standard Time) in the northern part of the Japanese island Honshu. The data range from 2008 January to 2011 June and therefore include the Tohoku earthquake (MW = 9.0), which occurred on 2011 March 11, off the coast of northern Honshu. The data are analysed in five different frequency ranges between 0.125 and 4.0 Hz. The data show coseismic velocity changes for both earthquakes followed by a post-seismic velocity recovery. In general, the coseismic velocity changes increase with frequency. For the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake, the strongest velocity changes occur close to the fault zone. Quickly recovering coseismic velocity changes can be separated from changes not recovering during the study period. For the Tohoku earthquake, the complete area is affected by coseismic velocity changes. A modelling of the depth of

  7. Continuous H/V Spectral Ratio Analysis of Ambient Noise Recorded by Stationary Seismic Stations to Improve Microzonation Results Obtained by Mobile Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Noten, K.; Lecocq, T.; Meyer, L.; Molron, J.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating the resonance frequency and amplification factor of unconsolidated sediments by H/V spectral ratio (HVSR) analysis of seismic ambient noise has been widely used since Nakamura's proposal in 1989. The fundamental frequency (f0) usually correlates well with the thickness of unconsolidated sediments above the bedrock. To measure f0 properly, Nakamura suggested to perform microzonation surveys at night when the artificial microtremor is small and does not fully disrupt the ambient seismic noise. As nightly fieldwork is not always a reasonable demand, we propose an alternative workflow of Nakamura's technique to improve the quality of HVSR results obtained by ambient noise measurements of mobile stations during the day. This new workflow includes the automated H/V calculation of one year of continuous seismic data of a stationary/permanent station located nearby the sites selected for microzonation. By means of an automated python script, the daily, weekly, monthly and seasonally variations of the fundamental frequency and the H/V amplitude at the site where the stationary station is installed are evaluated. Continuous HVSR analysis of sites with constant bedrock depth shows that the changes in the determined f0 and H/V amplitude are dominantly caused by the human behaviour which is stored in the ambient seismic noise (e.g. later onset of traffic in a weekend, quiet Sundays, differences between daily/nightly activity,…). This continuous analysis allows the characterisation of the deviation of the measured f0 to the true f0 throughout the whole year! Consequently, as mobile stations are affected by the same variation of the ambient noise, a correction factor can be applied on the calculated f0 of individual measurements during the microzonation survey and a proper Vs can be estimated. In this presentation, we apply this workflow to two different case studies; i.e. a rural site with a shallow bedrock depth of 30 m and an urban site (Brussels, capital of

  8. Seismic noise level variation in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, D.; Shin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The variations of seismic background noise in South Korea have been investigated by means of power spectral analysis. The Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and the Korea Meteorological Administation (KMA) have national wide seismic networks in South Korea, and, in the end of 2007, there are 30 broadband stations which have been operating for more than a year. In this study, we have estimated the power spectral density of seismic noise for 30 broadband stations from 2005 to 2007. Since we estimate PSDs from a large dataset of continuous waveform in this study, a robust PSD estimate of McNamara and Buland (2004) is used. In the frequency range 1-5 Hz, the diurnal variations of noise are observed at most of stations, which are especially larger at coastal stations and at insular than at inland. Some stations shows daily difference of diurnal variations, which represents that cultural activities contribute to the noise level of a station. The variation of number of triggered stations, however, shows that cultural noise has little influence on the detection capability of seismic network in South Korea. Seasonal variations are observed well in the range 0.1-0.5 Hz, while much less found in the frequency range 1-5 Hz. We observed that strong peaks in the range 0.1-0.5 Hz occur at the summer when Pacific typhoons are close to the Korean Peninsula.

  9. Sources of high frequency seismic noise: insights from a dense network of ~250 stations in northern Alsace (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, Jerome; Blachet, Antoine; Lehujeur, Maximilien

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring local or regional seismic activity requires stations having a low level of background seismic noise at frequencies higher than few tenths of Hertz. Network operators are well aware that the seismic quality of a site depends on several aspects, among them its geological setting and the proximity of roads, railways, industries or trees. Often, the impact of each noise source is only qualitatively known which precludes estimating the quality of potential future sites before they are tested or installed. Here, we want to take advantage of a very dense temporary network deployed in Northern Alsace (France) to assess the effect of various kinds of potential sources on the level of seismic noise observed in the frequency range 0.2-50 Hz. In September 2014, more than 250 seismic stations (FairfieldNodal@ Zland nodes with 10Hz vertical geophone) have been installed every 1.5 km over a ~25km diameter disc centred on the deep geothermal sites of Soultz-sous-Forêts and Rittershoffen. This region exhibits variable degrees of human imprints from quite remote areas to sectors with high traffic roads and big villages. It also encompasses both the deep sedimentary basin of the Rhine graben and the piedmont of the Vosges massif with exposed bedrock. For each site we processed the continuous data to estimate probability density functions of the power spectral densities. At frequencies higher than 1 Hz most sites show a clear temporal modulation of seismic noise related to human activity with the well-known variations between day and night and between weekdays and weekends. Moreover we observe a clear evolution of the spatial distribution of seismic noise levels with frequency. Basically, between 0.5 and 4 Hz the geological setting modulates the level of seismic noise. At higher frequencies, the amplitude of seismic noise appears mostly related to the distance to nearby roads. Based on road maps and traffic estimation, a forward approach is performed to model the induced

  10. Physically based probabilistic seismic hazard analysis using broadband ground motion simulation: a case study for the Prince Islands Fault, Marmara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Aydin; Fahjan, Yasin M.; Hutchings, Lawrence J.; Pınar, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The main motivation for this study was the impending occurrence of a catastrophic earthquake along the Prince Island Fault (PIF) in the Marmara Sea and the disaster risk around the Marmara region, especially in Istanbul. This study provides the results of a physically based probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) methodology, using broadband strong ground motion simulations, for sites within the Marmara region, Turkey, that may be vulnerable to possible large earthquakes throughout the PIF segments in the Marmara Sea. The methodology is called physically based because it depends on the physical processes of earthquake rupture and wave propagation to simulate earthquake ground motion time histories. We included the effects of all considerable-magnitude earthquakes. To generate the high-frequency (0.5-20 Hz) part of the broadband earthquake simulation, real, small-magnitude earthquakes recorded by a local seismic array were used as empirical Green's functions. For the frequencies below 0.5 Hz, the simulations were obtained by using synthetic Green's functions, which are synthetic seismograms calculated by an explicit 2D /3D elastic finite difference wave propagation routine. By using a range of rupture scenarios for all considerable-magnitude earthquakes throughout the PIF segments, we produced a hazard calculation for frequencies of 0.1-20 Hz. The physically based PSHA used here followed the same procedure as conventional PSHA, except that conventional PSHA utilizes point sources or a series of point sources to represent earthquakes, and this approach utilizes the full rupture of earthquakes along faults. Furthermore, conventional PSHA predicts ground motion parameters by using empirical attenuation relationships, whereas this approach calculates synthetic seismograms for all magnitudes of earthquakes to obtain ground motion parameters. PSHA results were produced for 2, 10, and 50 % hazards for all sites studied in the Marmara region.

  11. Seismic azimuthal anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere from broadband surface wave analysis of OBS array records at 60 Ma seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Kawakatsu, H.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed seismic ambient noise and teleseismic waveforms of nine broadband ocean bottom seismometers deployed at a 60 Ma seafloor in the southeastward of Tahiti island, the South Pacific, by the Tomographic Investigation by seafloor ARray Experiment for the Society hotspot project. We first obtained one-dimensional shear wave velocity model beneath the array from average phase velocities of Rayleigh waves at a broadband period range of 5-200 s. The obtained model shows a large velocity reduction at depths between 40 and 80 km, where the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary might exist. We then estimated shear wave azimuthal anisotropy at depths of 20-100 km by measuring azimuthal dependence of phase velocities of Rayleigh waves. The obtained model shows peak-to-peak intensity of the azimuthal anisotropy of 2%-4% with the fastest azimuth of NW-SE direction both in the lithosphere and asthenosphere. This result suggests that the ancient flow frozen in the lithosphere is not perpendicular to the strike of the ancient mid-ocean ridge but is roughly parallel to the ancient plate motion at depths of 20-60 km. The fastest azimuths in the current asthenosphere are subparallel to current plate motion at depths of 60-100 km. Additional shear wave splitting analysis revealed possible perturbations of flow in the mantle by the hot spot activities and implied the presence of azimuthal anisotropy in the asthenosphere down to a depth of 190-210 km.

  12. ANSS Backbone Station Installation and Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meremonte, M.; Leeds, A.; Overturf, D.; McMillian, J.; Allen, J.; McNamara, D.

    2004-12-01

    During 2004 several new broadband seismic stations have been deployed as a part of the USGS's Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone and regional networks. New stations include: ERPA, MNTX, OGLA, AMTX, NATX, KCCO, BMO, MARC, TZTN, LAO, DGMT, REDW, KSU1, MOOW, TPAW, LOHW, RAMW. Permanent station locations were chosen to minimize the local noise conditions by recording continuous data and using a quantitative analysis of the statistical distribution of noise power estimates. For each one-hour segment of continuous data, a power spectral density (PSD) is estimated and smoothed in full octave averages at 1/8 octave intervals. Powers for each 1/8 period interval were then accumulated in one dB power bins. A statistical analysis of power bins yields probability density functions (PDFs) as a function of noise power for each of the octave bands at each station and component. Examination of earthquake signal, artifacts related to station operation and episodic cultural noise in the PDFs allow us to estimate both the overall station quality and the level of earth noise at each potential backbone site. The main function of a seismic network, such as the ANSS, is to provide high quality data for earthquake monitoring, source studies, and Earth structure research. The utility of seismic data is greatly increased when noise levels are reduced. A good quantification and understanding of seismic noise is a first step at reducing noise levels in seismic data and improving overall data quality from the ANSS backbone network.

  13. The current state of seismic monitoring in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Haslinger, F.; Diehl, T.; Cauzzi, C.; Plenkers, K.; Kästli, P.; Fäh, D.; Wiemer, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Swiss Seismological Service at ETH Zurich (SED) operates both the national strong motion and broadband permanent seismic networks in Switzerland, as well as supporting local real-time densifications related to projects (such as geothermal explorations and major tunneling) and a mobile pool for national and international deployments related to research and aftershock studies. This submission provides an overview of the current status of network monitoring in Switzerland. A digital high gain network has been operating since 1974 and was upgraded to a continuously recording realtime modern 24 bit broadband network comprising 30 stations from 1999-2002, with station spacing averaging ~30km across the nation. Various improvements and densifications since then have raised the number of broadband sensors to 45 and added co-located strong motion sensors at 13 sites. A notable recent densification is in the NE of Switzerland, where the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) have funded an additional 10 broadband stations (including 3 100-200m deep borehole short period stations) in order to reduce the earthquake detection threshold and increase location accuracy in regions that are identified as potential deep nuclear waste storage sites. A strong motion network has been maintained since 1990, comprising 70 12-16 bit triggered sensors located predominantly in free-field urban sites but also including arrays on dams. The free-field network is in the midst of an upgrade (2009-2018), with 30 new stations already installed from the eventual 100 new free-field 24-bit real-time continuous stations. A project has just begun to upgrade the Swiss broadband network, which will co-locate strong-motion sensors at existing broadband sites; assess and implement improvements of installation quality, e.g. by shallow post-hole installations rather than surface vaults; and potentially fill remaining gaps in station coverage. The seismic network has

  14. The Belgian National Seismic Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Camp, M.; Lecocq, T.; Vanneste, K.; Rapagnani, G.; Martin, H.; Devos, F.; Bukasa, B.; Hendrickx, M.; Collin, F.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) is responsible for the seismic activity monitoring in Belgium. For this purpose the ROB operates a network of 24 seismic stations. In addition 18 accelerographs have been installed since 2001 in the most seismic active zones. Seismometers allow detecting and localizing any earthquake of magnitude larger than 1.0 in Belgium and surrounding regions. The location of the accelerometric stations is chosen in function of the type of sub-soil and in some places in function of the nearness of important infrastructures as well. Seven seismic stations are now sending their data in real time to the Observatory (in Uccle) using ADSL lines. This will be increased in a near future. Among them 3 broad-band stations are also sending data to the ORFEUS and IRIS data centres. IRIS also receives data from the Belgian superconducting gravimeter. In addition, in 2010, a broadband borehole seismometer is to be installed at the Princess Elizabeth Antarctic station (71°57' S - 23°20' E), on the bedrock, 180 km away from the coastline. Recently a low-cost seismic alert system was developed for the Belgian territory, based on the connection flow on the ROB website (http://www.seismology.be), in parallel to an automatic control of the "Did you feel it ?" macroseismic inquiries, implemented in 2002. The alert is then confirmed at the latest by the seismic signals from five seismic stations that appear on the website with a delay of more or less ten minutes. It was successfully tested during the earthquake sequence that has been observed in the region at the southwest of Brussels since July 2008.

  15. Multi-Parameter GEOSCOPE Land Stations and Ocean Bottom Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, E.; Roult, G.; Montagner, J.; Karczewski, J.; Geoscope Group,.

    2002-12-01

    Since the mid-eighties, the number of high quality broadband stations installed over the world has increased in a spectacular way and these stations cover now most of the emerged lands, with a higher concentration in the northern hemisphere between the latitudes 0 and 60N. The GEOSCOPE program has been the first global network of 3-component broadband seismic stations and has contributed to the elaboration of the FDSN. The 25 broadband GEOSCOPE stations fulfill the FDSN criteria, the data are stored in data-centers at the IPGP and IRIS DMC and are accessible through the netdc procedure (email to netdc@ipgp.jussieu.fr) or via the web. GEOSCOPE data have contributed to the major progresses of our knowledge of the earth interior. The earthquake CMT are now determined in a routine manner and the temporal history of the seismic source is accessible for the largest earthquakes. The geographical distribution of GEOSCOPE stations, specially in the southern hemisphere, has also played an important role in improving the resolution of global tomographic models. Recent P-wave models give high resolution images of subducted slabs whereas recent S-wave models have enable to discover the two super-swells. The evolution of the GEOSCOPE program is now focused on the installation of multi-parameter stations including 3-component broadband seismic sensors, pressure gauge, thermometer and GPS receivers. These stations will enable to decrease the seismic noise, and -among others- to better characterize the background free oscillations of the earth. The seismic station earth coverage is limited by the presence of oceans and the next step is the installation of ocean bottom broadband stations. For this purpose, in 1992, a first temporary station sismobs/OFM has been working for 2 weeks, along the mid atlantic ridge. In 1997, an international multi-parameter station, MOISE has been operating during 3 months in the Monterey Bay. The further step is the installation of the station NERO in a

  16. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    with ONEV and BME, installed 4 seismic stations with financial support from the Inter-American Development Bank and the Haitian Government. The 4 stations include strong motion and broad-band sensors, complementing the 8 sensors initially installed. The stations communicate via SATMEX5 with the Canadian HUB, which sends the data back to Haiti with minimum delay. In the immediate future, data transfer will be improved with the installation of a main antenna for data reception and the Seismic Warning Center of Port-au-Prince. A bidirectional satellite communication is considered of fundamental importance for robust real-time data transmission that is not affected in the case of a catastrophic event.

  17. A New Standard Installation Method of the Offline Seismic Observation Station in Heavy Snowfall Area of Tohoku Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirahara, S.; Nakayama, T.; Hori, S.; Sato, T.; Chiba, Y.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2015-12-01

    Soon after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, seismic activity of Tohoku region, NE Japan is induced in the inland area of Akita prefecture and the border area between Fukushima and Yamagata prefectures. We plan to install a total of 80 offline seismic observation stations in these areas for studying the effect of megathrust earthquake on the activities of inland earthquakes. In our project, maintenance will be held twice-a-year for 4 years from 2015 by using 2.0Hz short-period 3-component seismometer, KVS-300 and ultra-low-power data logger, EDR-X7000 (DC12V 0.08W power supply). We installed seismometer on the rock surface or the slope of the natural ground at the possible sites confirmed with low noise level to obtain distinct seismic waveform data. We report an improvement in installation method of the offline seismic observation station in the heavy snowfall area of Tohoku region based on the retrieved data. In the conventional method, seismometer was installed in the hand-dug hole of a slope in case it is not waterproof. Data logger and battery were installed in the box container on the ground surface, and then, GPS antenna was installed on the pole fixed by stepladder. There are risks of the inclination of seismometer and the damage of equipment in heavy snowfall area. In the new method, seismometer is installed in the robust concrete box on the buried basement consists of precast concrete mass to keep its horizontality. Data logger, battery, and GPS antenna are installed on a high place by using a single pole with anchor bolt and a pole mount cabinet to enhance their safety. As a result, total costs of installation are kept down because most of the equipment is reusable. Furthermore, an environmental burden of waste products is reduced.

