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Sample records for brunswick overhauls trauma

  1. States Strive to Overhaul Teacher Tenure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on how states strive to overhaul their teacher tenure policies. Over the past year, a handful of states have begun to overhaul their tenure-granting processes by increasing the number of years it takes teachers to win due process rights, and by trying to improve the evaluations that are supposed to guide determinations of…

  2. Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries. PMID:27430465

  3. New Brunswick`s forestry sector. Forest report number 7

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, D.D.; Simpson, C.M.

    1991-12-31

    The report presents data on the New Brunswick forestry industry, including forest land area, ownership, stock inventory, wood utilization, forest management expenditures, volume of roundwood production, silviculture activities, economic benefits from forest, fish, and wildlife, fuelwood consumption, Christmas tree production, maple syrup production, forest sector employment, salaries, income taxes from the industry, exports, and gross domestic product due to the forest sector.

  4. 14 CFR 43.2 - Records of overhaul and rebuilding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of overhaul and rebuilding. 43.2 Section 43.2 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.2 Records of overhaul and...

  5. 14 CFR 43.2 - Records of overhaul and rebuilding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of overhaul and rebuilding. 43.2 Section 43.2 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATION § 43.2 Records of overhaul and...

  6. Transmission overhaul estimates for partial and full replacement at repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Lewicki, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Timely transmission overhauls increase in-flight service reliability greater than the calculated design reliabilities of the individual aircraft transmission components. Although necessary for aircraft safety, transmission overhauls contribute significantly to aircraft expense. Predictions of a transmission's maintenance needs at the design stage should enable the development of more cost effective and reliable transmissions in the future. The frequency is estimated of overhaul along with the number of transmissions or components needed to support the overhaul schedule. Two methods based on the two parameter Weibull statistical distribution for component life are used to estimate the time between transmission overhauls. These methods predict transmission lives for maintenance schedules which repair the transmission with a complete system replacement or repair only failed components of the transmission. An example illustrates the methods.

  7. Transmission overhaul and replacement predictions using Weibull and renewal theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Lewicki, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    A method to estimate the frequency of transmission overhauls is presented. This method is based on the two-parameter Weibull statistical distribution for component life. A second method is presented to estimate the number of replacement components needed to support the transmission overhaul pattern. The second method is based on renewal theory. Confidence statistics are applied with both methods to improve the statistical estimate of sample behavior. A transmission example is also presented to illustrate the use of the methods. Transmission overhaul frequency and component replacement calculations are included in the example.

  8. Transmission overhaul and replacement predictions using Weibull and renewel theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Lewicki, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    A method to estimate the frequency of transmission overhauls is presented. This method is based on the two-parameter Weibull statistical distribution for component life. A second method is presented to estimate the number of replacement components needed to support the transmission overhaul pattern. The second method is based on renewal theory. Confidence statistics are applied with both methods to improve the statistical estimate of sample behavior. A transmission example is also presented to illustrate the use of the methods. Transmission overhaul frequency and component replacement calculations are included in the example.

  9. Libraries in New Brunswick: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/newbrunswick.html Libraries in New Brunswick To use the sharing features ... Fredericton Horizon Health Network (Fredericton Zone) Health Sciences Library P.O. Box 9000 Fredericton, NB E3B 5N5 ...

  10. 14 CFR 21.337 - Performance of inspections and overhauls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... domestic repair station. (c) An appropriately certificated foreign repair station having adequate overhaul... the use of such foreign repair station. (d) The holder of an inspection authorization as provided in... manual as provided in Part 121 of this chapter....

  11. 17. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL AREAS; LOOKING WEST. - Northwest Airways Hangar & Administration Building, 590 Bayfield Street, St. Paul Downtown Airport (Holman), Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  12. 18. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL AREAS; LOOKING EAST - Northwest Airways Hangar & Administration Building, 590 Bayfield Street, St. Paul Downtown Airport (Holman), Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  13. 40 CFR 81.437 - New Brunswick, Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Eastern Head Herring Cove Mainland New Brunswick* Point La Preau* Wolf Islands* Atlantic Ocean* Grand... Brunswick* Atlantic Ocean* Wolf Islands* Grand Manan Island* Sail Rock West Quoddy Head Lighthouse...

  14. 40 CFR 81.437 - New Brunswick, Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Park Eastern Head Herring Cove Mainland New Brunswick* Point La Preau* Wolf Islands* Atlantic Ocean... Brunswick* Atlantic Ocean* Wolf Islands* Grand Manan Island* Sail Rock West Quoddy Head Lighthouse...

  15. 76 FR 39259 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Brunswick, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... with the date July 25, 2011. Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Brunswick, ME AGENCY... establishes Class E airspace at Brunswick Executive Airport, Brunswick, ME. DATES: The effective date is...

  16. Applications to New Brunswick Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Hope; Easterbrook-Nadeau, Pamela, Ed.

    In 1989, a study was conducted of applicants to training programs offered at community colleges in New Brunswick to determine the characteristics of applicants, their reasons for applying, their expectations of the program, and influences on their enrollment decisions. Applications and available training seats were examined over the 3-year period…

  17. New Brunswick. Reference Series No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of New Brunswick and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss cities and population, geography, history, politics, economy, manufacturing, forestry, agriculture, fisheries, mining, electricity, transportation, government…

  18. Assessment of potential asbestos exposures from jet engine overhaul work.

    PubMed

    Mlynarek, S P; Van Orden, D R

    2012-06-01

    Asbestos fibers have been used in a wide variety of products and numerous studies have shown that exposures from the use or manipulation of these products can vary widely. Jet engines contained various components (gaskets, clamps, o-rings and insulation) that contained asbestos that potentially could release airborne fibers during routine maintenance or during an engine overhaul. To evaluate the potential exposures to aircraft mechanics, a Pratt & Whitney JT3D jet engine was obtained and overhauled by experienced mechanics using tools and work practices similar to those used since the time this engine was manufactured. This study has demonstrated that the disturbance of asbestos-containing gaskets, o-rings, and other types of asbestos-containing components, while performing overhaul work to a jet engine produces very few airborne fibers, and that virtually none of these aerosolized fibers is asbestos. The overhaul work was observed to be dirty and oily. The exposures to the mechanics and bystanders were several orders of magnitude below OSHA exposure regulations, both current and historic. The data presented underscore the lack of risk to the health of persons conducting this work and to other persons in proximity to it from airborne asbestos. PMID:22401880

  19. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to provide and maintain a nuclear material measurements and standards laboratory as a technical response to DOE's statutory responsibility to assure the safeguarding of nuclear materials. This report summarizes the mission-fulfilling activities of the New Brunswick Laboratory for the period of October 1990 through September 1991.

  20. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.D.

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Is to provide and maintain a nuclear material measurements and standards laboratory as a technical response to DOE's statutory responsibility to assure the safeguarding of nuclear materials. This report summarizes the mission-fulfilling activities of the New Brunswick Laboratory for the period of October 1991 through September 1992.

  1. Preparation and Execution of the GIS First Overhaul for Qinshan NPP Phase One

    SciTech Connect

    Kaihong Lou; Jiapeng Yan

    2006-07-01

    This paper addresses the necessity and feasibility of the first major overhaul on the GIS based on the analysis of the special conditions and the issues we confronted; After the comparison of various schemes, the optimized scheme is put forward; the paper also expounds the proper preparation and cautious practice which led to the hard but final accomplishment of the initial overhaul on the GIS; this article further explains the necessity of the major overhaul on the GIS through the disposal of abnormalities during the execution of this major overhaul. (authors)

  2. Assessment of Core French: The New Brunswick Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Viviane

    1985-01-01

    The development of an oral language proficiency rating scale for use in evaluating New Brunswick's junior and senior high school students' core French program achievement is described and discussed. (MSE)

  3. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Tenebrionidae and Zopheridae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian; Bouchard, Patrice; Bousquet, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Thirteen species of Tenebrionidae are newly reported for New Brunswick, Canada. Paratenetus punctatus Spinola, Pseudocistela brevis (Say), Mycetochara foveata (LeConte), and Xylopinus aenescens LeConte are recorded for the first time from the Maritime provinces. Platydema excavatum (Say) is removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick, and the presence of Platydema americanum Laporte and Brullé for the province is confirmed. This brings the total number of species of Tenebrionidae known from New Brunswick to 42. Two species of Zopheridae, Bitoma crenata Fabricius and Synchita fuliginosa Melsheimer, are newly recorded for New Brunswick, bringing the number of species known from the province to four. Bitoma crenata is new to the Maritime provinces. Collection and habitat data are presented for these species. PMID:22539897

  4. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to provide and maintain a nuclear material measurements and standards laboratory as a technical response to DOE`s statutory responsibility to assure the safeguarding of nuclear materials. This report summarizes the mission-fulfilling activities of the New Brunswick Laboratory for the period of October 1990 through September 1991.

  5. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.D.

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Is to provide and maintain a nuclear material measurements and standards laboratory as a technical response to DOE`s statutory responsibility to assure the safeguarding of nuclear materials. This report summarizes the mission-fulfilling activities of the New Brunswick Laboratory for the period of October 1991 through September 1992.

  6. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to provide and maintain a nuclear material measurements and standards laboratory as a technical response to DOE`s statutory responsibility to assure the safeguarding of nuclear materials. This report summarizes the mission-fulfilling activities of the New Brunswick Laboratory for the period of October 1992 through September 1993.

  7. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Histeridae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Makepeace, Scott; DeMerchant, Ian; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eighteen species of Histeridae are newly reported from New Brunswick, Canada. This brings the total number of species known from New Brunswick to 42. Seven of these species, Acritus exguus (Erichson), Euspilotus rossi (Wenzel), Hypocaccus fitchi (Marseul), Dendrophilus kiteleyi Bousquet and Laplante, Platysoma cylindricum (Paykull), Atholus sedecimstriatus (Say), and Margarinotus harrisii (Kirby) are recorded from the Maritime provinces for the first time. Collection and bionomic data are presented for these species. PMID:22539882

  8. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Elateridae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Twenty-two species of Elateridae are newly reported for New Brunswick, Canada. Negastrius exiguus (Randall) is removed from the faunal list and Agriotes pubescens Melsheimer is re-instated as a member of the New Brunswick fauna. Agriotes pubescens Melsheimer, Dalopius brevicornis W. J. Brown, Danosoma obtectum (Say) and Megapenthes solitarius Fall are newly reported for the Maritime provinces. Collection data, bionomic data, and distribution maps are presented for all these species. PMID:22539888

  9. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Mordellidae and Ripiphoridae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eleven species of Mordellidae are newly recorded for New Brunswick, Canada. Six of these, Falsomordellistena discolor (Melsheimer), Falsomordellistena pubescens (Fabricius), Mordellistena ornata (Melsheimer), Mordellaria undulata (Melsheimer), Tomoxia inclusa LeConte, and Yakuhananomia bidentata (Say)are new for the Maritime provinces. Falsomordellistena pubescens is new to Canada. Pelecotoma flavipes Melsheimer (family Ripiphoridae) is reported for the first time for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Collection and habitat data are presented for all these species. PMID:22539896

  10. Overhauling, updating and augmenting NASA spacelink electronic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Jean A.

    1991-01-01

    NASA/Spacelink is a collection of NASA information and educational materials stored on a computer at the MSFC. It is provided by the NASA Educational Affairs Division and is operated by the Education Branch of the Marshall Center Public Affairs Office. It is designed to communicate with a wide variety of computers and modems, especially those most commonly found in classrooms and homes. It was made available to the public in February, 1988. The system may be accessed by educators and the public over regular telephone lines. NASA/Spacelink is free except for the cost of long distance calls. Overhauling and updating Spacelink was done to refurbish NASA/Spacelink, a very valuable resource medium. Several new classroom activities and miscellaneous topics were edited and entered into Spacelink. One of the areas that received a major overhaul (under the guidance of Amos Crisp) was the SPINOFFS BENEFITS, the great benefits resulting from America's space explorations. The Spinoff Benefits include information on a variety of topics including agriculture, communication, the computer, consumer, energy, equipment and materials, food, health, home, industry, medicine, natural resources, public services, recreation, safety, sports, and transportation. In addition to the Space Program Spinoff Benefits, the following is a partial list of some of the material updated and introduced: Astronaut Biographies, Miscellaneous Aeronautics Classroom Activities, Miscellaneous Astronomy Classroom Activities, Miscellaneous Rocketry Classroom Activities, Miscellaneous Classroom Activities, NASA and Its Center, NASA Areas of Research, NASA Patents, Licensing, NASA Technology Transfer, Pictures from Space Classroom Activities, Status of Current NASA Projects, Using Art to Teach Science, and Word Puzzles for Use in the Classroom.

  11. Ninth-grade students' attitudes toward energy: A comparison between Maine and New Brunswick

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, L.H.; Morrisey, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if there was any relationship between energy attitudes of ninth-grade students by gender and by their geographical location (Maine and New Brunswick). For general energy concerns, Maine students had a more positive attitude than New Brunswick students. Both Maine and New Brunswick females had a more positive attitude toward energy than males. Overall, Maine and New Brunswick students had a nonpositive attitude toward energy.

  12. 18. Yards & Docks Drawing 112,447 (463A1) (1931), 'Battery Overhaul ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Yards & Docks Drawing 112,447 (463-A-1) (1931), 'Battery Overhaul Bldg., Acid Mixing Plant & Misc. Details' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Acid Mixing Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; deMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract One species of Silvanidae, Silvanus muticus Sharp, is newly recorded from New Brunswick, Canada and the Maritime provinces; Ahasverus longulus (Blatchley) is re-instated to the faunal list of the province, and we report the first recent provincial records of Dendrophagus cygnaei Mannerheim. Five species of Laemophloeidae (Charaphloeus convexulus (LeConte), Charaphloeus undescribed species (near adustus), Leptophloeus angustulus (LeConte), Placonotus zimmermanni (LeConte), and an undescribed Leptophloeus species) are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick. Collection data, bionomic data, and distribution maps are presented for all these species. PMID:22539892

  14. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 23. Mayersak RJ. Facial trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ...

  15. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Lyme disease risk in dogs in New Brunswick.

    PubMed

    Bjurman, Natalie K; Bradet, Gina; Lloyd, Vett K

    2016-09-01

    This study assessed the seroprevalence of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in New Brunswick dogs. Testing of 699 serum samples from dogs across the province revealed a 6% province-wide seropositivity, more than 6 times higher than that found in 2008. The rapid increase in seropositivity indicates increased Lyme disease risk to both canine and human health. PMID:27587892

  17. New Brunswick Francophone and Anglophone Student Attitudes and Outlooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Thomas P.; Rankine, Fred C.

    1974-01-01

    Analyzes the impact of a wide reaching educational reform program on the attitudes and world outlook of a current generation of anglophone and francophone undergraduates in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, drawn from summaries of questionnaires and personal interviews in the students' mother tongue. (Author)

  18. 76 FR 42471 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Brunswick, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... rule FR Doc 2011-16783, on page 39259 in the Federal Register of July 6, 2011 (76 FR 39259), make the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Brunswick, ME...

  19. Checklist of the Coleoptera of New Brunswick, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract All 3,062 species of Coleoptera from 92 families known to occur in New Brunswick, Canada, are recorded, along with their author(s) and year of publication using the most recent classification framework. Adventive and Holarctic species are indicated. There are 366 adventive species in the province, 12.0% of the total fauna. PMID:27110174

  20. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering. PMID:24617751

  1. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick and eastern Canada: Tachyporinae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Twenty-three species of Tachyporinae are newly recorded from New Brunswick. This brings the total number of Tachyporinae known from the province to 70. Lordithon campbelli Schülke is newly recorded for Canada and we provide the first documented records of Tachinus addendus Horn and Tachinus frigidus Erichson for New Brunswick. Collection and habitat data are presented and discussed for each species. A list of Tachyporinae species currently known from the province of New Brunswick is presented. PMID:22577318

  2. New Brunswick Laboratory: Progress report, October 1993 through September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to serve as the National Certifying Authority for nuclear reference materials and to provide an independent Federal technical staff and laboratory resource performing nuclear material measurement, safeguards and non-proliferation functions in support of multiple program sponsors. During FY 94 New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) completed development of a Strategic Plan which will aid in better defining performance oriented laboratory goals and objectives in each functional area consistent with the changing needs of the global nuclear community. This annual report describes accomplishments achieved in carrying out NBL`s assigned missions. Details of completed projects are reported in separate topical reports or as open-literature publications. Programs discussed here are: (1) safeguards assistance; (2) reference materials program; (3) measurement evaluation; (4) measurement services; and (5) measurement development.

  3. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Megalopodidae and Chrysomelidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; LeSage, Laurent; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Zeugophora varians Crotch and the family Megalopodidae are newly recorded for New Brunswick, Canada. Twenty-eight species of Chrysomelidae are newly recorded for New Brunswick, including Acalymma gouldi Barber, Altica knabii Blatchley, Altica rosae Woods, Altica woodsi Isely, Bassareus mammifer (Newman), Chrysolina marginata (Linnaeus), Chrysomela laurentia Brown, Crepidodera violacea Melsheimer, Cryptocephalus venustus Fabricius, Neohaemonia melsheimeri (Lacordaire), Neohaemonia nigricornis (Kirby), Pachybrachis bivittatus (Say), Pachybrachis m-nigrum (Melsheimer), Phyllobrotica limbata (Fabricius), Psylliodes affinis (Paykull), Odontota dorsalis (Thunberg), Ophraella communa (LeSage), Ophraella cribrata (LeConte), Ophraella notata (Fabricius), Systena hudsonias (Forster), Tricholochmaea ribicola (Brown), and Tricholochmaea rufosanguinea (Say), which are also newly recorded for the Maritime provinces. Collection data, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for all these species. PMID:22539900

  4. Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Medzon, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Within the next 15 years, 1 in 5 Americans will be over age 65. $34 billion will be spent yearly on trauma care of this age group. This section covers situations in trauma unique to the geriatric population, who are often under-triaged and have significant injuries underestimated. Topics covered include age-related pathophysiological changes, underlying existing medical conditions and certain daily medications that increase the risk of serious injury in elderly trauma patients. Diagnostic evaluation of this group requires liberal testing, imaging, and a multidisciplinary team approach. Topics germane to geriatric trauma including hypothermia, elder abuse, and depression and suicide are also covered. PMID:27475011

  5. [New Brunswick Tire Stewardship Board] annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The Board`s mission is to administer a recycling program for tires in accordance with the Clean Environment Act. This report looks at the Board`s history and profile, composition, the trucking industry, the Atlantic Tire Dealers Association, and the New Brunswick Auto Dealers Association. Next, it looks at the Board`s relationship with Tire Recycling Atlantic Canada Corporation (TRACC), public relations and promotion, and administration. The report also examines financial surplus management and provides financial statements.

  6. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) of the A. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to serve as the National Certifying Authority for nuclear reference materials and to provide an independent Federal technical staff and laboratory resource performing nuclear material measurement, safeguards, and non-proliferation functions in support of multiple program sponsors. This annual report describes accomplishments achieved in carrying out NBL`s assigned missions.

  7. Reflections on the Teacher Education System Overhaul (TESO) Program in Ethiopia: Promises, Pitfalls, and Propositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mekonnen, Dawit M.

