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Sample records for brote por salmonella

  1. Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative non-spore forming rods belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Salmonellosis is a zoonotic and foodborne illness that is usually transmitted by the fecal-oral route estimated to be responsible for 1.4 million cases of human infections in 2009 in...

  2. Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The problem of Salmonella in the global food chain and its current and projected repercussions on human health is cause for concern. Numerous studies have suggested that antimicrobial resistance among bacteria is on the rise and this has lead to changes in control and treatment strategies. Increas...

  3. Salmonella enterica.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian Salmonella infections are important as both a cause of clinical disease in poultry and as a source of food-borne transmission of disease to humans. Host-adapted salmonellae (Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum and Gallinarum) are responsible for severe systemic diseases, whereas numerous sero...

  4. Salmonella Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    McAnearney, S; McCall, D

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella infection can cause four predominant clinical syndromes: enteric fever, acute gastroenteritis, bacteraemia with or without metastatic infection, and the asymptomatic carrier state. Salmonella as an aetiological agent in osteomyelitis is essentially rare and salmonella osteomyelitis in itself is predominantly seen in patients with haemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease or thalassemia. There are very few cases reported in the literature in which salmonella osteomyelitis is seen in otherwise healthy individuals. We describe here a case of salmonella osteomyelitis in a young gentleman with no significant comorbidities who presented with fever and severe back pain, having returned from recent foreign travel. It is therefore important to consider uncommon pathogens in the differential diagnosis of travellers with prolonged fever and insidious symptoms. PMID:26668420

  5. Salmonella Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... reptiles like snakes, turtles, and lizards. Symptoms include Fever Diarrhea Abdominal cramps Headache Possible nausea, vomiting, and ... be serious. The usual treatment is antibiotics. Typhoid fever, a more serious disease caused by Salmonella, is ...

  6. Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the 1980's, public health authorities around the world have continued to report high incidences of human SE infections. In both 2008 and 2009, SE was the Salmonella serotype most often associated with human illness in the US, with more than 7000 cases reported each year. Far more SE cases and ...

  7. Salmonella Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for a variety of acute and chronic diseases in poultry. These diseases continue to cause economically significant losses in many nations and absorb a large investment of resources in testing and control efforts in others. Infected poul...

  8. 78 FR 42526 - Salmonella

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog Food; Withdrawal of...) entitled ``Sec. 690.700 Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog Food.'' This CPG is obsolete. DATES: The.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: FDA issued the CGP entitled ``Sec. 690.700 Salmonella Contamination of Dry Dog...

  9. Salmonella osteomyelitis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Agustsson, Agust Ingi; Olafsson, Karl; Thorisdottir, Anna S

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella osteomyelitis is rare in the immunocompetent host, even though Salmonella is not an infrequent public health problem. Invasive salmonellosis has in general a poor outcome in pregnancy with regard to fetal survival. We report the case of a healthy woman who developed Salmonella osteomyelitis of the iliac bone four weeks after a febrile gastroenteritis in the first trimester of pregnancy. Diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging scanning of the iliac bone and a growth of Salmonella enteritidis in blood culture. The patient recovered fully after six weeks treatment with intravenous antibiotics and delivered a healthy infant at 40 weeks. PMID:19639457

  10. Salmonella Infections in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Bula-Rudas, Fernando J; Rathore, Mobeen H; Maraqa, Nizar F

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella are gram-negative bacilli within the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Animals (pets) are an important reservoir for nontyphoidal Salmonella, whereas humans are the only natural host and reservoir for Salmonella Typhi. Salmonella infections are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They account for an estimated 2.8 billion cases of diarrheal disease each year. The transmission of Salmonella is frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated water and food of animal origin, and it is facilitated by conditions of poor hygiene. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infections have a worldwide distribution, whereas most typhoidal Salmonella infections in the United States are acquired abroad. In the United States, Salmonella is a common agent for food-borne–associated infections. Several outbreaks have been identified and are most commonly associated with agricultural products. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection is usually characterized by a self-limited gastroenteritis in immunocompetent hosts in industrialized countries, but it may also cause invasive disease in vulnerable individuals (eg, children less than 1 year of age, immunocompromised). Antibiotic treatment is not recommended for treatment of mild to moderate gastroenteritis by nontyphoidal Salmonella in immunocompetent adults or children more than 1 year of age. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in infants less than 3 months of age, because they are at higher risk for bacteremia and extraintestinal complications. Typhoid (enteric) fever and its potential complications have a significant impact on children, especially those who live in developing countries. Antibiotic treatment of typhoid fever has become challenging because of the emergence of Salmonella Typhi strains that are resistant to classically used first-line agents: ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol. The

  11. Testing Feeds for Salmonella.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human salmonellosis outbreaks have been linked to contamination of animal feeds. Thus it is crucial to employ sensitive Salmonella detection methods for animal feeds. Based on a review of the literature, Salmonella sustains acid injury at about pH 4.0 to5.0. Low pH can also alter the metabolism of S...

  12. Salmonella Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature, as measured with a food thermometer. Salmonella can ... are not cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature as measured with a food thermometer and fruits ...

  13. Coconut and Salmonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Carl P.; Mosbach, Klaus; Bibit, Venuso C.; Watson, Colin H.

    1967-01-01

    Raw, unprocessed coconut supports the growth of salmonellae as well as that of other enteric bacteria, salmonellae being particularly resistant to subsequent desiccation. Original contamination is not due to carriers or to polluted water supplies, but to contact with bacteria-containing soils followed by dispersion via infected coconut milk and shells. Pasteurization of raw coconut meat in a water bath at 80 C for 8 to 10 min effectively killed such bacteria, did not injure the product, and provided a prophylactic method now widely used by the coconut industry. PMID:5340650

  14. Salmonella enteritidis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Caffer, M I; Eiguer, T

    1994-01-01

    A significant increase in the number of isolations of Salmonella enteritidis has been observed in Argentina since 1986. Outbreaks of foodborne diseases in humans were associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked hens' eggs. Between 1986 and the first 6 months of 1993 there were 150 outbreaks reported, affecting more than 6000 persons. A total of 71.3% of these outbreaks were confirmed by stool cultures, and 47.3% by bacteriological study of the food implicated in the outbreak. A permanent surveillance of salmonellosis is imperative, taking into account the persistence of Salmonella enteritidis isolations in sporadic cases and in new outbreaks. PMID:8155472

  15. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  16. Multiplex PCR for the concurrent detection and differentiation of Salmonella spp., Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Chai Fung; Wong, Woan Chwen; Chai, Lay Ching; Lee, Hai Yen; Noorlis, Ahmad; Zainazor, Tuan Chilek Tuan; Tang, John Yew Huat; Ghazali, Farinazleen Mohamad; Cheah, Yoke Kqueen; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Radu, Son

    2011-01-01

    Salmonellosis outbreaks involving typhoid fever and human gastroenteritis are important diseases in tropical countries where hygienic conditions are often not maintained. A rapid and sensitive method to detect Salmonella spp., Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Typhimurium is needed to improve control and surveillance of typhoid fever and Salmonella gastroenteritis. Our objective was the concurrent detection and differentiation of these food-borne pathogens using a multiplex PCR. We therefore designed and optimized a multiplex PCR using three specific PCR primer pairs for the simultaneous detection of these pathogens. The concentration of each of the primer pairs, magnesium chloride concentration, and primer annealing temperature were optimized before verification of the specificity of the primer pairs. The target genes produced amplicons at 429 bp, 300 bp and 620 bp which were shown to be 100% specific to each target bacterium, Salmonella spp., Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Typhimurium, respectively. PMID:22028607

  17. Interaction of Salmonella enterica with Fresh Produce Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attachment and colonization of Salmonella enterica serovars to fresh produce leaves was investigated. Biofilm assay and attachment of Salmonella serovars to intact and cut leaves were determined. Salmonella Tennessee and Salmonella Thompson produced stronger biofilms compared to Salmonella Newpor...

  18. Salmonella burden in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Malaeb, M; Bizri, A R; Ghosn, N; Berry, A; Musharrafieh, U

    2016-06-01

    Salmonellosis is a disease that represents a major public health concern in both developing and developed countries. The aim of this article is to evaluate the public health burden of Salmonella illness in Lebanon. The current scope of the Salmonella infection problem was assessed in relation to disease incidence and distribution with respect to age, gender and district. Factors that provide a better understanding of the magnitude of the problem were explored and highlighted. Data reported to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Department at the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health between 2001 and 2013 was reviewed. Information obtained was compared to information reported regionally and globally. The estimated true incidence was derived using multipliers from the CDC and Jordan. A literature review of all published data from Lebanon about Salmonella susceptibility/resistance patterns and its serious clinical complications was conducted. The estimated incidence was 13·34 cases/100 000 individuals, most cases occurred in the 20-39 years age group with no significant gender variation. Poor and less developed districts of Lebanon had the highest number of cases and the peak incidence was in summer. Reflecting on the projected incidence derived from the use of multipliers indicates a major discrepancy between what is reported and what is estimated. We conclude that data about Salmonella infection in Lebanon and many Middle Eastern and developing countries lack crucial information and are not necessarily representative of the true incidence, prevalence and burden of illness. PMID:26743045

  19. Incidence of Salmonella in fresh dressed turkeys raised under Salmonella-controlled and uncontrolled environments.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D F; Green, S S; Custer, C S; Johnston, R W

    1982-10-01

    The incidence of salmonella in turkeys from experimental salmonella-controlled and uncontrolled, or normal, flocks processed at three turkey slaughter plants were compared. The results indicate that processing salmonella-controlled turkeys in a plant that routinely kills normal birds may result in the contamination of the salmonella-controlled birds, probably due to salmonella in the plant environment. The salmonella-controlled turkeys studied tended to have a lower incidence of salmonella than normal birds. These observation indicate that salmonella control practices in turkey raising can result in a salmonella reduction in market birds even under existing commercial slaughter, evisceration, and cooling procedures. PMID:6217458

  20. Salmonella: an ecological success story

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella was first described in 1885 as a secondary pathogen in the infectious disease process. In 1929, a paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine reported that Salmonella organisms were predominant in food borne outbreaks but acknowledged that the path of infection wa...

  1. Host Stress Drives Salmonella Recrudescence

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Dhaenens, Maarten; Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Shearer, Neil; Van Parys, Alexander; Haesendonck, Roel; Bert, Wim; Favoreel, Herman; Deforce, Dieter; Thompson, Arthur; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Host stress is well known to result in flare-ups of many bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. The mechanism by which host stress is exploited to increase pathogen loads, is poorly understood. Here we show that Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium employs a dedicated mechanism, driven by the scsA gene, to respond to the host stress hormone cortisol. Through this mechanism, cortisol increases Salmonella proliferation inside macrophages, resulting in increased intestinal infection loads in DBA/2J mice. ScsA directs overall Salmonella virulence gene expression under conditions that mimic the intramacrophagic environment of Salmonella, and stimulates the host cytoskeletal alterations that are required for increased Salmonella proliferation inside cortisol exposed macrophages. We thus provide evidence that in a stressed host, the complex interplay between a pathogen and its host endocrine and innate immune system increases intestinal pathogen loads to facilitate pathogen dispersal. PMID:26857846

  2. Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, John; Frank, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia cause a well-characterized spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from asymptomatic carriage to hemorrhagic colitis and fatal typhoidal fever. These pathogens are responsible for millions of cases of food-borne illness in the U.S. each year, with substantial costs measured in hospitalizations and lost productivity. In the developing world, illness caused by these pathogens is not only more prevalent, but is also associated with a greater case-fatality rate. Classical methods for identification rely on selective media and serology, but newer methods based on mass spectrometry and PCR show great promise for routine clinical testing. PMID:26004640

  3. The paratyphoid salmonellae.

    PubMed

    Barrow, P A

    2000-08-01

    The paratyphoid Salmonella bacteria, comprising more than 2,000 serovars or serotypes, are a major problem to the poultry industry. This is largely the result of entry of the bacteria into the human food chain. Human infection takes the form of a gastroenteritis, which in highly susceptible individuals can result in death. Some strains of certain serotypes have the capacity to produce morbidity and mortality in very young chickens. In adult birds, some serovars become localised in the reproductive tract with concomitant vertical transmission. The association between S. Enteritidis and table eggs has produced a great deal of publicity and concern with resulting national and international attempts at controlling the major serotypes, S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, at the breeder and layer level. Control is possible through rigorous hygiene and management procedures, but is not always economically viable. As a result, control by serological and bacteriological testing and slaughter may also not be feasible. Antibiotics have been used to reduce carriage but can cause problems of resistance and increased susceptibility. The use of growth promoting antibiotics can also increase susceptibility to infection. Other means of increasing the resistance of poultry to infection are therefore being sought. These include the use of intestinal flora preparations for competitive exclusion of Salmonella from newly hatched chicks. Killed and live vaccines are used, both with some success. However, the safety of some live vaccines is still uncertain. PMID:10935268

  4. Prevalence of Salmonella in vegetables from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Quiroz-Santiago, Carolina; Rodas-Suárez, Oscar R; Carlos R, Vázquez; Fernández, Francisco J; Quiñones-Ramírez, Elsa Irma; Vázquez-Salinas, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    The present study is an overview of the role of vegetables as a transmission vehicle of Salmonella in Mexico. One hundred samples of each of 17 different vegetables were analyzed during a period of 18 months. Salmonella was isolated from 98 samples. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was isolated from the highest percentage of samples with typeable Salmonella isolates (23.9%), followed by S. enterica subsp. arizonae and Salmonella Choleraesuis each from 16.9%, Salmonella Gallinarum from 11.1%, Salmonella Anatum and S. enterica subsp. houtenae each from 9.7%, Salmonella Agona and Salmonella Edinburg each from 4.22%, Salmonella Enteritidis and S. enterica subsp. salamae each from 2.81%, and Salmonella Bongor, Salmonella Pullorum, Salmonella Typhi, and Salmonella C1 flagellar b each from 1.4%. Of the isolated bacteria, 27.6% were nontypeable strains. Salmonella was isolated from 12% of parsley samples, 11% of cilantro samples, 9% of broccoli samples, 9% of cauliflower samples, 9% of "papaloquelite" (Porophyllum ruderale) samples, 9% of purslane (Portulaca oleracea) samples, 7% of long lettuce samples, 7% of spinach samples, 7% of watercress samples, 6% of Chinese parsley samples, 4% of beet samples, 3% of celery samples, 3% of Romaine lettuce samples, 1% of cabbage samples, and 1% of potato samples. The presence of Salmonella Typhi in parsley is noteworthy. No Salmonella isolates were obtained from zucchini and onion. These results indicate that raw or minimally processed vegetables can be contaminated with Salmonella, leading to direct infection of consumers or cross-contamination of other foodstuffs. These contaminated vegetables can represent a severe health risk for the Mexican consumer. PMID:19610340

  5. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host–pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections. PMID:25598340

  6. Vertical transmission of Salmonella paratyphi A.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, R; Wattal, C; Sharma, A; Kler, N; Garg, P; Gujral, K; Khera, N

    2007-08-01

    Neonatal enteric fever is a rare but life-threatening illness. Patients may present with varying severity, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi causing more severe illness than Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A. Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A is considered to cause milder infection with fewer complications. We report a rare case of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A with severe complications and high mortality. Even though there are case reports of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, to our knowledge, this is the first case report of vertical transmission of Salmonella enterica serotype ParatyphiA. The role of blood culture in accurate diagnosis and treatment is also discussed. PMID:17785907

  7. Salmonella isolation from hospital areas.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R. W.; Price, T. H.; Joynson, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence of the presence of salmonellas in a paediatric ward, a special care baby unit, a maternity unit and a hospital kitchen was obtained by culture of sewer swabs, faeces and food samples. The survey was designed to cause as little administrative interference as possible. The technical aspects of the survey did not strain laboratory facilities. Minimal secondary spread of salmonella infection was experienced. PMID:390044

  8. Immunity to systemic Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Mastroeni, Pietro

    2002-06-01

    Salmonella infections are a serious public health problem in developing countries and represent a constant concern for the food industry. The severity and the outcome of a systemic Salmonella infection depends on the "virulence" of the bacteria, on the infectious dose as well as on the genetic makeup and immunological status of the host. The control of bacterial growth in the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in the early phases of a Salmonella infection relies on the NADPH oxidase-dependent anti-microbial functions of resident phagocytes and is controlled by the innate resistance gene Nramp1. This early phase is followed by the suppression of Salmonella growth in the RES due to the onset of an adaptive host response. This response relies on the concerted action of a number of cytokines (TNFalpha, IFNgamma, IL12, IL18, and IL15), on the recruitment of inflammatory phagocytes in the tissues and on the activation of the recruited cells. Phagocytes control bacterial growth in this phase of the infection by producing reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) generated via the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Clearance of the bacteria from the RES at a later stage of the infection requires the CD28-dependent activation of CD4+ TCR-alphabeta T-cells and is controlled by MHC class II genes. Resistance to re-infection with virulent Salmonella micro-organisms requires the presence of Th1 type immunological memory and anti-Salmonella antibodies. Thus, the development of protective immunity to Salmonella infections relies on the cross-talk between the humoral and cellular branches of the immune system. PMID:12108950

  9. Reveal for Salmonella test system.

    PubMed

    Bird, C B; Miller, R L; Miller, B M

    1999-01-01

    The Reveal for Salmonella (RSS) test system is a presumptive qualitative test that detects the presence of Salmonella organisms in foods within 21 h total testing time, allowing the user to release negative products 24 h earlier than when using other rapid test kits. Foods are enriched with a proprietary resuscitation medium called Revive and then selectively enriched with either Selenite Cystine or Rappaport-Vassiliadis selective media. The enriched culture is used to inoculate the RSS detection device, which initiates a lateral flow through a reagent zone containing anti-Salmonella antibodies conjugated to colloidal gold particles that capture antigens present in the culture. The antigen-antibody complex migrates farther and is captured by an additional anti-Salmonella antibody, causing the colloidal gold to precipitate and form a visual line, indicating a positive result. A procedural control line also will form regardless of the presence of Salmonella organisms to indicate the test is working properly. Existing AOAC Official Methods for Salmonella organisms require a 48 h enrichment before testing. Hence, a food product has to be held before release, adding extra cost to the company and the consumer. The RSS test system was evaluated by quantitative spiking studies. Although AOAC encourages inclusion of naturally contaminated foods, almost all microbiological AOAC validation studies have been performed with artificially contaminated foods for absolute control over the study. The RSS test system is designed to test many food types for Salmonella organisms and has a limit of detection of 5-10 colony-forming units (cfu)/25 g with a false-negative rate of < 1% and a false-positive rate of < 5.0%. It showed an 81% overall agreement with the traditional procedure of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety Inspection Service. PMID:10367381

  10. Salmonella enterica Genomics and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a prevalent food-borne pathogen and a model system for the study of virulence and pathogenesis. The development of DNA microarray technology has furthered investigation of genome organization that leads to the variations in Salmonella serotypes. There are over 2400 Salmonella serotypes...

  11. Screening for Salmonella in backyard chickens.

    PubMed

    Manning, Johanna; Gole, Vaibhav; Chousalkar, Kapil

    2015-06-15

    Salmonellosis is a significant zoonotic disease which has a considerable economic impact on the egg layer industry. There is limited information about the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in backyard chickens. The current study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Salmonella in backyard chickens, and the associated virulence of any serovars identified. Hundred and fifteen pooled samples from 30 backyard flocks in South Australia were screened. Four flocks tested positive for Salmonella spp. The overall Salmonella isolation rate in the current study was 10.4%. The estimated prevalence at individual bird level was 0.02% (95% CI 0.025-0.975). The serovars isolated were Salmonella Agona, Salmonella subsp 2 ser 21:z10:z6 (Wandsbek) and Salmonella Bovismorbificans. All Salmonella isolates tested positive for the prgH, orfL and spiC genes. The Salmonella subsp 2 ser 21:z10:z6 (Wandsbek) had the most antibiotic resistance, being resistant to ampicillin and cephalothin and having intermediate resistance to florphenicol. All of the Salmonella Agona had intermediate resistance to the ampicillin, while the Salmonella Bovismorbificans were susceptible to all antibiotics tested. With the increased interest of keeping backyard chickens, the current study highlights the zoonotic risk from Salmonella spp. associated with home flocks. PMID:25899620

  12. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  13. Salmonella attribution and clonal dissemination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The bacterial species Salmonella enterica is one of the major causes of gastroenteritis in humans and has over 1,500 serotypes. Serotyping is the most common tool used to identify isolates from diseased patients. However, the serotyping method can takes several weeks and sometimes can...

  14. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  15. Strain differences among Salmonella serotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens are constantly adapting to circumvent intervention strategies. The ability to detect and overcome these adaptations are critical to ensure a safe food supply. We determined genotypic and/or phenotypic differences between Salmonella recovered from broiler chicks after comingling w...

  16. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE TRENDS IN SALMONELLA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Since the early 1990’s there has been increasing awareness and concern regarding the development of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria of public health significance. Reports targeting zoonotic bacteria, and in particular Salmonella species, suggest that resistance is trending upwar...

  17. Host defenses trigger salmonella's arsenal.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-03-17

    Salmonella survives in macrophages by using a molecular syringe to deliver proteins into the host-cell cytosol where they manipulate phagocyte physiology. Arpaia and colleagues (Arpaia et al., 2011) show that deployment of this virulence factor is triggered by the very responses that are intended to confer host resistance. PMID:21402352

  18. Identification and characterization of salmonella serotypes using DNA spectral characteristics by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of DNA samples of Salmonella serotypes (Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky) were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrometer by placing directly in contact with a diamond attenua...

  19. Salmonella Is a Sneaky Germ: Seven Tips for Safer Eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... our food safer to eat focuses on reducing contamination from Salmonella. Don't let Salmonella sneak up ... used to be a common cause of Salmonella contamination. To counter that, stringent procedures for cleaning and ...