  18. The Applicability of Incoherent Array Processing to IMS Seismic Array Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. J.

    2012-04-01

    The seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System for the CTBT differ greatly in size and geometry, with apertures ranging from below 1 km to over 60 km. Large and medium aperture arrays with large inter-site spacings complicate the detection and estimation of high frequency phases since signals are often incoherent between sensors. Many such phases, typically from events at regional distances, remain undetected since pipeline algorithms often consider only frequencies low enough to allow coherent array processing. High frequency phases that are detected are frequently attributed qualitatively incorrect backazimuth and slowness estimates and are consequently not associated with the correct event hypotheses. This can lead to missed events both due to a lack of contributing phase detections and by corruption of event hypotheses by spurious detections. Continuous spectral estimation can be used for phase detection and parameter estimation on the largest aperture arrays, with phase arrivals identified as local maxima on beams of transformed spectrograms. The estimation procedure in effect measures group velocity rather than phase velocity and the ability to estimate backazimuth and slowness requires that the spatial extent of the array is large enough to resolve time-delays between envelopes with a period of approximately 4 or 5 seconds. The NOA, AKASG, YKA, WRA, and KURK arrays have apertures in excess of 20 km and spectrogram beamforming on these stations provides high quality slowness estimates for regional phases without additional post-processing. Seven arrays with aperture between 10 and 20 km (MJAR, ESDC, ILAR, KSRS, CMAR, ASAR, and EKA) can provide robust parameter estimates subject to a smoothing of the resulting slowness grids, most effectively achieved by convolving the measured slowness grids with the array response function for a 4 or 5 second period signal. The MJAR array in Japan recorded high SNR Pn signals for both the 2006 and 2009 North Korea

  19. Geologic and seismic investigations for relocation of Route 138 in Brockton, Mass., prospective cut, stations 169 to 180

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Miller, Raymond

    1954-01-01

    This work was done to obtain geologic and seismic data that would aid in establishing grade for a segment of Route 138 between stations 169 and 180, and that would also be of value in estimating the nature and quantities of subsurface materials to be estimating the nature and quantities of subsurface materials to be excavated from the proposed cut. The work was performed in August 1952, as part of a cooperative program pf the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  20. Performance of the primary seismic array stations of the IMS network for the year 2015 Part II): An Analyst's perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonathan, Ezekiel; Kebede, Fekadu

    2016-04-01

    Verification of the CTBT is partly dependent on the ability of the automatic system to detect and present correct attributes for all phases that are detected at the stations. This helps in building of more accurate automatic event solutions and thus reducing the work load and time for interactive analysis whilst increasing the quality of bulletins issued out to member states so that they can decide if there are any treaty violations. During interactive analysis automatic event solutions are refined and/or re-estimated by checking the correctness of the associated phase identity, phase arrival time, azimuth and slowness using raw waveform data. This refinement procedure leads analysts to rename, associate, disassociate and manually add seismic arrivals. The final event solution is accepted or rejected based on the existing rules, guidelines and procedures. In addition, new event solutions are built using unassociated signal detections and the raw waveform data during scanning. In this study differences between seismic phases associated to automatically produced SEL3 bulletin and the Late Event Bulletin (LEB) obtained through interactive analysis are investigated using data from all primary seismic array stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS) network during the year 2015. The performance of the network is evaluated from an analyst's perspective by looking at the number of phases that are renamed, manually added, associated, and disassociated by analysts during interactive analysis. The observed differences do shed some light on analysts workload as well as the performance of the primary seismic array of the IMS network. For example, the results indicate that for the Waramunga array station in Australia (WRA) out of a total of 41175 detections associated to saved events in 2015, 13305 (32.3%) of them were renamed during interactive analysis and 7667 were automatic detections that were associated to events by analysts. 1174 detections were manually added

  1. How to make robust splitting measurements for single-station analysis and three-dimensional imaging of seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien

    2010-07-01

    We quantify errors on splitting intensity measurements produced by incoherent noise on horizontal components through a detailed analysis of synthetic seismograms and of SKS and SKKS waves recorded by four permanent broad-band stations. We find that these errors are quite significant, even on high-quality records, because the measurement procedure involves the comparison of radial and transverse components, which are both contaminated by noise. To decrease the level of noise in the data, it is thus recommended to average splitting intensities from waves coming from the same backazimuth. Alternatively, one can analyse stacked radial and transverse components after applying a Wiener filter, which standardizes the waveforms. This is found to be equivalent because the measure of splitting intensity is a linear process. The utilization of Wiener filters reduces variations of apparent splitting resulting from differences in frequency content of the waveforms. It is possible to determine splitting parameters (splitting delays and fast directions) from azimuthal variations of splitting intensity at a particular station. Tests on synthetic seismograms demonstrate that this approach gives unbiased and robust estimates of splitting parameters, in contrast to the Silver and Chan method, which only works on the rare records that have very large signals on their transverse components. The Wolfe and Silver method does not suffer from this limitation and gives the same results as the multichannel splitting intensity method. Analysis of splitting intensities at stations BDFB, BGCA, CAN and ERM gives fast directions that are generally in excellent agreement with those determined with the Wolfe and Silver method. However, at some stations, azimuthal variations of splitting intensities reveal features that are not well captured by the sinusoidal variation representing the average anisotropy beneath the station. This suggests that small-scale lateral variations of anisotropy are present

  2. A fast topographic characterization of seismic station locations in Iran through integrated use of digital elevation models and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimzadeh, Sadra; Miyajima, Masakatsu; Kamel, Batoul; Pessina, Vera

    2015-10-01

    We present topographic slope positions of seismic stations within four independent networks (IGUT, IIEES, GSI, and BHRC) in Iran through integrated use of digital elevation models and GIS. Since topographic amplification factor (TAF) due to ground surface irregularity could be one of the reasons of earthquake wave amplification and unexpected damage of structures located on the top of ridges in many previous studies, the ridge stations in the study area are recognized using topographic position index (TPI) as a spatial-based scale-dependent approach that helps in classification of topographic positions. We also present the correlation between local topographic positions and V {/s 30} along with Voronoi tiles of two networks (IGUT and IIEES). The obtained results can be profitably used in seismology to establish homogeneous subnetworks based on Voronoi tiles with precise feedback and in the formulation of new ground motion prediction equations with respect to topographic position and topographic amplification factor.

  3. On the seismic design of piping for fossil fired power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzeri, L.

    1996-12-01

    The seismic design criteria are briefly reviewed: the importance of the yielding phenomena on the seismic response is presented. The decisive importance of ductility is confirmed by the field observations. The ductility causes reduction in the response with flattening of the peaks. Some analyses are performed on several piping systems in static equivalent conditions with ZPA loading. Such analyses assume some ductility in the system. Problems are found only for very flexible systems.

  4. Lithospheric structure below seismic stations in Cuba from the joint inversion of Rayleigh surface waves dispersion and receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, O'Leary; Moreno, Bladimir; Romanelli, Fabio; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2012-05-01

    The joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion and receiver functions has been used to study the crust and upper mantle structure at eight seismic stations in Cuba. Receiver functions have been computed from teleseismic recordings of earthquakes at epicentral (angular) distances in the range from 30° to 90° and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion relations have been taken from earlier surface wave tomographic studies in the Caribbean area. The thickest crust (˜30 km) below Cuban stations is found at Cascorro (CCC) and Maisí (MAS) whereas the thinnest crust (˜18 km) is found at stations Río Carpintero (RCC) and Guantánamo Bay (GTBY), in the southeastern part of Cuba; this result is in agreement with the southward gradual thinning of the crust revealed by previous studies. In the crystalline crust, the S-wave velocity varies between ˜2.8 and ˜3.9 km s-1 and, at the crust-mantle transition zone, the shear wave velocity varies from ˜4.0 and ˜4.3 km s-1. The lithospheric thickness varies from ˜65 km, in the youngest lithosphere, to ˜150 km in the northeastern part of the Cuban island, below Maisí (MAS) and Moa (MOA) stations. Evidence of a subducted slab possibly belonging to the Caribbean plate is present below the stations Las Mercedes (LMG), RCC and GTBY whereas earlier subducted slabs could explain the results obtained below the Soroa (SOR), Manicaragua (MGV) and Cascorro (CCC) station.

  5. A single-station method for the detection, classification and location of fin whale calls using ocean-bottom seismic stations.

    PubMed

    Matias, Luis; Harris, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    Passive seismic monitoring in the oceans uses long-term deployments of Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs). An OBS usually records the three components of ground motion and pressure, typically at 100 Hz. This makes the OBS an ideal tool to investigate fin and blue whales that vocalize at frequencies below 45 Hz. Previous applications of OBS data to locate whale calls have relied on single channel analyses that disregard the information that is conveyed by the horizontal seismic channels. Recently, Harris, Matias, Thomas, Harwood, and Geissler [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 3522-3535 (2013)] presented a method that used all four channels recorded by one OBS to derive the range and azimuth of fin whale calls. In this work, the detection, classification, and ranging of calls using this four-channel method were further investigated, focusing on methods to increase the accuracy of range estimates to direct path arrivals. Corrections to account for the influences of the sound speed in the water layer and the velocity structure in the top strata of the seabed were considered. The single station method discussed here is best implemented when OBSs have been deployed in deep water on top of seabed strata with low P-wave velocity. These conditions maximize the ability to detect and estimate ranges to fin whale calls. PMID:26233048

  6. Single-Station Passive Seismic Stratigraphy for the characterization of subsurface structure of the Valtellina valley (central Alps, northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, M.; Bini, A.; Bassi, S.; Giudici, M.; Monti, M.; Azzola, M.

    2012-04-01

    The reconstruction of the subsurface structure of alpine valleys plays a key-role in the evaluation of their genesis, entrenchment and tectonic evolution. As a matter of fact, their characterization is strictly dependent on borehole data (water wells, shallow geognostic logs) and land based, deep seismic reflection/refraction lines; unfortunately, the availability of these datasets is often limited by economic and logistical limitations. In this work the subsurface structure of the Valtellina buried valley (central Alps, northern Italy) was investigated by the means of Single-Station Passive Seismic Stratigraphy (S-SPSS), which yields the 1D shear velocity (Vs) profiles, based on the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratios (HVSR) of microtremors produced by Raleigh waves trapped in the ground and provided by measurements of the resonance frequencies produced by a layered seismic stratigraphy. The study area is the central part of Valtellina, W-E oriented along the Insubric line and drained by the Adda river. The sedimentary succession is known by shallow (

  7. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  8. The development of the Moldova digital seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilies, I.; Ionescu, C.; Grigore, A. G.

    2009-04-01

    The Republic of Moldova is located in the seismically active region, about 70% of its area is predisposed to shaking intensity 7 - 8 points MSK. Focal zones of the primary seismic danger to the territory of the Republic of Moldova are: Vrancea zone - for the whole of its territory and Dobrogea zone - for the southern part. Monitoring of seismic instrumentation in the republic is provided by the Center of Experimental Seismology, Institute of Geology and Seismology, Academy of Sciences of Moldova. According to the seismic zoning map of the Republic of Moldova, seismic stations "Cahul, Leova" and "Giurgiulesti" located in 8 - degree zone, the central regional station "Chisinau" - in 7 - degree, a station "Soroca" - in 6 - degree zone MSK scale. The development of seismic network since 2004, going through a transition to a modern digital recording, improving working conditions for staff and the construction of new buildings for seismic stations, equipping the new network equipment and improve the methods of collecting and processing seismic data. The works to modernize the network of seismic stations in Moldova were initiated in 2003 with the acquisition of the first three axial digital accelerometer. The device was installed initially in Chisinau, and from it we received the first digital recordings of earthquakes from September 27 and October 27, 2004. In joint efforts with National Institute of Research and Development for Earth Physics from Bucharest, Romania, four seismic stations from Republic of Moldavia was upgraded by broadband and strong motion sensors connected at Q 330 digital recorders that issue continuous recording and real time data stream. Starting from spring of 2008, real time seismic data exchange between IGG Republic of Moldavia and NIEP Romania is running using internet connection.

  9. Landslide seismic magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. H.; Jan, J. C.; Pu, H. C.; Tu, Y.; Chen, C. C.; Wu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    Landslides have become one of the most deadly natural disasters on earth, not only due to a significant increase in extreme climate change caused by global warming, but also rapid economic development in topographic relief areas. How to detect landslides using a real-time system has become an important question for reducing possible landslide impacts on human society. However, traditional detection of landslides, either through direct surveys in the field or remote sensing images obtained via aircraft or satellites, is highly time consuming. Here we analyze very long period seismic signals (20-50 s) generated by large landslides such as Typhoon Morakot, which passed though Taiwan in August 2009. In addition to successfully locating 109 large landslides, we define landslide seismic magnitude based on an empirical formula: Lm = log ⁡ (A) + 0.55 log ⁡ (Δ) + 2.44, where A is the maximum displacement (μm) recorded at one seismic station and Δ is its distance (km) from the landslide. We conclude that both the location and seismic magnitude of large landslides can be rapidly estimated from broadband seismic networks for both academic and applied purposes, similar to earthquake monitoring. We suggest a real-time algorithm be set up for routine monitoring of landslides in places where they pose a frequent threat.

  10. Using hydroacoustic stations as water column seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Selda; Sabra, Karim; Dorman, Leroy M.; Kuperman, W. A.

    2013-06-01

    Getting seismic data from the deep oceans usually involves ocean-bottom seismometers, but hydrophone arrays may provide a practical alternative means of obtaining vector data. We here explore this possibility using hydrophone stations of the International Monitoring System, which have been used to study icebergs and T-wave propagation among others. These stations consist of three hydrophones at about the depth of the deep sound channel in a horizontal triangle array with 2 km sides. We use data from these stations in the very low-frequency regime (0.01-0.05 Hz band) to demonstrate that these stations can also be used as water column seismometers. By differencing the acoustic pressure, we obtain vector quantities analogous to what a seismometer would record. Comparing processed hydrophone station records of the 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake with broadband seismograms from a nearby island station, we find that the differenced hydrophones are indeed a practical surrogate for seismometers.

  11. Broad Band Data and Noise Observed with Surface Station and Borehole Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunc, Suleyman; Ozel, Oguz; Safa Arslan, Mehmet; Behiye Akşahin, Bengi; Hatipoglu, Mustafa; Cagin Yalcintepe, Ragip; Ada, Samim; Meral Ozel, Nurcan

    2016-04-01

    Marmara region tectonically is very active and many destructive earthquakes happened in the past. North Anatolian Fault Zone crosses the Marmara region and it has three branches. The northern branch passes through Marmara Sea and expected future large earthquake will happen along this fault zone. There is a gap in seismic network in the Marmara region at offshore and onshore areas. We have started broadband borehole seismographic observations to obtain the detailed information about fault geometry and its stick-slip behavior beneath the western Marmara Sea, as a part of the MARsite collaborative Project, namely "New Directions in Seismic Hazard Assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite-MARsite". The target area western Marmara of Turkey. In the beginning of the project, we installed eight Broadband surface station around Marmara Sea in April 2014. Then, we added broadband sensor and broadband surface sensor at the same location in November 2014. In this study, we developed a Matlab application to calculate Power Spectral Density against the New Low Noise Model (NLNM) and New High Noise Model (NHNM) determined for one-hour segments of the data. Also we compared ambient noise of broadband borehole sensor and surface broadband sensor.

  12. ANSS Backbone Station Quality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeds, A.; McNamara, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we assess the ambient noise levels of the broadband seismic stations within the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone network. The backbone consists of stations operated by the USGS as well as several regional network stations operated by universities. We also assess the improved detection capability of the network due to the installation of 13 additional backbone stations and the upgrade of 26 existing stations funded by the Earthscope initiative. This assessment makes use of probability density functions (PDF) of power spectral densities (PSD) (after McNamara and Buland, 2004) computed by a continuous noise monitoring system developed by the USGS- ANSS and the Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC). We compute the median and mode of the PDF distribution and rank the stations relative to the Peterson Low noise model (LNM) (Peterson, 1993) for 11 different period bands. The power of the method lies in the fact that there is no need to screen the data for system transients, earthquakes or general data artifacts since they map into a background probability level. Previous studies have shown that most regional stations, instrumented with short period or extended short period instruments, have a higher noise level in all period bands while stations in the US network have lower noise levels at short periods (0.0625-8.0 seconds), high frequencies (8.0- 0.125Hz). The overall network is evaluated with respect to accomplishing the design goals set for the USArray/ANSS backbone project which were intended to increase broadband performance for the national monitoring network.

