Science.gov

Sample records for btp supported liquid

  1. Supported liquid membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.; Bush, H. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    A cell apparatus for a supported liquid membrane including opposing faceplates, each having a spirally configured groove, an inlet groove at a first end of the spirally configured groove, and an outlet groove at the other end of the spirally configured groove, within the opposing faces of the faceplates, a microporous membrane situated between the grooved faces of the faceplates, said microporous membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for a predetermined chemical species within the pores of said membrane, means for aligning the grooves of the faceplates in an directly opposing configuration with the porous membrane being situated therebetween, such that the aligned grooves form a pair of directly opposing channels, separate feed solution and stripping solution compartments connected to respective channels between the faceplates and the membrane, separate pumping means for passing feed solution and stripping solution through the channels is provided.

  2. Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators

    DOEpatents

    Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Dempsey, Michael D. (Revere, MA)

    1986-01-01

    Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

  3. Method of fabrication of supported liquid membranes

    DOEpatents

    Luebke, David R.; Hong, Lei; Myers, Christina R.

    2015-11-17

    Method for the fabrication of a supported liquid membrane having a dense layer in contact with a porous layer, and a membrane liquid layer within the interconnected pores of the porous layer. The dense layer is comprised of a solidified material having an average pore size less than or equal to about 0.1 nanometer, while the porous layer is comprised of a plurality of interconnected pores and has an average pore size greater than 10 nanometers. The supported liquid membrane is fabricated through the preparation of a casting solution of a membrane liquid and a volatile solvent. A pressure difference is established across the dense layer and porous layer, the casting solution is applied to the porous layer, and the low viscosity casting solution is drawn toward the dense layer. The volatile solvent is evaporated and the membrane liquid precipitates, generating a membrane liquid layer in close proximity to the dense layer.

  4. Separation of metals by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1990-12-31

    A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

  5. Flexible Support Liquid Argon Heat Intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-05-18

    A device in the flexible support system for the Central Calorimeter is the Liquid Argon Heat Intercept. The purpose of this apparatus is to intercept heat outside the inner vessel so that bubbles do not form inside. If bubbles did happen to form inside the vessel, they would cause an electric arc between the read-out board and the absorption plates, thus destroying the pre-amplifier. Since this heat intercept is located in the center of the flexible support, it must also support the load of the Central Caloimeter. Figure 1 shows how the intercept works. The subcooled liquid argon is driven through a 1/4-inch x 0.049-inch w tube by hydrostatic pressure. the ambient heat boils the subcooled argon. The gaseous argon flows through the tube and is condensed at the top of the vessel by a 100 kW cooling coil. This process is rpesent in all four flexible support systems.

  6. Separations by supported liquid membrane cascades

    DOEpatents

    Danesi, P.R.

    1983-09-01

    The invention describes a new separation technique which leads to multi-stage operations by the use of a series (a cascade) of alternated carrier-containing supported-liquid cation exchanger extractant and a liquid anion exchanger extractant (or a neutral extractant) as carrier. The membranes are spaced between alternated aqueous electrolytic solutions of different composition which alternatively provide positively charged extractable species and negatively charged (or zero charged) extractable species, of the chemical species to be separated. The alternated aqueous electrolytic solutions in addition to providing the driving force to the process, simultaneously function as a stripping solution from one type of membrane and as an extraction-promoting solution for the other type of membrane. The aqueous electrolytic solution and the supported liquid membranes are arranged to provide a continuous process.

  7. Separations by supported liquid membrane cascades

    DOEpatents

    Danesi, Pier R. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1986-01-01

    The invention describes a new separation technique which leads to multi-stage operations by the use of a series (a cascade) of alternated carrier-containing supported-liquid membranes. The membranes contain alternatively a liquid cation exchanger extractant and a liquid anion exchanger extractant (or a neutral extractant) as carrier. The membranes are spaced between alternated aqueous electrolytic solutions of different composition which alternatively provide positively charged extractable species and negatively charged (or zero charged) extractable species, of the chemical species to be separated. The alternated aqueous electrolytic solutions in addition to providing the driving force to the process, simultaneously function as a stripping solution from one type of membrane and as an extraction-promoting solution for the other type of membrane. The aqueous electrolytic solutions and the supported liquid membranes are arranged in such a way to provide a continuous process which leads to the continuous enrichment of the species which show the highest permeability coefficients. By virtue of the very high number of stages which can be arranged, even chemical species having very similar chemical behavior (and consequently very similar permeability coefficients) can be completely separated. The invention also provide a way to concentrate the separated species.

  8. Supported polymeric liquid membranes for wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.V.

    1997-12-31

    The removal or elimination of organic residues from aqueous waste streams represents a major need in the chemical industry. A class of membrane has been developed called supported polymeric liquid membranes capable of removing and concentrating low molecular weight organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions, especially those that also contain high concentrations of inorganic salts. These membranes are prepared by filling the pores of microfiltration or ultrafiltration membranes with polymeric (oligomeric) liquids having affinity for the organic compounds of interest. With this approach, membrane`s separation characteristics are decoupled from its mechanical stability and depend primarily on the chemical properties of the liquid polymer used. As a result, membranes of diverse separation capabilities can be conveniently prepared using liquid polymers possessing the appropriate functional groups. Physical properties typical of polymeric liquids such as high viscosity, extremely low volatility and insolubility in water contribute to the observed stability of the membranes under broad operating conditions. This membrane process has been successfully applied to several aqueous waste streams. This paper describes the early development activities for treating a waste stream containing a dilute mixture of C2-C6 carboxylic acids. Feasibility testings were initially carried out with flat sheet membranes in a small stirred cell. Scaleup was then conducted using hollow fiber membranes, first with small modules prepared in the laboratory, then with a much larger commercial module. Attractive features of this membrane process include the ability to recover the contaminants in concentrated form for either recycle or more economical disposal, low pressure (ambient) operation, simple scale-up using commercial hollow fiber modules, and ease of in-situ regeneration of the polymeric liquid.

  9. Radiolysis and Ageing of C2-BTP in Cinnamaldehyde/Hexanol Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fermvik, Anna; Ekberg, Christian; Retegan, Teodora; Skarnemark, Gunnar

    2007-07-01

    The separation of actinides from lanthanides is an important step in the alternative methods for nuclear waste treatment currently under development. Polycyclic molecules containing nitrogen are synthesised and used for solvent extraction. A potential problem in the separation process is the degradation of the molecule due to irradiation or ageing. An addition of nitrobenzene has proved to have an inhibitory effect on degradation when added to a system containing C2-BTP in hexanol before irradiation. In this study, 2,6-di(5,6-diethyl-1,2,4-triazine-3-yl)pyridine (C2-BTP) was dissolved in different mixtures of cinnamaldehyde and hexanol and the effects on extraction after ageing and irradiation were investigated. Similar to nitrobenzene, cinnamaldehyde contains an aromatic ring which generally has a relatively high resistance towards radiolysis. Both C2-BTP in cinnamaldehyde and C2-BTP in hexanol seem to degrade with time. The system with C2-BTP in pure hexanol is relatively stable up to 17 days but then starts slowly to degrade. The solution with pure cinnamaldehyde as diluent started to degrade after only {approx}20 hours. The opposite is true for degradation caused by radiolysis; hexanol systems are more sensitive to radiolysis than cinnamaldehyde systems. Most of the radiolytic degradation took place during the first days of irradiation, up to a dose of 4 kGy. (authors)

  10. Development of Practical Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes: A Systematic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-11-01

    Supported liquid membranes (SLMs) are a class of materials that allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties to optimize membrane performance. These membranes also have the advantage of liquid phase diffusivities, which are higher than those observed in polymers and grant proportionally greater permeabilities. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which may possess high CO2 solubility relative to light gases such as H2, are excellent candidates for this type of membrane since they are stable at elevated temperatures and have negligible vapor pressure. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of a variety of ionic liquids in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of CO2 from streams containing H2. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame synthesized and characterized ionic liquids, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated membrane performance for the resulting materials. Several steps have been taken in the development of practical supported ionic liquid membranes. Proof-of-concept was established by showing that ionic liquids could be used as the transport media in SLMs. Results showed that ionic liquids are suitable media for gas transport, but the preferred polymeric supports were not stable at temperatures above 135oC. The use of cross-linked nylon66 supports was found to produce membranes mechanically stable at temperatures exceeding 300oC but CO2/H2 selectivity was poor. An ionic liquid whose selectivity does not decrease with increasing temperature was needed, and a functionalized ionic liquid that complexes with CO2 was used. An increase in CO2/H2 selectivity with increasing temperature over the range of 37 to 85oC was observed and the dominance of a facilitated transport mechanism established. The presentation will detail membrane development, the effect of increasing transmembrane pressure, and preliminary results dealing with other gas pairs and contaminants.

  11. Supporting Information Self-Assembled Liquid Crystal Gels in Emulsion

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Yue

    Supporting Information Self-Assembled Liquid Crystal Gels in Emulsion Xia Tong,1 Jong Won Chung,2 emulsion. Fig. S1. Image a is the photomicrograph (reflection mode) of an emulsion cast on a glass slide. Polarizing photomicrographs showing (a) the droplets of liquid crystal emulsion without gelator and (b

  12. 26. DETAIL OF CONCRETE PIPE SUPPORTS LEADING TO NEW LIQUID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF CONCRETE PIPE SUPPORTS LEADING TO NEW LIQUID HYDROGEN TANK FARM; VIEW TO WEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28402, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. 25. DETAIL OF NEW CONCRETE PIPE SUPPORTS FOR YETTOBEINSTALLED LIQUID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF NEW CONCRETE PIPE SUPPORTS FOR YET-TO-BE-INSTALLED LIQUID HYDGROGEN PIPING; VIEW TO WEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28402, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. Fabrication of fiber supported ionic liquids and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Luebke, David R; Wickramanayake, Shan

    2013-02-26

    One or more embodiments relates to the production of a fabricated fiber having an asymmetric polymer network and having an immobilized liquid such as an ionic liquid within the pores of the polymer network. The process produces the fabricated fiber in a dry-wet spinning process using a homogenous dope solution, providing significant advantage over current fabrication methods for liquid-supporting polymers. The fabricated fibers may be effectively utilized for the separation of a chemical species from a mixture based on the selection of the polymer, the liquid, and the solvent utilized in the dope.

  15. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, was used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improve the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study were: (1) Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems. (2) Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system. (3) Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit. (4) Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system. and (5) Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts (not completed due to lack of funds)

  16. Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Pennline, H.W.; Myers, C.R.

    2007-05-01

    A practical form of CO2 capture at water-gas shift conditions in the IGCC process could serve the dual function of producing a pure CO2 stream for sequestration and forcing the equilibrium-limited shift reaction to completion enriching the stream in H2. The shift temperatures, ranging from the low temperature shift condition of 260°C to the gasification condition of 900°C, limit capture options by diminishing associative interactions which favor removal of CO2 from the gas stream. Certain sorption interactions, such as carbonate formation, remain available but generally involve exceptionally high sorbent regeneration energies that contribute heavily to parasitic power losses. Carbon dioxide selective membranes need only establish an equilibrium between the gas phase and sorption states in order to transport CO2, giving them a potential energetic advantage over other technologies. Supported liquid membranes take advantage of high, liquid phase diffusivities and a solution diffusion mechanism similar to that observed in polymeric membranes to achieve superior permeabilities and selectivites. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high CO2 solubility relative to light gases such as H2, are excellent candidates for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of ionic liquids including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of CO2 from streams containing H2. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame synthesized and characterized ionic liquids, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Improvements to the ionic liquid and support have allowed testing of these supported ionic liquid membranes at temperatures up to 300°C without loss of support mechanical stability or degradation of the ionic liquid. Substantial improvements in selectivity have also been observed at elevated temperature with the best membrane currently achieving optimum performance at 75°C.

  17. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  18. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-02-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  19. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, is used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improving the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study are: Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems; Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system; Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit; Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system; Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts; Work for the coming year will focus on the determination of toxicity of various solvents, selection of the emulsifying agents, as well as characterizing the mass transfer of hollow-fiber contactors.

  20. Supported liquid inorganic membranes for nuclear waste separation

    DOEpatents

    Bhave, Ramesh R; DeBusk, Melanie M; DelCul, Guillermo D; Delmau, Laetitia H; Narula, Chaitanya K

    2015-04-07

    A system and method for the extraction of americium from radioactive waste solutions. The method includes the transfer of highly oxidized americium from an acidic aqueous feed solution through an immobilized liquid membrane to an organic receiving solvent, for example tributyl phosphate. The immobilized liquid membrane includes porous support and separating layers loaded with tributyl phosphate. The extracted solution is subsequently stripped of americium and recycled at the immobilized liquid membrane as neat tributyl phosphate for the continuous extraction of americium. The sequestered americium can be used as a nuclear fuel, a nuclear fuel component or a radiation source, and the remaining constituent elements in the aqueous feed solution can be stored in glassified waste forms substantially free of americium.

  1. Feasibility of Surfactant-Free Supported Emulsion Liquid Membrane Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shih-Yao B.; Li, Jin; Wiencek, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Supported emulsion liquid membrane (SELM) is an effective means to conduct liquid-liquid extraction. SELM extraction is particularly attractive for separation tasks in the microgravity environment where density difference between the solvent and the internal phase of the emulsion is inconsequential and a stable dispersion can be maintained without surfactant. In this research, dispersed two-phase flow in SELM extraction is modeled using the Lagrangian method. The results show that SELM extraction process in the microgravity environment can be simulated on earth by matching the density of the solvent and the stripping phase. Feasibility of surfactant-free SELM (SFSELM) extraction is assessed by studying the coalescence behavior of the internal phase in the absence of the surfactant. Although the contacting area between the solvent and the internal phase in SFSELM extraction is significantly less than the area provided by regular emulsion due to drop coalescence, it is comparable to the area provided by a typical hollow-fiber membrane. Thus, the stripping process is highly unlikely to become the rate-limiting step in SFSELM extraction. SFSELM remains an effective way to achieve simultaneous extraction and stripping and is able to eliminate the equilibrium limitation in the typical solvent extraction processes. The SFSELM design is similar to the supported liquid membrane design in some aspects.

  2. Acid extraction by supported liquid membranes containing basic carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.; Cianetti, C.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The extraction of HNO/sub 3/ (nitric acid) from aqueous solutions by permeation through a number of supported liquid membranes containing basic carriers dissolved in diethylbenzene has been studied. The results have shown that the best permeations are obtained with long chain aliphatic amines (TLA, Primene JM-T) followed by TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) and then by other monofunctional and bifunctional organophosphorous basic carriers. The influence of an aliphatic diluent on the permeability of HNO/sub 3/ through a supported liquid membrane containing TLA as carrier was also investigated. In this case the permeability to HNO/sub 3/ decreases as a result of the lower diffusion coefficient of the acid-carrier complex in the more vicous aliphatic solvent. 4 figures.

  3. Supported ionic liquid phase catalysis with supercritical flow.

    PubMed

    Hintermair, Ulrich; Zhao, Guoying; Santini, Catherine C; Muldoon, Mark J; Cole-Hamilton, David J

    2007-04-14

    Rapid hydroformylation of 1-octene (rates up to 800 h(-1)) with the catalyst remaining stable for at least 40 h and with very low rhodium leaching levels (0.5 ppm) is demonstrated when using a system involving flowing the substrate, reacting gases and products dissolved in supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) over a fixed bed supported ionic liquid phase catalyst. PMID:17389993

  4. Facilitated Catecholamine Transport through Bulk and Polymer-Supported Liquid Membranes

    E-print Network

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Facilitated Catecholamine Transport through Bulk and Polymer-Supported Liquid Membranes Marie as carriers for catecholamine transport through bulk liquid membranes (BLMs) and supported liquid membranes considered: (i) bulk liquid membranes (BLMs), where the aqueous source and receiving phases are separated

  5. Liquid supported denture-management of flabby ridges

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Pranav V.; Kumar, Girish; Kumar, Manish; Shetty, Brijesh

    2012-01-01

    The ideal properties of a denture are adequate rigidity on polished surface to bear masticatory forces and at the same time, flexibility and softness on the tissue surface for proper and even distribution of masticatory forces. The problem with conventional denture is rigidity of tissue surface; leads to uneven distribution of load. This drawback even worsens in the case of flabby, atrophic and unemployed ridges with excessive bone resorption. The liquid supported denture allows continued adaptation and eliminates the disadvantages of denture designs based on the application of temporary tissue conditioners or soft liners. PMID:23293491

  6. Separation of metal species by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The work performed in the Separation Chemistry Group of the Chemistry Division of Argonne National Laboratory on the transport and separation properties of supported liquid membranes (SLM) are reviewed. The models and equations which describe the permeation through SLMs of metal species are described. These models have been tested with various carriers absorbed on flat-sheet and hollow-fiber SLMs by measuring the permeation of several metal species of hydrometallurgical and nuclear interest. An equation for the separation factor of metal species in SLM processes and examples of separations of metal ions are reported. The possibility of bypassing the single stage character of SLM separations by using multilayer composite SLMs, arranged in series, is also analyzed. Finally, the factors which control the stability of SLMs are briefly discussed. 28 references, 27 figures, 6 tables.

  7. Separation of metal species by supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    The works performed on the transport and separation properties of supported liquid membranes (SLM) are reviewed. The models and equations which describe the permeation through SLMs of metal species are described. These models have been tested with various carriers absorbed on flat-sheet and hollow-fiber SLMs by measuring the permeation of several metal species of hydrometallurgical and nuclear interest. An equation for the separation factor of metal species in SLM processes and examples of separations of metal ions are reported. The possibility of bypassing the single stage character of SLM separations by using multilayer composite SLMs, arranged in series, is also analyzed. Finally, the factors which control the stability of SLMs are briefly discussed.

  8. Systemic resistance and lipoxygenase-related defence response induced in tomato by Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Adam; Ongena, Marc; Duby, Francéline; Dommes, Jacques; Thonart, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1 to promote induced systemic resistance (ISR) in different host plants. Since ISR is long-lasting and not conducive for development of resistance of the targeted pathogen, this phenomenon can take part of disease control strategies. However, in spite of the numerous examples of ISR induced by PGPR in plants, only a few biochemical studies have associated the protective effect with specific host metabolic changes. Results In this study, we showed the protective effect of this bacterium in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. Following treatment by P. putida BTP1, analyses of acid-hydrolyzed leaf extracts showed an accumulation of antifungal material after pathogen infection. The fungitoxic compounds thus mainly accumulate as conjugates from which active aglycones may be liberated through the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. These results suggest that strain BTP1 can elicit systemic phytoalexin accumulation in tomato as one defence mechanism. On another hand, we have shown that key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway are stimulated in plants treated with the bacteria as compared with control plants. Interestingly, this stimulation is observed only after pathogen challenge in agreement with the priming concept almost invariably associated with the ISR phenomenon. Conclusion Through the demonstration of phytoalexin accumulation and LOX pathway stimulation in tomato, this work provides new insights into the diversity of defence mechanisms that are inducible by non-pathogenic bacteria in the context of ISR. PMID:19000301

  9. Advanced Supported Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Control in Extravehicular Activity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickham, David T. (Inventor); Gleason, Kevin J. (Inventor); Cowley, Scott W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    There is disclosed a portable life support system with a component for removal of at least one selected gas. In an embodiment, the system includes a supported liquid membrane having a first side and a second side in opposition to one another, the first side configured for disposition toward an astronaut and the second side configured for disposition toward a vacuum atmosphere. The system further includes an ionic liquid disposed between the first side and the second side of the supported liquid membrane, the ionic liquid configured for removal of at least one selected gas from a region housing the astronaut adjacent the first side of the supported liquid membrane to the vacuum atmosphere adjacent the second side of the supported liquid membrane. Other embodiments are also disclosed.

  10. The effect of porous support composition and operating parameters on the performance of supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1991-02-01

    Factors, such as porous support composition and operating parameters, that influence the performance of supported liquid membranes (SLMs) were investigated. SLMs of varying porous support compositions and structures were studied for the transport of metal ions. A microporous polybenzimidazole support was synthesized and prepared in the form of an SLM. This SLM containing the selective extractant di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid was evaluated for the transport of copper and neodymium. Dramatically improved performance over that of commercially available membranes was found in tests for removing the metal ions from solution. Metal ion transport reaches near completion in less than 3 hours, whereas Celgard-polypropylene and Nuclepore-polycarbonate reaches only 50% completion even after 15 hours. The transport driving force for acidic extractants is a pH gradient between the feed and strip solutions. Polybenzimidazole, an acid- and radiation-resistant polymer, has two protonatable tertiary nitrogens per repeat unit that may help sustain the pH driving force. Another factor may be the ability of the polybenzimidazole to hydrogen bond with the extractant. Transport through the flat-sheet SLMs were tested using a unique cell design. Countercurrent flow of the feed and strip solutions was established through machined channels in half-cell faceplates that are in a spiral, mirror-image pattern with respect to each other, with the flat-sheet SLM interposed between the two channeled solutions. 7 refs., 14 figs.

  11. Buildings R&D Breakthroughs: Technologies and Products Supported by the Building Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Weakley, Steven A.

    2012-04-15

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and characterize commercially available products and emerging (near-commercial) technologies that benefited from the support of the Building Technologies Program (BTP) within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The investigation specifically focused on technology-oriented research and development (R&D) projects funded by BTP’s Emerging Technologies subprogram from 2005-2011.

  12. Buildings R&D Breakthroughs. Technologies and Products Supported by the Building Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-04-01

    This report identifies and characterizes commercially available products and emerging (near-commercial) technologies that benefited from the support of the Building Technologies Program (BTP) within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The investigation specifically focused on technology-oriented research and development (R&D) projects sponsored by BTP’s Emerging Technologies subprogram from 2005-2009.

  13. Early Transcriptional Responses of Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants to Wild Type, ?virB2 or ?btpB Brucella abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Juliana P. S.; Costa, Erica A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Sun, Yao-Hui; Tsolis, Reneé M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Santos, Renato L.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the Brucella-induced inflammatory response in the bovine placenta is not completely understood. In this study we evaluated the role of the B. abortus Type IV secretion system and the anti-inflammatory factor BtpB in early interactions with bovine placental tissues. Transcription profiles of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) explants inoculated with wild type (strain 2308), ?virB2 or ?btpB Brucella abortus were compared by microarray analysis at 4 hours post infection. Transcripts with significant variation (>2 fold change; P<0.05) were functionally classified, and transcripts related to defense and inflammation were assessed by quantitative real time RT-PCR. Infection with wild type B. abortus resulted in slightly more genes with decreased than increased transcription levels. Conversely, infection of trophoblastic cells with the ?virB2 or the ?btpB mutant strains, that lack a functional T4SS or that has impaired inhibition of TLR signaling, respectively, induced more upregulated than downregulated genes. Wild type Brucella abortus impaired transcription of host genes related to immune response when compared to ?virB and ?btpB mutants. Our findings suggest that proinflammatory genes are negatively modulated in bovine trophoblastic cells at early stages of infection. The virB operon and btpB are directly or indirectly related to modulation of these host genes. These results shed light on the early interactions between B. abortus and placental tissue that ultimately culminate in inflammatory pathology and abortion. PMID:25259715

  14. The elicitation of a systemic resistance by Pseudomonas putida BTP1 in tomato involves the stimulation of two lipoxygenase isoforms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some non-pathogenic rhizobacteria called Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) possess the capacity to induce in plant defense mechanisms effective against pathogens. Precedent studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida BTP1 to induce PGPR-mediated resistance, termed ISR (Induced Systemic Resistance), in different plant species. Despite extensive works, molecular defense mechanisms involved in ISR are less well understood that in the case of pathogen induced systemic acquired resistance. Results We analyzed the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX), key enzymes of the phenylpropanoid and oxylipin pathways respectively, in tomato treated or not with P. putida BTP1. The bacterial treatment did not stimulate PAL activity and linoleate-consuming LOX activities. Linolenate-consuming LOX activity, on the contrary, was significantly stimulated in P. putida BTP1-inoculated plants before and two days after infection by B. cinerea. This stimulation is due to the increase of transcription level of two isoforms of LOX: TomLoxD and TomLoxF, a newly identified LOX gene. We showed that recombinant TomLOXF preferentially consumes linolenic acid and produces 13-derivative of fatty acids. After challenging with B. cinerea, the increase of transcription of these two LOX genes and higher linolenic acid-consuming LOX activity were associated with a more rapid accumulation of free 13-hydroperoxy-octadecatrienoic and 13-hydroxy-octadecatrienoic acids, two antifungal oxylipins, in bacterized plants. Conclusion In addition to the discovery of a new LOX gene in tomato, this work is the first to show differential induction of LOX isozymes and a more rapid accumulation of 13-hydroperoxy-octadecatrienoic and 13-hydroxy-octadecatrienoic acids in rhizobacteria mediated-induced systemic resistance. PMID:21294872

  15. A BTP1 prophage gene present in invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella determines composition and length of the O-antigen of the lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kintz, Erica; Davies, Mark R; Hammarlöf, Disa L; Canals, Rocío; Hinton, Jay C D; van der Woude, Marjan W

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella?Typhimurium isolate D23580 represents a recently identified ST313 lineage of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellae (iNTS). One of the differences between this lineage and other non-iNTS S. Typhimurium isolates is the presence of prophage BTP1. This prophage encodes a gtrC gene, implicated in O-antigen modification. GtrCBTP1 is essential for maintaining O-antigen length in isolate D23580, since a gtrBTP1 mutant yields a short O-antigen. This phenotype can be complemented by gtrCBTP1 or very closely related gtrC genes. The short O-antigen of the gtrBTP1 mutant was also compensated by deletion of the BTP1 phage tailspike gene in the D23580 chromosome. This tailspike protein has a putative endorhamnosidase domain and thus may mediate O-antigen cleavage. Expression of the gtrCBTP1 gene is, in contrast to expression of many other gtr operons, not subject to phase variation and transcriptional analysis suggests that gtrC is produced under a variety of conditions. Additionally, GtrCBTP1 expression is necessary and sufficient to provide protection against BTP1 phage infection of an otherwise susceptible strain. These data are consistent with a model in which GtrCBTP1 mediates modification of the BTP1 phage O-antigen receptor in lysogenic D23580, and thereby prevents superinfection by itself and other phage that uses the same O-antigen co-receptor. PMID:25586744

  16. Management of flabby ridges using liquid supported denture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya

    2011-01-01

    Flabby ridges commonly occur in edentulous patients. Inadequate retention and stability of a complete denture are the often encountered problems in these patients. A liquid supported denture due to its flexible tissue surface allows better distribution of stress and hence provides an alternate treatment modality in such cases. This case report presents the use of a liquid supported denture in a patient with completely edentulous maxillary arch with flabby tissue in anterior region opposing a partially edentulous mandibular arch. PMID:21503193

  17. Nanopore stochastic detection of a liquid explosive component and sensitizers using boromycin and an ionic liquid supporting electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Jayawardhana, Dilani A; Crank, Jeffrey A; Zhao, Qitao; Armstrong, Daniel W; Guan, Xiyun

    2009-01-01

    We report a rapid and sensitive stochastic nanopore sensing method for the detection of monovalent cations and liquid explosive components and their sensitizers. The sensing element is a wild-type alpha-hemolysin protein pore with boromycin as a molecular adaptor, while a solution containing an ionic liquid was used as the background electrolyte. The analyte-boromycin complexes showed significantly different signatures. Specifically, their event mean dwell times and amplitudes were sufficiently distinct to permit the convenient differentiation and even simultaneous detection of liquid explosive components in aqueous environments. In addition, the results also demonstrate that the usage of specific ionic liquid salt solutions instead of NaCl or KCl solution as supporting electrolyte provides a useful means to greatly enhance the sensitivity of the nanopore for some analytes in stochastic sensing. PMID:19055422

  18. A Monolithic Hybrid Cellulose-2.5-Acetate/Polymer Bioreactor for Biocatalysis under Continuous Liquid-Liquid Conditions Using a Supported Ionic Liquid Phase.

    PubMed

    Sandig, Bernhard; Michalek, Lukas; Vlahovic, Sandra; Antonovici, Mihaela; Hauer, Bernhard; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2015-10-26

    Mesoporous monolithic hybrid cellulose-2.5-acetate (CA)/polymer supports were prepared under solvent-induced phase separation conditions using cellulose-2.5-acetate microbeads 8-14??m in diameter, 1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl)propane and 4,4'-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) as monomers as well as THF and n-heptane as porogenic solvents. 4-(Dimethylamino)pyridine and dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTDL), respectively, were used as catalysts. Monolithic hybrid supports were used in transesterification reactions of vinyl butyrate with 1-butanol under continuous, supported ionic liquid-liquid conditions with Candida antarctica lipase?B (CALB) and octylmethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([OMIM(+) ][BF4 (-) ]) immobilized within the CA beads inside the polymeric monolithic framework and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as the continuous phase. The new hybrid bioreactors were successfully used in dimensions up to 2×30?cm (V=94?mL). Under continuous biphasic liquid-liquid conditions a constant conversion up to 96?% was achieved over a period of 18?days, resulting in a productivity of 58??mol?mg(-1) (CALB)?min(-1) . This translates into an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 3.9×10(7) within two weeks, which is much higher than the one obtained under standard biphasic conditions using [OMIM(+) ][BF4 (-) ]/MTBE (TON=2.7×10(6) ). The continuous liquid-liquid setup based on a hybrid reactor presented here is strongly believed to be applicable to many other enzyme-catalyzed reactions. PMID:26493884

  19. SEPARATION PROPERTIES OF SURFACE MODIFIED SILICA SUPPORTED LIQUID MEMBRANES FOR DIVALENT METAL REMOVAL/RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis and separation properties of a mesoporous silica supported liquid membrane (SLM) were studied. The membranes consisted of a silica layer, from dip-coated colloidal silica, on a a-alumina support, modified with DCDMS (dichlorodimethyl silane) to add surface methyl g...