  20. Isolation of Salmonellae from Pork Carcasses

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, J. A.; Elliot, J. G.; Reynolds, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    Four hundred and twenty pork carcasses from four abattoirs were examined for the presence of salmonellae by use of swabbing-enrichment techniques and contact plate methods. Carcasses from only one abattoir were found to be contaminated by swabbing-enrichment (23.3%) and contact plate (17.9%) methods. The area of the skin side of the ham, near the anal opening, was determined to be the area to examine for isolating salmonellae from pork carcasses with the greatest frequency. The most frequently isolated species of salmonellae in this study were Salmonella derby, S. anatum, S. typhimurium, and S. indiana. PMID:4577175

  1. Monoclonal antibodies that detect live salmonellae.

    PubMed Central

    Torensma, R; Visser, M J; Aarsman, C J; Poppelier, M J; van Beurden, R; Fluit, A C; Verhoef, J

    1992-01-01

    Nine immunoglobulin G and nine immunoglobulin M murine monoclonal antibody-producing hybridomas reactive with live Salmonella bacteria were obtained from several fusions of immune spleen cells and Sp2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were selected by the magnetic immunoluminescence assay. The monoclonal antibodies were reactive with serogroups A, B, C1, C2, D, E, and K and Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. diarizonae. Each monoclonal antibody proved to be reactive with a distinct serotype. Clinical isolates belonging to these Salmonella serogroups could be detected. Reactivity with non-Salmonella bacteria proved to be minor. Images PMID:1476430

  2. Procalcitonin levels in salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas; Sorabjee, Jehangir

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Procalcitonin (PCT) as a diagnostic marker for bacteremia and sepsis has been extensively studied. We aimed to study PCT levels in Salmonella infections whether they would serve as marker for early diagnosis in endemic areas to start empiric treatment while awaiting blood culture report. Materials and Methods: BACTEC blood culture was used to isolate Salmonella in suspected enteric fever patients. Serum PCT levels were estimated before starting treatment. Results: In 60 proven enteric fever patients, median value of serum PCT levels was 0.22 ng/ml, values ranging between 0.05 and 4 ng/ml. 95% of patients had near normal or mild increase (<0.5 ng/ml), only 5% of patients showed elevated levels. Notably, high PCT levels were found only in severe sepsis. Conclusion: PCT levels in Salmonella infections are near normal or minimally increased which differentiates it from other systemic Gram-negative infections. PCT cannot be used as a specific diagnostic marker of typhoid. PMID:26321807

  3. Survival of Salmonella Heidelberg in hummus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Heidelberg is the fourth-most commonly reported Salmonella serotype to cause human illness. There have been several outbreaks and recalls caused by S. Heidelberg in ready to eat foods. Recently, 700 people became ill from ingesting hummus shirazi contaminated with S. Heidelberg. This stud...

  4. Manure microbes may stop Salmonella in lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella causes an estimated 1.4 million cases of human food-borne illness and more than 500 food-related human deaths in the United States annually. People infected with Salmonella, whether they experience typical symptoms of gastroenteritis and diarrhea or not, may be reservoirs fr...

  5. REGROWTH OF SALMONELLAE IN COMPOSTED SEWAGE SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to investigate the regrowth of salmonellae in composted sewage sludge. Though composting effectively stabilizes and disinfects sewage sludges, the decrease in salmonellae may be only temporary, since this pathogen can survive and grow without a human or ani...

  6. Host-Salmonella interaction: human trials.

    PubMed

    Levine, M M; Tacket, C O; Sztein, M B

    2001-01-01

    Human clinical trials, including experimental challenges of volunteers with pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, small phase I and II trials that monitor the immune responses to vaccines, and large-scale controlled field trials that assess vaccine efficacy under conditions of natural challenge, have helped elucidate the interactions between Salmonella typhi and human hosts. PMID:11755415

  7. Increasing Ceftriaxone Resistance in Salmonellae, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lin-Hui; Teng, Wen-Shin; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Lee, Hao-Yuan; Li, Hsin-Chieh; Wu, Tsu-Lan

    2011-01-01

    In Taiwan, despite a substantial decline of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis infections, strains resistant to ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone persist. A self-transferable blaCMY-2-harboring IncI1 plasmid was identified in S. enterica serotypes Choleraesuis, Typhimurium, Agona, and Enteritidis and contributed to the overall increase of ceftriaxone resistance in salmonellae. PMID:21749777

  8. Minimization of Salmonella Contamination on Raw Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many reviews have discussed Salmonella in poultry and suggested best practices to minimize this organism on raw poultry meat. Despite years of research and conscientious control efforts by industry and regulatory agencies, human salmonellosis rates have declined only modestly and Salmonella is stil...

  9. DIVA defense: Broad protection for salmonella suppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A live, attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine was developed to confer broad protection against multiple Salmonella serovars to prevent disease and reduce pathogen colonization and shedding. Two vaccine trials were performed in swine to determine the protection afforded by the va...

  10. Effects of Climate Change on Salmonella Infections

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Luma; Reddy, Remata S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Climate change and global warming have been reported to increase spread of foodborne pathogens. To understand these effects on Salmonella infections, modeling approaches such as regression analysis and neural network (NN) were used. Methods: Monthly data for Salmonella outbreaks in Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), and Alabama (AL) were analyzed from 2002 to 2011 using analysis of variance and time series analysis. Meteorological data were collected and the correlation with salmonellosis was examined using regression analysis and NN. Results: A seasonal trend in Salmonella infections was observed (p<0.001). Strong positive correlation was found between high temperature and Salmonella infections in MS and for the combined states (MS, TN, AL) models (R2=0.554; R2=0.415, respectively). NN models showed a strong effect of rise in temperature on the Salmonella outbreaks. In this study, an increase of 1°F was shown to result in four cases increase of Salmonella in MS. However, no correlation between monthly average precipitation rate and Salmonella infections was observed. Conclusion: There is consistent evidence that gastrointestinal infection with bacterial pathogens is positively correlated with ambient temperature, as warmer temperatures enable more rapid replication. Warming trends in the United States and specifically in the southern states may increase rates of Salmonella infections. PMID:25496072

  11. Taming the Elephant: Salmonella Biology, Pathogenesis, and Prevention▿

    PubMed Central

    Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; McCormick, Beth A.; Fang, Ferric C.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella infections continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality throughout the world. However, recent discoveries and new paradigms promise to lead to novel strategies to diagnose, treat, and prevent Salmonella infections. This review provides an update of the Salmonella field based on oral presentations given at the recent 3rd ASM Conference on Salmonella: Biology, Pathogenesis and Prevention. PMID:20385760

  12. Interactions of Salmonella with animals and plants

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Agnès; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chaussé, Anne-Marie; Schikora, Adam; Velge, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica species are Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for a wide range of food- and water-borne diseases in both humans and animals, thereby posing a major threat to public health. Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports, linking Salmonella contaminated raw vegetables and fruits with food poisoning. Many studies have shown that an essential feature of the pathogenicity of Salmonella is its capacity to cross a number of barriers requiring invasion of a large variety of cells and that the extent of internalization may be influenced by numerous factors. However, it is poorly understood how Salmonella successfully infects hosts as diversified as animals or plants. The aim of this review is to describe the different stages required for Salmonella interaction with its hosts: (i) attachment to host surfaces; (ii) entry processes; (iii) multiplication; (iv) suppression of host defense mechanisms; and to point out similarities and differences between animal and plant infections. PMID:25653644

  13. Salmonella investigation in an Ontario feed mill.

    PubMed Central

    Hacking, W C; Mitchell, W R; Carlson, H C

    1978-01-01

    The frequency of Salmonella contamination of feedstuffs and finished broiler chicken feeds at an Ontario feed mill were investigated over a four-month period. Samples of feed ingredients and finished pelleted feeds were collected at various points during manufacture and cultured in trypticase soy broth prior to selective enrichment for isolation of Salmonella. Salmonella contamination was found in 4.3% of 93 finished pelleted broiler feeds examined. The contamination appeared to result primarily from the incorporation of contaminated animal protein ingredients into the feed. Meatmeal and the broiler, premix, which contained meatmeal as a filler, were most frequently contaminated followed by feather meal. Pelleting failed to eliminate the Salmonellae from the feeds. The methods used failed to detect Salmonella in the environment of the feed mill or its delivery trucks. Recommendations for control are made. PMID:369663

  14. Interactions of Salmonella with animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Agnès; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chaussé, Anne-Marie; Schikora, Adam; Velge, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica species are Gram-negative bacteria, which are responsible for a wide range of food- and water-borne diseases in both humans and animals, thereby posing a major threat to public health. Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports, linking Salmonella contaminated raw vegetables and fruits with food poisoning. Many studies have shown that an essential feature of the pathogenicity of Salmonella is its capacity to cross a number of barriers requiring invasion of a large variety of cells and that the extent of internalization may be influenced by numerous factors. However, it is poorly understood how Salmonella successfully infects hosts as diversified as animals or plants. The aim of this review is to describe the different stages required for Salmonella interaction with its hosts: (i) attachment to host surfaces; (ii) entry processes; (iii) multiplication; (iv) suppression of host defense mechanisms; and to point out similarities and differences between animal and plant infections. PMID:25653644

  15. Salmonella bongori Provides Insights into the Evolution of the Salmonellae

    PubMed Central

    Fookes, Maria; Schroeder, Gunnar N.; Langridge, Gemma C.; Blondel, Carlos J.; Mammina, Caterina; Connor, Thomas R.; Seth-Smith, Helena; Vernikos, Georgios S.; Robinson, Keith S.; Sanders, Mandy; Petty, Nicola K.; Kingsley, Robert A.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A.; Maskell, Duncan; Barrow, Paul; Humphrey, Tom; Nastasi, Antonino; Roberts, Mark; Frankel, Gad; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Salmonella contains two species, S. bongori and S. enterica. Compared to the well-studied S. enterica there is a marked lack of information regarding the genetic makeup and diversity of S. bongori. S. bongori has been found predominantly associated with cold-blooded animals, but it can infect humans. To define the phylogeny of this species, and compare it to S. enterica, we have sequenced 28 isolates representing most of the known diversity of S. bongori. This cross-species analysis allowed us to confidently differentiate ancestral functions from those acquired following speciation, which include both metabolic and virulence-associated capacities. We show that, although S. bongori inherited a basic set of Salmonella common virulence functions, it has subsequently elaborated on this in a different direction to S. enterica. It is an established feature of S. enterica evolution that the acquisition of the type III secretion systems (T3SS-1 and T3SS-2) has been followed by the sequential acquisition of genes encoding secreted targets, termed effectors proteins. We show that this is also true of S. bongori, which has acquired an array of novel effector proteins (sboA-L). All but two of these effectors have no significant S. enterica homologues and instead are highly similar to those found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Remarkably, SboH is found to be a chimeric effector protein, encoded by a fusion of the T3SS-1 effector gene sopA and a gene highly similar to the EPEC effector nleH from enteropathogenic E. coli. We demonstrate that representatives of these new effectors are translocated and that SboH, similarly to NleH, blocks intrinsic apoptotic pathways while being targeted to the mitochondria by the SopA part of the fusion. This work suggests that S. bongori has inherited the ancestral Salmonella virulence gene set, but has adapted by incorporating virulence determinants that resemble those employed by EPEC. PMID:21876672

  16. Salmonella bongori provides insights into the evolution of the Salmonellae.

    PubMed

    Fookes, Maria; Schroeder, Gunnar N; Langridge, Gemma C; Blondel, Carlos J; Mammina, Caterina; Connor, Thomas R; Seth-Smith, Helena; Vernikos, Georgios S; Robinson, Keith S; Sanders, Mandy; Petty, Nicola K; Kingsley, Robert A; Bäumler, Andreas J; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A; Maskell, Duncan; Barrow, Paul; Humphrey, Tom; Nastasi, Antonino; Roberts, Mark; Frankel, Gad; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R

    2011-08-01

    The genus Salmonella contains two species, S. bongori and S. enterica. Compared to the well-studied S. enterica there is a marked lack of information regarding the genetic makeup and diversity of S. bongori. S. bongori has been found predominantly associated with cold-blooded animals, but it can infect humans. To define the phylogeny of this species, and compare it to S. enterica, we have sequenced 28 isolates representing most of the known diversity of S. bongori. This cross-species analysis allowed us to confidently differentiate ancestral functions from those acquired following speciation, which include both metabolic and virulence-associated capacities. We show that, although S. bongori inherited a basic set of Salmonella common virulence functions, it has subsequently elaborated on this in a different direction to S. enterica. It is an established feature of S. enterica evolution that the acquisition of the type III secretion systems (T3SS-1 and T3SS-2) has been followed by the sequential acquisition of genes encoding secreted targets, termed effectors proteins. We show that this is also true of S. bongori, which has acquired an array of novel effector proteins (sboA-L). All but two of these effectors have no significant S. enterica homologues and instead are highly similar to those found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Remarkably, SboH is found to be a chimeric effector protein, encoded by a fusion of the T3SS-1 effector gene sopA and a gene highly similar to the EPEC effector nleH from enteropathogenic E. coli. We demonstrate that representatives of these new effectors are translocated and that SboH, similarly to NleH, blocks intrinsic apoptotic pathways while being targeted to the mitochondria by the SopA part of the fusion. This work suggests that S. bongori has inherited the ancestral Salmonella virulence gene set, but has adapted by incorporating virulence determinants that resemble those employed by EPEC. PMID:21876672

  17. The spectrum of Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, M B; Rubin, R H

    1988-09-01

    Salmonellae have demonstrated an extraordinary capacity to adapt to a wide range of ecologic niches and to the peculiarities of modern society, such as the mass production of food products. The vast majority of infections in the United States are caused by serotypes not specifically adapted to human or animal hosts, whereas the most frequent isolate in developing countries is S. typhi, which is highly adapted to human hosts. The number of isolates reported in the United States has been increasing steadily since 1975, largely a result of outbreaks associated with the mass production of food products, particularly poultry, which is frequently contaminated. Salmonella infection occurs when ingested organisms bypass gastric defenses, multiply within the intestinal lumen, penetrate the intestinal mucosa, and multiply within macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. They may then disseminate via the systemic circulation. Several virulence factors have been identified. The wide range of pathologic and clinical manifestations are subdivided into four syndromes, each requiring a distinct diagnostic and therapeutic approach: (1) gastroenteritis, (2) enteric fever, (3) bacteremia with or without metastatic disease, and (4) asymptomatic carriage. Although any serotype can cause any of these syndromes, certain serotypes are associated with specific presentations. Serious complications of bacteremic infection include infections of the aorta, endocardium, bone, and meninges. Salmonella infection is particularly severe in patients who have AIDS, leukemia, lymphoma, immunodeficiency of other causes, inflammatory bowel disease, schistosomiasis, and macrophage dysfunction. Diagnosis is based on culture of the organism from appropriate sites. Several serologic tests have been developed that warrant further evaluation. Chloramphenicol, ampicillin, amoxicillin, and trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole have clearly established efficacy. Experience with third generation cephalosporins and

  18. Managing Salmonella in equine populations.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Brandy A; Morley, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    Infection control is achieved through all efforts used to prevent the introduction and limit the spread of contagious pathogens within a facility or population, with the goal of eliminating sources of potentially pathogenic microorganisms and to disrupt infectious disease transmission. Congregating animals from multiple sources, as occurs at veterinary hospitals, racetracks, equestrian events, and boarding and training facilities, increases the risk for transmission of infectious diseases such as salmonella. There is a recognizable standard of practice for infection control and due effort must be given to control and prevention of infectious disease transmission within animal populations and facilities. PMID:25282320

  19. SALMATcor: microagglutination for Salmonella flagella serotyping.

    PubMed

    Duarte Martínez, Francisco; Sánchez-Salazar, Luz Marina; Acuña-Calvo, María Teresa; Bolaños-Acuña, Hilda María; Dittel-Dittel, Isis; Campos-Chacón, Elena

    2010-08-01

    Salmonella is a complex bacterial group with more than 2400 serovars widely distributed in nature; they are considered zoonotic because they can infect a variety of animals and be transmitted to humans. Usually, they cause alimentary acquired diseases such as gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, and others that can lead to severe complications and death. Serotyping is useful to differentiate among Salmonella, because it shows an important correlation with their clinical and epidemiological patterns; consequently, it is of high value for public health, animal health, agriculture, and industry. To characterize all known Kauffmann-White Salmonella serovars, over 250 antisera are required. Due to this and to high prices antisera, many laboratories worldwide have limitations in establishing Salmonella surveillance. Therefore, we developed and validated a Salmonella flagella microagglutination test (SALMATcor) that significantly reduces laboratory requirements of antisera. SALMATcor is based on scaling down, by fivefold, the antigen:antiserum volumes actually required for the reference method: flagella standard tube agglutination technique (STAT). Antigen preparation, temperatures, and incubation periods remained as established for STAT. The SALMATcor was validated according to ISO/DIS 16140:1999 protocol, which included 1187 comparisons of flagella determinations conducted by SALMATcor and STAT, on 141 Salmonella isolates of 12 common serotypes and the use of antiserum recommended for STAT. SALMATcor concordance was excellent (Cohen's kappa index 0.9982), obtaining relative accuracy >99.9% and relative specificity >99.9%. Additionally, SALMATcor has been used by CNRB-INCIENSA since 2004 to respond to all 40 Salmonella proficiency testing strains, provided by World Health Organization-Global Salmonella Surveillance Network, obtaining 100% concordance on serovar identification. On the basis of the results achieved with SALMATcor and considering that it also significantly

  20. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R.; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors. PMID:24396177

  1. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors. PMID:24396177

  2. Comparison of the environmental survival characteristics of Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Miranda J; Liebana, Ernesto; McLaren, Ian; Clifton-Hadley, Felicity A; Wales, Andrew D; Davies, Robert H

    2012-10-12

    To examine possible correlations in bovine Salmonella isolates between environmental survival and serovar-associated epidemiological patterns, bovine field isolates of Salmonella serovars Typhimurium and Dublin (two each) were inoculated into bovine faeces slurry and tested monthly by culture for survival during a six-month period of storage at a variable ambient temperature in a disused animal transporter. Low moisture conditions, where the slurry was dried onto wooden dowels, increased detectable survival of a low-level inoculum by up to five months, compared with wet slurry. A more modest increase of survival time was seen with storage of wet slurry under refrigeration at 4°C. Under both dry and wet conditions, the concentration of culturable Salmonella Typhimurium declined at a slower rate than did that of Salmonella Dublin. Salmonella that was naturally contaminating bovine faeces from farms with Salmonella Typhimurium did not show superior survival times compared with Salmonella Typhimurium that had been artificially inoculated into samples. The differing survival characteristics of the two serovars that was observed in environmental faeces may complement their different modes of infection in cattle. Salmonella Dublin, being a bovine host-adapted strain that establishes chronic infection in some animals, may have less need to survive for a prolonged period outside of its host than does Salmonella Typhimurium. PMID:22565008

  3. Inactivation of Salmonella Senftenberg, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Tennessee in peanut butter by 915 MHz microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Jae; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 915 MHz microwave with 3 different levels to inactivate 3 serovars of Salmonella in peanut butter. Peanut butter inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Tennessee were treated with a 915 MHz microwave with 2, 4 and 6 kW and acid and peroxide values and color changes were determined after 5 min of microwave heating. Salmonella populations were reduced with increasing treatment time and treatment power. Six kW 915 MHz microwave treatment for 5 min reduced these three Salmonella serovars by 3.24-4.26 log CFU/g. Four and two kW 915 MHz microwave processing for 5 min reduced these Salmonella serovars by 1.14-1.48 and 0.15-0.42 log CFU/g, respectively. Microwave treatment did not affect acid, peroxide, or color values of peanut butter. These results demonstrate that 915 MHz microwave processing can be used as a control method for reducing Salmonella in peanut butter without producing quality deterioration. PMID:26678129

  4. Pet Turtles Continue to Spread Salmonella

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159393.html Pet Turtles Continue to Spread Salmonella 15 outbreaks in U.S. ... WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Kissing a turtle may be more than just yucky -- sometimes it ...

  5. The occurrence of Salmonella in airline meals.

    PubMed

    Hatakka, M; Asplund, K

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence of Salmonella in airline meals was studied in 1989-1992. Samples were collected from flight kitchens in 29 countries. The material consisted of 400 cold dishes and 1,288 hot dishes as well as salads, cheese plates and deserts. Total number of samples was 2211. Salmonella spp. were isolated from 6 samples; 1 contaminated sample was a cold dish prepared in Bangkok, 1 was a hot dish prepared in Mombasa and the remaining 4 contaminated samples were hot dishes prepared within one week in Beijing. The isolated serotypes were S. ohio, S. manchester and S. braenderup. The contaminated cold dish prepared by a flight kitchen in Bangkok was found to be connected with a Salmonella outbreak which occurred in Finland in 1990. Cold airline dishes containing food of animal origin seems to be more risky as a source of Salmonella infections among airline passengers. PMID:8147292

  6. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA SPECIES IN RIVER WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of four Salmonella strains in river water microcosms was monitored using culturing techniques, direct counts, whole cell hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and resuscitation techniques via the direct viable count method and flow cytrometry. Plate counts of...

  7. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA SPECIES IN RIVER WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of four Salmonella strains in river water microcosms was monitored by culturing techniques, direct counts, whole-cell hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and resuscitation techniques via the direct viable count method and flow cytometry. Plate counts of bact...

  8. Salmonella kingabwa meningitis in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Olariu, Adina; Jain, Sangita; Gupta, Ajay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A 23-day-old male baby was admitted with 1 day history of high temperature, irritability and poor feeding. His general examination was unremarkable. Salmonella species grew from CSF culture and subsequent identification revealed Salmonella kingabwa, a serotype which rarely causes human illness. The child lived with his parents and regularly visited his grandmother for 4 h every day. Grandmother kept five snakes and five water dragons as pets. They lived in tanks and crawled freely around the house. For decades the reptiles have been known to carry Salmonella, which can be transmitted directly or indirectly to humans through ingestion of the bacteria, which causes subsequent infection. Reptile exposure is a rare but significant risk factor for Salmonella illness in England and contact with reptiles should be avoided by children less than 5 years old, pregnant ladies, older and those with impaired immunity. PMID:22665552

  9. A carbon nanotube immunosensor for Salmonella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Mitchell B.; Goldsmith, Brett R.; McMillon, Ronald; Dailey, Jennifer; Pillai, Shreekumar; Singh, Shree R.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-functionalized carbon nanotube devices have been suggested for use as bacterial detectors for monitoring of food purity in transit from the farm to the kitchen. Here we report progress towards that goal by demonstrating specific detection of Salmonella in complex nutrient broth solutions using nanotube transistors functionalized with covalently-bound anti-Salmonella antibodies. The small size of the active device region makes them compatible with integration in large-scale arrays. We find that the on-state current of the transistor is sensitive specifically to the Salmonella concentration and saturates at low concentration (<1000 cfu/ml). In contrast, the carrier mobility is affected comparably by Salmonella and other bacteria types, with no sign of saturation even at much larger concentrations (108 cfu/ml).