  13. Geologic interpretation of seismic data relocation Route 1, stations 150-155 in Danvers, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    At this site the reconstruction of Route 1 requires a deep excavation through a high, east-west elongated hill. In order to obtain subsurface information that would be of aid in selecting the most suitable location for this deep cut through the hill, geologic and seismic studies were made in October 1949. The work was done as part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  14. Geologic and seismic investigation for southeast expressway, stations 600-603 in Quincy, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.

    1954-01-01

    At this site the southbound lane of the proposed highway will be located approximately 75 feet to the left (south) of the base line. This will place it close to the base of a mound of granite quarry waste with very steep slopes. As a cut of considerable depth will be required for the road, the mound of waste with its unstable slope constitutes a very hazardous condition, especially with respect to the possibility of rock-falls and slides. Seismic work was performed at the site with the two aims in view; firstly, to obtain information on depths to bedrock that would aid in estimating the quantities of materials to be removed from the proposed cut, secondly, to obtain data that might aid in estimating the quantity of material in the mound of quarry waste with the object of obtaining estimates for its removal. Transverses A-13 and C-D were made for this latter purpose. Additional transverses would have been of value, but they were not made because of the possibility of starting rock-falls or slides, a situation that would have exposed personnel to unwarranted danger, and equipment to avoidable risk. Mr. M. E. Chandler and Me. W. L. Carney, Massachusetts Department of Public Works' Engineers, performed pertinent survey work required for this project, and prepared the essential plans and profiles. Mr. Chandler also operated the seismic equipment and assisted in the preparation of the seismic velocity data. The work was performed in June 1953 as part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  15. Low frequency signals analysis from broadband seismometers records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Broadband seismometers record signals over a wide frequency band, in which the high-frequency background noise is usually associated with human activities, such as cars, trains and factory-related activities. Meanwhile, the low-frequency signals are generally linked to the microseisms, atmospheric phenomena and oceanic wave movement. In this study, we selected the broadband seismometer data recorded during the pass of the typhoons with different moving paths, such as Doksuri in 2012, Trami and Kong-Rey in 2013, Hagibis and Matmo in 2014. By comparing the broadband seismic data, the meteorological information, and the marine conditions, we attempt to understand the effect of the meteorological conditions on the low-frequency noise. The result shows that the broadband station located along the southwestern coast of Taiwan usually have relatively higher background noise value, while the inland stations were characterized by lower noise energy. This rapid decay of the noise energy with distance from the coastline suggest that the low frequency noise could be correlated with the oceanic waves. In addition, the noise energy level increases when the distance from the typhoon and the station decreases. The enhanced frequency range is between 0.1~0.3 Hz, which is consistent with the effect caused by the interference of oceanic waves as suggested by the previous studies. This observation indicates that when the pass of typhoon may reinforce the interaction of oceanic waves and caused some influence on the seismic records. The positive correlation between the significant wave height and the noise energy could also give evidence to this observation. However, we found that the noise energy is not necessarily the strongest when the distance from typhoon and the station is the shortest. This phenomenon seems to be related to the typhoon path. When the typhoon track is perpendicular to the coastline, the change of noise energy is generally more significantly; whereas less energy

  16. Systematic Site Characterization at Seismic Stations combined with Empirical Spectral Modeling: critical data for local hazard analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Clotaire; Hobiger, Manuel; Edwards, Benjamin; Poggi, Valerio; Burjanek, Jan; Cauzzi, Carlo; Kästli, Philipp; Fäh, Donat

    2016-04-01

    The Swiss Seismological Service operates one of the densest national seismic networks in the world, still rapidly expanding (see http://www.seismo.ethz.ch/monitor/index_EN). Since 2009, every newly instrumented site is characterized following an established procedure to derive realistic 1D VS velocity profiles. In addition, empirical Fourier spectral modeling is performed on the whole network for each recorded event with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. Besides the source characteristics of the earthquakes, statistical real time analyses of the residuals of the spectral modeling provide a seamlessly updated amplification function w.r. to Swiss rock conditions at every station. Our site characterization procedure is mainly based on the analysis of surface waves from passive experiments and includes cross-checks of the derived amplification functions with those obtained through spectral modeling. The systematic use of three component surface-wave analysis, allowing the derivation of both Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves, also contributes to the improved quality of the retrieved profiles. The results of site characterisation activities at recently installed strong-motion stations depict the large variety of possible effects of surface geology on ground motion in the Alpine context. Such effects range from de-amplification at hard-rock sites to amplification up to a factor of 15 in lacustrine sediments with respect to the Swiss reference rock velocity model. The derived velocity profiles are shown to reproduce observed amplification functions from empirical spectral modeling. Although many sites are found to exhibit 1D behavior, our procedure allows the detection and qualification of 2D and 3D effects. All data collected during the site characterization procedures in the last 20 years are gathered in a database, implementing a data model proposed for community use at the European scale through NERA and EPOS (www.epos-eu.org). A web stationbook derived from it

  17. Towards the Establishment of the Hawaii Integrated Seismic Network for Tsunami, Seismic, and Volcanic Hazard Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiro, B. R.; Koyanagi, S. K.; Okubo, P. G.; Wolfe, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    The NOAA Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) located in `Ewa Beach, Hawai`i, provides warnings to the State of Hawai`i regarding locally generated tsunamis. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) located in Hawai`i National Park monitors earthquakes on the island of Hawai`i in order to characterize volcanic and earthquake activity and hazards. In support of these missions, PTWC and HVO operate seismic networks for rapidly detecting and evaluating earthquakes for their tsunamigenic potential and volcanic risk, respectively. These existing seismic networks are comprised mostly of short-period vertical seismometers with analog data collection and transmission based on decades-old technology. The USGS National Strong Motion Program (NSMP) operates 31 accelerometers throughout the state, but none currently transmit their data in real time. As a result of enhancements to the U.S. Tsunami Program in the wake of the December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami disaster, PTWC is upgrading and expanding its seismic network using digital real-time telemetry from broadband and strong motion accelerometer stations. Through new cooperative agreements with partners including the USGS (HVO and NSMP), IRIS, University of Hawai`i, and Germany's GEOFON, the enhanced seismic network has been designed to ensure maximum benefit to all stakeholders. The Hawaii Integrated Seismic Network (HISN) will provide a statewide resource for tsunami, earthquake, and volcanic warnings. Furthermore, because all data will be archived by the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC), the HISN will become a research resource to greater scientific community. The performance target for the enhanced HISN is for PTWC to provide initial local tsunami warnings within 90 seconds of the earthquake origin time. This will be accomplished using real-time digital data transmission over redundant paths and by implementing contemporary analysis algorithms in real-time and near-real-time. Earthquake location, depth, and

  18. The Southern Kansas Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Historically aseismic Harper and Sumner counties in Southern Kansas experienced a dramatic increase in seismicity beginning in early 2014, coincident with the development of new oil production in the Mississippi Lime Play. In order to better understand the potential relationships between seismicity and oil development, the USGS installed a real-time telemetered seismic network in cooperation with the Kansas Geological Survey, the Kansas Corporation Commission, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Harper County, and the Oklahoma Geological Survey. The network began operation in March 2014 with an initial deployment of 5 NetQuakes accelerometers and by July 2014 had expanded to include 10 broadband sites. The network currently has 14 stations, all with accelerometers and 12 with broadband seismometers. The network has interstation spacing of 15 - 25 km and typical azimuthal gap of 80 for well-located events. Data are continuously streamed to IRIS at 200 samples per second from most sites. Earthquake locations are augmented with additional stations from the USGS National Network, Oklahoma Geological Survey Seismic Network, Kansas Seismic Monitoring Network and the Enid Oklahoma Network. Since the spring of 2014 over 7500 earthquakes have been identified with data from this network, 1400 of which have been manually timed and cataloged. Focal depths for earthquakes typically range between 2 and 7 km. The catalog is available at earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/search/ under network code 'Ismpkansas'. The network recorded the largest known earthquake in Harper County, Mw 4.3, on October 2, 2014 and in Sumner County, Mw 4.9, on November 12, 2014. Recorded ground motions at the epicenter of the October earthquake were 0.70 g (PGA) and 12 cm/s (PGV). These high ground motion values agree with near-source recordings made by other USGS temporary deployments in the U. S. midcontinent, indicating a significant shaking hazard from such shallow, moderate

  19. Ambient seismic noise levels: A survey of the permanent and temporary seismographic networks in Morocco, North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fellah, Y.; Khairy Abd Ed-Aal, A.; El Moudnib, L.; Mimoun, H.; Villasenor, A.; Gallart, J.; Thomas, C.; Elouai, D.; Mimoun, C.; Himmi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract The results, of a conducted study carried out to analyze variations in ambient seismic noise levels at sites of the installed broadband stations in Morocco, North Africa, are obtained. The permanent and the temporary seismic stations installed in Morocco of the Scientific Institute ( IS, Rabat, Morocco), institute de Ciencias de la Tierra Jaume almera (ICTJA, Barcelona, Spain) and Institut für Geophysik (Munster, Germany) were used in this study. In this work, we used 23 broadband seismic stations installed in different structural domains covering all Morocco from south to north. The main purposes of the current study are: 1) to present a catalog of seismic background noise spectra for Morocco obtained from recently installed broadband stations, 2) to assess the effects of experimental temporary seismic vault construction, 3) to determine the time needed for noise at sites to stabilize, 4) to establish characteristics and origin of seismic noise at those sites. We calculated power spectral densities of background noise for each component of each broadband seismometer deployed in the different investigated sites and then compared them with the high-noise model and low-noise Model of Peterson (1993). All segments from day and night local time windows were included in the calculation without parsing out earthquakes. The obtained results of the current study could be used forthcoming to evaluate permanent station quality. Moreover, this study could be considered as a first step to develop new seismic noise models in North Africa not included in Peterson (1993). Keywords Background noise; Power spectral density; Model of Peterson; Scientific Institute; Institute de Ciencias de la Tierra Jaume almera; Institut für Geophysik

  20. Improved characterization of local seismicity using the Dubai Seismic Network, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Khatibi, Eman; Abou Elenean, K. M.; Megahed, A. S.; El-Hussain, I.

    2014-08-01

    In April 2006, Dubai Municipality established a broadband seismological network in Dubai Emirate, United Arab Emirates (UAE). This network was the first seismic network in UAE and consists of four remote seismic stations to observe local and regional seismic activity that may have an effect on Dubai Emirate and the surrounding areas. The network exchanges real-time data with the National Center of Meteorology and Seismology in Abu Dhabi, the Earthquake Monitoring Center in Oman and imports in real-time data from few Global Seismic Network stations, which increases the aperture of the network. In April 2012, Dubai Municipality installed an additional five free-field strong motion stations inside the urban area to estimate and publish real-time ShakeMaps for public and decision makers. Although the local seismic activity from April 2006 to June 2013 reflects low seismic activity with the Emirate, it indicates active tectonics in the relatively aseismic northern Oman Mountains region. A few inland clusters of micro-to-small earthquakes have been identified with the new network. A clear cluster of small-to-moderate earthquakes took place in the eastern part of UAE to the east of Masafi, while two clusters of micro-to-small earthquakes took place at Wadi Nazwa and northern Huwaylat. Focal mechanisms of few well recorded earthquakes in this region indicate normal faulting, generally trending NE in parallel to the transition shear zone between the collision at Zagros and the subduction at the Makran zone.

  1. Application of continuous seismic-reflection techniques to delineate paleochannels beneath the Neuse River at US Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardinell, Alex P.

    1999-01-01

    A continuous seismic-reflection profiling survey was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey on the Neuse River near the Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station during July 7-24, 1998. Approximately 52 miles of profiling data were collected during the survey from areas northwest of the Air Station to Flanner Beach and southeast to Cherry Point. Positioning of the seismic lines was done by using an integrated navigational system. Data from the survey were used to define and delineate paleochannel alignments under the Neuse River near the Air Station. These data also were correlated with existing surface and borehole geophysical data, including vertical seismic-profiling velocity data collected in 1995. Sediments believed to be Quaternary in age were identified at varying depths on the seismic sections as undifferentiated reflectors and lack the lateral continuity of underlying reflectors believed to represent older sediments of Tertiary age. The sediments of possible Quaternary age thicken to the southeast. Paleochannels of Quaternary age and varying depths were identified beneath the Neuse River estuary. These paleochannels range in width from 870 feet to about 6,900 feet. Two zones of buried paleochannels were identified in the continuous seismic-reflection profiling data. The eastern paleochannel zone includes two large superimposed channel features identified during this study and in re-interpreted 1995 land seismic-reflection data. The second paleochannel zone, located west of the first paleochannel zone, contains several small paleochannels near the central and south shore of the Neuse River estuary between Slocum Creek and Flanner Beach. This second zone of channel features may be continuous with those mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1995 using land seismic-reflection data on the southern end of the Air Station. Most of the channels were mapped at the Quaternary-Tertiary sediment boundary. These channels appear to have been cut into the older sediments

  2. Pre-instrumental seismicity in Central Africa using felt seisms recorded mainly at the meteorological stations of DRC, Rwanda and Burundi during the colonial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulumba, J.-L.; Delvaux, D.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic hazard assessment and mitigation of catastrophes are primarily based on the identification and characterization of seismically active zones. These tasks still rely heavily on the existing knowledge of the seismic activity over the longest possible time period. The first seismic network in Equatorial Africa (IRSAC network) was operated from the Lwiro scientific base on the western shores of Lake Kivu between 1953 and 1963. Before this installation, the historical record of seismic activity in Central Africa is sparse. Even for the relatively short period concerned, spanning only 50-60 years, the historical record is far from being complete. A first attempt has been made by Herrinckx (1959) who compiled a list 960 felt seisms recorded at the meteorological stations between 1915 and 1954 in Congo, Rwanda and Burundi. They were used to draw a density map of felt seisms per square degree. We completed this data base by exploiting the meteorological archives and any available historical report to enlarge the database which now reaches 1513 entries between 1900 and 1959. These entries have been exanimate in order to identify possible historical seismic events. Those are defined by 3 or more quasi-simultaneous records observed over a relatively short distance (a few degrees of latitude/longitude) within a short time difference (few hours). A preliminary list of 115 possible historical seisms has been obtained, identified by 3 to 15 different stations. The proposed location is taken as the average latitude and longitude of the stations where the felt seisms were recorded. Some of the most important ones are associated to aftershocks that have been felt at some stations after the main shocks. The most recent felt seisms have been also recorded instrumentally, which helps to validate the procedure followed. The main difficulties are the magnitude estimation and the possible spatial incompleteness of the recording of felt seism evidence at the margin of the observation

  3. Implementation of Real-Time Testing of Earthquake Early Warning Algorithms: Using the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) Infrastructure as a Test Bed for the P Amplitude and Period Monitor for a Single Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, K.; Hauksson, E.; Kanamori, H.; Friberg, P.; Wu, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A necessary first step toward the goal of implementing proof-of-concept projects for earthquake early warning (EEW) is the real-time testing of the seismological algorithms. To provide the most appropriate environment, the CISN has designed and implemented a platform for such testing. We are testing the amplitude (Pd) and period (Tau-c) monitor developed for providing on-site earthquake early warning (EEW) using data from a single seismic station. We have designed and implemented a framework generator that can automatically generate code for waveform- processing systems. The framework generator is based on Code Worker software www.codeworker.org, which provides APIs and a scripting language to build parsers and template processing engines. Higher-level description of the waveform processing system is required to generate the waveform-processing framework. We have implemented Domain Specific Language DSL to provide description of the waveform-processing framework. The framework generator allows the developer to focus more on the waveform processing algorithms and frees him/her from repetitive and tedious coding tasks. It also has an automatic gap detector, transparent buffer management, and built in thread management. We have implemented the waveform-processing framework to process real-time waveforms coming from the dataloggers deployed throughout southern California by the Southern California Seismic Network. The system also has the capability of processing data from archived events to facilitate off-line testing. An application feeds data from MiniSEED packets into the Wave Data Area (WDA). The system that grabs the data from the WDA processes each real-time data stream independently. To verify results, sac files are generated at each processing step. Currently, we are processing broadband data streams from 160 stations and determining Pd and Tau-c as local earthquakes occur in southern California. We present the results from this testing and compare the

  4. The Geoscope Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, N.; Stutzmann, E.; Maggi, A.; Vallee, M.; Pardo, C.