  20. Biopolymer-supported ionic-liquid-phase ruthenium catalysts for olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Clousier, Nathalie; Filippi, Alexandra; Borré, Etienne; Guibal, Eric; Crévisy, Christophe; Caijo, Fréderic; Mauduit, Marc; Dez, Isabelle; Gaumont, Annie-Claude

    2014-04-01

    Original ruthenium supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts based on alginates as supports were developed for olefin metathesis reactions. The marine biopolymer, which fulfills most of the requisite properties for a support such as widespread abundance, insolubility in the majority of organic solvents, a high affinity for ionic liquids, high chemical stability, biodegradability, low cost, and easy processing, was impregnated by [bmim][PF6 ] containing an ionically tagged ruthenium catalyst. These biosourced catalysts show promising performances in ring-closing metathesis (RCM) and cross-metathesis (CM) reactions, with a high level of recyclability and reusability combined with a good reactivity. PMID:24616203

  1. Liquid-Supported Dentures: A Soft Option—A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anoop; Puranik, Shivakumar; Jagadeesh, M. S.; Kattimani, Puttaraj; Akki, Savita; Kumar, Pawan; laxmi', Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-supported denture technique allows continued adaptation of denture to the mucosa both at resting and functional state. A complete denture prosthesis is unacceptable if it violates the foundation on which it rests. In this case, a technique for fabrication of a complete denture prosthesis that eliminates the disadvantages of tissue conditioners and soft liners (i.e., poor bond strength to acrylic, candidal colonization, etc.) and preserves the remaining tissues is described. Liquid-supported denture can be a permanent solution to some patients with problematic conditions like diabetes, xerostomia, atrophied ridge, and so forth. PMID:23555061

  2. Extraction of aluminum from a pickling bath with supported liquid membrane extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Berends, A.M.; Witkamp, G.J.; Rosmalen, G.M. van

    1999-04-01

    Large amounts of waste are produced yearly in the galvanic and chemical surface treatment industry. Bath liquids used in the various processes lose their function due to contamination. The spent bath liquids have to be replaced and treated prior to disposal, leading to high costs and a high environmental burden. In this paper, a proposed solution to the problem is investigated: the selective removal of the contaminant with supported liquid membrane extraction. The extraction of aluminum, a contaminant at high concentrations, from a pickling bath liquid with hydrofluoric acid and phosphoric acid as its main components has been carried out with the basic extractants Alamine 308 and Alamine 336 in a flat sheet-supported liquid membrane setup. Aluminum transport rates were obtained in the order of 10{sup {minus}6}--10{sup {minus}5} mol/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} s), which are normal values for this technique. The extraction was not completely selective as dissolved phosphorus was coextracted. In all experiments, precipitation took place on the surface of the liquid membrane and in the bulk of the strip phase. Increasing the stripping alkalinity from pH = 8 to pH = 13 reduced the amount of precipitation in the bulk of the strip phase but caused a substantial decrease in the aluminum flux. The precipitation prevents industrial application of the systems investigated.

  3. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-02

    This report consists of Detailed Data Acquisition Sheets for Runs E-6 and E-7 for Task 2.2 of the Modification, Operation, and Support Studies of the Liquid Phase Methanol Laporte Process Development Unit. (Task 2.2: Alternate Catalyst Run E-6 and Catalyst Activity Maintenance Run E-7).

  4. The Effect of Microporous Polymeric Support Modification on Surface and Gas Transport Properties of Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Akhmetshina, Alsu A; Davletbaeva, Ilsiya M; Grebenschikova, Ekaterina S; Sazanova, Tatyana S; Petukhov, Anton N; Atlaskin, Artem A; Razov, Evgeny N; Zaripov, Ilnaz I; Martins, Carla F; Neves, Luísa A; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V

    2015-01-01

    Microporous polymers based on anionic macroinitiator and toluene 2,4-diisocyanate were used as a support for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF?]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([emim][Tf?N]) immobilization. The polymeric support was modified by using silica particles associated in oligomeric media, and the influence of the modifier used on the polymeric structure was studied. The supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) were tested for He, N?, NH?, H?S, and CO? gas separation and ideal selectivities were calculated. The high values of ideal selectivity for ammonia-based systems with permanent gases were observed on polymer matrixes immobilized with [bmim][PF?] and [emim][Tf?N]. The modification of SILMs by nanosize silica particles leads to an increase of NH? separation relatively to CO? or H?S. PMID:26729177

  5. Evaluation of LMR (liquid metal reactors) core support concepts under seismic events

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In the design of the core support system for liquid metal reactors (LMR) against earthquakes, the major concerns are directed toward the structural integrity as well as the reactivity control. This means that, in addition to the stress levels, maximum displacements and accelerations should also be within their allowable limits. This investigation studies the seismic responses of a large pool-type LMR with different design approaches to support the reactor core. Different core support designs yield different frequency ranges and responses. Responses of these designs to the given floor response spectra are required to satisfy a set of criteria which are common to all designs. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Selective Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes: The Effect of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-04-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is widely viewed as a promising technology for the large scale production of energy in a carbon constrained world. These cycles, which include gasification, contaminant removal, water-gas shift, CO2 capture and compression, and combustion of the reduced-carbon fuel gas in a turbine, often have significant efficiency advantages over conventional combustion technologies. A CO2 selective membrane capable of maintaining performance at conditions approaching those of low temperature water-gas shift (260oC) could facilitate the production of carbon-neutral energy by simultaneously driving the shift reaction to completion and concentrating CO2 for sequestration. Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) have been previously evaluated for this application and determined to be physically and chemically stable to temperatures in excess of 300oC. These membranes were based on ionic liquids which interacted physically with CO2 and diminished considerably in selectivity at higher temperatures. To alleviate this problem, the original ionic liquids were replaced with ionic liquids able to form chemical complexes with CO2. These complexing ionic liquid membranes have a local maximum in selectivity which is observed at increasing temperatures for more stable complexes. Efforts are currently underway to develop ionic liquids with selectivity maxima at temperatures greater than 75oC, the best result to date, but other practical concerns must also be addressed if the membrane is to be realistically expected to function under water-gas shift conditions. A CO2 selective membrane must function not only at high temperature, but also in the presence of all the reactants and contaminants likely to be present in coal-derived fuel gas, including water, CO, and H2S. A study has been undertaken which examines the effects of each of these gases on both complexing and physically interacting supported liquid membranes. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame synthesized and characterized ionic liquids, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance.

  7. Determination of phthalate ester plasticizers in the aquatic environment using hollow fibre supported liquid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtibe, A.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mishra, Ajay K.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    Phthalates are known to be carcinogenic, teratogenic as well as endocrine disruptors. The potential risk to human and animals health generated from them has drawn great attention all over the world. Hollow fibre supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) online with high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and Diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in wastewater. Toluene, di-n-hexyl ether and undecane were used as liquid barriers separating both donor (sample) and acceptor phase. Toluene performed much better than undecane and was used in sample preparation. The presence of toluene showed the potential for the enrichment and removal of phthalates to the concentrations ranges from 0 to 1.7 mg L-1.

  8. Ignition capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, D. D.-M.; Salmonson, J. D.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; Haan, S. W.; Amendt, P.; Wu, K. J.

    2013-11-01

    For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to ?-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65 - 75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

  9. Development of a Supported Emulsion Liquid Membrane System for Propionic Acid Separation in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jin; Hu, Shih-Yao B.; Wiencek, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Perstractive fermentation is a good way to increase the productivity of bioreactors. Using Propionibacteria as the model system, the feasibility of using supported emulsion liquid membrane (SELM) for perstractive fermentation is assessed in this study. Five industrial solvents were considered as the solvent for preparing the SELM. The more polar a solvent is, the higher the partition coefficient. However, toxicity of a solvent also increases with its polarity. CO-1055 (industrial decanol/octanol blend) has the highest partition coefficient toward propionic acid among the solvents that has no molecular toxicity toward Propionibacteria. A preliminary extraction study was conducted using tetradecane as solvent in a hydrophobic hollow fiber contactor. The result confirmed that SELM eliminates the equilibrium limitation of conventional liquid-liquid extraction, and allows the use of a non-toxic solvent with low partition coefficient.

  10. Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported Liquid DT Fuel For The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D D; Salmonson, J D; Clark, D S; Lindl, J D; Haan, S W; Amendt, P; Wu, K J

    2011-10-25

    For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to {beta}-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65-75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

  11. Chiroptical Probing of Lanthanide-Directed Self-Assembly Formation Using btp Ligands Formed in One-Pot Diazo-Transfer/Deprotection Click Reaction from Chiral Amines.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Joseph P; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Peacock, Robert D; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2016-01-11

    A series of enantiomeric 2,6-bis(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridines (btp)-containing ligands was synthesized by a one-pot two-step copper-catalyzed amine/alkyne click reaction. The Eu(III) - and Tb(III) -directed self-assembly formation of these ligands was studied in CH3 CN by monitoring their various photophysical properties, including their emerging circular dichroism and circularly polarized luminescence. The global analysis of the former enabled the determination of both the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the various chiral supramolecular species in solution. PMID:26555573

  12. SUPPORTED LIX-84 LIQUID MEMBRANES FOR METAL ION SEPARATION: A STUDY ON METAL ION SORPTION EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Supported 2-hydroxy-5-nonyl-acetophenone oxime (LIX-84) liquid membranes have potential applications for the removal (or recovery) of copper ions from waste streams. But, the stability of such a liquid membrane remains the major hurdle for its practical applications. Inorganic su...

  13. A supported polymeric liquid membrane process for removal of carboxylic acids from a waste stream

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.V.

    1999-12-31

    The removal or elimination of organic residues from aqueous waste streams represents a major need in the chemical industry. The authors have developed a new class of membrane called supported polymeric liquid membranes that are capable of removing and concentrating low molecular weight organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions, especially those that also contain high concentrations of inorganic salts. Attractive features of this membrane process include the ability to recover the contaminants in concentrated form for either recycle or more economical disposal, low pressure (ambient) operation, simple scale-up using commercial hollow fiber modules, and ease of in-situ regeneration of the polymeric liquid. The process has shown treatment feasibility for several types of aqueous waste streams. This paper describes the laboratory development activities for treating a waste stream containing a dilute mixture of C2-C6 carboxylic acids and nitric acid.

  14. Supported liquid membrane-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of cyanobacterial toxins in fresh water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbukwa, Elbert A.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasingly becoming of great concern to water resources worldwide due to indiscriminate waste disposal habits resulting in water pollution and eutrophication. When cyanobacterial cells lyse (burst) they release toxins called microcystins (MCs) that are well known for their hepatotoxicity (causing liver damage) and have been found in eutrophic lakes, rivers, wastewater ponds and other water reservoirs. Prolonged exposure to low concentrated MCs are equally of health importance as they are known to be bioaccumulative and even at such low concentration do exhibit toxic effects to aquatic animals, wildlife and human liver cells. The application of common treatment processes for drinking water sourced from HABs infested reservoirs have the potential to cause algal cell lyses releasing low to higher amounts of MCs in finished water. Trace microcystins in water/tissue can be analyzed and quantified using Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) following solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample clean-up procedures. However, extracting MCs from algal samples which are rich in chlorophyll pigments and other organic matrices the SPE method suffers a number of drawbacks, including cartridge clogging, long procedural steps and use of larger volumes of extraction solvents. We applied a supported liquid membrane (SLM) based technique as an alternative sample clean-up method for LC-ESI-MS analysis of MCs from both water and algal cells. Four (4) MC variants (MC-RR, -YR, -LR and -WR) from lyophilized cells of Microcystis aeruginosa and water collected from a wastewater pond were identified) and quantified using LC-ESI-MS following a SLM extraction and liquid partitioning step, however, MC-WR was not detected from water extracts. Within 45 min of SLM extraction all studied MCs were extracted and pre-concentrated in approximately 15 ?L of an acceptor phase at an optimal pH 2.02 of the donor phase (sample). The highest total quantifiable intracellular and extracellular MCs were 37.039 ± 0.087 ?g/g DW and 5.123 ± 0.018 ?g/L, respectively. The concentrations of MC-RR were the highest from all samples studied recording maximum values of 21.579 ± 0.066 ?g/g DW and 3.199 ± 0.012 ?g/L for intracellular and extracellular quantities, respectively.

  15. SUPPORTED LIQUID CATALYSTS FOR REMOVAL OF HIGH TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan W. Weimer; Peter Czerpak; Patrick Hilbert

    2000-01-01

    A novel catalytic synthesis gas oxidation process using molten carbonate salts supported on compatible fluidized iron oxide particles (supported-liquid-phase-catalyst (SLPC) fluidized bed process) was investigated. This process combines the advantages of large scale fluidized bed processing with molten salt bath oxidation. Molten salt catalysts can be supported within porous fluidized particles in order to improve mass transfer rates between the liquid catalysts and the reactant gases. Synthesis gas can be oxidized at reduced temperatures resulting in low NO{sub x} formation while trace sulfides and halides are captured in-situ. Hence, catalytic oxidation of synthesis gas can be carried out simultaneously with hot gas cleanup. Such SLPC fluidized bed processes are affected by inter-particle liquid capillary forces that may lead to agglomeration and de-fluidization of the bed. An understanding of the origin and strength of these forces is needed so that they can be overcome in practice. Process design is based on thermodynamic free energy minimization calculations that indicate the suitability of eutectic Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures for capturing trace impurities in-situ (< 1 ppm SO{sub x} released) while minimizing the formation of NO{sub x}(< 10 ppm). Iron oxide has been identified as a preferred support material since it is non-reactive with sodium, is inexpensive, has high density (i.e. inertia), and can be obtained in various particle sizes and porosities. Force balance modeling has been used to design a surrogate ambient temperature system that is hydrodynamically similar to the real system, thus allowing complementary investigation of the governing fluidization hydrodynamics. The primary objective of this research was to understand the origin of and to quantify the liquid capillary interparticle forces affecting the molten carbonate SLPC fluidized bed process. Substantial theoretical and experimental exploratory results indicate process feasibility. The potential environmental gain from success is enormous, impacting all areas of the world where coal is burned to supply steam or direct industrial heat. Project success may lead to an integrated combustion system providing for simultaneous catalytic oxidation and hot gas cleanup of raw synthesis gas from an upstream coal gasifier.

  16. Matrix supported liquid culture and machine vision analysis of regenerated shoots of gladiolus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S Dutta; Prasad, V S S

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of efficiency and efficacy of plant regeneration are primary goals of micropropagation. An efficient method with rapid and improved shoot regeneration of gladiolus based upon matrix supported liquid culture technique has been demonstrated. This technique in addition ensured the quality of the regenerated shoots by effectively alleviating the phenomenon of hyperhydricity. Efficacy in plant regeneration can be brought about by the ability to sort and objectively select plants or group of plants with a desired feature. A reliable, noninvasive, machine vision-neural network based sorting method for clustering photometric variants of regenerated shoots of gladiolus has also been described. PMID:20099094

  17. Summary of Liquid Propulsion System Needs in Support of the Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorier, Terry; Sumrall, Phil; Baine, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In January 2004, the President of the United States established the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) to complete the International Space Station, retire the Space Shuttle and develop its replacement, and expand the human presence on the Moon as a stepping stone to human exploration of Mars and worlds beyond. In response, NASA developed the Constellation Program, consisting of the components shown in Figure 1. This paper will summarize the manned spaceflight liquid propulsion system needs in support of the Constellation Program over the next 10 years. It will address all liquid engine needs to support human exploration from low Earth orbit (LEO) to the lunar surface, including an overview of engines currently under contract, those baselined but not yet under contract, and those propulsion needs that have yet to be initiated. There may be additional engine needs for early demonstrators, but those will not be addressed as part of this paper. Also, other portions of the VSE architecture, including the planned Orion abort test boosters and the Lunar Precursor Robotic Program, are not addressed here as they either use solid motors or are focused on unmanned elements of returning humans to the Moon.

  18. Supported Phospholipid Bilayer Defects Created by a Cation or Anion of a Room-Temperature Ionic Liquid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, the independent effects on a supported phospholipid bilayer (SPB) caused by a cation and anion of a room-temperature ionic liquid (RT-IL) were studied via atomic force microscopy (AFM). The supported phospholipid bilayer was composed only of 1,2-dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine (DEPC) an...

  19. Effect of supporting membrane on removal of cadmium by the hybrid liquid membrane process.

    PubMed

    Garmsiri, M; Mortaheb, H R; Amini, M H

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid liquid membrane process was used to remove cadmium cation from a solution using bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid as the carrier for the first time. Different polyethersulphone supporting membranes were prepared by a phase inversion technique. The prepared membrane could be efficiently used as the supporting membranes for the proposed process. The effects of porosity and pore size of the supporting membrane on removal efficiency were investigated. In addition, the effects of various operating parameters such as carrier concentration in organic phase, pH of feed phase, acid concentration, and temperature on the performance of the process were also investigated. It was found that the maximum flux of cadmium is obtained using the supporting membrane with 84.5% porosity and the pore size of 132?nm. The optimum carrier concentration is 0.2?M, the optimum pH of the feed phase is 6, and the optimum concentration of acid in the stripping phase is 0.6?M. PMID:25337970

  20. Advanced Supported Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Control in Cabin Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickham, David T.; Gleason, Kevin J.; Engel, Jeffrey R.; Chullen, Cinda

    2016-01-01

    The development of new, robust, life support systems is critical to NASA's continued progress in space exploration. One vital function is maintaining the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the cabin at levels that do not impair the health or performance of the crew. The CO2 removal assembly (CDRA) is the current CO2 control technology on-board the International Space Station (ISS). Although the CDRA has met the needs of the ISS to date, the repeated cycling of the molecular sieve sorbent causes it to break down into small particles that clog filters or generate dust in the cabin. This reduces reliability and increases maintenance requirements. Another approach that has potential advantages over the current system is a membrane that separates CO2 from air. In this approach, cabin air contacts one side of the membrane while other side of the membrane is maintained at low pressure to create a driving force for CO2 transport across the membrane. In this application, the primary power requirement is for the pump that creates the low pressure and then pumps the CO2 to the oxygen recovery system. For such a membrane to be practical, it must have high CO2 permeation rate and excellent selectivity for CO2 over air. Unfortunately, conventional gas separation membranes do not have adequate CO2 permeability and selectivity to meet the needs of this application. However, the required performance could be obtained with a supported liquid membrane (SLM), which consists of a microporous material filled with a liquid that selectively reacts with CO2 over air. In a recently completed Phase II SBIR project, Reaction Systems, Inc. fabricated an SLM that is very close to meeting permeability and selectivity objectives for use in the advanced space suit portable life support system. This paper describes work carried out to evaluate its potential for use in spacecraft cabin application.

  1. The application of supported liquid extraction in the analysis of benzodiazepines using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Doctor, Erika L; McCord, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently prescribed medicines for anxiety disorders and are present in many toxicological screens. These drugs are often administered in the commission of drug facilitated sexual assaults due their effects on the central nervous system. Due to the potency of the drugs, only small amounts are usually given to victims; therefore, the target detection limit for these compounds in biological samples has been set at 50ng/mL. Currently the standard screening method for detection of this class of drug is the immunoassay; however, screening methods that are more sensitive and selective than immunoassays are needed to encompass the wide range of structural variants of this class of compounds. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can be highly sensitive and has been shown to permit analysis of various benzodiazepines with limits of detection as low as 6ng/mL. This technique permits analytical results in less than 2min when used on pure drug samples. For biological samples, a key issue for analysis by SERS is removal of exogenous salts and matrix components. In this paper we examine supported liquid extraction as a useful preparation technique for SERS detection. Supported liquid extraction has many of the benefits of liquid-liquid extraction along with the ability to be automated. This technique provides a fast and clean extraction for benzodiazepines from urine at a pH of 5.0, and does not produce large quantities of solvent waste. To validate this procedure we have determined figures of merit and examined simulated urine samples prepared with commonly appearing interferences. It was shown that at a pH 5.0 many drugs that are prevalent in urine samples can be removed, permitting a selective detection of the benzodiazepine of interest. This technique has been shown to provide rapid (less than 20min), sensitive, and specific detection of benzodiazepines with limits of detection between 32 and 600ng/mL and dynamic range of 32-25,000ng/mL. It provides the forensic community with a sensitive and specific screening technique for the detection of benzodiazepines in drug facilitated assault cases. PMID:26452911

  2. Some methods of human liquid and solid wastes utilization in bioregenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, N. A.; Ushakova, S. Á.; Tikhomirov, A. Á.; Zolotukhin, I. G.; Gribovskaya, I. V.; Gros, J. B.

    The possibility of stepwise utilization of human liquid and solid wastes with the purpose of an increase of a closure degree of bioregenerative life support systems BLSS and sodium chloride inclusion in the organic matter turnover was investigated On the first stage urine and faeces were subjected to oxidation by Yu A Kudenko physicochemical method On the next stage the products of human liquid and solid wastes oxidation were used for roots nutrition of wheat grown by substrate culture method Soil-like substrate the technology of which was described earlier was used as a substrate After the wheat cultivation the irrigational solution and the solution obtained in the result of substrate washing containing mineral elements not absorbed by the plants were used for cultivation of salt-tolerant Salicornia europaea plants The above-ground biomass of these vegetables can be used as a food and roots washed from dissoluble mineral elements can be added to the soil-like substrate Four consecutive wheat and Salicornia europaea vegetations were cultivated In the result of this complex technology of wheat and Salicornia europaea cultivation the soil-like substrate salinization by NaCl introduced into the irrigational solution together with the products of urine oxidation has considerably decreased

  3. Hollow-fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) for the separation of lanthanides and actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Mohapatra, P.K.; Ansari, S.A.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Manchanda, V.K.; Patil, C.B.

    2008-07-01

    The transport behavior of Nd(III) was investigated using hollow-fiber supported liquid membranes (HFSLM) from an acidic feed solution using N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-diglycolamide (TODGA) in normal paraffinic hydrocarbon (NPH) as the carrier. Near quantitative transport (>99%) of Nd(III) from 500 mL of feed containing 1 g/L Nd in 3.5 M HNO{sub 3} was possible in about 45 minutes. Quantitative transport time increased when the volume or Nd(III ) concentration in the feed was increased. The liquid membrane had excellent stability as indicated by eight consecutive runs that gave consistent transport rates. The HFSLM data using Cyanex- 301 in n-dodecane as carrier extractant for the lanthanide-actinide separation with the feed solution 1 M NaNO{sub 3} at pH 3.5 and stripping solution 0.01 M EDTA at a pH 3.5 were promising. (authors)

  4. Effect of Ammonium- and Phosphonium-Based Ionic Liquids on the Separation of Lactic Acid by Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes (SILMs)

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Michiaki; Panigrahi, Abhishek; Murakami, Yuuki; Kondo, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers have attracted much attention from an environmental point of view. Optically pure lactic acid that can be prepared by fermentation is one of the important raw materials for biodegradable polymer. The separation and purification of lactic acid from the fermentation broth are the major portions of the production costs. We proposed the application of supported ionic liquid membranes to recovering lactic acid. In this paper, the effect of ionic liquids, such as Aliquat 336, CYPHOS IL-101, CYPHOS IL-102, CYPHOS IL-104, CYPHOS IL-109 and CYPHOS IL-111 on the lactic acid permeation have been studied. Aliquat 336, CYPHOS IL-101 and CYPHOS IL-102 were found to be the best membrane solvents as far as membrane stability and permeation of lactic acid are concerned. CYPHOS IL-109 and CYPHOS IL-111 were found to be unsuitable, as they leak out from the pores of the supported liquid membrane (SLM), thereby allowing free transport of lactic acid as well as hydrochloric acid. CYPHOS IL-102 was found to be the most adequate (Permeation rate = 60.41%) among these ionic liquids as far as the separation of lactic acid is concerned. The permeation mechanisms, by which ionic liquid-water complexes act as the carrier of lactate and hydrochloric acid, were proposed. The experimental permeation results have been obtained as opposed to the expected values from the solution-diffusion mechanism. PMID:24957613

  5. Continuous flow hydroformylation using supported ionic liquid phase catalysts with carbon dioxide as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Hintermair, Ulrich; Gong, Zenxing; Serbanovic, Ana; Muldoon, Mark J; Santini, Catherine C; Cole-Hamilton, David J

    2010-09-28

    A supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalyst prepared from [PrMIM][Ph(2)P(3-C(6)H(4)SO(3))] (PrMIM = 1-propyl-3-methylimidazolium), [Rh(CO)(2)(acac)] (acacH = 2,4-pentanedione) [OctMIM]NTf(2) (OctMIM = 1-n-octyl-3-methylimidazolium, Tf = CF(3)SO(2)) and microporous silica has been used for the continuous flow hydroformylation of 1-octene in the presence of compressed CO(2). Statistical experimental design was used to show that the reaction rate is neither much affected by the film thickness (IL loading) nor by the syngas:substrate ratio. However, a factor-dependent interaction between the syngas:substrate ratio and film thickness on the reaction rate was revealed. Increasing the substrate flow led to increased reaction rates but lower overall yields. One of the most important parameters proved to be the phase behaviour of the mobile phase, which was studied by varying the reaction pressure. At low CO(2) pressures or when N(2) was used instead of CO(2) rates were low because of poor gas diffusion to the catalytic sites in the SILP. Furthermore, leaching of IL and Rh was high because the substrate is liquid and the IL had been designed to dissolve in it. As the CO(2) pressure was increased, the reaction rate increased and the IL and Rh leaching were reduced, because an expanded liquid phase developed. Due to its lower viscosity the expanded liquid allows better transport of gases to the catalyst and is a poorer solvent for the IL and the catalyst because of its reduced polarity. Above 100 bar (close to the transition to a single phase at 106 bar), the rate of reaction dropped again with increasing pressure because the flowing phase becomes a better and better solvent for the alkene, reducing its partitioning into the IL film. Under optimised conditions, the catalyst was shown to be stable over at least 40 h of continuous catalysis with a steady state turnover frequency (TOF, mol product (mol Rh)(-1)) of 500 h(-1) at low Rh leaching (0.2 ppm). The selectivity of the catalyst was not much affected by the variation of process parameters. The linear:branched (l:b) ratios were ca. 3, similar to that obtained using the very same catalyst in conventional organic solvents. PMID:20520868

  6. Combination of hollow-fiber-supported liquid membrane and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a fast and sensitive technique for the extraction of pesticides from grape juice followed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanessa Dutra; Simão, Vanessa; Dias, Adriana Neves; Carletto, Jeferson Schneider; Carasek, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    The simultaneous use of a hollow-fiber-supported liquid membrane and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of pesticides directly in grape juice was investigated. The detection and quantification were performed by liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The optimum extraction condition was reached by filling the pores of the membrane wall with dodecanol and using hexane/acetone as extraction/dispersion solvents. Salt addition had a highly negative effect on the extraction efficiency and the optimum extraction time was 60 min. The volume of hexane/acetone mixture and the sample pH did not affect the signal at the levels studied. Therefore, an intermediate amount of these solvents (250 ?L; 1:7.5 v/v) and pH 6 were selected. The optimum desorption condition was obtained with acetonitrile and 10 min of desorption time. The linear working range varied from 58 to 500 ?g/L (parathion-methyl), 62-500 ?g/L (difenoconazole) and 107-500 ?g/L (chlorpyrifos), with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9980-0.9942. The limits of detection and quantification found were, respectively, 17 and 58 ?g/L for parathion-methyl, 19 and 62 ?g/L for difenoconazole and 32 and 107 ?g/L for chlorpyrifos. The relative standard deviation ranged between 3.5 and 11.2%. PMID:25808680

  7. Some methods for human liquid and solid waste utilization in bioregenerative life-support systems.

    PubMed

    Ushakova, S A; Zolotukhin, I G; Tikhomirov, A A; Tikhomirova, N A; Kudenko, Yu A; Gribovskaya, I V; Balnokin, Yu; Gros, J B

    2008-12-01

    Bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS) are studied for developing the technology for a future biological life-support system for long-term manned space missions. Ways to utilize human liquid and solid wastes to increase the closure degree of BLSS were investigated. First, urine and faeces underwent oxidation by Kudenko's physicochemical method. The products were then used for root nutrition of wheat grown by the soil-like substrate culture method. Two means of eliminating sodium chloride, introduced into the irrigation solution together with the products of urine oxidation, were investigated. The first was based on routine electrodialysis of irrigation water at the end of wheat vegetation. Dialysis eliminated about 50% of Na from the solution. This desalinization was performed for nine vegetations. The second method was new: after wheat cultivation, the irrigation solution and the solution obtained by washing the substrate containing mineral elements not absorbed by the plants were used to grow salt-tolerant Salicornia europaea L. plants (saltwort). The above-ground biomass of this plant can be used as a food, and roots can be added to the soil-like substrate. Four consecutive wheat and Salicornia vegetations were cultivated. As a result of this wheat and Salicornia cultivation process, the soil-like substrate salinization by NaCl were considerably decreased. PMID:18581263

  8. Investigations of Water Structure at the Solid/Liquid Interface in the Presence of Supported Lipid Bilayers by

    E-print Network

    Investigations of Water Structure at the Solid/Liquid Interface in the Presence of Supported Lipid spectroscopy. By varying the pH of the bulk solution and the charge on the SLB, changes in both ice many properties of biological membranes including two-dimensional fluidity (Figure 1).1-6 Lateral

  9. An electrochemical gas sensor based on paper supported room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Dossi, Nicolò; Toniolo, Rosanna; Pizzariello, Andrea; Carrilho, Emanuel; Piccin, Evandro; Battiston, Simone; Bontempelli, Gino

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive and fast-responding membrane-free amperometric gas sensor is described, consisting of a small filter paper foil soaked with a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), upon which three electrodes are screen printed with carbon ink, using a suitable mask. It takes advantage of the high electrical conductivity and negligible vapour pressure of RTILs as well as their easy immobilization into a porous and inexpensive supporting material such as paper. Moreover, thanks to a careful control of the preparation procedure, a very close contact between the RTIL and electrode material can be achieved so as to allow gaseous analytes to undergo charge transfer just as soon as they reach the three-phase sites where the electrode material, paper supported RTIL and gas phase meet. Thus, the adverse effect on recorded currents of slow steps such as analyte diffusion and dissolution in a solvent is avoided. To evaluate the performance of this device, it was used as a wall-jet amperometric detector for flow injection analysis of 1-butanethiol vapours, adopted as the model gaseous analyte, present in headspace samples in equilibrium with aqueous solutions at controlled concentrations. With this purpose, the RTIL soaked paper electrochemical detector (RTIL-PED) was assembled by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide as the wicking RTIL and printing the working electrode with carbon ink doped with cobalt(II) phthalocyanine, to profit from its ability to electrocatalyze thiol oxidation. The results obtained were quite satisfactory (detection limit: 0.5 ?M; dynamic range: 2-200 ?M, both referring to solution concentrations; correlation coefficient: 0.998; repeatability: ±7% RSD; long-term stability: 9%), thus suggesting the possible use of this device for manifold applications. PMID:22076475

  10. Troponin T immunosensor based on liquid crystal and silsesquioxane-supported gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zapp, Eduardo; da Silva, Paulo Sérgio; Westphal, Eduard; Gallardo, Hugo; Spinelli, Almir; Vieira, Iolanda Cruz

    2014-09-17

    A nanostructured immunosensor based on the liquid crystal (E)-1-decyl-4-[(4-decyloxyphenyl)diazenyl]pyridinium bromide (Br-Py) and gold nanoparticles supported by the water-soluble hybrid material 3-n-propyl-4-picolinium silsesquioxane chloride (AuNP-Si4Pic(+)Cl(-)) was built for the detection of troponin T (cTnT), a cardiac marker for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The functionalized nanostructured surface was used to bind anti-cTnT monoclonal antibodies through electrostatic interaction. The immunosensor (ab-cTnT/AuNP-Si4Pic(+)Cl(-)/Br-Py/GCE) surface was characterized by microscopy techniques. The electrochemical behavior of the immunosensor was studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A calibration curve was obtained by square-wave voltammetry. The immnunosensor provided a limit of detection of 0.076 ng mL(-1) and a linear range between 0.1 and 0.9 ng mL(-1) (appropriate for AMI diagnosis). PMID:25111622

  11. Stability and efficiency of supported liquid membranes in electromembrane extraction--a link to solvent properties.

    PubMed

    Seip, Knut Fredrik; Faizi, Moheba; Vergel, Cristina; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2014-03-01

    The current work presents a large systematic screening of 61 possible organic solvents used as supported liquid membranes (SLM) in electromembrane extraction (EME). For each organic solvent, recovery, current across the SLM, and stability considerations have been investigated and correlated to relevant solvent properties through partial least square regression analysis. The five unpolar basic drugs pethidine, haloperidol, methadone, nortriptyline, and loperamide were used as model analytes. Efficient EME solvents were found to have a low water solubility (<0.5 g L(-1)) and belonged to cluster 2 of a Kamlet-and-Taft-based solvent classification system (high dipole moments and proton acceptor properties). These parameters were especially found in nitroaromatic compounds and ketones. Small molecules with low log P value and high water solubility were unsuitable, as they tended to give unstable extractions, caused by a high current across the SLM. This was often combined with substantial solvent-related interferences and the generation of an electroosmotic flow across the SLM, with resulting acceptor solution expansion. Large molecules with a high log P value were classified as inefficient. For these solvents, no current was measured across the SLM and no analytes were extracted. This is the first time systematic knowledge on the SLM in EME has been gathered and investigated, and the presented results could be highly beneficial for future development and optimization of EME. PMID:24136254

  12. Interaction of an ionic liquid with a supported phospholipid bilayer is lipid-dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid salts, commonly called ionic liquids, are used as solvents to conduct transformation of vegetable oils into new products. These reactions are often catalyzed via immobilized enzymes. However, some enzymes were found to lose activity and are in need of some protection. Phospholipid bilayers...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of heteropolytungstate-ionic liquid supported on the surface of silica coated magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, M.; Masteri-Farahani, M.; Ghorbani, M.