  10. Multiplicity of Salmonella entry mechanisms, a new paradigm for Salmonella pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Velge, P; Wiedemann, A; Rosselin, M; Abed, N; Boumart, Z; Chaussé, A M; Grépinet, O; Namdari, F; Roche, S M; Rossignol, A; Virlogeux-Payant, I

    2012-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica species includes about 2600 diverse serotypes, most of which cause a wide range of food- and water-borne diseases ranging from self-limiting gastroenteritis to typhoid fever in both humans and animals. Moreover, some serotypes are restricted to a few animal species, whereas other serotypes are able to infect plants as well as cold- and warm-blooded animals. An essential feature of the pathogenicity of Salmonella is its capacity to cross a number of barriers requiring invasion of a large variety of phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. The aim of this review is to describe the different entry pathways used by Salmonella serotypes to enter different nonphagocytic cell types. Until recently, it was accepted that Salmonella invasion of eukaryotic cells required only the type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by the Salmonella pathogenicity island-1. However, recent evidence shows that Salmonella can cause infection in a T3SS-1-independent manner. Currently, two outer membrane proteins Rck and PagN have been clearly identified as Salmonella invasins. As Rck mediates a Zipper-like entry mechanism, Salmonella is therefore the first bacterium shown to be able to induce both Zipper and Trigger mechanisms to invade host cells. In addition to these known entry pathways, recent data have shown that unknown entry routes could be used according to the serotype, the host and the cell type considered, inducing either Zipper-like or Trigger-like entry processes. The new paradigm presented here should change our classic view of Salmonella pathogenicity. It could also modify our understanding of the mechanisms leading to the different Salmonella-induced diseases and to Salmonella-host specificity. PMID:23170225

  11. Multiplicity of Salmonella entry mechanisms, a new paradigm for Salmonella pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Velge, P; Wiedemann, A; Rosselin, M; Abed, N; Boumart, Z; Chaussé, A M; Grépinet, O; Namdari, F; Roche, S M; Rossignol, A; Virlogeux-Payant, I

    2012-09-01

    The Salmonella enterica species includes about 2600 diverse serotypes, most of which cause a wide range of food- and water-borne diseases ranging from self-limiting gastroenteritis to typhoid fever in both humans and animals. Moreover, some serotypes are restricted to a few animal species, whereas other serotypes are able to infect plants as well as cold- and warm-blooded animals. An essential feature of the pathogenicity of Salmonella is its capacity to cross a number of barriers requiring invasion of a large variety of phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. The aim of this review is to describe the different entry pathways used by Salmonella serotypes to enter different nonphagocytic cell types. Until recently, it was accepted that Salmonella invasion of eukaryotic cells required only the type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by the Salmonella pathogenicity island-1. However, recent evidence shows that Salmonella can cause infection in a T3SS-1-independent manner. Currently, two outer membrane proteins Rck and PagN have been clearly identified as Salmonella invasins. As Rck mediates a Zipper-like entry mechanism, Salmonella is therefore the first bacterium shown to be able to induce both Zipper and Trigger mechanisms to invade host cells. In addition to these known entry pathways, recent data have shown that unknown entry routes could be used according to the serotype, the host and the cell type considered, inducing either Zipper-like or Trigger-like entry processes. The new paradigm presented here should change our classic view of Salmonella pathogenicity. It could also modify our understanding of the mechanisms leading to the different Salmonella-induced diseases and to Salmonella-host specificity. PMID:23170225

  12. Salmonella in beef and produce from honduras.

    PubMed

    Maradiaga, Martha; Miller, Mark F; Thompson, Leslie; Pond, Ansen; Gragg, Sara E; Echeverry, Alejandro; Garcia, Lyda G; Loneragan, Guy H; Brashears, Mindy M

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella continues to cause a considerable number of foodborne illnesses worldwide. The sources of outbreaks include contaminated meat and produce. The purpose of this study was to establish an initial investigation of the burden of Salmonella in produce and beef from Honduras by sampling retail markets and abattoirs. Retail produce samples (cantaloupes, cilantro, cucumbers, leafy greens, peppers, and tomatoes; n = 573) were purchased in three major cities of Honduras, and retail whole-muscle beef (n = 555) samples were also purchased in four major cities. Additionally, both hide and beef carcass (n = 141) samples were collected from two Honduran abattoirs. Whole-muscle beef samples were obtained using a sponge hydrated with buffered peptone water, and 10 ml of the buffered peptone water rinsate of each produce sample was collected with a dry sponge and placed in a bag to be transported back to the United States. Salmonella was detected using a commercially available, closeplatform PCR system, and positive samples were subjected to culture on selective media to obtain isolates. Overall, the prevalence of Salmonella-positive samples, based on PCR detection in Honduras (n = 555) retail beef was 10.1% (95% confidence interval = 7.8, 12.9), whereas 7.8% (n = 141) of beef carcass and hides samples were positive in both beef plants. The overall Salmonella prevalence for all produce samples (n = 573) collected was 2.1% (95% confidence interval = 1.2, 3.6). The most common serotypes identified in Honduras were Salmonella Typhimurium followed by Derby. These results provide an indication of Salmonella contamination of beef and produce in Honduras. Developing a Salmonella baseline for Latin America through an initial investigation like the one presented here contributes to a broader global understanding of the potential exposure through food, thus providing insight into the needs for control strategies. PMID:25719872

  13. The In Vivo Salmonella gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, A.

    1959-01-01

    The intravenous inoculation into fowls of large doses of crude polysaccharide preparations derived from a smooth strain of Salmonella gallinarum resulted in the adsorption of some of the polysaccharide on the surfaces of circulating erythrocytes. This in vivo adsorption, detectable by an antiglobulin haemagglutination test, lasted for a maximum of approximately 24 hours after inoculation of polysaccharide. Similarly, in vivo sensitization of avian erythrocytes reached a maximum at about 8-10 days following oral infection of fowls with Salm. gallinarum. These results are discussed in relation to the ability of the reticulo-endothelial system to remove polysaccharide from the blood stream, and to the possible consequences of the hosts' immunological response to sensitized erythrocytes. PMID:13806563

  14. SALMONELLA REGROWTH IN COMPOST AS INFLUENCED BY SUBSTRATE (SALMONELLA REGROWTH IN COMPOST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Composting can eliminate pathogenic organisms, including salmonellae, from sewage sludge. However, if salmonellae are present in the compost at undetectable levels or are inoculated into the compost by infected animals or from other sources, they may regrow presenting a health ha...

  15. ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS AND SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM FROM MICE IN POULTRY FLOCKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    House mice (Mus musculus), laying hens and the environments of thirty-nine poultry flocks in Pennsylvania, USA were cultured for Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium. Mice spleen and intestinal samples were each cultured, individually, with S. enteritidis isolated from fifteen and thi...

  16. Salmonella recovery from broilers and litter following gavage with Salmonella colonized darkling beetles and larvae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmission of Salmonella to broiler chicks with Salmonella colonized darkling beetles or larvae was evaluated by sampling litter and ceca during growout. In two trials, 1 or 2 day-of-hatch broiler chicks (in a pen of 40) were gavaged with either 4 darkling beetles, 4 beetle larvae, or 0.1 mL pept...

  17. Salmonella

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms Key Resource Enteritidis Infections Linked to Restaurant Chain A 2011 Outbreaks Typhimurium Infections Linked to Ground ... Pulp Hartford and Baildon Infections Associated with Restaurant Chain A I 4,[5],12:i:- Linked to ...

  18. Unsolved Problems in Salmonella Food Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Savage, William G.

    1929-01-01

    Salmonella groups of organisms are recognized as predominant in food poisoning outbreaks, but knowledge of the primary source of Salmonella bacilli and of paths of infection to implicated food is incomplete.—Unsolved problems discussed.—Food animals suffering from Salmonella infection are common in Germany but comparatively rare in this country and in most outbreaks the original food is shown to have been sound.—Infection of food from a human carrier is extremely rare. Detailed study of individual outbreaks brings out the striking fact that the Salmonella strains which cause food poisoning are just those types capable of causing disease in both man and animals. The hypothesis which best explains bacterial causation of most outbreaks is that the source of infection is derived, in most cases, from animals suffering from Salmonella disease or acting as carriers of these bacilli. Many facts favour this view, including the widespread extent of Salmonella infections in animals associated with food. Examples: Cows suffering from Salmonella infections with these bacilli in the milk; the widespread prevalence of such infections in rats and mice; the considerable extent to which pigs are infected with Salmonella bacilli.—Attention is directed to the presence of specific agglutinins in the blood of food animals such as bullocks and pigs, also to the fact that while in man a carrier condition for food-poisoning bacilli is extremely rare and at best a transient condition in animals. It is a well attested phenomenon. The causes of this difference are worthy of further study. Not only are there numerous types within the Salmonella group but these types exhibit characteristic and definite differences of pathological behaviour. Bacillus paratyphosus B and Bacillus aertrycke furnish a good illustration and these two types are critically contrasted. While our present knowledge is imperfect, it is suggested that the types in this group fall into three groups, i.e., (a) Strains

  19. Transovarian passage, visceral distribution, and pathogenicity of salmonella in snakes.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, R J

    1982-01-01

    Transovarian passage of salmonella was evaluated in snakes by cesarean delivery and subsequent bacteriological examination of fetuses. In all cases, the same Salmonella serotype was isolated from the feces of gravid females and their fetuses. The visceral distribution of salmonella in normal snakes was found to involve almost all visceral organs. Of nonenteric organs examined, salmonella was recovered most often from the livers and ureters. Experimental infections with Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella arizonae were established by oral, intracardial, and intracoelomic routes. Animals infected orally shed the organism in feces, but did not develop humoral antibodies or any detectable adverse effect. Animals injected by the intracardiac and intracoelomic routes developed antibody titers of 1:256 to the respective salmonella serotypes, but remained normal throughout the experiment. On the basis of results, salmonella was regarded as an opportunistic organism in reptiles. PMID:7044975

  20. Autophagy Facilitates Salmonella Replication in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong B.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Marchiando, Amanda M.; Ferreira, Rosana B. R.; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. PMID:24618251

  1. Enjoying Homemade Ice Cream without the Risk of Salmonella Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... responsible for the outbreaks is raw or undercooked eggs. A person infected with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), the strain of Salmonella found most frequently in raw eggs, usually has fever, diarrhea and abdominal cramps beginning ...

  2. Epidemiology of Food-borne Salmonella in Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite decades of research and implementation of numerous control measures, Salmonella continues to colonize all vertebrates. In food producing animals, Salmonella can be transferred to humans via contaminated food stuffs or through contact with (ill) animals. Environmental contamination plays a ...

  3. Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella Isolates Recovered from Cattle at Slaughter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Since 1997, the animal arm of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) has monitored changes in antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella isolates from animal origin. Additionally, since 2000, susceptibility of bovine Salmonella isolates collected in the US has ...

  4. Comparative Virulotyping of Salmonella typhi and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Elemfareji, Omar Ismail; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2013-12-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are important foodborne pathogens of significant public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to determine a range of virulence genes among typhoidal (S. typhi) and non-typhoidal (S. enteritidis) strains isolated from different geographical regions and different years. A total of 87 S. typhi and 94 S. enteritidis strains were tested for presence of 22 virulence genes by employing multiplex PCR and the genetic relatedness of these strains was further characterized by REP-PCR. In S. typhi, invA, prgH, sifA, spiC, sopB, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, cdtB, and orfL were present in all the strains, while sopE, agfC, agfA, sefC, mgtC, and sefD were present in 98.8, 97.7, 90.8, 87.4, 87.4 and 17.2 %, of the strains, respectively. No lpfA, lpfC, pefA, spvB, or spvC was detected. Meanwhile, in S. enteritidis, 15 genes, agfA, agfC, invA, lpfA, lpfC, sefD, prgH, spiC, sopB, sopE, iroN, sitC, misL, pipD, and orfL were found in all S. enteritidis strains 100 %, followed by sifA and spvC 98.9 %, pefA, spvB and mgtC 97.8 %, and sefC 90.4 %. cdtB was absent from all S. enteritidis strains tested. REP-PCR subtyped S. typhi strains into 18 REP-types and concurred with the virulotyping results in grouping the strains, while in S. enteritidis, REP-PCR subtyped the strains into eight profiles and they were poorly distinguishable between human and animal origins. The study showed that S. typhi and S. enteritidis contain a range of virulence factors associated with pathogenesis. Virulotyping is a rapid screening method to identify and profile virulence genes in Salmonella strains, and improve an understanding of potential risk for human and animal infections. PMID:24426144

  5. Detection and classification of salmonella serotypes using spectral signatures collected by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectral signatures of Salmonella serotypes namely Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky were collected using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). About 5-10 µL of Salmonella suspensions with concentrations of 1...

  6. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Two Salmonella enterica spp.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J.; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is responsible for major foodborne outbreaks worldwide. It can cause gastroenteritis characterized by diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Salmonella infections raise public health concerns along with consequential economic impacts. In this report, we announce the first complete genome sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraeuis (S. Choleraeuis) ATCC 10708 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Pullorum (S. Pullorum) ATCC 9120, isolated from patients with diarrhea. PMID:26798102

  7. Salmonella Serovars in the Herpetofauna of Indiana County, Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, David L.; Hulse, Arthur C.

    2006-01-01

    Herpetofaunal Salmonella enterica serovars have not been fully examined in any U.S. region. Thirty-three Salmonella serovars were isolated from 156 samples from 34 species, all within Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Results suggest that herpetofaunas could potentially pose a threat to humans. Further understanding of Salmonella in herpetofaunas may prevent future human cases. PMID:16672533

  8. A survey of free-living falconiform birds for Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, C E; Trexler-Myren, V P

    1986-11-01

    Of 105 migrating falconiform birds of 7 species examined for Salmonella shedding in New Jersey, 2 (1.9%) were positive for Salmonella spp. Both positive birds were immature red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). Salmonella enteritidis and S newport were the serotypes isolated. Neither serotype expressed multiple resistance when tested against a panel of 12 antimicrobial drugs. PMID:3506002

  9. Salmonella infection and immune response in finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and the immunological alterations that occur in Salmonella-carrier pigs, by longitudinally com...

  10. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERNS OF SALMONELLA FROM RETAIL CHICKEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is frequently reported as a cause of food-borne illness. The emergence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella associated with meat products has heightened concerns regarding antimicrobial use in food animal production. Eighty Salmonella isolates recovered from fresh whole chicken carcass...

  11. Salmonella surrogate reduction using industrial peanut dry roasting parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of industrial peanut dry roasting parameters in Salmonella reduction using a Salmonella surrogate, Enterococcus faecium, which is slightly more heat tolerant than Salmonella. Runner-type peanuts were inoculated with E. faecium and roasted in a lab...

  12. Extended Spectrum Beta-lactam Resistance among Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is an important food bourn pathogen capable of infecting both humans and animals. One of the most effective treatments for Salmonella infections is beta-lactam antibiotics, particularly extended spectrum beta-lactams; however, Salmonella resistant to these antibiotics have been recovered ...

  13. Hospitalization and Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella Outbreaks, 1984–2002

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Katherine D.; Ovitt, Jessa; Barrett, Timothy J.; Medalla, Felicita; Angulo, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the health consequences of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella strains associated with outbreaks. Among 32 outbreaks occurring in the United States from 1984 to 2002, 22% of 13,286 persons in 10 Salmonella-resistant outbreaks were hospitalized, compared with 8% of 2,194 persons in 22 outbreaks caused by pansusceptible Salmonella strains (p<0.01). PMID:15963293

  14. Salmonella virulence, genomics and interactions with the immune system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    “Every living thing has two ultimate goals—to survive and reproduce, and Salmonella is no exception,” said Harhay. “If we think about that as we try to understand this pathogen, it may help us in developing effective controls.” Harhay discussed the evolution of Salmonella to Salmonella enterica, the...

  15. Protection Against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Gallinarum, and Salmonella Enteritidis Infection in Layer Chickens Conferred by a Live Attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) strain against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Gallinarum (SG), and Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection in layer chickens. Birds were orally primed with the attenuated ST strain at 7 days of age and then boosted at 4 weeks post prime immunization (PPI). Sequential monitoring of plasma IgG and mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) levels revealed that inoculation with ST induced a significant antibody response to antigens against ST, SE, and SG. Moreover, significant lymphoproliferative responses to the 3 Salmonella serovars were observed in the immunized group. We also investigated protection against virulent ST, SE, and SG strain challenge. Upon virulent SG challenge, the immunized group showed significantly reduced mortality compared to the non-immunized group. The reduced persistence of the virulent ST and SE challenge strains in the liver, spleen, and cecal tissues of the immunized group suggests that immunization with the attenuated ST strain may not only protect against ST infection but can also confer cross protection against SE and SG infection. PMID:25713506

  16. Salmonella capture using orbiting magnetic microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Drew; Ballard, Matthew; Mills, Zachary; Hanasoge, Srinivas; Hesketh, Peter; Alexeev, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Using three-dimensional simulations and experiments, we examine capture of salmonella from a complex fluid sample flowing through a microfluidic channel. Capture is performed using orbiting magnetic microbeads, which can easily be extracted from the system for analysis after salmonella capture. Numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of the system, which consists of a microchannel filled with a viscous fluid, model salmonella, magnetic microbeads and a series of angled parallel ridges lining the top of the microchannel. Simulations provide a statistical measure of the ability of the system to capture target salmonella. Our modeling findings guide the design of a lab-on-a-chip experimental device to be used for the detection of salmonella from complex food samples, allowing for the detection of the bacteria at the food source and preventing the consumption of contaminated food. Such a device can be used as a generic platform for the detection of a variety of biomaterials from complex fluids. This work is supported by a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture.

  17. Salmonella and Eggs: From Production to Plate

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, Harriet; Ross, Kirstin

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella contamination of eggs and egg shells has been identified as a public health concern worldwide. A recent shift in consumer preferences has impacted on the egg industry, with a push for cage-free egg production methods. There has also been an increased desire from consumers for raw and unprocessed foods, potentially increasing the risk of salmonellosis. In response to these changes, this review explores the current literature regarding Salmonella contamination of eggs during the production processing through to food handling protocols. The contamination of eggs with Salmonella during the production process is a complex issue, influenced by many variables including flock size, flock age, stress, feed, vaccination, and cleaning routines. Currently there is no consensus regarding the impact of caged, barn and free range egg production has on Salmonella contamination of eggs. The literature regarding the management and control strategies post-collection, during storage, transport and food handling is also reviewed. Pasteurisation and irradiation were identified as the only certain methods for controlling Salmonella and are essential for the protection of high risk groups, whereas control of temperature and pH were identified as potential control methods to minimise the risk for foods containing raw eggs; however, further research is required to provide more detailed control protocols and education programs to reduce the risk of salmonellosis from egg consumption. PMID:25730295

  18. Salmonellas on pig farms and in abattoirs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. A.; Ghosh, A. C.; Mann, P. G.; Tee, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    Salmonella infection on two pig farms and its relation to infection in pigs at slaughter was studied. On the first farm feed ingredients were mixed on the farm, and these included fish meal which was found to be contaminated with salmonellas. The feed was pumped to pigs in liquid form. There was a high salmonella isolation rate at slaughter when the contaminated fish meal was fed in liquid feed, but it was significantly lower when no fish meal was fed to the pigs examined at slaughter. In some instances the same serotypes were found in fish meal and pig excreta on the farm and in caecal contents of the pigs at slaughter. No serotype was repeatedly isolated from any source and it appeared that the serotypes were not able to establish themselves in the pigs. It is concluded that infection found at slaughter originated on the farm where fish meal introduced and maintained infection. There was an opportunity for salmonellas to have multiplied in the liquid feed for several hours each day. On a second farm environmental conditions were similar, but feed was given in the form of ready-made pellets and nuts. Salmonellas were not isolated from the feed. At slaughter there was a significantly lower isolation rate than on the first farm. PMID:4501835

  19. Survival of salmonellae during pepperoni manufacture.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Huhtanen, C N; Kissinger, J C; Palumbo, S A

    1975-11-01

    Survival of salmonellae in artificially contaminated beef-pork mixtures (approximately 10(4) salmonellae/g) was studied in pepperoni prepared by either a natural flora or lactic starter culture fermentation or in nonfermented sausages. The pepperoni did not become salmonellae free during the usual commercial 15 to 30-day drying period. Salmonella dublin was present in all products, fermented or unfermented, after 42 to 43 days of drying. At a lower level of contamination, 10(3)/g, S. dublin could not be recovered from starter culture-fermented pepperoni after 14 days of drying but persisted in the natural flora-fermented sausage. S. typhimurium (initial count, 10(4)/g) was absent after 42 days of drying when starter culture was used to ferment the pepperoni, but was still present in the natural flora-fermented and unfermented products. S. dublin, host adapted to cattle, or S. choleraesuis, host adapted to swine, had similar survival patterns in beef pork, or beef-pork pepperoni. Heating salmonellae contaminated beef-pork pepperoni (after fermantation but before drying) to an internal temperature of 60 C (trichinae inactivating) eliminated the food-borne pathogen from the sausage product. PMID:951

  20. Salmonella and eggs: from production to plate.

    PubMed

    Whiley, Harriet; Ross, Kirstin

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella contamination of eggs and egg shells has been identified as a public health concern worldwide. A recent shift in consumer preferences has impacted on the egg industry, with a push for cage-free egg production methods. There has also been an increased desire from consumers for raw and unprocessed foods, potentially increasing the risk of salmonellosis. In response to these changes, this review explores the current literature regarding Salmonella contamination of eggs during the production processing through to food handling protocols. The contamination of eggs with Salmonella during the production process is a complex issue, influenced by many variables including flock size, flock age, stress, feed, vaccination, and cleaning routines. Currently there is no consensus regarding the impact of caged, barn and free range egg production has on Salmonella contamination of eggs. The literature regarding the management and control strategies post-collection, during storage, transport and food handling is also reviewed. Pasteurisation and irradiation were identified as the only certain methods for controlling Salmonella and are essential for the protection of high risk groups, whereas control of temperature and pH were identified as potential control methods to minimise the risk for foods containing raw eggs; however, further research is required to provide more detailed control protocols and education programs to reduce the risk of salmonellosis from egg consumption. PMID:25730295

  1. Prediction and comparison of Salmonella-human and Salmonella-Arabidopsis interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Schleker, Sylvia; Garcia-Garcia, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Salmonellosis caused by Salmonella bacteria is a food-borne disease and worldwide health threat causing millions of infections and thousands of deaths every year. This pathogen infects an usually broad range of host organisms including human and plants. A better understanding of the mechanisms of communication between Salmonella and its hosts requires identifying the interactions between Salmonella and host proteins. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the fundamental building blocks of communication. Here we utilize the prediction platform BIANA to obtain the putative Salmonella-human and Salmonella-Arabidopsis interactomes based on sequence and domain similarity to known PPIs. A gold standard list of Salmonella-host PPIs served to validate the quality of the human model. 24,726 and 10,926 PPIs comprising interactions between 38 and 33 Salmonella effectors and virulence factors with 9,740 human and 4,676 Arabidopsis proteins, respectively, were predicted. Putative hub proteins could be identified and parallels between the two interactomes were discovered. This approach can provide insight into possible biological functions of so far uncharacterized proteins. The predicted interactions are available via a web interface which allows filtering of the database according to parameters provided by the user to narrow down the list of suspected interactions. The interactions are available via a webinterface at http://sbi.imim.es/web/SHIPREC.php PMID:22589098

  2. Molecular characterization of Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ and Salmonella Heidelberg from poultry and retail chicken meat in Colombia by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ variant (also termed Salmonella Java) and Salmonella Heidelberg are human pathogens frequently isolated from poultry. As a step towards implementing the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistant Surveillance (COIPARS), this study characterized molecular patt...