    2014-12-01

    The GEOSCOPE observatory provides 32 years of continuous broadband data to the scientific community. The 31 GEOSCOPE stations are installed in 19 countries, across all continents and on islands throughout the oceans. They are equipped with three component very broadband seismometers (STS1 or STS2) and 24 or 26 bit digitizers (Q330HR). Seismometers are installed with warpless base plates, which decrease long period noise on horizontal components by up to 15dB. In most stations, a pressure gauge and a thermometer are also installed. In 2014, we upgraded 4 stations: SSB in France, CAN in Australia, ROCAM in Rodrigues and ECH in France. 27 stations send data in real or near real time to the GEOSCOPE Data Center and to tsunami warning centers. Continuous data of all stations are collected in real time or with a delay by the IPGP Data Center in Paris where they are validated, archived and made available to the international scientific community through different interfaces including web services (see details on http://geoscope.ipgp.fr). In 2015, GEOSCOPE data will also be available through the French national data center RESIF. Seismic noise level of the continuous data are computed every 24 hours and accessible via the geoscope web site. GEOSCOPE data are also validated by comparing real and synthetic body wave waveforms using the SCARDEC method (Vallee et al., 2011). The information on earthquake characteristics, on GEOSCOPE data available for each event and on the waveform fit for each channel are available through the geoscope web portal.

  5. Quantifying Similarity in Seismic Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W. S.; Jones, J. P.; Caffagni, E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring similarity in seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low S/N signals, and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via. computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Using records of the Mw=8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake from CNSN broadband sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and vertical borehole array data from a monitoring experiment at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Because histogram distance metrics are bounded by [0 1], clustering allows empirical time-frequency separation of seismic phase arrivals on single-station three-component records. Array processing for automatic seismic phase classification may be possible using subspace clustering of polarization similarity, but efficient algorithms are required to reduce the dimensionality.

  6. Improvements on the MedNet Broadband Network from the viewpoint of tomographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. Dolores; Lana, Xavier; Badal, José; Canas, José A.

    Our work aims to provide a methodology to assess path coverage of a domain from a tomographic viewpoint, and for the design of an improved or new seismic network. This methodology permits different simulations through a rigorous procedure based on both mathematical and seismological aspects. In this sense, some concepts of mathematical information theory and Monte Carlo methods have been combined with the aim of improving the epicentre-station path coverage offered by the MedNet broadband seismic network in the Mediterranean area for a surface wave tomography problem. The best path coverage is obtained without the constraint of including locations of existing stations. Nevertheless, even in the case of a network already installed over a region, as is the case of MedNet, our technique allows new station sites to be assessed since, it predicts improvements in the path coverage.

  7. Geologic interpretation of seismic data relocation Route 1, cut, Stations 34-52, Copper Mine Road area and northern portion of Ballard Estate in Topsfield, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    Relocation of the Newburyport Turnpike, Route 1, in Topsfield, Mass., will require a long relatively deep cut between stations 34 and 52. In order to obtain preliminary information on the depths to bedrock and on the nature of the subsurface materials at this site, reconnaissance seismic work was performed in October 1949. Because this reconnaissance work indicated that bedrock might be relatively near the surface over an extensive area where cuttings were to be made, a more detailed seismic study of the area was made in November 1949. The results of both the reconnaissance and detailed seismic work are included in this report. The work was done as part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the U.S. Geological Survey.

  8. The Algerian Seismic Network: Performance from data quality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelles, Abdelkarim; Allili, Toufik; Alili, Azouaou

    2013-04-01

    Seismic monitoring in Algeria has seen a great change after the Boumerdes earthquake of May 21st, 2003. Indeed the installation of a New Digital seismic network (ADSN) upgrade drastically the previous analog telemetry network. During the last four years, the number of stations in operation has greatly increased to 66 stations with 15 Broad Band, 02 Very Broad band, 47 Short period and 21 accelerometers connected in real time using various mode of transmission ( VSAT, ADSL, GSM, ...) and managed by Antelope software. The spatial distribution of these stations covers most of northern Algeria from east to west. Since the operation of the network, significant number of local, regional and tele-seismic events was located by the automatic processing, revised and archived in databases. This new set of data is characterized by the accuracy of the automatic location of local seismicity and the ability to determine its focal mechanisms. Periodically, data recorded including earthquakes, calibration pulse and cultural noise are checked using PSD (Power Spectral Density) analysis to determine the noise level. ADSN Broadband stations data quality is controlled in quasi real time using the "PQLX" software by computing PDFs and PSDs of the recordings. Some other tools and programs allow the monitoring and the maintenance of the entire electronic system for example to check the power state of the system, the mass position of the sensors and the environment conditions (Temperature, Humidity, Air Pressure) inside the vaults. The new design of the network allows management of many aspects of real time seismology: seismic monitoring, rapid determination of earthquake, message alert, moment tensor estimation, seismic source determination, shakemaps calculation, etc. The international standards permit to contribute in regional seismic monitoring and the Mediterranean warning system. The next two years with the acquisition of new seismic equipment to reach 50 new BB stations led to

  9. Properties of Repetitive Long-Period Seismicity at Villarrica Volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J.; Waite, G. P.; Palma, J.; Johnson, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Villarrica Volcano, Chile hosts a persistent lava lake and is characterized by degassing and long-period seismicity. In order to better understand the relationship between outgassing and seismicity, we recorded broadband seismic and acoustic data along with high-rate SO2 emission data. We used both a densely-spaced linear array deployed on the northern flank of Villarrica, during the austral summer of 2011, and a wider aperture array of stations distributed around the volcano that was active in the austral summer of 2010. Both deployments consisted of three-component broadband stations and were augmented with broadband infrasound sensors. Of particular interests are repetitive, ~1 Hz seismic and coincident infrasound signals that occurred approximately every 2 minutes. Because these events are typically very low amplitude, we used a matched filter approach to identify them. We windowed several high-amplitude records of these events from broadband seismic stations near the vent. The record section of each event served as a template to compare with the entire dataset by cross-correlation. This approach identified ~20,000 nearly identical events during the ~7 day deployment of the linear array, which were otherwise difficult to identify in the raw records. Assuming that all of the events that we identified have identical source mechanisms and depths, we stack the large suite of events to produce low-noise records and particle motions at receivers farther than 5 km from the vent. We find that the records from stations near the edifice are dominated by tangential particle motion, suggesting the influence of near-field components. Correlation of these data with broadband acoustic data collected at the summit suggest that these repeatable seismic processes are linked to acoustic emissions, probably due to gas bubbles bursting at the magma free surface, as no eruptive products besides gas were being emitted by the volcano during the instrument deployment. The acoustic

  10. Seismic Noise Analysis and Reduction through Utilization of Collocated Seismic and Atmospheric Sensors at the GRO Chile Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, M. E.; Russo, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    gain insight into how local atmospheric conditions couple with the ground to generate seismic noise, and to explore strategies for reducing this noise post data collection. Comparison of spectra of atmospheric data streams to the three broadband seismic channels for continuous signals recorded during May and June of 2013 shows high coherence between infrasound signals and time variation of air pressure (dP/dt) that we calculated from the air pressure data stream. Coherence between these signals is greatest for the east-west component of the seismic data in northern Chile. Although coherence between seismic, infrasound, and dP/dt is lower for all three seismic channels at other GRO Chile stations, for some of the data streams coherence can jump as much as 6 fold for certain frequency bands, with a common 3-fold increase for periods shorter than 10 seconds and the occasional 6-fold increase at long or very long periods.

  11. Seismicity of southern Lake Tanganyika

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavayssiere, A.; Gallacher, R. J.; Keir, D.; Ebinger, C. J.; Drooff, C.; Khalfan, M.; Bull, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global seismic networks document frequent and unusually deep earthquakes in East African rift sectors lacking central volcanoes. The deep seismicity means that we can use earthquakes to probe the geometry and kinematics of fault systems throughout the crust, and to understand the distribution of strain between large offset border fault systems and intrabasinal faults. The southern Tanganyika rift zone has the highest seismicity rate within East Africa during the period 1973-present, yet earlier temporary seismometer networks have been too sparse in space and time to relocate earthquakes with location and depth errors of < 5-10 km. We address this issue by recording seismicity of southern Lake Tanganyika since June 2014 using a network at 12 broadband seismic stations. The distribution of earthquakes shows that deformation primarily occurs on large offset border faults beneath the lake. Subsidiary earthquake activity occurs along the subparrallel Rukwa graben, and beneath the NE-SW striking Mweru rift. The distribution of earthquakes suggests the southern end of lake Tanganyika is characterized by a network of intersecting NNW and NE striking faults. The depths of earthquakes are distributed throughout the crust, consistent with the relatively strong lithosphere.

  12. Earth Analog Seismic Deployment for InSight's Mars seismic installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Bradford, S. C.; Clayton, R. W.; Davis, P. M.; Ervin, J.; Kawamura, T.; Lognonne, P. H.; Lorenz, R. D.; Mimoun, D.; Murdoch, N.; Roberson, T.; Stubailo, I.; Van Buren, D.

    2014-12-01

    InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) is a NASA Discovery Program mission that will place a single geophysical lander on Mars to study its deep interior. InSight's main experiment is the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS), which will robotically place a broadband seismometer provided by the French Space Agency (CNES) on the Martian surface. SEIS will operate on the surface for a full Mars year. Installing and operating a seismometer on Mars imposes constraints rarely considered in terrestrial seismic installations. The InSight project has therefore conducted a terrestrial analog field deployment exercise to better understand and prepare for the distinctive challenges that placing a broadband seismometer in a Mars-like configuration and environment would pose. The exercise was conducted in two phases at NASA's Goldstone facility in the Southern California Mojave desert. In the first phase we have installed a surface geophysical station including a broadband seismometer, a microbarometer, anemometer, and thermal sensors in a configuration resembling the InSight's geophysical station. The site was located in an exposed location with rough surface and subsurface terrain. It was in close proximity to Goldstone permanent seismic station (GSC) that provided a ground-truth measurement. In the second phase, the installation was moved to a dry lakebed where the geophysical conditions mimic the expected geophysical environment of InSight's target landing site on Mars. We will present a summary of lessons learned so far from our analog deployment exercise. The data analysis emphasizes several aspects of key importance to the InSight mission: (1) Exploring strategies to mitigate environmental noise sources; (2) Recognizing noise sources that might be introduced by the InSight lander (solar panel flutter); (3) Identifying weak geophysical signals with low SNR above the environmental noise; (4) Using non tectonic

  13. UNIBRA - the German contribution to the AlpArray Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friederich, Wolfgang; Korn, Michael; Meier, Thomas; Plenefisch, Thomas; Ritter, Joachim; Rümpker, Georg; Thomas, Christine; Tilmann, Frederik; Wassermann, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    AlpArray is a European initiative to advance our understanding of orogenesis and its relationship to mantle dynamics, plate reorganizations, surface processes and seismic hazard in the Alps-Apennines-Carpathians-Dinarides orogenic system (cited from the AlpArray Science Plan). The core of the AlpArray project is a dense seismic network covering the entire Alpine region including its forelands. The network is composed of about 600 broadband seismic sensors of which 280 are operated permanently by national institutions and the remaining 320 are deployed temporarily by project partners for a time span of at least 2 years. In a joint effort, German universities contribute 71 temporary stations to the AlpArray Seismic Network, of which 55 are located in southern Germany and 16 in Austria. The instrumentation of the stations is heterogeneous and comprises Streckeisen, Nanometrics and Guralp sensors operated with EarthData, Nanometrics and Quanterra data loggers. The instruments are installed in remote areas and rarely used buildings with power supply. Some stations transfer data via mobile internet connection. The data will be collected at national EIDA centers which also serve as nodes for dissemination of data to the members of the AlpArray working group. Here, we describe installation procedures and setting of the German UNIBRA (UNIversity BRoadband Array) stations. In addition, we present noise characteristics and first records of teleseismic earthquakes. The descriptions may serve as a reference for later work with data from the AlpArray Seismic Network.

  14. Geologic interpretations of seismic data Route 128 (Northern Circumferential Highway) cut, and Hopkins Street grade separation stations 1-18 in Wakefield, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Lineham, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    The completion of a segment of the Northern Circumferential Highway, Route 126, in Wakefield, Mass., requires an underpass bridge at Hopkins Street, Station 5+50. The plan of the project shows approximately 1800 feet if approach cuts between stations 1 and 18. In October 1945 a preliminary seismic study was made of a segment of this cut between stations 6+50 and 13+30. Four profiles were made at this time and a report was submitted by Newton E. Chute and Rev. Daniel Linhan (file report of January 15). This work showed a relatively shallow (in general, 6 to 12 feet in depth) somewhat irregular bedrock surface between stations 6+50 and 13+50. That data indicated that much of this segment of the cut will be in bedrock. In order to obtain more complete data for the preparation of detailed estimates on the amount of bedrock to be excavated for this segment of the cut, and also to obtain sufficient data for the unexplored segment of the cut, 21 additional seismic traverses were made in September 1949. The present report contains only the results obtained from this later work. The work was performed as a part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  15. Monitoring seismic velocity changes caused by the 2014 Northern Aegean earthquake using continuous ambient noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, Christos; Daskalakis, Emmanouil; Tsogka, Chrysoula

    2016-04-01

    The 24 May 2014 Northern Aegean earthquake (6.9 Mw), an event on the Northern Aegean Trough (NAT), ruptured on two different fault segments with a total ruptured length of ~100 km. For the second delayed segment, rupture propagated eastward from the hypocenter for ˜65 km with a supershear velocity (5.5 km/s). Low-aftershock seismicity on the supershear segment implies a simple and linear fault geometry there. An effort to monitor temporal seismic velocity changes across the ruptured area of the Northern Aegean earthquake is underway. In recent years, neighboring seismic broadband stations near active faults have been successfully used to detect such changes. The crosscorrelation functions (CCF) of ambient noise records between stations yields the corresponding traveltimes for those inter-station paths. Moreover, the auto-correlation functions (ACF) at each station produce the seismic responce for a coincident source and receiver position. Possible temporal changes of the measured traveltimes from CCFs and ACFs correspond to seismic velocity changes. Initially, we investigate the characteristics and sources of the ambient seismic noise as recorded at permanent seismic stations installed around NAT at the surrounding islands and in mainland Greece and Turkey. The microseismic noise levels show a clear seasonal variation at all stations. The noise levels across the double frequency band (DF; period range 4-8 s) reflect the local sea-weather conditions within a range of a few hundred kilometers. Three years of continuous seismic records framing the main shock have been analysed from ~15 stations within a radius of 100 km from the epicentre. We observe a clear decrease of seismic velocities most likely corresponding to the co-seismic shaking. The spatial variation of this velocity drop is imaged from all inter-station paths that correspond to CCF measurements and for station sites that correspond to ACF measurements. Thus, we explore a possible correlation between co-seismic

  16. Seismic source study of the Racha-Dzhava (Georgia) earthquake from aftershocks and broad-band teleseismic body-wave records: An example of active nappe tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuenzalida, H.; Rivera, L.; Haessler, H.; Legrand, D.; Philip, H.; Dorbath, L.; McCormack, D.; Arefiev, S.; Langer, C.; Cisternas, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Racha-Dzhava earthquake (Ms = 7.0) that occurred on 1991 April 29 at 09:12:48.1 GMT in the southern border of the Great Caucasus is the biggest event ever recorded in the region, stronger than the Spitak earthquake (Ms = 6.9) of 1988. A field expedition to the epicentral area was organised and a temporary seismic network of 37 stations was deployed to record the aftershock activity. A very precise image of the aftershock distribution is obtained, showing an elongated cloud oriented N105??, with one branch trending N310?? in the western part. The southernmost part extends over 80 km, with the depth ranging from 0 to 15 km, and dips north. The northern branch, which is about 30 km long, shows activity that ranges in depth from 5 to 15 km. The complex thrust dips northwards. A stress-tensor inversion from P-wave first-motion polarities shows a state of triaxial compression, with the major principal axis oriented roughly N-S, the minor principal axis being vertical. Body-waveform inversion of teleseismic seismograms was performed for the main shock, which can be divided into four subevents with a total rupture-time duration of 22 s. The most important part of the seismic moment was released by a gentle northerly dipping thrust. The model is consistent with the compressive tectonics of the region and is in agreement with the aftershock distribution and the stress tensor deduced from the aftershocks. The focal mechanisms of the three largest aftershocks were also inverted from body-wave records. The April 29th (Ms = 6.1) and May 5th (Ms = 5.4) aftershocks have thrust mechanisms on roughly E-W-oriented planes, similar to the main shock. Surprisingly, the June 15th (Ms = 6.2) aftershock shows a thrust fault striking N-S. This mechanism is explained by the structural control of the rupture along the east-dipping geometry of the Dzirula Massif close to the Borzhomi-Kazbeg strike-slip fault. In fact, the orientation and shape of the stress tensor produce a thrust on a N

  17. Regionalization and calibration of seismic discriminants, path effects and signal-to-noise for station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A.J.; Walter, W.R.