    2013-02-01

    Silica coated magnetic nanoparticles supported ionic liquid, IL-SCMNPs, was prepared by covalent attachment of chloropropyl silyl groups and reacted with 1-methyl imidazole on the surface of the silica coated magnetic nanoparticles. Then, reaction of IL-SCMNPs with H3PW12O40 resulted in the preparation of heteropolytungstate-ionic liquid supported on the surface of silica coated magnetite nanoparticles, PW-IL-SCMNPs. The PW-IL-SCMNPs were characterized with different physicochemical methods such as Fourier transform Infrared and atomic absorption spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and thermogravimetric analyses. VSM analysis showed superparamagnetic properties of the materials and TEM and SEM analyses indicated the relatively uniform spherical nanoparticles with 20 nm average size. Finally, catalytic activity of the prepared PW-IL-SCMNPs was examined in the epoxidation of olefins with H2O2.

  14. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte Process Development Unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-28

    The LPMEOH process was conceived and patented by Chem Systems Inc. in 1975. Initial research and studies on the process focused on two distinct modes of operation. The first was a liquid fluidized mode with relatively large catalyst pellets suspended in a fluidizing liquid, and the second was an entrained (slurry) mode with fine catalyst particles slurried in an inert liquid. The development of both operating modes progressed in parallel from bench scale reactors, through an intermediate scale lab PDU, and then to the LaPorte PDU in 1984. The slurry mode of operation was ultimately chosen as the operating mode of choice due to its superior performance.

  15. Multiresidue determination of sulfonamides in a variety of biological matrices by supported liquid membrane with high pressure liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Msagati, Titus A M; Nindi, Mathew Muzi

    2004-09-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS) was used for a simultaneous determination of 16 sulfonamide compounds spiked in water, urine, milk, and bovine liver and kidney tissues. Supported liquid membrane (SLM) made up of 5% tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in hexyl amine was used as a sample clean-up and/or enrichment technique. The sulfonamides mixture was made up of 5-sulfaminouracil, sulfaguanidine, sulfamethoxazole, sulfamerazine, sulfamethizole, sulfamethazine (sulfadimidine), sulfacetamide, sulfapyridine, sulfabenzamide, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfamonomethoxine, sulfadimethoxine sulfasalazine, sulfaquinoxaline, sulfadiazine, and sulfathiazole. Some of these compounds, such as, sulfaquinoxaline, sulfadiazine, sulfabenzamide, sulfathiazole and sulfapyridine failed to be trapped efficiently by the same liquid membrane (5% TOPO in hexylamine). The detection limits (DL) obtained were 1.8ppb for sulfaguanidine and sulfamerazine and between 3.3 and 10ppb in bovine liver and kidney tissues for the other sulfonamides that were successfully enriched with SLM; 2.1ppb for sulfaguanidine and sulfamerazine and between 7.5 and 15ppb in cow's urine, whereas the DL values in milk were 12.4ppb for sulfaguanidine and sulfamerazine and between 16.8 and 24.3 for the other compounds that were successfully enriched by the membrane. Several factors affecting the extraction efficiency during SLM enrichment, such as donor pH, acceptor pH, enrichment time and the membrane solvent were studied. PMID:18969572

  16. Monitoring of N-methyl carbamate pesticide residues in water using hollow fibre supported liquid membrane and solid phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    The aim of this work was to develop a method for the determination of N-methyl carbamates in water involving hollow fibre supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) and solid phase extraction (SPE) as sample preparation methods. Four N-methyl carbamate pesticides, aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran and methiocarb sulfoxide, were simultaneously extracted and analysed by a liquid chromatograph with a diode array detector (LC-UV/DAD) and a liquid chromatograph coupled to a ion trap quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of carabamate extracts was performed on a C18 column with water-acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The mass spectrometry analyses were carried out in the positive mode, operating under both the selected ion monitoring (SIM) and full scan modes. The solid phase recoveries of the extracts ranged between 8% and 98%, with aldicarb having the highest recoveries, followed by carbaryl, carbofuran and methiocarb had the lowest recovery. The HFSLM recovery ranged between 8% and 58% and the order of recovery was similar to the SPE trend. Factors controlling the efficiency of the HFSLM extraction such as sample pH, stripping phase pH, enrichment time, stirring speed as well as organic solvent used for entrapment of analytes, were optimised to achieve the highest enrichment factors.

  17. Piping support system for liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, Jr., William G. (Forward Township, Washington County, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A pipe support consisting of a rigid link pivotally attached to a pipe and an anchor, adapted to generate stress or strain in the link and pipe due to pipe thermal movement, which stress or strain can oppose further pipe movement and generally provides pipe support. The pipe support can be used in multiple combinations with other pipe supports to form a support system. This support system is most useful in applications in which the pipe is normally operated at a constant elevated or depressed temperature such that desired stress or strain can be planned in advance of pipe and support installation. The support system is therefore especially useful in steam stations and in refrigeration equipment.

  18. Liquid layers bound to a gold surface supporting a surface plasmon-polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambles, J. R.; Pollard, J. D.; Bradberry, G. W.

    1987-09-01

    This paper presents a novel use of the surface plasmon-polariton at the surface of a gold film to allow a study of the progressive thickening of an organic liquid film condensing on the gold. The vapour is supplied by an effectively infinite liquid reservoir some 4 mm below the observation height. For methanol, n-hexane and n-heptane equilibrium thicknesses of order 16 nm, 26 nm and 28 nm respectively, are obtained, while for ethanol there appears to be continual growth to a bulk condensed phase. The data can be reconciled in the most general terms with theories of Van der Waal's bonding between thin liquid layers and a plane surface. Currently however there is no detailed theory which would predict the striking difference in behaviour between methanol and ethanol.

  19. Effects of Silica Nanoparticle Supported Ionic Liquid as Additive on Thermal Reversibility of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Fallahbagheri, Azadeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Ma'mani, Leila; Taghizadeh, Mohammad; Khodarahmi, Reza; Ranjbar, Samira; Bohlooli, Mousa; Shafiee, Abbas; Foroumadi, Alireza; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanoparticle supported imidazolium ionic liquid [SNImIL] was synthesized and utilized as a biocompatible additive for studying the thermal reversibility of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). For this purpose, we prepared additive by modification of nanoparticles through the grafting of ionic liquids on the surface of nanoparticles (SNImIL). The SNImIL were fully characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The characterization of HCA II was investigated by various techniques including UV–Vis and ANS fluorescence spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and docking study. SNImIL induced disaggregation, enhanced protein stability and increased thermal reversibility of HCA II by up to 42% at pH 7.75. PMID:22829053

  20. Supporting Information: Absorption spectra and photolysis of methyl peroxide in liquid and frozen water

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    the hydrogens in the methyl group and the hydrogen in the peroxide group, respectively. #12;Fig. S2 ASupporting Information: Absorption spectra and photolysis of methyl peroxide in liquid and frozen of methyl peroxide in a solution of deuterated chloroform. NMR-peaks due to the presence of the chloroform

  1. Study of the separation limits of continuous solid support free liquid-liquid chromatography: separation of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin by centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Goll, Johannes; Frey, Andreas; Minceva, Mirjana

    2013-04-01

    Sequential centrifugal partition chromatography (sCPC) is a cyclic solid support-free liquid-liquid chromatographic process, in which a continuously introduced feed mixture is separated into two sequentially collected product streams. The few experimental demonstrations of this concept already revealed its potential for the preparative separation of pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. In this work not only the possibilities, but also the limits of the sCPC technology are explored. A feed mixture consisting of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, whose molecular structure differs in only one double bond, was selected for this purpose. The sCPC unit operating parameters needed for a complete separation of the feed mixture were selected using the recently published approach, which uses the partition coefficient of the feed components and the hydrodynamic characteristics of the system as input data. A complete separation of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin with the solvent system heptane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water:1/1/1/1 (v/v/v/v) was achieved, although the separation factor was only 1.32. The sCPC unit separation performance was successfully simulated using the cell model. PMID:23466203

  2. Determination of ketamine, norketamine and dehydronorketamine in urine by hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction using an essential oil as supported liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Bairros, André Valle de; Lanaro, Rafael; Almeida, Rafael Menck de; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2014-10-01

    Here, we present a method for the determination of ketamine (KT) and its main metabolites, norketamine (NK) and dehydronorketamine (DHNK) in urine samples by using hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) in the three-phase mode. The fiber pores were filled with eucalyptus essential oil and a solution of 1.0mol/L of HCl was introduced into the lumen of the fiber (acceptor phase). The fiber was submersed in the alkalinized urine containing 10% NaCl, and the system was submitted to lateral shaking (2400rpm) during 30min. Acceptor phase was withdrawn from the fiber, dried and the residue was then derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) for further determination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The calibration curves were linear over the specified range and limits of detection (LoDs) obtained for KT, NK and DHNK were below the cut-off value (1.0ng/mL) recommended by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). A totally "green chemistry" approach of the sample extraction was obtained by using essential oil as a supported liquid membrane in HF-LPME. The developed method was successfully validated and applied to urine samples collected from two clinical cases in which KT was suspected to be involved. PMID:24810678

  3. Hollow fiber-supported designer ionic liquid sponges for post-combustion CO2 scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, JS; Hillesheim, PC; Huang, DK; Lively, RP; Oh, KH; Dai, S; Koros, WJ

    2012-11-30

    A proof of concept study for a new type of carbon capture system is considered for post-combustion CO2 capture based on porous hollow fiber sorbents with ionic liquids sorbed in the cell walls of the fiber. This study proves that delicate morphological features in the open-celled porous wall can be maintained during the infusion process. Mixtures of task specific ionic liquid (i.e. [BMIM][Tf2N]) and superbase (i.e. DBU) were loaded into polyamide-imide (PAI) fibers by a so-called two-step non-solvent infusion protocol. In the protocol, methanol carries ionic liquids into the pore cell walls of hollow fibers and then hexane carries superbase to create an efficient CO2 sorbent. Our ionic liquid/superbase impregnation technique overcomes a serious increase in mass transfer resistance upon reaction with CO2, thereby allowing its large scale utilization for post-combustion CO2 capture. The investigation on the effect of different pore former additives (different molecular weights of polyvinylpyrrolidone, lithium nitrate, and their mixtures) suggested that a large molecular weight of PVP (M-w; 1300k) including dope composition produces highly interconnected open cell pore structures of PAI hollow fibers. Lastly, a lumen side barrier layer was successfully formed on the bore side of neat PAI fibers by using a mixture of Neoprene (R) with crosslinking agents (TSR-633) via a post-treatment process. The lumen layer will enable heat removal from the fiber sorbents during their application in rapid thermal swing cycling processes. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Liquid perfluorochemical-supported hybrid cell culture system for proliferation of chondrocytes on fibrous polylactide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Pilarek, Maciej; Grabowska, Iwona; Senderek, Ilona; Wojasi?ski, Micha?; Janicka, Justyna; Janczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Ciach, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    CP5 bovine chondrocytes were cultured on biodegradable electrospun fibrous polylactide (PLA) scaffolds placed on a flexible interface formed between two immiscible liquid phases: (1) hydrophobic perfluorochemical (PFC) and (2) aqueous culture medium, as a new way of cartilage implant development. Robust and intensive growth of CP5 cells was achieved in our hybrid liquid-solid-liquid culture system consisting of the fibrous PLA scaffolds in contrast to limited growth of the CP5 cells in traditional culture system with PLA scaffold placed on solid surface. The multicellular aggregates of CP5 cells covered the surface of PLA scaffolds and the chondrocytes migrated through and overgrew internal fibers of the scaffolds. Our hybrid culture system simultaneously allows the adhesion of adherent CP5 cells to fibers of PLA scaffolds as well as, due to use of phase of PFC, enhances the mass transfer in the case of supplying/removing of respiratory gases, i.e., O2 and CO2. Our flexible (independent of vessel shape) system is simple, ready-to-use and may utilize a variety of polymer-based scaffolds traditionally proposed for implant development. PMID:24532258

  5. Thermo-mechanical simulation of liquid-supported stretch blow molding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, J.; Stommel, M.

    2015-05-22

    Stretch blow molding is the well-established plastics forming method to produce Polyehtylene therephtalate (PET) bottles. An injection molded preform is heated up above the PET glass transition temperature (Tg?85°C) and subsequently inflated by pressurized air into a closed cavity. In the follow-up filling process, the resulting bottle is filled with the final product. A recently developed modification of the process combines the blowing and filling stages by directly using the final liquid product to inflate the preform. In a previously published paper, a mechanical simulation and successful evaluation of this liquid-driven stretch blow molding process was presented. In this way, a realistic process parameter dependent simulation of the preform deformation throughout the forming process was enabled, whereas the preform temperature evolution during forming was neglected. However, the formability of the preform is highly reduced when the temperature sinks below Tg during forming. Experimental investigations show temperature-induced failure cases due to the fast heat transfer between hot preform and cold liquid. Therefore, in this paper, a process dependent simulation of the temperature evolution during processing to avoid preform failure is presented. For this purpose, the previously developed mechanical model is used to extract the time dependent thickness evolution. This information serves as input for the heat transfer simulation. The required material parameters are calibrated from preform cooling experiments recorded with an infrared-camera. Furthermore, the high deformation ratios during processing lead to strain induced crystallization. This exothermal reaction is included into the simulation by extracting data from preform measurements at different stages of deformation via Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Finally, the thermal simulation model is evaluated by free forming experiments, recorded by a high-speed infrared camera.

  6. Apparatus for supporting contactors used in extracting nuclear materials from liquids

    DOEpatents

    Leonard, Ralph A. (River Forest, IL); Frank, Robert C. (Crestwood, IL)

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for supporting one or more contactor stages used to remove radioactive materials from aqueous solutions. The contactor stages include a housing having an internal rotor, a motor secured to the top of the housing for rotating the rotor, and a drain in the bottom of the housing. The support apparatus includes two or more vertical members each secured to a ground support that is horizontal and perpendicular to the frame member, and a horizontally disposed frame member. The frame member may be any suitable shape, but is preferably a rectangular tube having substantially flat, spaced top and bottom surfaces separated by substantially vertical side surfaces. The top and bottom surfaces each have an opening through which the contactor housing is secured so that the motor is above the frame and the drain is below the frame during use.

  7. Diffusion coefficient of an inclusion in a liquid membrane supported by a solvent of arbitrary thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Ramachandran, Sanoop; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2011-08-01

    The diffusion coefficient of an inclusion in a liquid membrane is investigated by taking into account the interaction between membranes and bulk solvents of arbitrary thickness. As illustrative examples, the diffusion coefficients of two types of inclusions, a circular domain composed of fluid with the same viscosity as the host membrane and that of a polymer chain embedded in the membrane, are studied. The diffusion coefficients are expressed in terms of the hydrodynamic screening lengths, which vary according to the solvent thickness. When the membrane fluid is dragged by the solvent of finite thickness, via stick boundary conditions, multiple hydrodynamic screening lengths together with the weight factors to the diffusion coefficients are obtained from the characteristic equation. The conditions for which the diffusion coefficients can be approximated by the expression including only a single hydrodynamic screening length are also shown.

  8. Diffusion coefficient of an inclusion in a liquid membrane supported by a solvent of arbitrary thickness

    E-print Network

    Kazuhiko Seki; Sanoop Ramachandran; Shigeyuki Komura

    2011-07-22

    The diffusion coefficient of a circular shaped inclusion in a liquid membrane is investigated by taking into account the interaction between membranes and bulk solvents of arbitrary thickness. As illustrative examples, the diffusion coefficients of two types of inclusions - a circular domain composed of fluid with the same viscosity as the host membrane and that of a polymer chain embedded in the membrane are studied.The diffusion coefficients are expressed in terms of the hydrodynamic screening lengths which vary according to the solvent thickness. When the membrane fluid is dragged by the solvent of finite thickness, via stick boundary conditions, multiple hydrodynamic screening lengths together with the weight factors to the diffusion coefficients are obtained from the dispersion relation. The condition for which the diffusion coefficients can be approximated by the expression including only a single hydrodynamic screening length are also shown.

  9. The Influence of MSI (Metal-Support Interactions) and the Solvent in Liquid-Phase Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vannice, M. A.

    2003-05-30

    Results were repeatedly obtained that were consistent with a hypothesis proposed at the beginning of this program, i.e., due to Metal-Support Interactions (MSI), unique active sites can be created in the metal-support interfacial region to enhance activity and improve selectivity in certain types of reactions, especially those involving the hydrogenation of carbonyl and unsaturated C=C bonds. Higher turnover frequencies (TOF-molecule/s/site) and increased selectivity for C=O bond versus C=C bond hydrogenation was established in the hydrogenation reactions of: acetone, crotonaldehyde, acetophenone, phenylethanol, acetylcyclohexane, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, phenylacetaldehyde and citral over Pt/TiO{sub 2} MSI catalysts. Higher rates of hydrogenation benzene, toluene and xylene could be obtained over certain supported Pt and Pd catalysts. Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were developed that were active for CO hydrogenation at subambient temperatures. The influence of support and metal crystallite size were established for the adsorption of H{sub 2}, CO and O{sub 2} on families of Pt and Pd catalysts.

  10. Unlocking the potential of supported liquid phase catalysts with supercritical fluids: low temperature continuous flow catalysis with integrated product separation.

    PubMed

    Franciò, Giancarlo; Hintermair, Ulrich; Leitner, Walter

    2015-12-28

    Solution-phase catalysis using molecular transition metal complexes is an extremely powerful tool for chemical synthesis and a key technology for sustainable manufacturing. However, as the reaction complexity and thermal sensitivity of the catalytic system increase, engineering challenges associated with product separation and catalyst recovery can override the value of the product. This persistent downstream issue often renders industrial exploitation of homogeneous catalysis uneconomical despite impressive batch performance of the catalyst. In this regard, continuous-flow systems that allow steady-state homogeneous turnover in a stationary liquid phase while at the same time effecting integrated product separation at mild process temperatures represent a particularly attractive scenario. While continuous-flow processing is a standard procedure for large volume manufacturing, capitalizing on its potential in the realm of the molecular complexity of organic synthesis is still an emerging area that requires innovative solutions. Here we highlight some recent developments which have succeeded in realizing such systems by the combination of near- and supercritical fluids with homogeneous catalysts in supported liquid phases. The cases discussed exemplify how all three levels of continuous-flow homogeneous catalysis (catalyst system, separation strategy, process scheme) must be matched to locate viable process conditions. PMID:26574523

  11. A review of the supply of liquid propellants and other fluids in support of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchwell, Stacy E.; Bain, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, over twenty significant liquid propellants and other fluids were reviewed as to their supply in support of the Space Shuttle Program (SSP), primarily at KSC. The uniqueness of most of the products, either by their application or production characteristics, present a variety of supply issues to contend with. Each, however, is critical to the success of the SSP. It becomes necessary to formulate, and maintain, a logistic approach to assure a continued availability of each product. For convenience, two categories were established. One, labeled limited-availability, represents those products wherein they are single sourced, have production restrictions and/or there has been a history of supply problems. The other, labeled universally-available, is characteristic of those having several sources and/or having little, if any, historical supply problems. This last category was not examined in depth. Through concepts of establishing stockpile inventories, multiple supply contracts, or other arrangements, the supply of liquid propellants and other fluids can be assured.

  12. Unlocking the potential of supported liquid phase catalysts with supercritical fluids: low temperature continuous flow catalysis with integrated product separation

    PubMed Central

    Franciò, Giancarlo; Hintermair, Ulrich; Leitner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Solution-phase catalysis using molecular transition metal complexes is an extremely powerful tool for chemical synthesis and a key technology for sustainable manufacturing. However, as the reaction complexity and thermal sensitivity of the catalytic system increase, engineering challenges associated with product separation and catalyst recovery can override the value of the product. This persistent downstream issue often renders industrial exploitation of homogeneous catalysis uneconomical despite impressive batch performance of the catalyst. In this regard, continuous-flow systems that allow steady-state homogeneous turnover in a stationary liquid phase while at the same time effecting integrated product separation at mild process temperatures represent a particularly attractive scenario. While continuous-flow processing is a standard procedure for large volume manufacturing, capitalizing on its potential in the realm of the molecular complexity of organic synthesis is still an emerging area that requires innovative solutions. Here we highlight some recent developments which have succeeded in realizing such systems by the combination of near- and supercritical fluids with homogeneous catalysts in supported liquid phases. The cases discussed exemplify how all three levels of continuous-flow homogeneous catalysis (catalyst system, separation strategy, process scheme) must be matched to locate viable process conditions. PMID:26574523

  13. Use of supported liquid membranes incorporated in a flow system for the direct determination of eugenol in spice samples.

    PubMed

    Luque, M; Ríos, A; Valcárcel, M

    2000-10-01

    A method for the determination of eugenol in spice samples based on the use of supported liquid membranes coupled to a flow system was developed. The solid sample is placed directly in the membrane unit without any treatment and the analyte is extracted from the sample, passes through the membrane and is conducted to the flow cell by the acceptor stream. This stream flows through the detector, allowing the measurement of the analyte by using a PVC-graphite composite electrode, versus Ag/AgCl/3 M KCl at +0.3 V, placed in a well-jet flow cell as amperometric detector. The method allowed the determination of eugenol in the range 0.5-30 micrograms ml-1 with a relative standard deviation of 5%. Results provided by the proposed procedure when applied to clove and seasoning samples agreed well with those obtained by a reference method. PMID:11070549

  14. Applications of new liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technologies for drug development support.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Wu, N; Rudewicz, P J

    2001-08-10

    We have evaluated (i) a multiplexed electrospray interface, (ii) serial sample introduction, and (iii) a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer for quantitative bioanalysis in compliance with good laboratory practice. These evaluations were done using a 96-well plate liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of loratadine and its metabolite, descarboethoxyloratadine. The assay has a dynamic range of 1-1000 ng/ml with 5.56 pg of each analyte being injected on-column at the limit of quantitation. For the four-channel multiplexed electrospray experiments, one-run validations were performed simultaneously in rat, rabbit, mouse and dog plasma. In the four-stream serial experiments, the total run time of the assay was reduced from 3.5 to 0.35 min, resulting in a net acquisition time of 11 s. Four simulated validation runs with standard and quality control solutions were analyzed. Precision and accuracy for standards and quality control samples met US Food and Drug Administration recommended criteria for both the drug and the metabolite using those two approaches. In addition, a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used as a detector in the tandem mass spectrometry mode for the loratadine assay. Our results demonstrated that a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude could be achieved using the quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, making it useful for quantitation in preclinical toxicology studies. PMID:11554418

  15. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-23

    The objectives of this program are to implement and test the process improvements identified through the engineering studies of the current program to demonstrate the capability of long-term catalyst activity maintenance, and to perform process and design engineering work that can be applied to a scaled-up Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) facility. An optional series of PDU runs is offered to extend the testing of the process improvements. A parallel research program will be performed to enhance the LPMEOH technical data base to improve the likelihood of commercialization of the LPMEOH process. Activities this quarter include: Flow sheet development for La Porte PDU modifications continues. A preliminary P ID review was completed and flow sheet modifications were identified and are being incorporated. A preliminary hazards review was completed on 22 May. Some minor flow sheet modifications resulted and a number of action items were identified. The most significant action item is to develop a materials reactivity and compatibility grid for the different alcohols, ethers, and esters which will be produced at the PDU. Heat and material balances were completed for the maximum production case of the mixed DME/MEOH synthesis campaign. An improved rate expression was developed. 1 fig.

  16. Feasible way of Human Solid and Liquid Wastes' Inclusion Into Intersystem Mass Exchange of Biological-Technical Life Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Kudenko, Yurii; Griboskaya, Illiada; Gros, Jean-Bernard; Lasseur, Christophe

    The basic objective arising at use of mineralized human solid and liquid wastes serving as the source of mineral elements for plants cultivation in biological-technical life support systems appears to be NaCl presence in them. The given work is aimed at feasibility study of mineralized human metabolites' utilization for nutrient solutions' preparation for their further employment at a long-term cultivation of uneven-aged wheat and Salicornia europaea L. cenosis in a conveyer regime. Human solid and liquid wastes were mineralized by the "wet incineration" method developed by Yu. Kudenko. On their base the solutions were prepared which were used for cultivation of 5-aged wheat conveyer with the time step-interval of 14 days. Wheat was cultivated by hydroponics method on expanded clay aggregate. For partial demineralization of nutrient solution every two weeks after regular wheat harvesting 12 L of solution was withdrawn from the wheat irrigation tank and used for Salicornia europaea cultivation by the water culture method in a conveyer regime. The Salicornia europaea conveyer was represented by 2 ages with the time step-interval of 14 days. Resulting from repeating withdrawal of the solution used for wheat cultivation, sodium concentration in the wheat irrigation solution did not exceed 400 mg/l, and mineral elements contained in the taken solution were used for Salicornia europaea cultivation. The experiment lasted 7 months. Total wheat biomass productivity averaged 30.1 g*m-2*day-1 at harvest index equal to 36.8The work was carried out under support of SB RAS grant 132 and INTAS 05-1000008-8010

  17. Controlled synthesis and electrocatalytic characteristics of Pt nanoparticles-supported nanographene synthesized by in-liquid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hiroki; Amano, Tomoki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Meijo University Collaboration; Nagoya University Team

    2014-10-01

    We investigated a high-speed synthesis of high-crystallinity nanographenes over 1 micro-gram/min using in-liquid plasma. In this study, nanographene materials with different crystallinity were synthesized using ethanol and 1-butanol. Pt nanoparticles were supported on their surfaces reducing 8 wt%-H2PtCl6 in H2O. G-band and D-band peaks in Raman spectra indicated nanographene materials. Nanographene materials synthesized using ethanol have higher crystallinity than those synthesized using 1-butanol. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, sizes of Pt nanoparticles are almost similar regardless of alcohol types. In cyclic voltammetry characteristics, peaks related to adsorption and desorption of hydrogen were clearly found in the both cases. The platinum effective areas were estimated to be 208.5 and 147.63 m2/g for the cases using ethanol and 1-butanol, respectively. In addition, after potential cycling tests, nanographene materials synthesized using ethanol show almost no degradation, while those using 1-butanol show a drastic degradation. These results indicate that the higher-density Pt nanoparticles can be supported on the higher-crystallinity nanographene material and they show higher durability.

  18. Total Liquid Ventilation Provides Superior Respiratory Support to Conventional Mechanical Ventilation in a Large Animal Model of Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pohlmann, Joshua R; Brant, David O; Daul, Morgan A; Reoma, Junewai L; Kim, Anne C; Osterholzer, Kathryn R; Johnson, Kent J; Bartlett, Robert H; Cook, Keith E; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2011-01-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) has the potential to provide respiratory support superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, laboratory studies are limited to trials in small animals for no longer than 4 hours. The objective of this study was to compare TLV and CMV in a large animal model of ARDS for 24 hours. Ten sheep weighing 53 ± 4 (SD) kg were anesthetized and ventilated with 100% oxygen. Oleic acid was injected into the pulmonary circulation until PaO2:FiO2 ? 60 mmHg, followed by transition to a protective CMV protocol (n=5) or TLV (n=5) for 24 hours. Pathophysiology was recorded and the lungs were harvested for histological analysis. Animals treated with CMV became progressively hypoxic and hypercarbic despite maximum ventilatory support. Sheep treated with TLV maintained normal blood gases with statistically greater PO2 (p<10?9) and lower PCO2 (p < 10?3) than the CMV group. Survival at 24 hours in the TLV and CMV groups were 100% and 40% respectively (p< 0.05). Thus, TLV provided gas exchange superior to CMV in this laboratory model of severe ARDS. PMID:21084968

  19. Ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in seawater by hollow fiber supported liquid membrane extraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jin-feng; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-fu; He, Bin; Hu, Xia-lin; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2007-05-01

    A new procedure, based on hollow fiber supported liquid membrane preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection, was developed for the determination of trace Cd in seawater samples. With 1-octanol that contained a mixture of dithizone (carrier) and oleic acid immobilized in the pores of the polypropylene hollow fiber as a liquid membrane, Cd was selectively extracted from water samples into 0.05 M HNO 3 that filled the lumen of the hollow fiber as a stripping solution. The main extraction related parameters were optimized, and the effects of salinity and some coexisting interferants were also evaluated. Under the optimum extraction conditions, an enrichment factor of 387 was obtained for a 100-mL sample solution. In combination with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, a very low detection limit (0.8 ng L - 1 ) and a relative standard deviation (2.5% at 50 ng L - 1 level) were achieved. Five seawater samples were analyzed by the proposed method without dilution, with detected Cd concentration in the range of 56.4-264.8 ng L - 1 and the relative spiked recoveries over 89%. For comparison, these samples were also analyzed by the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) method after a 10-fold dilution for matrix effect elimination. Statistical analysis with a one-way ANOVA shows no significant differences (at 0.05 level) between the results obtained by the proposed and ICP-MS methods. Additionally, analysis of certified reference materials (GBW (E) 080040) shows good agreement with the certified value. These results indicate that this present method is very sensitive and reliable, and can effectively eliminate complex matrix interferences in seawater samples.