    2008-01-01

    In 2003 the Ethiopian education system experienced wide-ranging reform that touches every aspect of the system. This reform is called TESO (Teacher Education System Overhaul). Designed to address educational problems in Ethiopia, TESO introduced significant structural changes and promised to bring a "paradigm shift" in the Ethiopian educational…

  8. 77 FR 29953 - Application of Buy America Waivers to Rolling Stock Overhauls and Rebuilds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Federal Transit Administration 49 CFR Part 661 Application of Buy America Waivers to Rolling Stock... the application of the Federal Transit Administration's Buy America rules to procurements for the... America requirements to procurements for the overhaul and rebuilding of rolling stock. Until now,...

  9. Building Political Will to Overhaul California's School Finance System. Forum Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EdSource, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Calls for changes in California's complex state-run school funding system, provided the backdrop for "Overhauling School Funding in California: The Push for Greater Adequacy, Equity, and Accountability," the EdSource 27th Annual Forum in March 2004. Participants discussed approaches for determining what would constitute adequate funding, reforms…

  10. Vietnamese Leaders Discuss Overhaul of Higher Education During U.S. Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasley, Paula

    2007-01-01

    At a June 2007 forum, Vietnam's president and minister of education outlined an ambitious plan to overhaul their country's troubled educational system, while a panel of American academics and scientists highlighted the importance of higher education to Vietnam's rapidly growing economy and suggested potential models for reform. Two decades after…

  11. Respiratory protection for firefighters--evaluation of CBRN canisters for use during overhaul.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leaton; Lutz, Eric A; Duncan, Michael; Burgess, Jefferey L

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, there are approximately 366,600 structural fires each year. After visible flames are extinguished, firefighters begin the overhaul stage of firefighting to smother remaining hot spots and initiate investigations. Typically during overhaul significant ambient concentrations of chemical contaminants remain. However, previous research suggests that the use of air purifying respirators (APR) fitted with chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) canisters may reduce occupational respiratory exposures. This pilot study used large-scale prescribed burns of representative structural materials to perform simultaneous, side-by-side, filtering and service-life evaluations of commercially available CBRN filters. Three types of CBRN canisters and one cartridge were challenged in repetitive post live-fire overhaul exposure tests using a sampling manifold apparatus. At a flow rate of 80 L/min, nine tests were conducted in the breathing zone for three different exposure durations (0-15 min, 0-30 min, and 0-60 min). Fifty different chemicals were identified for evaluation and results indicate that 21 of the 50 chemicals tested were in the air of the overhaul environment. Respirable particles and formaldehyde were consistently present above the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) recommended exposure level (REL) and threshold limit ceiling value (TLVc), respectively. Each filter effectively reduced concentrations for respirable particulates below the maximum recommended level. Formaldehyde was reduced, but not consistently filtered below the TLVc. These results were consistent across all exposure durations. This study indicates that, regardless of brand, CBRN filters provide protection from the vast majority of particle and gas-phase contaminants. However, due to formaldehyde breakthrough, CBRN filters do not provide complete protection during firefighter overhaul. PMID:25738516

  12. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  13. 76 FR 45772 - Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone-Brunswick, ME; Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone--Brunswick, ME; Application An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by the Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority to establish a general-purpose foreign-trade zone at a site in Brunswick, Maine, adjacent to the Portland...

  14. 78 FR 12041 - Information on Surplus Land at Former Naval Air Station, Brunswick, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... 16, 2007 (72 FR 7624, FR Doc. E7-2762)). DATES: Effective February 7, 2013, by updating the acreage... Department of the Navy Information on Surplus Land at Former Naval Air Station, Brunswick, ME AGENCY... additional surplus property at the former Naval Air Station (NAS), Brunswick, ME, in accordance with...

  15. Tailbone trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Choi SB, Cwinn AA. Pelvic trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 55. Vora ...

  16. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Geotrupidae and Scarabaeidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Two species of Geotrupidae, Geotrupes splendidus splendidus (Fabricius) and Odonteus liebecki (Wallis), are newly reported for New Brunswick, Canada. Twelve species of Scarabaeidae are added to the faunal list of the province, including Aegialia criddlei Brown, Caelius humeralis (Brown), Dialytellus dialytoides (Fall), Diapterna omissa (LeConte), Diapterna pinguis (Haldeman), Planolinoides aenictus (Cooper and Gordon), Stenotothorax badipes (Melsheimer), and Ataenius strigatus (Say), which are also newly recorded for the Maritime provinces. Collection data, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for each species. PMID:22539883

  17. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Buprestidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nine species of Buprestidae; Agrilus bilineatus (Weber), Agrilus crinicornis Horn, Agrilus obsoletoguttatus Gory, Agrilus putillus putillus Say, Brachys ovatus (Weber), Buprestis sulcicollis (LeConte), Chalcophora liberta (Germar), Phaenops aeneola (Melsheimer), and Taphrocerus gracilis (Say) are newly recorded for New Brunswick, Canada. Agrilus bilineatus, A. crinicornis, A. obsoletoguttatus,and B. ovatus are also newly reported for the Maritime provinces. Lindgren 12-funnel traps do not appear to be an effective tool for sampling the Bupresidae. Collection, habitat notes, and distribution maps are presented for each species. PMID:22539885

  18. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Mycetophagidae, Tetratomidae, and Melandryidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We report 21 new species records for the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick, Canada, seven of which are new records for the Maritime provinces. Four species of Mycetophagidae (Litargus didesmus Say, Litargus tetrapilotus LeConte, Mycetophagus punctatus Say, and Mycetophagus quadriguttatus Müller) are newly reported for the province of New Brunswick. Litargus didesmus is newly recorded for the Maritime provinces. Seven species of Tetratomidae are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick: Eustrophus tomentosus Say, Penthe obliquata (Fabricius), and Tetratoma tessellata Melsheimer are new to New Brunswick: Hallomenus serricornis LeConte, Pisenus humeralis Kirby, Synstrophus repandus (Horn), and Tetratoma variegata Casey, which are newly recorded for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Ten additional species of Melandryidae are reported from New Brunswick, of which Orchesia cultriformis Laliberté, Orchesia ovata Laliberté, Phloeotrya fusca (LeConte), Scotochroides antennatus Mank, Spilotus quadripustulatus (Melsheimer), Symphora flavicollis (Haldeman), Symphora rugosa (Haldeman), and Zilora hispida LeConte are new for the province, and Microscapha clavicornis LeConte and Zilora nuda Provancher are newly recorded for the Maritime provinces. In addition, we report numerous additional records for three species of Mycetophagidae and one species of Melandryidae previously recorded from New Brunswick that suggest these species are more widely distributed than previously known. Collection, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for all these species. PMID:22539895

  19. Elderly trauma.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Renee Semonin

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, the population is aging. Adults 65 years and older make up one of the fastest growing segments of the US population. Trauma is a disease process that affects all age groups. The mortality and morbidity that result from an injury can be influenced by many factors including age, physical condition, and comorbidities. The management of the elderly trauma patient can present some unique challenges. This paper addresses the differences that occur in the management of elderly patient who has been injured. This paper also includes a discussion of how to prevent injury in the elderly. PMID:26039652

  20. Health assessment for Brunswick Naval Air Station, Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine, Region 1. CERCLIS No. ME8170022018. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    The Brunswick Naval Air Station (BWK) Site is listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Brunswick (Cumberland County), Maine, and encompasses 7 waste areas within a 2-mile radius occupying 15 acres. Five of the seven sites were used to dispose various acids, caustics, and asbestos wastes. Preliminary on-site sampling results have identified various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals in groundwater. The site-related contaminants include: Chloroform, trichloroethylene, bis 2 ethylhexylphalate, lead, chromium, and mercury. On-site surface water contaminants identified include: total organics, chloroform, and chromium. Off-site surface water sampling results identified cadmium and mercury. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances through direct contact and ingestion of contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediment and soil. Access to the waste areas inside the base should be restricted, if not already.

  1. Shock trauma.

    PubMed

    Trunkey, D D

    1984-09-01

    Trauma - accidental or intentional injury - is a major health and social problem. It is still the chief cause of death in people between the ages of 1 and 38 years. In the United States, the mortality due to trauma between the ages of 15 and 24 years increased by 13% from 1960 to 1978. During the same period, the mortality for people aged 25 to 64 years declined by 16%. Murders have increased from 8464 in 1960, to 26 000 in 1982. The overall death rate of American teenagers and young adults is 50% higher than that of their counterparts in Britain, Sweden and Japan. Trauma affects young, productive citizens, and the estimated costs for death, disability and loss of productivity exceed $230 million a day. The most tragic statistic is that at least 40% of the deaths are needless and preventable if better treatment and prevention programs were available. Trauma deaths that might be prevented are those due to motor vehicle accidents, homicide, burns, and alcohol and drug abuse. In this paper suggestions for prevention are made. They include improved crash worthiness of motor vehicles, revocation of drunk drivers' licences, use of devices that limit drunk drivers, increased tax on alcohol and random breathalyser tests, and the use of seat belts and motorcycle helmets. Control of hand-guns and burn characteristics of cigarettes could also reduce deaths. The problems and issues in trauma care can be divided into two broad categories: system and professional. System problems include prehospital care, in-hospital care, rehabilitation and prevention. Professional problems include education, research, economics, and quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6478325

  2. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Dermestidae, Endecatomidae, Bostrichidae, and Ptinidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian; Turgeon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We report ten new species records for the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick, Canada from the families Dermestidae, Endecatomidae, Bostrichidae, and Ptinidae. Anthrenus fuscus Olivier and Anthrenus museorum (Linnaeus) of the family Dermestidae are newly recorded for New Brunswick. Endecatomus rugosus (Randall) and the family Endecatomidae are recorded for the first time for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Two Bostrichidae, the adventive Dinoderus minutus (Fabricius) and the native Stephanopachys substriatus (Paykull), are newly recorded for the province. Five species of Ptinidae, the adventive Anobium punctatum (DeGeer) and Microbregma emarginatum emarginatum (Duftschmid), and the native Hadrobregmus notatus (Say), Ptilinus lobatus Casey, and Ptilinus ruficornis Say are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick. Collection data, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for all these species. PMID:22539890

  3. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, and Dytiscidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Dineutus assimilis Kirby and Dineutus discolor Aubé of the Family Gyrinidae are newly reported from New Brunswick, Canada. Four species of Carabidae, Agonum (Agonum) piceolum (LeConte), Bembidion (Pseudoperyphus) rufotinctum Chaudoir, Harpalus (Harpalus) opacipennis (Haldeman), and Pterostichus (Melanius) castor Goulet & Bousquet are newly reported from New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces, and one species of Dytiscidae, Liodessus noviaffinis Miller, is newly recorded for the province. Collection, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for each species. PMID:22539881

  4. BCS theory has to be overhauled: Reassurance from numerical survival rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. H.; Walmsley, D. G.

    2016-07-01

    The BCS theory has conceptual and numerical difficulties. We have previously overhauled it with a new scheme of phonon-mediated electron pairing that can be expressed analytically in terms of an empirical pairing survival rate factor, S(q) = 0 or 1/2, depending on phonon momentum, q. Now we evaluate S(q) numerically entirely from experimental data on normal state electrical resistivity and on superconducting tunnelling conductance. The empirical and numerical S(q) are reassuringly close in aluminium and lead and particularly so in two other cases, niobium and tantalum.

  5. Innovation Overhaul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiss, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Traditional community college CEOs who are experiencing an increased demand for services, as well as reduced funding, have a choice to make: They can worry and complain, or they can change their operating model. In this article, the author calls for CEOs to have a clear focus on how they operate their organizations. The author argues that it is…

  6. Penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  7. Penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  8. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada: Omaliinae, Micropeplinae, Phloeocharinae, Olisthaerinae, and Habrocerinae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eleven species of Omaliinae are newly recorded from New Brunswick, bringing the total number of species known from the province to 32 described species. Supporting data are presented for the New Brunswick record of Geodromicus strictus (Fauvel) reported by Majka et al. (2011). Micropeplus browni Campbell, Micropeplus laticollis Mäklin (Micropeplinae), Charyhyphus picipennis (LeConte) (Phloeocharinae), Olisthaerus substriatus (Paykull) (Olisthaerinae), Habrocerus capillaricornis (Gravenhorst), Habrocerus magnus LeConte, and Habrocerus schwarzi Horn (Habrocerinae) are also newly recorded for New Brunswick. These are the first records of the latter four subfamilies from New Brunswick. Collection and bionomic data are presented for each species and discussed. PMID:22577316

  9. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report, October 1989--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has been tasked by the DOE Office of Safeguards and Security, Defense Programs (OSS/DP) to assure the application of accurate and reliable measurement technology for the safeguarding of special nuclear materials. NBL is fulfilling its mission responsibilities by identifying the measurement and measurement-related needs of the nuclear material safeguards community and addressing them by means of activities in the following program areas: (1) reference and calibration materials, (2) measurement development, (3) measurement services, (4) measurement evaluation, (5) safeguards assessment, and (6) site-specific assistance. Highlights of each of these program areas are provided in this summary. This progress report is written as a part of NBL's technology transfer responsibilities, primarily for the use and benefit of the scientific personnel that perform safeguards-related measurements. Consequently, the report is technical in nature. Many of the reports of multi-year projects are fragmentary in that only partial results are reported. Separate topical reports are to be issued at the completion of many of these projects. 30 refs.

  10. The New Brunswick Laboratory Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cacic, C.G.; Trahey, N.M.; Zook, A.C.

    1987-07-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has been tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) to assess and evaluate the adequacy of measurement technology as applied to materials accounting in DOE nuclear facilities. The Safeguards Measurement Evaluation (SME) Program was developed as a means to monitor and evaluate the quality and effectiveness of accounting measurements by site, material balance area (MBA), or unit process. Phase I of the SME Program, initiated during 1985, involved evaluation of the primary accountability measurement methods at six DOE Defense Programs facilities: Savannah River Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Y-12 Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, Rockwell Hanford Operations, and NBL. Samples of uranyl nitrate solution, dried plutonium nitrates, and plutonium oxides were shipped to the participants for assay and isotopic abundance measurements. Resulting data are presented and evaluated as indicators of current state-of-the-practice accountability measurement methodology, deficiencies in materials accounting practices, and areas for possible assistance in upgrading measurement capabilities. Continuing expansion of the SME Program to include materials which are representative of specific accountability measurement points within the DOE complex is discussed.

  11. A study in animal ethics in New Brunswick.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, B J

    2001-01-01

    Society uses animals in ever-increasing numbers and ways, providing ethical challenges. Decisions about animal use are guided by the social consensus ethic towards animals. Because there is no clear social consensus ethic, these decisions are difficult. Society's ethic is changing and a "new ethic" towards animals is emerging. This study addressed the need to better understand society's ethics towards animals. Qualitative research methodology (focus groups) was used to study 7 different animal-interest groups. Qualitative data analysis was computer-aided. The group ethical position towards animals of its own group interest was determined for each group. The animal welfare, companion animal, and veterinary groups took Rollin's Position, a position based on both the Utilitarian and the Rights Principles; the farmer and trapper groups the Utilitarian/Land Ethic position, a dual position based on actions producing the greatest amount of pleasure and the least amount of pain for the greatest number, and preserving the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community; the hunter group the Utilitarian/Judeo-Christian position, a dual position based on actions producing the greatest amount of pleasure and the least amount of pain for the greatest number, and having dominion over animals; and the naturalist group took Rollin's Position/Land Ethic. All these groups perceived medium to extreme ethical responsibility towards animals of their own group's interest that are used by others. The study showed that the predicted "new ethic" towards animals is in New Brunswick society and it is Rollin's Position. PMID:11467182

  12. New Brunswick Laboratory. Progress report, October 1995--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Fiscal year (FY) 1996 was a very good year for New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), whose major sponsor is the Office of Safeguards and Security (NN-51) in the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, Office of Security Affairs. Several projects pertinent to the NBL mission were completed, and NBL`s interactions with partners and customers were encouraging. Among the partners with which NBL interacted in this report period were the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), NN-51. Environmental Program Group of the DOE Chicago Operations Office, International Safeguards Project Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Ukraine Working Group, Fissile Materials Assurance Working Group, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Belgium, Brazilian/Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, and other DOE facilities and laboratories. NBL staff publications, participation in safeguards assistance and other nuclear programs, development of new reference materials, involvement in the updating and refinement of DOE documents, service in enhancing the science education of others, and other related activities enhanced NBL`s status among DOE laboratories and facilities. Noteworthy are the facts that NBL`s small inventory of nuclear materials is accurately accounted for, and, as in past years, its materials and human resources were used in peaceful nuclear activities worldwide.

  13. Transforming the New Brunswick Energy Hub: An Analysis on Renewable Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunter, Christopher

    This research examines the benefits and disadvantages of instituting a shift from fossil fuel dependence to renewable sources of energy in New Brunswick. The New Brunswick Energy Hub is a complex system acting under the mandate of the White Paper New Brunswick Energy Policy. In my research, I consider information derived from statistical indicators developed by Patlitzianas, Doukas, Kagiannas and Psarras (2008) and compare these findings to the efficacy of energy policies in Germany, Denmark and Spain. These countries are similar to New Brunswick in climate and organizational complexity (US Department of Commerce, 2009). Weighing the outcomes of this comparative study, I discuss my recommendations highlighting the environmental and economic benefits. My research investigates subsidies in each country that allowed them early economic and environmental advantages. Specific regional considerations, such as Denmark's trend of selling energy technology for profit over domestic applications, inform my conclusions. The future New Brunswick Energy Policy should focus on creating favorable conditions for renewable energy development to occur. Some proven conditions include infrastructure development subsidies and the development and annual review of a competitive open access transmission tariff. With the expiry of the current White Paper comes the necessity of this investigation, and the opportunity to address the growing financial and environmental concerns that many politicians and policy planners have failed to deal with in past policies.

  14. Scheduling challenges. With overhauled Form 990, hospitals are being asked for more specifics on governance, pay, perks, subsidized care.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    With an expanded and overhauled Form 990, hospitals will find themselves digging up and reporting lots more details about executive pay and perks, governance policies, and how much subsidized care they provide. "We look at this as the first step," says the IRS' Theresa Pattara, left, who was project manager for the form's retooling. PMID:18271193

  15. Overhaul, Inspection and Repair of Reciprocating Engines 1 (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics (Power Plant): 9055.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline has been prepared as a guide to help the trainee acquire the knowledge and skills associated with the overhaul, inspection, and repair of reciprocating engines. This course is the first of two and must be completed first. Successful completion of these courses and others will provide the trainee with the knowledge and skills…

  16. Overhaul, Inspection and Repair of Reciprocating Engines 2 (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics (Power Plant): 9055.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outlined is the second of two designed to help a trainee acquire the knowledge and become proficient in the skills associated with the overhaul, inspection, and repair of reciprocating engines. The knowledge and skills are necessary to pass the Powerplant Theory and Maintenence section of the Federal Aviation Administration examination…

  17. Partial Overhaul and Initial Parallel Optimization of KINETICS, a Coupled Dynamics and Chemistry Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Howard; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    KINETICS is a coupled dynamics and chemistry atmosphere model that is data intensive and computationally demanding. The potential performance gain from using a supercomputer motivates the adaptation from a serial version to a parallelized one. Although the initial parallelization had been done, bottlenecks caused by an abundance of communication calls between processors led to an unfavorable drop in performance. Before starting on the parallel optimization process, a partial overhaul was required because a large emphasis was placed on streamlining the code for user convenience and revising the program to accommodate the new supercomputers at Caltech and JPL. After the first round of optimizations, the partial runtime was reduced by a factor of 23; however, performance gains are dependent on the size of the data, the number of processors requested, and the computer used.