    1997-07-01

    We report measurements and analysis of regional seismic phase amplitude ratios and signal-to-noise for earthquakes observed at the International Monitoring System primary station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan). We measured noise and phase amplitudes of the regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg in four frequency bands between 0.75-9.0 Hz. Measurements were made in both the time and frequency domains. The spatial variation of amplitude ratios (e.g., Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg, Pn/Sn, Pg/Sn) and signal-to-noise (phase/noise) reveal significant path effect differences between the Hindu Kush, Kazahk Platform, Iranian Plateau and Caspian Sea. In order to represent this behavior, we have investigated several techniques for characterizing the data. These techniques are: 1) correlation with along-path distance and waveguide properties; 2) sector analysis; and 3) spatial averaging. Along-path waveguide properties, such as mean elevation and rms topographic slope are found to be the strongest factors related to Pg/Lg amplitude ratios at the lowest frequencies (<3.0 Hz). Other path properties such as mean crustal thickness and basement depth are not strongly correlated with Pg/Lg ratios. For sector analysis we divided the data into four (4) azimuthal sectors and characterized the data within each sector by a distance trend. Sectors were chosen based on the behavior of Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg and Pn/Sn amplitude ratios as well as topographic and tectonic character. Results reveal significant reduction (up to a factor of two) in the scatter of the Pn/Lg and Pg/Lg amplitude ratios for the sectorized data compared to the entire data set from all azimuths. Spatial averaging involves smoothing and interpolation for the ratios projected at the event location. Methods such as cap averaging and kriging will be presented at the meeting. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Processed seismic motion records from Big Bear, California earthquake of June 28, 1992, recorded at seismograph stations in southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, P.K.; Honda, K.K.

    1993-04-01

    The 8mm data-tape contains the processed seismic data of the Big Bear, California earthquake of June 28, 1992. The seismic data were recorded by 15 seismographs maintained by the DOE/NV in Southern Nevada. Four files were generated from each seismic recorder. They are ``Uncorrected acceleration time histories, 2. Corrected acceleration, velocity and displacement time histories, 3. Pseudo response velocity spectra, and 4. Fourier amplitude spectra of acceleration.``

  19. Processed seismic motion records from Landers, California earthquake of June 28, 1992, recorded at seismograph stations in southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, P.K.; Honda, K.K.

    1993-04-01

    The 8mm data tape contains the processed seismic data of the Landers, California earthquake of June 28, 1992. The seismic, data were recorded by 19 seismographs maintained by the DOE/NV in Southern Nevada. Four files were generated from each seismic recorder. They are ``Uncorrected acceleration time histories, 2. Corrected acceleration, velocity and displacement time histories, 3. Pseudo response velocity spectra, and 4. Fourier amplitude spectra of acceleration.``

  20. National Seismic Network System of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunbul, S.; Kadirioğlu, F. T.; Holoğlu, N.; Kartal, R. F.; Kiliç, T.; Yatman, A.; Iravul, Y.; Tüzel, B.

    2009-04-01

    In order to mitigate disaster losses, it is necessary to establish an effective disaster management and risk system. The first step of the management is constituted by preparedness studies before the earthquake (disaster). In order to determinate disaster and risk information it is necessary to have a seismological observation network. Due to the monitoring of the earhquakes in the country-wide scale, recording, evaluation, archieving and to inform to the public autority, the project named "Development of the National Seismic Network Project-USAG" has been started. 6 Three Component Short Period, 63 Broad-band, 13 One Component Short Period stations, 65 Local Network- Broad-band, and 247 accelerometers have been operated in the frame of this project. All of the stations transmit continuously their signal to the ERD (Earthquake Research Department) seismic data center in Ankara. Capability of the network is to determine an earthquake which is minimum local magnitude ML= 2.8 generally, in some region local magnitude threshold is ML=1.5 (the places where the stations are concentrated). Earthquake activity in Turkey and surrounding region has been observed 7 days / 24 hours, in ERD data center in Ankara. After the manuel location of an earthquake, If the magnitude is over 4.0, system sends to SMS message automaticaly to the authorized people and immediately press, public and national-local crisis center, scientific institutions are informed by fax and e-mail. Data exchange has been carried out to EMSC-CSEM. During the İnstallation of the broad-band stations, the seismotectonics of the region has been taken into consideration. Earthqauke record stations are concentrated at the most important fault zones in Turkey; North Anatolian Fault System, East Anatolian Fault System, Bitlis Overlap Belt and Aegean Graben (or opening) System. After 1999 İzmit and Düzce earthquakes, the number of the seismic stations in Turkey have been increased each passing year. In this study

  1. Geologic and seismic investigation for relocation of Route 8, cut, stations 0-18 in Sandisfield, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.

    1954-01-01

    Mr. M. E. Chandler and Mr. W. L. Carney, Department of Public Works Engineers, performed all pertinent survey work required for this project, and prepared the essential plans and profiles. Mr. Chandler also operated the seismic equipment and assisted in the preparation of the seismic velocity data.

  2. The data quality analyzer: a quality control program for seismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Hagerty, M.T.; Holland, James F.; Gonzales, A.; Gee, Lind S.; Edwards, J.D.; Wilson, David; Baker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of data quality is based on the evaluation of various metrics (e.g., timing quality, daily noise levels relative to long-term noise models, and comparisons between broadband data and event synthetics). Users may select which metrics contribute to the assessment and those metrics are aggregated into a “grade” for each station. The DQA is being actively used for station diagnostics and evaluation based on the completed metrics (availability, gap count, timing quality, deviation from a global noise model, deviation from a station noise model, coherence between co-located sensors, and comparison between broadband data and synthetics for earthquakes) on stations in the Global Seismographic Network and Advanced National Seismic System.

  3. Leveraging EarthScope USArray with the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, R.; Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Frassetto, A.; Brudzinski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent earthquakes, such as the 2011 M5.8 Mineral, Virginia earthquake, raised awareness of the comparative lack of knowledge about seismicity, site response to ground shaking, and the basic geologic underpinnings in this densely populated region. With this in mind, the National Science Foundation, United States Geological Survey, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Department of Energy supported the creation of the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Network (CEUSN). These agencies, along with the IRIS Consortium who operates the network, recognized the unique opportunity to retain EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) seismic stations in this region beyond the standard deployment duration of two years per site. The CEUSN project supports 159 broadband TA stations, more than 30 with strong motion sensors added, that are scheduled to operate through 2017. Stations were prioritized in regions of elevated seismic hazard that have not been traditionally heavily monitored, such as the Charlevoix and Central Virginia Seismic Zones, and in regions proximal to nuclear power plants and other critical facilities. The stations (network code N4) transmit data in real time, with broadband and strong motion sensors sampling at 100 samples per second. More broadly the CEUSN concept also recognizes the existing backbone coverage of permanently operating seismometers in the CEUS, and forms a network of over 300 broadband stations. This multi-agency collaboration is motivated by the opportunity to use one facility to address multiple missions and needs in a way that is rarely possible, and to produce data that enables both researchers and federal agencies to better understand seismic hazard potential and associated seismic risks. In June 2015, the CEUSN Working Group (www.usarray.org/ceusn_working_group) was formed to review and provide advice to IRIS Management on the performance of the CEUSN as it relates to the target scientific goals and objectives. Map shows

  4. Investigation of Historic Seismic and Infrasound Records from Events Occurred at the Region of Novaya Zemplya Test Site by the USSR Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Inna

    2014-05-01

    Located in the north the Novaya Zemlya Test Site was used in Soviet time for conducting unique nuclear weapon tests in different mediums. 130 nuclear explosions with total yield 265 megatons were conducted at the Test Site for the period 1955-1990. During this period the following nuclear explosions were conducted: 1 surface explosion, 85 air explosions, 2 above water explosions, 3 underwater explosions and 39 underground explosions (in boreholes and tunnels). In addition, tectonic earthquakes and induced earthquakes caused by multi-megatons UNE occur near the Test Site. Unfortunately, only few seismic events occurred on the territory of the Test Site were recorded by digital stations. However, the archives of different seismological organizations of the USSR contain huge amount of analogue seismograms recorded by permanent and temporary stations. Historical seismograms of nuclear explosions and earthquakes from Novaya Zemlya Test site territory were digitized by the Complex Seismological Expedition IPE RAS and by the Institute of Geophysical Researches RK; a database of the events from the Test Site containing 470 seismograms at epicentral distance 2100-3800 was created. The database includes seismic records of air, underground nuclear explosions, and records of underwater nuclear explosion conducted within "Korall" exercise. In addition, infrasound records of waves from multi-megatons air nuclear explosions recorded by a microbarograph installed at Talgar seismic station at distance ~3600 km from the Test Site were digitized. Kinematic and dynamic parameters of nuclear explosions records conducted in different mediums (air, under water and underground) were investigated by the digitized records from events at Novaya Zemlya Test Site; specific features of wave pattern for each class of events were found.

  5. Broadband radiometer

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, T.W.

    1994-07-26

    A broadband radiometer is disclosed including (a) an optical integrating sphere having generally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample. 8 figs.

  6. Broadband radiometer

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Theodore W.

    1994-01-01

    A broadband radiometer including (a) an optical integrating sphere having a enerally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample.

  7. The Kyrgyz Seismic Network (KNET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, V. D.; Willemann, R. J.; Matix, A. I.; Dudinskih, R. R.; Vernon, F.; Offield, G.

    2007-05-01

    The Kyrgyz Digital Seismic Network (KNET) is a regional continuous telemetric network of very broadband seismic data. KNET was installed in 1991. The telemetry system was upgraded in 1998. The seismograms are transmitted in near real time. KNET is located along part of the boundary between the northern Tien Shan Mountains and the Kazakh platform. Several major tectonic features are spanned by the network including a series of thrust faults in the Tien Shan, the Chu Valley, and the NW-SE trending ridges north of Bishkek. This network is designed to monitor regional seismic activity at the magnitude 3.5+ level as well as to provide high quality data for research projects in regional and global broadband seismology. The Kyrgyz seismic network array consists of 10 stations - 3 of them with more than 3600 m altitude, 2 mountain repeaters, 1 intermediate data base and 2 data centers. One of data centers is a remote source for IRIS data base. KNET is operated by International Research Center - Geodynamic Proving Ground in Bishkek (IGRC) with the participation of Research Station of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RS RAS) and Kyrgyz Institute of Seismology (KIS). The network consists of Streckeisen STS-2 sensors with 24-bit PASSCAL data loggers. All continuous real-time data are accessible through the IRIS DMC in Seattle with over 95% data availability, which compares favorably to the best networks currently operating worldwide. National institutes of seismology in Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan, National Nuclear Centre of Kazakhstan, RS RAS, divisions of the ministries on extreme situations and the institutes of the Russian Academy of Sciences use KNET data for estimating seismic hazards and to study deep-seated structure of researched territory. KNET data is used by National Nuclear Centre of Republic of Kazakhstan, which together with LAMONT laboratory (USA) carries out verification researches and monitoring of nuclear detonations in China, India and Pakistan. The uniform

  8. The new Hamburg Broadband Oceanbottom Seismometer: experiences from a longterm-deployment in the Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, T.; Herber, R.; Thorwart, M.

    2001-12-01

    Since winter 2000 the Geophysical Institute of the University of Hamburg, Germany, has developed 4 new broadband free-fall oceanbottom stations which are available for longterm experiments in oceanbottom seismology. The modular system consists of a flat and broad frame and anchor, holding commercially available components as datalogger (Send-MLS, < 200 sps, 24 bit), releaser (Mors-Oceano), sensors (PMD Scientific 21233m LP seismometer and E-2PD hydrophone), and location tools (Novatec flashlight and radio antenna). The broadband sensor is mounted into a passively gravity-levelled oil-damped gimbal in one of the four buoyancy glass-spheres (17''), which itself is fixed in close contact to the anchor of the station. The station can be alternatively equipped with a 4.5 Hz sensor hosted in an external pack and a SEND-MBS datalogger, for use in high-frequency seismics. The frame and anchor is designed to have a good coupling to ground below 10 Hz and a low sensitivity to flow and differential-motion induced tilt. Two pressure tubes are available for the data-acquisition system, the power, and possible additional equipment. The maximal deployment depth is 6000 m. It is possible to continously record 4 channels with 50 sps for one year. A first 6-month deployment has been in the Tyrrhenian Sea, within a cooperational project with GEOMAR, Kiel, and GEOSTAR of INGV, Rome, in order to study teleseismic phases and the local seismicity from the Ionian slab and the Aeolian Island volcanic chain. Several M>7 events have been recorded. The Hamburg stations show, in most cases, low tilt-noise and high-quality teleseismic and local recordings, also on the horizontal components, indicating a good coupling in the frequency range of interest. We found that the compact and simple design of the free-fall station is well suited for oceanbottom broadband seismology.

  9. Seismic and deformation precursory to the small explosions of Marapi Volcano, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, D.; Patria, C.; Gunawan, H.; Taisne, B.; Nurfiani, D.; Avila, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Marapi Volcano is one of the active volcanoes of Indonesia located near the city of Bukittinggi, West Sumatra, Indonesia. Its activity is characterized by small vulcanian explosions with occasional VEI 2 producing tephra and pyroclastic flows. Due to its activity, it is being monitored by Centre for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM). Four seismic stations consists of 2 broadband and 2 short period instruments have been established since 2009. In collaboration with CVGHM, Earth Observatory of Singapore added 5 seismic stations around the volcano in 2014, initially with short period instruments but later upgraded to broadbands. We added one tilt station at the summit of Marapi. These seismic and tilt stations are telemetered by 5.8GHz radio to Marapi Observatory Post where data are archived and displayed for Marapi observers for their daily volcanic activity monitoring work. We also archive the data in the EOS and CVGHM main offices. Here we are presenting examples of seismic and deformation data from Marapi prior, during, and after the vulcanian explosion. Our study attempt to understand the state of the volcano based on monitoring data and in order to enable us to better estimate the hazards associated with the future eruptions of this or similar volcano.

  10. The Italian National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The Italian National Seismic Network is composed by about 400 stations, mainly broadband, installed in the Country and in the surrounding regions. About 110 stations feature also collocated strong motion instruments. The Centro Nazionale Terremoti, (National Earthquake Center), CNT, has installed and operates most of these stations, although a considerable number of stations contributing to the INGV surveillance has been installed and is maintained by other INGV sections (Napoli, Catania, Bologna, Milano) or even other Italian or European Institutions. The important technological upgrades carried out in the last years has allowed for significant improvements of the seismic monitoring of Italy and of the Euro-Mediterranean Countries. The adopted data transmission systems include satellite, wireless connections and wired lines. The Seedlink protocol has been adopted for data transmission. INGV is a primary node of EIDA (European Integrated Data Archive) for archiving and distributing, continuous, quality checked data. The data acquisition system was designed to accomplish, in near-real-time, automatic earthquake detection and hypocenter and magnitude determination (moment tensors, shake maps, etc.). Database archiving of all parametric results are closely linked to the existing procedures of the INGV seismic monitoring environment. Overall, the Italian earthquake surveillance service provides, in quasi real-time, hypocenter parameters which are then revised routinely by the analysts of the Bollettino Sismico Nazionale. The results are published on the web page http://cnt.rm.ingv.it/ and are publicly available to both the scientific community and the the general public. This presentation will describe the various activities and resulting products of the Centro Nazionale Terremoti. spanning from data acquisition to archiving, distribution and specialised products.