  3. Inactivation of Salmonella Enteriditis and Salmonella Senftenberg in liquid whole egg using generally recognized as safe additives, ionizing radiation and heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of combining irradiation followed by heat on Salmonella Enteriditis and Salmonella Senftenberg inoculated into liquid whole egg (LWE) with added nisin, EDTA, sorbic acid, carvacrol, or combinations of these GRAS additives was investigated. Synergistic reductions of Salmonella populations ...

  4. Impact of litter Salmonella strain on the recovered Salmonella strains from broiler crop and ceca following feed withdrawal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the impact of litter Salmonella status during feed withdrawal, 2 pens of 5-wk-old broilers (n=10/pen) in separate rooms were challenged with marker strains of either Salmonella Montevideo (nalidixic acid resistant) or Salmonella Heidelberg (streptomycin resistant) by oral gavage. Three ...

  5. Profiling the gastrointestinal microbiota in response to Salmonella: low versus high Salmonella shedding in the porcine host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the leading cause of bacterial foodborne disease in the U.S., Salmonella is a major food safety concern. Endeavors to control Salmonella in our food chain are hindered by the ability of Salmonella to sub-clinically colonize livestock, thereby serving as a significant reservoir for contamination ...

  6. Profiling the gastrointestinal microbiota in response to Salmonella: low versus high Salmonella shedding in the natural porcine host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlling Salmonella in the food chain is complicated by the ability of Salmonella to sub-clinically colonize livestock. These Salmonella-carrier animals are a significant reservoir for contamination of naïve animals, the environment, and our food supply. On the farm and in experimental infections...

  7. Comparison of CHROMagar Salmonella Medium and Xylose-Lysine-Desoxycholate and Salmonella-Shigella Agars for Isolation of Salmonella Strains from Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Susan; Olma, Tom; Chen, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    The growth and appearance of 115 stock Salmonella isolates on a new formulation of CHROMagar Salmonella (CAS) medium were compared to those on xylose-lysine-desoxycholate agar (XLD), Salmonella-Shigella agar (SS), and Hektoen enteric agar (HEA) media. CAS medium was then compared prospectively to XLD and SS for the detection and presumptive identification of Salmonella strains in 500 consecutive clinical stool samples. All stock Salmonella isolates produced typical mauve colonies on CAS medium. Nine Salmonella strains were isolated from clinical specimens. The sensitivities for the detection of salmonellae after primary plating on CAS medium and the combination of XLD and SS after enrichment were 100%. The specificity for the detection of salmonellae after primary plating on CAS medium (83%) was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher than that after primary plating on the combination of SS and XLD media (55%) (a 28% difference in rates; 95% confidence interval, 23.0 to 34%). Twenty-nine non-Salmonella organisms produced mauve colonies on CAS medium, including 17 Candida spp. (59%) and 8 Pseudomonas spp. (28%). These were easily excluded as salmonellae by colony morphology, microscopic examination of a wet preparation, or oxidase testing. One biochemically inert Escherichia coli isolate required further identification to differentiate it from Salmonella spp. The use of plating on CAS medium demonstrated high levels of sensitivity and specificity and reduced the time to final identification of Salmonella spp., resulting in substantial cost savings. It can be recommended for use for the primary isolation of Salmonella spp. from stool specimens. Other media (e.g., XLD) are required to detect Shigella spp. concurrently. PMID:12149365

  8. Ozone is mutagenic in Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, D.; Combes, R.; McConville, M.; Zeiger, E. )

    1992-01-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive gas that has been tested for genotoxicity in a number of systems. Induced genetic damage resulting from ozone treatment may not be readily observed because of the high toxicity of the chemical and difficulties in generating and administering controlled concentrations. The mutagenicity of ozone was investigated in Salmonella typhimurium using a plate test protocol designed for reactive vapours and gases. Ozone, at two to three consecutive doses, induced weak, albeit statistically significant, mutagenic responses in tester strain TA102 with and without Aroclor-induced rat liver S9 (lowest effective mean concentration of 0.019 ppm; 35 min total exposure). However, dose-related responses were not always obtained. No mutagenicity was detected in strains TA98, TA100, or TA1535, with or without S9. In strain TA104, ozone induced a weak response only at a single dose with S9; this response was not reproducible. Mutagenicity was dependent on the ozone flow rate and total exposure time, with variations in the optimum dose-time regimen leading to toxicity or complete inactivity. The data show that ozone is a very weak bacterial mutagen and only when tested under narrowly prescribed, subtoxic dosing conditions.

  9. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  10. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  11. Exploiting host immunity: the Salmonella paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Behnsen, Judith; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens have evolved clever strategies to evade and in some cases exploit the attacks of an activated immune system. Salmonella enterica is one such pathogen, exploiting multiple aspects of host defense to promote its replication in the host. Here we review recent findings on the mechanisms by which Salmonella establishes systemic and chronic infection, including strategies involving manipulation of innate immune signaling and inflammatory forms of cell death, as well as immune evasion by establishing residency in M2 macrophages. We also examine recent evidence showing that the oxidative environment and the high levels of antimicrobial proteins produced in response to localized Salmonella gastrointestinal infection enable the pathogen to successfully outcompete the resident gut microbiota. PMID:25582038

  12. Salmonella as a vaccine delivery vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Kenneth L.; Brenneman, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella vaccines can be administered orally to deliver recombinant antigens to mucosal surfaces inducing a protective immune response against a variety of targeted pathogens. A number of exciting new approaches and technologies for attenuated Salmonella vaccines have been developed recently. However, there remains a disconnect between results obtained with mice in preclinical studies and results obtained in human clinical trials. This is due to an incomplete understanding of S. Typhi interactions with human hosts and inadequate animal models available for study. In this review, we describe recent progress in identifying important differences underlying S. Typhi-host interactions, the development of novel approaches to vaccine design and six recent clinical trials evaluating Salmonella-vectored vaccines. PMID:24053397

  13. Muscle Abscess due to Salmonella Enterica

    PubMed Central

    Akkoyunlu, Yasemin; Ceylan, Bahadir; Iraz, Meryem; Elmadag, Nuh Mehmet; Aslan, Turan

    2013-01-01

    Non typhoidal Salmonellae spp. causes clinical symptoms especially in neonates, infants, aged and immunocompromised patients. Hematogenous dissemination may occur in complicated cases whereas the formation of abscess is rare. A 61-year old woman presented to our hospital with pain and a mass in her left arm, without fever and leukocytosis. She was using methotrexate, corticosteroids and quinine for rheumatoid arthritis. She had a history of cervix cancer and was given radiotherapy and chemotherapy 3 years ago. Upon physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging, the mass was considered as an abscess and was surgically drained. Salmonella enterica spp. enterica was yielded in the culture of the drainage material. Ceftriaxon 2g/day was started intramuscularly and continued for 4 weeks. Salmonellosis is usually a self-limited disease, generally restricted to gastrointestinal tract and acquired following food poisoning. Management of Salmonella abscess requires a combination of antibiotherapy, surgical drainage and eradication of primary foci. PMID:24396582

  14. Tentative colistin epidemiological cut-off value for Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Agersø, Yvonne; Torpdahl, Mia; Zachariasen, Camilla; Seyfarth, Annemette; Hammerum, Anette M; Nielsen, Eva Møller

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this research was to determine minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) population distributions for colistin for Salmonella on subtype level. Furthermore, we wanted to determine if differences in MIC for colistin could be explained by mutations in pmrA or pmrB encoding proteins involved in processes that influence the binding of colistin to the cell membrane. During 2008-2011, 6,583 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica isolates of human origin and 1931 isolates of animal/meat origin were collected. The isolates were serotyped, and susceptibility was tested towards colistin (range 1-16 mg/L). Moreover, 37 isolates were tested for mutations in pmrA and pmrB by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. MIC distribution for colistin at serotype level showed that Salmonella Dublin (n=198) followed by Salmonella Enteritidis (n=1247) were less susceptible than "other" Salmonella serotypes originating from humans (n=5,274) and Salmonella Typhimurium of animal/meat origin (n=1794). MIC was ≤1 mg/L for 98.9% of "other" Salmonella serotypes originating from humans, 99.4% of Salmonella Typhimurium, 61.3% of Salmonella Enteritidis, and 12.1% of Salmonella Dublin isolates. Interestingly, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Enteritidis belong to the same O-group (O:1, 9,12), suggesting that surface lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the cell (O-antigen) play a role in colistin susceptibility. The epidemiological cut-off value of >2 mg/L for colistin suggested by European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) is placed inside the distribution for both Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Enteritidis. All tested Salmonella Dublin isolates, regardless of MIC colistin value, had identical pmrA and pmrB sequences. Missense mutations were found only in pmrA in one Salmonella Reading and in pmrB in one Salmonella Concord isolate, both with MIC of ≤1 for colistin. In conclusion, our study indicates that missense mutations are not necessarily

  15. Salmonella in broiler flocks in the republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Montserrat; Fanning, June; Murphy, Anne; Murray, Gerardine; Griffin, Margaret; Flack, Alma; Leonard, Nola; Egan, John

    2009-01-01

    In order to obtain an estimation of the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in flocks of broilers in the Republic of Ireland, a study was conducted in 2006 in a total of 362 broiler flocks associated with four integrated companies. Salmonella spp. was isolated from 27.3% of flocks, and eight Salmonella serovars were identified, none of which were Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Typhimurium. The most prevalent serovar was Salmonella Mbandaka, followed by Salmonella Kentucky, which respectively accounted for 61.6% and 27.0% of positive samples. Notable differences were observed among the flocks associated with different integrated companies, both in the Salmonella spp. prevalence and in the serovar distribution. Results from routine official Salmonella testing in broiler production in 2006 showed similar serovar distribution within each integrated company from the associated hatchery and factory samples. In our study, differences in the prevalence of Salmonella at farm level did not correlate with differences in the percentages of positive chicken carcasses officially tested, which were low, for all the four companies investigated. Given the high prevalence of Salmonella Mbandaka, all human isolates obtained in the Republic of Ireland from 2003 to 2006 were compared to a subset of poultry isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, but an epidemiological link between the animal and the human strains could not be established. Finally the antimicrobial resistance analysis indicated a low proportion of resistant strains among the broiler flock isolates. PMID:19061369

  16. Microantiglobulin Test for Detecting Salmonella typhimurium Agglutinins

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. E.; Whittemore, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    A sensitive antiglobulin (AG) test procedure for the demonstration and experimental study of the agglutinin response of chickens infected orally with Salmonella typhimurium is described. A tetrazolium-stained S. typhimurium antigen was employed with microagglutination techniques and equipment for the first time in conducting the AG test. Results with the conventional macroscopy tube agglutination test for S. typhimurium and the 24-hr microtest were comparable; however, the AG test enhanced titers as much as 16 times, and these persisted at a significant level for as long as 4 months. This study is being extended to other Salmonella serotypes and possible field applications of the AG test procedure. Images PMID:4113257

  17. Salmonella colonization in commercial pet turtles (Pseudemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed Central

    Shane, S. M.; Gilbert, R.; Harrington, K. S.

    1990-01-01

    An epidemiological survey was conducted on two commercial turtle farms in southern Louisiana to determine the reason for an apparent increase in the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in turtle hatchlings at the time of pre-export certification examination. Pond water was consistently found to be contaminated (6/36 samples) with either Salmonella newport, S. arizonae, or S. poona. Environmental specimens obtained from eggs and turtle hatcheries (204 specimens) failed to yield Salmonella spp. A sample comprising 197 hatchlings, derived from a batch previously demonstrated to be contaminated, showed a salmonella prevalence of 12%, with S. arizonae and S. poona the only serotypes isolated. Four serotypes of Salmonella sp. isolated by a certifying laboratory in 1988, and 20 salmonella isolates obtained from hatchling turtles, were all resistant to gentamicin. The emergence of gentamicin resistance in Salmonella spp. isolated from turtles will reduce the effectiveness of preventive measures in use in Louisiana since 1984. PMID:2209735

  18. Evaluation of the respiratory route as a viable portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry via intratracheal challenge of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium1

    PubMed Central

    Kallapura, G.; Morgan, M. J.; Pumford, N. R.; Bielke, L. R.; Wolfenden, A. D.; Faulkner, O. B.; Latorre, J. D.; Menconi, A.; Hernandez-Velasco, X.; Kuttappan, V. A.; Hargis, B. M.; Tellez, G.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that primary infection of Salmonella is by the oral-fecal route for poultry. However, the airborne transmission of Salmonella and similar enteric zoonotic pathogens has been historically neglected. Increasing evidence of Salmonella bioaerosol generation in production facilities and studies suggesting the vulnerabilities of the avian respiratory architecture together have indicated the possibility of the respiratory system being a potential portal of entry for Salmonella in poultry. Presently, we evaluated this hypothesis through intratracheal (IT) administration of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, as separate challenges, in a total of 4 independent trials, followed by enumeration of cfu recovery in ceca-cecal tonsils and recovery incidence in liver and spleen. In all trials, both Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, challenged IT colonized cecae to a similar or greater extent than oral administration at identical challenge levels. In most trials, chickens cultured for cfu enumeration from IT-challenged chicks at same dose as orally challenged, resulted in an increase of 1.5 log higher Salmonella Enteritidis from ceca-cecal tonsils and a much lower dose IT of Salmonella Enteritidis could colonize ceca to the same extent than a higher oral challenge. This trend of increased cecal colonization due to IT challenge was observed with all trails involving week-old birds (experiment 2 and 3), which are widely considered to be more difficult to infect via the oral route. Liver-spleen incidence data showed 33% of liver and spleen samples to be positive for Salmonella Enteritidis administered IT (106 cfu/chick), compared with 0% when administered orally (experiment 2, trial 1). Collectively, these data suggest that the respiratory tract may be a largely overlooked portal of entry for Salmonella infections in chickens. PMID:24570455

  19. Low-oxygen tensions found in Salmonella-infected gut tissue boost Salmonella replication in macrophages by impairing antimicrobial activity and augmenting Salmonella virulence.

    PubMed

    Jennewein, Jonas; Matuszak, Jasmin; Walter, Steffi; Felmy, Boas; Gendera, Kathrin; Schatz, Valentin; Nowottny, Monika; Liebsch, Gregor; Hensel, Michael; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Gerlach, Roman G; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    In Salmonella infection, the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2)-encoded type three secretion system (T3SS2) is of key importance for systemic disease and survival in host cells. For instance, in the streptomycin-pretreated mouse model SPI-2-dependent Salmonella replication in lamina propria CD11c(-)CXCR1(-) monocytic phagocytes/macrophages (MΦ) is required for the development of colitis. In addition, containment of intracellular Salmonella in the gut critically depends on the antimicrobial effects of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX), and possibly type 2 nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). For both antimicrobial enzyme complexes, oxygen is an essential substrate. However, the amount of available oxygen upon enteroinvasive Salmonella infection in the gut tissue and its impact on Salmonella-MΦ interactions was unknown. Therefore, we measured the gut tissue oxygen levels in a model of Salmonella enterocolitis using luminescence two-dimensional in vivo oxygen imaging. We found that gut tissue oxygen levels dropped from ∼78 Torr (∼11% O2) to values of ∼16 Torr (∼2% O2) during infection. Because in vivo virulence of Salmonella depends on the Salmonella survival in MΦ, Salmonella-MΦ interaction was analysed under such low oxygen values. These experiments revealed an increased intracellular replication and survival of wild-type and t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella. These findings were paralleled by blunted nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced Salmonella ROS perception. In addition, hypoxia enhanced SPI-2 transcription and translocation of SPI-2-encoded virulence protein. Neither pharmacological blockade of PHOX and NOS2 nor impairment of T3SS2 virulence function alone mimicked the effect of hypoxia on Salmonella replication under normoxic conditions. However, if t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella were used, hypoxia did not further enhance Salmonella recovery in a PHOX and NOS2-deficient situation. Hence, these data suggest that

  20. Prevalence and Characterization of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella Bacteriophages Recovered from Beef Cattle Feedlots in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yicheng; Savell, Jeffrey W; Arnold, Ashley N; Gehring, Kerri B; Gill, Jason J; Taylor, T Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in beef cattle is a food safety concern, and the beef feedlot environment may function as a reservoir of this pathogen. The goal of this study was to identify and isolate Salmonella and Salmonella bacteriophages from beef cattle feedlot environments in order to better understand the microbial ecology of Salmonella and identify phages that might be useful as anti-Salmonella beef safety interventions. Three feedlots in south Texas were visited, and 27 distinct samples from each source were collected from dropped feces, feed from feed bunks, drinking water from troughs, and soil in cattle pens (n = 108 samples). Preenrichment, selective enrichment, and selective/differential isolation of Salmonella were performed on each sample. A representative subset of presumptive Salmonella isolates was prepared for biochemical identification and serotyping. Samples were pooled by feedlot and sample type to create 36 samples and enriched to recover phages. Recovered phages were tested for host range against two panels of Salmonella hosts. Salmonella bacteria were identified in 20 (18.5%) of 108 samples by biochemical and/or serological testing. The serovars recovered included Salmonella enterica serovars Anatum, Muenchen, Altona, Kralingen, Kentucky, and Montevideo; Salmonella Anatum was the most frequently recovered serotype. Phage-positive samples were distributed evenly over the three feedlots, suggesting that phage prevalence is not strongly correlated with the presence of culturable Salmonella. Phages were found more frequently in soil and feces than in feed and water samples. The recovery of bacteriophages in the Salmonella-free feedlot suggests that phages might play a role in suppressing the Salmonella population in a feedlot environment. PMID:27497120

  1. Persistence of salmonella typhimurium in nopal cladodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh produce associated outbreaks have increased in the last few years. E.coli O157:H7 and Salmonella have been causative agents of infection in these outbreaks. Fresh produce is consumed raw, and in the absence of terminal kill treatment, it is imperative to understand sources of contamination o...

  2. Salmonella and Impact on Egg Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a strong association between the incidence of human illness and the prevalence of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial egg-producing poultry. Although most egg-associated disease around the world has been attributed to S. Enteritidis, other serovars are sometimes implicated. The deposition ...

  3. Nontyphoidal Salmonella Infection, Guangdong Province, China, 20121

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xi; Huang, Qiong; Dun, Zhongjun; Huang, Wei; Wu, Shuyu; Liang, Junhua; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    We used active and passive surveillance to estimate nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection during 2012 in Guangdong Province, China. Under passive surveillance, for every reported NTS infection, an estimated 414.8 cases occurred annually. Under active surveillance, an estimated 35.8 cases occurred. Active surveillance provides remarkable advantages in incidence estimate. PMID:26982074

  4. Control of salmonella at the chill tank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of Salmonella on poultry meat should be in the form of a continuous effort from the breeder farm to the fully processed and further processed product, as well as, consumer education. However, control is often measured at the chill tank and efforts are made to relate prevalence to processing...

  5. SALMONELLA ON FREE-RANGE CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many consumers assume that broiler chickens grown under traditional commercial conditions will have more salmonella than free-range chickens which are usually less crowded and have access to outside spaces during grow-out. However, because of the lack of published information about the microbiologi...

  6. Invasive Illness with Salmonella Virchow Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mani, V.; Brennand, J.; Mandal, B. K.

    1974-01-01

    Salmonella virchow infection in man is usually sporadic and is little known in Britain. We report an outbreak of 21 cases in the Manchester area. The source of infection was believed to be chickens bought at different shops. Symptoms were typhoidal or septicaemic. PMID:4856881

  7. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  8. 75 FR 18751 - Prevention of Salmonella

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 118 Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During... part 118 to correct the following information: (1) The date by which egg producers must register their... address to which egg producers must send their CD-ROM. Publication of this document constitutes...

  9. Peanut Roaster Temperatures Relative to Salmonella Kill

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ARS, Market Quality and Handling Research Unit, Raleigh NC 27695 In response to the limited peanut butter contamination incident of 2006/7, studies were initiated to examine the effect of various time and temperature protocols on log kill levels for Salmonella on peanuts. The objective of the work ...

  10. Mechanisms of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Enteritidis is the major cause of the food-borne salmonellosis pandemic in humans of the last 20 years, during which contaminated eggs were the most important vehicle of the infection. Eggs can be contaminated on the outer shell surface and internally. Internal contamination can be the re...

  11. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26846804

  12. ALIPHATIC HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS PRODUCE VOLATILE 'SALMONELLA' MUTAGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Production of volatile mutagenic metabolites from 5 halogenated promutagens was examined by a simple modification of the conventional Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. This method incorporates the taping together of 2 agar plates face to face during the initial portion of ...