  18. Ten years of the Three Gorges Dam: a call for policy overhaul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiankun; Lu, X. X.

    2013-12-01

    The Three Gorges Dam (TGD), the world’s largest source of ‘clean’ hydroelectric power (Shen and Xie 2004), has entered its tenth year after the first turbine went into operation in June 2003. The dam, with a generating capacity 20 times that of the United States’ Hoover Dam, has been hailed as a crucial part of a solution to China’s energy crisis. Despite great benefits, however, major concerns have been voiced over the disastrous environmental and social consequences of this massive engineering project (Stone 2011). In this paper, we review the benefits and impacts learned from the controversial megadam over the past decade and discuss perspective quests on policy overhaul for future environmental protection.

  19. 75 FR 35024 - North Carolina Waters Along the Entire Length of Brunswick and Pender Counties and the Saline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY North Carolina Waters Along the Entire Length of Brunswick and Pender Counties and the Saline Waters of the Cape Fear River in Brunswick and New Hanover Counties No Discharge Zone Determination The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region...

  20. 76 FR 8720 - Record of Decision for the Disposal and Reuse of Naval Air Station Brunswick, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... storm water management plan, as required by the Town of Brunswick. Sediment and Erosion Control: Redevelopment of NAS Brunswick has the potential to cause soil erosion. The developer will be required to utilize mitigation measures in accordance with Maine's Erosion and Sediment Control Law and...

  1. 78 FR 64207 - Application To Export Electric Energy; New Brunswick Energy Marketing Corporation (f/k/a New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; New Brunswick Energy Marketing Corporation (f/k/a New Brunswick Power... 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 824a(e)). On December...

  2. 76 FR 18548 - North Carolina Waters Along the Entire Length of Brunswick and Pender Counties and the Lower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY North Carolina Waters Along the Entire Length of Brunswick and Pender Counties and the Lower Portion of the Cape Fear River in Brunswick and New Hanover Counties; No Discharge Zone Determination On June 21, 2010, the Environmental...

  3. 75 FR 53197 - Restricted Area in Cape Fear River and Tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION... Terminal, Brunswick County, North Carolina, by renaming the marker buoys and specifying the latitude and... Terminal. DATES: This rule is effective November 1, 2010 without further notice, unless the Corps...

  4. 76 FR 4148 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Brunswick-Golden Isles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ..., Atlanta, GA 30337-2747. In addition, one copy of any comments submitted to the FAA must be mailed or... Manager, Atlanta Airports District Office, 1701 Columbia Ave., Campus Bldg, Ste. 2-260, Atlanta, GA 30337... Brunswick-Golden Isles Airport, Brunswick, GA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT....

  5. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  6. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Trogossitidae, Cleridae, and Melyridae, with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Grynocharis quadrilineata (Melsheimer) and Tenebroides corticalis (Melsheimer) of the family Trogossitidae are newly recorded for New Brunswick, Canada. Additional records of the recently reported Calitys scabra (Thunberg)and Ostoma fraterna (Randall) are presented for the province. The record of Ostoma fraterna is the first recent record of this species from New Brunswick. Additional New Brunswick records of the thaneroclerine, Zenodosus sanguineus (Say), are given, indicting that this species is common and widespread in the province. One species of Cleridae, Cymatodera bicolor (Say),is newly reported from New Brunswick, and the adventive Thanasimus formicarius Linnaeus is newly recorded from Nova Scotia and the Maritime provinces. Attalus morulus (LeConte) and Dolichosoma foveicolle (Kirby), family Melyridae, are reported for the first time for New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces. Collection, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for these species. PMID:22539891

  7. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Sphindidae, Erotylidae, Monotomidae, and Cryptophagidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Two species of Sphindidae, Odontosphindus denticollis LeConteand Sphindus trinifer Casey, are reported for the first time for New Brunswick. Another species, Sphindus near americanus LeConte is reported from the province but may be an undescribed species, pending further study. Five species of Erotylidae are newly recorded for the province, including Tritoma humeralis Fabricius and Tritoma sanguinipennis (Say), which are new to the Maritime provinces. Three species of Monotomidae are added to the New Brunswick faunal list, including Pycnotomina cavicollis (Horn), which is newly recorded for the Maritime provinces. Six additional species of Cryptophagidae are reported for the province and the presence of Antherophagus convexulus LeContein New Brunswick is confirmed. Cryptophagus pilosus Gyllenhal and Myrmedophila americana (LeConte) are newly reported to the Maritime provinces. PMID:22539893

  8. Hydrogeology and ground-water quality of Brunswick County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Stephen L.; Fine, Jason M.; Spruill, Timothy B.

    2003-01-01

    Brunswick County is the southernmost coastal county in North Carolina and lies in the southeastern part of the Coastal Plain physiographic province. In this report, geologic, hydrologic, and chemical data were used to investigate and delineate the hydro-geologic framework and ground-water quality of Brunswick County. The major aquifers and their associated confining units delineated in the Brunswick County study area include, from youngest to oldest, the surficial, Castle Hayne, Peedee, Black Creek, upper Cape Fear, and lower Cape Fear aquifers. All of these aquifers, with the exception of the Castle Hayne aquifer, are located throughout Brunswick County. The Castle Hayne aquifer extends across only the southeastern part of the county. Based on available data, the Castle Hayne and Peedee confining units are missing in some areas of Brunswick County, which allows direct hydraulic contact between the surficial aquifer and underlying Castle Hayne or Peedee aquifers. The confining units for the Black Creek, upper Cape Fear, and lower Cape Fear aquifers appear to be continuous throughout Brunswick County. In examining the conceptual hydrologic system for Brunswick County, a generalized water budget was developed to better understand the natural processes, including precipitation, evapotranspiration, and stream runoff, that influence ground-water recharge to the shallow aquifer system in the county. In the generalized water budget, an estimated 11 inches per year of the average annual precipitation of 55 inches per year in Brunswick County is estimated to infiltrate and recharge the shallow aquifer system. Of the 11 inches per year that recharges the shallow system, about 1 inch per year is estimated to recharge the deeper aquifer system. The surficial aquifer in Brunswick County is an important source of water for domestic supply and irrigation. The Castle Hayne aquifer is the most productive aquifer and serves as the principal ground-water source of municipal supply

  9. Automation of the New Brunswick Laboratory controlled-potential coulometric method for plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, W.G.; Troutman, D.; Lewis, K.

    1988-11-01

    The development and evolution of the automated coulometric analysis of plutonium at the New Brunswick Laboratory is described. The importance of maintaining electrical calibration of the analysis so that the results are traceable to the Faraday is discussed. The innovations which were necessary to achieve the desired accuracy and precision are explained. The experimental tests to qualify the instruments for use in sample analysis at New Brunswick Laboratory are detailed. Details of the calculations performed by the automated coulometer system are given in the Appendix. 21 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada: Paederinae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We report 17 species of Paederinae new for New Brunswick, Canada. Ten of these species, Lathrobium othioides LeConte, Lathrobium amplipenne Casey, Lathrobium armatum Say, Lathrobium confusum LeConte, Lathrobium debile LeConte, Achenomorphus corticinus (Gravenhorst), Rugilus rufipes Germar, Homaeotarsus bicolor (Gravenhorst), Homaeotharsus cribratus (LeConte), and Homaeotarsus pallipes (Gravenhorst) are newly recorded for the Maritime provinces. This brings the total number of Paederinae recorded from New Brunswick to 36 species. Additional records are presented for the recently reported Lathrobium simile LeConte and Lathrobium washingtoni Casey. Collection and habitat data are presented for all species. PMID:22577324

  11. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada: Oxyporinae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Five species of Oxyporinae: Oxyporus occipitalis Fauvel, Oxyporus quinquemaculatus LeConte, Oxyporus major Gravenhorst, Oxyporus rufipennis LeConte, and Oxyporus stygicus Say, are newly recorded from New Brunswick, bringing the number of Oxyporinae known from the province to eight. The first documented records from New Brunswick are provided for Oxyporus kiteleyi reported by Majka et al. (2011). Oxyporus occipitalis and Oxyporus major are newly reported for the Maritime provinces of Canada. Collection and habitat data are presented for all these species. PMID:22577323

  12. Rural trauma management.

    PubMed

    Wayne, R

    1989-05-01

    Rural trauma is a major problem in the United States. Up to 70 percent of trauma fatalities occur in rural areas, even though 70 percent of the population live in urban areas. Over the past 3 decades, numerous studies have defined the concept of preventable trauma death in both rural and urban populations. With the development of a regional trauma care system in Oregon, preventable trauma mortality should decrease. An effort was made to improve the quality of trauma care in Clatsop County, Oregon, a community of 30,000 people with 2 small rural hospitals. To obtain this goal, four steps were taken: (1) physician and nurse education was improved, (2) trauma protocols promoting prompt resuscitation and stabilization of patients were established, (3) regular trauma case reviews were conducted, and (4) emergency medical technician and prehospital management were coordinated. This study reviews the trail from sporadic, uncoordinated rural trauma care to the designation process. PMID:2712202

  13. Urine vanadium concentrations in workers overhauling an oil-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Hauser, R; Elreedy, S; Ryan, P B; Christiani, D C

    1998-01-01

    Since fuel oil ash contains vanadium (V), the measurement of urinary levels of V may provide a biological marker in workers exposed to fuel oil ash. The usefulness of urine V samples as a biological monitoring tool ultimately depends on determining the appropriate time of sampling relative to when exposure occurs. Twenty boilermakers were studied during the overhaul of a large oil-fired boiler. A total of 117 urine samples were collected, 65 start-of-shift (S-O-S) and 52 end-of-shift (E-O-S) samples. Air V exposures were estimated with personal sampling devices and work history diaries. Air V concentrations ranged from 0.36 to 32.19 micrograms V/m3, with a mean +/- SD of 19.1 +/- 10.7, and a median of 18.5. On the first day of work on the overhaul, the V urine levels at the E-O-S (mean +/- SD were 1.53 +/- 0.53, median was 1.52 mg V/g creatinine) were significantly higher than those at the S-O-S (0.87 +/- 0.32, median was 0.83), P = 0.004. However, the V concentrations of the S-O-S urine samples on the last Monday of the study were not significantly different from the S-O-S urine levels on the previous Saturday, a time interval of about 38 hr between the end of exposure and sample collection. The Spearman correlation coefficient (r) between the S-O-S urine V and the workplace concentration of V dust during the previous day was r = 0.35. In summary, the results suggest a rapid initial clearance of V (elevating the E-O-S V concentration on the first day of work relative to the S-O-S concentration), followed by a slow clearance that is not complete 38 hr after the end of exposure, as evidenced by the Monday morning urine V concentrations. The Spearman correlations suggest that the S-O-S urine is preferred to the E-O-S urine for across-shift biological monitoring of V exposure. PMID:9408529

  14. Relationship between trauma narratives and trauma pathology.

    PubMed

    Amir, N; Stafford, J; Freshman, M S; Foa, E B

    1998-04-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between posttrauma pathology and the level of articulation (complexity) in rape narratives recounted by victims shortly after the assault. Degree of articulation was operationalized as the reading level of the narrative as determined by a computer program. Shortly after the trauma, reading level was correlated with severity of anxiety but not with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Degree of the narrative articulation shortly after the trauma, however, was related to severity of later PTSD. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the less developed trauma narratives hinder recovery from trauma. PMID:9565923

  15. Women's Access to Training in New Brunswick. Training Matters: Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Joan

    A gender-based analysis of training that focuses on barriers to women because of changes in the availability of sponsorship leads to the conclusion that training programs for women in New Brunswick have been spotty at best. Women's training has occurred during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s under the aegis of the Canadian Manpower Training Program,…

  16. (New Brunswick Laboratory): Progress report for the period October 1985 through September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This report summarizes the mission activities of the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). NBL's mission is to provide and maintain a nuclear material measurements and standards laboratory as a technical response to DOE's statutory responsibility to assure the safeguarding of nuclear materials.

  17. (New Brunswick Laboratory): Progress report for the period October 1986 through September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    This report summarizes the mission activities of the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). NBL's mission is to provide and maintain a nuclear material measurements and standards laboratory as a technical response to DOE's statutory responsibility to assure the safeguarding of nuclear materials.

  18. (Mission activities of New Brunswick Laboratory). Progress report, October 1983-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes the mission activities of the New Brunswick Laboratory to provide and maintain a nuclear material standards and measurement laboratory in support of Federal programmatic responsibilities to assure the application of accurate and reliable measurement technology for the safeguarding of special nuclear materials. 20 refs., 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  19. New Brunswick Laboratory progress report for the period October 1988--September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The mission of the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to provide and maintain a nuclear material measurements and standards laboratory as a technical response to DOE's statutory responsibility to assure the safeguarding of nuclear materials. This report summarizes the mission-fulfilling activities of NBL for the period October 1988 through September 1989.

  20. 40 CFR 81.91 - Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.91 Section 81.91 Protection of Environment... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate... County, Suwannee County, Taylor County, Union County, Wakulla County. In the State of Georgia:...

  1. 40 CFR 81.91 - Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.91 Section 81.91 Protection of Environment... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate... County, Suwannee County, Taylor County, Union County, Wakulla County. In the State of Georgia:...

  2. 40 CFR 81.91 - Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.91 Section 81.91 Protection of Environment... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate... County, Suwannee County, Taylor County, Union County, Wakulla County. In the State of Georgia:...

  3. 40 CFR 81.91 - Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.91 Section 81.91 Protection of Environment... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate... County, Suwannee County, Taylor County, Union County, Wakulla County. In the State of Georgia:...

  4. 40 CFR 81.91 - Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.91 Section 81.91 Protection of Environment... (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate... County, Suwannee County, Taylor County, Union County, Wakulla County. In the State of Georgia:...

  5. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada: Pselaphinae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Chandler, Donald S.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Twenty species of Pselaphinae are newly recorded from New Brunswick, Canada. This brings the total number of species known from the province to 36. Thirteen of these species are newly recorded for the Maritime provinces of Canada. Dalmosella tenuis Casey and Brachygluta luniger (LeConte) are newly recorded for Canada. Collection and habitat data are presented for these species. PMID:22577317

  6. A Collision of Culture, Values, and Education Policy: Scrapping Early French Immersion in New Brunswick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Max

    2009-01-01

    A CBC New Brunswick Forum broadcast live on March 27, 2008, from Moncton's Capitol Theatre provided a cathartic moment for parents angry at Education Minister Kelly Lamrock, who was linked into the discussion via satellite from Fredericton. Two weeks earlier, Minister Lamrock had declared in a press release that bilingualism was changing from an…

  7. 76 FR 28481 - Carolina Power & Light Company; Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Carolina Power & Light Company; Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering issuance of an exemption, pursuant to Title...

  8. The New Brunswick Graduate Follow-Up for the 1987 and 1988 Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Martha

    In 1987 and 1988, the New Brunswick (Canada) Department of Advanced Education and Training conducted follow-up surveys of graduates of full-time training programs to determine their labor market success. In 1987, of the 2,319 graduates surveyed, 1,574 (68%) responded, while in 1988, 1,578 (69%) of the 2,302 graduates surveyed responded. In both…

  9. Ninth-Grade Students' Attitudes toward Energy: A Comparison between Maine and New Brunswick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Morrisey, J. Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study to compare the energy attitudes of ninth-grade students by gender and by their geographical location. Results indicated that students in Maine had more positive attitudes than those in New Brunswick, that females in both locations had more positive attitudes than males, but that, overall, all had nonpositive attitudes. (TW)

  10. The Ciidae (Coleoptera) of New Brunswick, Canada: New records and new synonyms

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano; Webster, Reginald P.; Webster, Vincent L.; Alderson, Chantelle A.; Hughes, Cory C.; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Ciidae of New Brunswick, Canada are reviewed. Seventeen species are recorded for New Brunswick, including the following 10 species that are newly recorded for the province: Ceracis singularis (Dury), Ceracis thoracicornis (Ziegler), Cis angustus Hatch, Cis fuscipes Mellié, Cis horridulus Casey, Cis striatulus Mellié, Dolichocis laricinus (Mellié), Malacocis brevicollis (Casey), Orthocis punctatus (Mellié), and Plesiocis cribrum Casey. Additional locality data are provided for the following species previously known from the province: Cis americanus Mannerheim, Cis creberrimus Mellié, Cis levettei (Casey), Cis submicans Abeille de Perrin, Dolichocis manitoba Dury, Hadreule elongatula (Gyllenhal), and Octotemnus glabriculus (Gyllenhal). Seven synonyms are proposed here; Cis pistoria Casey with Cis submicans Abeille de Perrin; Cis fraternus Casey, Cis macilentus Casey and Cis striolatus Casey with Cis striatulus Mellié; Dolichocis indistinctus Hatch with Dolichocis laricinus (Mellié); and Octotemnus denudatus Casey and Octotemnus laevis Casey with Octotemnus glabriculus (Gyllenhal). Lindgren funnel traps provided the majority of specimens for 15 of the 17 species reported from New Brunswick and were the sole source of specimens for seven of the 10 species newly reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Ciidae in the forests of New Brunswick. PMID:27110172

  11. 75 FR 8753 - Carolina Power & Light Company, Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... part 73 as discussed in a Federal Register notice dated March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13967). There will be no... Requirements, 74 FR 13926, 13967 (March 27, 2009)). The licensee currently maintains a security system... COMMISSION Carolina Power & Light Company, Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2;...

  12. 75 FR 16871 - Carolina Power & Light Company, Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... significant effect on the quality of the human environment (75 FR 8753, February 25, 2010). This exemption is... COMMISSION Carolina Power & Light Company, Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L, the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating...

  13. Ground-Water Conditions and Studies in the Brunswick-Glynn County Area, Georgia, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherry, Gregory S.; Clarke, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer is contaminated with saltwater in a 2-square-mile area of downtown Brunswick, Georgia. This contamination has limited the development of the ground-water supply in the Glynn County area. Hydrologic, geologic, and water-quality data are needed to effectively manage water resources. Since 1959, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted a cooperative water-resources program with the City of Brunswick to monitor and assess the effect of ground-water development on saltwater contamination of the Floridan aquifer system. The potential development of alternative sources of water in the Brunswick and surficial aquifer systems also is an important consideration in coastal areas. During calendar year 2007, the cooperative water-resources monitoring program included continuous water-level recording of 13 wells completed in the Floridan, Brunswick, and surficial aquifer systems; collecting water levels from 22 wells to map the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer during July and August 2007; and collecting and analyzing water samples from 76 wells to map chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer during July and August 2007. In addition, work was initiated to refine an existing ground-water flow model for evaluation of water-management scenarios.

  14. The University of New Brunswick's Renaissance College: Curricular Evolution and Assessment at the Faculty Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zundel, Pierre; Mengel, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to draw some general lessons on curricular evolution processes and practices at the faculty level emerging from the creation of Renaissance College at the University of New Brunswick and the implementation of its BPhil program. The authors proceed by induction, working from the specific case of Renaissance College to…

  15. Doing Local History: A Case Study of New Brunswick, New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael P.; Crocco, Margaret Smith

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a methodology that teachers can use to incorporate themes and ideas related to local history in their classrooms. Using the city of New Brunswick, New Jersey as a case study, the article offers different approaches that allow local history to be connected to wider themes in American history. The focus here on a small,…

  16. 77 FR 66875 - Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is giving notice that by petition dated July 10, 2012, Mr. David Lochbaum (the petitioner) and two copetitioners on behalf of the North Carolina Waste Awareness & Reduction Network, the Nuclear Information and Resource Service, and the Union of Concerned Scientists have requested that the NRC take action with regard to Brunswick......