  11. Surface seismic measurements of near-surface P-and S-wave seismic velocities at earthquake recording stations, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Frankel, A.D.; Odum, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    We measured P-and S-wave seismic velocities to about 40-m depth using seismic-refraction/reflection data on the ground surface at 13 sites in the Seattle, Washington, urban area, where portable digital seismographs recently recorded earthquakes. Sites with the lowest measured Vs correlate with highest ground motion amplification. These sites, such as at Harbor Island and in the Duwamish River industrial area (DRIA) south of the Kingdome, have an average Vs in the upper 30 m (V??s30) of 150 to 170 m/s. These values of V??s30 place these sites in soil profile type E (V??s30 < 180 m/s). A "rock" site, located at Seward Park on Tertiary sedimentary deposits, has a V??S30 of 433 m/s, which is soil type C (V??s30: 360 to 760 m/s). The Seward Park site V??s30 is about equal to, or up to 200 m/s slower than sites that were located on till or glacial outwash. High-amplitude P-and S-wave seismic reflections at several locations appear to correspond to strong resonances observed in earthquake spectra. An S-wave reflector at the Kingdome at about 17 to 22 m depth probably causes strong 2-Hz resonance that is observed in the earthquake data near the Kingdome.

  12. Broadband seismological observations at two phase geothermal area in West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Hendriyana, Andry; Jaya, Makky; Diningrat, Wahyuddin; Rachmat Sule, M.; Syahbana, Devy; Braeuer, Benjamin; Otto, Christopher; Merz, Michaela; Umar, Muksin; Kusnadi, Yosep; Erbas, Kemal

    2013-04-01

    In order to improve our understanding and enhancing the knowledge about structures and dynamics of geothermal reservoirs for geothermal exploration and a sustainable use of the resource, we assess geothermal reservoirs with an integrated multi-scale and multi-disciplinary approach. A passive seismic monitoring study started in October 2012 with the deployment of a network of 30 broadband seismic stations and 4 short period seismic stations around a two phase geothermal area in West Java, Indonesia. This geothermal field is situated inside the volcanic zone in the center of West Java. Sediments and volcanic product were deposited less than 50,000 years ago. The presence of a complex tectonic setting may explain co-existence of a large variety of intense surface manifestations like fumaroles, hot-steaming grounds, hot water pools, and active volcanoes (Guntur and Papandayan volcanoes). These co-existent features suggest an intimate coupling between volcanic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes in this area. We describe the set-up of the broadband network and discuss first observations.

  13. Uncertainty estimates in broadband seismometer sensitivities using microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringler, A. T.; Storm, T.; Gee, L. S.; Hutt, C. R.; Wilson, D.

    2015-04-01

    The midband sensitivity of a seismic instrument is one of the fundamental parameters used in published station metadata. Any errors in this value can compromise amplitude estimates in otherwise high-quality data. To estimate an upper bound in the uncertainty of the midband sensitivity for modern broadband instruments, we compare daily microseism (4- to 8-s period) amplitude ratios between the vertical components of colocated broadband sensors across the IRIS/USGS (network code IU) seismic network. We find that the mean of the 145,972 daily ratios used between 2002 and 2013 is 0.9895 with a standard deviation of 0.0231. This suggests that the ratio between instruments shows a small bias and considerable scatter. We also find that these ratios follow a standard normal distribution ( R 2 = 0.95442), which suggests that the midband sensitivity of an instrument has an error of no greater than ±6 % with a 99 % confidence interval. This gives an upper bound on the precision to which we know the sensitivity of a fielded instrument.

  14. Uncertainty estimates in broadband seismometer sensitivities using microseisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam T.; Storm, Tyler L.; Gee, Lind S.; Hutt, Charles R.; Wilson, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The midband sensitivity of a seismic instrument is one of the fundamental parameters used in published station metadata. Any errors in this value can compromise amplitude estimates in otherwise high-quality data. To estimate an upper bound in the uncertainty of the midband sensitivity for modern broadband instruments, we compare daily microseism (4- to 8-s period) amplitude ratios between the vertical components of colocated broadband sensors across the IRIS/USGS (network code IU) seismic network. We find that the mean of the 145,972 daily ratios used between 2002 and 2013 is 0.9895 with a standard deviation of 0.0231. This suggests that the ratio between instruments shows a small bias and considerable scatter. We also find that these ratios follow a standard normal distribution (R 2 = 0.95442), which suggests that the midband sensitivity of an instrument has an error of no greater than ±6 % with a 99 % confidence interval. This gives an upper bound on the precision to which we know the sensitivity of a fielded instrument.

  15. Peru Subduction Zone Seismic Experiment (PeruSZE): Preliminary Results From a Seismic Network Between Mollendo and Lake Titicaca, Peru.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, R.; Stubailo, I.; Skinner, S.; Phillips, K.; Foote, E.; Lukac, M.; Aguilar, V.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Husker, A.; Clayton, R.; Davis, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    This work describes preliminary results from a 50 station broadband seismic network recently installed from the coast to the high Andes in Peru. UCLA's Center for Embedded Network Sensing (CENS) and Caltech's Tectonic Observatory are collaborating with the IRD (French L'Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement) and the Institute of Geophysics, in Lima Peru in a broadband seismic experiment that will study the transition from steep to shallow slab subduction. The currently installed line has stations located above the steep subduction zone at a spacing of about 6 km. In 2009 we plan to install a line of 50 stations north from this line along the crest of the Andes, crossing the transition from steep to shallow subduction. A further line from the end of that line back to the coast, completing a U shaped array, is in the planning phase. The network is wirelessly linked using multi-hop network software designed by computer scientists in CENS in which data is transmitted from station to station, and collected at Internet drops, from where it is transmitted over the Internet to CENS each night. The instrument installation in Peru is almost finished and we have been receiving data daily from 10 stations (out of total 50) since June 2008. The rest are recording on-site while the RF network is being completed. The software system provides dynamic link quality based routing, reliable data delivery, and a disruption tolerant shell interface for managing the system from UCLA without the need to travel to Peru. The near real-time data delivery also allows immediate detection of any problems at the sites. We are building a seismic data and GPS quality control toolset that would greatly minimize the station's downtime by alerting the users of any possible problems.

  16. Enhancing Seismic Monitoring Capability for Hydraulic Fracturing Induced Seismicity in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, H.; Cassidy, J. F.; Farahbod, A.; Lamontagne, M.

    2012-12-01

    The amount of natural gas produced from unconventional sources, such as the shale gas, has increased dramatically since the last decade. One of the key factors in the success of shale gas production is the application of hydraulic fracturing (also known as "fracking") to facilitate the efficient recovery of natural gas from shale matrices. As the fracking operation becomes routine in all major shale gas fields, its potential to induce local earthquakes at some locations has become a public concern. To address this concern, Natural Resources Canada has initiated a research effort to investigate the potential links between fracking operations and induced seismicity in some major shale gas basins of Canada. This federal-provincial collaborative research aims to assess if shale gas fracking can alter regional pattern of background seismicity and if so, what the relationship between how fracking is conducted and the maximum magnitude of induced seismicity would be. Other objectives include the investigation of the time scale of the interaction between fracking events and induced seismicity and the evaluation of induced seismicity potential for shale gas basins under different tectonic/geological conditions. The first phase of this research is to enhance the detection and monitoring capability for seismicity possibly related to shale gas recovery in Canada. Densification of the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN) is currently underway in northeast British Columbia where fracking operations are taking place. Additional seismic stations are planned for major shale gas basins in other regions where fracking might be likely in the future. All newly established CNSN stations are equipped with broadband seismographs with real-time continuous data transmission. The design goal of the enhanced seismic network is to significantly lower the detection threshold such that the anticipated low-magnitude earthquakes that might be related to fracking operations can be

  17. Monitoring gas reservoirs by seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Priolo, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Ambient seismic noise can be used to image spatial anomalies in the subsurface, without the need of recordings from seismic sources, such as earthquakes or explosions. Furthermore, the temporal variation of ambient seismic noise's can be used to infer temporal changes of the seismic velocities in the investigated medium. Such temporal variations can reflect changes of several physical properties/conditions in the medium. For example, they may be consequence of stress changes, variation of hydrogeological parameters, pore pressure and saturation changes due to fluid injection or extraction. Passive image interferometry allows to continuously monitor small temporal changes of seismic velocities in the subsurface, making it a suitable tool to monitor time-variant systems such as oil and gas reservoirs or volcanic environments. The technique does not require recordings from seismic sources in the classical sense, but is based on the processing of noise records. Moreover, it requires only data from one or two seismic stations, their locations constraining the sampled target area. Here we apply passive image interferometry to monitor a gas storage reservoir in northern Italy. The Collalto field (Northern Italy) is a depleted gas reservoir located at 1500 m depth, now used as a gas storage facility. The reservoir experience a significant temporal variation in the amount of stored gas: the injection phases mainly occur in the summer, while the extraction take place mostly in winter. In order to monitor induced seismicity related to gas storage operations, a seismic network (the Collalto Seismic Network) has been deployed in 2011. The Collalto Seismic Network is composed by 10 broadband stations, deployed within an area of about 20 km x 20 km, and provides high-quality continuous data since January 1st, 2012. In this work we present preliminary results from ambient noise interferometry using a two-months sample of continuous seismic data, i.e. from October 1st, 2012, to the

  18. Improving the Detectability of the Catalan Seismic Network for Local Seismic Activity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Jose Antonio; Frontera, Tànit; Batlló, Josep; Goula, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The seismic survey of the territory of Catalonia is mainly performed by the regional seismic network operated by the Cartographic and Geologic Institute of Catalonia (ICGC). After successive deployments and upgrades, the current network consists of 16 permanent stations equipped with 3 component broadband seismometers (STS2, STS2.5, CMG3ESP and CMG3T), 24 bits digitizers (Nanometrics Trident) and VSAT telemetry. Data are continuously sent in real-time via Hispasat 1D satellite to the ICGC datacenter in Barcelona. Additionally, data from other 10 stations of neighboring areas (Spain, France and Andorra) are continuously received since 2011 via Internet or VSAT, contributing both to detect and to locate events affecting the region. More than 300 local events with Ml ≥ 0.7 have been yearly detected and located in the region. Nevertheless, small magnitude earthquakes, especially those located in the south and south-west of Catalonia may still go undetected by the automatic detection system (DAS), based on Earthworm (USGS). Thus, in order to improve the detection and characterization of these missed events, one or two new stations should be installed. Before making the decision about where to install these new stations, the performance of each existing station is evaluated taking into account the fraction of detected events using the station records, compared to the total number of events in the catalogue, occurred during the station operation time from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2014. These evaluations allow us to build an Event Detection Probability Map (EDPM), a required tool to simulate EDPMs resulting from different network topology scenarios depending on where these new stations are sited, and becoming essential for the decision-making process to increase and optimize the event detection probability of the seismic network.

  19. Geologic interpretation of seismic data, relocation of Route 3: cut, stations 364-382 in Billerica, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.

    1954-01-01

    Geologic and seismic studies were made of this site in October 1951, primarily for the purpose of obtaining data what would aid in establishing a grade for the proposed highway. A report on the geology of the site together with the interpretation of the seismic data that were obtained at this time was submitted by James E. Maynard and Robert M. Haslewood (file report of October 1952). Additional seismic work was performed at this site in Maroh 1953; Mr. M. E. Chandler, Engineer, Massachusetts Department of Public Works, operated seismic equipment at this time. This later work was done to obtain information that would augment the data of the preliminary survey sufficiently to permit estimates to be made of the quantities of materials to be excavated from the cut. This report contains the geologic interpretation of the supplementary seismic data that were obtained during the Maroh 1953 survey. The work was perfromed as a part of a cooperative project of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  20. Crustal structure beneath two seismic stations in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone derived from receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syuhada, Hananto, Nugroho D.; Puspito, Nanang T.; Anggono, Titi; Handayani, Lina; Yudistira, Tedi

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed receiver functions to estimate the crustal thickness and velocity structure beneath two stations of Geofon (GE) network in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone. The stations are located in two different tectonic regimes: Sumbawa Island (station PLAI) and Timor Island (station SOEI) representing the oceanic and continental characters, respectively. We analyzed teleseismic events of 80 earthquakes to calculate the receiver functions using the time-domain iterative deconvolution technique. We employed 2D grid search (H-κ) algorithm based on the Moho interaction phases to estimate crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio. We also derived the S-wave velocity variation with depth beneath both stations by inverting the receiver functions. We obtained that beneath station PLAI the crustal thickness is about 27.8 km with Vp/Vs ratio 2.01. As station SOEI is covered by very thick low-velocity sediment causing unstable solution for the inversion, we modified the initial velocity model by adding the sediment thickness estimated using high frequency content of receiver functions in H-κ stacking process. We obtained the crustal thickness is about 37 km with VP/Vs ratio 2.2 beneath station SOEI. We suggest that the high Vp/Vs in station PLAI may indicate the presence of fluid ascending from the subducted plate to the volcanic arc, whereas the high Vp/Vs in station SOEI could be due to the presence of sediment and rich mafic composition in the upper crust and possibly related to the serpentinization process in the lower crust. We also suggest that the difference in velocity models and crustal thicknesses between stations PLAI and SOEI are consistent with their contrasting tectonic environments.

  1. Crustal structure beneath two seismic stations in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone derived from receiver function analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Syuhada; Hananto, Nugroho D.; Handayani, Lina; Puspito, Nanang T; Yudistira, Tedi; Anggono, Titi

    2015-04-24

    We analyzed receiver functions to estimate the crustal thickness and velocity structure beneath two stations of Geofon (GE) network in the Sunda-Banda arc transition zone. The stations are located in two different tectonic regimes: Sumbawa Island (station PLAI) and Timor Island (station SOEI) representing the oceanic and continental characters, respectively. We analyzed teleseismic events of 80 earthquakes to calculate the receiver functions using the time-domain iterative deconvolution technique. We employed 2D grid search (H-κ) algorithm based on the Moho interaction phases to estimate crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio. We also derived the S-wave velocity variation with depth beneath both stations by inverting the receiver functions. We obtained that beneath station PLAI the crustal thickness is about 27.8 km with Vp/Vs ratio 2.01. As station SOEI is covered by very thick low-velocity sediment causing unstable solution for the inversion, we modified the initial velocity model by adding the sediment thickness estimated using high frequency content of receiver functions in H-κ stacking process. We obtained the crustal thickness is about 37 km with VP/Vs ratio 2.2 beneath station SOEI. We suggest that the high Vp/Vs in station PLAI may indicate the presence of fluid ascending from the subducted plate to the volcanic arc, whereas the high Vp/Vs in station SOEI could be due to the presence of sediment and rich mafic composition in the upper crust and possibly related to the serpentinization process in the lower crust. We also suggest that the difference in velocity models and crustal thicknesses between stations PLAI and SOEI are consistent with their contrasting tectonic environments.

  2. Geologic and seismic investigations for relocation of Route 20 (Springfield Bypass) Alden Street to Chicopee River, proposed cuts, stations 783-788, and 790-796 in Ludlow, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1954-01-01

    This work was done to obtain geologic and seismic data that would aid in establishing a grade for the proposed highway and, also, be of value in preparing estimates on the quantities of materials to be excavated from the cuts. Seismic work was done at two sites, namely, stations 783-788; and 790-796. The work was performed in February 19852 as part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United State Geological Survey.

  3. Geology and geologic interpretation of seismic data, relocation of Route 102 in Lee, Mass., proposed cut, stations 30-36

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Hazelwood, Robert M.

    1954-01-01

    Geologic and seismic studies were made at this site for the purpose of obtaining data that would aid in determining the kinds of material underlying the site, and estimating the amounts of these materials to be excavated. The work was done in May 1952 as part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the Interior States Geological Survey.