  13. Persistence of salmonella Typhimurium in Nopal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Having documented information available on the capability of Salmonella to remain in the cladode tissue it is important to understand the role of nopal on the lifecycle of enteropathogenic bacteria in humans, as well as for management and control programs of theses pathogens in plants. Because of th...

  14. Salmonella enterica Genomics and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a prevalent food-borne pathogen and a model system for the study of virulence and pathogenesis. The development of DNA microarray technology has furthered investigation of complicated regulatory pathways used during survival and pathogenesis as well as genome organization that leads to...

  15. Nontyphoid salmonella infection: microbiology, clinical features, and antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Ming; Wang, Yue; Su, Lin-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2013-06-01

    Nontyphoid Salmonella is the most common bacterial pathogen causing gastrointestinal infection worldwide. Most nontyphoid Salmonella infection is limited to uncomplicated gastroenteritis that seldom requires antimicrobial treatment. Nevertheless, invasive infections, such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis, and meningitis, may occur and require antimicrobial therapy. Continuous genetic and genomic evolution in Salmonella leading to increased virulence and resistance to multiple drugs are of significant public health concern. Two major changes in the epidemiology of nontyphoid salmonellosis in Europe and in the USA occurred in the second half of the 20(th) century: the emergence of foodborne human infections caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteriditis and by multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium. In the 21(st) century, a worsening situation is the increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in nontyphoid Salmonella. Clinical isolates showing carbapenem resistance also have been identified. Although antimicrobial therapy is usually not indicated for uncomplicated Salmonella gastroenteritis, recent studies indicated that a short-course ceftriaxone therapy (3-5 days) for patients with severe gastroenteritis would lead to a faster clinical recovery. Continuous surveillance of Salmonella in both humans and animals is mandatory. A better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella may help in the devising of better interventional strategies to reduce the spread of resistant Salmonella between humans and reservoirs along the food chain. PMID:23597525

  16. A Protocol to Infect Caenorhabditis elegans with Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiuli; Jia, Kailiang

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, C. elegans has emerged as an invertebrate organism to study interactions between hosts and pathogens, including the host defense against gram-negative bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. Salmonella establishes persistent infection in the intestine of C. elegans and results in early death of infected animals. A number of immunity mechanisms have been identified in C. elegans to defend against Salmonella infections. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway, has been shown to limit the Salmonella replication in C. elegans and in mammals. Here, a protocol is described to infect C. elegans with Salmonella typhimurium, in which the worms are exposed to Salmonella for a limited time, similar to Salmonella infection in humans. Salmonella infection significantly shortens the lifespan of C. elegans. Using the essential autophagy gene bec-1 as an example, we combined this infection method with C. elegans RNAi feeding approach and showed this protocol can be used to examine the function of C. elegans host genes in defense against Salmonella infection. Since C. elegans whole genome RNAi libraries are available, this protocol makes it possible to comprehensively screen for C. elegans genes that protect against Salmonella and other intestinal pathogens using genome-wide RNAi libraries. PMID:24998902

  17. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella spp. in pork burger patties.

    PubMed

    Gurman, P M; Ross, T; Holds, G L; Jarrett, R G; Kiermeier, A

    2016-02-16

    Predictive models, to estimate the reduction in Escherichia coli O157:H7 concentration in beef burgers, have been developed to inform risk management decisions; no analogous model exists for Salmonella spp. in pork burgers. In this study, "Extra Lean" and "Regular" fat pork minces were inoculated with Salmonella spp. (Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:-, Salmonella Senftenberg and Salmonella Typhimurium) and formed into pork burger patties. Patties were cooked on an electric skillet (to imitate home cooking) to one of seven internal temperatures (46, 49, 52, 55, 58, 61, 64 °C) and Salmonella enumerated. A generalised linear logistic regression model was used to develop a predictive model for the Salmonella concentration based on the internal endpoint temperature. It was estimated that in pork mince with a fat content of 6.1%, Salmonella survival will be decreased by -0.2407log10 CFU/g for a 1 °C increase in internal endpoint temperature, with a 5-log10 reduction in Salmonella concentration estimated to occur when the geometric centre temperature reaches 63 °C. The fat content influenced the rate of Salmonella inactivation (P=0.043), with Salmonella survival increasing as fat content increased, though this effect became negligible as the temperature approached 62 °C. Fat content increased the time required for patties to achieve a specified internal temperature (P=0.0106 and 0.0309 for linear and quadratic terms respectively), indicating that reduced fat pork mince may reduce the risk of salmonellosis from consumption of pork burgers. Salmonella serovar did not significantly affect the model intercepts (P=0.86) or slopes (P=0.10) of the fitted logistic curve. This predictive model can be applied to estimate the reduction in Salmonella in pork burgers after cooking to a specific endpoint temperature and hence to assess food safety risk. PMID:26686598

  18. Ability of Cecal Cultures to Inhibit Growth of Salmonella Typhimurium during Aerobic Incubation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Poultry can serve as reservoirs for Salmonella; however, chicks provided cultures of cecal bacteria develop resistance to colonization by Salmonella. Research has indicated that cecal bacteria metabolize organic acids to produce substances that inhibit Salmonella growth. Purpose: The...

  19. Assessing the potential impact of Salmonella vaccines in an endemically infected dairy herd

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella spp. in cattle are contributing to bacterial foodborne disease for humans. Reduction of Salmonella prevalence in herds is important to prevent human Salmonella infections. Typical control measures are culling of infectious animals, vaccination, and improved hygiene management. Vaccines ha...

  20. Comparing human-Salmonella with plant-Salmonella protein-protein interaction predictions.

    PubMed

    Schleker, Sylvia; Kshirsagar, Meghana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis is the most frequent foodborne disease worldwide and can be transmitted to humans by a variety of routes, especially via animal and plant products. Salmonella bacteria are believed to use not only animal and human but also plant hosts despite their evolutionary distance. This raises the question if Salmonella employs similar mechanisms in infection of these diverse hosts. Given that most of our understanding comes from its interaction with human hosts, we investigate here to what degree knowledge of Salmonella-human interactions can be transferred to the Salmonella-plant system. Reviewed are recent publications on analysis and prediction of Salmonella-host interactomes. Putative protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between Salmonella and its human and Arabidopsis hosts were retrieved utilizing purely interolog-based approaches in which predictions were inferred based on available sequence and domain information of known PPIs, and machine learning approaches that integrate a larger set of useful information from different sources. Transfer learning is an especially suitable machine learning technique to predict plant host targets from the knowledge of human host targets. A comparison of the prediction results with transcriptomic data shows a clear overlap between the host proteins predicted to be targeted by PPIs and their gene ontology enrichment in both host species and regulation of gene expression. In particular, the cellular processes Salmonella interferes with in plants and humans are catabolic processes. The details of how these processes are targeted, however, are quite different between the two organisms, as expected based on their evolutionary and habitat differences. Possible implications of this observation on evolution of host-pathogen communication are discussed. PMID:25674082

  1. Distribution of Salmonella serovars and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Makaya, P V; Matope, G; Pfukenyi, D M

    2012-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Salmonella serovars from chickens from large-scale commercial (LSC), small-scale commercial (SSC), and rural free-range (RFR) farms of Zimbabwe. Pooled cloacal swabs were collected for culture and isolation of Salmonella spp. A chi-square test was used to assess distribution differences of salmonellas among the farming sectors. Approximately 10% (283/2833) of the swabs were positive for Salmonella enterica, with only subspecies enterica (98.6%) and arizonae (1.4%) being detected. The prevalence of S. enterica varied significantly (P<0.05) among areas, with Harare (27.8%) and Buhera (1.3%) recording the highest and the least prevalence, respectively. S. enterica was only isolated from LSC and SSC farms, with the former having a significantly (P<0.001; χ(2)=155.3) higher prevalence than the latter. S. arizonae was only isolated from the SSC farms while none were obtained from the RFR farms. The serovars isolated were Salmonella Enteritidis (72.8%), Group C (20.1%), Group B (4.2%), Salmonella Typhimurium (1.1%) and Salmonella Gallinarum (0.4%). S. Enteritidis predominated in the urban/periurban areas. Approximately 26% (53/206) of S. Enteritidis isolates were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. Resistance to tetracycline was the most common, while no resistance was detected for furazolidone, neomycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. There were 12.1% multi-drug-resistant S. Enteritidis isolates, and the resistance to ampicillin/kanamycin was predominant. The identification of multi-drug-resistant S. Enteritidis is of public health concern. Thus, stringent control of S. Enteritidis will reduce the public health risk of human salmonellosis. PMID:22515540

  2. Salmonella sampling and recovery from on farm litter to fully processed carcasses – ability to detect salmonella vs. “salmonella-free”

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry are sampled often for Salmonella during growout on the farm and throughout the processing plant. While on farm sampling is not currently a regulatory requirement it can be useful in determining Salmonella status of each flock. On farm sampling can include varying types of both environmental ...

  3. Chasing Salmonella Typhimurium in free range egg production system.

    PubMed

    Chousalkar, Kapil; Gole, Vaibhav; Caraguel, Charles; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2016-08-30

    Free range production systems are becoming a major source of egg production in Australia and worldwide. This study investigated shedding and ecology of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella species in a free range layer flock, wild birds and foxes in the vicinity of the free range farm in different seasons. Shedding of Salmonella was significantly higher in summer. Within the shed, overall, Salmonella prevalence was highest in dust. Corticosterone level in faeces was highest in spring and lowest in winter. There was no direct association between the Salmonella shedding (MPN/gm) and corticosterone levels in faeces. Salmonella Typhimurium MLVA types isolated from fox and wild birds were similar to MLVA types isolated from layer flock and reported during human food borne illness. Wild birds and foxes appear to play an important role in S. Typhimurium ecology and food safety. Environmental factors could play a role in evolution of S. Typhimurium in free range environment. PMID:27527766

  4. Persistence and growth of different Salmonella serovars on pre- and postharvest tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Namvar, A; Kostrzynska, M; Hora, R; Warriner, K

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of a range of Salmonella serovars with pre- and postharvest tomatoes was evaluated. Serovars were selected on the basis of previous association in tomato-linked outbreaks of salmonellosis (Salmonella Javiana, Salmonella Montevideo, and Salmonella Newport) or those typically isolated from animal or clinical infections (Salmonella Dublin, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Hadar, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Senftenberg). Salmonella serovars introduced onto the flowers of growing plants were recovered on and within the developing tomato fruit. Of all the Salmonella serovars tested, Montevideo appeared to be more adapted to survival within tomatoes and was recovered from 90% of the fruit screened. All of the Salmonella serovars could persist and grow when introduced onto unripened (green) tomato fruit. In general, growth (internal and external) was promoted at the high incubation temperature (25 degrees C) and high relative humidity (95%), although this was serovar dependent. The growth and persistence of Salmonella introduced on and into ripened (red) tomatoes was serovar dependent. Salmonella serovars Enteritidis, Typhimurium, and Dublin were less adapted to grow in or on intact red tomatoes than were serovars Hadar, Montevideo, or Newport. The results illustrated that a diverse range of Salmonella serovars can become established within and/or on preharvest tomatoes. The majority of Salmonella can grow and become established both on and within unripened tomatoes, but growth on ripened fruit was serovar dependent. The results provide a possible explanation why only a narrow range of Salmonella serovars are associated with foodborne illness outbreaks linked to tomatoes. PMID:18095423

  5. Immunofluorescence Technique for the Detection of Salmonellae in Various Foods

    PubMed Central

    Insalata, N. F.; Schulte, S. J.; Berman, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Salmonella species have been detected in nine food varieties by use of fluorescent antibodies without false-positive or false-negative results. Test antisera were specially prepared, commercially available, conjugated polyvalent O globulin absorbed with cultures of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter freundii, and polyvalent phase II H globulin antibodies. Use of this technique permits a decrease of 24 hr in time normally required for Salmonella detection when compared with cultural Salmonella recovery methods. PMID:16349728

  6. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Results Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFNγ and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. Conclusion We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression

  7. Isolation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Phoon, Yee Wei; Chan, Yuen Yue Candice; Koh, Tze Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella is a well-recognised problem worldwide, especially in developing countries such as India, where non-typhoidal Salmonella infections and enteric fever are endemic. Antimicrobial resistance, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is common and leads to the frequent use of alternative agents, such as azithromycin. We herein describe the first reported case of azithromycin-resistant Salmonella gastroenteritis in a Singaporean patient. PMID:26311915

  8. Comparison of CHROMagar Salmonella Medium and Hektoen Enteric Agar for Isolation of Salmonellae from Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gaillot, Olivier; Di Camillo, Patrick; Berche, Patrick; Courcol, René; Savage, Colette

    1999-01-01

    CHROMagar Salmonella (CAS), a new chromogenic medium, was retrospectively compared to Hektoen enteric agar (HEA) with 501 Salmonella stock isolates and was then prospectively compared to HEA for the detection and presumptive identification of Salmonella spp. with 508 stool samples before and after enrichment. All stock cultures (100%), including cultures of H2S-negative isolates, yielded typical mauve colonies on CAS, while 497 (99%) isolates produced typical lactose-negative, black-centered colonies on HEA. Following overnight incubation at 37°C, a total of 20 Salmonella strains were isolated from the 508 clinical samples. Sensitivities for primary plating and after enrichment were 95% (19 isolates) and 100% (20 isolates), respectively, for CAS and 80% (16 isolates) and 100% (20 isolates), respectively, for HEA. The specificity of CAS (88.9%) was significantly higher than that of HEA (78.5%; P < 0.0001). On the basis of its good sensitivity and specificity, CAS medium can be recommended for use for primary plating when human stool samples are screened for Salmonella spp. PMID:9986847

  9. A comparison between longitudinal shedding patterns of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Dublin on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, M; McLaren, I; Clifton-Hadley, F A; Liebana, E; Wales, A D; Davies, R H

    2012-08-25

    Salmonella in cattle herds may behave as epidemic or endemic infections. An intensive longitudinal sampling study across all management groups and ages on six dairy farms in the UK was used to examine patterns of Salmonella shedding, following the prior identification of either Salmonella Dublin (SD) (three farms) or Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) (three farms) on the premises in the context of clinical salmonellosis. Individual faeces, pooled faeces and environmental samples (total 5711 samples), taken approximately every six weeks for 15-24 weeks, were cultured for Salmonella. SD was detected at low frequency (on any visit, 0.5-18.3 per cent of samples positive) and most consistently in calves. By contrast, ST was isolated at higher frequency (on any visit, 6.8-75 per cent of samples positive), and in higher numbers, up to 10(7) cfu/g faeces. Significantly more samples from calves were positive for ST than were positive for SD (50.6 per cent v 3.1 per cent; P < 0.001), which was also true for milking cows (46.3 per cent v 4.4 per cent; P < 0.001). The differences could help to explain the different patterns of bovine infection classically associated with these two serovars in the UK. No consistent effect upon shedding was seen among the ST-infected herds following vaccination. PMID:22859413

  10. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J.; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  11. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    PubMed

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  12. Salmonella prevalence in free-range and certified organic chickens.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J S; Cosby, D E

    2005-11-01

    Many consumers assume that broiler chickens grownunder traditional commercial conditions will have more Salmonella than free-range or organic chickens, which usually are less crowded, have access to outside spaces during grow out, and are fed special diets. Despite these perceptions, there is a lack of published information about the microbiological status of free-range and organic chickens. A total of 135 processed free-range chickens from four different commercial free-range chicken producers were sampled in 14 different lots for the presence of Salmonella. Overall, 9 (64%) of 14 lots and 42 (31%) of 135 of the carcasses were positive for Salmonella. No Salmonella were detected in 5 of the 14 lots, and in one lot 100% of the chickens were positive for Salmonella. An additional 53 all-natural (no meat or poultry meal or antibiotics in the feed) processed chickens from eight lots were tested; 25% ofthe individual chickens from 37% of these lots tested positive for Salmonella. Three lots of chickens from a single organicfree-range producer were tested, and all three of the lots and 60% of the individual chickens were positive for Salmonella.The U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service reported that commercial chickens processed from 2000 to 2003 had a Salmonella prevalence rate of 9.1 to 12.8%. Consumers should not assume that free-range or organicconditions will have anything to do with the Salmonella status of the chicken. PMID:16300088

  13. Immunity to Intracellular Salmonella Depends on Surface-associated Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Claudi, Beatrice; Mazé, Alain; Schemmer, Anne K.; Kirchhoff, Dennis; Schmidt, Alexander; Burton, Neil; Bumann, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Invasive Salmonella infection is an important health problem that is worsening because of rising antimicrobial resistance and changing Salmonella serovar spectrum. Novel vaccines with broad serovar coverage are needed, but suitable protective antigens remain largely unknown. Here, we tested 37 broadly conserved Salmonella antigens in a mouse typhoid fever model, and identified antigen candidates that conferred partial protection against lethal disease. Antigen properties such as high in vivo abundance or immunodominance in convalescent individuals were not required for protectivity, but all promising antigen candidates were associated with the Salmonella surface. Surprisingly, this was not due to superior immunogenicity of surface antigens compared to internal antigens as had been suggested by previous studies and novel findings for CD4 T cell responses to model antigens. Confocal microscopy of infected tissues revealed that many live Salmonella resided alone in infected host macrophages with no damaged Salmonella releasing internal antigens in their vicinity. In the absence of accessible internal antigens, detection of these infected cells might require CD4 T cell recognition of Salmonella surface-associated antigens that could be processed and presented even from intact Salmonella. In conclusion, our findings might pave the way for development of an efficacious Salmonella vaccine with broad serovar coverage, and suggest a similar crucial role of surface antigens for immunity to both extracellular and intracellular pathogens. PMID:23093937

  14. First-trimester Septic Abortion Due to Salmonella enteritidis Oranienburg

    PubMed Central

    Jelsema, Russel D.; Isada, Nelson B.

    1995-01-01

    Background: Septic abortion caused by transplacental salmonella infection is extremely rare; there are no reported cases of serotype oranienburg as an etiology. Case: We describe a patient with non-typhoidal Salmonella enteritidis serotype oranienburg as a cause of first-trimester pregnancy loss. The rapid progression of this patient's septicemia and adverse outcome is described. The epidemiology and natural history of salmonella infections are also discussed. Conclusion: Non-typhoidal salmonella is still a cause of morbidity in Western countries. This infection can result in rapid-onset fetal demise and septic abortion. PMID:18475401

  15. Salmonella Serotype Determination Utilizing High-Throughput Genome Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaokang; Yin, Yanlong; Jones, Marcus B.; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L.; Dinsmore, Blake A.; Fitzgerald, Collette; Fields, Patricia I.

    2015-01-01

    Serotyping forms the basis of national and international surveillance networks for Salmonella, one of the most prevalent foodborne pathogens worldwide (1–3). Public health microbiology is currently being transformed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS), which opens the door to serotype determination using WGS data. SeqSero (www.denglab.info/SeqSero) is a novel Web-based tool for determining Salmonella serotypes using high-throughput genome sequencing data. SeqSero is based on curated databases of Salmonella serotype determinants (rfb gene cluster, fliC and fljB alleles) and is predicted to determine serotype rapidly and accurately for nearly the full spectrum of Salmonella serotypes (more than 2,300 serotypes), from both raw sequencing reads and genome assemblies. The performance of SeqSero was evaluated by testing (i) raw reads from genomes of 308 Salmonella isolates of known serotype; (ii) raw reads from genomes of 3,306 Salmonella isolates sequenced and made publicly available by GenomeTrakr, a U.S. national monitoring network operated by the Food and Drug Administration; and (iii) 354 other publicly available draft or complete Salmonella genomes. We also demonstrated Salmonella serotype determination from raw sequencing reads of fecal metagenomes from mice orally infected with this pathogen. SeqSero can help to maintain the well-established utility of Salmonella serotyping when integrated into a platform of WGS-based pathogen subtyping and characterization. PMID:25762776

  16. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    García, Ana V.; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. PMID:24772109

  17. A case of canine salmonellosis due to Salmonella infantis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Kuwamoto, R

    1999-01-01

    A 7-year-old male dog kept outdoors manifested severe watery diarrhea with generalized weakness. Salmonella Infantis was isolated from a fecal sample and the dog recovered soon after medication with ampicillin, to which the isolate was highly sensitive. The present case was diagnosed as S. Infantis infection. Due to the importance of Salmonella in public health, soil samples were collected from the garden where the dog was kept and were examined for Salmonella, Some of them were positive for S. Infantis, however, no Salmonella was isolated from any soil samples collected after thorough disinfection of the surrounded environment. PMID:10027169

  18. Prevalence of Nontyphoidal Salmonella and Salmonella Strains with Conjugative Antimicrobial-Resistant Serovars Contaminating Animal Feed in Texas.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Poole, Toni L; Runyon, Mick; Hume, Michael; Herrman, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize 365 nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica isolates from animal feed. Among the 365 isolates, 78 serovars were identified. Twenty-four isolates (7.0%) were recovered from three of six medicated feed types. Three of these isolates derived from the medicated feed, Salmonella Newport, Salmonella Typhimurium var. O 5- (Copenhagen), and Salmonella Lexington var. 15+ (Manila), displayed antimicrobial resistance. Susceptibility testing revealed that only 3.0% (12) of the 365 isolates displayed resistance to any of the antimicrobial agents. These 12 isolates were recovered from unmedicated dry beef feed (n = 3), medicated dry beef feed (n = 3), cabbage culls (n = 2), animal protein products (n = 2), dry dairy cattle feed (n = 1), and fish meal (n = 1). Only Salmonella Newport and Salmonella Typhimurium var. O 5- (Copenhagen) were multidrug resistant. Both isolates possessed the IncA/C replicon and the blaCMY-2 gene associated with cephalosporin resistance. Plasmid replicons were amplified from 4 of 12 resistant isolates. Plasmids (40 kb) were Salmonella Montevideo and Salmonella Kentucky. Conjugation experiments were done using 7 of the 12 resistant isolates as donors. Only Salmonella Montevideo, possessing a plasmid and amplifying IncN, produced transconjugants. Transconjugants displayed the same antimicrobial resistance profile as did the donor isolate. Three isolates that amplified replicons corresponding to IncA/C or IncHI2 did not produce transconjugants at 30 or 37°C. The results of this study suggest that the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella contaminating animal feed is low in Texas. However, Salmonella was more prevalent in feed by-products; fish meal had the highest prevalence (84%) followed by animal protein products (48%). Ten of the 35 feed types had no Salmonella contamination. Further investigation is needed to understand the possible role of specific feed types in the dissemination of antimicrobial

  19. Salmonella outbreak from microwave cooked food.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. R.; Parry, S. M.; Ribeiro, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    Following a buffet meal served to six guests at a private domestic function, five of the guests and the host developed symptoms of food poisoning. Salmonella enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4) was isolated from all four individuals who submitted faecal samples for investigation. Leftover samples of a savoury rice dish consumed by all six ill persons contained 6 x 10(3)/gm Salmonella enteritidis PT4. The rice salad comprised boiled rice, raw carrots, eggs, cheese and curry powder. The curry powder and remainder of the pack of six eggs were negative on microbiological analysis. The rice dish had been prepared by heating in a 500 W microwave oven with a rotating turntable on full power for 5 min. Although the hazards of inadequate microwave cooking are well recognized, this is only the second outbreak of food poisoning from microwave cooking to be reported. PMID:7589262

  20. Helicobacter and Salmonella Persistent Infection Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Monack, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    Some host-adapted bacterial pathogens are capable of causing persistent infections in humans. For example, Helicobacter pylori inhabits the human gastric mucosa and persistence can be lifelong. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi causes systemic infections that involve colonization of the reticuloendothelial system and some individuals become lifelong carriers. In this review, I compare and contrast the different lifestyles of Helicobacter and Salmonella within the host and the strategies they have evolved to persist in mammalian hosts. Persistently infected carriers serve as the reservoirs for these pathogens, and the carrier state is an essential feature that is required for survival of the bacteria within a restricted host population. Therefore, investigating the chronic carrier state should provide insight into bacterial survival strategies, as well as new therapeutic approaches for treatments. PMID:24296347

  1. Renal Abscess Caused by Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amarjeet; Sarma, Smita; Kumar, Navin; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella typhi is a true pathogen, which is capable of causing both intestinal and extraintestinal infections. Unusual presentations of Salmonella should always be kept in mind as this organism can cause disease in almost any organ of the body. S. typhi has been reported to cause the life-threatening infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, myocarditis, empyema, and hepatic abscess. Renal involvement by S. typhi is a relatively rare presentation. We report a case of renal abscess caused by S. typhi in an afebrile, 10-year-old child who did not have any clinical history of enteric fever. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolation of S. typhi from the renal abscess, and interestingly this isolate was found to be resistant to quinolones. PMID:26417164

  2. Growth of Salmonella on chilled meat.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, B. M.; Roberts, T. A.; Mansfield, J.; Farkas, G.