  17. The Ciidae (Coleoptera) of New Brunswick, Canada: New records and new synonyms.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano; Webster, Reginald P; Webster, Vincent L; Alderson, Chantelle A; Hughes, Cory C; Sweeney, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    The Ciidae of New Brunswick, Canada are reviewed. Seventeen species are recorded for New Brunswick, including the following 10 species that are newly recorded for the province: Ceracis singularis (Dury), Ceracis thoracicornis (Ziegler), Cis angustus Hatch, Cis fuscipes Mellié, Cis horridulus Casey, Cis striatulus Mellié, Dolichocis laricinus (Mellié), Malacocis brevicollis (Casey), Orthocis punctatus (Mellié), and Plesiocis cribrum Casey. Additional locality data are provided for the following species previously known from the province: Cis americanus Mannerheim, Cis creberrimus Mellié, Cis levettei (Casey), Cis submicans Abeille de Perrin, Dolichocis manitoba Dury, Hadreule elongatula (Gyllenhal), and Octotemnus glabriculus (Gyllenhal). Seven synonyms are proposed here; Cis pistoria Casey with Cis submicans Abeille de Perrin; Cis fraternus Casey, Cis macilentus Casey and Cis striolatus Casey with Cis striatulus Mellié; Dolichocis indistinctus Hatch with Dolichocis laricinus (Mellié); and Octotemnus denudatus Casey and Octotemnus laevis Casey with Octotemnus glabriculus (Gyllenhal). Lindgren funnel traps provided the majority of specimens for 15 of the 17 species reported from New Brunswick and were the sole source of specimens for seven of the 10 species newly reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Ciidae in the forests of New Brunswick. PMID:27110172

  18. Stormy weather. Echoes of Columbia/HCA heard as Tenet overhauls management amid scrutiny of outliner payments and investor protests.

    PubMed

    Galloro, Vince

    2002-11-11

    What began as a small shower of questions quickly transformed into a storm of investor protest last week as Tenet Healthcare Corp. underwent a management overhaul and analysts asked questions about its fiscal future. Tenet's business strategy came under scrutiny because a large proportion of its Medicare revenue was generated by so-called outlier payments. Chairman and CEO Jeffrey Barbakow (left) says that's not how he wants to do business. PMID:12462882

  19. Exposure to fuel-oil ash and welding emissions during the overhaul of an oil-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youcheng; Woodin, Mark A; Smith, Thomas J; Herrick, Robert F; Williams, Paige L; Hauser, Russ; Christiani, David C

    2005-09-01

    The health effects of exposure to vanadium in fuel-oil ash are not well described at levels ranging from 10 to 500 microg/m(3). As part of a larger occupational epidemiologic study that assessed these effects during the overhaul of a large oil-fired boiler, this study was designed to quantify boilermakers' exposures to fuel-oil ash particles, metals, and welding gases, and to identify determinants of these exposures. Personal exposure measurements were conducted on 18 boilermakers and 11 utility workers (referents) before and during a 3-week overhaul. Ash particles < 10 microm in diameter (PM(10), mg/m(3)) were sampled over full work shifts using a one-stage personal size selective sampler containing a polytetrafluoroethylene filter. Filters were digested using the Parr bomb method and analyzed for the metals vanadium (V), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), and arsenic (As) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) was measured with an Ogawa passive badge-type sampler and ozone (O(3)) with a personal active pump sampler.Time-weighted average (TWA) exposures were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for boilermakers than for utility workers for PM(10) (geometric mean: 0.47 vs. 0.13 mg/m(3)), V (8.9 vs. 1.4 microg/m(3)), Ni (7.4 vs. 1.8 microg/m(3)) and Fe (56.2 vs. 11.2 microg/m(3)). Exposures were affected by overhaul time periods, tasks, and work locations. No significant increases were found for O(3) or NO(2) for boilermakers or utility workers regardless of overhaul period or task group. Fuel-oil ash was a major contributor to boilermakers' exposure to PM(10) and metals. Vanadium concentrations sometimes exceeded the 2003 American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value. PMID:16048845

  20. The impact of new and emerging technologies in the commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul industry a Delphi study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Janet

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to identify new or emerging technological trends and events that are likely to occur between now and 2017 that will have an impact on the commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) industry. Further, it was the purpose of this study to examine those technological trends and events believed to provide the greatest impact and, given the experts' analysis, identify the feasibility of implementation. Methodology. This descriptive study utilized the Delphi method with a panel of twenty-four experts comprised of practitioners, theorists, and futurists. A priority matrix was utilized to determine the impact and feasibility of trend and events. Findings. The experts identified fifty-three trends and events that will impact the commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) industry. Analysis of the priority matrix revealed eighteen trends and events were of high priority and high feasibility. Conclusions. The responses from the expert panel were examined and the findings analyzed. The following are the conclusions constructed from the data provided by the Delphi panel of experts: (1) the need to respond to the demands of the maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) industry such as down time, efficiency, cost, and environmental concerns by implementing new technology, (2) the demand to integrate and implement new technology as indicative of the priority matrix scoring high importance/high feasibility, (3) to proactively address the inadequate professional development in new technologies, and (4) the consensus reached by the panel of experts of importance and feasibility of implementation of new technologies encompass eighteen trends and events. Implications and recommendations for action. The implementation of new and emerging technological advances in the commercial aviation maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) industry between now and 2017 will be dependent on the technologies' capacity to reduce

  1. Helping Youth Overcome Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jamie C.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of trauma can roll on unchecked like a spirit of death. In its path are strewn its once vibrant victims. Human bonds are rent asunder by the disgrace of trauma. These are the youngsters who have been verbally bashed, physically battered, sexually assaulted, and spiritually exploited. Other traumas of childhood neglect include: (1)…

  2. Computed tomography in trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  3. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system. PMID:23210554

  4. The right scan, for the right patient, at the right time: the reorganization of major trauma service provision in England and its implications for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J J; West, A T H

    2013-09-01

    Major trauma services in England are currently undergoing a radical overhaul with the formation of regional trauma networks and designated major trauma centres (MTCs). Radiology is scheduled to play a key role within major trauma care both in terms of 24/7 access to whole body computed tomography (WBCT) and interventional radiology (IR) services, as well as providing immediate expert imaging guidance to the trauma team. This review examines the rationale behind trauma networks, as well as drawing attention to the new Royal College of Radiologists' standards for major trauma imaging. It attempts to address radiologists' understandable concerns about the inappropriate use of WBCT, radiation dose, and intravenous contrast medium risks. Reporting whole-body CT for trauma patients is difficult, covering multiple body regions, with great pressure to provide a rapid and accurate report to the trauma team. The benefits of standardized reports, dual-radiologist reporting, and the use of organ injury severity grading are explored to aid succinct communication of findings and further guide patient management. PMID:23453710

  5. Analysis of infectious laryngotracheitis virus isolates from Ontario and New Brunswick by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H S; Key, D W; Nagy, E

    1998-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify DNA of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) isolates obtained from field specimens. The examined 47 samples included 37 isolates representing 35 cases of infectious laryngotracheitis from Ontario and 10 isolates originating from 10 field cases in New Brunswick. The viruses were grown in either embryonated chicken eggs or cell culture, the DNA extracted and amplified using primers designed from the sequence information of a 1.1 kb BamHI fragment of the Ontario 1598 ILTV strain. Thirty-four of the Ontario isolates and all of the New Brunswick isolates were amplified successfully. This suggests that the selected primers would be useful for the majority of the isolates encountered in outbreaks of ILTV. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9442943

  6. Carrots and Sticks: New Brunswick and Maine Forest Landowner Perceptions Toward Incentives and Regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartuch, Michael R.; Beckley, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The governments of countries that allow private land ownership have two main tools to motivate landowner behavior: regulations and incentives. This research examines landowner preferences toward these policy tools and asks specifically: Do private forest landowners in New Brunswick and Maine believe that regulations and/or incentives are effective means to motivate responsible stewardship? Can landowners identify explicit regulations and policies that restrict property rights? Also, we were interested to see if any discernible differences existed between these adjacent jurisdictions from different countries, but that share similar forests and a similar settlement history. We identified and interviewed diverse landowners, recorded and transcribed our discussions, and analyzed the results using a grounded theory approach. Findings suggest that both New Brunswick and Maine participants are fairly comfortable with most regulations and many agreed that a combination of incentives and regulations are in fact useful. Furthermore, landowners in New Brunswick discussed non-monetary incentives as a mechanism to reward "good" stewardship; while Maine respondents articulated a degree of responsible stewardship that transcends a need to incentivize landowners. This study demonstrates that diverse landowners may be more comfortable with environmental regulations than previously understood and may be interested in non-monetary incentives.

  7. Carrots and sticks: New Brunswick and Maine forest landowner perceptions toward incentives and regulations.

    PubMed

    Quartuch, Michael R; Beckley, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    The governments of countries that allow private land ownership have two main tools to motivate landowner behavior: regulations and incentives. This research examines landowner preferences toward these policy tools and asks specifically: Do private forest landowners in New Brunswick and Maine believe that regulations and/or incentives are effective means to motivate responsible stewardship? Can landowners identify explicit regulations and policies that restrict property rights? Also, we were interested to see if any discernible differences existed between these adjacent jurisdictions from different countries, but that share similar forests and a similar settlement history. We identified and interviewed diverse landowners, recorded and transcribed our discussions, and analyzed the results using a grounded theory approach. Findings suggest that both New Brunswick and Maine participants are fairly comfortable with most regulations and many agreed that a combination of incentives and regulations are in fact useful. Furthermore, landowners in New Brunswick discussed non-monetary incentives as a mechanism to reward "good" stewardship; while Maine respondents articulated a degree of responsible stewardship that transcends a need to incentivize landowners. This study demonstrates that diverse landowners may be more comfortable with environmental regulations than previously understood and may be interested in non-monetary incentives. PMID:24281917

  8. New Brunswick Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the New Brunswick Site (NBS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. The site, near New Brunswick,, New Jersey, is a 5.6-acre vacant, fenced, and grass-covered area. Environmental monitoring of NBS began in 1981 when the site was part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Surplus Facilities Management Program. In 1990 responsibility for NBS was transferred to the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSP.4P). FUSRAP is a DOE program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the,early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at NBS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-228, thorium-230, thorium-232, americium-241, cesium-137, plutonium-239, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several nonradiological parameters are also measured in groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides, dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment.

  9. Caring for Trauma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Although trauma exposure is common, few people develop acute and chronic psychiatric disorders. Those who develop posttraumatic stress disorder likely have coexisting psychiatric and physical disorders. Psychiatric nurses must be knowledgeable about trauma responses, implement evidence-based approaches to conduct assessments, and create safe environments for patients. Most researchers assert that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral approaches demonstrate the most efficacious treatment outcomes. Integrated approaches, offer promising treatment options. This article provides an overview of clinical factors necessary to help the trauma survivor begin the process of healing and recovery and attain an optimal level of functioning. PMID:27229285

  10. Blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Michael J; Fullerton, David A

    2008-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma represents a significant portion of trauma admissions to hospitals in the United States. These injuries are encountered by physicians in many specialities such as emergency medicine, pediatrics, general surgery and thoracic surgery. Accurate diagnosis and treatment improves the chances of favorable outcomes and it is desirable for all treating physicians to have current knowledge of all aspects of blunt thoracic trauma. Cardiothoracic surgeons often treat the most severe forms of blunt thoracic injuries and we review the aspects of blunt thoracic trauma that are pertinent to the practicing cardiothoracic surgeon. PMID:18420123

  11. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Stenotrachelidae, Oedemeridae, Meloidae, Myceteridae, Boridae, Pythidae, Pyrochroidae, Anthicidae, and Aderidae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We report 19 new species records for the faunal list of Coleoptera in New Brunswick, Canada, six of which are new records for the Maritime provinces, and one of which is new Canadian record. We also provide the first recent records for five additional species in New Brunswick. One new species of Stenotrachelidae, Cephaloon ungulare LeConte, is added to the New Brunswick faunal list. Additional records are provided for Cephaloon lepturides Newman, as well the first recent record of Nematoplus collaris LeConte. Two species of Oedemeridae, Asclera puncticollis (Say) and Asclera ruficollis (Say), are newly reported for New Brunswick, and additional locality and bionomic data are provided for Calopus angustus LeConte and Ditylus caeruleus (Randall). The records of Ditylus caerulus are the first recent records for the province. Three species of Meloidae, Epicauta pestifera Werner, Lytta sayi LeConte, and Meloe augustcollis Say are reported the first time for New Brunswick; Epicauta pestifera is newly recorded in Canada. Lacconotus punctatus LeConte and the family Mycteridaeis newly recorded for New Brunswick. The first recent records of Borus unicolor Say (Boridae) are reported from the province. One new species of Pythidae, Pytho siedlitzi Blair, and the first recent records of Pytho niger Kirby are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick. Three species of Pyrochroidae are newly reported for the province, including Pedilus canaliculatus (LeConte) and Pedilus elegans (Hentz), which are new for the Maritime provinces. Five species of Anthicidae and the first recent record of Anthicus cervinus LaFerté-Sénectére are newly reported for New Brunswick. Anthicus melancholicus LaFerté-Sénectère, Sapintus pubescens (LaFerté-Sénectère), Notoxus bifasciatus (LeConte), and Stereopalpus rufipes Casey are new to the Maritime provinces faunal list. Ambyderus granularis (LeConte) is removed from the faunal list of the province. Three species of Aderidae, Vanonus

  12. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Stenotrachelidae, Oedemeridae, Meloidae, Myceteridae, Boridae, Pythidae, Pyrochroidae, Anthicidae, and Aderidae.

    PubMed

    Webster, Reginald P; Sweeney, Jon D; Demerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    We report 19 new species records for the faunal list of Coleoptera in New Brunswick, Canada, six of which are new records for the Maritime provinces, and one of which is new Canadian record. We also provide the first recent records for five additional species in New Brunswick. One new species of Stenotrachelidae, Cephaloon ungulare LeConte, is added to the New Brunswick faunal list. Additional records are provided for Cephaloon lepturides Newman, as well the first recent record of Nematoplus collaris LeConte. Two species of Oedemeridae, Asclera puncticollis (Say) and Asclera ruficollis (Say), are newly reported for New Brunswick, and additional locality and bionomic data are provided for Calopus angustus LeConte and Ditylus caeruleus (Randall). The records of Ditylus caerulus are the first recent records for the province. Three species of Meloidae, Epicauta pestifera Werner, Lytta sayi LeConte, and Meloe augustcollis Say are reported the first time for New Brunswick; Epicauta pestifera is newly recorded in Canada. Lacconotus punctatus LeConte and the family Mycteridaeis newly recorded for New Brunswick. The first recent records of Borus unicolor Say (Boridae) are reported from the province. One new species of Pythidae, Pytho siedlitzi Blair, and the first recent records of Pytho niger Kirby are added to the faunal list of New Brunswick. Three species of Pyrochroidae are newly reported for the province, including Pedilus canaliculatus (LeConte) and Pedilus elegans (Hentz), which are new for the Maritime provinces. Five species of Anthicidae and the first recent record of Anthicus cervinus LaFerté-Sénectére are newly reported for New Brunswick. Anthicus melancholicus LaFerté-Sénectère, Sapintus pubescens (LaFerté-Sénectère), Notoxus bifasciatus (LeConte), and Stereopalpus rufipes Casey are new to the Maritime provinces faunal list. Ambyderus granularis (LeConte) is removed from the faunal list of the province. Three species of Aderidae, Vanonus huronicus

  13. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick and an addition to the fauna of Quebec: Staphylininae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Smetana, Aleš; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Forty-four species of Staphylininae are newly reported from New Brunswick, bringing the total number of species known from the province to 126. Quedius criddlei (Casey) is reported for the first time from Quebec. Bisnius cephalotes (Gravenhorst) is removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick due to a lack of supporting voucher specimens. Additional locality data are presented for seven species either recently recorded from the province or with few previous records and little habitat data. We provide the first documented records of Atrecus americanus (Casey), Quedius erythrogaster Mannerheim, Quedius labradorensis labradorensis Smetana, Quedius plagiatus (Mannerheim), and Neobisnius terminalis (LeConte) from New Brunswick. Collection and habitat data are presented and discussed for all species. PMID:22577325

  14. Imaging of head trauma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sandra; Gupta, Rajiv; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is an indispensable part of the initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with head trauma. Initially, it is important for diagnosing the extent of injury and the prompt recognition of treatable injuries to reduce mortality. Subsequently, imaging is useful in following the sequelae of trauma. In this chapter, we review indications for neuroimaging and typical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols used in the evaluation of a patient with head trauma. We review the role of CT), the imaging modality of choice in the acute setting, and the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with head trauma. We describe an organized and consistent approach to the interpretation of imaging of these patients. Important topics in head trauma, including fundamental concepts related to skull fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, penetrating trauma, cerebrovascular injuries, and secondary effects of trauma, are reviewed. The chapter concludes with advanced neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of traumatic brain injury, including use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS), techniques which are still under development. PMID:27432678

  15. An evaluation of energy-absorbing guide rail terminals in New Brunswick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esligar, Ryan W.

    2011-12-01

    Energy-absorbing guide rail terminals (EAGRTs) are a form of end treatment designed to absorb energy during a collision and prevent intrusion into the impacting vehicle. After several years of use in New Brunswick there is evidence to suggest these systems may not always perform as expected. This study was conducted to evaluate the real-world performance of EAGRT systems in collisions throughout the Province. A retrospective review of data for 103 collisions that occurred prior to the study was supplemented with an in-depth analysis and reconstruction of 18 collisions that occurred during the study. The study revealed that two types of EAGRTs are used in New Brunswick; the ET-Plus and the SKT-350. Between 2007 and 2010 approximately 80% of all EAGRT collisions were PDO, nearly 19% resulted in injuries, while one collision resulted in a fatality. In most cases the EAGRT absorbed a significant amount of energy (an average of 315 KJ per crash); however, there were several problems identified. It was determined that not all EAGRT systems are being installed in accordance with the manufacturer's guidelines. Intrusion into the vehicle was documented in three collisions. It was also discovered that many of the collision configurations were different than the NCHRP Report 350 tests. The major recommendations focused on installation and maintenance issues identified during the study. The study also revealed areas in need of further research. These areas include the feasibility of using the FLEAT system in New Brunswick, the installation of rumble strips on the median shoulder, and whether or not additional crash test configurations should be incorporated into NCHRP Report 350 or Project 22-14(2).