  20. Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes and Ion-Jelly® Membranes with [BMIM][DCA]: Comparison of Its Performance for CO2 Separation

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Ricardo; Neves, Luísa; Simões, Pedro; Coelhoso, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) was prepared by impregnating a PVDF membrane with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([BMIM][DCA]) ionic liquid. This membrane was tested for its permeability to pure gases (CO2, N2 and O2) and ideal selectivities were calculated. The SILM performance was also compared to that of Ion-Jelly® membranes, a new type of gelled membranes developed recently. It was found that the PVDF membrane presents permeabilities for pure gases similar or lower to those presented by the Ion-Jelly® membranes, but with increased ideal selectivities. This membrane presents also the highest ideal selectivity (73) for the separation of CO2 from N2 when compared with SILMs using the same PVDF support but with different ionic liquids. PMID:25594165

  1. Supported phospholipid bilayer interaction with components found in typical room-temperature ionic liquids - a QCM-D and AFM study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and atomic force microscopy were combined to evaluate the defects created by room-temperature ionic liquid anion and cation in a supported phospholipid bilayer composed of Zwitterionic lipids on a silica surface. The cation 1-octyl-3-methyl im...

  2. Novel analytical procedure using a combination of hollow fiber supported liquid membrane and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of aflatoxins in soybean juice by high performance liquid chromatography - Fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Simão, Vanessa; Merib, Josias; Dias, Adriana N; Carasek, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a combination between hollow fiber membrane and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of aflatoxins in soybean juice by HPLC. The main advantage of this approach is the use of non-chlorinated solvent and small amounts of organic solvents. The optimum extraction conditions were 1-octanol as immobilized solvent; toluene and acetone at 1:5 ratio as extraction and disperser solvents (100?L), NaCl at 2% of the sample volume and extraction time of 60min. The optimal condition for the liquid desorption was 150?L acetonitrile:water (50:50 v/v) and desorption time of 20min. The linear range varied from 0.03 to 21?gL(-1), with R(2) coefficients ranging from 0.9940 to 0.9995. The limits of detection and quantification ranged from 0.01?gL(-1) to 0.03?gL(-1) and from 0.03?gL(-1) to 0.1?gL(-1), respectively. Recovery tests ranged from 72% to 117% and accuracy between 12% and 18%. PMID:26593494

  3. Determination of selected pharmaceutical compounds in biosolids by supported liquid extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Albero, Beatriz; Sánchez-Brunete, Consuelo; Miguel, Esther; Aznar, Ramón; Tadeo, José L

    2014-04-01

    In this work, an analytical method was developed for the determination of pharmaceutical drugs in biosolids. Samples were extracted with an acidic mixture of water and acetone (1:2, v/v) and supported liquid extraction was used for the clean-up of extracts, eluting with ethyl acetate:methanol (90:10, v/v). The compounds were determined by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using matrix-match calibration after silylation to form their t-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives. This method presents various advantages, such as a fairly simple operation for the analysis of complex matrices, the use of inexpensive glassware and low solvent volumes. Satisfactory mean recoveries were obtained with the developed method ranging from 70 to 120% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ? 13%, and limits of detection between 0.5 and 3.6 ng g(-1). The method was then successfully applied to biosolids samples collected in Madrid and Catalonia (Spain). Eleven of the sixteen target compounds were detected in the studied samples, at levels up to 1.1 ?g g(-1) (salicylic acid). Ibuprofen, caffeine, paracetamol and fenofibrate were detected in all of the samples analyzed. PMID:24582395

  4. Pumice-supported Pd-Pt bimetallic catalysts: Synthesis, structural characterization, and liquid-phase hydrogenation of 1,3-cyclooctadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Deganello, G.; Duca, D.; Liotta, L.F.; Martorana, A.; Venezia, M.; Benedetti, A.; Fagherazz, G.

    1995-01-01

    A series of pumice-supported palladium-platinum bimetallic catalysts were prepared and investigated by X-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS) and XPS techniques. An alloy Pd-Pt was formed. The less abundant metal was found to segregate to the surface. The catalysts were tested in the liquid-phase hydrogenation of 1,3-cyclooctadiene to cyclooctene, and compared with similarly prepared pumice-supported palladium and platinum catalysts and other supported Pd-Pt catalysts reported in the literature. The addition of platinum reduces the activity and the selectivity of the palladium catalysts. Differences between the activity of these pumice-supported catalysts and the activity of previously described Pd and Pd-Pt catalysts on other supports, are attributed to the presence, in the latter, of diffusional processes. 50 refs., 4 figs. 2 tabs.

  5. Development of supported liquid membrane techniques for the monitoring of trace levels of organic pollutants in wastewaters and water purification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    The supported liquid membrane (SLM) extraction technique has been developed and successfully used for the monitoring of trace quantities of ionisable organic contaminants, including 17?-estradiol and its metabolites, testosterones and their methyl ester derivatives, benzimidazole anthelmintic antibiotics and sulphonamides in aquatic systems. A number of parameters which control the mass transfer in the supported liquid membrane extraction process such as donor and acceptor pH, extraction time and the type of organic liquid membrane were optimised to enhance the efficiency of the liquid membrane in the removal of these compounds. The method developed gave very low detection limits (0.3 ng/l to 2.4 ng/l for 17?-estradiol and its metabolites; between 1 ?g/l and 20 ?g/l for sulphonamides; and between 0.1 ng/l and 10 ng/l for benzimidazole anthelmintic compounds). The SLM method showed good linearity, reproducibility and repeatability values and is therefore suitable for routine monitoring of such compounds in water and wastewater systems.

  6. Supported liquid membrane based removal of lead(II) and cadmium(II) from mixed feed: Conversion to solid waste by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Bhatluri, Kamal Kumar; Manna, Mriganka Sekhar; Ghoshal, Aloke Kumar; Saha, Prabirkumar

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous removal of two heavy metals, lead(II) and cadmium(II), from mixed feed using supported liquid membrane (SLM) based technique is investigated in this work. The carrier-solvent combination of "sodium salt of Di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) (4% w/w) in environmentally benign coconut oil" was immobilized into the pores of solid polymeric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) support. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) was used as the stripping agent. Carbonate salts of lead(II) and cadmium(II) were formed in the stripping side interface and they were insoluble in water leading to precipitation inside the stripping solution. The transportation of solute is positively affected due to the precipitation. Lead(II) removal was found to be preferential due to its favorable electronic configuration. The conversion of the liquid waste to the solid one was added advantage for the final removal of hazardous heavy metals. PMID:26252994

  7. Analysis of the organic liquid produced from catalytic cracking of crude palm oil in the presence of alumina supported catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Anita; Razak, Rozlina Abdul

    2012-09-01

    Catalytic cracking of crude palm oil (CPO) was studied in the presence of alumina, 1% Pt/Al2O3 and 1% Pd/Al2O3 as catalyst. The CPO to catalyst weight ratio used was 1:0.05. The experiment was carried out in a simple liquid-phase batch reactor at atmospheric pressure where the sample was heated to 300-350 ?C. Products formed were organic liquid products (OLP) and gaseous product with the solid residue remains in the reactor. The total conversion of CPO was only between 25 - 31% where the residue is suggested to be mainly of polimerised CPO. The OLP was analysed using a gas chromatography with FID detector. Analyses show that the selectivity to liquid fuel is influence by the catalyst used whereby Al2O3 gives the highest selectivity to gasoline while 1% Pt/Al2O3 has the highest selectivity to diesel. However, 1% Pd/Al2O3 is not a suitable catalyst for catalytic cracking of CPO to liquid fuel where less than 17.5% of OLP produced could be classified as liquid fuel.

  8. Hydrophobic benzyl amines as supports for liquid-phase C-terminal amidated peptide synthesis: application to the preparation of ABT-510.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Emiko; Fujita, Yuko; Okada, Yohei; Kauppinen, Esko I; Kamiya, Hidehiro; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2015-09-01

    C-terminal amidation is one of the most common modification of peptides and frequently found in bioactive peptides. However, the C-terminal modification must be creative, because current chemical synthetic techniques of peptides are dominated by the use of C-terminal protecting supports. Therefore, it must be carried out after the removal of such supports, complicating reaction work-up and product isolation. In this context, hydrophobic benzyl amines were successfully added to the growing toolbox of soluble tag-assisted liquid-phase peptide synthesis as supports, leading to the total synthesis of ABT-510 (2). Although an ethyl amide-forming type was used in the present work, different types of hydrophobic benzyl amines could also be simply designed and prepared through versatile reductive aminations in one step. The standard acidic treatment used in the final deprotection step for peptide synthesis gave the desired C-terminal secondary amidated peptide with no epimerization. PMID:26200065

  9. Design, testing, fabrication and launch support of a liquid chemical barium release payload (utilizing the liquid fluorine-barium salt/hydrazine system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A payload was designed which included a cryogenic oxidizer tank, a fuel tank, and burner section. Release of 30 lb of chemicals was planned to occur in 2 seconds at the optimum oxidizer to fuel ratio. The chemicals consisted of 17 lb of liquid fluorine oxidizer and 13 lb of hydrazine-barium salt fuel mixture. The fuel mixture was 17% barium chloride, 16% barium nitrate, and 67% hydrazine, and contained 2.6 lb of available barium. Two significant problem areas were resolved during the program: explosive valve development and burner operation. The release payload was flight tested, from Wallops Island, Virginia. The release took place at an altitude of approximately 260 km. The release produced a luminous cloud which expanded very rapidly, disappearing to the human eye in about 20 seconds. Barium ion concentration slowly increased over a wide area of sky until measurements were discontinued at sunrise (about 30 minutes).

  10. Comparative Study on the Sulfur Tolerance and Carbon Resistance of Supported Noble Metal Catalysts in Steam Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chao; Chen, Yongsheng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Song, Chunshan

    2012-04-18

    This work was conducted to clarify the influence of the type of metal and support on the sulfur tolerance and carbon resistance of supported noble metal catalysts in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons. Al2O3-supported noble metal catalysts (Rh, Ru, Pt, and Pd), Rh catalysts on different supports (Al2O3, CeO2, SiO2, and MgO), and Pt catalyst supported on CeO2 and Al2O3, were examined for steam reforming of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel (Norpar13 from Exxon Mobil) at 800 C for 55 h. The results indicate that (1) Rh/Al2O3 shows higher sulfur tolerance than the Ru, Pt, and Pd catalysts on the same support; (2) both Al2O3 and CeO2 are promising supports for Rh catalyst to process sulfur-containing hydrocarbons; and (3) Pt/CeO2 exhibits better catalytic performance than Pt/Al2O3 in the reaction with sulfur. TEM results demonstrate that the metal particles in Rh/Al2O3 were better dispersed (mostly in 1-3 nm) compared with the other catalysts after reforming the sulfur-containing feed. As revealed by XPS, the binding energy of Rh 3d for Rh/Al2O3 is notably higher than that for Rh/CeO2, implying the formation of electron-deficient Rh particles in the former. The strong sulfur tolerance of Rh/Al2O3 may be related to the formation of well-dispersed electron-deficient Rh particles on the Al2O3 support. Sulfur K-edge XANES illustrates the preferential formation of sulfonate and sulfate on Rh/Al2O3, which is believed to be beneficial for improving its sulfur tolerance as their oxygen-shielded sulfur structure may hinder direct Rh-S interaction. Due to its strong sulfur tolerance, the carbon deposition on Rh/Al2O3 was significantly lower than that on the Al2O3-supported Ru, Pt, and Pd catalysts after the reaction with sulfur. The superior catalytic performance of CeO2-supported Rh and Pt catalysts in the presence of sulfur can be ascribed mainly to the promotion effect of CeO2 on carbon gasification, leading to much lower carbon deposition compared with the Rh/Al2O3, Rh/MgO, Rh/SiO2 and Pt/Al2O3 catalysts.

  11. Determination of phenolic acids and flavonoids in raw propolis by silica-supported ionic liquid-based matrix solid phase dispersion extraction high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhibing; Sun, Rui; Wang, Yuanpeng; Li, Na; Lei, Lei; Yang, Xiao; Yu, Aimin; Qiu, Fangping; Zhang, Hanqi

    2014-10-15

    The silica-supported ionic liquid (S-SIL) was prepared by impregnation and used as the dispersion adsorbent of matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) for the simultaneous extraction of eight phenolic acids and flavonoids, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, morin, luteolin, quercetin, apigenin, chrysin, and kaempferide in raw propolis. High performance liquid chromatography with a Zorbax SB-C18 column (150mm×4.6mm, 3.5?m) was used for separation of the analytes. The mobile phase consisted of 0.2% phosphoric acid aqueous solution and acetonitrile and the flow rate of the mobile phase was 0.5mL/min. The experimental conditions for silica-supported ionic liquid-based matrix solid phase dispersion (S-SIL-based MSPD) were optimized. S-SIL containing 10% [C6MIM]Cl was used as dispersant, 20mL of n-hexane as washing solvent and 15mL of methanol as elution solvent. The ratio of S-SIL to sample was selected to be 4:1. The standard curves showed good linear relationship (r>0.9995). The limits of detection and quantification were in the range of 5.8-22.2ngmL(-1) and 19.2-74.0ngmL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra-day and inter-day determination were lower than 8.80% and 11.19%, respectively. The recoveries were between 65.51% and 92.32% with RSDs lower than 8.95%. Compared with ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and soxhlet extraction, the present method consumed less sample, organic solvent, and extraction time, although the extraction yields obtained by S-SIL-based MSPD are slightly lower than those obtained by UAE. PMID:25190186

  12. Comparative Study of Graphite-Supported LDI- and ESI-FT-ICR-MS of a Pyrolysis Liquid from a German Brown Coal.

    PubMed

    Rathsack, Philipp; Wolf, Bianca; Kroll, Marius M; Otto, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Pyrolysis liquids from coal are complex mixtures of organic compounds with low to high molecular mass and low to high polarity. Compared to low-molecular-weight compounds, little information is available regarding high-molecular-weight compounds in pyrolysis liquids, although their characterization is important for the elucidation of degradation pathways. In this study, laser desorption ionization (LDI) using graphite powder as the support material has been used in conjunction with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) for the analysis of a pyrolysis liquid from brown coal. The acquired data is compared to previous results of the same sample using electrospray ionization (ESI). Using LDI, compounds with masses between 300 and 900 Da were detected by LDI. An evaluation of the spectra was based on the frequency of molecular formulas with a different number of heteroatoms. Hydrocarbon compounds and heteroatomic compounds containing oxygen and sulfur were found. A comparison to ESI results shows that the numbers of observed molecular formulas are virtually the same, but a higher quantity of molecular formulas with a low number of oxygen can be detected by LDI. The observation of molecular formulas without oxygen is a unique feature of the LDI spectra. A more detailed investigation was possible by the utilization of double bond equivalent plots versus carbon number, which revealed a prevalence of LDI for the ionization of compounds with higher DBE. PMID:26143658

  13. Role of diluent on the separation of 90Y from 90Sr by solvent extraction and supported liquid membrane using T2EHDGA as the extractant.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Raut, D R; Mohapatra, P K

    2012-04-01

    The separation behaviour of (90)Y from (90)Sr was investigated by diluent variation using solvent extraction and supported liquid membrane techniques employing N,N,N',N'-tetra-2-ethylhexyldiglycolamide (T2EHDGA) as the extractant. Both D(Y) (distribution ratio of Y(III)) and S.F. (separation factor) were found to be high in the solvent extraction studies when chloroform was used as the diluent. Subsequent supported liquid membrane (SLM) studies using PTFE flat sheet membranes containing 0.2M T2EHDGA in various diluents indicated the trend of Y transport as xylene>hexone>chloroform>carbon tetrachloride>n-dodecane+30% iso-decanol mixture. However, the Sr(II) transport rates were also high with xylene, hexone, and carbon tetrachloride as the diluents which led us to carry out subsequent studies using chloroform and n-dodecane+30% iso-decanol mixture. Acid variation studies in chloroform system indicated an interesting phenomena of increasing Y(III) transport and decreasing Sr(II) transport with increasing acid concentration. Separation of (90)Y from a mixture of (90)Sr and (90)Y was also attempted. PMID:22309631

  14. Lanthanide directed self-assembly of highly luminescent supramolecular "peptide" bundles from ?-amino acid functionalized 2,6-bis(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridine (btp) ligands.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Joseph P; Kitchen, Jonathan A; O'Brien, John E; Peacock, Robert D; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2015-02-16

    Ligands containing the [2,6-bis(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridine] (btp) motif have recently shown promise in coordination chemistry. The motif is synthesized via the Cu(I)-catalyzed "click" reaction and can be conveniently functionalized when compared to other terdentate chelating motifs. Ligand 1 was synthesized and shown to sensitize Eu(III) and Tb(III) excited states effectively. The use of these ions to synthesize self-assembly structures in solution was investigated by carrying out both (1)H NMR and photophysical titrations. The latter were used to determine high binding constants from changes in the absorption, ligand emission (fluorescence), and lanthanide-centered emission. A small library of amino acid derivatives of 1, ligands 3, were prepared upon coupling reactions with Gly, Ala, Phe, and Trp methyl esters, with a view to introducing biologically relevant and chiral moieties into such ligands. All of these derivatives were shown to form stable, emissive Ln(III) self-assemblies, emitting in the millisecond time range, which were studied by means of probing their photophysical properties in organic solutions using lanthanide ion titrations. All the Tb(III) complexes, with the exception of Trp based derivatives, gave rise to highly luminescent and bright complexes, with quantum yields of Tb(III) emission of 46-70% in CH3CN solution. In contrast, the Eu(III) complexes gave rise to more modest quantum yields of 0.3-3%, reflecting better energy match for the Tb(III) complexes, and hence, more efficient sensitization, as demonstrated by using low temperature measurements to determine the triplet state of 1. PMID:25634622

  15. MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN SUPPORT OF QUALIFICATION OF PROCESSING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE LOW-LEVEL LIQUID WASTE INTO SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, C.; Cozzi, A.; Staub, A.; Ray, J.

    2010-01-27

    The Saltstone Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) immobilizes low-level liquid waste into Saltstone to be disposed of in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility, Class Three Landfill. In order to meet the permit conditions and regulatory limits set by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), both the low-level salt solution and Saltstone samples are analyzed quarterly. Waste acceptance criteria (WAC) are designed to confirm the salt solution sample from the Tank Farm meets specific radioactive and chemical limits. The toxic characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) is used to confirm that the treatment has immobilized the hazardous constituents of the salt solution. This paper discusses the methods used to characterize the salt solution and final Saltstone samples from 2007-2009.

  16. LIQUID PHASE SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ETHYLBENZENE OVER ACTIVATED AL2O3 SUPPORTED V2O5 CATALYST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetophenone, a very useful industrial chemical for fragrance and flavoring agent and a solvent for plastics and resins, is usually produced as a byproduct of phenol production from cumeme. Aluminia supported vandium oxide catalyst is now explored for the selective oxidation of e...

  17. Partial oxidation of liquid hydrocarbons in the presence of oxygen-conducting supports: Effect of catalyst layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Berry, D.; Shekhawt, D.; Haynes, D.; Spivey, J.

    2010-01-01

    Ni-substituted barium hexaaluminate (BNHA) catalysts supported onto gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC), an oxygen-conductor, were prepared using two different methods: (1) conventional incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), in which a non-porous GDC support was impregnated in the conventional manner with aqueous precursors, then dried and calcined to form a supported hexaaluminate, and (2) solid-state mixing (SSM), in which solid hexaaluminate and GDC particles were mechanically ground together and thermally treated to produce a final catalyst. These catalysts were compared to bulk, unsupported BNHA; 3 wt% Ni/alumina; and 3 wt% Ni/GDC (the latter two prepared by conventional impregnation) for the partial oxidation (POX) of n-tetradecane. The reaction studies included examining the effect of 50 ppm S as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and 5 wt% 1-methylnaphthalene (MN) on the product yield under POX conditions. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) was used to characterize carbon formation in the reactor. The materials were characterized by BET, ICP-OES, XRD, and SEM/EDS prior to the reaction tests. Characterization of the two GDC-supported BNHA catalysts prior to the reaction studies indicated no significant differences in the bulk composition, surface area, and crystal structure. However, SEM images showed a larger amount of exposed GDC support surface area for the material prepared by IWI. Both of the GDC-supported BNHA materials demonstrated greatly reduced deactivation, with significantly reduced carbon formation compared to bulk BNHA. This was attributed to the oxygen-conducting property of the GDC, which reduced the rate of deactivation of the reaction sites by DBT and MN. The material prepared by IWI demonstrated more stable hydrogen and carbon monoxide yield than the material prepared by SSM. Although both catalysts deactivated in the presence of DBT and MN, the activity of the catalyst prepared by IWI recovered activity more quickly after the contaminants were removed. This material also maintained >50% of its initial hydrogen yield for more than 4 h after exposure to DBT and MN, while the hydrogen for the material prepared by SSM dropped to this same level within 2 h. Incipient wetness impregnation appears to provide a higher degree of interaction between the oxygenconducting GDC support and the hexaaluminate, resulting in less rapid deactivation, which appears to be due primarily to carbon deposition.

  18. Liquid-Phase Synthesis of 2'-Methyl-RNA on a Homostar Support through Organic-Solvent Nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Piers R J; Kim, Jeong F; Valtcheva, Irina B; Williams, Glynn D; Anson, Mike S; Buswell, Andrew M; Livingston, Andrew G

    2015-06-22

    Due to the discovery of RNAi, oligonucleotides (oligos) have re-emerged as a major pharmaceutical target that may soon be required in ton quantities. However, it is questionable whether solid-phase oligo synthesis (SPOS) methods can provide a scalable synthesis. Liquid-phase oligo synthesis (LPOS) is intrinsically scalable and amenable to standard industrial batch synthesis techniques. However, most reported LPOS strategies rely upon at least one precipitation per chain extension cycle to separate the growing oligonucleotide from reaction debris. Precipitation can be difficult to develop and control on an industrial scale and, because many precipitations would be required to prepare a therapeutic oligonucleotide, we contend that this approach is not viable for large-scale industrial preparation. We are developing an LPOS synthetic strategy for 2'-methyl RNA phosphorothioate that is more amenable to standard batch production techniques, using organic solvent nanofiltration (OSN) as the critical scalable separation technology. We report the first LPOS-OSN preparation of a 2'-Me RNA phosphorothioate 9-mer, using commercial phosphoramidite monomers, and monitoring all reactions by HPLC, (31)P?NMR spectroscopy and MS. PMID:26012874

  19. Liquid-Phase Synthesis of 2?-Methyl-RNA on a Homostar Support through Organic-Solvent Nanofiltration

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Piers R J; Kim, Jeong F; Valtcheva, Irina B; Williams, Glynn D; Anson, Mike S; Buswell, Andrew M; Livingston, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    Due to the discovery of RNAi, oligonucleotides (oligos) have re-emerged as a major pharmaceutical target that may soon be required in ton quantities. However, it is questionable whether solid-phase oligo synthesis (SPOS) methods can provide a scalable synthesis. Liquid-phase oligo synthesis (LPOS) is intrinsically scalable and amenable to standard industrial batch synthesis techniques. However, most reported LPOS strategies rely upon at least one precipitation per chain extension cycle to separate the growing oligonucleotide from reaction debris. Precipitation can be difficult to develop and control on an industrial scale and, because many precipitations would be required to prepare a therapeutic oligonucleotide, we contend that this approach is not viable for large-scale industrial preparation. We are developing an LPOS synthetic strategy for 2?-methyl RNA phosphorothioate that is more amenable to standard batch production techniques, using organic solvent nanofiltration (OSN) as the critical scalable separation technology. We report the first LPOS-OSN preparation of a 2?-Me RNA phosphorothioate 9-mer, using commercial phosphoramidite monomers, and monitoring all reactions by HPLC, 31P NMR spectroscopy and MS. PMID:26012874

  20. Core-Shell Diamond as a Support for Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Gaurav; Jensen, David S.; Wiest, Landon A.; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Lee, Milton L.; Shutthanandan, V.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2010-06-01

    We report the formation of core-shell diamond particles for solid phase extraction (SPE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) made by layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition. Their synthesis begins with the amine functionalization of microdiamond by its immersion in an aqueous solution of a primary amine-containing polymer (polyallylamine (PAAm)). The amine-terminated microdiamond is then immersed in an aqueous suspension of nanodiamond, which leads to adsorption of the nanodiamond. Alternating (self-limiting) immersions in the solutions of the amine-containing polymer and the suspension of nanodiamond are continued until the desired number of nanodiamond layers is formed around the microdiamond. Finally, the core-shell particles are cross-linked with 1,2,5,6-diepoxycyclooctane or reacted with 1,2-epoxyoctadecane. Layer-by-layer deposition of PAAm and nanodiamond is also studied on planar Si/SiO2 surfaces, which were characterized by SEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Core-shell particles are characterized by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area and pore size measurements. Larger (ca. 50 ?m) core-shell diamond particles have much higher surface areas, and analyte loading capacities in SPE than nonporous solid diamond particles. Smaller (ca. 3 ?m), normal and reversed phase, core-shell diamond particles have been used for HPLC, with 36,300 plates per meter for mesitylene in a separation of benzene and alkyl benzenes on a C18 adsorbent, and 54,800 plates per meter for diazinon in a similar separation of two pesticides.

  1. A biological method of including mineralized human liquid and solid wastes into the mass exchange of bio-technical life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, S. A.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Tikhomirova, N. A.; Kudenko, Yu. A.; Litovka, Yu. A.; Anishchenko, O. V.

    2012-10-01

    The main obstacle to using mineralized human solid and liquid wastes as a source of mineral elements for plants cultivated in bio-technical life support systems (BLSS) is that they contain NaCl. The purpose of this study is to determine whether mineralized human wastes can be used to prepare the nutrient solution for long-duration conveyor cultivation of uneven-aged wheat and Salicornia europaea L. plant community. Human solid and liquid wastes were mineralized by the method of "wet incineration" developed by Yu. Kudenko. They served as a basis for preparing the solutions that were used for conveyor-type cultivation of wheat community represented by 5 age groups, planted with a time interval of 14 days. Wheat was cultivated hydroponically on expanded clay particles. To reduce salt content of the nutrient solution, every two weeks, after wheat was harvested, 12 L of solution was removed from the wheat irrigation tank and used for Salicornia europaea cultivation in water culture in a conveyor mode. The Salicornia community was represented by 2 age groups, planted with a time interval of 14 days. As some portion of the nutrient solution used for wheat cultivation was regularly removed, sodium concentration in the wheat irrigation solution did not exceed 400 mg/L, and mineral elements contained in the removed portion were used for Salicornia cultivation. The experiment lasted 4 months. The total wheat biomass productivity averaged 30.1 g · m-2 · day-1, and the harvest index amounted to 36.8%. The average productivity of Salicornia edible biomass on a dry weight basis was 39.3 g · m-2 · day-1, and its aboveground mass contained at least 20% of NaCl. Thus, the proposed technology of cultivation of wheat and halophyte plant community enables using mineralized human wastes as a basis for preparing nutrient solutions and including NaCl in the mass exchange of the BLSS; moreover, humans are supplied with additional amounts of leafy vegetables.

  2. Influence of Sulfur on the Carbon Deposition in Liquid Hydrocarbon Steam Reforming over CeO2-Al2O3 supported Ni and Rh Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    C Xie; Y Chen; Y Li; X Wang; C Song

    2011-12-31

    This study was performed to elucidate the influence of sulfur on the carbon deposition in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons over CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported Ni and Rh catalysts at 800 C. The characteristics of the carbon deposits on the used catalysts after the reactions without and with sulfur were investigated by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Though abundant carbon deposits can accumulate on the pure CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support due to fuel thermal cracking, the addition of Ni or Rh metal greatly reduced the carbon deposition in the sulfur-free reaction. The presence of sulfur increased the carbon deposition on both catalysts, which has a much more significant impact for the Ni catalyst. Carbon XANES study on the used catalysts revealed that graphitic carbon was dominant in the presence of sulfur, while oxidized carbon species (quinone-like carbon, carboxyl and carbonate) prevailed without sulfur. Meanwhile, the formation of carboxyl and carbonate more dramatically dropped on the Ni catalyst than that on the Rh catalyst. Our results strongly suggest that (I) the presence of sulfur can suppress carbon gasification and promote the formation of graphitic carbon on reforming catalysts due mainly to its poisoning effect on metals, and (II) Rh catalyst possesses stronger capability to maintain carbon gasification activity than Ni catalyst in the presence of sulfur.