    1980-01-01

    Growth rates of a mixture of Salmonella serotypes inoculated on beef from a commercial abattoir were measured at chill temperatures. The minimum recorded mean generation times were 8.1 h at 10 degrees C; 5.2 h at 12.5 degrees C and 2.9 h at 15 degrees C. Growth did not occur at 7-8 degrees C. From these data the maximum extent of growth of Salmonella during storage of meat for different times at chill temperatures was calculated. Criteria for deciding safe handling temperatures for meat are discussed. Maintaining an internal temperature below 10 degrees C during the boning operation would be sufficient to safeguard public health requirements. PMID:7052227

  3. The IL-23 axis in Salmonella gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Godinez, Ivan; Keestra, A Marijke; Spees, Alanna; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-11-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serotypes cause a localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. In contrast, primary immunodeficiencies that impair interleukin-23 (IL-23)-dependent pathways are associated in humans with disseminated NTS bloodstream infections (bacteraemia). The recent use of animal models has helped to define the role the IL-23 axis plays during NTS gastroenteritis, but additional work is needed to elucidate how this host defence pathway prevents NTS bacteraemia. PMID:21740501

  4. Immune reaction and survivability of salmonella typhimurium and salmonella infantis after infection of primary avian macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braukmann, Maria; Methner, Ulrich; Berndt, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2) for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF) as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages. PMID:25811871

  5. Immune Reaction and Survivability of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Infantis after Infection of Primary Avian Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Braukmann, Maria; Methner, Ulrich; Berndt, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are differentially able to infect chickens. The underlying causes are not yet fully understood. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the importance of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2) for the virulence of two non-host-specific, but in-vivo differently invasive, Salmonella serovars in conjunction with the immune reaction of the host. Primary avian splenic macrophages were inoculated with Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica serovar (S.) Typhimurium and S. Infantis. The number and viability of intracellular bacteria and transcription of SPI-1 and -2 genes by the pathogens, as well as transcription of immune-related proteins, surface antigen expression and nitric oxide production by the macrophages, were compared at different times post inoculation. After infection, both of the Salmonella serovars were found inside the primary macrophages. Invasion-associated SPI-1 genes were significantly higher transcribed in S. Infantis- than S. Typhimurium-infected macrophages. The macrophages counteracted the S. Infantis and S. Typhimurium infection with elevated mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha factor (LITAF) as well as with an increased synthesis of nitric oxide. Despite these host cell attacks, S. Typhimurium was better able than S. Infantis to survive within the macrophages and transcribed higher rates of the SPI-2 genes spiC, ssaV, sifA, and sseA. The results showed similar immune reactions of primary macrophages after infection with both of the Salmonella strains. The more rapid and stronger transcription of SPI-2-related genes by intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to S. Infantis might be responsible for its better survival in avian primary macrophages. PMID:25811871

  6. Electrochemical immunosensors for Salmonella detection in food.

    PubMed

    Melo, Airis Maria Araújo; Alexandre, Dalila L; Furtado, Roselayne F; Borges, Maria F; Figueiredo, Evânia Altina T; Biswas, Atanu; Cheng, Huai N; Alves, Carlúcio R

    2016-06-01

    Pathogen detection is a critical point for the identification and the prevention of problems related to food safety. Failures at detecting contaminations in food may cause outbreaks with drastic consequences to public health. In spite of the real need for obtaining analytical results in the shortest time possible, conventional methods may take several days to produce a diagnosis. Salmonella spp. is the major cause of foodborne diseases worldwide and its absence is a requirement of the health authorities. Biosensors are bioelectronic devices, comprising bioreceptor molecules and transducer elements, able to detect analytes (chemical and/or biological species) rapidly and quantitatively. Electrochemical immunosensors use antibody molecules as bioreceptors and an electrochemical transducer. These devices have been widely used for pathogen detection at low cost. There are four main techniques for electrochemical immunosensors: amperometric, impedimetric, conductometric, and potentiometric. Almost all types of immunosensors are applicable to Salmonella detection. This article reviews the developments and the applications of electrochemical immunosensors for Salmonella detection, particularly the advantages of each specific technique. Immunosensors serve as exciting alternatives to conventional methods, allowing "real-time" and multiple analyses that are essential characteristics for pathogen detection and much desired in health and safety control in the food industry. PMID:27138197

  7. Smartphone quantifies Salmonella from paper microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Park, Tu San; Li, Wenyue; McCracken, Katherine E; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-12-21

    Smartphone-based optical detection is a potentially easy-to-use, handheld, true point-of-care diagnostic tool for the early and rapid detection of pathogens. Paper microfluidics is a low-cost, field-deployable, and easy-to-use alternative to conventional microfluidic devices. Most paper-based microfluidic assays typically utilize dyes or enzyme-substrate binding, while bacterial detection on paper microfluidics is rare. We demonstrate a novel application of smartphone-based detection of Salmonella on paper microfluidics. Each paper microfluidic channel was pre-loaded with anti-Salmonella Typhimurium and anti-Escherichia coli conjugated submicroparticles. Dipping the paper microfluidic device into the Salmonella solutions led to the antibody-conjugated particles that were still confined within the paper fibers to immunoagglutinate. The extent of immunoagglutination was quantified by evaluating Mie scattering from the digital images taken at an optimized angle and distance with a smartphone. A smartphone application was designed and programmed to allow the user to position the smartphone at an optimized angle and distance from the paper microfluidic device, and a simple image processing algorithm was implemented to calculate and display the bacterial concentration on the smartphone. The detection limit was single-cell-level and the total assay time was less than one minute. PMID:24162816

  8. Regulatory principles governing Salmonella and Yersinia virulence

    PubMed Central

    Erhardt, Marc; Dersch, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Enteric pathogens such as Salmonella and Yersinia evolved numerous strategies to survive and proliferate in different environmental reservoirs and mammalian hosts. Deciphering common and pathogen-specific principles for how these bacteria adjust and coordinate spatiotemporal expression of virulence determinants, stress adaptation, and metabolic functions is fundamental to understand microbial pathogenesis. In order to manage sudden environmental changes, attacks by the host immune systems and microbial competition, the pathogens employ a plethora of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control elements, including transcription factors, sensory and regulatory RNAs, RNAses, and proteases, to fine-tune and control complex gene regulatory networks. Many of the contributing global regulators and the molecular mechanisms of regulation are frequently conserved between Yersinia and Salmonella. However, the interplay, arrangement, and composition of the control elements vary between these closely related enteric pathogens, which generate phenotypic differences leading to distinct pathogenic properties. In this overview we present common and different regulatory networks used by Salmonella and Yersinia to coordinate the expression of crucial motility, cell adhesion and invasion determinants, immune defense strategies, and metabolic adaptation processes. We highlight evolutionary changes of the gene regulatory circuits that result in different properties of the regulatory elements and how this influences the overall outcome of the infection process. PMID:26441883

  9. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Pande, Vivek V; Devon, Rebecca L; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R; Chousalkar, Kapil K

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  10. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  11. Survival and growth of Salmonella in salsa and related ingredients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Guodong; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Tauxe, Robert V; Doyle, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    A large outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul associated with raw jalapeño peppers, serrano peppers, and possibly tomatoes was reported in the United States in 2008. During the outbreak, two clusters of illness investigated among restaurant patrons were significantly associated with eating salsa. Experiments were performed to determine the survival and growth characteristics of Salmonella in salsa and related major ingredients, i.e., tomatoes, jalapeño peppers, and cilantro. Intact and chopped vegetables and different formulations of salsas were inoculated with a five-strain mixture of Salmonella and then stored at 4, 12, and 21 degrees C for up to 7 days. Salmonella populations were monitored during storage. Salmonella did not grow, but survived on intact tomatoes and jalapeño peppers, whereas significant growth at 12 and 21 degrees C was observed on intact cilantro. In general, growth of Salmonella occurred in all chopped vegetables when stored at 12 and 21 degrees C, with chopped jalapeño peppers being the most supportive of Salmonella growth. Regardless of differences in salsa formulation, no growth of Salmonella (initial inoculation ca. 3 log CFU/g) was observed in salsa held at 4 degrees C; however, rapid or gradual decreases in Salmonella populations were only observed in formulations that contained both fresh garlic and lime juice. Salmonella grew at 12 and 21 degrees C in salsas, except for those formulations that contained both fresh garlic and lime juice, in which salmonellae were rapidly or gradually inactivated, depending on salsa formulation. These results highlight the importance of preharvest pathogen contamination control of fresh produce and proper formulation and storage of salsa. PMID:20202327

  12. Survival of Salmonella during baking of peanut butter cookies.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Amanda A; Taylor, Tiffany; Schnepf, James

    2014-04-01

    Peanuts and peanut-based products have been the source of recent Salmonella outbreaks worldwide. Because peanut butter is commonly used as an ingredient in baked goods, such as cookies, the potential risk of Salmonella remaining in these products after baking needs to be assessed. This research examines the potential hazard of Salmonella in peanut butter cookies when it is introduced via the peanut-derived ingredient. The survival of Salmonella during the baking of peanut butter cookies was determined. Commercial, creamy-style peanut butter was artificially inoculated with a five-strain Salmonella cocktail at a target concentration of 10(8) CFU/g. The inoculated peanut butter was then used to prepare peanut butter cookie dough following a standard recipe. Cookies were baked at 350 °F (177 °C) and were sampled after 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 min. Temperature profiles of the oven and cookies were monitored during baking. The water activity and pH of the inoculated and uninoculated peanut butter, raw dough, and baked cookies were measured. Immediately after baking, cookies were cooled, and the survival of Salmonella was determined by direct plating or enrichment. After baking cookies for 10 min, the minimum reduction of Salmonella observed was 4.8 log. In cookies baked for 13 and 14 min, Salmonella was only detectable by enrichment reflecting a Salmonella reduction in the range of 5.2 to 6.2 log. Cookies baked for 15 min had no detectable Salmonella. Results of this study showed that proper baking will reduce Salmonella in peanut butter cookies by 5 log or more. PMID:24680076

  13. Long term prognosis of reactive salmonella arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leirisalo-Repo, M; Helenius, P; Hannu, T; Lehtinen, A; Kreula, J; Taavitsainen, M; Koskimies, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Reactive joint complications triggered by salmonella gastroenteritis are increasingly reported, but the outcome and long term prognosis of the patients is incompletely known. This study looked at the prognosis of salmonella arthritis in patients hospitalised in 1970-1986.
METHODS—Hospital records from two hospitals in southern Finland were screened for patients with the discharge diagnosis of salmonellosis or reactive, postinfectious arthritis or Reiter's disease. For the patients with confirmed diagnosis of reactive salmonella arthritis, data about the acute disease were collected from the hospital records. A follow up study was performed.
RESULTS—There were 63 patients (28 women, 35 men, mean age 36.5 years) with salmonella arthritis. Urethritis occurred in 27%, eye inflammation in 13%, and low back pain in 44% of the patients. HLA-B27 was present in 88%. More men than women were HLA-B27 positive. HLA-B27 positive patients had higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (mean 80.9 v 46.5 mm 1st h, p = 0.0180). Also, extra-articular features and radiological sacroiliitis were seen only in HLA-B27 positive patients. A follow up study was performed on 50 patients mean 11.0 (range 5-22 years) later. Twenty patients had recovered completely. Ten patients had mild joint symptoms, 11 patients had had a new acute transient arthritis, and five acute iritis. Eight patients had developed chronic spondyloarthropathy. Radiological sacroiliitis was seen in six of 44 patients, more frequently in male than in female patients (32% v 0%; p = 0.0289). Recurrent or chronic arthritis, iritis or radiological sacroiliitis developed only in HLA-B27 positive patients.
CONCLUSION—Joint symptoms are common after reactive salmonella arthritis. HLA-B27 contributes to the severity of acute disease and to the late prognosis.

 PMID:9370874

  14. T-2 toxin induced Salmonella Typhimurium intoxication results in decreased Salmonella numbers in the cecum contents of pigs, despite marked effects on Salmonella-host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Dhaenens, Maarten; Shearer, Neil; Goossens, Joline; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; D'Herde, Katharina; Thompson, Arthur; Deforce, Dieter; Boyen, Filip; Leyman, Bregje; Van Parys, Alexander; De Backer, Patrick; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Croubels, Siska; Pasmans, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The mycotoxin T-2 toxin and Salmonella Typhimurium infections pose a significant threat to human and animal health. Interactions between both agents may result in a different outcome of the infection. Therefore, the aim of the presented study was to investigate the effects of low and relevant concentrations of T-2 toxin on the course of a Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs. We showed that the presence of 15 and 83 μg T-2 toxin per kg feed significantly decreased the amount of Salmonella Typhimurium bacteria present in the cecum contents, and a tendency to a reduced colonization of the jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and colon contents was noticed. In vitro, proteomic analysis of porcine enterocytes revealed that a very low concentration of T-2 toxin (5 ng/mL) affects the protein expression of mitochondrial, endoplasmatic reticulum and cytoskeleton associated proteins, proteins involved in protein synthesis and folding, RNA synthesis, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and regulatory processes. Similarly low concentrations (1-100 ng/mL) promoted the susceptibility of porcine macrophages and intestinal epithelial cells to Salmonella Typhimurium invasion, in a SPI-1 independent manner. Furthermore, T-2 toxin (1-5 ng/mL) promoted the translocation of Salmonella Typhimurium over an intestinal porcine epithelial cell monolayer. Although these findings may seem in favour of Salmonella Typhimurium, microarray analysis showed that T-2 toxin (5 ng/mL) causes an intoxication of Salmonella Typhimurium, represented by a reduced motility and a downregulation of metabolic and Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 genes. This study demonstrates marked interactions of T-2 toxin with Salmonella Typhimurium pathogenesis, resulting in bacterial intoxication. PMID:22440148

  15. Salmonella and antimicrobial resistance in broilers: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic pathogen which can readily pass from animal to man through the consumption of contaminated food. The prevalence of Salmonella enterica associated with poultry and poultry meat products has been well documented and this prevalence has both public health and economic...

  16. Salmonella enterica Strains with Reduced Susceptibility to Quarternary Ammonium Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonella spp. are responsible for 76 million illnesses per year in the U.S. Quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) are commonly used antimicrobial agents. Reduced susceptibility to these compounds by a broad spectrum of organisms is a concern. Methods: Salmonella enterica strains with r...

  17. THE PREVALENCE OF CAMPYLOBACTER AND SALMONELLA THROUGHOUT TURKEY BROODER PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously surveyed market weight turkeys for the presence of Campylobacter and Salmonella and have reported that whereas the prevalence of Campylobacter is >60% at slaughter the Salmonella prevalence varies from 0 to 97%. The purpose of this study was to determine the temporal point of ent...

  18. Application of Microarray Technology to Investigate Salmonella genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays were developed for the molecular study of various genes in Salmonella species, which may be important in causing illness in both humans and animals. There are over 2400 Salmonella serotypes each of which differs in their ability to cause disease in humans and animals, persist within the ...

  19. Bacteriophage Therapy To Reduce Salmonella Colonization of Broiler Chickens▿

    PubMed Central

    Atterbury, R. J.; Van Bergen, M. A. P.; Ortiz, F.; Lovell, M. A.; Harris, J. A.; De Boer, A.; Wagenaar, J. A.; Allen, V. M.; Barrow, P. A.

    2007-01-01

    Acute enteric infections caused by salmonellas remain a major public health burden worldwide. Poultry, particularly chickens, are known to be the main reservoir for this zoonotic pathogen. Although some progress has been made in reducing Salmonella colonization of broiler chickens by using biosecurity and antimicrobials, it still remains a considerable problem. The use of host-specific bacteriophages as a biocontrol is one possible intervention by which Salmonella colonization could be reduced. A total of 232 Salmonella bacteriophages were isolated from poultry farms, abattoirs, and wastewater in 2004 and 2005. Three phages exhibiting the broadest host ranges against Salmonella enterica serotypes Enteritidis, Hadar, and Typhimurium were characterized further by determining their morphology and lytic activity in vitro. These phages were then administered in antacid suspension to birds experimentally colonized with specific Salmonella host strains. The first phage reduced S. enterica serotype Enteritidis cecal colonization by ≥4.2 log10 CFU within 24 h compared with controls. Administration of the second phage reduced S. enterica serotype Typhimurium by ≥2.19 log10 CFU within 24 h. The third bacteriophage was ineffective at reducing S. enterica serotype Hadar colonization. Bacteriophage resistance occurred at a frequency commensurate with the titer of phage being administered, with larger phage titers resulting in a greater proportion of resistant salmonellas. The selection of appropriate bacteriophages and optimization of both the timing and method of phage delivery are key factors in the successful phage-mediated control of salmonellas in broiler chickens. PMID:17526794

  20. Salmonella enterica genomics and genetics of antimicrobial resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica is an important food-borne pathogen and an excellent model system for the study of genomics, virulence and pathogenesis. . There are over 2,400 Salmonella serotypes each of which differs in their ability to cause disease in humans and animals, persist within the host, and survive...

  1. Salmonella serovars differentially stimulate bovine leukocyte responses in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of Salmonella serovars cause no clinical signs in cattle, while some serovars, such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) and Dublin (SD), may cause severe disease. Mechanisms underlying the difference in pathogenesis between different serovars are not clear. The objective of ...

  2. Mitsuokella jalaludinii inhibits growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella continues to be a significant human health threat, and the objective of this study was to identify microorganisms with the potential to improve porcine food-safety through their antagonism of Salmonella. Anaerobic culture supernatants of 973 bacterial isolates from the gastrointestinal tr...

  3. Mitsuokella jalaludinii inhibits growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella continues to be a significant human health threat, and the objective of this study was to identify microorganisms with the potential to improve porcine food-safety through their antagonism of Salmonella. Anaerobic culture supernates of 973 bacterial isolates from the gastrointestinal trac...

  4. Development of a transdermal Salmonella challenge model in calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The peripheral lymph nodes (PLN) in cattle may contain Salmonella and thus are a potential source of contamination for ground beef. Research on the prevalence of Salmonella in these lymph nodes suggests that regional and seasonal differences occur with the seasonal fluctuations, a reflection of fly...

  5. Evaluation of gallium maltolate on fecal Salmonella shedding in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness in humans and causes over a third of all cases of gastroenteritis in the United States. Human foodborne outbreaks due to Salmonella have been traced to milk, beef, pork, and poultry. Fecal contamination of the carcass and hide is thought to be a maj...

  6. Predicting Salmonella enterica serotypes by repetitive sequence-based PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) utilizing a semi-automated system, was evaluated as a method to determine Salmonella serotypes. A group of 216 Salmonella isolates belonging to 13 frequently isolated serotypes and one rarer serotype from poultry were used to create a D...

  7. Salmonella-positive broiler carcasses contaminated by multiple serotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many laboratories that routinely sample broiler carcasses for Salmonella are primarily interested only in determining the presence or absence of Salmonella, so only one colony-forming unit may be selected. The objective of this study was to select several colonies from each of four selective plates...

  8. Salmonella in lymph nodes of cattle presented for harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Salmonella can invade and survive within host immune cells. Once internalized, these pathogens have the potential to disseminate throughout the lymphatic system and reside within lymph nodes. If so, because some lymph nodes are located within muscle and fat tissues, Salmonella-positiv...

  9. PREVALENCE OF CAMPYLOBACTER AND SALMONELLA IN THE TURKEY BROODER HOUSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously surveyed market weight turkeys for the effect of transport to and holding at the abattoir for the prevalence of Campylobacter and Salmonella. Whereas Campylobacter is frequently found in the ceca of adult birds (~60%), the prevalence of Salmonella varies considerably from farm to...

  10. Is it time for NESST (National Egg Salmonella Surveillance Testing)?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The logistics required for a National Egg Salmonella sampling Testing (NESST) project are described. Market egg sampling data has never been collected in the United States on a national basis and no regional sampling data has been collected in 10 years. Salmonella outbreaks continue to be attribute...