  16. The coagulopathy of trauma.

    PubMed

    Maegele, M

    2014-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death, with uncontrolled hemorrhage and exsanguination being the primary causes of preventable deaths during the first 24 h following trauma. Death usually occurs quickly, typically within the first 6 h after injury. One out of four patients arriving at the Emergency Department after trauma is already in hemodynamic and hemostatic depletion. This early manifestation of hemostatic depletion is referred to as the coagulopathy of trauma, which may distinguished as: (i) acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) and (ii) iatrogenic coagulopathy (IC). The principle drivers of ATC have been characterized by tissue trauma, inflammation, hypoperfusion/shock, and the acute activation of the neurohumoral system. Hypoperfusion leads to an activation of protein C with cleavage of activated factors V and VIII and the inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), with subsequent fibrinolysis. Endothelial damage and activation results in Weibel-Palade body degradation and glycocalyx shedding associated with autoheparinization. In contrast, there is an IC which occurs secondary to uncritical volume therapy, leading to acidosis, hypothermia, and hemodilution. This coagulopathy may, then, be an integral part of the "vicious cycle" when combined with acidosis and hypothermia. The awareness of the specific pathophysiology and of the principle drivers underlying the coagulopathy of trauma by the treating physician is paramount. It has been shown that early recognition prompted by appropriate and aggressive management can correct coagulopathy, control bleeding, reduce blood product use, and improve outcome in severely injured patients. This paper summarizes: (i) the current concepts of the pathogenesis of the coagulopathy of trauma, including ATC and IC, (ii) the current strategies available for the early identification of patients at risk for coagulopathy and ongoing life-threatening hemorrhage after trauma, and (iii) the current and updated European

  17. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  18. New records of Helophoridae, Hydrochidae, and Hydrophilidae (Coleoptera) from New Brunswick, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The following three species of Helophoridae are newly recorded for New Brunswick, Canada: Helophorus (Kyphohelophorus) turberculatus Gyllenhal, Helophorus (Rhopaleloporus) oblongus LeConte, Helophorus (Rhopaleloporus) marginicollis Smetana. Hydrochus subcupreus Randall, family Hydrochidae, and the following 15 species of Hydrophilidae are newly reported for the province: Berosus fraternus LeConte, Berosus peregrinus (Herbst), Berosus sayi Hansen, Paracymus despectus (LeConte), Chaetarthria atra (LeConte), Cymbiodyta acuminata Fall, Cymbiodyta blanchardi Horn, Cymbiodyta minima Notman, Enochrus (Lumetus) hamiltoni Horn, Enochrus (Methydrus) consors (LeConte), Enochrus (Methydrus) consortus Green, Enochrus (Methydrus) pygmaeus nebulosus (Say), Cercyon (Cercyon) cinctus Smetana, Cercyon (Cercyon) herceus frigidus Smetana, Cercyon (Dicyrtocercyon) ustulatus (Preyssler). PMID:27110166

  19. Imaging in orbital trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken Y.; Ngai, Philip; Echegoyen, Julio C.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital trauma is one of the most common reasons for ophthalmology specialty consultation in the emergency department setting. We survey the literature from 1990 to present to describe the role of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their associated angiography in some of the most commonly encountered orbital trauma conditions. CT orbit can often detect certain types of foreign bodies, lens dislocation, ruptured globe, choroidal or retinal detachments, or cavernous sinus thrombosis and thus complement a bedside ophthalmic exam that can sometimes be limited in the setting of trauma. CT remains the workhorse for acute orbital trauma owing to its rapidity and ability to delineate bony abnormalities; however MRI remains an important modality in special circumstances such as soft tissue assessment or with organic foreign bodies. PMID:23961028

  20. Imaging of Abusive Trauma.

    PubMed

    Shekdar, Karuna

    2016-06-01

    "Shaken baby syndrome" is a term often used by the physicians and public to describe abusive trauma inflicted on infants and young children. Advances in the understanding of the mechanisms and the associated clinical spectrum of injury has lead us to modify our terminology and address it as "abusive trauma" (AT). Pediatric abusive head trauma is defined as an injury to the skull or intracranial contents of an infant or a young child (< 5 y age) due to inflicted blunt impact and/or violent shaking. This chapter focuses on the imaging aspects of childhood abusive trauma along with a brief description of the mechanism and pathophysiology of abusive injury. The diagnosis of AT is not always obvious, and abusive injuries in many infants may remain unrecognized. Pediatricians should be cognizant of AT since pediatricians play a crucial role in the diagnosis, management and prevention of AT. PMID:26882906

  1. Trauma program development.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    The development of a strong trauma program is clearly one of the most important facets of successful business development. Several recent publications have demonstrated that well run trauma services can generate significant profits for both the hospital and the surgeons involved. There are many aspects to this task that require constant attention and insight. Top notch patient care, efficiency, and cost-effective resource utilization are all important components that must be addressed while providing adequate physician compensation within the bounds of hospital financial constraints and the encompassing legal issues. Each situation is different but many of the components are universal. This chapter addresses all aspects of trauma program development to provide the graduating fellow with the tools to create a new trauma program or improve an existing program in order to provide the best patient care while optimizing financial reward and improving care efficiency. PMID:24918830

  2. Basic trauma life support.

    PubMed

    Werman, H A; Nelson, R N; Campbell, J E; Fowler, R L; Gandy, P

    1987-11-01

    The impact of traumatic injuries on modern society in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic cost is enormous. Studies have shown that both advanced life support skills and rapid stabilization and transport of the trauma victim have a beneficial effect on the patient's ultimate outcome. The Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) course was designed to provide pre-hospital care providers with the skills necessary to provide a thorough assessment, initial resuscitation, and rapid transportation of the trauma victim. Early studies suggest that the material is easily learned by prehospital care providers and that the on-scene time for trauma cases is reduced following training in BTLS. More widespread training in BTLS may have a significant effect on the mortality and morbidity associated with traumatic injuries. PMID:3662184

  3. Penetrating extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Ivatury, Rao R; Anand, Rahul; Ordonez, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating extremity trauma (PET) usually becomes less important when present along with multiple truncal injuries. The middle eastern wars documented the terrible mortality and morbidity resulting from PET. Even in civilian trauma, PET can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. There are now well-established principles in the evaluation and management of vascular, bony, soft tissue, and neurologic lesions that will lead to a reduction of the poor outcomes. This review will summarize some of these recent concepts. PMID:25413177

  4. Trauma registry reengineered.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Christina; Bolig, Nicole; Hixson, Heather; McWilliams, Nate; Rummerfield, Heather; Stratton, Elaine; Woodruff, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    A successful trauma registry balances accuracy of abstraction and timeliness of case submissions to achieve quality performance. Staffing to achieve quality performance is a challenge at times based on competitive institutional need. The aim of this performance improvement timing study was to identify trauma registry job responsibilities and redesign the responsibilities to create increased abstraction time and maintain accuracy of data abstraction. The outcome is measured by case submission rates with existing staffing and interrater reliability outcomes. PMID:25397337

  5. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  6. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma.

    PubMed

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  7. Role of the statistician in the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory and other nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1980-12-01

    This report examines what the statistician can contribute to decommissioning operations, with particular emphasis on the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) currently scheduled for decommissioning beginning in FY81. In the opinion of the author, a professional statistician should be a full member of the planning team directing decommissioning operations at the New Brunswick Laboratory. This opinion is based in part on the familiarity with the valuable contributions made by statisticians toward the cleanup of transuranics in soil on the Enewetak Atoll. More generally, however, the professional statistician can help plan the decommissioning effort to help ensure that representative data are obtained, analyzed and, interpreted in appropriate ways so that RA decisions can be made with the required confidence. The statistician's contributions at the NBL could include providing guidance on the number and location of samples and in-situ measurements, analyzing and interpreting these data, designing a data management and documentation system, interfacing with the certification contractor's statistician, and assisting in writing documentation and final reports. In all cases, the statistician should work closely with the professional health physicist and others on the planning team in a closely coordinated effort of planning and data analysis.

  8. New Brunswick nurses' views on nursing research, and factors influencing their research activities in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Robichaud-Ekstrand, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    New Brunswick became the first province in Canada to require a baccalaureate degree in nursing as the entry to practice, yet nursing research in hospital settings remains quite low. This study examined clinical nurses' views on nursing research, and identified some contributing factors to the research-practice gap. This descriptive, cross-sectional multicenter study involved 1081 nurses working in the Francophone Regional Health Authority in New Brunswick, Canada. Nurses were eager to identify nursing-care problems to improve patient care (92.9%), and to be involved in collecting data for nursing research studies (95.2%). However, without research supervision, few had engaged in basic research activities, such as formulating or refining research questions (24.5%), presenting at research conferences (6.9%), or changing their practice based on research findings (27.2%). Younger, more educated nurses, nurse managers, and educators participated more readily in research. Sharing research and clinical expertise, as well as infrastructures between academic and clinical institutions is the key to enduring successful patient-centered nursing research in clinical settings. Concrete actions are proposed to build clinical nursing research. PMID:26822438

  9. New Curculionoidea records from New Brunswick, Canada with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Anderson, Robert S.; Webster, Vincent L.; Alderson, Chantelle A.; Hughes, Cory C.; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents 27 new records of Curculionoidea for the province of New Brunswick, Canada, including three species new to Canada, and 12 adventive species, as follows: Eusphryrus walshii LeConte, Choragus harrisii LeConte (newly recorded for Canada), Choragus zimmermanni LeConte (newly recorded for Canada) (Anthribidae); Cimberis pallipennis (Blatchley) (Nemonychidae); Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze) (Brentidae); Procas lecontei Bedel (Brachyceridae); Anthonomus pusillus LeConte (newly recorded for Canada), Anthonomus (Cnemocyllus) pictus Blatchley, Archarius salicivorus (Paykull), Dorytomus hirtus LeConte, Ellescus bipunctatus (Linnaeus), Mecinus janthinus (Germar), Myrmex chevrolatii (Horn), Madarellus undulatus (Say), Microplontus campestris (Gyllenhal), Pelenomus waltoni (Boheman), Rhinoncus bruchoides (Herbst), Rhinoncus perpendicularis (Reich), Cossonus impressifrons Boheman, Cossonus pacificus Van Dyke, Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher), Eubulus bisignatus (Say), Polydrusus cervinus (Linnaeus), Magdalis piceae Buchanan, Procryphalus mucronatus (LeConte), Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), and Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford). Recent name changes in the genus Rhinoncus are applied to species known from New Brunswick. In addition, Orchestes alni (Linnaeus) is newly recorded from Nova Scotia. PMID:27110173

  10. Political Partisanship, Bureaucratic Pragmatism and Acadian Nationalism: New Brunswick, Canada's 1920 History Textbook Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helyar, Frances

    2014-01-01

    During a time of post-war sensitivity to Canadian nationalism and patriotism, public feeling was aroused in 1920 New Brunswick regarding a world history textbook with a new chapter about the First World War. The American author made no reference to Canada's war efforts. The subsequent public discussion focused on issues of patriotism,…

  11. Building a Strong Foundation for Teaching: The Fifth Annual Report of the Beginning Teacher Induction Program in New Brunswick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Neil H.

    This report describes the reactions of beginning teachers, mentors, principals, and district coordinators in 12 New Brunswick, Canada, school districts to a teacher induction program that paired beginning teachers with experienced mentor teachers over one school year. Questionnaires were sent to each of the four groups. All four groups strongly…

  12. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera) records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada: Scaphidiinae, Piestinae, Osorinae, and Oxytelinae

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nine species of Scaphidiinae are newly reported for New Brunswick, Canada, bringing the total number of species known from the province to 12. Scaphium castanipes Kirby, Baeocera inexspectata Löbl and Stephen, Baeocera securiforma (Cornell), Scaphisoma repandum Casey, and Toxidium gammaroides LeConte are reported for the first time from the Maritime provinces. Siagonum punctatum LeConte and Siagonum stacesmithi Hatch, and the subfamily Piestinae are reported for the first time from New Brunswick. The subfamily Osoriinae is reported for the first time from New Brunswick and the Maritime provinces based on the collection of three species: Clavilispinus prolixus (LeConte), Thoracophorus costalis (Erichson), and a Lispinodes species. The Lispinodes species is also newly recorded for Canada. Six species of Oxytelinae are newly recorded from New Brunswick, bringing the total number of species of this subfamily known to the province to 20. Apocellus sphaericollis (Say) and Platystethus americanus Erichson are new to the Maritime provinces. Additional locality and bionomic data are presented for Mitosynum vockerothi Campbell, and the male genitalia are illustrated for the first time. Collection and bionomic data are presented for all included species. PMID:22577322

  13. Inclusion on the Agenda in Four Different School Contexts in Canada (Ontario, Manitoba, New Brunswick and Quebec)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Nathalie; Gougeon, Nathalie A.

    2009-01-01

    Four case studies from four different Canadian provinces (Ontario, Manitoba, New Brunswick, and Quebec) are examined in order to better understand meanings given to an inclusive approach in education, as it is defined and experienced by the actors, practitioners, parents, and students. The data examined in this article come from a larger research…

  14. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  15. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  16. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  17. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  18. 76 FR 53970 - Carolina Power & Light; Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Independent Spent Fuel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Carolina Power & Light; Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2; Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Notice of Consideration of Approval of Application for Indirect License Transfers Resulting From the Proposed Merger...

  19. 75 FR 53264 - Restricted Area in Cape Fear River and Tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION... regulation for the restricted area in the Cape Fear River and its tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal... facility, including vessels loading and offloading at the Sunny Point Army Terminal. In the ``Rules...

  20. Further contributions to the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Webster, Vincent L.; Alderson, Chantelle A.; Hughes, Cory C.; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper treats 134 new records of Coleoptera for the province of New Brunswick, Canada from the following 41 families: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Leiodidae, Scarabaeidae, Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae, Heteroceridae, Ptilodactylidae, Eucnemidae, Throscidae, Elateridae, Lampyridae, Cantharidae, Dermestidae, Bostrichidae, Ptinidae, Cleridae, Melyridae, Monotomidae, Cryptophagidae, Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, Nitidulidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, Corylophidae, Latridiidae, Tetratomidae, Melandryidae, Mordellidae, Tenebrionidae, Mycteridae, Pyrochroidae, Aderidae, Scraptiidae, Megalopodidae, and Chrysomelidae. Among these, the following four species are newly recorded from Canada: Dirrhagofarsus ernae Otto, Muona & McClarin (Eucnemidae), Athous equestris (LeConte) (Elateridae), Ernobius opicus Fall (Ptinidae), and Stelidota coenosa Erichson (Nitidulidae). The Family Limnichidae is newly reported for New Brunswick, and one species is added to the fauna of Nova Scotia. Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer (Latridiidae), Tetratoma (Abstrulia) variegata Casey (Tetratomidae), and Chauliognathus marginatus (Fabricius) (Cantharidae) are removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick, and additional records of Lacconotus punctatus LeConte (Mycteridae) are presented and discussed. Lindgren funnel traps provided specimens for 104 (78%) of the species and were the sole source of specimens for 89 (66%) of the species reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Coleoptera fauna in the forests of New Brunswick. PMID:27110171

  1. Pitfalls in penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, A B

    2003-08-01

    In Western Europe the most frequent cause of multiple injuries is blunt trauma. Only few of us have experience with penetrating trauma, without exception far less than in the USA or South-Africa. In Rotterdam, the Erasmus Medical Centre is a level I trauma centre, situated directly in the town centre. All penetrating traumas are directly presented to our emergency department by a well organized ambulance service supported by a mobile medical team if necessary. The delay with scoop and run principles is very short for these cases, resulting in severely injured reaching the hospital alive in increasing frequency. Although the basic principles of trauma care according to the guidelines of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) (1-2) are the same for blunt and penetrating trauma with regard to priorities, diagnostics and primary therapy, there are some pitfalls in the strategy of management in penetrating trauma one should be aware of. Simple algorithms can be helpful, especially in case of limited experience (3). In case of life-saving procedures, the principles of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) must be followed (4-5). This approach is somewhat different from "traditional" surgical treatment. In the Ist phase prompt interventions by emergency thoracotomy and laparotomy are carried out, with only two goals to achieve: surgical control of haemorrhage and contamination. After temporary life-saving procedures, the 2nd phase is characterized by intensive care treatment, dealing with hypothermia, metabolic acidosis and clotting disturbances. Finally in the 3rd phase, within 6-24 hours, definitive surgical care takes place. In this overview, penetrating injuries of neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities will be outlined. Penetrating cranial injuries, as a neurosurgical emergency with poor prognosis, are not discussed. History and physical examination remain the corner stones of good medical praxis. In a work-up according to ATLS principles airway, breathing and circulation

  2. Compilation of Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting for Brunswick County, North Carolina, 1933-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fine, Jason M.; Cunningham, William L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data were compiled for Brunswick County, North Carolina, to describe the hydrologic conditions of the County. Hydrologic data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as well as data collected by other governmental agencies and reviewed by the U.S. Geological Survey are presented. Data from four weather stations and two surface-water stations are summarized. Data also are presented for land use and land cover, soils, geology, hydrogeology, 12 continuously monitored ground-water wells, 73 periodically measured ground-water wells, and water-quality measurements from 39 ground-water wells. Mean monthly precipitation at the Longwood, Shallotte, Southport, and Wilmington Airport weather stations ranged from 2.19 to 7.94 inches for the periods of record, and mean monthly temperatures at the Longwood, Southport, and Wilmington Airport weather stations ranged from 43.4 to 80.1 degrees Fahrenheit for the periods of record. An evaluation of land-use and land-cover data for Brunswick County indicated that most of the County is either forested land (about 57 percent) or wetlands (about 29 percent). Cross sections are presented to illustrate the general hydrogeology beneath Brunswick County. Water-level data for Brunswick County indicate that water levels ranged from about 110 feet above mean sea level to about 22 feet below mean sea level. Chloride concentrations measured in aquifers in Brunswick County ranged from near 0 to 15,000 milligrams per liter. Chloride levels in the Black Creek and Cape Fear aquifers were measured at well above the potable limit for ground water of 250 milligrams per liter set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for safe drinking water.

  3. Classification of Liver Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Hanna, Sherif S.; Kahnamoui, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    The classification of liver injuries is important for clinical practice, clinical research and quality assurance activities. The Organ Injury Scaling (OIS) Committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma proposed the OIS for liver trauma in 1989. The purpose ofthe present study was to apply this scale to a cohort ofliver trauma patients managed at a single Canadian trauma centre from January 1987 to June 1992.170 study patients were identified and reviewed. The mean age was 30, with 69% male and a mean ISS of 33.90% had a blunt mechanism ofinjury. The 170 patients were categorized into the 60IS grades ofliver injury. The number of units of blood transfused, the magnitude of the operative treatment required, the liver-related complications and the liver-related mortality correlated well with the OIS grade. The OIS grade was unable to predict the need for laparotomy or the length of stay in hospital. We conclude that the OIS is a useful, practical and important tool for the categorization of liver injuries, and it may prove to be the universally accepted classification scheme in liver trauma. PMID:8809585

  4. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. PMID:25241267

  5. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.

  6. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  7. Assuring optimal trauma care: the role of trauma centre accreditation

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Optimal care of the injured patient requires the delivery of appropriate, definitive care shortly after injury. Over the last 30 to 40 years, civilian trauma systems and trauma centres have been developed in the United States based on experience gained in military conflicts, particularly in Korea and Vietnam. A similar process is evolving in Canada. National trauma committees in the US and Canada have defined optimal resources to meet the goal of rapid, appropriate care in trauma centres. They have introduced programs (verification or accreditation) to externally audit trauma centre performance based on these guidelines. It is generally accepted that implementing trauma systems results in decreased preventable death and improved survival after trauma. What is less clear is the degree to which each facet of trauma system development contributes to this improvement. The relative importance of national performance guidelines and trauma centre audit as integral steps toward improved outcomes following injury are reviewed. Current Trauma Association of Canada guidelines for trauma centres are presented and the process of trauma centre accreditation is discussed. PMID:12174987

  8. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  9. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  10. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  11. The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) at Renaissance College (University of New Brunswick): A Case Study of SoTL at the Faculty Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mengel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents the case study of Renaissance College at the University of New Brunswick, discussing the faculty's achievements, challenges, and outlook for the future in the context of the scholarship of teaching and learning in Canada.