  3. Determination of the triacylglycerol fraction in fish oil by comprehensive liquid chromatography techniques with the support of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Beccaria, Marco; Costa, Rosaria; Sullini, Giuseppe; Grasso, Elisa; Cacciola, Francesco; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-01

    Fish oil made from menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) can be used as a dietary supplement for the presence of high levels of the long-chained omega-3 fatty acids, viz. epentaenoic and docosahexanoic. In this work, for the first time, two different multidimensional approaches were developed and compared, in terms of peak capacity, for triacylglycerol characterization. In particular, silver ion chromatography with a silver-ion column and non-aqueous reverse-phase liquid chromatography with a C18 column were tested in both comprehensive (stop-flow) and off-line modes. The use of mass spectra attained by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for both LC approaches, and the fatty acids methyl esters profile of menhaden oil obtained by gas chromatography analysis, greatly supported the elucidation of the triacylglycerol content in menhaden oil. The off-line approach afforded a better separation and, thus, higher peak capacity to allow identifying and semiquantifying more than 250 triacylglycerols. Such a huge number has never been reported for a menhaden oil sample.The main disadvantage of such an approach over the stop-flow one was the longer analysis time, mainly attributable to solvent exchange between the two dimensions. PMID:25963648

  4. Speciation Analysis of Labile and Total Silver(I) in Nanosilver Dispersions and Environmental Waters by Hollow Fiber Supported Liquid Membrane Extraction.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jing-Bo; Zhou, Xiao-Xia; Shen, Mo-Hai; Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Rui; Yu, Su-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2015-12-15

    Hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) extraction was coupled with ICP-MS for speciation analysis of labile Ag(I) and total Ag(I) in dispersions of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and environmental waters. Ag(I) in aqueous samples was extracted into the HFSLM of 5%(m/v) tri-n-octylphosphine oxide in n-undecane, and stripped in the acceptor of 10 mM Na2S2O3 and 1 mM Cu(NO3)2 prepared in 5 mM NaH2PO4-Na2HPO4 buffer (pH 7.5). Negligible depletion and exhaustive extraction were conducted under static and 250 rpm shaking to extract the labile Ag(I) and total Ag(I), respectively. The extraction equilibration was reached in 8 h for both extraction modes. The extraction efficiency and detection limit were (2.97 ± 0.25)% and 0.1 ?g/L for labile Ag(I), and (82.3 ± 2.0)% and 0.5 ?g/L for total Ag(I) detection, respectively. The proposed method was applied to determine labile Ag(I) and total Ag(I) in different sized AgNP dispersions and real environmental waters, with spiked recoveries of total Ag(I) in the range of 74.0-98.1%. With the capability of distinguishing labile and total Ag(I), our method offers a new approach for evaluating the bioavailability and understanding the fate and toxicity of AgNPs in aquatic systems. PMID:26580982

  5. In silico and in vitro metabolism studies support identification of designer drugs in human urine by liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tyrkkö, Elli; Pelander, Anna; Ketola, Raimo A; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-08-01

    Human phase I metabolism of four designer drugs, 2-desoxypipradrol (2-DPMP), 3,4-dimethylmethcathinone (3,4-DMMC), ?-pyrrolidinovalerophenone (?-PVP), and methiopropamine (MPA), was studied using in silico and in vitro metabolite prediction. The metabolites were identified in drug abusers’ urine samples using liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/Q-TOF/MS). The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of the in silico and in vitro methods to generate the main urinary metabolites found in vivo. Meteor 14.0.0 software (Lhasa Limited) was used for in silico metabolite prediction, and in vitro metabolites were produced in human liver microsomes (HLMs). 2-DPMP was metabolized by hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and oxidation, resulting in six phase I metabolites. Six metabolites were identified for 3,4-DMMC formed via N-demethylation, reduction, hydroxylation, and oxidation reactions. ?-PVP was found to undergo reduction, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and oxidation reactions, as well as degradation of the pyrrolidine ring, and seven phase I metabolites were identified. For MPA, the nor-MPA metabolite was detected. Meteor software predicted the main human urinary phase I metabolites of 3,4-DMMC, ?-PVP, and MPA and two of the four main metabolites of 2-DPMP. It assisted in the identification of the previously unreported metabolic reactions for ?-PVP. Eight of the 12 most abundant in vivo phase I metabolites were detected in the in vitro HLM experiments. In vitro tests serve as material for exploitation of in silico data when an authentic urine sample is not available. In silico and in vitro designer drug metabolism studies with LC/Q-TOF/MS produced sufficient metabolic information to support identification of the parent compound in vivo. PMID:23797910

  6. Sensitivity enhancement in direct coupling of supported liquid membrane extractions to capillary electrophoresis by means of transient isotachophoresis and large electrokinetic injections.

    PubMed

    Pant??ková, Pavla; Kubá?, Pavel; Bo?ek, Petr

    2015-04-10

    Enhanced sensitivity for determination of basic drugs in body fluids was achieved by in-line coupling of extraction across supported liquid membrane (SLM) to large electrokinetic injection and transient isotachophoresis-capillary zone electrophoresis (tITP-CZE) in commercial CZE instrument. Twelve cm long tITP plug of 300mM ammonium acetate was formed in the separation capillary just before the electrokinetic injection of acceptor solution containing nortriptyline, haloperidol and loperamide extracted across the SLM. The tITP plug ensured efficient stacking and preconcentration of the injected basic drugs due to the tITP action of ammonium and the drugs were then separated by CZE using 5.2M acetic acid as background electrolyte. No interferences were observed from highly-abundant body fluid species (NaCl and human serum albumin) due to the excellent clean-up properties of SLMs and analytical sensitivity increased up to 340 times compared to SLM extractions coupled in-line to CZE with standard hydrodynamic injections. The SLM-tITP-CZE method was characterized by good repeatability (RSDs of peak areas below 7.8%), linearity over two orders of magnitude (r(2) better than 0.994) and limits of detection (defined as 3×S/N) between 3 and 45?g/L. Interfacing of SLM extractions to CZE instrumentation was achieved by low-cost, disposable micro-extraction devices, which can be routinely prepared in every analytical laboratory. These devices eliminated sample carry-over, minimized the need for manual sample handling and ensured fully automated determination (including extraction, injection, preconcentration and separation) of the three basic drugs in 20?L of untreated body fluids. PMID:25747667

  7. Development of liquid chromatographic method for the analysis of dabigatran etexilate mesilate and its ten impurities supported by quality-by-design methodology.

    PubMed

    Pantovi?, Jasmina; Malenovi?, An?elija; Vemi?, Ana; Kosti?, Na?a; Medenica, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the development of reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method for the analysis of dabigatran etexilate mesilate and its ten impurities supported by quality by design (QbD) approach is presented. The defined analytical target profile (ATP) was the efficient baseline separation and the accurate determination of the investigated analytes. The selected critical quality attributes (CQAs) were the separation criterions between the critical peak pairs because the mixture complexity imposed a gradient elution mode. The critical process parameters (CPPs) studied in this research were acetonitrile content at the beginning of gradient program, acetonitrile content at the end of gradient program and the gradient time. Plan of experiments was defined by Box-Behnken design. The experimental domains of the three selected factors x1--content of the acetonitrile at the start of linear gradient, x2--content of the acetonitrile at the end of linear gradient and x3--gradient time (tG) were [10%, 30%], [48%, 60%] and [8 min, 15 min], respectively. In order to define the design space (DS) as a zone where the desired quality criteria is met providing also the quality assurance, Monte Carlo simulations were performed. The uniform error distribution equal to the calculated standard error was added to the model coefficient estimates. Monte Carlo simulation included 5000 iterations in each of 3969 defined grid points and the region having the probability ? ? 95% to achieve satisfactory values of all defined CQAs was computed. As a working point, following chromatographic conditions suited in the middle of the DS were chosen: 22% acetonitrile at the start of gradient program, 55.5% acetonitrile at the end of gradient program end and the gradient time of 11.5 min. The developed method was validated in order to prove its reliability. PMID:25828507

  8. Halophytic plants as a component of a bioregenerative life support system for recycling of NaCl contained in human liquid waste.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balnokin, Yurii; Balnokin, Yurii; Myasoedov, Nikolay; Popova, Larissa; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Ushakova, Sofya; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lasseur, Christophe; Gros, Jean-Bernard

    Currently, the closure of matter turnover is one of the urgent problems of bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) designing. The important aspect of the problem is involving of substances contained in liquid and solid exometabolites of humans inhabiting BLSS into intrasystem matter turnover. Recycling of Na+ and Cl- contained in human liquid exometabolites, i.e. urine is acknowledged to be among the main tasks of the matter turnover in BLSS. The ions excreted with urine may be returned to human organism with food. A way to allow this is including edible halophytic plants into the phototrophic compartment of BLSS. Halophytes are defined as plants which can grow on saline soils and produce high biomass under these conditions. Some halophytes can take up high quantities of Na+ and Cl- and accumulate the ions in the shoots or extrude them to leaf surface by means of salt glands. To allow Na+ and Cl- recycling through halophyte utilization, the following principal steps should be accomplished: (i) mineralization of the exometabolites by physicochemical methods; (ii) oxidation of ammonia formed during the exometabolite mineralization to nitrate by nitrifying bacteria, (iii) growing the halophyte on the nutrient solution prepared on the basis of the mineralized exometabolites, (iv) introducing the halophyte green biomass into human food. The present work is devoted to the following problems: (i) selection of a salt-accumulating/extruding halophytic plant suitable for Na+ and Cl- recycling in BLSS and (ii) parameter evaluation of a plant conveyor containing the halophytic plants at various ages. Halophytic plants selected for BLSS should meet the following criteria: (i) ability to grow under 24-hour-illumination, (ii) high productivity, (iii) ability to accumulate Na+ and Cl- in high quantities in shoots or to excrete salts to leaf surface, (iv) edibility, and (v) high nutritive value of the biomass. Relying on these criteria, salt-accumulating halophyte Salicornia europaea was selected from seven halophytic plant candidates, preliminary chosen from observations in their natural habitats, from our previous investigations and literature data. Characterization of the plant performance was obtained in the experiments on plants grown in water culture in a cultivation chamber under controlled conditions. A model nutrient solution simulating mineralized urine was used for halophyte growing. Under the experimental conditions, S.europaea exhibited high productivity and accumulated Na+ and Cl- in the shoots in high quantities. It has been shown that above-ground organs of S.europaea exhibit high nutritive value, the proteins are enriched with the essential amino acids and displayed high abundance of leucine, aspartic and glutamic acids. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to put into practice permanent Na+ and Cl- recycling in BLSS by a various-aged S.europaea conveyor. Relying on data on distribution of Na+ and Cl- between the plant and growth medium, parameters of the conveyor for permanent ion turnover in the system humans - exometabolites - nutrient solution - S.europaea - humans have been evaluated.

  9. Liquid level sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Terhune, J. H.; Neissel, J. P.

    1985-06-04

    A liquid level detector, or detector array, for insertion into the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor, or into any liquid-containing vessel, for that matter. A coaxial cable supports the detector, which includes a sensing element having a positive temperature-coefficient of electrical resistivity. The detector is driven by a constant current source of electricity and the presence of liquid is determined by making a resistance measurement.

  10. Electrokinetics over liquid/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Todd M.

    2011-11-01

    Since liquid-liquid interfaces flow in response to an applied stress, one might expect electrokinetic flows at liquid-liquid interfaces to be significantly higher than over liquid-solid interfaces. The earliest predictions for the electrophoretic mobility of charged mercury drops - distinct approaches by Frumkin and Levich (1946), and Booth (1951) - differed by O (a /?D) , where a is the radius of the drop and ?D is the Debye screening length. Seeking to reconcile this rather striking discrepancy, Levine (1973) showed double-layer polarization to be the key ingredient. Without a physical mechanism by which electrokinetic effects are enhanced, however, it is difficult to know how general the enhancement is - whether it holds only for liquid metal surfaces, or more generally, for all liquid/liquid surfaces. By considering a series of systems in which a planar metal strip is coated with either a liquid metal or liquid dielectric, we show that the central physical mechanism behind the enhancement predicted by Frumkin and Levich (1946) is the presence of an unmatched electrical stress upon the electrolyte-liquid interface, which establishes a Marangoni stress on the droplet surface and drives it into motion. The source of the unbalanced electrokinetic stress on a liquid metal surface is clear - metals represent equipotential surfaces, so no field exists to drive an equal and opposite force on the surface charge. This might suggest that liquid metals represent a unique system, since dielectric liquids can support finite electric fields, which might be expected to exert an electrical stress on the surface charge that balances the electric stress. We demonstrate, however, that electrical and osmotic stresses on relaxed double-layers internal to dielectric liquids precisely cancel, so that internal electrokinetic stresses generally vanish in closed, ideally polarizable liquids. The enhancement for liquid mercury drops can thus be expected quite generally over clean, ideally polarizable liquid drops. More broadly, the ability to reliably engineer liquid interfaces in microfluidic systems, then, may provide a path to significantly enhanced electrokinetic flows. Research done in collaboration with A. J. Pascall.

  11. High-Surface-Area CO2 Sponge: High Performance CO2 Scrubbing Based on Hollow Fiber-Supported Designer Ionic Liquid Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    IMPACCT Project: The team from ORNL and Georgia Tech is developing a new technology that will act like a sponge, integrating a new, alcohol-based ionic liquid into hollow fibers (magnified image, right) to capture CO2 from the exhaust produced by coal-fired power plants. Ionic liquids, or salts that exist in liquid form, are promising materials for carbon capture and storage, but their tendency to thicken when combined with CO2 limits their efficiency and poses a challenge for their development as a cost-effective alternative to current-generation solutions. Adding alcohol to the mix limits this tendency to thicken in the presence of CO2 but can also make the liquid more likely to evaporate, which would add significantly to the cost of CO2 capture. To solve this problem, ORNL is developing new classes of ionic liquids with high capacity for absorbing CO2. ORNL’s sponge would reduce the cost associated with the energy that would need to be diverted from power plants to capture CO2 and release it for storage.

  12. Liquid-phase methanol process development unit: installation, operation, and support studies. Technical progress report No. 1, 28 September 1981-31 December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-20

    During this period the Work Breakdown Structure Dictionary was established. Task 1 was completed with submittal of the Project Work Plan and the Quality Assurance Manual. CSI produced basic process design information and a preliminary flowsheet for the LaPorte LPMeOH PDU. APCI developed the flowsheet further and set up the process on APCI's process simulator. The flowsheet development revealed a number of major changes necessary in the existing LPM pilot plant; this has led to pursuit of a unified design concept. Approval was requested for the unified design concept as well as advanced schedule for relocation of the LPM unit and advanced procurement of long delivery equipment items. A number of preliminary heat and material balances were calculated for the LPMeOH PDU and preliminary process specifications were prepared for the equipment items. The final design basis was established. The design pressure was set at 1000 psig. Eight design operating cases were defined for the following range of reactor operating conditions: Pressure - 500 to 900 psig, Temperature - 220 to 270/sup 0/C, Liquid-Fluidized Space Velocity - 1000 to 4000 l/hr-kg catalyst, Liquid-Entrained Space Velocity - 2000 to 10,000 l/hr-kg catalyst, and Liquid-Entrained Catalyst Loading - 0.1 to 0.4 kg catalyst/l oil. The methanol production rate for these cases ranges from 0.2 to 9.7 short tons per day. Preliminary equipment arrangement and site layout drawings were prepared for the PDU. In the laboratories, CSI began autoclave testing of in-situ catalyst reduction procedures. The specification and evaluation of equipment for the CSI laboratory PDU progressed. CSI prepared and issued a Topical Report covering liquid-entrained LPMeOH lab development work accomplished under advance funding. APCI's laboratories progressed with the design of the bench scale slurry reactor.

  13. Characterization of an internal-surface reversed-phase silica support for liquid chromatography and its application to assays of drugs in serum.

    PubMed

    Haginaka, J; Wakai, J; Yasuda, N; Yasuda, H; Kimura, Y

    1990-08-31

    Internal-surface reversed-phase (ISRP) silica supports having N-octanoylaminopropyl phases bound to the internal surfaces of the porous silica and N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)aminopropyl phases bound to the external surfaces were synthesized from silica particles differing in nominal pore diameters and specific surface areas. These ISRP supports were characterized with regard to physical and chromatographic properties. The support with an N-octanoylaminopropyl phase coverage of 485 mumol/g and an average pore diameter of 65 A was the most suitable for the direct-injection determination of hydrophilic or hydrophobic drugs in serum or plasma. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid) and tricyclic antidepressant drugs (desipramine and nortriptyline) in serum were successfully determined with this support and an acidic eluent. PMID:2178170

  14. An Improved Method for the Separation of Lead-210 from Ra-DEF for Radioactive Equilibrium Experiments: Microscale Liquid-Liquid Extraction Using a Polymer-Supported Crown Ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Mark L.; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1996-02-01

    A novel extraction chromatographic material, comprised of a solution of a lead-selective macrocyclic polyether (di-t-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6) in isodecanol sorbed on an inert polymeric support, is shown to provide a rapid and simple means for the separation of lead-210 from its daughter products for subsequent radiochemical experimentation.

  15. Laboratory characterization of non-aqueous phase liquid/tracer interaction in support of a vadose zone partitioning interwell tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Neil E.; McKinney, Daene C.; Pope, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Contaminant characterization is important for successful remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the unsaturated zone. A partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) can provide a good estimate of average subsurface NAPL saturations. Screening experiments were completed in the laboratory to evaluate several gas tracers for a PITT study to be completed in the vadose zone at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, NM. Four perfluorocarbon tracers were found to be suitable for this PITT. Further laboratory column studies were completed using contaminated field soil to measure the partition coefficients between the tracers and the NAPL. The results from the column studies showed that the air/NAPL tracer partition coefficients ranged from 8.8±0.6 to 71±3. This range of partition coefficients is suitable for detection of NAPL saturations in the field of 0.002 to 0.14.

  16. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS IN SUPPORT OF INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL IN 241-AP TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; ABBOTT FG; CARPENTER BG; RINKER MW

    2007-02-16

    The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The "Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Project" is in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14.

  17. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA)

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  18. Liquid metal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.

    1982-11-23

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  19. Recent development of ionic liquid stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianzhe; Qiao, Lizhen; Xu, Guowang

    2015-11-13

    Based on their particular physicochemical characteristics, ionic liquids have been widely applied in many fields of analytical chemistry. Many types of ionic liquids were immobilized on a support like silica or monolith as stationary phases for liquid chromatography. Moreover, different approaches were developed to bond covalently ionic liquids onto the supporting materials. The obtained ionic liquid stationary phases show multi-mode mechanism including hydrophobic, hydrophilic, hydrogen bond, anion exchange, ?-?, and dipole-dipole interactions. Therefore, they could be used in different chromatographic modes including ion-exchange, RPLC, NPLC and HILIC to separate various classes of compounds. This review mainly summarizes the immobilized patterns and types of ionic liquid stationary phases, their retention mechanisms and applications in the recent five years. PMID:26463427

  20. Evaluation of the measurement of Cu(II) bioavailability in complex aqueous media using a hollow-fiber supported liquid membrane device (HFSLM) and two microalgae species (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Scenedesmus acutus).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Erik A; Rodríguez de San Miguel, Eduardo; de Gyves, Josefina

    2015-11-01

    The environmental bioavailability of copper was determined using a hollow-fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) device as a chemical surrogate and two microalgae species (Scenedesmus acutus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). Several experimental conditions were studied: pH, the presence of organic matter, inorganic anions, and concomitant cations. The results indicated a strong relationship between the response given by the HFSLM and the microalgae species with free copper concentrations measured by an ion selective electrode (ISE), in accordance with the free-ion activity model (FIAM). A significant positive correlation was evident when comparing the bioavailability results measured by the HFSLM and the S. acutus microalga species, showing that the synthetic device may emulate biological uptake and, consequently, be used as a chemical test for bioavailability measurements using this alga as a biological reference. PMID:26431807

  1. Reaction profiling by ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in support of the synthesis of DNA-encoded libraries.

    PubMed

    Hargiss, Leonard O; Zipp, G Greg; Jessop, Theodore C; Sun, Xuejun; Keyes, Philip; Rawlins, David B; Liang, Zhi; Park, Kum Joo; Gu, Huizhong

    2014-11-15

    An ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS) separation and analysis method has been devised for open access analysis of synthetic reactions used in the production of DNA-encoded chemical libraries. The aqueous mobile phase is 100mM hexafluoroisopropanol and 8.6mM triethylamine; the organic mobile phase is methanol. The UHPLC separation uses a C18 OST column (50mm×2.1mm×1.7?m) at 60°C, with a flow rate of 0.6mL/min. Gradient concentration is from 10 to 40% B in 1.0min, increasing to 95% B at 1.2min. Cycle time was about 5min. This method provides a detection limit of a 20-mer oligonucleotide by mass spectrometry of better than 1pmol on-column. Linear UV response for 20-mer extends from 2 to 200pmol/?L in concentration, same-day relative average deviations are less than 5% and bias (observed minus expected) is less than 10%. Deconvoluted mass spectra are generated for components in the predicted mass range using a maximum entropy algorithm. Mass accuracy of deconvoluted spectra is typically 20ppm or better for isotopomers of oligonucleotides up to 7000Da. PMID:25282130

  2. Development of hollow fiber-supported liquid-phase microextraction and HPLC-DAD method for the determination of pyrethroid metabolites in human and rat urine.

    PubMed

    Bartosz, Wielgomas; Marcin, Wi?niewski; Wojciech, Czarnowski

    2014-05-01

    A simple hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction method for the determination of synthetic pyrethroid metabolites, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-phenoxybenzoic acid, in human and rat urine was developed and validated. A polypropylene hollow fiber tightly fitted onto a Nylon rod and impregnated with organic solvent served as a disposable extraction device. Desorption of analytes was carried out in NaOH solution, analyzed further by gradient HPLC and diode array detection method. Important factors were identified using Taguchi OA16 (4(5) ) orthogonal array design and further optimized using univariate approach. The optimum method performance was observed when 1?mL of urine hydrolyzed with 0.2?mL of concentrated HCl was further supplemented with 100?mg of NaCl and extracted for 120?min into dihexyl ether immobilized in the pores of the hollow fiber. Metabolites were desorbed into 0.1?mL of 0.1?M NaOH for another 120?min. Limits of detection and quantitation of 15 and 50?ng/mL were obtained for both analytes. Relative standard deviations of 1.6-12.6% over the linear range (50-10,000?ng/mL, r?>?0.9906) were observed. Intra- and inter-day accuracies of the method ranged from 98.3 to 109.5% and from 93.3 to 110.9%, respectively. The optimized method was applied to the analysis of real urine samples collected from rats exposed orally to cypermethrin. PMID:24347457

  3. Separation, identification and quantification of riboflavin and its photoproducts in blood products using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection: a method to support pathogen reduction technology.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Christopher C; Herivel, Troy R; Hernandez, Shiloh C; Ruane, Patrick H; Goodrich, Raymond P

    2004-01-01

    A medical device using riboflavin (RB) and light is being developed for the reduction of pathogens in platelet concentrates (MIRASOL pathogen reduction technology [PRT]). A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the quantification of RB and its main photoproduct, lumichrome (LC) in blood components has been developed and validated. In addition, the same method has been used to identify and quantify the presence of additional photoproducts-catabolites of RB. Levels of these agents before and after treatment as well as endogenous levels present in normal donor blood are reported using this analytical technique. The method allows for quantitative and qualitative analysis of RB and LC in blood components using HPLC-fluorescence detection, a Zorbax SB-CN (stable bond cyano) column and a methanol-water mobile phase. Quantitation and qualitative analysis of additional photoproducts of RB was also performed, but the method has not been validated for these other components. The method described has passed an 8 day validation and has been found to be adequate for its intended use. The range of the method for RB is 0.016-1.500 microM and for LC is 0.060-1.500 microM. The method detection limit for RB is 0.0006 microM and for LC is 0.012 microM. The acceptance criteria for repeatability were met; the relative standard deviation for RB was 0.64% and for LC was 0.76%. The acceptance criteria for bias were met with a 97% average recovery for RB and a 102% recovery for LC. Samples were centrifuged and diluted 1:50 with 0.9% saline before analysis. No protein precipitation or extraction was required. A mass balance of approximately 93.4-94.4% was achieved after exposure of products to UV light in the intended pathogen reduction treatment method. The method permitted the identification of photoproducts in blood that were both naturally occurring and produced after photolysis of blood samples treated with the PRT process. The identity of these photoproducts has been established using HPLC Tandem Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) and UV spectroscopic methods and has been correlated with known metabolites and catabolites of RB. HPLC with fluorescence detection using a reverse phase cyano-column allows for accurate separation, identification and quantification of both RB and LC in blood products without the need for solvent extraction or protein precipitation. Additional photoproducts could also be identified and quantified using this method. The presence of these agents in normal, untreated blood suggests that their presence in blood is ubiquitous. PMID:15382964

  4. Facilitated transport of Pd(II) through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) containing N,N,N',N'-tetra-(2-ethylhexyl) thiodiglycolamide T(2EH)TDGA: a novel carrier.

    PubMed

    Ruhela, R; Panja, S; Sharma, J N; Tomar, B S; Tripathi, S C; Hubli, R C; Suri, A K

    2012-08-30

    A novel carrier, N,N,N',N'-tetra-(2-ethylhexyl) thiodiglycolamide, T(2EH)TDGA has been studied for transport of Pd(II) from nitric acid medium across a supported liquid membrane (SLM). Pd(II) was found to be almost quantitatively transported (? 99.9%) within 2h from 3.0M HNO(3) medium using 0.05 M T(2EH)TDGA in n-dodecane as carrier and 0.01 M thiourea in 0.2M HNO(3) as strippant. Pd(II) transport was also studied against various parameters like feed acidity, carrier concentration, membrane pore size, etc. Palladium transport was found to be diffusion controlled and the diffusion co-efficient value was found to be 3.56 × 10(-5)cm(2)/s. Selectivity of T(2EH)TDGA for palladium over other fission products was found to be quite high, with the separation factors for Pd, with respect to different fission products being >10(3). With respect to leaching out of carrier from the membrane support, the membrane was found to be stable for six consecutive cycles. Thus, T(2EH)TDGA can be used as an efficient carrier of Pd(II) from nitric acid medium. PMID:22704775

  5. Preconcentration of emerging contaminants in environmental water samples by using silica supported Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles for improving mass detection in capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Moliner-Martínez, Yolanda; Ribera, Antonio; Coronado, Eugenio; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2011-04-22

    A magnetic material based on Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles incorporated in a silica matrix by using a sol-gel procedure has been used to extract and preconcentrate emerging contaminants such as acetylsalicylic acid, acetaminophen, diclofenac and ibuprofen from environmental water samples prior to the analysis with Capillary LC-MS. The use of the proposed silica supported Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles enables surfactant free extracts for the analysis with MS detection without interferences in the ionisation step. Under the optimum conditions, we demonstrated the reusability of the magnetic sorbent material during 20 uses without loss in the extraction efficiency. In addition, no cleanup was necessary. The preconcentration factor was 100 and the detection limits were between 50 and 150 ng/L. The proposed procedure has been applied to the analysis of water samples obtaining recoveries between 80 and 110% and RSD values lower than 12%. Concentrations of the target analytes over the range 1.7 and 0.1 ?g/L have been found in different water samples. PMID:21388625

  6. A study of liquid propellant autoignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. H.; Gibbs, A. G.; Lessor, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Data and theory pertinent to the autoignition of liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants were reviewed. Physical models of the processes supporting or contributing to autoignition were developed. Emphasis was placed on the description of the physical environment and its relationship to the autoignition phenomenon.

  7. PREFACE: Functionalized Liquid Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Hubert; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Monroe, Charles W.; Urbakh, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Most natural processes take place at interfaces. For this reason, surface science has been a focal point of modern research. At solid-liquid interfaces one can induce various species to adsorb or react, and thus may study interactions between the substrate and adsorbates, kinetic processes, optical properties, etc. Liquid-liquid interfaces, formed by immiscible liquids such as water and oil, have a number of distinctive features. Both sides of the interface are amenable to detailed physical and chemical analysis. By chemical or electrochemical means, metal or semiconductor nanoparticles can be formed or localised at the interface. Surfactants can be used to tailor surface properties, and also to place organic molecular or supermolecular constructions at the boundary between the liquids. Electric fields can be used to drive ions from one fluid to another, or even change the shape of the interface itself. In many cases, both liquids are optically transparent, making functionalized liquid-liquid interfaces promising for various optical applications based on the transmission or reflection of light. An advantage common to most of these systems is self-assembly; because a liquid-liquid interface is not mechanically constrained like a solid-liquid interface, it can easily access its most stable state, even after it has been driven far from equilibrium. This special issue focuses on four modes of liquid-liquid interfacial functionalization: the controlled adsorption of molecules or nanoparticles, the formation of adlayers or films, electrowetting, and ion transfer or interface-localized reactions. Interfacial adsorption can be driven electrically, chemically, or mechanically. The liquid-liquid interface can be used to study how anisotropic particles orient at a surface under the influence of a field, how surfactants interact with other adsorbates, and how nanoparticles aggregate; the transparency of the interface also makes the chirality of organic adsorbates amenable to optical study. Film formation goes a step beyond adsorption; some surfactants form monolayers or multilayers at the interface. A polymer microfilm or a polymer-particle matrix can be synthesized at the liquid-liquid boundary. Such films exhibit unique adsorption and ion-intercalation properties of their own. Electrowetting refers broadly to the phenomenon in which an applied voltage modulates the shape of a liquid-liquid interface, essentially by altering the surface tension. Electric fields can be used to induce droplets on solid substrates to change shape, or to affect the structure of liquid-liquid emulsions. Various chemical reactions can be performed at the liquid-liquid boundary. Liquid-liquid microelectrodes allow detailed study of ion-transfer kinetics at the interface. Photochemical processes can also be used to control the conformations of molecules adsorbed at the interface. But how much precise control do we actually have on the state of the interfacial region? Several contributions to this issue address a system which has been studied for decades in electrochemistry, but remains essentially unfamilar to physicists. This is the interface between two immiscible electrolytic solutions (ITIES), a progressing interdisciplinary field in which condensed-matter physics and physical chemistry meet molecular electrochemistry. Why is it so exciting? The reason is simple. The ITIES is chargeable: when positioned between two electrodes it can be polarized, and back- to-back electrical double layers form on both sides of the liquid-liquid interface. Importantly, the term immiscible refers not only to oil and water but also to the electrolytes. Inorganic electrolytes, such as alkali halides, tend to stay in water, whereas organic electrolytes, such as tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate, stay in oil. This behaviour arises because energies of the order of 0.2-0.3 eV are needed to drive ions across the interface. As long as these free energies of transfer are not exceeded by the external potential bias, the ITIES works as an 'electrode'; there is no traffic of ions

  8. Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Norman Henry

    1990-10-01

    This comprehensive, research level introduction to the theory of liquid metals presents the concepts needed to understand the properties of these metals starting with a survey of the basic experimental facts. The quantitative theory of liquid pair correlation functions, effective ion-ion interactions, thermodynamic properties and electronic and atomic transport is then developed. The book also explores inelastic neutron scattering from bulk liquid metals, critical behavior, magnetism, the present understanding of the liquid metal surface, binary liquid metals, shock wave studies, liquid hydrogen plasmas and the constitution of red star giants. This is an informative text for advanced postgraduate students and researchers in condensed matter physics, theoretical physics, physical chemistry and theoretical chemistry.

  9. Liquid pearls

    E-print Network

    Bremond, Nicolas; Bibette, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video reports how to form liquid core capsules having a thin hydrogel elastic membrane named liquid pearls. These fish-egg like structures are initially made of a millimetric liquid drop, aqueous or not, coated with an aqueous liquid film containing sodium alginate that gels once the double drop enters a calcium chloride bath. The creation of such pearls with micrometer thick membrane requires to suppress mixing until gelling takes place. Here, we show that superimposing a two dimensional surfactant precipitation at the interface confers a transient rigidity that can damp the shear induced instability at impact. Based on this, pearls containing almost any type of liquids can be created. The video focuses on the dynamics of the entry of the compound drop into the gelling bath.