  11. Differences in attachment of Salmonella to fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh produce. The produce may be contaminated with Salmonella at any point throughout the food continuum. To develop effective strategies to minimize the risk of foodborne disease caused by this organism, it is essential to examine i...

  12. A DIVA vaccine for cross-protection against Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., a leading cause of human bacterial foodborne disease. Vaccination against Salmonella is effective for protection of animal health and enhancement of food safety. However, current vaccines for swine may only offer limited cross-protection agai...

  13. Split marketing: A risk factor for Salmonella in market pigs?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if split marketing affects Salmonella prevalence in market pigs, by comparing the Salmonella prevalence in the first group of pigs selected for slaughter (i.e., “First pull”) versus the last group of pigs selected for slaughter (i.e., “Close out”) from typical co...

  14. Salmonella bacteriophage diversity reflects host diversity on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Switt, Andrea I Moreno; den Bakker, Henk C; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Hoelzer, Karin; Warnick, Lorin D; Cummings, Kevin J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella is an animal and human pathogen of worldwide concern. Surveillance programs indicate that the incidence of Salmonella serovars fluctuates over time. While bacteriophages are likely to play a role in driving microbial diversity, our understanding of the ecology and diversity of Salmonella phages is limited. Here we report the isolation of Salmonella phages from manure samples from 13 dairy farms with a history of Salmonella presence. Salmonella phages were isolated from 10 of the 13 farms; overall 108 phage isolates were obtained on serovar Newport, Typhimurium, Dublin, Kentucky, Anatum, Mbandaka, and Cerro hosts. Host range characterization found that 51% of phage isolates had a narrow host range, while 49% showed a broad host range. The phage isolates represented 65 lysis profiles; genome size profiling of 94 phage isolates allowed for classification of phage isolates into 11 groups with subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showing considerable variation within a given group. Our data not only show an abundance of diverse Salmonella phage isolates in dairy farms, but also show that phage isolates that lyse the most common serovars causing salmonellosis in cattle are frequently obtained, suggesting that phages may play an important role in the ecology of Salmonella on dairy farms. PMID:24010608

  15. Survival of Salmonella spp. In Waste Egg Wash Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of salmonellae under various environmental conditions has been subject of numerous research studies. Due to low densities of these organisms in natural samples, laboratory or clinical cultures were used to ensure that the initial density of salmonellae was sufficien...

  16. Aquariums as Reservoirs for Multidrug-resistant Salmonella Paratyphi B

    PubMed Central

    Levings, Renee S.; Lightfoot, Diane; Hall, Ruth M.

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+ isolates from patients with gastroenteritis were identical with isolates from their home aquariums. Matched isolates had identical phage types, XbaI and IS200 profiles, and Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). Ornamental fish tanks are reservoirs for SGI1-containing S. Paratyphi B dT+. PMID:16704796

  17. Persistence of poultry associated Salmonella spp. on spinach plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Pre-harvest spinach contamination can occur via irrigation water and can influence the persistence of Salmonella on spinach leaves. Salmonella persistence on spinach plants should be evaluated as nearby poultry farms can be a critical source of contaminated water run-off. Purpose: The...

  18. Salmonella serotype shift during an endemic dairy infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy farms are known reservoirs for Salmonella spp. and control of this organism is challenging. Salmonellae have been shown to be endemic in herds in part because they are easily spread between animals and throughout the farm environment. The impact of the infection on the herd is variable and dep...

  19. Limited Genetic Diversity in Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis PT13

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has emerged as a significant food-borne pathogen throughout the world and it is commonly characterized by phage typing (PT). In Canada, PT4, 8 and 13 are the predominant PTs. Epidemiological subtyping of Salmonella is typically done by PFGE but plasmid profil...

  20. Salmonella Mississippi: a rare cause of second trimester miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Gyang, Anthony; Saunders, Michael

    2008-05-01

    We report a case of transplacental transmission of Salmonella Mississippi resulting in a spontaneous miscarriage at 18 weeks gestation. The miscarriage occurred 1 week after resolution of an acute diarrheal illness. We recommend evaluation by stool culture for Salmonella infection in pregnant women with diarrheal illness. PMID:18004579

  1. EFFECT OF EXPERIMENTAL CHLORATE PRODUCT ON SALMONELLA CONTAMINATION OF POULTRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E. coli and Salmonella are members of the family Enterobacteriacea, a common commensal family of bacteria. Salmonella and E. coli have a nitrate reductase enzyme that allows respiration in anaerobic conditions. Nitrate reductase can also co-metabolize chlorate to chlorite which will kill the bacte...

  2. Orange peel products can reduce Salmonella populations in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella can live undetected in the gut of food animals and be spread to humans directly and indirectly. Diet can impact intestinal populations of foodborne pathogens, including Salmonella spp. Orange juice production results in a waste product, orange peel and orange pulp, which has a high nutr...

  3. Overview of USDA VetNet Salmonella Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA VetNet commenced in May 2004 with submission of Salmonella isolates and in December 2005, Campylobacter isolates were added to the program. The objectives of USDA VetNet are to determine PFGE patterns of Salmonella and Campylobacter isolates submitted to the National Antimicrobial Resistance Mo...

  4. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA IN WASTE EGG WASH WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of salmonellae under various environmental conditions has been subject of numerous research studies. Due to low densities of these organisms in natural samples, laboratory or clinical cultures were used to ensure that the initial density of salmonellae was sufficien...

  5. Inactivation of Salmonella spp. on tomatoes by plant molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of carvacrol (CAR), trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), eugenol (EUG) and ß-resorcylic acid (BR) as a wash treatment for reducing Salmonella spp. on tomatoes was investigated. Plum tomatoes inoculated with a six-serotype mixture of Salmonella (108 CFU) were subjected to washing in sterile deion...

  6. 40 CFR 79.68 - Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay. 79.68 Section 79.68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGISTRATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Testing Requirements for Registration § 79.68 Salmonella typhimurium reverse...

  7. Application of Microarray Technology to Investigate Salmonella and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarrays have been developed for the study of various aspects of Salmonella, which is a model system for investigating pathogenesis. Microarrays were used to analyze the gene expression of Salmonella in various environments that mimic the host environment and these studies have helped to elucidat...

  8. Serotyping of Salmonella Isolates from Broiler Vertical Integrations in Colombia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study analyzed 106 Salmonella isolates from different points in broiler vertical integrations of two important poultry areas of Colombia. It was possible to identify the presence of Salmonella in five categories: breeder farm (17.9%), hatchery (6.6 %), broiler farm (38.7 %), processing plant (9...

  9. Qualitative map of Salmonella contamination on the chicken carcass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella contamination of poultry is a global public health problem. The objective of this study was to map the distribution of Salmonella on the chicken carcass for the purpose of improving poultry inspection and food safety. Young chickens (n = 70) in the Cornish game hen class were obtained a...

  10. Characterization of Salmonella bacteriophages isolated from swine lagoon effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four Salmonella bacteriophages originally isolated from swine lagoon effluent were further characterized. Their differences and similarities to known phages and to each other and their potential for biocontrol of Salmonella were assessed. In host inoculation spot tests the lagoon phages produced s...

  11. A Role for Vaccination to Control Salmonella in Poultry Flocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For more than twenty years, the egg-borne transmission of human Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infections has been a prominent international public health and economic issue. Vaccination to induce immunity against Salmonella has been both extensively researched and widely i...

  12. Nontyphoidal Salmonella: An Occupational Hazard for Clinical Laboratory Workers

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Anna; Duster, Megan; Van Hoof, Sarah; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory-acquired infections due to nontyphoidal Salmonella are rare. Yet, recent outbreaks in microbiology teaching laboratories show that these species are still an appreciable occupational hazard for laboratory employees. This article presents two cases of nontyphoidal Salmonella that occurred at the authors' institution—an infected patient and a clinical laboratory worker who acquired the infection by handling this patient's specimens. PMID:26435704

  13. Salmonella prevalence in bovine lymph nodes differs among feedyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lymphatic tissue, specifically lymph nodes, is commonly incorporated into ground beef products as a component of lean trimmings. Salmonella and other pathogenic bacteria have been identified in bovine lymph nodes. Although Salmonella prevalence has been examined among lymph nodes within an animal,...

  14. 9 CFR 113.30 - Detection of Salmonella contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detection of Salmonella contamination. 113.30 Section 113.30 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... agar or Salmonella-Shigella agar, incubated for 18-24 hours and examined. (d) If no growth typical...

  15. 9 CFR 113.30 - Detection of Salmonella contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Detection of Salmonella contamination. 113.30 Section 113.30 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... agar or Salmonella-Shigella agar, incubated for 18-24 hours and examined. (d) If no growth typical...

  16. 9 CFR 113.30 - Detection of Salmonella contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of Salmonella contamination. 113.30 Section 113.30 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... agar or Salmonella-Shigella agar, incubated for 18-24 hours and examined. (d) If no growth typical...

  17. Experimental Salmonella Enterica Infection in Market-weight Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Market pigs infected with Salmonella pose a significant food safety risk by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in market-weight pigs (220-240 lbs.). Pigs (n=24) were individually inoculated (intranasally; 108 cfu/mL) with Salm...

  18. Isolation and characterization of Salmonella enterica in day-old ducklings in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Kamelia M; Marouf, Sherif H; Zolnikov, Tara R; AlAtfeehy, Nayerah

    2014-01-01

    Importing day-old ducklings (DOD) unknowingly infected with non-typhoid Salmonella (NTS) may be associated with disease risk. Domestic and international trade may enhance this risk. Salmonella enterica serovars, their virulence genes combinations and antibiotic resistance, garner attention for their potentiality to contribute to the adverse health effects on populations throughout the world. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of imported versus domestic DOD as potential carriers of NTS. The results confirm the prevalence of salmonellosis in imported ducklings was 18.5% (25/135), whereas only 12% (9/75) of cases were determined in the domestic ducklings. Fourteen serovars (Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella kisii, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella gaillac, Salmonella uno, Salmonella eingedi, Salmonella shubra, Salmonella bardo, Salmonella inganda, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella stanley, Salmonella virchow, Salmonella haifa, and Salmonella anatum) were isolated from the imported ducklings, whereas only S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, S. virchow, and S. shubra were isolated from the domestic ducklings. The isolated Salmonella serovars were 100% susceptible to only colistin sulphate and 100% resistant to lincomycin. The 14 Salmonella serovars were screened for 11 virulence genes (invA, avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB, gipA, sodC1, sopE1, spvC, and bcfC) by PCR. The invA, sopB, and bcfC genes were detected in 100% of the Salmonella serovars; alternatively, the gipA gene was absent in all of the isolated Salmonella serovars. The 11 virulent genes were not detected in either of S. stanley or S. haifa serovars. The results confirm an association between antibiotic resistance and virulence of Salmonella in the DOD. This study confirms the need for a country adherence to strict public health and food safety regimes. PMID:24548159

  19. Analysis of antimicrobial resistance and plasmid profiles in Salmonella serovars associated with tropical seafood of India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Surendran, P K; Thampuran, Nirmala

    2009-06-01

    A total of 256 Salmonella strains consisting of 29 Salmonella serovars isolated from seafood of Cochin (India) were analyzed for resistance to antimicrobials commonly used in human and veterinary medicines as therapeutic agents. The 10 most predominant Salmonella serovars in seafood were also characterized for presence of plasmids using the alkaline lysis method. Antimicrobial susceptibility studies highlighted a comparatively high resistance in Salmonella isolates to sulfamethizol and carbenicillin, and moderate resistance to nalidixic acid and oxytetracycline. Nevertheless, antimicrobial resistance was not observed against ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and kanamycin in different Salmonella serovars. Fifty percent of the Salmonella isolates, comprising 16 Salmonella serovars, were resistant to sulfamethizol followed by 39% resistant to carbenicillin and 14% resistant to oxytetracycline. Multidrug resistance was detected in 39.4%, 14.4%, 12.1%, and 1.5% of Salmonella isolates towards two drugs (sulfamethizol and carbenicillin), three drugs (sulfamethizol, carbenicillin, and oxytetracycline), four drugs (sulfamethizol, carbenicillin, oxytetracycline, and nalidixic acid), and five drugs (sulfamethizol, carbenicillin, oxytetracycline, nalidixic acid, and streptomycin), respectively. Plasmid profiling highlighted the presence of nine plasmid profiles in Salmonella serovars and plasmids that were not detected in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Weltevreden, Salmonella Rissen, Salmonella Bareilly, Salmonella Irumu, Salmonella Ohio, Salmonella Oslo, and Salmonella Typhi isolated from seafood. PMID:19422307

  20. Direct feeding of microencapsulated bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella colonization in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella shedding often increases in pigs following pre-slaughter transportation and/or lairage. We previously showed that administering anti-Salmonella bacteriophages to pigs by gavage significantly reduced Salmonella colonization when the pigs were exposed to a Salmonella-contaminated pen. In ...

  1. Examination of predictors of Salmonella enterica contamination in cattle feedlot environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To identify a “predictor” or “environmental marker” that can be used to estimate Salmonella prevalence in a given feedlot environment. Further, to examine the correlation between environmental Salmonella contamination, Salmonella fecal shedding status, and prevalence of Salmonella in per...

  2. Salmonella Neck Abscess as an Opportunistic Infection in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella neck infections represent an uncommon cause of focal salmonellosis. While the incidence of nontyphoid salmonellosis is estimated at over 2 million cases annually, extraintestinal manifestations account for less than 1% of cases. This paper describes two patients with Salmonella neck abscesses as the initial presentation of diabetes mellitus. The first patient was diagnosed as having Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis sternocleidomastoid pyomyositis and the second patient Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium parapharyngeal abscess. Both patients had elevated hemoglobin A1c levels and had not been previously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Salmonella spp. should be on the differential as a causative pathogen in patients presenting with neck abscesses and poorly controlled glucose levels. Diabetes may be a risk factor for salmonellosis due to decreased gastric acidity and prolonged gastric transit time. Prompt incision and drainage accompanied by antibiotics remains the treatment of choice for infected neck abscesses. PMID:24307959

  3. Salmonella serotypes in reptiles and humans, French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Gay, Noellie; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; de Thoisy, Benoit; Berger, Franck

    2014-05-14

    In French Guiana, a French overseas territory located in the South American northern coast, nearly 50% of Salmonella serotypes isolated from human infections belong to serotypes rarely encountered in metropolitan France. A reptilian source of contamination has been investigated. Between April and June 2011, in the area around Cayenne, 151 reptiles were collected: 38 lizards, 37 snakes, 32 turtles, 23 green iguanas and 21 caimans. Cloacal swab samples were collected and cultured. Isolated Salmonella strains were identified biochemically and serotyped. The overall carriage frequency of carriage was 23.2% (95% confidence interval: 16.7-30.4) with 23 serotyped strains. The frequency of Salmonella carriage was significantly higher for wild reptiles. Near two-thirds of the Salmonella serotypes isolated from reptiles were also isolated from patients in French Guiana. Our results highlight the risk associated with the handling and consumption of reptiles and their role in the spread of Salmonella in the environment. PMID:24560590

  4. Salmonella – At Home in the Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Malik-Kale, Preeti; Jolly, Carrie E.; Lathrop, Stephanie; Winfree, Seth; Luterbach, Courtney; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica has developed an array of sophisticated tools to manipulate the host cell and establish an intracellular niche, for successful propagation as a facultative intracellular pathogen. While Salmonella exerts diverse effects on its host cell, only the cell biology of the classic “trigger”-mediated invasion process and the subsequent development of the Salmonella-containing vacuole have been investigated extensively. These processes are dependent on cohorts of effector proteins translocated into host cells by two type III secretion systems (T3SS), although T3SS-independent mechanisms of entry may be important for invasion of certain host cell types. Recent studies into the intracellular lifestyle of Salmonella have provided new insights into the mechanisms used by this pathogen to modulate its intracellular environment. Here we discuss current knowledge of Salmonella-host interactions including invasion and establishment of an intracellular niche within the host. PMID:21687432

  5. Salmonellae as an Index of Pollution of Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, William B.; Hanks, John B.; Thomason, Berenice M.; Murlin, Alma M.; Biddle, James W.; Croom, John M.

    1972-01-01

    Screening enrichments of surface water specimens by means of a polyvalent fluorescent antibody reagent for the salmonellae yielded approximately 60% more positive specimens than was obtained by cultural procedures. It is not known what fraction of the excess of fluorescent antibody-positive over culturally positive specimens represents staining of non-salmonellae or non-arizonae as opposed to the staining of non-cultivatable organisms of these two genera. Cotton gauze and rayon-polypropylene fiber swabs were equally sensitive for collecting salmonellae from the streams examined. Tetrathionate enrichment incubated at 41.5 C appeared to be superior to selenite-cystine for isolation of salmonellae from surface waters. Twenty-eight serotypes of Salmonella and two serotypes of Arizona were identified in the 121 positive specimens. In water rated moderately polluted, 65% of all specimens tested were positive; in minimally polluted waters, 38% were positive; and in unpolluted streams, 44% were positive. PMID:4562473

  6. Presence of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in commercial laying hens diagnosed with Fowl Typhoid Disease in Colombia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : A severe outbreak of salmonellosis in commercial brown table egg layers first occurred in Colombia in 2006. From 2008 to 2012, 35 samples collected from commercial layers farms in the states of Cundinamarca, Santander, Bolivar and San Andres, were positive to Salmonella enterica. Salmonella (S) wa...

  7. Detection of Salmonella spp, Salmonella Enteritidis and Typhimurium in naturally infected broiler chickens by a multiplex PCR-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Paião, F.G.; Arisitides, L.G.A.; Murate, L.S.; Vilas-Bôas, G.T.; Vilas-Boas, L.A.; Shimokomaki, M.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of Salmonella in the intestinal tract, on the chickens skin and among their feathers, may cause carcasses contamination during slaughtering and processing and possibly it is responsible by the introduction of this microorganism in the slaughterhouses. A rapid method to identify and monitor Salmonella and their sorovars in farm is becoming necessary. A pre-enriched multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) assay employing specific primers was developed and used to detect Salmonella at the genus level and to identify the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in broiler chicken swab samples. The method was validated by testing DNA extract from 90 fresh culture cloacal swab samples from poultry chicken cultured in phosphate buffer peptone water at 37 °C for 18 h. The final results showed the presence of Salmonella spp. in 25% of samples, S. Enteritidis was present in 12% of the Salmonella-positive samples and S. Typhimurium in 3% of the samples. The m-PCR assay developed in this study is a specific and rapid alternative method for the identification of Salmonella spp. and allowed the observation of specific serovar contamination in the field conditions within the locations where these chickens are typically raised. PMID:24159281

  8. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella recovered from processed poultry.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Salina; Taabodi, Maryam; Schwarz, Jurgen G; Oscar, Thomas P; Harter-Dennis, Jeanine; White, David G

    2007-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolates recovered from processed poultry. Four hundred eighty pre- and postchill whole broiler chicken carcasses were collected from a poultry processing plant between July 2004 and June 2005. Water samples also were collected at the entrance and exit of the chiller. After preenrichment, carcass and water samples were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella using the automated BAX system followed by traditional culture methods. The proportions of pre- and postchill carcasses that were positive for Salmonella were 88.4 and 84.1%, respectively. Ninety-two percent of water samples collected at the entrance of the chiller were positive for Salmonella, but all exit samples were negative. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of Salmonella between pre- and postchill carcasses (P > 0.05). Salmonella isolates recovered were serotyped and tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials. Thirteen serotypes were identified; the most common were Salmonella Kentucky (59.5%) and Salmonella Typhimurium (17.8%). Three hundred thirty-nine (79.8%) of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, and 53.4% were resistant to three or more antimicrobials. Resistance was most often observed to tetracycline (73.4% of isolates), ampicillin (52.9%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (52%), ceftiofur (51.7%), streptomycin (35.2%), and sulfisoxazole (21.8%). These results indicate the high prevalence of Salmonella contamination in whole broiler carcasses, and a large number of these Salmonella isolates were resistant to commonly used antimicrobials. PMID:18044422

  9. Salmonella infection and carriage in reptiles in a zoological collection.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Meredith M; Davis, Meghan; Valitutto, Marc T; Nelson, Kenrad; Sykes, John M

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify important subspecies and serovars of Salmonella enterica in a captive reptile population and clinically relevant risk factors for and signs of illness in Salmonella-positive reptiles. DESIGN Retrospective cross-sectional study. ANIMALS 11 crocodilians (4 samples), 78 snakes (91 samples), 59 lizards (57 samples), and 34 chelonians (23 samples) at the Bronx Zoo from 2000 through 2012. PROCEDURES Data pertaining to various types of biological samples obtained from reptiles with positive Salmonella culture results and the reptiles themselves were analyzed to determine period prevalence of and risk factors for various Salmonella-related outcomes. RESULTS Serovar distribution differences were identified for sample type, reptile phylogenetic family, and reptile origin and health. Salmonella enterica subsp enterica was the most common subspecies in Salmonella cultures (78/175 [45%]), identified across all reptilian taxa. Salmonella enterica subsp diarizonae was also common (42/175 [24%]) and was recovered almost exclusively from snakes (n = 33), many of which had been clinically ill (17). Clinically ill reptiles provided 37% (64) of Salmonella cultures. Factors associated with an increased risk of illness in reptiles with a positive culture result were carnivorous diet and prior confiscation. Snakes had a higher risk of illness than other reptile groups, whereas lizards had a lower risk. Bony changes, dermatitis, and anorexia were the most common clinical signs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE This study provided new information on Salmonella infection or carriage and associated clinical disease in reptiles. Associations identified between serovars or subspecies and reptile groups or clinical disease can guide management of Salmonella-positive captive reptiles. PMID:27074614

  10. Portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, POR-006 SKID D storage plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, O.D.

    1997-09-04

    This document provides a storage plan for portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, AND POR-006 SKID D. The exhausters will be stored until they are needed by the TWRS (Tank Waste Remediation Systems) Saltwell Pumping Program. The storage plan provides criteria for portable exhauster storage, periodic inspections during storage, and retrieval from storage.