  12. Reconstructing the Avalon continent: Marginal to inner platform transition in the Cambrian of southern New Brunswick

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landing, E.

    1996-01-01

    A west to east, marginal to inner Avalonian platform transition, comparable to that in southeast Newfoundland and southern Britain, is present in the Cambrian of southern New Brunswick. The Saint John - Caton's Island - Hanford Brook area lay on the marginal platform, and its thick, uppermost Precambrian - lower Lower Cambrian is unconformably overlain by trilobite-bearing, upper Lower Cambrian. An inner platform remnant is preserved in the Cradle Brook outlier 60 km northeast of Saint John. In contrast to the marginal platform sequences, the Cradle Brook outlier has a very thin lower Lower Cambrian and has middle Lower Cambrian strata (Bonavista Group) not present on the marginal platform. The Cradle Brook Lower Cambrian closely resembles inner platform successions in eastern Massachusetts and Trinity and Placentia bays, southeast Newfoundland. A limestone with Camenella baltica Zone fossils on Cradle Brook seems to be the peritidal limestone cap of the subtrilobitic Lower Cambrian known in Avalonian North America (Fosters Point Formation) and England (Home Farm Member).

  13. Learning through EC directive based SEA in spatial planning? Evidence from the Brunswick Region in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Thomas B.; Kidd, Sue; Jha-Thakur, Urmila; Gazzola, Paola; Peel, Deborah

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents results of an international comparative research project, funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Academy for Sustainable Communities (ASC) on the 'learning potential of appraisal (strategic environmental assessment - SEA) in spatial planning'. In this context, aspects of 'single-loop' and 'double-loop' learning, as well as of individual, organisational and social learning are discussed for emerging post-EC Directive German practice in the planning region (Zweckverband) of Brunswick (Braunschweig), focusing on four spatial plan SEAs from various administrative levels in the region. It is found that whilst SEA is able to lead to plan SEA specific knowledge acquisition, comprehension, application and analysis ('single-loop learning'), it is currently resulting only occasionally in wider synthesis and evaluation ('double-loop learning'). Furthermore, whilst there is evidence that individual and occasionally organisational learning may be enhanced through SEA, most notably in small municipalities, social learning appears to be happening only sporadically.

  14. Groundwater flow in the Brunswick/Glynn County area, Georgia, 2000-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherry, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Simulated potentiometric profiles for 2000 and 2004 were used to evaluate the potentiometric gradients in the upper water-bearing zone of the Upper Floridan aquifer (layer 7) near the chloride plume in the downtown Brunswick area. Four potentiometric profiles were constructed for 2000 to compare the simulated and observed water levels in 13 wells and were oriented outward from a primary well field. The simulated potentiometric gradients from the four profiles for 2000 ranged from 3.6 to 5.2 feet per mile (ft/mi) compared to observed values ranging from 4.1 to 5.6 ft/mi. The five potentiometric profiles constructed for 2004 allowed for a similar comparison using simulated and observed water levels in 18 wells. The simulated pote

  15. Nurses' voice: influencing the restructuring of the New Brunswick healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Davidson, P; Rhéaume, A; Dykeman, M; Ericson, P; Duffett-Leger, L; Doucet, J

    2007-01-01

    Although nurses make up the largest group of professionals working in th healthcare field, they are often left out of the decisions that shape the restructuring of healthcare in Canada. A feminist philosophy guided this qualitative study, conducted in New Brunswick, to gain an in-depth knowledge of the impact of restructuring on nurses working in all types of healthcare facilities across the province. Sixty-five nurses were interviewed, and a number of themes, including "having a voice," emerged from the data. While many of the nurses interviewed reported that they were not invited to participate in decisions related to healthcare restructuring, others noted that when they did have an opportunity to participate, they were frequently not heard. However, a number of nurses also reported that they believed they had some influence and could continue to make a positive difference when they were asked to be involved at the outset of a change process. PMID:18303727

  16. Trauma Induced Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lolay, Georges A.; Abdel-Latef, Ahmed K.

    2016-01-01

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the Trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out Aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction. PMID:26490501

  17. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  18. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  19. Pediatric head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, George A; Sfakianos, George; Prodromou, Neofytos

    2011-01-01

    Head injury in children accounts for a large number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions. Falls are the most common type of injury, followed by motor-vehicle-related accidents. In the present study, we discuss the evaluation, neuroimaging and management of children with head trauma. Furthermore, we present the specific characteristics of each type of pediatric head injury. PMID:21887034

  20. Imaging in spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Johan W M; Maes, Menno; Ozsarlak, Ozkan; van den Hauwe, Luc; Parizel, Paul M

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  1. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes. PMID:27414143

  2. 78 FR 9771 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Brunswick-Golden Isles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ...Under the provisions of Title 49, U.S.C. 47153(c), notice is being given that the FAA is considering a request from the Glynn County Airport Commission to waive the requirement that a 0.739-acre parcel of surplus property, located on Glynn County airport owned and operated land adjacent to, but not contiguace with, Brunswick--Golden Isles Airport, be used for aeronautical...

  3. Maxillofacial trauma scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    The changing complexity of maxillofacial fractures in recent years has created a situation where classical systems of classification of maxillofacial injuries fall short of defining trauma particularly that observed with high-velocity collisions where more than one region of the maxillofacial skeleton is affected. Trauma scoring systems designed specifically for the maxillofacial region are aimed to provide a more accurate assessment of the injury, its prognosis, the possible treatment outcomes, economics, length of hospital stay, and triage. The evolution and logic of such systems along with their merits and demerits are discussed. The author also proposes a new system to aid users in quickly and methodically choosing the system best suited to their needs without having to study a plethora of literature available in order to isolate their choice. PMID:26971084

  4. Needle Thoracotomy in Trauma.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Misgav; Fay, Shmuel; Gendler, Sami; Klein, Yoram; Arkovitz, Marc; Rottenstreich, Amihai

    2015-12-01

    Tension pneumothorax is one of the leading causes of preventable death in trauma patients. Needle thoracotomy (NT) is the currently accepted first-line intervention but has not been well validated. In this review, we have critically discussed the evidence for NT procedure, re-examined the recommendations by the Advanced Trauma Life Support organization and investigated the safest and most effective way of NT. The current evidence to support the use of NT is limited. However, when used, it should be applied in the 2nd intercostal space at midclavicular line using a catheter length of at least 4.5 cm. Alternative measures should be studied for better prehospital management of tension pneumothorax. PMID:26633663

  5. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD. PMID:27613348

  6. Rethinking historical trauma.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Gone, Joseph P; Moses, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of historical trauma as a construct to describe the impact of colonization, cultural suppression, and historical oppression of Indigenous peoples in North America (e.g., Native Americans in the United States, Aboriginal peoples in Canada). The discourses of psychiatry and psychology contribute to the conflation of disparate forms of violence by emphasizing presumptively universal aspects of trauma response. Many proponents of this construct have made explicit analogies to the Holocaust as a way to understand the transgenerational effects of genocide. However, the social, cultural, and psychological contexts of the Holocaust and of post-colonial Indigenous "survivance" differ in many striking ways. Indeed, the comparison suggests that the persistent suffering of Indigenous peoples in the Americas reflects not so much past trauma as ongoing structural violence. The comparative study of genocide and other forms of massive, organized violence can do much to illuminate both common mechanisms and distinctive features, and trace the looping effects from political processes to individual experience and back again. The ethics and pragmatics of individual and collective healing, restitution, resilience, and recovery can be understood in terms of the self-vindicating loops between politics, structural violence, public discourse, and embodied experience. PMID:24855142

  7. [The Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma 2009].

    PubMed

    Kühne, C A; Mand, C; Sturm, J; Lackner, C K; Künzel, A; Siebert, H; Ruchholtz, S

    2009-10-01

    In 2009, 3 years after the foundation of the Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma (TraumaNetzwerkD DGU), the majority of German hospitals participating in the treatment of seriously injured patients is registered in regional trauma networks (TNW). Currently there are 41 trauma networks with more than 660 hospitals in existence, 18 more are registered but are still in the planning phase. Each Federal State has an average of 39 trauma centres of different levels taking part in the treatment of seriously injured patients and every trauma network has an average catchment area of 8708 km(2). The most favourable geographical infrastructure conditions exist in Nordrhein-Westfalen, the least favourable in Sachsen-Anhalt and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. A total of 95 hospitals have already fulfilled the first audit of the structural, personnel and qualitative requirements by the certification bodies. Examination of the check lists of 26 hospitals showed shortcomings in the clinical structure so that these hospitals must be rechecked after correction of the shortcomings. A total of 59 hospitals throughout Germany were successfully audited and only one failed to fulfil the requirements. Because of the varying sizes of the trauma networks there are differences in the areas covered by each trauma network and trauma centre. Concerning the process of certification and auditing (together with the company DIOcert) it could be seen that by careful examination of the check lists of each hospital unforeseen problems during the audit could be avoided. The following article will present the current state of development of the Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma and describe the certification and auditing process. PMID:19756455

  8. Trauma in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Cathy A

    2015-06-01

    Injury in older adults is a looming public health crisis. This article provides a broad overview of geriatric trauma across the continuum of care. After a review of the epidemiology of geriatric trauma, optimal approaches to patient care are presented for triage and transport, trauma team activation and initial assessment, inpatient management, and injury prevention. Special emphasis is given to assessment of frailty, advanced care planning, and transitions of care. PMID:25981722

  9. Global trauma: the great divide

    PubMed Central

    Paniker, Jayanth; Graham, Simon Matthew; Harrison, James William

    2015-01-01

    Road trauma is an emergent global issue. There is huge disparity between the population affected by road trauma and the resource allocation. If the current trend continues, a predicted extra 5 million lives will be lost in this decade. This article aims to create an awareness of the scale of the problem of road trauma and the inequality in the resources available to address this problem. It also describes the responses from the international organisations and the orthopaedic community in dealing with this issue. The International Orthopaedic community has a unique opportunity and moral obligation to play a part in changing this trend of global trauma. PMID:27163075

  10. Respiratory protection for firefighters--Evaluation of CBRN canisters for use during overhaul II: In mask analyte sampling with integrated dynamic breathing machine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leaton; Burgess, Jefferey L; Evans, Heath; Lutz, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Fire Protection Association there were 487,500 structural fires in the U.S. in 2013. After visible flames are extinguished firefighters begin the overhaul stage where remaining hot spots are identified and further extinguished. During overhaul, a significant amount of potentially hazardous chemicals can remain in the ambient environment. Previous research suggests that the use of air purifying respirators fitted with chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) canisters may reduce occupational exposure. This study used large scale burns of representative structural materials to perform side-by-side, filtering, and service-life evaluations of commercially available CBRN filters using two head forms fitted with full-face respirators and a dynamic breathing machine. Three types of CBRN canisters and one non-CBRN cartridge were challenged in repetitive post-fire environments. Tests were conducted with two different breathing volumes and rates for two sampling durations (0-15 min and 0-60 min). Fifty-five different chemicals were selected for evaluation and results indicate that 10 of the 55 chemicals were present in the post-fire overhaul ambient environment. Acetaldehyde and formaldehyde were found to be the only two chemicals detected post filter but were effectively filtered to below ACGIH TLVs. Counter to our prior published work using continuous flow filter evaluation, this study indicates that, regardless of brand, CBRN filters were effective at reducing concentrations of post-fire ambient chemicals to below occupational exposure limits. However, caution should be applied when using CBRN filters as the ambient formaldehyde level in the current study was 8.9 times lower than during the previous work. PMID:26554925

  11. Biomechanics of penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that injuries and deaths due to penetrating projectiles have become a national and an international epidemic in Western society. The application of biomedical engineering to solve day-to-day problems has produced considerable advances in safety and mitigation/prevention of trauma. The study of penetrating trauma has been largely in the military domain where war-time specific applications were advanced with the use of high-velocity weapons. With the velocity and weapon caliber in the civilian population at half or less compared with the military counterpart, wound ballistics is a largely different problem in today's trauma centers. The principal goal of the study of penetrating injuries in the civilian population is secondary prevention and optimized emergency care after occurrence. A thorough understanding of the dynamic biomechanics of penetrating injuries quantifies missile type, caliber, and velocity to hard and soft tissue damage. Such information leads to a comprehensive assessment of the acute and long-term treatment of patients with penetrating injuries. A review of the relevant military research applied to the civilian domain and presentation of new technology in the biomechanical study of these injuries offer foundation to this field. Relevant issues addressed in this review article include introduction of the military literature, the need for secondary prevention, environmental factors including projectile velocity and design, experimental studies with biological tissues and physical models, and mathematical simulations and analyses. Areas of advancement are identified that enables the pursuit of biomechanics research in order to arrive at better secondary prevention strategies. PMID:9719858

  12. Post-Taconic blueschist suture in the northern Appalachians of northern New Brunswick, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    van Staal, C.R.; Ravenhurst, C.E.; Roddick, J.C. ); Winchester, J.A. ); Langton, J.P. )

    1990-11-01

    A narrow belt of Late Ordovician-Early Silurian blueschist, at least 70 km long, separates an allochthonous fragment of back-arc oceanic crust of the Middle Ordovician Fournier Group from underlying, rift-related volcanic rocks of the Middle Ordovician Tetagouche Group in northern New Brunswick, Canada. The basalts on both sides of the blueschist belt are predominantly metamorphosed to greenschist facies conditions. The blueschist belt is interpreted to be an out-of-sequence thrust zone that accommodated tectonic transport of higher pressure rocks on top of lower pressure rocks during post-peak blueschist facies metamorphism. The blueschists have higher Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO ratios and total iron contents in comparison to otherwise chemically equivalent basalts of the Fournier and Tetagouche Groups that have been metamorphosed into greenschists. The blueschist belt was probably the site of channelized flow of oxidizing fluids during active deformation ina subduction complex formed during the closure of a wide Taconic back-arac basin in Late Ordovician-Silurian time.

  13. Further contributions to the longhorn beetle (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) fauna of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Alderson, Chantelle A.; Webster, Vincent L.; CoryC. Hughes; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sixteen species of Cerambycidae are newly recorded for New Brunswick, Canada; Arhopalus obsoletus (Randall), Atimia confusa confusa (Say), Callidium frigidum Casey, Phymatodes amoenus (Say), Phymatodes testaceus (Linnaeus), Neoclytus mucronatus mucronatus (Fabricius), Xylotrechus aceris Fisher, Xylotrechus sagittatus sagittatus (Germar), Tylonotus bimaculatus Haldeman, Lepturges angulatus (LeConte), Lepturges symmetricus (Haldeman), Urgleptes querci (Fitch), Oplosia nubila (LeConte), Eupogonius subarmatus (LeConte), Monochamus carolinensis (Olivier), and Pogonocherus parvulus LeConte. Urgleptes signatus (LeConte) and Urgleptes querci are newly recorded from Nova Scotia. All but two specimens were collected in 12-funnel Lindgren traps. Xylotrechus aceris, Tylonotus bimaculatus, Lepturges angulatus, Lepturges symmetricus, Urgleptes signatus (NS), and Pogonocherus parvulus were detected exclusively in traps deployed in the forest canopy, and most individuals of Oplosia nubila and Monochamus carolinensis were captured in canopy traps. Arhopalus obsoletus, Atimia confusa confusa, Callidium frigidum, Phymatodes testaceus, and Xylotrechus sagittatus sagittatus were captured almost exclusively in traps near (1 m above) the forest floor. These results highlight the importance of sampling both the understory and upper canopy when using traps for surveying diversity of Cerambycidae. PMID:26865818

  14. A teleseismic analysis of the New Brunswick earthquake of January 9, 1982.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Boatwright, J.; Dewey, J.W.; Sipkin, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of the New Brunswick earthquake of January 9, 1982, has important implications for the evaluation of seismic hazards in eastern North America. Although moderate in size (mb, 5.7), it was well-recorded teleseismically. Source characteristics of this earthquake have been determined from analysis of data that were digitally recorded by the Global Digital Seismography Network. From broadband displacement and velocity records of P waves, we have obtained a dynamic description of the rupture process as well as conventional static properties of the source. The depth of the hypocenter is estimated to be 9km from depth phases. The focal mechanism determined from the broadband data corresponds to predominantly thrust faulting. From the variation in the waveforms the direction of slip is inferred to be updip on a west dipping NNE striking fault plane. The steep dip of the inferred fault plane suggests that the earthquake occurred on a preexisting fault that was at one time a normal fault. From an inversion of body wave pulse durations, the estimated rupture length is 5.5km.-from Authors

  15. Two phase deglaciation incorporating a late-stage readvance in the Brunswick, Maine area

    SciTech Connect

    Borelli, C.; Smity, P. . Dept. of Geoscience)

    1993-03-01

    Reinterpretation of late Wisconsinan glacial deposits indicate that retreat of the Laurentide ice margin occurred west of the marine limit in the Brunswick area. Marine transgression deposited the overlying Presumpscot Formation which locally contains organic rich, silty sand. A regionally extensive readvance deformed and truncated the uppermost glaciomarine sediments during the oceanic highstand. Striations and other ice flow indicators which are found underlying the Presumpscot Formation consistently trend NW-SE, while those found on exposed outcrops above the Presumpscot Formation dominantly trend NE-SW. These otherwise anomalous directional flow indicators support a late stage readvance of the ice sheet. Areally extensive, stratified, and locally imbricated outwash caps the glaciomarine sediments. Mineral composition of the basal outwash differs from the upper outwash sequences, supporting the readvance model by indicating different source areas. Multi-phase emergence characterized by terraced landforms caused a reworking and redeposition of sediment in a fluvial, tidally influenced environment. Localized eolian deposits record a late phase reworking of sediment.

  16. Sticks and stones: racism as experienced by adolescents in New Brunswick.

    PubMed

    Baker, C; Varma, M; Tanaka, C

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe both the nature of racism as experienced by adolescent self-described victims in the province of New Brunswick and their response to the perceived racist incidents. A qualitative methodology based on the constructivist paradigm was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with non-White adolescent victims of racism and with parents of victims. Although the study was initiated in response to an eruption of publicity about teenage racial violence, the findings indicate that racist incidents were not a new phenomenon for the participants. They described a low-key but long-term problem that had begun when they entered the public school system. Name-calling was by far the most common form of racism identified and it played a part in most of the other incidents described; dismissed as harmless by authority figures, it appeared to have long-term consequences for its targets. The participants' response to racism was found to have three phases: splintered universe, spiralling resistance, and disengagement. The results suggest that nurses working in the field of school health should address issues of racism among children and adolescents. PMID:11845626

  17. Ascidian depth zonation on sublittoral hard substrates off deer island, New Brunswick, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, C.; Logan, A.; Thomas, M. L. H.

    1992-02-01

    The upper surfaces of sublittoral hard substrates in the Deer Island region of the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, support diverse, depth-zoned epibenthic communities of which ascidians form a minor part. Their population density was quantitatively studied from photo-transects taken between mean low water (MLW) and 30 m depth at four sites off the Deer Island coast and from 30-140 m depth along two photo-transects in Head Harbour Passage. All photo-analyses were aided by collections from transect survey sites, wharf pilings and salmon cage floats, to yield a total of 15 ascidian species encountered. Ascidians were found at all depths at the four shallow sites. Halocynthia pyriformis and Boltenia ovifera are most common at depths of less than 20 m, while Aplidium pallidum, Didemnum albidum and other species exhibit a marked increase in abundance below this depth. Cluster analysis of ascidians shows an association between B. echinata and B. ovifera, which may reflect resource partitioning, and between A. pallidum-D. albidum and Molgula sp.— A. stellatum, the ecological significance of which are as yet unknown. The community in Head Harbour Passage is animal-dominated and in its deeper sections often shows three-dimensional bottom relief from horse mussel shells. D. albidum, the commonest ascidian, shows a close association with Modiolus modiolus, to which it is normally attached, suggesting that mussel beds may minimize the possibility of dislodgement and even confer a feeding advantage on this ascidian.