  4. Seismic Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Soloviev, V. M.; Emanov, A. F.

    The paper is devoted to researches of influence of seismic actions for industrial and civil buildings and people. The seismic actions bring influence directly on the people (vibration actions, force shocks at earthquakes) or indirectly through various build- ings and the constructions and can be strong (be felt by people) and weak (be fixed by sensing devices). The great number of work is devoted to influence of violent seismic actions (first of all of earthquakes) on people and various constructions. This work is devoted to study weak, but long seismic actions on various buildings and people. There is a need to take into account seismic oscillations, acting on the territory, at construction of various buildings on urbanized territories. Essential influence, except for violent earthquakes, man-caused seismic actions: the explosions, seismic noise, emitted by plant facilities and moving transport, radiation from high-rise buildings and constructions under action of a wind, etc. can exert. Materials on increase of man- caused seismicity in a number of regions in Russia, which earlier were not seismic, are presented in the paper. Along with maps of seismic microzoning maps to be built indicating a variation of amplitude spectra of seismic noise within day, months, years. The presence of an information about amplitudes and frequencies of oscillations from possible earthquakes and man-caused oscillations in concrete regions allows carry- ing out soundly designing and construction of industrial and civil housing projects. The construction of buildings even in not seismically dangerous regions, which have one from resonance frequencies coincident on magnitude to frequency of oscillations, emitted in this place by man-caused objects, can end in failure of these buildings and heaviest consequences for the people. The practical examples of detail of engineering- seismological investigation of large industrial and civil housing projects of Siberia territory (hydro power

  5. Seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica): Recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Martín, R.; Cortés, G.; Alguacil, G.; Moreno, J.; Martín, B.; Martos, A.; Serrano, I.; Stich, D.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Deception Island (South Shetland Island, Antarctica) is an active volcano with recent eruptions (e.g. 1967, 1969 and 1970). It is also among the Antarctic sites most visited by tourists. Besides, there are currently two scientific bases operating during the austral summers, usually from late November to early March. For these reasons it is necessary to deploy a volcano monitoring system as complete as possible, designed specifically to endure the extreme conditions of the volcanic environment and the Antarctic climate. The Instituto Andaluz de Geofísica of University of Granada, Spain (IAG-UGR) performs seismic monitoring on Deception Island since 1994 during austral summer surveys. The seismicity basically includes volcano-tectonic earthquakes, long-period events and volcanic tremor, among other signals. The level of seismicity is moderate, except for a seismo-volcanic crisis in 1999. The seismic monitoring system has evolved during these years, following the trends of the technological developments and software improvements. Recent advances have been mainly focused on: (1) the improvement of the seismic network introducing broadband stations and 24-bit data acquisition systems; (2) the development of a short-period seismic array, with a 12-channel, 24-bit data acquisition system; (3) the implementation of wireless data transmission from the network stations and also from the seismic array to a recording center, allowing for real-time monitoring; (4) the efficiency of the power supply systems and the monitoring of the battery levels and power consumption; (5) the optimization of data analysis procedures, including database management, automated event recognition tools for the identification and classification of seismo-volcanic signals, and apparent slowness vector estimates using seismic array data; (6) the deployment of permanent seismic stations and the transmission of data during the winter using a satellite connection. A single permanent station is operating

  6. 47 CFR 27.1209 - Conversion of incumbent EBS and BRS stations to geographic area licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service § 27.1209 Conversion of incumbent EBS and BRS stations to...

  7. 47 CFR 27.1209 - Conversion of incumbent EBS and BRS stations to geographic area licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service § 27.1209 Conversion of incumbent EBS and BRS stations to...

  8. 47 CFR 27.1209 - Conversion of incumbent EBS and BRS stations to geographic area licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service § 27.1209 Conversion of incumbent EBS and BRS stations to...

  9. 47 CFR 27.1209 - Conversion of incumbent EBS and BRS stations to geographic area licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband Radio Service and Educational Broadband Service § 27.1209 Conversion of incumbent EBS and BRS stations to...

  10. Near-Real-Time Sismo-acoustic Submarine Station for offshore monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Antonino; Fertitta, Gioacchino; Fraticelli, Nicola; Calore, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    From the early 1980's, Italian seismicity is monitored by the National Seismic Network (NSN). The network has been considerably enhanced by INGV since 2005 by 24-bit digital stations equipped with broad-band sensors. The NSN is nowadays constituted by about 300 on-land seismic station able to detect and locate also small magnitude earthquake in the whole Italian peninsula. However, the lack of offshore seismic stations does not allow the accurate estimation of hypocentral and focal parameters of small magnitude earthquakes occurring in offshore areas. As in the Mediterranean area there is an intense offshore seismic activity, an extension of the seismic monitoring to the sea would be beneficial. There are two types of stations that could be used to extend the network towards the sea: the first type is connected to the coast though a cable, the second type is isolated (or stand alone) and works autonomously. Both solutions have serious limitations: the first one, for several technical and economic problems, linked to the indispensable transmission/alimentation cable, cannot be installed far from the coast; the second one, allows access to the recorded data, only after they are recovered from the seabed. It is clear that these technical solutions are not suitable for the real time monitoring of the offshore seismicity or for the realization of a tsunami warning system. For this reason, in early 2010, the OBSLab of Gibilmanna begins the design of a submarine station able to overcome the limitations of the two systems above. The station isbuilt under the project EMSO-MedIT. The two stations built have already been tested in dock and ready for installation. One of this station will be installed, in few time, in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea, near the epicentre of the Palermo 2002 main shock. The sea bottom station will be equipped with 2 very broadband 3C seismometers, a broad band hydrophone, a differential and an absolute pressure gauge. The station includes a submarine

  11. Applications of detailed 3D P-wave velocity crustal model in Poland for local, regional and global seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2015-04-01

    The 3D P-wave seismic velocity model was obtained by combining data from multiple studies during past 50 years. Data sources included refraction seismology, reflection seismology, geological boreholes, vertical seismic profiling, magnetotellurics and gravimetry. Use of many data sources allowed creation of detailed 3D P-wave velocity model that reaches to depth of 60 km and includes 6-layers of sediments and 3-layers of the crust. Purpose of this study is to analyze how 3D model influences local (accuracy of location and source time estimation for local events), regional (identification of wide-angle seismic phases) and global (teleseismic tomography) seismic travel times. Additionally we compare results of forward seismic wave propagation with signals observed on short period and broadband stations. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  12. Seismic imaging of esker structures from a combination of high-resolution broadband multicomponent streamer and wireless sensors, Turku-Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maries, Georgiana; Ahokangas, Elina; Mäkinen, Joni; Pasanen, Antti; Malehmir, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    Eskers and glaciofluvial interlobate formations, mainly composed of sands and gravels and deposited in winding ridges, define the locations of glacial melt-water streams. These sediments, porous and permeable, form the most important aquifers in Finland and are often used as aggregates or for artificial aquifer recharge. The Virttaankangas interlobate suite and artificial aquifer recharge plant provides the entire water supply for the city of Turku and therefore an accurate delineation of the aquifer is critical for long term planning and sustainable use of these natural resources. The study area is part of the Säkylänharju-Virttaankangas Glaciofluvial esker-chain complex and lies on an igneous, crystalline basement rocks. To provide complementary information to existing boreholes and GPR studies at the site, such as identification of potential esker cores, planning for a water extraction, fractured bedrock and possible kettle holes, a new seismic investigation was designed and carried out during summer 2014. Two seismic profiles each about 1 km long were acquired using a newly developed 200 m long prototype, comprising of 80-3C MEMs-based, landstreamer system. To provide velocity information at larger depths (and longer offsets), fifty-two 10-Hz 1C wireless sensors spaced at about every 20 m were used. A Bobcat mounted drop-hammer source, generating three hits per source location, was used as the seismic source. This proved to be a good choice given the attenuative nature of the dry sediments down to about 20 m depth. One of the seismic lines overlaps an existing streamer survey and thus allows a comparison between the system used in this study and the one employed before. Except at a few places where the loose sands mixed with leaves affected the coupling, the data quality is excellent with several reflections identifiable in the raw shot gathers. First arrivals were easily identifiable in almost all the traces and shots and this allowed obtaining velocity

  13. Observations and Modeling of Seismic Background Noise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jon R.

    1993-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The preparation of this report had two purposes. One was to present a catalog of seismic background noise spectra obtained from a worldwide network of seismograph stations. The other purpose was to refine and document models of seismic background noise that have been in use for several years. The second objective was, in fact, the principal reason that this study was initiated and influenced the procedures used in collecting and processing the data. With a single exception, all of the data used in this study were extracted from the digital data archive at the U.S. Geological Survey's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL). This archive dates from 1972 when ASL first began deploying digital seismograph systems and collecting and distributing digital data under the sponsorship of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). There have been many changes and additions to the global seismograph networks during the past twenty years, but perhaps none as significant as the current deployment of very broadband seismographs by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of California San Diego (UCSD) under the scientific direction of the IRIS consortium. The new data acquisition systems have extended the bandwidth and resolution of seismic recording, and they utilize high-density recording media that permit the continuous recording of broadband data. The data improvements and continuous recording greatly benefit and simplify surveys of seismic background noise. Although there are many other sources of digital data, the ASL archive data were used almost exclusively because of accessibility and because the data systems and their calibration are well documented for the most part. Fortunately, the ASL archive contains high-quality data from other stations in addition to those deployed by the USGS. Included are data from UCSD IRIS/IDA stations, the Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) deployed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the

  14. Glacial seismic events from Greenland recorded by the POLENET/LAPNET seismic array during the IPY 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, E.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial earthquakes are seismic events associated with rapid changes in the dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers. They belong to the class of so-called slow earthquakes caused by a variety of stick-slip and creep processes. Recordings of glacial events are depleted in high frequencies and can be detected from recordings of broadband seismic instruments. Monitoring of such events from Greenland at regional distances was one of the major targets of the POLENET/LAPNET passive seismic experiment in northern Fennoscandia (northern parts of Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russian Karelia) during the IPY 2007-2009. The POLENET/LAPNET array, with the average spacing between stations of 70 km, recorded high-frequency continuous data of 37 temporary stations, which were in operation during the time frame from 01.05.2008 to 31.09.2009, and of 21 stations of selected permanent networks in the Fennoscandia. Glacial events from Greenland were identified using manual analysis of the continuous POLENET/LAPNET data filtered by a bandpass filter from 35 s to 140 s frequency band. The detected events were located using standard array techniques. Our study demonstrated that the POLENET/LAPNET array, located at regional distances from Greenland, recorded more such events than the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) during the same observation period. In addition, the array detected a number of slow earthquakes originating from northern part of Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland, vicinity of Spitsbergen, Jan Mayen Island and a number of events originated from Arctic Canada. This shows that analysis of recordings of broadband stations in low-frequency can provide new information about seismicity and spreading processes in the Arctics. Our study proves that glacial earthquakes in Greenland show a seasonality, with most of events occurring during summer months. We found out that during 2008, significant number of events originated from the northern part of Greenland, where recent investigation using

  15. Characterization of broadband regional distance seismograms: Use of global, open data to study regions of interest. Final technical report, 15 July 1992-15 January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, T.C.; Beck, S.L.

    1995-06-01

    This research undertook scientific problem inherent in the monitoring of a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty; establishing confidence that the seismograms from small and moderate-sized events are understood, thus, identifiable. This requires an understanding of broadband regional distance seismic phases from both explosions and earthquakes, the excitation of the various phases, and their dependence on source. Data from open broadband stations across the Andean Cordillera were used in research to evaluate the utility of the spectral characteristics of regional distance seismo-grams of phase ratio pairs (Pg/Lg; Pn/Lg). The entire regional waveforms for seismic events traversing the Andes were modeled providing detail of crustal thickness, the average crustal velocity, and propagation efficiency. Further, this report details research to treat a single regional distance station as a seismic observatory and to establish a relative location procedure in which to locate smaller magnitude events relative to an established epicentral coordinate. Finally, the results are reported of a temporary broadband deployment used to record the DOE hosted Non-Proliferation Experiment; exploration of how geologic environment changes affects discriminants.

  16. The Central and Eastern U.S. Seismic Network: Legacy of USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakins, J. A.; Astiz, L.; Benz, H.; Busby, R. W.; Hafner, K.; Reyes, J. C.; Sharer, G.; Vernon, F.; Woodward, R.

    2014-12-01

    As the USArray Transportable Array entered the central and eastern United States, several Federal agencies (National Science Foundation, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Department of Energy) recognized the unique opportunity to retain TA stations beyond the original timeline. The mission of the CEUSN is to produce data that enables researchers and Federal agencies alike to better understand the basic geologic questions, background earthquake rates and distribution, seismic hazard potential, and associated societal risks of this region. The selected long-term sub-array from Transportable Array (TA) stations includes nearly 200 sites, complemented by 100 broadband stations from the existing regional seismic networks to form the Central and Eastern United States Network (CEUSN). Multiple criteria for site selection were weighed by an inter-agency TA Station Selection (TASS) Working Group: seismic noise characteristics, data availability in real time, proximity to nuclear power plants, and homogeneous distribution throughout the region. The Array Network Facility (ANF) started collecting data for CEUSN network stations since late 2013, with all stations collected since May 2014. Regional seismic data streams are collected in real-time from the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). TA stations selected to be part of CEUSN, retain the broadband sensor to which a 100 sps channel is added, the infrasound and environmental channels, and, at some stations, accelerometers are deployed. The upgraded sites become part of the N4 network for which ANF provides metadata and can issue remote commands to the station equipment. Stations still operated by TA, but planned for CEUSN, are included in the virtual network so all stations are currently available now. By the end of 2015, the remaining TA stations will be upgraded. Data quality control procedures developed for TA stations at ANF and at the DMC are currently performed on N4 data. However

  17. Discriminating non-seismic long-period pulses and noise to improve earthquake source inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Takahide; Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Pulido, Nelson; Bonita, Jun; Nakano, Masaru

    2016-04-01

    Broadband seismometers produce artifacts resembling long-period pulses (non-seismic pulses) that degrade centroid moment tensor (CMT) estimations based on waveform inversion of broadband seismic records in long-period bands (50-200 s). We propose a method to discriminate non-seismic pulses and long-period noise from seismic signals, which can be applied to automatic CMT inversion analysis. In this method, we calculate source amplitudes as peak-to-peak displacement amplitudes in individual long-period seismic records after each event has been corrected for medium attenuation and geometric spreading and then estimate the ratios of individual source amplitudes to the minimum source amplitude. Because source amplitude ratios for non-seismic pulses tend to be greater than those of the seismic signals, we use seismic records in CMT estimations only if their source amplitude ratios are lower than a threshold value ( R). We tested this method using broadband seismic data from the Philippines and found that reprocessed inversion solutions using this method showed a clear improvement when using R = 11, although focal mechanism estimations were not entirely stable. To investigate the general applicability of this method, we analyzed broadband seismic data from F-net in Japan. Our analysis indicated that source amplitude ratios in F-net data ranged up to about 20, indicating that the threshold value may be dependent on station density. Given that F-net is one of the highest density networks in the world, we may assume that a threshold value between 10 and 20 is appropriate for application of our method for most regional broadband networks. Our synthetic tests indicated that source amplitude ratios can be as high as 103, although observed ratios are only within the range 10-20. This suggests that we happened to observe only events having focal mechanisms with source amplitude ratios of 10-20. Alternatively, these high source amplitude ratios can be explained by distortion of

  18. Microearthquakes at Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Improved Detection and Location with Two Additional Caldera Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. M.; House, L. S.; Ten Cate, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN) has operated for 43 years, providing data to locate more than 2,500 earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. Roughly 1-2 earthquakes are detected and located per month within about 150 km of Los Alamos, a total of over 900 from 1973 to present. LASN's primary purpose is to monitor seismicity close to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for seismic hazards; monitoring seismicity associated with the nearby Valles Caldera is secondary. Until 2010 the network was focused on monitoring seismic hazards and comprised only 7 stations, all near LANL or in the nearby Jemez Mountains. Just one station—PER, installed in 1998—was close enough to Valles Caldera to be able to detect microearthquakes located in or near the caldera. An initial study of the data from station PER between 1998 and 2002 identified and located 13 events with magnitudes less than 0.5 using the single-station hodogram technique. Those events were all located south of the caldera within a few kilometers of PER. Recently, two new digital broadband stations were installed inside the caldera, one on a northeastern ring-fracture dome, station CDAB, and the other on a northwestern dome, station SAMT. Also, station PER was upgraded with digital broadband instrumentation. Thus, LASN now can detect and record microearthquakes as small as magnitude -1.5 near the caldera, and they can be located using multiple arrival times. Several recent events located near station SAMT on the caldera's ring fracture are the first that have been seen in that area. Additional events were recorded (by all three stations) and located in the area south of the caldera where the earlier hodogram-only events were located. These new multi-station event recordings allow a more quantitative assessment of the uncertainties in the initial single-station hodogram locations. Each event is located using multiple arrival times as well as the hodogram method at as many as three stations. Thus