  10. Antiferromagnetic marginal Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Zimanyi, G.T. ); Bedell, K.S. )

    1993-09-01

    The infrared singularities of the marginal-Fermi-liquid theory are treated within a perturbative renormalization-group approach for the original, weakly-momentum-dependent model. Then an alternative framework is introduced: marginal Fermi liquids with strong antiferromagnetic fluctuations. The models in both cases are found to be stable in a limited range of parameters, otherwise non-Fermi-liquid behavior is obtained. Comparison with experiments on the conductivity and spin susceptibility yields quite reasonable agreement between theory and the data in the case of the antiferromagnetic formulation. Trends with the doping and differences between copper and oxygen relaxation rates also gain a natural explanation. Analogies with the Luttinger-liquid ideas are also explored. Finally the antiferromagnetic marginal Fermi liquid offers clues about the microscopic origin of the anomalous fluctuations as well, as we find that the antiferromagnetic model is the [ital minimal] [ital model] capable of supporting a fixed line of the scaling equations, making it a promising candidate for the microscopic foundation of high-temperature superconductivity.

  11. IONIC LIQUID?IONIC LIQUID? Benign solvents to replace Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Organic salts with melting point lower than 100C, no measurable

    E-print Network

    Dalang, Robert C.

    in a layer of ionic liquid (IL), which is confined on the surface of the solid support. This approach material to the concept of supported ionic liquid catalysis (SILPc) for a continuous gas phase processIONIC LIQUID?IONIC LIQUID? Benign solvents to replace Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Organic

  12. A New Class of Ionic Liquids: Anion Amphiprotic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Treskow, Marcel; Pitawala, Jagath; Arenz, Sven; Matic, Aleksandar; Johansson, Patrik

    2012-08-16

    We here present a new class of protic ionic liquids, anion amphiprotic ionic liquids (AAILs). These materials are protonation equilibrium free protic ionic liquids and interesting in their own right by not following the classical Brønsted acid-base neutralization concept. Due to the very simple synthesis route applied and their stable basic chemistry, we believe in a potential use for manifold applications. This is supported by the combination of practical material properties, foremost, a general intrinsic stability versus reversal of the formation reaction toward neutral species, broad liquidus ranges, long-term thermal stabilities, high conductivities, protic characteristics, and a general stability versus water. PMID:26295756

  13. Liquid Bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Crystal Growth in magnetic fields, a float-zone sample, the surface tension of the melt keeps the sample suspended between the sample rods in the furnace forming an actual liquid bridge. Principal Investigator: Dr. Frank Szofran

  14. Method for treating liquid wastes

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

    1995-01-01

    The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering .sup.99 Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of .sup.99 TcO.sub.4.sup.- from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of .sup.99 Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester .sup.99 Tc from those liquids.

  15. Method for treating liquid wastes

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Singh, P.; Ketring, A.R.

    1995-12-26

    The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering {sup 99}Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of {sup 99}Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester {sup 99}Tc from those liquids. 6 figs.

  16. Sulfur poisoning of CeO[subscript 2]-Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3]-supported mono- and bi-metallic Ni and Rh catalysts in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons at low and high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chao; Chen, Yongsheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop a better understanding on sulfur poisoning of reforming catalysts in fuel processing for hydrogen production, steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was performed over CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported monometallic Ni and Rh and bimetallic Rh-Ni catalysts at 550 and 800 C. XANES was used to identify the sulfur species in the used catalysts and to study their impacts on the metal surface properties probed by XPS. It was found that both monometallic catalysts rapidly deactivated at 550 C, and showed poor sulfur tolerance. Although ineffective for the Ni catalyst, increasing the temperature to 800 C dramatically improved the sulfur tolerance of the Rh catalyst. XANES revealed that metal sulfide and organic sulfide are the dominant sulfur species on the used Ni catalyst, while sulfonate and sulfate predominate on the used Rh catalyst. The presence of sulfur induced severe carbon deposition on the Ni catalyst at 800 C. The superior sulfur tolerance of the Rh catalyst at 800 C may be associated with its capability in sulfur oxidation. It is likely that the formation of the oxygen-shielded sulfur structure of sulfonate and sulfate can suppress the poisoning impact of sulfur on Rh by inhibiting direct rhodium-sulfur interaction. Moreover, XPS indicated that the metal surface properties of the Rh catalysts after the reaction without and with sulfur at 800 C are similar, suggesting that sulfur poisoning on Rh was mitigated under the high-temperature condition. Although the Rh-Ni catalyst exhibited better sulfur tolerance than the monometallic catalysts at 550 C, its catalytic performance was inferior compared with the Rh catalyst in the sulfur-containing reaction at 800 C probably due to the severe carbon deposition on the bimetallic catalyst.

  17. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, J.E.

    1987-08-25

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

  18. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, James E. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

  19. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  20. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte Process Development Unit: Modification, operation, and support studies. Task 2.2: Process variable Scan Run E-8 and in-situ activation with syngas Run E-9

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-28

    The LPMEOH process was conceived and patented by Chem Systems Inc. in 1975. Initial research and studies on the process focused on two distinct modes of operation. The first was a liquid fluidized mode with relatively large catalyst pellets suspended in a fluidizing liquid, and the second was an entrained (slurry) mode with fine catalyst particles slurried in an inert liquid. The development of both operating modes progressed in parallel from bench scale reactors, through an intermediate scale lab PDU, and then to the LaPorte PDU in 1984. The slurry mode of operation was ultimately chosen as the operating mode of choice due to its superior performance.

  1. Method of forming supported doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-04-22

    A method of forming a supported oxidation catalyst includes providing a support comprising a metal oxide or a metal salt, and depositing first palladium compound particles and second precious metal group (PMG) metal particles on the support while in a liquid phase including at least one solvent to form mixed metal comprising particles on the support. The PMG metal is not palladium. The mixed metal particles on the support are separated from the liquid phase to provide the supported oxidation catalyst.

  2. Macromolecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Safinya, C.R.; Safran, S.A. ); Pincus, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Liquids include a broad range of material systems which are of high scientific and technological interest. Generally speaking, these are partially ordered or disordered phases where the individual molecular species have organized themselves on length scales which are larger than simple fluids, typically between 10 Angstroms and several microns. The specific systems reported on in this book include membranes, microemulsions, micelles, liquid crystals, colloidal suspensions, and polymers. They have a major impact on a broad spectrum of technological industries such as displays, plastics, soap and detergents, chemicals and petroleum, and pharmaceuticals.

  3. Liquid metal flow encasing a magnetic cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, A. B.; Drake, J. F.; Goel, Deepak; Lathrop, D. P.

    2000-04-01

    A stationary equilibrium of a liquid metal flowing past a cylindrical magnetic cavity is presented. The cavity has an azimuthal magnetic field and can also have an axial field. The liquid metal flow can be maintained by a sufficiently high pressure head. The scheme could be used to support a flowing liquid wall for systems producing high heat fluxes. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Models for Liquid Impact Onboard Sloshsat FLEVO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreeburg, Jan P. B.; Chato, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Orbital experiments on the behavior of liquid in spacecraft are planned. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. Preparation of the experiments, and later evaluation, are supported by models of varying complexity. The characteristics of the models are discussed. Particular attention is given to the momentum transfer between the liquid and the spacecraft, in connection with the liquid impact that may occur at the end of a reorientation maneuver of the spacecraft.

  5. Liquid ventilation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Suman; Paswan, Anil; Prakas, S

    2014-01-01

    Human have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids like fish. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. It is well-known that respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit. During the past few years several new modalities of treatment have been introduced. One of them and probably the most fascinating, is of LV. Partial LV, on which much of the existing research has concentrated, requires partial filling of lungs with perfluorocarbons (PFC's) and ventilation with gas tidal volumes using conventional mechanical ventilators. Various physico-chemical properties of PFC's make them the ideal media. It results in a dramatic improvement in lung compliance and oxygenation and decline in mean airway pressure and oxygen requirements. No long-term side-effect reported. PMID:25886321

  6. Liquid filtration simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, I.; Bergman, W.

    1996-06-01

    We have a developed a computer code that simulates 3-D filtration of suspended particles in fluids in realistic filter structures. This code, being the most advanced filtration simulation package developed to date, provides LLNL and DOE with new capabilities to address problems in cleaning liquid wastes, medical fluid cleaning, and recycling liquids. The code is an integrated system of commercially available and LLNL-developed software; the most critical are the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver and the particle transport program. For the CFD solver, we used a commercial package based on Navier-Stokes equations and a LLNL-developed package based on Boltzman-lattice gas equations. For the particle transport program, we developed a cod based on the 3-D Langevin equation of motion and the DLVO theory of electrical interactions. A number of additional supporting packages were purchased or developed to integrate the simulation tasks and to provide visualization output.

  7. Liquid ventilation: it's not science fiction anymore.

    PubMed

    Norris, M K; Fuhrman, B P; Leach, C L

    1994-08-01

    Liquid ventilation is, by all initial considerations, an unconventional concept. Decades of research, however, have found that by using perfluorocarbons, which are capable of holding high concentrations of critical gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, gas exchange optimal enough to support life is possible with no known toxic effects. The earliest method of liquid ventilation, tidal liquid breathing, involved infusion and active removal of tidal volumes of perfluorocarbons by a liquid ventilator for gas exchange. Recently, a new method of partial liquid breathing, called perfluorocarbon-associated gas exchange, makes the process of liquid ventilation simpler by using conventional gas ventilators. Current research is showing great promise in the use of liquid ventilation for patients with pulmonary pathology. Critical care nurses should become knowledgeable of this new mode of ventilation and be prepared to meet the special needs of this unique population. PMID:7780839

  8. Systems and methods for analyzing liquids under vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Li; Cowin, James P.; Iedema, Martin J.; Zhu, Zihua

    2013-10-15

    Systems and methods for supporting a liquid against a vacuum pressure in a chamber can enable analysis of the liquid surface using vacuum-based chemical analysis instruments. No electrical or fluid connections are required to pass through the chamber walls. The systems can include a reservoir, a pump, and a liquid flow path. The reservoir contains a liquid-phase sample. The pump drives flow of the sample from the reservoir, through the liquid flow path, and back to the reservoir. The flow of the sample is not substantially driven by a differential between pressures inside and outside of the liquid flow path. An aperture in the liquid flow path exposes a stable portion of the liquid-phase sample to the vacuum pressure within the chamber. The radius, or size, of the aperture is less than or equal to a critical value required to support a meniscus of the liquid-phase sample by surface tension.

  9. Liquid slosh dynamics and control technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Kana, Daniel D.

    1991-09-01

    Experimental and analytical studies were performed in support of proposed in-space experiments on low gravity liquid sloshing. The spatial and frequency requirements of liquid-vapor interface sensors for utilization in low gravity experiments were researched in the laboratory and found to be feasible.

  10. Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

  11. Supported inorganic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Sehgal, Rakesh (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

  12. Transverse excitations in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, S.; Munejiri, S.; Inui, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Pilgrim, W.-C.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Shimojo, F.; Hoshino, K.

    2013-02-01

    The transverse acoustic excitation modes were detected by inelastic x-ray scattering in liquid Ga, Cu and Fe in the Q range around 10 nm-1 using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8, although these liquid metals are mostly described by a simple hard-sphere liquid. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations clearly support this finding for liquid Ga. From the detailed analyses for the S(Q,?) spectra with good statistic qualities, the lifetime of less than 1 ps and the propagating length of less than 1 nm can be estimated for the transverse acoustic phonon modes, which correspond to the lifetime and size of cages formed instantaneously in these liquid metals. The microscopic Poisson's ratio estimated from the dynamic velocities of sound is 0.42 for liquid Ga and about -0.2 for liquid transition metals, indicating a rubber-like soft and extremely hard elastic properties of the cage clusters, respectively. The origin of these microscopic elastic properties is discussed in detail.

  13. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  14. Vapor liquid solid-hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) growth of ultra-long defect-free GaAs nanowires: Ab initio simulations supporting center nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Yamina; Lekhal, Kaddour; Hoggan, Philip; Avit, Geoffrey; Cadiz, Fabian; Rowe, Alistair; Paget, Daniel; Petit, Elodie; Leroux, Christine; Trassoudaine, Agnès; Réda Ramdani, M.; Monier, Guillaume; Colas, David; Ajib, Rabih; Castelluci, Dominique; Gil, Evelyne

    2014-05-01

    High aspect ratio, rod-like and single crystal phase GaAs nanowires (NWs) were grown by gold catalyst-assisted hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). High resolution transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed polytypism-free zinc blende (ZB) NWs over lengths of several tens of micrometers for a mean diameter of 50 nm. Micro-photoluminescence studies of individual NWs showed linewidths smaller than those reported elsewhere which is consistent with the crystalline quality of the NWs. HVPE makes use of chloride growth precursors GaCl of which high decomposition frequency after adsorption onto the liquid droplet catalysts, favors a direct and rapid introduction of the Ga atoms from the vapor phase into the droplets. High influxes of Ga and As species then yield high axial growth rate of more than 100 ?m/h. The diffusion of the Ga atoms in the liquid droplet towards the interface between the liquid and the solid nanowire was investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The diffusion coefficient of Ga atoms was estimated to be 3 × 10-9 m2/s. The fast diffusion of Ga in the droplet favors nucleation at the liquid-solid line interface at the center of the NW. This is further evidence, provided by an alternative epitaxial method with respect to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy, of the current assumption which states that this type of nucleation should always lead to the formation of the ZB cubic phase.

  15. Liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, G.

    1982-12-07

    Integrated nuclear reactor cooled by a liquid metal and incorporating a main vessel sealed in its upper part by a slab, an inner vessel containing the core, the latter resting on a system for the positioning and supply of the core with liquid metal and which is called the support, the latter itself resting on a supporting structure bearing on the bottom of the main vessel of the reactor, wherein it comprises an inner baffle cladding the side wall and bottom of the main vessel and defining with the latter an intermediate space filled with the liquid metal, tubes for supplying a liquid metal to the intermediate space below the bottom of the main vessel and tubes for returning said liquid metal to an auxiliary exchanger in order to remove heat from the intermediate space.

  16. Bearing for liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J. (Shaler Township, Allegheny County, PA); Wasko, John (Plum Borough, PA); Pennell, William E. (Unity Township, Allegheny County, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A liquid metal pump bearing support comprises a series of tangentially oriented spokes that connect the bearing cylinder to the pump internals structure. The spokes may be arranged in a plurality of planes extending from the bearing cylinder to the pump internals with the spokes in one plane being arranged alternately with those in the next plane. The bearing support structure provides the pump with sufficient lateral support for the bearing structure together with the capability of accommodating differential thermal expansion without adversely affecting pump performance.

  17. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  18. One-Dimensional Fermions with neither Luttinger-Liquid nor Fermi-Liquid Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that, generically, one-dimensional interacting fermions cannot be described in terms of a Fermi liquid. Instead, they present a different phenomenology, that of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid: the Landau quasiparticles are ill defined, and the fermion occupation number is continuous at the Fermi energy. We demonstrate that suitable fine tuning of the interaction between fermions can stabilize a peculiar state of one-dimensional matter, which is dissimilar to both Tomonaga-Luttinger and Fermi liquids. We propose to call this state a quasi-Fermi liquid. Technically speaking, such a liquid exists only when the fermion interaction is irrelevant (in the renormalization group sense). The quasi-Fermi liquid exhibits the properties of both a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid and a Fermi liquid. Similar to a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid, no finite-momentum quasiparticles are supported by the quasi-Fermi liquid; on the other hand, its fermion occupation number demonstrates a finite discontinuity at the Fermi energy, which is a hallmark feature of a Fermi liquid. A possible realization of the quasi-Fermi liquid with the help of cold atoms in an optical trap is discussed.

  19. Nutritional Support

    MedlinePLUS

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may need ... absorb nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in your ...

  20. Gauging Systems Monitor Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Rocket fuel needs to stay cool - super cool, in fact. The ability to store gas propellants like liquid hydrogen and oxygen at cryogenic temperatures (below -243 F) is crucial for space missions in order to reduce their volumes and allow their storage in smaller (and therefore, less costly) tanks. The Agency has used these cryogenic fluids for vehicle propellants, reactants, and life support systems since 1962 with the Centaur upper stage rocket, which was powered with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. During proposed long-duration missions, super-cooled fluids will also be used in space power systems, spaceports, and lunar habitation systems. In the next generation of launch vehicles, gaseous propellants will be cooled to and stored for extended periods at even colder temperatures than currently employed via a process called densification. Densification sub-cools liquids to temperatures even closer to absolute zero (-459 F), increasing the fluid s density and shrinking its volume beyond common cryogenics. Sub-cooling cryogenic liquid hydrogen, for instance, from 20 K (-423 F) to 15 K (-432.4 F) reduces its mass by 10 percent. These densified liquid gases can provide more cost savings from reduced payload volume. In order to benefit from this cost savings, the Agency is working with private industry to prevent evaporation, leakage, and other inadvertent loss of liquids and gases in payloads - requiring new cryogenic systems to prevent 98 percent (or more) of boil-off loss. Boil-off occurs when cryogenic or densified liquids evaporate, and is a concern during launch pad holds. Accurate sensing of propellants aboard space vehicles is also critical for proper engine shutdown and re-ignition after launch, and zero boil-off fuel systems are also in development for the Altair lunar lander.

  1. Vapor liquid solid-hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) growth of ultra-long defect-free GaAs nanowires: Ab initio simulations supporting center nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    André, Yamina Lekhal, Kaddour; Hoggan, Philip; Avit, Geoffrey; Réda Ramdani, M.; Monier, Guillaume; Colas, David; Ajib, Rabih; Castelluci, Dominique; Gil, Evelyne; Cadiz, Fabian; Rowe, Alistair; Paget, Daniel; Petit, Elodie; Leroux, Christine; Trassoudaine, Agnès

    2014-05-21

    High aspect ratio, rod-like and single crystal phase GaAs nanowires (NWs) were grown by gold catalyst-assisted hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). High resolution transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed polytypism-free zinc blende (ZB) NWs over lengths of several tens of micrometers for a mean diameter of 50 nm. Micro-photoluminescence studies of individual NWs showed linewidths smaller than those reported elsewhere which is consistent with the crystalline quality of the NWs. HVPE makes use of chloride growth precursors GaCl of which high decomposition frequency after adsorption onto the liquid droplet catalysts, favors a direct and rapid introduction of the Ga atoms from the vapor phase into the droplets. High influxes of Ga and As species then yield high axial growth rate of more than 100 ?m/h. The diffusion of the Ga atoms in the liquid droplet towards the interface between the liquid and the solid nanowire was investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The diffusion coefficient of Ga atoms was estimated to be 3 × 10{sup ?9} m{sup 2}/s. The fast diffusion of Ga in the droplet favors nucleation at the liquid-solid line interface at the center of the NW. This is further evidence, provided by an alternative epitaxial method with respect to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy, of the current assumption which states that this type of nucleation should always lead to the formation of the ZB cubic phase.

  2. Viscoelastic cushion for patient support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauers, D. G.

    1971-01-01

    Flexible container, filled with liquid, provides supportive device which conforms to patient's anatomy. Uniform cushion pressure prevents formation of decubitus ulcers, while the porous sponge substructure damps fluid movement through cushion response so that patient is not dumped when his weight shifts.

  3. Liquid foams of graphene

    E-print Network

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

  4. Lacerations - liquid bandage

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin adhesives; Tissue adhesive ... the cut is minor, a liquid bandage (liquid adhesive) can be used on the cut to close ... bandage is quick and painless to apply. Skin adhesives, or liquid bandages, seal the cut closed after ...

  5. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  6. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  7. Research News: Emulsion Liquid Membrane Extraction in a Hollow-Fiber Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.; Hu, Shih-Yao

    2000-01-01

    This article describes how ELMs (emulsion liquid membranes) can be used for extraction. The article addresses the disadvantages of ELM extraction in a stirred contactor, and the advantages of SELMs (supported emulsion liquid membranes). The introduction of the article provides background information on liquid-liquid solvent extraction and dispersion-free solvent extraction.

  8. The electromechanics of liquids electrowetting (EWOD) & liquid

    E-print Network

    Jones, Thomas B.

    experiment with cryogenic liquids Lumped parameter electromechanical model successfully predicts height-of-rise at the midpoint ... but NOT the details of meniscus profile. hcap hDEP V D cryogenic liquid: l, l g vapor phase cryogenic liquid: l, l w h = hcap+hDEP view thru electrodes profile does not depend on E #12;12 Pellat

  9. Poisoning of resin supported catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.L.; Moore, S.E.

    1987-02-10

    A method is described of enhancing performance of a combined hydroformylation/reduction reaction of an olefin liquid feed in the presence of a resin-supported transition metal complex catalyst. The method comprises: (a) preparing a resin-supported transition metal complex catalyst for use in a combined hydroformylation/reduction reaction substantially free of halides and halide salts in the metal complex catalyst; and (b) introducing an olefin liquid feed to the resin-supported catalyst for conducting a combined hydroformylation/reduction reaction, in the presence of CO and H/sub 2/. The olefin feed has a specified maximum limit of halide concentration sufficiently low to enable continued indefinite operation of the combined hydroformylation/reduction reaction process without halide poisoning.

  10. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.

    1984-07-03

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor of the kind wherein a fuel assembly is supported on a diagrid and submerged in a pool of coolant is described. The diagrid comprises a plenum supported on a load bearing undershell and has an array of resilient spikes upstanding from the upper face of the plenum each for locating a fuel subassembly. The load of the fuel assembly is distributed over the upper face plate of the plenum and transmitted to the undershell by an array of strut members.

  11. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  12. Supporting Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesaux, Nonie K.; Burkhauser, Mary A.; Kelley, Joan G.

    2013-01-01

    Material resources, personalized support, time to collaborate, and strong principal leadership are necessary for making curricular and instructional shifts. The authors of this article share the lessons they learned about supporting implementation of the Common Core State Standards. They draw on interviews with teachers, as well as field notes…

  13. Thermal support for scale support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal design work completed for the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the Space Shuttle System (TPS) of the space shuttle vehicle was documented. This work was divided into three phases, the first two of which reported in previous documents. About 22 separate tasks were completed in phase III, such as: hot gas facility (HGF) support, guarded tank support, shuttle external tank (ET) thermal design handbook support, etc.

  14. Shaped composite liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Balter, Revital; Aharoni, Hadas; Aurbach, Doron

    2014-03-01

    Shaped "cubic" non-stick droplets are reported. Shaped composite droplets were manufactured via a two-stage process. In the first stage, cubic foamed-polystyrene particles were hydrophilized with cold radiofrequency plasma. Then particles were wetted with water. In the second stage, they were coated with solid, colloidal particles such as lycopodium, Teflon or carbon black. Thus, "liquid marble"-like non-stick shaped droplets were obtained. The shaped "cubic" droplets remained stable when supported by a NaCl water solution. Shaped Janus droplets coated on one side with dielectric Teflon and with semiconductor carbon black on the other side, were prepared. Janus marbles were actuated with an electric field. PMID:24407678

  15. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  16. Inclusion of supported gold nanoparticles into their semiconductor support.

    PubMed

    Lau, Marcus; Ziefuss, Anna; Komossa, Tim; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2015-10-28

    Supported particles are easily accessible as standard materials used in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. This article addresses our exemplary studies on the integration of supported nanoparticles into their solid support, namely gold nanoparticles into zinc oxide sub-micrometer spheres, by energy controlled pulsed laser melting in a free liquid jet. This one-step, continuous flow-through processing route reverses the educt's structure, converting the ligand-free surface adsorbate into a spherical subsurface solid inclusion within its former support. The results show how a nanoparticulate surface adsorbate can be included in the form of crystalline nanoparticles into the resolidified support matrix, demonstrated by using plasmonic nanoparticles and semiconductor microparticles as reference materials. PMID:26467473

  17. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  18. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Hoyt, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    The present invention relates to the field of curable liquid crystal polyester monomers and to thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions prepared therefrom. It is an object of this invention to provide curable liquid crystalline polyester materials. Another object of this invention is to provide a process of preparing curable liquid crystal polyester monomers. Yet another object of this invention is to provide liquid crystalline blends of polyester materials. It is a further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions. It is a still further object of this invention to provide thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions having a high heat resistance. 1 fig.

  19. Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge with Liquid Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas in contact with liquid are widely studied aiming variety of plasma applications. DC glow discharge with liquid electrode is an easy method to obtain simple and stable plasma-liquid interface. When we focus attention on liquid-phase reaction, the discharge system is considered as electrolysis with plasma electrode. The plasma electrode will supply electrons and positive ions to the liquid surface in a different way from the conventional metal electrode. However, the phenomena at plasma-liquid interface have not been understood well. In this work, we studied physical and chemical effect in liquid induced by dc atmospheric pressure glow discharge with liquid electrode. The experiment was carried out using H-shaped Hoffman electrolysis apparatus filled with electrolyte, to separate the anodic and cathodic reactions. Two nozzle electrodes made of stainless steel are set about 2 mm above the liquid surface. By applying a dc voltage between the nozzle electrodes, dc glow discharges as plasma electrodes are generated in contact with liquid. As electrolyte, we used aqueous solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, AgNO3 and HAuCl4. AgNO3 and HAuCl4 are to discuss the reduction process of metal ions for synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs). OH radical generation yield in liquid was measured by chemical probe method using terephthalic acid. Discharge-induced liquid flow was visualized by Schlieren method. Electron irradiation to liquid surface (plasma cathode) generated OH- and OH radical in liquid while positive ion irradiation (plasma anode) generated H+ and OH radical. The generation efficiency of OH radical was better with plasma anode. Both Ag NPs in AgNO3 and Au NPs in HAuCl4 were synthesized with plasma cathode while only Au NPs were generated with plasma anode. Possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. The discharge-induced liquid flow such as convection pattern was strongly influenced by the gas flow on the liquid surface. This work was supported financially in part by Kakenhi (No 2111007), Japan.

  20. Liquid heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, W.T.

    1987-02-10

    This patent describes the method of creating a complete burn of combustible fuel within a heating system having a firebox at least partially surrounded by a liquid reservoir comprising placing fuel within a firebox having a knee wall extending upwardly from the bottom of the firebox so as to define a primary and secondary chamber on opposite side of the knee wall. The fuel is placed in the primary chamber adjacent the knee wall so as to create an air passage extending generally horizontally below the fuel and upwardly between the knee wall and the fuel. A fire core is created within the fuel. Negative pressure is used to create a streamlined air flow through the air passage, over the top of the knee wall and into the secondary chamber. The air flow moves at a speed where only a portion of the air flow can enter the fire core to support combustion of the fuel and to carry byproducts of the combustion upwardly from the fire core such that the byproducts combine with the streamlined air flow at the top of the knee wall and create a self-supporting after-burn in the secondary chamber whereby a clean burning, virtually pollution-free heating means is provided.

  1. A Liquid Sodium ? ? Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, Stirling; Beckley, Howard; Li, Hui; Sonnenfield, Richard; Westpfahl, Dave; Bentley, Ian; Ginanni, Rocky; McKinnly, Travis; Pariev, Valadimir

    2004-11-01

    A Liquid Sodium ? ? Dynamo Experiment; Stirling Colgate, Howard Beckley, Hui Li, Richard Sonnenfeld, Dave Westpfahl, Ian Bentley, Rocky Ginanni, Travis Mckinnly, and Valadimir Pariev, LANL, NMIMT, & Univ. of Rochester. A liquid sodium ? ? dynamo experiment has been constructed at NMIMT to simulate MRI, dynamo gain, and feed back in liquid sodium (r1 = 15 cm,; r2 = 30 cm,; L=30 cm,; f1 = 120 Hz,; f2 = 30 Hz ). It is designed to simulate the generation of large scale magnetic fields in massive black hole accretion disks, galaxies, and stars. The omega gain is due to the shear flow of differential rotation of Couette flow between two differentially rotating co-axial cylinders. Differential rotation in a conducting fluid twists a radial or quadrupole magnetic flux into a greatly enhanced toroidal flux. A large coherent helicity is produced by driven plumes and astrophisically by star-disk collisions, supernova explosions, or large scale plume convection respectively. We have rotated the apparatus with water and hot oil and demonstrated stable Couette flow with only Ekman-flow-induced torque. We will report on the ? gain with liquid sodium. This Work has been supported by NMIMT, EMRTC, NSF, & LDRD of LANL.

  2. Liquid-film electron stripper

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Basil F. (Albion, CA)

    1986-01-01

    An improved liquid-film electron stripper particularly for high intensity heavy ion beams which produces constant regenerated, stable, free-standing liquid films having an adjustable thickness between 0.3 to 0.05 microns. The improved electron stripper is basically composed of at least one high speed, rotating disc with a very sharp, precision-like, ground edge on one said of the disc's periphery and with a highly polished, flat, radial surface adjacent the sharp edge. A fine stream of liquid, such as oil, impinges at a 90.degree. angle adjacent the disc's sharp outer edge. Film terminators, located at a selected distance from the disc perimeter are positioned approximately perpendicular to the film. The terminators support, shape, and stretch the film and are arranged to assist in the prevention of liquid droplet formation by directing the collected film to a reservoir below without breaking or interfering with the film. One embodiment utilizes two rotating discs and associated terminators, with the discs rotating so as to form films in opposite directions, and with the second disc being located down beam-line relative to the first disc.

  3. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  4. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  5. Semiconductor nanorod liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi; Walda, Joost; Manna, Liberato; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2002-01-28

    Rodlike molecules form liquid crystalline phases with orientational order and positional disorder. The great majority of materials in which liquid crystalline phases have been observed are comprised of organic molecules or polymers, even though there has been continuing and growing interest in inorganic liquid crystals. Recent advances in the control of the sizes and shapes of inorganic nanocrystals allow for the formation of a broad class of new inorganic liquid crystals. Here we show the formation of liquid crystalline phases of CdSe semiconductor nanorods. These new liquid crystalline phases may have great importance for both application and fundamental study.

  6. Supporting Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Betty, Ed.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter feature issue focuses on services for persons with developmental disabilities that support the whole person by acknowledging, respecting, and incorporating aspects of identity such as race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender, age, and class. Articles include: (1) "Serving the Whole Person: The Journey to Embracing…

  7. Differentiated Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannagan, Jenny Sue; Kelly, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Supporting teachers begins with designing professional learning that is responsive to their needs. Gone are the days of one-size-fits all professional development. Principals cannot ensure that all teachers are effective in the classroom if they don't create learning opportunities that move all teachers toward expertise with teaching. In this…

  8. Mirror Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method of making a mirror support comprising a composite, the composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes, wherein at least two of the plurality of carbon nanotubes are bonded to each other through a bridging moiety bound to each of the two carbon nanotubes, and a laminate comprising the composite.