  18. Rural Trauma: Is Trauma Designation Associated with Better Hospital Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Stephen M.; Zimmerman, Frederick J.; Sharar, Sam R.; Baker, Margaret W.; Martin, Diane P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: While trauma designation has been associated with lower risk of death in large urban settings, relatively little attention has been given to this issue in small rural hospitals. Purpose: To examine factors related to in-hospital mortality and delayed transfer in small rural hospitals with and without trauma designation. Methods: Analysis…

  19. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth with Complex Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive…

  20. Trauma-focused CBT for youth with complex trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with complex trauma. Methods TF-CBT treatment phases are described and modifications of timing, proportionality and application are described for youth with complex trauma. Practical applications include a) dedicating proportionally more of the model to the TF-CBT coping skills phase; b) implementing the TF-CBT Safety component early and often as needed throughout treatment; c) titrating gradual exposure more slowly as needed by individual youth; d) incorporating unifying trauma themes throughout treatment; and e) when indicated, extending the TF-CBT treatment consolidation and closure phase to include traumatic grief components and to generalize ongoing safety and trust. Results Recent data from youth with complex trauma support the use of the above TF-CBT strategies to successfully treat these youth. Conclusions The above practical strategies can be incorporated into TF-CBT to effectively treat youth with complex trauma. Practice implications Practical strategies include providing a longer coping skills phase which incorporates safety and appropriate gradual exposure; including relevant unifying themes; and allowing for an adequate treatment closure phase to enhance ongoing trust and safety. Through these strategies therapists can successfully apply TF-CBT for youth with complex trauma. PMID:22749612

  1. Management of Pediatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Injury is still the number 1 killer of children ages 1 to 18 years in the United States (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/children.htm). Children who sustain injuries with resulting disabilities incur significant costs not only for their health care but also for productivity lost to the economy. The families of children who survive childhood injury with disability face years of emotional and financial hardship, along with a significant societal burden. The entire process of managing childhood injury is enormously complex and varies by region. Only the comprehensive cooperation of a broadly diverse trauma team will have a significant effect on improving the care of injured children. PMID:27456509

  2. Radiology of skeletal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    This 1000-page book contains over 1700 illustrations, is presented in two volumes and subdivided into 23 chapters. After brief chapters of Introduction and General Anatomy, a section on Skeletal Biomechanics is presented. The Epidemiology of Fractures chapter examines, among other things, the effects of age on the frequency and distribution of fractures. In the chapter on Classifications of Fractures, the author describes the character of traumatic forces such as angulating, torsional, avulsive, and compressive, and then relates these to the resultant fracture configurations. The Fracture Treatment chapter presents an overview of treatment principles. Other chapters deal with specific problems in pediatric trauma, fracture healing and nonhealing, and fracture complications.

  3. Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2007 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (31st, Fredricton, New Brunswick, Canada, Jun 8-12, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the University of New Brunswick in Fredricton, New Brunswick. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning.…

  4. NASA overhauls grant process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    A university recently received a NASA grant so quickly that the recipients, used to a long wait for money even after a grant had been approved, assumed a mistake had been made. Such a story has been making the rounds since NASA began to refurbish the procedure by which it issues grants, speeding up and streamlining the process in response to suggestions from space scientists.One way NASA has measured success so far is how quickly it has cleared the decks of pending grants. The agency reduced the backlog from 572 grants on September 11 to zero by the end of the month, according to Don Bush, NASA's deputy assistant administrator for procurement. But that's just the beginning of changes Bush expects to be completed by March or April next year. The new procedures are first being tested out at headquarters, which issues over half of the agency's space science grants. NASA centers will also adopt the procedures after full approval.

  5. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  6. Coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Christiaans, Sarah C; Duhachek-Stapelman, Amy L; Russell, Robert T; Lisco, Steven J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Pittet, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States among children aged 1 to 21 years. The most common cause of lethality in pediatric trauma is traumatic brain injury. Early coagulopathy has been commonly observed after severe trauma and is usually associated with severe hemorrhage and/or traumatic brain injury. In contrast to adult patients, massive bleeding is less common after pediatric trauma. The classical drivers of trauma-induced coagulopathy include hypothermia, acidosis, hemodilution, and consumption of coagulation factors secondary to local activation of the coagulation system after severe traumatic injury. Furthermore, there is also recent evidence for a distinct mechanism of trauma-induced coagulopathy that involves the activation of the anticoagulant protein C pathway. Whether this new mechanism of posttraumatic coagulopathy plays a role in children is still unknown. The goal of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the incidence and potential mechanisms of coagulopathy after pediatric trauma and the role of rapid diagnostic tests for early identification of coagulopathy. Finally, we discuss different options for treating coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma. PMID:24569507

  7. Sexual Trauma, Spirituality, and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krejci, Mark J.; Thompson, Kevin M.; Simonich, Heather; Crosby, Ross D.; Donaldson, Mary Ann; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the association between spirituality and psychopathology in a group of sexual abuse victims and controls with a focus on whether spirituality moderated the association between sexual trauma and psychopathology. Seventy-one sexual trauma victims were compared to 25 control subjects on spiritual well-being, the Eating Disorder…

  8. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services. PMID:25494913

  9. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Anthribidae, Brentidae, Dryophthoridae, Brachyceridae, and Curculionidae, with additions to the fauna of Quebec, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Anderson, Robert S.; Sweeney, Jon D.; DeMerchant, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We report 63 species of Curculionoidea that are new to New Brunswick (three species of Anthribidae, four species of Brentidae, three species of Dryophthoridae, three species of Brachyceridae, 50 species of Curculionidae). Among these are 27 species (two Anthribidae, two Brenthidae, one Brachyceridae, 22 Curculionidae) that are also newly recorded for the Maritime provinces, and one species, Plesiobaris disjuncta Casey (Curculionidae) that is newly recorded for Canada from New Brunswick and Quebec. Bagous planatus LeConte is reinstated to the faunal list of New Brunswick. Two species of Curculionidae are newly recorded from Nova Scotia and the Maritime provinces, and two others are reported for the first time for Prince Edward Island. PMID:22539901

  10. U.S. Geological Survey Georgia Water Science Center and City of Brunswick- Glynn County Cooperative Water Program-Summary of Activities, July 2005 through June 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherry, Gregory S.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1959, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted a cooperative water resources program (CWP) with the City of Brunswick and Glynn County in the Brunswick, Georgia, area. Since the late 1950s, the salinity of ground water in the Upper Floridan aquifer near downtown Brunswick, Georgia, has been increasing, and its occurrence has been detected across an area of increasing size. Pumping of the Upper Floridan aquifer near downtown Brunswick has lowered water levels in the aquifer and resulted in an upward hydraulic gradient between the highly saline parts of the Lower Floridan aquifer and the normally fresh Upper Floridan aquifer. Saltwater likely enters the Upper Floridan aquifer through localized, vertically oriented conduits of relatively high permeability and moves laterally in response to the distribution of stresses within the aquifer. The Brunswick-Glynn County CWP for fiscal year 2006 includes the operation and maintenance of 12 continuous water-level recorders. In addition, water-level data were collected from 52 wells and water from 70 wells was analyzed for chloride concentration during June 2005. Geophysical logs were obtained from one well to assess whether the cause of elevated chloride concentration could be due to leaky well casing. A summary of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division (GaEPD) Georgia Coastal Sound Science Initiative (CSSI) activities that directly benefit the CWP-Brunswick-Glynn County is included in this report. The GaEPD CSSI is a program of scientific and feasibility studies to support development of a final strategy to protect the Upper Floridan aquifer from saltwater contamination. These data presented in this report are needed by State and local authorities to manage water resources effectively in the coastal area of Georgia.

  11. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  12. Cancer Institute of New Jersey: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey to proceed with the design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Clinical Treatment and Research Facility of the University of New Jersey on the New Brunswick campus. The facility will provide for the integration of new and existing clinical outpatient cancer treatment with basic and clinical research to expedite the application of new discoveries in cancer treatment. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  13. New Brunswick air quality monitoring results for the years 1996 and 1997. Technical report number T-9901

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This report summarizes air quality monitoring data from New Brunswick during 1996 and 1997, with an emphasis on air quality assessment in relation to existing air quality standards and objectives. Introductory sections review provincial air quality legislation, national and provincial standards, other air quality criteria, sources and effects of regulated air pollutants, and air quality monitoring networks in the province. Results are presented by area, corporation, or network monitored, and are discussed and compared with data from centres in other parts of the world. Air pollutants monitored include nitrogen oxides, hydrogen sulphide, particulates, ozone, acid precipitation, carbon monoxide, and sulphur dioxide. Appendices include a glossary and detailed monthly monitoring results.

  14. [MUSCULOSKELETAL MARKERS, ARTHROPATY, TRAUMAS].

    PubMed

    Caldarini, Carla; Zavaroni, Federica; Benassi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The bone tissue remodeling due to strong physical/working activity is defined as ergonomic markers or MSM (Muscoloskeletal Stress Markers) (Capasso et al. 1999) and MOS (Markers of Occupational Stress). Among them we can find: enthesopaties, arthropaties, non metrical stress and traumas markers. In the present study, the analysis of these traits has been used to clarify habitual activity patterns of four imperial populations from Suburbium: Castel Malnome, Casal Bertone area Q, Via Padre Semeria e Quarto Cappello del Prete. The very high prevalence of activity-induced stress lesions occurred among the individuals of Castel Malnome and Casal Bertone area Q suggests that these groups were involved in strenuous occupations such as, respectively: the processing and storage of salt and the dyeing of textiles and hides discernible from the archaeological context. For the individuals of Via Padre Semeria and Quarto Cappello del Prete the alterations, instead, could be compatibles with agricultural work. PMID:27348990

  15. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on. PMID:21502112

  16. Trauma and religiousness.

    PubMed

    Gostečnik, Christian; Repič Slavič, Tanja; Lukek, Saša Poljak; Cvetek, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Victims of traumatic events who experience re-traumatization often develop a highly ambivalent relationship to God and all religiosity as extremely conflictual. On the one hand, they may choose to blame God for not having protected them, for having left them to feel so alone, for having been indifferent to them or they may even turn their wrath upon God, as the source of cruelty. Often though, the traumas experienced by individuals prompt them to turn to God and religion in search of help. This gives reason for the need of new and up-to-date research that can help elucidate why some people choose to seek help in religion and others turn away from it. PMID:23187617

  17. Lightweight Trauma Module - LTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Current patient movement items (PMI) supporting the military's Critical Care Air Transport Team (CCATT) mission as well as the Crew Health Care System for space (CHeCS) have significant limitations: size, weight, battery duration, and dated clinical technology. The LTM is a small, 20 lb., system integrating diagnostic and therapeutic clinical capabilities along with onboard data management, communication services and automated care algorithms to meet new Aeromedical Evacuation requirements. The Lightweight Trauma Module is an Impact Instrumentation, Inc. project with strong Industry, DoD, NASA, and Academia partnerships aimed at developing the next generation of smart and rugged critical care tools for hazardous environments ranging from the battlefield to space exploration. The LTM is a combination ventilator/critical care monitor/therapeutic system with integrated automatic control systems. Additional capabilities are provided with small external modules.

  18. An Integrated RFID and Barcode Tagged Item Inventory System for Deployment at New Brunswick Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, James R; Kuhn, Michael J; Gradle, Colleen; Preston, Lynne; Thomas, Brigham B.; Laymance, Leesa K; Kuziel, Ron

    2012-01-01

    New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has a numerous inventory containing thousands of plutonium and uranium certified reference materials. The current manual inventory process is well established but is a lengthy process which requires significant oversight and double checking to ensure correctness. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has worked with NBL to develop and deploy a new inventory system which utilizes handheld computers with barcode scanners and radio frequency identification (RFID) readers termed the Tagged Item Inventory System (TIIS). Certified reference materials are identified by labels which incorporate RFID tags and barcodes. The label printing process and RFID tag association process are integrated into the main desktop software application. Software on the handheld computers syncs with software on designated desktop machines and the NBL inventory database to provide a seamless inventory process. This process includes: 1) identifying items to be inventoried, 2) downloading the current inventory information to the handheld computer, 3) using the handheld to read item and location labels, and 4) syncing the handheld computer with a designated desktop machine to analyze the results, print reports, etc. The security of this inventory software has been a major concern. Designated roles linked to authenticated logins are used to control access to the desktop software while password protection and badge verification are used to control access to the handheld computers. The overall system design and deployment at NBL will be presented. The performance of the system will also be discussed with respect to a small piece of the overall inventory. Future work includes performing a full inventory at NBL with the Tagged Item Inventory System and comparing performance, cost, and radiation exposures to the current manual inventory process.

  19. Mercury concentrations in seabird tissues from Machias Seal Island, New Brunswick, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bond, Alexander L; Diamond, Antony W

    2009-07-01

    Mercury is a pervasive environmental contaminant, the anthropogenic portion of which is increasing globally, and in northeastern North America in particular. Seabirds frequently are used as indicators of the marine environment, including mercury contamination. We analysed paired samples for total mercury (Hg) concentrations in feathers and blood from adult and chick, albumen, and lipid-free yolk of seven seabirds breeding on Machias Seal Island, New Brunswick, Canada - Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea), Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica), Common Eider (Somateria mollissima), Common Murre (Uria aalge), Common Tern (Sterna hirundo), Leach's Storm-petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), and Razorbill (Alca torda). We also used stable-isotope ratios of carbon (delta(13)C), and nitrogen (delta(15)N) to evaluate the relationship between carbon source and trophic position and mercury. We found high Hg concentrations across tissue types in Leach's Storm-petrels, and Razorbills, with lower concentrations in other species, the lowest being in Common Eiders. Storm-petrels prey on mesopelagic fish that accumulate mercury, and Razorbills feed on larger, older fish that bioaccumulate heavy metals. Biomagnification of Hg, or the increase in Hg concentration with trophic position as measured by delta(15)N, was significant and greater in albumen than other tissues, whereas in other tissues, delta(15)N explained little of the overall variation in Hg concentration. Hg concentrations in egg components are higher on Machias Seal Island than other sites globally and in the Gulf of Maine region, but only for some species. Further detailed investigations are required to determine the cause of this trend. PMID:19419752

  20. Arenig volcanic and sedimentary strata, central New Brunswick and eastern Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poole, W.H.; Neuman, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    Arenig strata in the Napadogan area of the Miramichi Highlands of west-central New Brunswick are similar to those of the Lunksoos anti-clinorial area of eastern Maine. Strata from both areas were deposited in a volcanic back-arc setting upon Cambrian-Tremadoc, deep-water, turbiditic quartzose strata on the northwest-facing Gander margin of Gondwana. Tremadoc southeastward obduction of the Penobscot Arc, formed in the lapetus Ocean to the northwest of the margin, was followed by local uplift, rift faulting, erosion, and finally by local deposition of late Arenig gravel within the early stages of a subsiding back-arc basin that was related to a younger, northwest-facing, early Arenig-Llanvirn Popelogan Arc lying to the northwest. These strata became overlain by late Arenig marine felsic tuff, sandy and silty tuff and mudstone, coarse textured and many hundreds of metres thick in the Lunksoos area but much finer and only a few metres thick farther from the volcanic centres, in the Napadogan area. During Llanvirn, the strata became covered with deep-water, commonly manganiferous, ferruginous shale-chert in a basin shielded from currents carrying coarse detritus. Arenig strata of the Napadogan area probably developed to the southeast of the main rift-volcanism zone that perhaps extended between the Lunksoos and northeastern Miramichi Highlands during the Arenig. Brachiopods of the Celtic paleogeographic assemblage colonized newly formed shelves flanking islands along the zone. Shell beds developed upon fresh layers of ash in a nutrient-rich environment between episodes of volcanism. These Celtic brachiopods developed in cool waters of high southern latitudes off Gondwana, different from those on the Laurentian margin in warm waters of low southern latitudes.

  1. Development of site-specific soil cleanup criteria: New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site

    SciTech Connect

    Veluri, V.R.; Moe, H.J.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1983-03-01

    The potential human exposure which results from the residual soil radioactivity at a decommissioned site is a prime concern during D and D projects. To estimate this exposure, a pathway analysis approach is often used to arrive at the residual soil radioactivity criteria. The development of such a criteria for the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site is discussed. Contamination on this site was spotty and located in small soil pockets spread throughout the site area. Less than 1% of the relevant site area was contaminated. The major contaminants encountered at the site were /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, normal and natural uranium, and natural thorium. During the development of the pathway analysis to determine the site cleanup criteria, corrections for the inhomogeneity of the contamination were made. These correction factors and their effect upon the relevant pathway parameters are presented. Major pathways by which radioactive material may reach an individual are identified and patterns of use are specified (scenario). Each pathway is modeled to estimate the transfer parameters along the given pathway, such as soil to air to man, etc. The transfer parameters are then combined with dose rate conversion factors (ICRP 30 methodology) to obtain soil concentration to dose rate conversion factors (pCi/g/mrem/yr). For an appropriate choice of annual dose equivalent rate, one can then arrive at a value for the residual soil concentration. Pathway modeling, transfer parameters, and dose rate factors for the three major pathways; inhalation, ingestion and external exposure, which are important for the NBL site, are discussed.

  2. Association between ozone and asthma emergency department visits in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Stieb, D M; Burnett, R T; Beveridge, R C; Brook, J R

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the relationship of asthma emergency department (ED) visits to daily concentrations of ozone and other air pollutants in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. Data on ED visits with a presenting complaint of asthma (n = 1987) were abstracted for the period 1984-1992 (May-September). Air pollution variables included ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfate, and total suspended particulate (TSP); weather variables included temperature, humidex, dewpoint, and relative humidity. Daily ED visit frequencies were filtered to remove day of the week and long wave trends, and filtered values were regressed on air pollution and weather variables for the same day and the 3 previous days. The mean daily 1-hr maximum ozone concentration during the study period was 41.6 ppb. A positive, statistically significant (p < 0.05) association was observed between ozone and asthma ED visits 2 days later, and the strength of the association was greater in nonlinear models. The frequency of asthma ED visits was 33% higher (95% CI, 10-56%) when the daily 1-hr maximum ozone concentration exceeded 75 ppb (the 95th percentile). The ozone effect was not significantly influenced by the addition of weather or other pollutant variables into the model or by the exclusion of repeat ED visits. However, given the limited number of sampling days for sulfate and TSP, a particulate effect could not be ruled out. We detected a significant association between ozone and asthma ED visits, despite the vast majority of sampling days being below current U.S. and Canadian standards. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9118879

  3. An ecological view of psychological trauma and trauma recovery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M R

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an ecological view of psychological trauma and trauma recovery. Individual differences in posttraumatic response and recovery are the result of complex interactions among person, event, and environmental factors. These interactions define the interrelationship of individual and community and together may foster or impede individual recovery. The ecological model proposes a multidimensional definition of trauma recovery and suggests that the efficacy of trauma-focused interventions depends on the degree to which they enhance the person-community relationship and achieve "ecological fit" within individually varied recovery contexts. In attending to the social, cultural and political context of victimization and acknowledging that survivors of traumatic experiences may recover without benefit of clinical intervention, the model highlights the phenomenon of resiliency, and the relevance of community intervention efforts. PMID:8750448

  4. Immunohistochemical alterations after muscle trauma.

    PubMed

    Fechner, G; Bajanowski, T; Brinkmann, B

    1993-01-01

    The proteins fibrin, fibrinogen, fibronectin and complement C5b-9 were investigated in mechanically damaged skeletal muscle. An accumulation of fibrin, fibrinogen and fibronectin could be observed immediately after intra-vital trauma in damaged fibre zones, later an accumulation at the torn edges of the fibres. The accumulation of complement C5b-9 began one hour after trauma. After post mortem trauma no positive reactions could be observed for any of the proteins. The degree of expression of these proteins can therefore be used to differentiate between vital and postmortem muscle damage as well as the estimation of wound age in the early antemortem time period. PMID:8431399

  5. Computed tomography in trauma: An atlas approach

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book discussed computed tomography in trauma. The text is organized according to mechanism of injury and site of injury. In addition to CT, some correlation with other imaging modalities is included. Blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, complications and sequelae of trauma, and use of other modalities are covered.