  19. Broadband network on-line data acquisition system with web based interface for control and basic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Passive seismic experiment "13BB Star" is operated since mid 2013 in northern Poland and consists of 13 broadband seismic stations. One of the elements of this experiment is dedicated on-line data acquisition system comprised of both client (station) side and server side modules with web based interface that allows monitoring of network status and provides tools for preliminary data analysis. Station side is controlled by ARM Linux board that is programmed to maintain 3G/EDGE internet connection, receive data from digitizer, send data do central server among with additional auxiliary parameters like temperatures, voltages and electric current measurements. Station side is controlled by set of easy to install PHP scripts. Data is transmitted securely over SSH protocol to central server. Central server is a dedicated Linux based machine. Its duty is receiving and processing all data from all stations including auxiliary parameters. Server side software is written in PHP and Python. Additionally, it allows remote station configuration and provides web based interface for user friendly interaction. All collected data can be displayed for each day and station. It also allows manual creation of event oriented plots with different filtering abilities and provides numerous status and statistic information. Our solution is very flexible and easy to modify. In this presentation we would like to share our solution and experience. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  20. Performance comparison of mid-aperture broadband arrays at an ocean island and in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten

    2013-04-01

    Between 2011 and 2012, three mid-aperture broadband arrays were deployed on the island of Madeira, in western Portugal, and north of the Gloria fault in the Mid Atlantic within the DOCTAR (Deep Ocean Test ARray) project. Here, we compare performance parameters for the ocean island array on Madeira and the deep ocean array. The Madeira array consists of 24 temporary stations (12 broadband stations (8 Guralp 60s & 4 STS2), 12 temporary LE3D 5s stations). The mean inter-station distance is about 5 km and the array has an aperture of about 20 by 40 km on the island of Madeira if the broadband station(STS2) on the nearby island of Desertas is excluded. Furthermore, there are 3 permanent stations installed on Madeira (one Guralp 120s and 2 LE3D 5s) and 2 on the neighbouring island Porto Santo (one Guralp 120s and one LE3D 5S). The deep ocean array consists of 12 ocean bottom stations (broadband seismometer (Guralp 60s) combined with a HTI hydrophone (DEPAS type instruments)) and was deployed at the sea floor close to the Gloria fault between 5000 m and 4000 m water depth. The inter-station distance was about 10 km and the aperture about 70 km. One purpose of the experiment is to test the possible advantage of ocean bottom arrays in comparison to ocean island installations. Therefore, we compare different aspects: (1) the experimental effort and the specific problems of data processing (e.g. data loss, clock drift and station location problematic in case of the deep ocean array). Special emphasis will be given to the orientation of three component stations by waveform comparison methods and results from the use of a portable Gyrocompass on Madeira. (2) the ambient noise spectra as a function of frequency and time, (3) examples of fk analysis and the specific problems on the ocean floor and volcanic, oceanic islands (topography and scattering effects). (4) detection thresholds and frequency content of local and regional events. The presentation finally gives our

  1. The LUSI Seismic Experiment: Deployment of a Seismic Network around LUSI, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Haryanto, Iyan; Masturyono, Masturyono; Hadi, Soffian; Rohadi, Suprianto; Suardi, Iman; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lusi eruption started in northeast Java, Indonesia the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. Lusi is located few kilometres to the NE of the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. Lusi sits upon the Watukosek fault system. From this volcanic complex originates the Watukosek fault system that was reactivated by the M6.3 earthquake in 2006 and is still periodically reactivated by the frequent seismicity. To date Lusi is still active and erupting gas, water, mud and clasts. Gas and water data show that the Lusi plumbing system is connected with the neighbouring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. This makes the Lusi eruption a "sedimentary hosted geothermal system". To verify and characterise the occurrence of seismic activity and how this perturbs the connected Watukosek fault, the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic system and the ongoing Lusi eruption, we deployed 30 seismic stations (short-period and broadband) in this region of the East Java basin. The seismic stations are more densely distributed around LUSI and the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. Fewer stations are positioned around the volcanic arc. Our study sheds light on the seismic activity along the Watukosek fault system and describes the waveforms associated to the geysering activity of Lusi. The initial network aims to locate small event that may not be captured by the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG) seismic network and it will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-Arjuno Welirang region and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. Such variations will then be ideally related to

  2. An analysis of Haiti earthquake (January 12., 2010) from its aftershock sequence using land-based and off-shore temporary seismic stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchatelier, M. U.; Arroucau, P.; Mulrooney, T.; Vlahovic, G.; Deschamps, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Mw=7.0 earthquake that occurred in the vicinity of Port-au-Prince, Haiti on january 12th, 2010 caused significant damage to the infrastructures of the country and resulted in more than 200,00 casualties. The Republic of Haiti is part of the island of Hispaniola and is located at the boundary between the North American and Caribbean tectonic plates. The 20 mm/yr relative motion between these two plates results in long-term stress accumulation along this boundary and can explain the seismic activity of that region. First reports on the Haiti earthquake attributed that event to the Enriquillo Plaintain Garden fault Zone (EPGFZ), a major fault system whose location and geometry was compatible with earthquake scenarios inferred from previous studies. However, subsequent analyses have shown that the actual fault involved in that earthquake was probably a buried one, with expression at the surface. Detailed information about the source location and geometry of earthquakes can be obtained from the analysis of their aftershock distribution. In this work, we present location results for a set of 50 aftershocks recorded by a temporary array of 19 offshore and 5 onshore seismic stations deployed in the epicentral region a few days after January 12th earthquake.

  3. P-Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Eastern Eurasia From Finite Frequency Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Shen, Y.; Yang, X.

    2005-12-01

    Eastern Eurasia is one of the most tectonically complex regions in the world. While the evolution history of continental lithosphere has been well recognized, the fine structure associated with the complicated deformation in this region is far from clear, and deep mantle processes that accompanied shallower lithosphere deformations are poorly understood. In order to improve the resolution of the velocity structure in the region, we applied the newly-developed Finite Frequency Seismic Tomography (FFST) method, which utilizes the 3D Frechet-Born sensitivity kernels of the travel times of finite frequency seismic waves to account for wavefront healing and off-ray scattering, to eastern Eurasia. In addition to the new technique, we obtained a comprehensive finite-frequency body wave travel time data set from cross-correlation of broadband waveforms. Datasets used in this study include waveforms from the publicly accessible sources (e.g. IRIS, GSN, PASSCAL, and IMS stations) and other seismic networks in the region such as the Japanese Broadband Seismograph Network (F-net), the Japanese International Seismic Network (JISNET), the Taiwan Broadband Seismic Network and China National Digital Seismic Network. Taking advantage of broadband waveforms, we measured relative delays times by waveform cross-correlation in three frequency bands between 0.03 to 2 Hz for P waves. The travel times in the three frequency bands were inverted jointly to take advantage of the `data fusion' made possible by the finite-frequency kernels and separately to understand the resolving power of each data set. Preliminary results are comparable to the velocity models obtained in previous tomographic studies.

  4. Complex seismic anisotropy at the border of a very low velocity province at the base of the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Wen, Lianxing

    2007-09-01

    We constrain the anisotropy associated with a very low velocity province (VLVP) at the base of the Earth's mantle using the SKS and SKKS waves sampling the region. Our selected high-quality data sets consist of 415 SKS and 111 SKKS waveforms for 127 deep earthquakes recorded at distances between 90° and 150° by the seismic stations in three temporary broadband PASSCAL seismic arrays: the Kaapvaal seismic array (1997-1999), the Tanzania seismic array (1994-1995), and the Ethiopia/Kenya seismic array (1999-2001), as well as the permanent stations in the Global Seismographic Network. These seismic data provide good sampling coverage for some portion of the VLVP and its surrounding areas. Our results show, when the SKS or SKKS phases sample the regions away from the border of the VLVP (inside or outside the VLVP), the apparent splitting parameters inferred from the SKS phases are consistent with those inferred from the SKKS phases, and their variations strongly correlate with seismic stations but not with the exit points at the core-mantle boundary of these seismic phases. However, when the SKS or SKKS phases sample near the border of the VLVP, the apparent splitting parameters inferred from the SKS phases and SKKS phases are different, and their variations no longer correlate with seismic stations. These features indicate that part of the shear wave splitting for the seismic data sampling the border of the VLVP has to originate from deep mantle, most likely near the border of the VLVP. We assume that the anisotropy in the shallow mantle beneath seismic stations has a horizontal hexagonal symmetry axis and infer the splitting parameters associated with the shallow anisotropy beneath the seismic stations using the SKS and SKKS waveforms for the seismic data sampling the regions away from the border of the VLVP. We then obtain the splitting parameters associated with the lowermost mantle anisotropy using the SKS and SKKS waveforms corrected for the inferred shallow

  5. Calibration of seismic wave propagation in Jordan

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Husien, A; Amrat, A; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Nakanishi, K; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S; Ryall, F; Skinnell, K; Yazjeen, T

    1999-07-23

    The Natural Resources Authority of Jordan (NRA), the USGS and LLNL have a collaborative project to improve the calibration of seismic propagation in Jordan and surrounding regions. This project serves common goals of CTBT calibration and earthquake hazard assessment in the region. These objectives include accurate location of local and regional earthquakes, calibration of magnitude scales, and the development of local and regional propagation models. In the CTBT context, better propagation models and more accurately located events in the Dead Sea rift region can serve as (potentially GT5) calibration events for generating IMS location corrections. The detection and collection of mining explosions underpins discrimination research. The principal activity of this project is the deployment of two broadband stations at Hittiyah (south Jordan) and Ruweishid (east Jordan). These stations provide additional paths in the region to constrain structure with surface wave and body wave tomography. The Ruweishid station is favorably placed to provide constraints on Arabian platform structure. Waveform modeling with long-period observations of larger earthquakes will provide constraints on 1-D velocity models of the crust and upper mantle. Data from these stations combined with phase observations from the 26 short-period stations of the Jordan National Seismic Network (JNSN) may allow the construction of a more detailed velocity model of Jordan. The Hittiyah station is an excellent source of ground truth information for the six phosphate mines of southern Jordan and Israel. Observations of mining explosions collected by this station have numerous uses: for definition of templates for screening mining explosions, as ground truth events for calibrating travel-time models, and as explosion populations in development and testing discriminants. Following previously established procedures for identifying explosions, we have identified more than 200 explosions from the first 85 days of

  6. New Observations of Seismic Group Velocities in the Western Solomon Islands from Cross-Correlation of Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, C. S.; You, S. H.; Kuo, Y. T.; Huang, B. S.; Wu, Y. M.; Chen, Y. G.; Taylor, F. W.

    2015-12-01

    A MW 8.1 earthquake occurred on 1 April 2007 in the western Solomon Islands. Following this event, a damaging tsunami was induced and hit the Island Gizo where the capital city of Western Province of Solomon Islands located. Several buildings of this city were destroyed and several peoples lost their lives during this earthquake. However, during this earthquake, no near source seismic instrument has been installed in this region. The seismic evaluations for the aftershock sequence, the possible earthquake early warning and tsunami warning were unavailable. For the purpose of knowing more detailed information about seismic activity in this region, we have installed 9 seismic stations (with Trillium 120PA broadband seismometer and Q330S 24bit digitizer) around the rupture zone of the 2007 earthquake since September of 2009. Within a decade, it has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the Green's function or impulse response between two seismic stations can be retrieved from the cross-correlation of ambient noise. In this study, 6 stations' observations which are more complete during 2011/10 ~ 2012/12 period, were selected for the purpose of the cross-correlation analysis of ambient seismic noise. The group velocities at period 2-20 seconds of 15 station-pairs were extracted by using multiple filter technique (MFT) method. The analyzed results of this study presented significant results of group velocities with higher frequency contents than other studies (20-60 seconds in usually cases) and opened new opportunities to study the shallow crustal structure of the western Solomon Islands.

  7. The Hellenic Seismic Network (HL): Recent Upgrades and Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, N. S.; Evangelidis, C. P.; Boukouras, K.; Kalogeras, I. S.; Makropoulos, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Institute of Geodynamics, National Observatory of Athens (NOA-IG) monitors seismicity in Greece since its foundation in 1893. Upgrades with results towards a modernized digital seismic network started back in 2000 and they were continued since then in stages, as national funds were made available as well as more personnel was employed. The most recent upgrade started in 2007, with a dedicated project aiming to establish a Unified National Seismic Network and to link the Hellenic National Seismic Network of NOA-IG with the three Universities: Athens, Thessaloniki and Patras, which also operate local seismic networks. Although the four joining networks are operated independently, with each partner taking responsibility for the operation of its own network, the project upgrade achieved the update - improvement of every network and the seismic waveform data to be made available in near real time amongst the four partners. In parallel, a new upgraded National Strong Motion Network at NOA-IG is under way, giving the opportunity to join the continuous monitored accelerometric data in real time with the available broadband data and furthermore to upgrade existing seismic stations by deploying also an accelerometer next to the broadband sensor. Experiences through troubleshooting, methodologies and tools used to improve operation and examples of recordings from the new established infrastructure are presented, explaining the developments - improvements achieved at every stage until today. Specific earthquake recorded examples are shown, in order to explain the new possibilities opened for detail investigation and operational preparedness established on line in the 24/7 operational center at NOA-IG in Athens, as well as to other operating as backup centers. Further developments and operations using the present resulted operational - research infrastructure and the databases that are made available are also explained and presented.

  8. Geologic interpretation of seismic data relocation Route 2, Littleton Road grade separation stations 243-252 in Harvard, Mass.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, James E.; Linehan, Rev. Daniel

    1950-01-01

    During parts of June and July 1949 nine seismic traverses were made at this site. Upon preliminary office development, the velocity data for some of these traverses were though to be inadequate and it was recommended that these lines be re-surveyed. Later surveys (March 1950), however, of nearby sites indicated that the original data were reliable and that a re-survey was unnecessary. The work was done as part of a cooperative program of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the United States Geological Survey.

  9. Local seismic events in area of Poland based on data from PASSEQ 2006-2008 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Plesiewicz, Beata; Wiszniowski, Jan; Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Passeq Working Group

    2014-05-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 (Passive Seismic Experiment in TESZ; Wilde-Piórko et al, 2008) was the biggest so far passive seismic experiment in the area of Central Europe (Poland, Germany, Czech Republic and Lithuania). 196 seismic stations (including 49 broadband seismometers) worked simultaneously for over two years. During experiment multiple types of data recorders and seismometers were used making analysis more complex and time consuming. Dataset was unified and repaired to start the detection of local seismic events. Two different approaches for detection were applied for stations located in Poland. One used standard STA/LTA triggers (Carl Johnson's STA/LTA algorithm) and grid search to classify and locate events. Result was manually verified. Other approach used Real Time Recurrent Network (RTRN) detection (Wiszniowski et al, 2014). Both methods gave similar results showing four previously unknown seismic events located in area of Gulf Of Gdańsk in southern Baltic Sea. The investigation of local seismicity is a good opportunity for verification of new seismic models of lithosphere in the area. In this paper we discuss both detection methods with their pros and cons (accuracy, efficiency, manual work required, scalability). We also show details of all detected and previously unknown events in discussed area. This work was partially supported by NCN grant UMO-2011/01/B/ST10/06653.

  10. Development of XML Schema for Broadband Digital Seismograms and Data Center Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Tsuboi, S.; Ishihara, Y.; Nagao, H.; Yamagishi, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Yanaka, H.; Yamaji, H.

    2008-12-01

    There are a number of data centers around the globe, where the digital broadband seismograms are opened to researchers. Those centers use their own user interfaces and there are no standard to access and retrieve seismograms from different data centers using unified interface. One of the emergent technologies to realize unified user interface for different data centers is the concept of WebService and WebService portal. Here we have developed a prototype of data center portal for digital broadband seismograms. This WebService portal uses WSDL (Web Services Description Language) to accommodate differences among the different data centers. By using the WSDL, alteration and addition of data center user interfaces can be easily managed. This portal, called NINJA Portal, assumes three WebServices: (1) database Query service, (2) Seismic event data request service, and (3) Seismic continuous data request service. Current system supports both station search of database Query service and seismic continuous data request service. Data centers supported by this NINJA portal will be OHP data center in ERI and Pacific21 data center in IFREE/JAMSTEC in the beginning. We have developed metadata standard for seismological data based on QuakeML for parametric data, which has been developed by ETH Zurich, and XML-SEED for waveform data, which was developed by IFREE/JAMSTEC. The prototype of NINJA portal is now released through IFREE web page (http://www.jamstec.go.jp/pacific21/).