  9. Supported Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Ron, Ed.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This "feature issue" reports on major shifts in attitudes, practices, and policies that have led to the growth of supported employment programs for people with disabilities, with special focus on the situation in Minnesota. It contains the following articles: "To the Year 2000 and Beyond: Jobs Won't Be the Problem" (David R. Johnson); "The End of…

  10. Zero gravity liquid mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (inventors)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for mixing liquids under conditions of zero gravity is disclosed. The apparatus is comprised of a closed reservoir for the liquids, with a means for maintaining a positive pressure on the liquids in the reservoir. A valved liquid supply line is connected to the reservoir for supplying the reservoir with the liquids to be mixed in the reservoir. The portion of the reservoir containing the liquids to be mixed is in communication with a pump which alternately causes a portion of the liquids to flow out of the pump and into the reservoir to mix the liquids. The fluids in the reservoir are in communication through a conduit with the pump which alternately causes a portion of the fluids to flow out of the pump and into the sphere. The conduit connecting the pump and sphere may contain a nozzle or other jet-forming structure such as a venturi for further mixing the fluids.

  11. Multifragmentation and nuclear phase transitions (liquid-fog and liquid-gas)

    E-print Network

    V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; V. K. Rodionov; A. V. Simomenko; V. V. Kirakosyan; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; E. A. Kuzmin; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

    2003-10-10

    Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid-fog phase transition. The charge distributions of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p(3.6 GeV) + Au and p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed within the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition Tc as a free parameter. The analysis presented here provides strong support for a value of Tc > 15 MeV.

  12. Liquid Drops sliding down an inclined plane and Antoine Mellet

    E-print Network

    Mellet, Antoine

    Liquid Drops sliding down an inclined plane Inwon Kim and Antoine Mellet March 16, 2012 Abstract-static approximation Consider a liquid drop lying on an inclined plane. We introduce a coordinate system and the solid. If the support plane is inclined at an angle to the horizontal in the x

  13. Liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, M.

    1981-10-20

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described which comprises a core, a main vessel comprising a first supporting means, a primary vessel mounted inside said main vessel and coaxial therewith, at least one exchanger outside said vessels. Said primary vessel comprises a core-diagrid and a second supporting means integral with the main vessel lateral wall and with the primary vessel lateral wall. These lateral walls define an annular space in which is formed a horizontal partition.

  14. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    HPLC - 1 High Performance Liquid Chromatography HPLC MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CIGARETTE SMOKE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;HPLC - 2 High Performance Liquid Chromatography identify as many PAH as possible in cigarette smoke using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC

  15. Making Liquid Oxygen

    E-print Network

    French, M M J

    2010-01-01

    In this article I explain in detail a method for making small amounts of liquid oxygen in the classroom if there is no access to a cylinder of compressed oxygen gas. I also discuss two methods for identifying the fact that it is liquid oxygen as opposed to liquid nitrogen.

  16. Breakup of Liquid Filaments

    E-print Network

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J. R.; Hutchings, I. M.

    2012-01-01

    Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge, CB3 0FS, U.K. Whether a thin filament of liquid separates into two or more droplets or eventually condenses lengthwise to form a single larger drop depends on the liquid’s density, viscosity and surface tension...

  17. Renewable liquid reflection grating

    DOEpatents

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2003-10-07

    A renewable liquid reflection grating. Electrodes are operatively connected to a conducting liquid in an arrangement that produces a reflection grating and driven by a current with a resonance frequency. In another embodiment, the electrodes create the grating by a resonant electrostatic force acting on a dielectric liquid.

  18. Liquid detection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Regan, Thomas O. (North Aurora, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  19. Cosmology with liquid mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogg, David W.; Gibson, Brad K.; Hickson, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Liquid mirrors provide an exciting means to obtain large optical telescopes for substantially lower costs than conventional technologies. The liquid mirror concept has been demonstrated in the lab with the construction of a diffraction limited 1.5 m mirror. The mirror surface, using liquid mercury, forms a perfect parabolic shape when the mirror cell is rotated at a uniform velocity. A liquid mirror must be able to support a heavy mercury load with minimal flexure and have a fundamental resonant frequency that is as high as possible, to suppress the amplitude of surface waves caused by small vibrations transmitted to the mirror. To minimize the transmission of vibrations to the liquid surface, the entire mirror rests on an air bearing. This necessitates the mirror cell being lightweight, due to the limited load capabilities of the air bearing. The mirror components must also have physical characteristics which minimize the effects of thermal expansion with ambient temperature fluctuations in the observatory. In addition, the 2.7 m mirror construction is designed so that the techniques used may be readily extended to the construction of large mirrors. To attain the goals of a lightweight, rigid mirror, a composite laminant construction was used. The mirror consists of a foam core cut to the desired parabolic shape, with an accuracy of a few mm. An aluminum hub serves as an anchor for the foam and skin, and allows precise centering of the mirror on the air bearing and drive system. Several plys of Kevlar, covered in an epoxy matrix, are then applied to the foam. A final layer of pure epoxy is formed by spin casting. This final layer is parabolic to within a fraction of a mm. An aluminum ring bonded to the circumference of the mirror retains the mercury, and incorporates stainless-steel hard-points for the attachment of balance weights.

  20. Carbon cloth supported electrode

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P. (Upper St. Clair, PA); Ammon, Robert L. (Baldwin both of, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A flow-by anode is disclosed made by preparing a liquid suspension of about to about 18% by weight solids, the solids comprising about 3.5 to about 8% of a powdered catalyst of platinum, palladium, palladium oxide, or mixtures thereof; about 60 to about 76% carbon powder (support) having a particle size less than about 20 m.mu.m and about 20 to about 33% of an inert binder having a particle size of less than about 500 m.mu.m. A sufficient amount of the suspension is poured over a carbon cloth to form a layer of solids about 0.01 to about 0.05 cm thick on the carbon cloth when the electrode is completed. A vacuum was applied to the opposite side of the carbon cloth to remove the liquid and the catalyst layer/cloth assembly is dried and compressed at about 10 to about 50 MPa's. The binder is then sintered in an inert atmosphere to complete the electrode. The electrode is used for the oxidation of sulfur dioxide in a sulfur based hybrid cycle for the decomposition of water.

  1. Liquid–liquid phase transition in compressed hydrogen from first-principles simulations

    PubMed Central

    Scandolo, Sandro

    2003-01-01

    The properties of compressed liquid hydrogen, the most abundant fluid in the universe, have been investigated by means of first-principles molecular dynamics at pressures between 75 and 175 GPa and temperatures closer to the freezing line than so far reported in shock-wave experiments. Evidence for a liquid–liquid transition between a molecular and a dissociated phase is provided. The transition is accompanied by a 6% increase in density and by metallization. This finding has important implications for our understanding of the interiors of giant planets and supports predictions of a quantum fluid state at low temperatures. PMID:12626753

  2. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  3. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  4. Bubbling in unbounded coflowing liquids.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Herrada, Miguel A; Garstecki, Piotr

    2006-03-31

    An investigation of the stability of low density and viscosity fluid jets and spouts in unbounded coflowing liquids is presented. A full parametrical analysis from low to high Weber and Reynolds numbers shows that the presence of any fluid of finite density and viscosity inside the hollow jet elicits a transition from an absolute to a convective instability at a finite value of the Weber number, for any value of the Reynolds number. Below that critical value of the Weber number, the absolute character of the instability leads to local breakup, and consequently to local bubbling. Experimental data support our model. PMID:16605912

  5. Mobile impurities in ferromagnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Recent work has shown that mobile impurities in one dimensional interacting systems may exhibit behaviour that differs strongly from that predicted by standard Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory, with the appearance of power-law divergences in the spectral function signifying sublinear diffusion of the impurity. Using time-dependent matrix product states, we investigate a range of cases of mobile impurities in systems beyond the analytically accessible examples to assess the existence of a new universality class of low-energy physics in one-dimensional systems. Correspondence: Adrian.Kantian@unige.ch This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  6. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  7. Tool to Prioritize Energy Efficiency Investments

    SciTech Connect

    Farese, Philip; Gelman, Rachel; Hendron, Robert

    2012-08-01

    To provide analytic support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of the Building Technology Program (BTP), NREL developed a Microsoft Excel-based tool to provide an open and objective comparison of the hundreds of investment opportunities available to BTP. This tool uses established methodologies to evaluate the energy savings and cost of those savings.

  8. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-print Network

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  9. Liquid Propellant Manipulated Acoustically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Chato, David J.; Mann, Adin, III

    2003-01-01

    Fluids are difficult to manage in the space environment. Without gravity, the liquid and gas do not always remain separated as they do in the 1g environment of Earth. Instead the liquid and gas volumes mix and migrate under the influence of surface tension, thermodynamic forces, and external disturbances. As a result, liquid propellants may not be in a useable location or may even form a chaotic mix of liquid and gas bubbles. In the past, mechanical pumps, baffles, and a variety of specialized passive devices have been used to control the liquid and gas volumes. These methods need to be carefully tuned to a specific configuration to be effective. With increasing emphasis on long-term human activity in space there is a trend toward liquid systems that are more flexible and provide greater control. We are exploring new methods of manipulating liquids by using the nonlinear acoustic effects achieved by using beams of highly directed high-intensity acoustic waves.

  10. 49 CFR 195.208 - Welding of supports and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding of supports and braces. 195.208 Section 195.208 ...HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.208 Welding of supports and braces. Supports or braces may not...

  11. 49 CFR 195.208 - Welding of supports and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding of supports and braces. 195.208 Section 195.208 ...HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.208 Welding of supports and braces. Supports or braces may not...

  12. 49 CFR 195.208 - Welding of supports and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding of supports and braces. 195.208 Section 195.208 ...HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.208 Welding of supports and braces. Supports or braces may not...

  13. 49 CFR 195.208 - Welding of supports and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding of supports and braces. 195.208 Section 195.208 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.208 Welding of supports and braces. Supports or braces...

  14. 49 CFR 195.208 - Welding of supports and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding of supports and braces. 195.208 Section 195.208 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.208 Welding of supports and braces. Supports or braces...

  15. 49 CFR 195.208 - Welding of supports and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding of supports and braces. 195.208 Section 195.208 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.208 Welding of supports and braces. Supports or braces...

  16. 49 CFR 195.208 - Welding of supports and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding of supports and braces. 195.208 Section 195.208 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.208 Welding of supports and braces. Supports or braces...

  17. 49 CFR 195.208 - Welding of supports and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding of supports and braces. 195.208 Section 195.208 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.208 Welding of supports and braces. Supports or braces...

  18. Heat exchanger support apparatus in a fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Lawton, Carl W. (West Hartford, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A heat exchanger is mounted in the upper portion of a fluidized combusting bed for the control of the temperature of the bed. A support, made up of tubes, is extended from the perforated plate of the fluidized bed up to the heat exchanger. The tubular support framework for the heat exchanger has liquid circulated therethrough to prevent deterioration of the support.

  19. Supportive pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R

    2000-07-01

    We continue to explore the basics of anaesthesia with another article from Rachelle Griffiths, this month looking at supportive pharmacology. If you think this looks too complicated for a Back to Basics piece, read it in small chunks--and be grateful that you are not my spelling checker, which has gone berserk! This Back to Basics series is drawing to a close soon. However, if you have suggestions for any more articles, or perhaps an article itself, then do contact me via Headquarters. PMID:11299553

  20. Intensification of Liquid-Liquid Contacting Processes

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Zheyan

    2010-09-01

    transfer was intensified by the application of electric fields. As an alternative biofuel, biodiesel is produced through transesterification of vegetable oils, fat and algae lipids and alcohol with the help of acid or base. Transesterification is a liquid...

  1. Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC

    E-print Network

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    temperature ionic liquids (ILs). ILs are generally defined as organic salts with melting temperatures belowModeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC: markst@nd.edu #12;Abstract Characterization of liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) in system containing ionic

  2. Surface layering of liquids: The role of surface tension Oleg Shpyrko,1

    E-print Network

    Pershan, Peter S.

    Surface layering of liquids: The role of surface tension Oleg Shpyrko,1 Masafumi Fukuto,1 Peter and alloys are always layered, regardless of composition and surface tension; a result supported by three, for the liquid-vapor interface it is tempting to think that the large surface tension of liquid metals such as Hg

  3. Thrust vector control by liquid injection for solid propellant rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeamer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    In liquid injection thrust vector control, a rocket jet is deflected for steering purposed by injecting a liquid into the nozzle exit cone. The liquid is preferably both dense and reactive so that it adds mass and energy and generates shocks in the supersonic exhaust. This behavior increases thrust in the affected part of the jet producing not only a side force for steering but an addition to axial thrust. This paper presents a summary of current liquid injection thrust vector control technology, including procedures for design, development, analysis, testing and evaluation, together with supporting data and references.

  4. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Tiziana; Figoli, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs) look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s) plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration. PMID:25826756

  5. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  6. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Pulsating-gliding transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitorgen droplets.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Jacob, E. B.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Tel-Aviv Univ.

    2008-04-21

    Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-gliding dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or glide on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets.

  8. Industry Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is responsible for the Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project, a sub-element task of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) Project of the NASA Aviation System Capacity Program (ASC). The AC/ATM Project is developing new communications technologies and tools that will improve throughput in the U.S. Air Traffic Control System. The goal of the AC/ATM Project is to enable a communications infrastructure providing the capacity, efficiency, and flexibility necessary to realize benefits of the future mature Free-Flight environment. The capabilities and scope of communications technologies needed to accomplish this goal depend on characteristics of the future Free-Flight environment. There are many operational concepts being proposed for a future ATM system to enable user flexibility and efficiency. GRC s focus is on developing new technologies and techniques to support the digital communication of information involving airborne and ground-based users. However, the technologies and techniques must be integrated with the systems and services that industry and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are developing. Thus, GRC needs to monitor and provide input to the various industry and FAA organizations and committees that are specifying new systems and services. Adoption of technologies by the FAA is partially dependent on acceptance of the technology by the aviation community. The commercial aviation community in particular would like to adopt technologies that can be used throughout the world. As a result, the adoption of common or at least compatible technologies by European countries is a key factor in getting commitments to those technologies by the US aviation community. GRC desires to keep informed of European activities that relate to aviation communication technologies, particularly those that are being supported by Eurocontrol.

  9. Electrically actuated liquid iris.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Ren, Hongwen; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2015-03-01

    We report an adaptive iris using dielectric liquids and a radial-interdigitated electrode. A black liquid is confined by a circular gasket with a donut shape. The surrounding of the black liquid is filled with an immiscible liquid. In the relaxing state, the black liquid obtains the largest clear aperture. By applying a voltage, the surface of the black liquid is stretched by the generated dielectric force, resulting in a reduction of its aperture. For the demonstrated iris, the diameter of the aperture can be changed from ?4.7??mm to ?1.2??mm when the voltage is applied from 0 to 70??V(rms). The aperture ratio is ?94%. Owing to the radial-interdigitated electrode, the aperture size of the iris can be effectively switched with a reasonably fast response time. The optical switch is polarization-insensitive. The potential applications of our iris are light shutters, optical attenuators, biomimicry, and wearable devices. PMID:25723444

  10. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  11. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  12. Evidence for Liquid Water on Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Robert; Hoover, Richard

    2005-01-01

    We have reexamined the arguments for the existence of liquid water on comets, and believe that recent cometary flybys along with pre-Giotto data support its presence on short-period comets. Liquid water would affect cometary dynamics, leaving distinct signatures in precession, orbital dynamics, and potential splitting of comets. Liquid water geysers would affect cometary atmosphere, dust evolution, and non-gravitational forces that perturb the orbit. Liquid water would affect the composition of both the interior and exterior of the comet, producing geologic effects consistent with recent flyby photographs. And most importantly, liquid water suppork the growth of lifeforms, which would make a comet a biofriendly incubator for interplanetary transport. The major objection against liquid water is the necessity of a pressure vessel to prevent sublimation into space. We discuss how such a pressure vessel could naturally evolve as a pristine comet makes its first journey inside the orbit of Mars, and suggest that this type of vessel was observed by Giotto, Deep Space I, and Stardust.

  13. Modulation of Marangoni convection in liquid films.

    PubMed

    Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana

    2015-08-01

    Non-isothermal liquid films are subject to short- and long-wave modes of Marangoni instability. The short-wave instability leads to the development of convection cells, whereas long-wave instability is one of the primary causes of the film rupture. In this paper different methods for modulation of Marangoni convection and Marangoni-induced interface deformation in non-isotherm liquid films are reviewed. These methods include modification of substrates through topographical features, using substrates with non-uniform thermal properties, non-uniform radiative heating of the liquid-gas interface and non-uniform heating of substrates. All these approaches aim at promotion of temperature gradients along the liquid-gas interface, which leads to emergence of thermocapillary stresses, to the development of vortices and to the interface deformation. Finally, Marangoni convection in a liquid film supported by a substrate with periodic temperature distribution is modeled by solution of steady state creeping flow equations. This approach is justified for low Reynolds numbers and for Marangoni convection in liquids with high Prandtl numbers. The model predicts interaction between Marangoni convection induced by non-uniform wall heating and the Marangoni short-wave instability. PMID:25769473

  14. Liquid-Liquid Two-Phase Flow Systems Neima Brauner

    E-print Network

    Brauner, Neima

    2.22.2323 1 #12;Liquid-Liquid Two-Phase Flow Systems Neima Brauner School of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel 1 General Description of Liquid-Liquid Flows: Flow Patterns Flows of two immiscible liquids are encountered in a diverse range of processes and equipments. In particular

  15. Ionic conductivity of imidazole-functionalized liquid crystal mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddecha, Supacharee; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2012-02-01

    Imidazole has been investigated as a novel anhydrous proton conducting functional group that could enable higher temperature operation (> 120 ^oC) of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Its amphoteric behavior can support Grotthuss-like proton transport; however molecular mobility and a high concentration of imidazole groups are needed to achieve high ionic conductivity. Our hypothesis is that liquid crystal ordering, particularly in layered smectic phase, can facilitate formation of 2D proton transport and promote proton conductivity. We have designed and synthesized two imidazole-terminated liquid crystal mesogens, and the ionic conductivities in the liquid crystalline and isotropic states have been measured. Here we report on synthesis and characterization of diacylhydrazine liquid crystals bearing imidazole terminal groups. The proton conductivity of products is compared to pure liquid imidazole and to liquid crystal mesogens without imidazole groups.

  16. Liquid detection trial with x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, G.; Fleckenstein, H.; Olesinski, S.; Zienert, G.

    2010-08-01

    SALOME (an acronym for Small Angle Lab Operation Measuring Equipment) is a versatile, energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction imaging (XDi) test-bed facility commissioned and supported by the Transportation Security Laboratory, Atlantic City, USA. In work presented here, the Inverse Fan-beam (IFB) topology has been realized on SALOME and used to investigate the liquids identification capability of x-ray diffraction (XRD). Liquids were investigated from four classes of materials of relevance to security screening of aircraft passenger luggage; namely: dilute aqueous liquids; concentrated aqueous liquids; hydrocarbon fuels; and oxidizers. A set of features associated with the Molecular Interference Function (MIF) were used to classify the liquids. Within the limited scope of this investigation, XRD proved to have excellent capability for discriminating liquids from one another; in particular, for isolating the threat materials without raising false alarms from either household or innocuous substances. Consequences for XRD-based screening of air passenger luggage are summarized.

  17. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-print Network

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  18. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  19. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  20. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01

    A liquid level sensor having a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

  1. Dynamical and structural heterogeneities close to liquid-liquid phase transitions: The case of gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Alex; Cajahuaringa, Samuel; de Koning, Maurice

    2013-03-01

    Liquid-liquid phase transitions (LLPT) have been proposed in order to explain the thermodynamic anomalies exhibited by some liquids. Recently, it was found, through molecular dynamics simulations, that liquid elemental gallium, described by a modified embedded-atom model, exhibits a LLPT between a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL), about 60 K below the melting temperature. In this work, we studied the dynamics of supercooled liquid gallium close to the LLPT. Our results show a large increase in the plateau of the self-intermediate scattering function (?-relaxation process) and in the non-Gaussian parameter, indicating a pronounced dynamical heterogeneity upon the onset of the LLPT. The dynamical heterogeneity of the LDL is closely correlated to its structural heterogeneity, since the fast diffusing atoms belong to high-density domains of predominantly 9-fold coordinated atoms, whereas the slow diffusing ones are mostly in low-density domains of 8-fold coordinated atoms. The energetics suggests that the reason for the sluggish dynamics of LDL is due to its larger cohesive energy as compared to that of the HDL. Work supported by FAPESP, CNPq, CAPES, and FAEPEX/UNICAMP

  2. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-print Network

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquid–liquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  3. Technology Support Bob Davis

    E-print Network

    Technology Support Services · Bob Davis · Associate Director User Support Services 1 #12;Technology Support Services · NUIT Technology Support Services (TSS) helps Northwestern faculty, staff, and students Technologies · Brian Nielsen · Project Manager Faculty Initiatives 8 #12;Support for Teaching & Learning

  4. Liquid Chromatography in 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, David H.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews trends in liquid chromatography including apparatus, factors affecting efficient separation of a mixture (peak sharpness and speed), simplified problem-solving, adsorption, bonded phase chromatography, ion selectivity, and size exclusion. The current trend is to control chemical selectivity by the liquid phase. (Author/JN)

  5. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  6. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  7. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  8. Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids

    E-print Network

    have boiling points below -73°C (-100°F). The most common cryogenic liquids currently on campus conditions of temperature and pressure. But all have two very important properties in common. First, the liquids and their vapors are extremely cold. The risk of destructive freezing of tissues is always present

  9. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  10. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  11. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  12. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  13. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin

    2011-11-01

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  14. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  15. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  16. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vericella, John J.; Baker, Sarah E.; Stolaroff, Joshuah K.; Duoss, Eric B.; Hardin, James O.; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C.; Valdez, Carlos A.; Smith, William L.; Satcher, Joe H.; Bourcier, William L.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Aines, Roger D.

    2015-02-01

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  17. Ionic Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-07-12

    Recent scientific studies are rapidly advancing novel technological improvements and engineering developments that demonstrate the ability to minimize, eliminate, or facilitate the removal of various contaminants and green house gas emissions in power generation. The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) shows promise for carbon dioxide mitigation not only because of its higher efficiency as compared to conventional coal firing plants, but also due to a higher driving force in the form of high partial pressure. One of the novel technological concepts currently being developed and investigated is membranes for carbon dioxide (CO2) separation, due to simplicity and ease of scaling. A challenge in using membranes for CO2 capture in IGCC is the possibility of failure at elevated temperatures or pressures. Our earlier research studies examined the use of ionic liquids on various supports for CO2 separation over the temperature range, 37°C-300°C. The ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3methylimidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([hmim][Tf2N]), was chosen for our initial studies with the following supports: polysulfone (PSF), poly(ether sulfone) (PES), and cross-linked nylon. The PSF and PES supports had similar performance at room temperature, but increasing temperature caused the supported membranes to fail. The ionic liquid with the PES support greatly affected the glass transition temperature, while with the PSF, the glass transition temperature was only slightly depressed. The cross-linked nylon support maintained performance without degradation over the temperature range 37-300°C with respect to its permeability and selectivity. However, while the cross-linked nylon support was able to withstand temperatures, the permeability continued to increase and the selectivity decreased with increasing temperature. Our studies indicated that further testing should examine the use of other ionic liquids, including those that form chemical complexes with CO2 based on amine interactions. The hypothesis is that the performance at the elevated temperatures could be improved by allowing a facilitated transport mechanism to become dominant. Several amine-based ionic liquids were tested on the cross-linked nylon support. It was found that using the amine-based ionic liquid did improve selectivity and permeability at higher temperature. The hypothesis was confirmed, and it was determined that the type of amine used also played a role in facilitated transport. Given the appropriate aminated ionic liquid with the cross-linked nylon support, it is possible to have a membrane capable of separating CO2 at IGCC conditions. With this being the case, the research has expanded to include separation of other constituents besides CO2 (CO, H2S, etc.) and if they play a role in membrane poisoning or degradation. This communication will discuss the operation of the recently fabricated ionic liquid membranes and the impact of gaseous components other than CO2 on their performance and stability.

  18. Noncavitating Pump For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael; Swift, Walter; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    Immersion pump features high efficiency in cryogenic service. Simple and reliable centrifugal pump transfers liquid helium with mass-transfer efficiency of 99 percent. Liquid helium drawn into pump by helical inducer, which pressurizes helium slightly to prevent cavitation when liquid enters impeller. Impeller then pressurizes liquid. Purpose of pump to transfer liquid helium from supply to receiver vessel, or to provide liquid helium flow for testing and experimentation.

  19. Autothermal Processing of Renewable Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Jacob Scott

    The vast majority of petrochemicals are synthesized from just six building block molecules, but current feedstocks are an unsustainable resource with negative externalities. Biomass represents a potentially sustainable feedstock, but needs densification, preferably to a liquid form, to be a suitable replacement. Fermentation to butanol and pyrolysis to bio-oil are two promising liquid intermediates. Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of the liquid intermediates over noble metal catalysts, which converts the liquids primarily into syngas and light olefins, is a promising technique for processing densified biomass. The study of liquids at high temperatures requires consideration of a range of complex phenomena, including boiling behavior on hot surfaces, reactions of the feed molecules at high temperatures and on catalyst surfaces, and interactions of impurities in the liquid with the catalyst. Chapter 2 deals with the behavior of the transient liquid that forms when cellulose, a major constituent of biomass, is pyrolized. Fast photography experiments and numerical simulations are performed to show that the aerosols formed in the boiling of this liquid are capable of transporting nonvolatile fragments of biomass intact into the gas phase. These nonvolatile fragments have significant implications in the storage and downstream processing of bio-oil. Some of the behavior of bio-oil at high temperature may also be explained by the variety of molecules in the liquid. Many different functional groups are present, each with its own set of chemical reactions in combustion, pyrolysis, and partial oxidation on a metal catalyst. Chapters 3 and 4 investigate these reactions through a survey of two-carbon surrogates of the functional group classes found in bio-oil. Chapter 3 examines reactions occuring in the complete CPO system over Pt and Rh catalysts, and in the complete system absent O 2. The selectivity data from each molecule and the surface science literature of each molecule are used to propose a reaction mechanism over the catalyst surface. Chapter 4 investigates the reactions that may be occurring in the gas phase and over the alpha-Al2O3 foam monolith support. Significant gas-phase chemistry is likely present in the autothermal reactor, although different temperature gradients between the autothermal reactions and the externally heated tube makes quantification of the amount of homogeneous chemistry in the autothermal system impossible. The alpha-Al2O 3 support may serve as a heat transfer medium and radical quencher (due to its foam structure with small-diameter pores), but not likely acid catalysis, as selectivity to dehydration products was similar both with and without the foam support. Because butanol is another promising liquid intermediate in biomass processing, a series of experiments with butanol in an CPO reactor was also carried out. Chapter 5 compares the four butanol isomers in a CPO reactor over Pt, PtCe, Rh, and RhCe catalysts. The reactivity of tert-butanol was as high or higher than the other alcohols, indicating that the lack of a carbonyl decomposition path does not necessarily in uence the reactivity of the molecule. Rather, the reactivity appeared to be more a function of the initial pyrolysis temperature of the alcohol. Thus, much of the initial chemistry of the higher alcohols in a CPO reactor may be homogeneous. The main function of the catalyst may be to decompose the intermediate carbonyls and alkenes to syngas. To that end, the PtCe had significantly lower reforming activity than the other catalysts, evidenced by the lower selectivity to CO and H2 and generally higher temperatures. Selectivity to syngas and light olefins was high and tunable depending on feed ratios, indicating the potential of CPO to provide petrochemical building blocks from butanol. Chapter 6 combines CPO with a water-gas shift (WGS) stage and investigates the addition of steam to isobutanol for the production of a high-purity H2 stream. A RhCe catalyst was used in the CPO stage to convert 100% of the isobutanol feed to primarily

  20. Liquid metals. Concepts and theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, N. H.

    A research level comprehensive introduction to the theory and concepts of liquid metals. The book begins with a survey of the basic experimental facts and reviews the concepts needed to understand the properties of liquid metals. The quantitative theory of liquid pair correlation functions, effective ion-ion interactions, thermodynamic properties, and electronic and atomic transport is then developed. The book goes on to discuss inelastic neutron scattering from bulk liquid metals, a discussion of critical behavior, magnetism, and present understanding of the liquid metal surface, binary liquid metal alloys, the two component theory of pure liquid metals, shock wave studies, liquid hydrogen plasmas, and the constitution of giant planets.

  1. Cyrogenic Life Support Technology Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, David R.

    2015-01-01

    KSC has used cryogenic life support (liquid air based) technology successfully for many years to support spaceflight operations. This technology has many benefits unique to cryogenics when compared to traditional compressed gas systems: passive cooling, lighter, longer duration, and lower operating pressure. However, there are also several limiting factors that have prevented the technology from being commercialized. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (NIOSH-OMSHR) has partnered with NASA to develop a complete liquid air based life support solution for emergency mine escape and rescue. The project will develop and demonstrate various prototype devices and incorporate new technological innovations that have to date prevented commercialization.

  2. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  3. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  4. Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Integrated Propulsion System Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Howard; Lusby, Brian; Villemarette, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In support of NASA?s Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, a liquid oxygen (LO2)/liquid methane (LCH4) Integrated Propulsion System Test Bed (IPSTB) was designed and advanced to the Critical Design Review (CDR) stage at the Johnson Space Center. The IPSTB?s primary objectives are to study LO2/LCH4 propulsion system steady state and transient performance, operational characteristics and to validate fluid and thermal models of a LO2/LCH4 propulsion system for use in future flight design work. Two phase thermal and dynamic fluid flow models of the IPSTB were built to predict the system performance characteristics under a variety of operating modes and to aid in the overall system design work. While at ambient temperature and simulated altitude conditions at the White Sands Test Facility, the IPSTB and its approximately 600 channels of system instrumentation would be operated to perform a variety of integrated main engine and reaction control engine hot fire tests. The pressure, temperature, and flow rate data collected during this testing would then be used to validate the analytical models of the IPSTB?s thermal and dynamic fluid flow performance. An overview of the IPSTB design and analytical model development will be presented.