  6. Secondary Trauma in Children and School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motta, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    A review of childhood secondary trauma is presented. Secondary trauma involves the transfer and acquisition of negative affective and dysfunctional cognitive states due to prolonged and extended contact with others, such as family members, who have been traumatized. As such, secondary trauma refers to a spread of trauma reactions from the victim…

  7. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the New Brunswick Site, Middlesex County, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.; Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1996-02-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the New Brunswick Site, located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Residual radioactive material guidelines for individual radionuclides of concern and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the New Brunswick Site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. The guidelines derived in this report are intended to apply to the remediation of these remaining residual radioactive materials at the site. The primary radionuclides of concern in these remaining materials are expected to be radium-226 and, to a lesser extent, natural uranium and thorium. The DOE has established generic cleanup guidelines for radium and thorium in soil; however, cleanup guidelines for other radionuclides must be derived on a site-specific basis.

  8. Trauma and the wise baby.

    PubMed

    Kilborne, Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    This paper expands upon Ferenczi's concept of the wise baby and explores the dynamics of ignorance and compensatory ideals of wisdom as reactions to trauma and as manifestations of "double conscience," shame dynamics and Oedipal shame. Focusing on feelings of ignorance, of knowing and not knowing and their relation to trauma, the author elaborates on the dynamics of fantasies of wisdom, adumbrating implications for psychoanalytic technique. PMID:21818096

  9. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  10. [Trauma of the midface].

    PubMed

    Kühnel, T S; Reichert, T E

    2015-03-01

    Fractures of the midface pose a serious medical problem as for their complexity, frequency and their socio-economic impact. Interdisciplinary approaches and up-to-date diagnostic and surgical techniques provide favorable results in the majority of cases though. Traffic accidents are the leading cause and male adults in their thirties are affected most often. Treatment algorithms for nasal bone fractures, maxillary and zygoma fractures are widely agreed upon whereas trauma to the frontal sinus and the orbital apex are matter of current debate. Advances in endoscopic surgery and limitations of evidence based gain of knowledge are matters that are focused on in the corresponding chapter. As for the fractures of the frontal sinus a strong tendency towards minimized approaches can be seen. Obliteration and cranialisation seem to decrease in numbers.Some critical remarks in terms of high dose methylprednisolone therapy for traumatic optic nerve injury seem to be appropriate.Intraoperative cone beam radiographs and preshaped titanium mesh implants for orbital reconstruction are new techniques and essential aspects in midface traumatology. Fractures of the anterior skull base with cerebrospinal fluid leaks show very promising results in endonasal endoscopic repair. PMID:25860490

  11. [Major respiratory tract traumas].

    PubMed

    Petrov, D; Obretenov, E; Kalaĭdzhiev, G; Plochev, M; Kostadinov, D

    2002-01-01

    Between 1988 and 2000 a total of 33 patients with traumatic tracheobronchial lesions were diagnosed and treated. The trauma was penetrating in 7 (stab and gun-shot), blunt in 10 (car accidents, compression and falling from heights) and iatrogenic in 16 of them (postintubational--15, after foreign body extraction--1). The main clinical and radiological features were subcutaneous emphysema, hemoptysis, respiratory insufficiency, pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. The diagnosis was confirmed in all patients by early fiberoptic bronchoscopy. "Watch and see" tactics with massive antibiotics therapy was followed in 4 (12%) patients. A surgical treatment was carried out in 29 (88%) patients as follows: simple repair--19 (58%), left pneumonectomy--2 (6%), tracheal resection and anastomosis "end to end"--2 (6%), tracheostomy--1 (3%), thoracocenthesis and drainage--3 (9%) and cervical mediastinotomy--2 (6%). The operative mortality was 9%. The cause of death in these 3 patients were associated brain and spinal cord injuries. In the rest of patients the early and long-term postoperative results were considered very good. PMID:12515032

  12. Complications of pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, S J

    1991-09-01

    MSOF is a life-threatening complication of trauma. The body is a dynamic interrelated group of systems that work together efficiently. Changes in one system generally have a widespread impact, and soon the entire system is changed. In children with MSOF, the normal equilibrium that is maintained between organ systems does not exist. Generalized disruption of organ functions occur, and the body attempts to compensate and regain its homeostasis. This activity will often benefit certain organs and harm others. If the disruption continues and compensation fails, organ dysfunction occurs and general chaos reigns. Medical and nursing interventions are directed toward supporting individual organ systems before failure occurs. Attempts to provide this support for one system can cause adverse effects to occur in other systems. Although this is a potential result of medical and nursing interventions, often there is no other choice. It is essential that nurses be aware of the systemic consequences of these interventions and carefully evaluate them. Although overall mortality rates are high, children have a better chance for survival than adults. Expert nursing assessments, interventions, and evaluations are essential to maximize this outcome. More research in the area of MSOF in children is necessary, with specific attention to nursing management and the effect on patient outcome. PMID:1883588

  13. Trauma of the midface

    PubMed Central

    Kühnel, Thomas S.; Reichert, Torsten E.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the midface pose a serious medical problem as for their complexity, frequency and their socio-economic impact. Interdisciplinary approaches and up-to-date diagnostic and surgical techniques provide favorable results in the majority of cases though. Traffic accidents are the leading cause and male adults in their thirties are affected most often. Treatment algorithms for nasal bone fractures, maxillary and zygomatic fractures are widely agreed upon whereas trauma to the frontal sinus and the orbital apex are matter of current debate. Advances in endoscopic surgery and limitations of evidence based gain of knowledge are matters that are focused on in the corresponding chapter. As for the fractures of the frontal sinus a strong tendency towards minimized approaches can be seen. Obliteration and cranialization seem to decrease in numbers. Some critical remarks in terms of high dose methylprednisolone therapy for traumatic optic nerve injury seem to be appropriate. Intraoperative cone beam radiographs and preshaped titanium mesh implants for orbital reconstruction are new techniques and essential aspects in midface traumatology. Fractures of the anterior skull base with cerebrospinal fluid leaks show very promising results in endonasal endoscopic repair. PMID:26770280

  14. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  15. Teaching SciencePlus: An Observational Survey of Science Teaching in New Brunswick and Novia Scotia, Grades 7, 8 and 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Charles

    After several years of curriculum writing workshops and field-testing of draft materials, involving approximately 150 teachers, the SciencePlus program was implemented in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick between 1986 and 1991. SciencePlus programs provide a shift from an overwhelming emphasis on fact-recall testing to a predominate emphasis on…

  16. Who Is Using What in the Public Schools: The Interrelationships among Alcohol, Drug and Tobacco Use by Adolescents in New Brunswick Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobe, Cary; Campbell, Elaine

    1990-01-01

    Attempted to discover patterns of alcohol, drug, and tobacco use among public school children in New Brunswick using Provincial School Drug Survey (PSDS), an existing large-scale assessment. Recoded variables in PSDS dataset to derive profiles of typical tobacco, cannabis, and alcohol users. Found increase in predictive accuracy of regression…

  17. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, N.C.; restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, N.C.; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  18. The Character of Sn (-W-Mo) Mineralizing Fluids, North Zone, Mount Pleasant, New Brunswick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmi Assadzadeh, G.; Samson, I. M.; Gagnon, J. E.

    2009-05-01

    Several major Sn deposits and minor W-Mo mineralization occur within hydrothermally altered breccias in the North Zone (NZ), Mount Pleasant, New Brunswick. The principal hydrothermal minerals, which either replace the host granites or have been precipitated in cavities and veins, are quartz, fluorite, topaz and chlorite. Previous studies carried out on the Endogranitic Tin Zone (ETZ), one of the mineralized zones in the NZ, have reported that cassiterite is associated with all stages of alteration, but mostly occurred during intense chloritization-topazification. Our studies indicate, however, that cassiterite principally occurs in association with fluorite as an open space filling, and that chlorite alteration was a later event. Wolframite is also associated with fluorite, and with topaz and arsenopyrite. Molybdenite occurs either in quartz veins or in veins associated with quartz-topaz greisen. Previous work on the Endogranitic Tin Zone (ETZ) indicated that primary fluid inclusions in quartz, topaz, and fluorite contain liquid + vapour ± halite, with trapping temperatures of less than ˜ 225°C and salinities of < 30 equiv wt % NaCl. In the Fire Tower Zone (FTZ), fluid inclusions associated with W-Mo mineralization are reported to be liquid + vapour ± solid inclusions, with the latter containing up to 6 daughter crystals, and which homogenize by halite disappearance at temperatures from 146 to 492°C, with salinities ranging from 30 to 60 equiv wt % NaCl. Our studies show that primary fluid inclusions in fluorite that is intimately associated with cassiterite have very complex solid phase assemblages at room temperature. These solids occupy up to ˜ 75 volume % of these inclusions, the remainder being a vapour bubble and liquid. At least 7 of the solids melt between 89 and 385°C, indicating that they are daughter minerals, and the inclusions homogenize to liquid by vapour disappearance at between 469 and 493°C. These complex fluid inclusions indicate that the

  19. Predicting water temperatures using a deterministic model: Application on Miramichi River catchments (New Brunswick, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caissie, Daniel; Satish, Mysore G.; El-Jabi, Nassir

    2007-04-01

    SummaryWater temperature influences many physical, chemical and biological properties of rivers. It also influences the distribution of fish and many aquatic organisms within the river environment. Hence, a good understanding of the thermal regime of rivers is essential for effective management of fisheries and aquatic resources. This study deals with the modelling of river water temperature using a deterministic model. This model calculates the net heat flux at the water surface using meteorological conditions within the study area. The water temperature model was applied on two watercourses of different size and thermal characteristics, but within a similar meteorological region, i.e. the Little Southwest Miramichi River and Catamaran Brook (New Brunswick, Canada). Data from 1992 to 1994 were used to calibrate the model, while data from 1995 to 1999 were used for the model validation. Results showed equally good agreement between observed and predicted water temperatures during the calibration period for both rivers with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.49 °C for the Little Southwest Miramichi River compared to 1.51 °C for Catamaran brook. During the validation period, RMSEs were calculated at 1.55 °C for the Little Southwest Miramichi River and 1.61 °C for Catamaran Brook. Poorer model performances were generally observed early in the season (e.g. spring), especially for the Little Southwest Miramichi River due to the influence of snowmelt conditions, while late summer to autumn performances showed among the best results for both rivers. Late autumn performances were more variable in Catamaran Brook and presumably influenced by the groundwater, geothermal conditions and potentially riparian shading. The geothermal aspect was further investigated at Catamaran Brook (using 1998 data) and results revealed that although geothermal fluxes are present, they explained very little of the unexplained variability (<0.1 °C). Similar to previous studies, the net

  20. Trauma-Informed Care in the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jessica Dym; Barto, Beth; Griffin, Jessica L; Fraser, Jenifer Goldman; Hodgdon, Hilary; Bodian, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Child maltreatment is a serious public health concern, and its detrimental effects can be compounded by traumatic experiences associated with the child welfare (CW) system. Trauma-informed care (TIC) is a promising strategy for addressing traumatized children's needs, but research on the impact of TIC in CW is limited. This study examines initial findings of the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project, a statewide TIC initiative in the CW system and mental health network. After 1 year of implementation, Trauma-Informed Leadership Teams in CW offices emerged as key structures for TIC systems integration, and mental health providers' participation in evidence-based treatment (EBT) learning collaboratives was linked to improvements in trauma-informed individual and agency practices. After approximately 6 months of EBT treatment, children had fewer posttraumatic symptoms and behavior problems compared to baseline. Barriers to TIC that emerged included scarce resources for trauma-related work in the CW agency and few mental providers providing EBTs to young children. Future research might explore variations in TIC across service system components as well as the potential for differential effects across EBT models disseminated through TIC. PMID:26564909

  1. Liver trauma grading and biochemistry tests.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Gozde; Gemici, Aysegul Akdogan; Yirgin, Inci Kizildag; Gulsen, Esma; Inci, Ercan

    2013-10-01

    Among solid organ blunt traumas, the liver and spleen are mostly subject to injury. In addition, the liver is also commonly injured in penetrating traumas because of its size, location, and the ease of injury to the "Glisson Capsule". Several enzymes are known to be elevated following trauma. In our study, we evaluated the correlation between the levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in 57 patients with blunt trauma to the liver and compared these values to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma trauma grading system. Additionally, we compared the enzyme level elevations in these patients to the enzyme levels of 29 healthy subjects. As expected, we found significant elevations in enzyme levels of trauma patients compared to the control group. The calculated point estimates were not significantly different between grades 1 and 2 trauma. However, grade 3 trauma group showed a significant increase in enzyme levels. PMID:23793528

  2. Video recording of emergency department trauma resuscitations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Debra M

    2003-01-01

    Although hospitals are faced with the challenges of appropriately informing the public regarding health care and protecting the privacy of patients, a comprehensive policy concerning videotaping of trauma resuscitations can be developed to comply with regulatory bodies. Video recording of trauma team resuscitations can be utilized as an effective quality improvement tool to evaluate trauma team performance, psychomotor skills and techniques, and to identify educational needs related to specific trauma populations. Video recording of Trauma resuscitations is an effective tool for improving trauma team performance by educating clinical staff regarding roles and responsibilities. PMID:16265920

  3. Delta Alerts: Changing Outcomes in Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Lynn L; Day, Mark D; Harris, LeAnna

    2016-01-01

    Geriatric trauma patients (GTPs) suffering minor injuries have suboptimal outcomes compared with younger populations. Patients 65 years or older account for 10% of all traumas but 28% of all trauma deaths. This trauma center established a third tier trauma alert specifically targeting GTPs at risk for poor outcomes. A Delta Alert is activated when GTPs suffer injuries that fall outside traditional trauma alert guidelines. Early identification and treatment of injuries and expedited referral to specialty groups have improved our GTPs' outcomes including decreased mortality and length of stay and increased percentage of GTPs who are discharged home. PMID:27414140

  4. The study of psychic trauma.

    PubMed

    Bacciagaluppi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This article starts from the DSM definition of psychic trauma. A central source in this field is the 1992 book by Judith Herman. One line of investigation is the sexual abuse of women and children. In an early phase, both Janet and Freud described dissociation as a reaction to trauma. In 1897, Freud disputed the reality of sexual trauma, a position countered later by Ferenczi. In a later phase, this subject was investigated by the American feminist movement. Studies of physical abuse are then described, followed by mental abuse and neglect. Another line of investigation is combat neurosis. The two lines converged in the definition of PTSD and its incorporation into the DSM in 1980. The views on trauma of John Bowlby and Alice Miller are also discussed. The integration of the relational model in psychoanalysis with the trauma literature is presented. The most recent advances are located in neurobiology. The discussion makes a preliminary investigation of the remote causes of war and sexual violence. PMID:21902510

  5. Management of Carotid Artery Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Gordin, Eli; Stroman, David

    2014-01-01

    With increased awareness and liberal screening of trauma patients with identified risk factors, recent case series demonstrate improved early diagnosis of carotid artery trauma before they become problematio. There remains a need for unified screening criteria for both intracranial and extracranial carotid trauma. In the absence of contraindications, antithrombotic agents should be considered in blunt carotid artery injuries, as there is a significant risk of progression of vessel injury with observation alone. Despite CTA being used as a common screening modality, it appears to lack sufficient sensitivity. DSA remains to be the gold standard in screening. Endovascular techniques are becoming more widely accepted as the primary surgical modality in the treatment of blunt extracranial carotid injuries and penetrating/blunt intracranial carotid lessions. Nonetheless, open surgical approaches are still needed for the treatment of penetrating extracranial carotid injuries and in patients with unfavorable lesions for endovascular intervention. PMID:25136406

  6. Trauma--the malignant epidemic.

    PubMed

    Muckart, D J

    1991-01-19

    Trauma is the commonest cause of death in children and young adults in the USA and the UK and the incidence of both accidental and non-accidental injury continues to increase. In the Western world more pre-retirement years of life are lost annually from trauma than malignant disease, heart disease, and AIDS combined, and by the beginning of the last decade injury deaths outnumbered deaths from all other causes combined in those under 35 years of age. In South Africa, although infectious diseases continue to exact their toll, a similar pattern is emerging. Alcohol and speed are responsible for the majority of motor vehicle accidents, while the increasing ownership of firearms directly parallels the homicide rates from these weapons. Stricter application of the legislation governing alcohol, driving and firearm control is required and a regionalised trauma care programme is desperately needed to contain this epidemic. PMID:1989097

  7. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-01-01

    Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research. PMID:21083009

  8. Ventilatory strategies in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Arora, Shubhangi; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan

    2014-01-01

    Lung injury in trauma patients can occur because of direct injury to lung or due to secondary effects of injury elsewhere for example fat embolism from a long bone fracture, or due to response to a systemic insult such as; acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to sepsis or transfusion related lung injury. There are certain special situations like head injury where the primary culprit is not the lung, but the brain and the ventilator strategy is aimed at preserving the brain tissue and the respiratory system takes a second place. The present article aims to delineate the strategies addressing practical problems and challenges faced by intensivists dealing with trauma patients with or without healthy lungs. The lung protective strategies along with newer trends in ventilation are discussed. Ventilatory management for specific organ system trauma are highlighted and their physiological base is presented. PMID:24550626

  9. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.]. PMID:27322172

  10. Fate of spinosad in litter and soils of a mixed conifer stand in the Acadian forest region of New Brunswick.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dean G; Harris, Brenda J; Lanteigne, Leonard J; Buscarini, Teresa M; Chartrand, Derek T

    2002-02-13

    Spinosad is a natural insecticide, produced via fermentation culture of the actinomycete Saccharopolyspora spinosa, with potential use against a number of forest pests including spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana [Clem]). Persistence of spinosad was determined in terrestrial fate experiments conducted within a semimature stand of black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.]) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea [L]) in the Acadian forest region of New Brunswick, Canada. Results of experiments established under full coniferous canopy and in a canopy opening indicated that spinosad dissipated rapidly following hyperbolic kinetics in both litter and soils and was not susceptible to leaching. Time to 50% dissipation estimates for spinosyn A ranged from 2.0 to 12.4 days depending upon matrix and experimental conditions. Spinosyn D dissipated to levels below quantitation limits (0.02 microg/g of dry mass) within 7 days in all cases. Sporadic low-level detection of the demethylated metabolites suggested that parent compounds were degraded in situ. PMID:11829646