  11. Molecular fingerprinting of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica derby isolated from tropical seafood in South India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Surendran, P K; Thampuran, Nirmala

    2008-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby strains isolated from different seafood were genotyped by PCR-ribotyping and ERIC-PCR assays. This study has ascertained the genetic relatedness among serovars prevalent in tropical seafood. PCR-ribotyping exhibited genetic variation in both Salmonella serovars, and ribotype profile (II) was most predominant, which was observed in 10/18 of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and 7/17 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby isolates. Cluster analysis of ERIC-PCR for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium strains exhibited nine different banding patterns and four strains showed >95% genetic homology within the cluster pairs. ERIC-PCR produced more genetic variations in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium; nevertheless, both methods were found to be comparable for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby isolates. Discrimination index of PCR-ribotyping for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium isolates was obtained at 0.674 and index value 0.714 was observed for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby strains. Molecular fingerprinting investigation highlighted the hypothesis of diverse routes of Salmonella contamination in seafood as multiple clones of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby were detected in same or different seafood throughout the study period. PMID:18480975

  12. Chloramphenicol-resistant Salmonella typhi in Saigon.

    PubMed

    Brown, J D; Duong Hong, M o; Rhoades, E R

    1975-01-13

    Chloramphenicol-resistant Salmonella typhi was detected in Saigon in September 1971. Subsequently, 163 strains of S typhi were isolated, 46 percent of which were resistant to choramphenicol by the agar-disk method. Sixty-two strains were studied by the broth-dilution method; 37 percent had minimal inhibitory concentrations for chloramphenicol greater than 250mug/ml, but all strains were susceptible to 0.4mug/ml of ampicillin and to a disk of a combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim). Persons infected with chloramphenicol-resistant strains of S typhi responded poorly to chloramphenicol alone, but ampicillin or the combination drug was effective. PMID:1172682

  13. Bacteriophage typing scheme for Salmonella infantis.

    PubMed Central

    Kasatiya, S; Caprioli, T; Champoux, S

    1979-01-01

    A bacteriophage typing system is described for Salmonella infantis. Nine phages were selected, of which three were isolated from sewage and six from human feces. All except 7 of the 546 strains collected between 1974 and 1978 could be classified into 23 different phage types. The five most common phage types comprised 26, 13, 9, 9, and 9% of all strains, respectively. Strains from humans, animals, food, and water isolated during nine episodes, or from given patients at different intervals of time, belonged to the same phage type. PMID:544631

  14. Liver abscess caused by Salmonella choleraesuis

    PubMed Central

    Kamatani, Takashi; Okada, Takemichi; Iguchi, Hiroyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshihito; Yokomori, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with long-term alcohol abuse presented with intermittent fever. Abdominal computed tomography revealed multiple masses. Abscess blood and pus cultures conducted after percutaneous catheter drainage with pigtail catheters yielded Salmonella choleraesuis. Antibiotic treatment with meropenem was started using multiple catheters in the liver. Drainage catheters in different locations were exchanged several times with larger-bored catheters. After septicemia was detected, abscesses spread to the peritoneal cavity. Pleural complications developed. Antibiotic treatment, with careful drainage guided by ultrasound or computed tomography, controlled the abscesses and complications. This report describes the difficult clinical course and treatment of a liver abscess from S. choleraesuis. PMID:25945064

  15. Salmonella mutagenicity test results for 250 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Haworth, S.; Lawlor, T.; Mortelmans, K.; Speck, W.; Zeiger, E.

    1983-01-01

    This publication is a presentation of Salmonella testing results on 250 coded chemicals, encompassing 370 tests. The majority of these results were previously summarized in issues of the National Toxicology Program Technical Bulletin. However, some interpretations were changed since publication in the NTP Bulletin, based upon a reevaluation of the data. The presentation here is designed both to summarize the results in the text and to present the data so that the reader has the opportunity of performing an independent evaluation of the data. The chemicals tested, their source, and purity (where known) are listed and their structures are given in Appendix 1.

  16. Mutagenicity of oxaspiro compounds with Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Sinsheimer, J E; Chakraborty, P K; Messerly, E A; Gaddamidi, V

    1989-10-01

    The spiro attachment of an epoxide group to a tetrahydropyran ring in the trichothecene mycotoxins has prompted this study of the mutagenicity and alkylation rates of the trichothecene, anguidine, and 5 related model oxaspiro compounds. While the model compounds were weak alkylating agents of 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine as a test nucleophile, anguidine lacks such activity. Also, while mutagenicity was not established for anguidine in Salmonella TA100, 3 of the oxaspiro compounds were weakly mutagenic and 2 compounds were toxic to the bacteria. The toxicity and mutagenicity of the model compounds are more related to their polarity than to their alkylation rates. PMID:2677708

  17. Salmonella detection in a microfluidic channel using orbiting magnetic beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Matt; Mills, Zachary; Owen, Drew; Hanasoge, Srinivas; Hesketh, Peter; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We use three-dimensional simulations to model the detection of salmonella in a complex fluid sample in a microfluidic channel. Salmonella is captured using magnetic microbeads orbiting around soft ferromagnetic discs at the microchannel bottom subjected to a rotating external magnetic field. Numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of salmonella and microbeads throughout the detection process. We examine the effect of the channel geometry on the salmonella capture, and the forces applied to the salmonella as it is dragged through the fluid after capture. Our findings guide the design of a lab-on-a-chip device to be used for detection of salmonella in food samples in a way that ensures that salmonella captured by orbiting microbeads are preserved until they can be extracted from the system for testing, and are not washed away by the fluid flow or damaged due to the experience of excessive stresses. Such a device is needed to detect bacteria at the food source and prevention of consumption of contaminated food, and also can be used for the detection of a variety of biomaterials of interest from complex fluid samples. Support from USDA and NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Prevalence of Salmonella in retail chicken meat in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Luu, Quynh Huong; Fries, Reinhard; Padungtod, Pawin; Tran, Thi Hanh; Kyule, Moses N; Baumann, Maximilian P O; Zessin, Karl H

    2006-10-01

    Infection with Salmonella (S.) is the most frequently reported cause of bacterial food-borne illness worldwide. Poultry are a common source and, in recent years, much attention has been focused in determining the prevalence of Salmonella during the different stages in the poultry production chain. This article was designed to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella serovars in retail chicken meat sold in Hanoi. A total of 262 samples were randomly collected from retail markets and examined for the presence of Salmonella. Of these samples, 48.9% were found to be contaminated with Salmonella. Predominant serotypes were S. Agona, S. Emek, S. London. The prevalence of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium was considered. These findings have highlighted the magnitude of Salmonella contamination in retail chicken meat in Hanoi. On the basis of these preliminary survey results, it is recommended that a cost-effective monitoring and surveillance system for Salmonella should be established in Hanoi. This system should be augmented by good agricultural and hygienic practices and well-designed longitudinal research activities on the whole poultry production chain. PMID:17135521

  19. Minimum inhibitory concentration of carbapenems and tigecycline against Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Capoor, Malini R; Nair, Deepthi; Posti, Jitendra; Singhal, Smita; Deb, Monorama; Aggarwal, Pushpa; Pillai, Parukutty

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella spp. is of grave concern, more so in quinolone-resistant and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates that cause complicated infections. The MIC of azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, cefixime, cefepime, ceftriaxone, gatifloxacin, imipenem, levofloxacin, meropenem and ofloxacin (E-test strip) and tigecycline and faropenem (agar dilution) against 210 Salmonella spp. was determined. MIC(90) (defined as the antimicrobial concentration that inhibited growth of 90 % of the strains) of the carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem) for Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A was 0.064 microg ml(-1). MIC(90) of faropenem was 0.25 microg ml(-1) for S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A and Salmonella Typhimurium. The MIC(90) of azithromycin for all Salmonella spp. ranged from 8 to 16 microg ml(-1). Tigecycline showed an MIC(90) of 2 microg ml(-1) for S. Typhi, 1 microg ml(-1) for S. Paratyphi A and 4 microg ml(-1) for S. Typhimurium. We concluded that tigecycline and the carbapenems are likely to have roles in the final stage of treatment of quinolone-resistant and ESBL-producing multidrug-resistant salmonellae. PMID:19208884

  20. [Low-titer cold agglutinin disease following Salmonella gastroenteritis].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Hamaki, Tamae; Ohwada, Akira; Tomiyama, Junji; Sakuma, Ryoko; Mizuta, Yoko; Moriyama, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Emi; Akiya, Itsuo; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We encountered a patient with cold agglutinin disease (CAD) that worsened after Salmonella gastroenteritis. A 52-year-old male complained pain in the left fingers with cyanosis and was admitted in a local hospital. After treatment for ischemia, he demonstrated diarrhea with fever. Because of progressive anemia, he was referred to our hospital. Salmonella gastroenteritis was diagnosed based on the results of microbiological examination. Severe hemolysis was noted at admission, and Coombs test was positive (IgG-, C3d+). Cold agglutinin titer was elevated (x256). There were no findings of malignancy or infection demonstrating CA. A diagnosis of CAD with Salmonella gastroenteritis was made. Because spherocytosis was noted during admission, we measured the mean channel fluorescence (MCF) of eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) in erythrocytes from patients. MCF of EMA of the patient's erythrocytes was similar to that of normal subjects. Therefore, we concluded that coexisting hereditary spherocytosis was unlikely. We also examined the in vitro hemolytic effect of Salmonella infection on his blood and on blood from normal subjects. Treatment with Salmonella enteritidis isolated from this patient was found to induce hemolysis in the patient's blood, but not in blood from a normal subject. Moreover, treatment with Salmonella increased the titer of cold agglutinin in vitro. These data suggested that Salmonella infection might worsen hemolysis in CAD. PMID:21378480

  1. Relationship between genotype and phenotype of flagellin C in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wan-Sheng; Hu, Jia-Lu; Qiu, Jun-Wen; Pan, Bo-Rong; Peng, Dao-Rong; Shi, Bing-Long; Zhou, Shao-Juan; Wu, Kai-Chun; Fan, Dai-Ming

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To discover the relationship between the genotype and antigen serotype of flagellin C among Salmonella strains. METHODS: Fragment of Salmonella flagellin C in plasmid pLS408 was cloned, sequenced and compared with the corresponding sequence in other strains. Salmonella strains including two typhi strains, one paratyphoid strain, one enteritidis and one typhimurium strain were isolated from outpatients. Genome DNA was purified respectively from these clinical isolates, then the corresponding flagellin C fragment was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the amplification products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. RESULTS: The cloned fragment includes 582 nucleotides encoding the variable region and partial conservative region of Salmonella flagellin C in plasmid pLS408. With comparison to the corresponding sequences reported previously, there is only a little difference from other strains with the same flagellar serotype in both nucleotide and amino acid level. Specific PCR products were amplified in Salmonella strains with flagellar serotype H-1-d including S. muenchen, typhi and typhimurium, but not in S. paratyphoid C or S. enteritidis strains. CONCLUSION: In this experiment, the specificity of nucleotide sequence could be found in flagellin C central variable regions as it exists in flagellar serotypes in Salmonella. It may be helpful to developing a rapid, sensitive, accurate and PCR-based method to detect Salmonella strains with serotype H-1-d. PMID:11854918

  2. Ethylene signalling affects susceptibility of tomatoes to Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Noel, Jason T; George, Andrée S; Farias, Marcelo A; Jenkins, Keith T; Hochmuth, George; Xu, Yimin; Giovanonni, Jim J; Teplitski, Max

    2014-01-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are increasingly recognized as important reservoirs of human pathogens, and therefore, significant attention has been directed recently to understanding mechanisms of the interactions between plants and enterics, like Salmonella. A screen of tomato cultivars for their susceptibility to Salmonella revealed significant differences in the ability of this human pathogen to multiply within fruits; expression of the Salmonella genes (cysB, agfB, fadH) involved in the interactions with tomatoes depended on the tomato genotype and maturity stage. Proliferation of Salmonella was strongly reduced in the tomato mutants with defects in ethylene synthesis, perception and signal transduction. While mutation in the ripening-related ethylene receptor Nr resulted only in a modest reduction in Salmonella numbers within tomatoes, strong inhibition of the Salmonella proliferation was observed in rin and nor tomato mutants. RIN and NOR are regulators of ethylene synthesis and ripening. A commercial tomato variety heterozygous for rin was less susceptible to Salmonella under the greenhouse conditions but not when tested in the field over three production seasons. PMID:24888884

  3. Evidence supporting vertical transmission of Salmonella in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Hanson, D L; Loneragan, G H; Brown, T R; Nisbet, D J; Hume, M E; Edrington, T S

    2016-04-01

    We set out to investigate whether Salmonella enterica could be recovered from various tissues of viable neonatal calves immediately following parturition. Eleven samples were aseptically collected from each of 20 calves and consisted of both left and right subiliac and prescapular lymph nodes (LN), mesenteric LN, spleen and liver, as well as intestinal tissue (including luminal contents) from the small intestine, caecum, spiral colon and rectum. In addition, a faecal sample was collected from 19 of the dams. Salmonella was recovered from at least one sample from 10 of the 20 neonates. Across all calves, Salmonella was recovered from 12·7% of all samples and from LN in particular, Salmonella was recovered from 10·0%, 5·0%, and 5·0% of subiliac, prescapular, and mesenteric LN, respectively. Within calves, Salmonella was recovered from 0% to 73% of samples and across tissues, estimates of Salmonella prevalence were greatest in the caecum (30%) but was never recovered from the right pre-scapular LN. These data provide evidence of vertical transmission from a dam to her fetus such that viable calves are born already infected and thereby not requiring faecal-oral exposure for transmission. This new knowledge ought to challenge - or at least add to - existing paradigms of Salmonella transmission dynamics within cattle herds. PMID:26419321

  4. Parallel Exploitation of Diverse Host Nutrients Enhances Salmonella Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Steeb, Benjamin; Claudi, Beatrice; Burton, Neil A.; Tienz, Petra; Schmidt, Alexander; Farhan, Hesso; Mazé, Alain; Bumann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen access to host nutrients in infected tissues is fundamental for pathogen growth and virulence, disease progression, and infection control. However, our understanding of this crucial process is still rather limited because of experimental and conceptual challenges. Here, we used proteomics, microbial genetics, competitive infections, and computational approaches to obtain a comprehensive overview of Salmonella nutrition and growth in a mouse typhoid fever model. The data revealed that Salmonella accessed an unexpectedly diverse set of at least 31 different host nutrients in infected tissues but the individual nutrients were available in only scarce amounts. Salmonella adapted to this situation by expressing versatile catabolic pathways to simultaneously exploit multiple host nutrients. A genome-scale computational model of Salmonella in vivo metabolism based on these data was fully consistent with independent large-scale experimental data on Salmonella enzyme quantities, and correctly predicted 92% of 738 reported experimental mutant virulence phenotypes, suggesting that our analysis provided a comprehensive overview of host nutrient supply, Salmonella metabolism, and Salmonella growth during infection. Comparison of metabolic networks of other pathogens suggested that complex host/pathogen nutritional interfaces are a common feature underlying many infectious diseases. PMID:23633950

  5. A DIVA vaccine for cross-protection against Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Bearson, Bradley L; Bearson, Shawn M D; Kich, Jalusa D

    2016-03-01

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., a leading cause of human bacterial foodborne disease. Vaccination against Salmonella is effective for protecting animal health and enhancing food safety. However, with >2500 Salmonella serovars, current vaccines for swine offer limited cross-protection against heterologous serovars. Also, existing vaccines can interfere with surveillance programs that monitor the Salmonella status of swine herds. To overcome Salmonella vaccine limitations, we rationally designed and constructed an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine (BBS 866) by deleting multiple small regulatory RNA (sRNA) genes (omrA, omrB, rybB, micA, and invR) in combination with an rfaH mutation. We vaccinated swine intranasally at 3-weeks of age with PBS (mock-vaccinated), BBS 866 or BBS 202 (S. Typhimurium rfaH, Bearson et al., Front Vet Sci 2014;1:9.) and challenged at 7-weeks of age with virulent S. Choleraesuis, a swine pathogen. Vaccination with BBS 866 enhanced protection against S. Choleraesuis by significantly limiting the duration of fever, weight loss, the levels of circulating INFγ, and the total number of swine with S. Choleraesuis septicemia. Vaccination with either BBS 866 or BBS 202 significantly reduced S. Choleraesuis colonization of both systemic (spleen and liver) and gastrointestinal (Peyer's Patch, Ileocecal lymph nodes, and cecum) tissues. Similar to our earlier report for BBS 202, the BBS 866 vaccine strain can be used in swine without compromising the differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Therefore, the attenuated S. Typhimurium BBS 866 strain, containing mutations in rfaH and multiple sRNAs, addresses the limitations of current Salmonella vaccines by providing cross-protection against Salmonella serovars in swine without interfering with established monitoring programs for Salmonella surveillance. PMID:26836212

  6. Salmonella contamination during production of cantaloupe: a binational study.

    PubMed

    Castillo, A; Mercado, I; Lucia, L M; Martínez-Ruiz, Y; Ponce de León, J; Murano, E A; Acuff, G R

    2004-04-01

    Six cantaloupe farms and packing plants in South Texas (950 cantaloupe, 140 water, and 45 environmental samples), including the Rio Grande Valley area, and three farms in Colima State, Mexico (300 cantaloupe, 45 water, and 15 environmental samples), were sampled to evaluate cantaloupe contamination with Salmonella and Escherichia coli during production and processing. Samples collected from external surfaces of cantaloupes, water, and the environments of packing sheds on cantaloupe farms were examined for the presence of Salmonella and E. coli. Of a total of 1,735 samples collected, 31 (1.8%) tested positive for Salmonella. Fifteen Salmonella serotypes were isolated from samples collected in Texas, and nine from samples collected in Colima. Two serotypes (Poona and Oranienburg) that have been associated with three large Salmonella outbreaks in the United States and Canada linked to the consumption of contaminated cantaloupe were found in water samples collected at four farms (three from the United States). Susceptibility of Salmonella isolates to 10 antimicrobials was evaluated by disk diffusion. Eighty-eight percent of the isolates from the United States and Mexico were pansusceptible to the antimicrobials tested; eight isolates from the United States demonstrated an intermediate susceptibility to streptomycin and only two isolates were resistant to the same antimicrobial. From Mexico, four isolates showed an intermediate susceptibility to streptomycin and one isolate was resistant to nalidixic acid and streptomycin. Repetitive sequence-based PCR analysis of Salmonella isolates helped to trace potential sources of Salmonella contamination in source water and in subsequent water samples obtained after the filtration systems of U.S. and Mexican cantaloupe farms. No differences could be seen between the levels of Salmonella contamination in melons from both countries. PMID:15083723

  7. Salmonella infection in a remote, isolated wild pig population.

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael P; Cowled, Brendan D; Galea, Francesca; Garner, M Graeme; Laffan, Shawn W; Marsh, Ian; Negus, Katherine; Sarre, Stephen D; Woolnough, Andrew P

    2013-03-23

    Although wild pig populations are known to sometimes be infected by Salmonella, the situation in Australia has received little attention and few population-based, planned studies have been conducted. Understanding the distribution of Salmonella infections within wild pig populations allows the potential hazard posed to co-grazing livestock to be assessed. We sampled a remote and isolated wild pig population in northwestern Australia. Faecal and mesenteric lymph node samples were collected from 651 wild pigs at 93 locations and cultured for Salmonella. The population sampled was typical of wild pig populations in tropical areas of Australia, and sampling occurred approximately halfway through the population's breeding season (38% of the 229 adult females were pregnant and 35% were lactating). Overall, the prevalence of Salmonella infection based on culture of 546 freshly collected faecal samples was 36.3% (95% CI 32.1-40.7%), and based on culture of mesenteric lymph nodes was 11.9% (95% CI, 9.4-15.0%). A total of 39 serovars (139 isolates) were identified--29 in faecal samples and 24 in lymph node samples--however neither Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium nor Salmonella Cholerasuis were isolated. There was a significant (p<0.0001) disagreement between faecal and lymph node samples with respect to Salmonella isolation, with isolation more likely from faecal samples. Prevalence differed between age classes, with piglets being less likely to be faecal-positive but more likely to be lymph node positive than adults. The distribution of faecal-positive pigs was spatially structured, with spatial clusters being identified. Study results suggest that this population of wild pigs is highly endemic for Salmonella, and that Salmonella is transmitted from older to younger pigs, perhaps associated with landscape features such as water features. This might have implications for infection of co-grazing livestock within this environment. PMID:23266110

  8. A mouse model of Salmonella typhi infection

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ramkumar; Oh, Hyunju; Zhang, Dekai; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Seo, Jin; Koblansky, Alicia; Hayden, Matthew S.; Ghosh, Sankar

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are gram-negative flagellated bacteria that can cause food and water-borne gastroenteritis and typhoid fever in humans. We now report that flagellin from Salmonella spp. is recognized in mouse intestine by Toll-like receptor 11 (TLR11). Absence of TLR11 renders mice more susceptible to infection by S. typhimurium, with increased dissemination of the bacteria and enhanced lethality. Unlike S. typhimurium, S. typhi, a human obligatory pathogen that causes typhoid fever, is normally unable to infect mice. TLR11 is expressed in mice but not in humans, and remarkably, we find that tlr11−/− mice are efficiently infected with orally-administered S. typhi. We also find that tlr11−/− mice can be immunized against S. typhi. Therefore, tlr11−/− mice represent the first small animal model for the study of the immune response to S. typhi, and for the development of vaccines against this important human pathogen. PMID:23101627

  9. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Mauricio H.; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission. PMID:25848006

  10. Salmonella promotes virulence by repressing cellulose production.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Lee, Eun-Jin; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-04-21

    Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. In bacteria, cellulose confers protection against environmental insults and is a constituent of biofilms typically formed on abiotic surfaces. We report that, surprisingly, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium makes cellulose when inside macrophages. We determine that preventing cellulose synthesis increases virulence, whereas stimulation of cellulose synthesis inside macrophages decreases virulence. An attenuated mutant lacking the mgtC gene exhibited increased cellulose levels due to increased expression of the cellulose synthase gene bcsA and of cyclic diguanylate, the allosteric activator of the BcsA protein. Inactivation of bcsA restored wild-type virulence to the Salmonella mgtC mutant, but not to other attenuated mutants displaying a wild-type phenotype regarding cellulose. Our findings indicate that a virulence determinant can promote pathogenicity by repressing a pathogen's antivirulence trait. Moreover, they suggest that controlling antivirulence traits increases long-term pathogen fitness by mediating a trade-off between acute virulence and transmission. PMID:25848006