  5. Enhanced catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    1986-01-01

    The conversion of synthesis gas to liquid molar fuels by means of a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst composition is enhanced by the addition of molybdenum, tungsten or a combination thereof as an additional component of said composition. The presence of the additive component increases the olefinic content of the hydrocarbon products produced. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

  6. Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    1986-01-01

    The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

  7. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  8. Chiral spin liquids on the kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna; Sun, Kai; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    We study the nearest-neighbor X X Z Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet on the kagome lattice. Here we consider the effects of several perturbations: (a) a chirality term, (b) a Dzyaloshinski-Moriya term, and (c) a ring-exchange type term on the bowties of the kagome lattice, and inquire if they can support chiral spin liquids as ground states. The method used to study these Hamiltonians is a flux attachment transformation that maps the spins on the lattice to fermions coupled to a Chern-Simons gauge field on the kagome lattice. This transformation requires us to consistently define a Chern-Simons term on the kagome lattice. We find that the chirality term leads to a chiral spin liquid even in the absence of an uniform magnetic field, with an effective spin Hall conductance of ?xy s=1/2 in the regime of X Y anisotropy. The Dzyaloshinski-Moriya term also leads a similar chiral spin liquid but only when this term is not too strong. An external magnetic field also has the possibility of giving rise to additional plateaus which also behave like chiral spin liquids in the X Y regime. Finally, we consider the effects of a ring-exchange term and find that, provided its coupling constant is large enough, it may trigger a phase transition into a chiral spin liquid by the spontaneous breaking of time-reversal invariance.

  9. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  10. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  11. Electrically Deformable Liquid Marbles

    E-print Network

    Edward Bormashenko; Roman Pogreb; Tamir Stein; Gene Whyman; Marcelo Schiffer; Doron Aurbach

    2011-02-17

    Liquid marbles, which are droplets coated with a hydrophobic powder, were exposed to a uniform electric field. It was established that a threshold value of the electric field, 15 cgse, should be surmounted for deformation of liquid marbles. The shape of the marbles was described as a prolate spheroid. The semi-quantitative theory describing deformation of liquid marbles in a uniform electric field is presented. The scaling law relating the radius of the contact area of the marble to the applied electric field shows a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  12. 114. WEST SIDE OF LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROL ROOM (205). LIQUID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. WEST SIDE OF LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROL ROOM (205). LIQUID NITROGEN (LN2) SUBCOOLER ON LEFT; SKID 8, LIQUID OXYGEN CONTROLLER FOR SWITCHING BETWEEN RAPID-LOAD AND TOPPING ON RIGHT. LIQUID OXYGEN LINE FROM SKID 9A AT RIGHT EDGE OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. Theoretical Aspects of Liquid Crystals and Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    E-print Network

    Feng, James J.

    ­solid duality gives rise to much of the ``anomalous'' behavior of liquid crystal- line materials. WhenTheoretical Aspects of Liquid Crystals and Liquid Crystalline Polymers James J. Feng Department,'' while the lack of strong positional order allows the material to flow like ordinary fluids. This liquid

  14. Impact of Liquid Fuel Boundary Condition and Nozzle Geometry on Liquid Jet in Crossflow Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Sina; Herrmann, Marcus

    2012-11-01

    The atomization of a liquid jet by a high speed cross-flowing gas has many applications such as gas turbines and augmentors. The mechanisms by which the liquid jet initially breaks up, however, are not well understood. Experimental studies suggest the dependence of spray properties on operating conditions and nozzle geometry. Detailed numerical simulations can offer better understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms that lead to the breakup of the injected liquid jet. In this work, we present detailed numerical simulation results of turbulent liquid jets injected into turbulent gaseous cross flows for different liquid fuel boundary conditions and injector geometries. We employ a finite volume, balanced force fractional step flow solver to solve the Navier-Stokes equations coupled to a Refined Level Set Grid method to follow the phase interface. To enable the simulation of atomization of high density ratio fluids, we ensure discrete consistency between the solution of the conservative momentum equation and the level set based continuity equation by employing the Rescaled Conservative Momentum method. We analyze the impact of liquid jet turbulent fluctuations and injector geometry on different jet properties such as jet penetration and generated drop sizes. This work was supported by NSF grant number CBET-0853627.

  15. Geomorphologic evidence for liquid water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masson, P.; Carr, M.H.; Costard, F.; Greeley, R.; Hauber, E.; Jaumann, R.

    2001-01-01

    Besides Earth, Mars is the only planet with a record of resurfacing processes and environmental circumstances that indicate the past operation of a hydrologic cycle. However the present-day conditions on Mars are far apart of supporting liquid water on the surface. Although the large-scale morphology of the Martian channels and valleys show remarkable similarities with fluid-eroded features on Earth, there are major differences in their size, small-scale morphology, inner channel structure and source regions indicating that the erosion on Mars has its own characteristic genesis and evolution. The different landforms related to fluvial, glacial and periglacial activities, their relations with volcanism, and the chronology of water-related processes, are presented.

  16. Extensible automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Songqing; Hu, Lu; Chen, Ketao; Gao, Haixiang

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a convenient and extensible automated ionic liquid-based in situ dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (automated IL-based in situ DLLME) was developed. 1-Octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethane)sulfonyl]imide ([C8MIM]NTf2) is formed through the reaction between [C8MIM]Cl and lithium bis[(trifluoromethane)sulfonyl]imide (LiNTf2) to extract the analytes. Using a fully automatic SPE workstation, special SPE columns packed with nonwoven polypropylene (NWPP) fiber, and a modified operation program, the procedures of the IL-based in situ DLLME, including the collection of a water sample, injection of an ion exchange solvent, phase separation of the emulsified solution, elution of the retained extraction phase, and collection of the eluent into vials, can be performed automatically. The developed approach, coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), was successfully applied to the detection and concentration determination of benzoylurea (BU) insecticides in water samples. Parameters affecting the extraction performance were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed method achieved extraction recoveries of 80% to 89% for water samples. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were in the range of 0.16-0.45 ng mL(-1). The intra-column and inter-column relative standard deviations (RSDs) were <8.6%. Good linearity (r>0.9986) was obtained over the calibration range from 2 to 500 ng mL(-1). The proposed method opens a new avenue for automated DLLME that not only greatly expands the range of viable extractants, especially functional ILs but also enhances its application for various detection methods. Furthermore, multiple samples can be processed simultaneously, which accelerates the sample preparation and allows the examination of a large number of samples. PMID:25892068

  17. Diet - clear liquid

    MedlinePLUS

    ... juices without pulp, such as grape juice, filtered apple juice, and cranberry juice Soup broth (bouillon or ... might ask you to avoid liquids that have red coloring for some tests, like a colonoscopy.

  18. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  19. Safer Liquid Natural Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    After the disaster of Staten Island in 1973 where 40 people were killed repairing a liquid natural gas storage tank, the New York Fire Commissioner requested NASA's help in drawing up a comprehensive plan to cover the design, construction, and operation of liquid natural gas facilities. Two programs are underway. The first transfers comprehensive risk management techniques and procedures which take the form of an instruction document that includes determining liquid-gas risks through engineering analysis and tests, controlling these risks by setting up redundant fail safe techniques, and establishing criteria calling for decisions that eliminate or accept certain risks. The second program prepares a liquid gas safety manual (the first of its kind).

  20. Liquid crystal bilayer wall

    E-print Network

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    to a liquid crystal solution of hexanol, cetylpyridinium chloride, and 0.2 M hydrochloric acid, and our hexanol, cetylpyridinium chloride, and 1 wt % aqueous NaCl solution.[1] This phase, which is optically

  1. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-print Network

    Arregui, Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  2. Liquid medication administration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cooking are accurate, but they spill easily. Oral syringes have some advantages for giving liquid medications. They ... easy to use. You can take a capped syringe containing a dose of medication to your child's ...

  3. The Liquid Nitrogen Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, Robin; Rahn, Jeffrey A.; Beamer, Timothy W.; Lebret, Norm

    2002-10-01

    Details of a demonstration using liquid nitrogen are presented. The demonstration is based on a 500-mL transparent polyethylene soft-drink bottle with a screw-on pop-up drink top. Prior to the demonstration, a balloon is placed over the popped-up spout of the bottle top. The bottle is filled with liquid nitrogen and the top, with the balloon affixed, is quickly put in place and screwed on tightly. As the liquid nitrogen in the bottle boils, the balloon inflates. When the balloon bursts the noise produced is far greater than would ordinarily be expected, and a fountain of liquid nitrogen and condensing water vapor shoots into the air above the bottle.

  4. Capacitance cell for liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, D. T.; Greer, S. C.

    1980-07-01

    We present a simple and chemically inert, guarded cylindrical capacitance cell for liquids in the temperature range 170 to 370 K and at pressures near atmospheric. A precision in the dielectric constant of 2 ppm is realizable with this cell.

  5. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  6. Diet - full liquid

    MedlinePLUS

    ... liquid when they are at room temperature, like ice cream. It also includes: Strained creamy soups Tea Juice ... Butter, margarine, oil, cream, custard, and pudding Plain ice cream, frozen yogurt, and sherbet. Fruit ices and popsicles ...

  7. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid bismuth, lead, and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, a substantial program existed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel reactor program on the compatibility of bismuth, lead, and their alloys with structural materials. Subsequently, compatibility investigations of mercury with structural materials were performed in support of development of Rankine cycle mercury turbines for nuclear applications. The present talk will review present understanding of the corrosion/mass-transfer reactions of structural materials with these liquid metal coolants. Topics to be discussed include the basic solubility relationships of iron, chromium, nickel, and refractory metals in these liquid metals, the results of inhibition studies, the role of oxygen on the corrosion processes, and specialized topics such as cavitation-corrosion and liquid metal embrittlement. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing the understanding gained in this earlier work on the development of heavy liquid metal targets in spallation neutron sources.

  8. Containerless Liquid-Phase Processing of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard (Principal Investigator); Nordine, Paul C.

    1996-01-01

    The present project builds on the results of research supported under a previous NASA grant to investigate containerless liquid-phase processing of molten ceramic materials. The research used an aero-acoustic levitator in combination with cw CO2 laser beam heating to achieve containerless melting, superheating, undercooling, and solidification of poorly-conducting solids and liquids. Experiments were performed on aluminum oxide, binary aluminum oxide-silicon dioxide materials, and oxide superconductors.

  9. Modeling of Diffusion in Liquid Ge and Its Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, David G.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made on NASA Grant NAG3-1437, Modeling of diffusion in Liquid Ge and Its Alloys, which was in effect from January 15, 1993 through July 10, 1997. It briefly describes the purpose of the grant, and the work accomplished in simulations and other studies of thermophysical properties of liquid semiconductors and related materials. A list of publications completed with the support of the grant is also given.

  10. Evaluation of mercury in the liquid waste processing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Vijay; Shah, Hasmukh; Occhipinti, John E.; Wilmarth, William R.; Edwards, Richard E.

    2015-08-13

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  11. Liquid blocking check valve

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, John T. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A liquid blocking check valve useful particularly in a pneumatic system utilizing a pressurized liquid fill chamber. The valve includes a floatable ball disposed within a housing defining a chamber. The housing is provided with an inlet aperture disposed in the top of said chamber, and an outlet aperture disposed in the bottom of said chamber in an offset relation to said inlet aperture and in communication with a cutaway side wall section of said housing.

  12. Applications of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Divia Dinesh; Lee, Jong-Min

    2012-06-01

    Ionic liquids have recently gained popularity in the scientific community owing to their special properties and characteristics. One of the reasons why ionic liquids have been termed "green solvents" is due to their negligible vapour pressure. Their use in electrochemical, biological and metal extraction applications is discussed. Wide research has been carried out for their use in batteries, solar panels, fuel cells, drug deliveries and biomass pretreatments. This work aims to consolidate the various findings from previous works in these areas. PMID:22711528

  13. Liquid cooled helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, William (Inventor); Williams, Bill A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Liquid cooled helmet comprising a cap of flexible material adapted to fit the head of a person, cooling panels mounted inside the cap forming passageways for carrying a liquid coolant, the panels being positioned to engage the cranium and neck of a person wearing the helmet, inlet and outlet lines communicating with the passageways, and releasable straps for securing the helmet about the neck of the wearer.

  14. Liquid Level Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Duffell, Amanda G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A liquid level sensing system includes waveguides disposed in a liquid and distributed along a path with a gap between adjacent waveguides. A source introduces electromagnetic energy into the waveguides at a first end of the path. A portion of the electromagnetic energy exits the waveguides at a second end of the path. A detector measures the portion of the electromagnetic energy exiting the second end of the path.

  15. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  16. Flexible liquid metal-filled metamaterial absorber on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

    PubMed

    Ling, Kenyu; Kim, Kyeoungseob; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-08-10

    In this paper, we propose a novel flexible metamaterial (MM) absorber. The conductive pattern consists of liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) enclosed in elastomeric microfluidic channels. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material is used as a supporting substrate. The proposed MM absorber is flexible because of its liquid metal and PDMS substrate. Numerical simulations and experimental results are presented when the microfluidic channels are filled with liquid metal. In order to evaluate the proposed MM absorber's performance, the fabricated absorber prototype is tested with rectangular waveguides. Almost perfect absorptivity is achieved at a resonant frequency of 8.22 GHz. PMID:26367985

  17. Monogroove heat pipe design: Insulated liquid channel with bridging wick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J. P.; Brown, R. F.; Kosson, R. L. (inventors)

    1985-01-01

    A screen mesh artery supported concentrically within the evaporator section of a heat pipe liquid channel retains liquid in the channel. Continued and uniform liquid feed to the heat pipe evaporation section (20) during periods of excessive heat transfer is assured. The overall design provides high evaporation and condensation film coefficients for the working fluid by means of the circumferential grooves in the walls of the vapor channel, while not interfering with the overall heat transport capability of the axial groove. The design has particular utility in zero-g environments.

  18. Radiography for a Shock-accelerated Liquid Layer

    SciTech Connect

    P. Meekunnasombat J.G. Oakley\\inst M.H. Anderson R. Bonazza

    2005-07-01

    This program supported the experimental study of the itneraction of planar shock waves with both solid structures (a single cylinder or a bank of cylinders) and single and multiple liquid layers. Objectives of the study included: characterization of the shock refraction patterns; measurements of the impulsive loading of the solid structures; observation of the response of the liquid layers to shock acceleration; assessment of the shock-mitigation effects of single and multiple liquid layers. The uploaded paper is intended as a final report for the entire funding period. The poster described in the paper won the Best Poster Award at the 25 International Symposium on Shock Waves.

  19. Surface layering of liquids: The role of surface tension

    E-print Network

    Oleg Shpyrko; Masafumi Fukuto; Peter Pershan; Ben Ocko; Ivan Kuzmenko; Thomas Gog; Moshe Deutsch

    2004-06-24

    Recent measurements show that the free surfaces of liquid metals and alloys are always layered, regardless of composition and surface tension; a result supported by three decades of simulations and theory. Recent theoretical work claims, however, that at low enough temperatures the free surfaces of all liquids should become layered, unless preempted by bulk freezing. Using x-ray reflectivity and diffuse scattering measurements we show that there is no observable surface-induced layering in water at T=298 K, thus highlighting a fundamental difference between dielectric and metallic liquids. The implications of this result for the question in the title are discussed.

  20. Liquid membranes for the production of oxygen-enriched air

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; Roman, I.C.; Smith, K.L.; Lonsdale, H.K.

    1982-07-01

    Energy efficient production of oxygen-enriched air through use of newly developed liquid membranes is reported. The facilitated-transport membranes developed at Bend Research consist of a liquid membrane containing a dissolved oxygen carrier held by capillarity within the pores of a microporous, polymeric membrane support. The key to this development has been the discovery of liquid membranes that exhibit high oxygen permeability, high oxygen-to-nitrogen selectivity, and stable membrane performance. The most selective membrane allowed production of 88% oxygen in a single pass through the membrane.

  1. Apparatus and method for electrochemical modification of liquids

    DOEpatents

    James, Patrick I

    2015-04-21

    An apparatus for electrochemical modification of liquid streams employing an electrolytic cell which includes an anode compartment defined by an anode structure where oxidation is effected, containing a liquid electrolyte anolyte, and a cathode compartment defined by a cathode structure where reduction is effected containing a liquid electrolyte catholyte. In addition, the electrolytic cell includes at least one additional compartment arranged at least partially between the anode compartment and the cathode compartment and separated from the anode compartment and the cathode compartment by a separator structure arranged to supports ionic conduction of current between the anode structure and the cathode structure.

  2. Surface Chemistry and Properties of Oxides as Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Contescu, Cristian I

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis relies on metal-oxides as supports for the catalysts. Catalyst supports are an indispensable component of most heterogeneous catalysts, but the role of the support is often minimized in light of the one played by the catalytically active species it supports. The active species of supported catalysts are located on the surface of the support where their contact with liquid or gas phase reactants will be greatest. Considering that support plays a major role in distribution and stability of active species, the absorption and retention of reactive species, and in some cases in catalytic reaction, the properties and chemistry that can occur at the surface of an oxide support are important for understanding their impact on the activity of a supported catalyst. This chapter examines this rich surface chemistry and properties of oxides used as catalyst supports, and explores the influence of their interaction with the active species.

  3. Implications of liquid-liquid distribution coefficients to mineral-liquid partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Hess, P. C.

    1978-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of a silicate liquid structure on mineral-liquid partitioning, element partitioning data is obtained for coexisting anhydrous immiscible granitic and ferrobasaltic magmas. It is found that: (1) mineral-liquid distribution coefficients indicate the competition of crystal and liquid for cation incorporation, (2) increased polymerization of the residual liquid during crystal-liquid fractionation increases the mineral-liquid distribution coefficients for high-charge-density cations, (3) incompatible element ratios of low- and high-charge-density cations may vary during crystal-liquid fractionation because of changes in the melt composition and structure, (4) relative solubilities of REE's in melts do not vary with melt polymerization, (5) the changes of Sm/Eu ratios during crystal-liquid fractionation depend on the melt composition, and (6) minor components and volatiles can significantly influence the silicate melt structure and the mineral-liquid distribution coefficients.

  4. Control of the Liquid-Liquid Transition in a Molecular Liquid by Spatial Confinement Rei Kurita and Hajime Tanaka*

    E-print Network

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Control of the Liquid-Liquid Transition in a Molecular Liquid by Spatial Confinement Rei Kurita to nanotechnology. Here we report the first systematic experimental study on confinement effects on a liquid-liquid transition of a molecular liquid. We found that one liquid can be transformed into another purely by spatial

  5. Microgravity liquid propellant management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement to settle or to position liquid fluid over the outlet end of a spacecraft propellant tank prior to main engine restart, poses a microgravity fluid behavior problem. Resettlement or reorientation of liquid propellant can be accomplished by providing optimal acceleration to the spacecraft such that the propellant is reoriented over the tank outlet without any vapor entrainment, any excessive geysering, or any other undersirable fluid motion for the space fluid management under microgravity environment. The most efficient technique is studied for propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage and weight penalties. Both full scale and subscale liquid propellant tank of Space Transfer Vehicle were used to simulate flow profiles for liquid hydrogen reorientation over the tank outlet. In subscale simulation, both constant and impulsive resettling acceleration were used to simulate the liquid flow reorientation. Comparisons between the constant reverse gravity acceleration and impulsive reverse gravity acceleration to be used for activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive reverse gravity thrust is superior to constant reverse gravity thrust.

  6. Heat exchanger support apparatus in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.W.

    1982-05-25

    A heat exchanger is mounted in the upper portion of a fluidized combusting bed for the control of the temperature of the bed. A support, made up of tubes, is extended from the perforated plate of the fluidized bed up to the heat exchanger. The tubular support framework for the heat exchanger has liquid circulated there through to prevent deterioration of the support. 2 figs.

  7. Redox chemistry at liquid/liquid interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkov, A. G.; Deamer, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    The interface between two immiscible liquids with immobilized photosynthetic pigments can serve as the simplest model of a biological membrane convenient for the investigation of photoprocesses accompanied by spatial separation of charges. As it follows from thermodynamics, if the resolvation energies of substrates and products are very different, the interface between two immiscible liquids may act as a catalyst. Theoretical aspects of charge transfer reactions at oil/water interfaces are discussed. Conditions under which the free energy of activation of the interfacial reaction of electron transfer decreases are established. The activation energy of electron transfer depends on the charges of the reactants and dielectric permittivity of the non-aqueous phase. This can be useful when choosing a pair of immiscible solvents to decrease the activation energy of the reaction in question or to inhibit an undesired process. Experimental interfacial catalytic systems are discussed. Amphiphilic molecules such as chlorophyll or porphyrins were studied as catalysts of electron transfer reactions at the oil/water interface.

  8. Liquid lubrication in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for long-term, reliable operation of aerospace mechanisms has, with a few exceptions, pushed the state of the art in tribology. Space mission life requirements in the early 1960s were generally 6 months to a year. The proposed U.S. space station schedule to be launched in the 1990s must be continuously usable for 10 to 20 years. Liquid lubrication systems are generally used for mission life requirements longer than a year. Although most spacecraft or satellites have reached their required lifetimes without a lubrication-related failure, the application of liquid lubricants in the space environment presents unique challenges. The state of the art of liquid lubrication in space as well as the problems and their solutions are reviewed.

  9. Buckling of Liquid Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, M.; Rahmani, Y.; Bonn, Daniel; Ribe, N. M.

    2010-02-01

    Under appropriate conditions, a column of viscous liquid falling onto a rigid surface undergoes a buckling instability. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that liquid buckling exhibits a hitherto unsuspected complexity involving three different modes—viscous, gravitational, and inertial—depending on how the viscous forces that resist bending of the column are balanced. We also find that the nonlinear evolution of the buckling exhibits a surprising multistability with three distinct states: steady stagnation flow, “liquid rope coiling,” and a new state in which the column simultaneously folds periodically and rotates about a vertical axis. The transitions among these states are subcritical, leading to a complex phase diagram in which different combinations of states coexist in different regions of the parameter space.

  10. Alloying of liquid aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Shafyei, A.; Guthrie, R.I.L.

    1996-10-01

    The addition of high melting point alloying elements is an integral component in the processing of molten aluminum alloys. In this research, the kinetics of dissolution of manganese and iron particles, freely dispersed in turbulently-stirred baths of liquid aluminum, has been investigated at a laboratory scale. First, the suspension behavior of alloying elements in liquid aluminum was studied via water modeling analogues, using dimensional analysis and similarity techniques. Second, mass transfer coefficients between particles of manganese or iron and stirred liquid aluminum were measured. These high temperature experiments showed that measured mass transfer coefficients of manganese and iron particles were strongly dependent on the intensity of the mixing, until the point at which particles became fully suspended. Further increases in the rate of mixing produced little further rises in mass transfer coefficients. From a practical point of view, therefore, these results suggested that very high rates of melt mixing are not recommended during an alloying process.

  11. Liquid Acquisition Device Design Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyke, M. K.; Hastings, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    In-space propulsion often necessitates the use of a capillary liquid acquisition device (LAD) to assure that gas-free liquid propellant is available to support engine restarts in microgravity. If a capillary screen-channel device is chosen, then the designer must determine the appropriate combination screen mesh and channel geometry. A screen mesh selection which results in the smallest LAD width when compared to any other screen candidate (for a constant length) is desirable; however, no best screen exists for all LAD design requirements. Flow rate, percent fill, and acceleration are the most influential drivers for determining screen widths. Increased flow rates and reduced percent fills increase the through-the-screen flow pressure losses, which drive the LAD to increased widths regardless of screen choice. Similarly, increased acceleration levels and corresponding liquid head pressures drive the screen mesh selection toward a higher bubble point (liquid retention capability). After ruling out some screens on the basis of acceleration requirements alone, candidates can be identified by examining screens with small flow-loss-to-bubble point ratios for a given condition (i.e., comparing screens at certain flow rates and fill levels). Within the same flow rate and fill level, the screen constants inertia resistance coefficient, void fraction, screen pore or opening diameter, and bubble point can become the driving forces in identifying the smaller flow-loss-to-bubble point ratios.

  12. Improved liquid-film electron stripper

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, B.F.

    1984-11-01

    An improved liquid-film electron stripper particularly for high intensity heavy ion beams which produces constant regenerated, stable, free-standing liquid films having an adjustable thickness between 0.3 to 0.05 microns. The improved electron stripper is basically composed of at least one high speed, rotating disc with a very sharp, precision-like, ground edge on one side of the disc's periphery and with highly polished, flat, radial surface adjacent the sharp edge. A fine stream of liquid, such as oil, impinges at a 90/sup 0/ angle adjacent the disc's sharp outer edge. Film terminators, located at a selected distance from the disc perimeter are positioned approximately perpendicular to the film. The terminators support, shape, and stretch the film and are arranged to assist in the prevention of liquid droplet formation by directing the collected film to a reservoir below without breaking or interfering with the film. One embodiment utilizes two rotating discs and associated terminators, with the discs rotating so as to form films in opposite directions, and with the second disc being located down beam-line relative to the first disc.

  13. Liquid metal fuel combustion mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvvuri, Tirumalesa

    1990-07-01

    The modeling of the droplet formation at the gas/liquid boundary interface of a gaseous jet injected into a liquid metal bath and the turbulent mixing of the resultant two-phase (gas/liquid) mixture is presented as a preliminary to the analysis of the liquid metal fuel combustion problem. The model is used to predict velocity and liquid droplet fraction distributions across the mixing zone and along the centerline of the jet. These results show that the distribution of the liquid fuel droplets peaks away from the region of maximum oxidizer concentrations.

  14. Turbine meters for liquid measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wass, D.J.; Allen, C.R.

    1995-12-01

    Liquid turbine meters operate in response to fundamental engineering principles, Operation with a single moving part produces excellent longevity and reliability. Liquid turbine meters display wide rangeability, high accuracy, excellent repeatability, low pressure drop and moderate cost. Liquid turbine meters may be applied to many different fluids with different physical properties and corrosive tendencies. The marriage of liquid turbine meters to electronic instruments allows instantaneous flow calculations and produces the flexibility to display data, store data, transmit data in the most convenient form. Liquid turbine meters should be the first flow measurement instrument considered for liquid measurement applications.

  15. Liquid fuel developments

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.; Carreira, L.H.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    This book concerns the biosynthesis of ethanol fuels from biomass. Topics considered include anaerobic thermophilic bacteria, screening for cellulolytic mutants, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to fermentable sugars, process biotechnology for the conversion of biomass into liquid fuels, a flow reactor for acid hydrolysis or pretreatment of cellulosic biomass, the production of ethanol and chemicals from wood by the Georgia Tech process, liquid fuels and chemicals from cellulosic residues by acid hydrolysis, alkane fuels production from biomass, and the integration of production of corn-derived fuels with animal feed production.

  16. Improved Capacitive Liquid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, Francis A.

    1992-01-01

    Improved capacitive sensor used to detect presence and/or measure thickness of layer of liquid. Electrical impedance or admittance of sensor measured at prescribed frequency, and thickness of liquid inferred from predetermined theoretical or experimental relationship between impedance and thickness. Sensor is basically a three-terminal device. Features interdigitated driving and sensing electrodes and peripheral coplanar ground electrode that reduces parasitic effects. Patent-pending because first to utilize ground plane as "shunting" electrode. System less expensive than infrared, microwave, or refractive-index systems. Sensor successfully evaluated in commercial production plants to characterize emulsions, slurries, and solutions.

  17. Liquid sheet radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; White, K. Alan, III

    1987-01-01

    A new external flow radiator concept, the liquid sheet radiator (LSR), is introduced. The LSR sheet flow is described and an expression for the length/width (l/w), ratio is presented. A linear dependence of l/w on velocity is predicted that agrees with experimental results. Specific power for the LSR is calculated and is found to be nearly the same as the specific power of a liquid droplet radiator, (LDR). Several sheet thicknesses and widths were experimentally investigated. In no case was the flow found to be unstable.

  18. Liquid air cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosevear, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a definition of Liquid Air Cycle Engines (LACE) and existing relevant technologies. Heat exchanger design and fabrication techniques, the handling of liquid hydrogen to achieve the greatest heat sink capabilities, and air decontamination to prevent heat exchanger fouling are discussed. It was concluded that technology needs to be extended in the areas of design and fabrication of heat exchangers to improve reliability along with weight and volume reductions. Catalysts need to be improved so that conversion can be achieved with lower quantities and lower volumes. Packaging studies need to be investigated both analytically and experimentally. Recycling with slush hydrogen needs further evaluation with experimental testing.

  19. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  20. 138. LIQUID NITROGEN INSTRUMENT PANEL ON EAST WALL OF LIQUID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    138. LIQUID NITROGEN INSTRUMENT PANEL ON EAST WALL OF LIQUID NITROGEN CONTROL ROOM (115), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures

    E-print Network

    Brigo, Damiano

    ' liquidity risk management in relation to the risks they hold" (Basel committee on banking supervisionRisk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures GARP Seminar, London, Nov://www.capco.com/capco-insights -- Joint work with Claudio Nordio Prof. D. Brigo (Imperial College and Capco) Risk Management under

  2. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-02-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL).

  3. ELECTRONS IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    2002-10-22

    Excess electrons can be introduced into liquids by absorption of high energy radiation, by photoionization, or by photoinjection from metal surfaces. The electron's chemical and physical properties can then be measured, but this requires that the electrons remain free. That is, the liquid must be sufficiently free of electron attaching impurities for these studies. The drift mobility as well as other transport properties of the electron are discussed here as well as electron reactions, free-ion yields and energy levels, Ionization processes typically produce electrons with excess kinetic energy. In liquids during thermalization, where this excess energy is lost to bath molecules, the electrons travel some distance from their geminate positive ions. In general the electrons at this point are still within the coulombic field of their geminate ions and a large fraction of the electrons recombine. However, some electrons escape recombination and the yield that escapes to become free electrons and ions is termed G{sub fi}. Reported values of G{sub fi} for molecular liquids range from 0.05 to 1.1 per 100 eV of energy absorbed. The reasons for this 20-fold range of yields are discussed here.

  4. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  5. LIQUID WASTE COMPOSTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was conducted at the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park to examine the feasibility of adapting and using the sludge composting technique to compost liquid waste collected in the National Parks. This study evaluated the composting of two probl...

  6. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  7. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  8. The SNS Liquids Reflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ankner, John Francis; Tao, Xiaodong; Halbert, Candice E; Browning, Jim; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Swader, Onome A; Dadmun, Mark D; Kharlampieva, Dr. Eugenia; Sukhishvili, Prof. Svetlana A.

    2008-01-01

    The SNS Liquids Reflectometer [1], installed as one of the first instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source, has now been functional for more than a year. This instrument is designed to view liquid and solid surfaces in specular, off specular, and near-surface small angle scattering geometries. The guide system supplies 2 {angstrom} < {angstrom} < 16.5 {angstrom} neutrons at vertical incident angles ranging from 0{sup o} < {alpha}{sub i} < 5.5{sup o} for free liquid surfaces and up to 45{sup o} for solid surfaces. Three bandwidth choppers, synchronized with the spallation source and operating at 15-60 Hz, provide neutrons in bandwidths ranging from 3.5-14 {angstrom} at a fixed incident angle onto a sample. The sample stage enables all of the motions necessary for positioning liquid and solid surfaces, while the detector arm directs a position-sensitive detector to view the sample at specular or off specular angles up to 90{sup o} and can scan out of the specular plane by up to 30{sup o}.

  9. Liquid White Enamel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmar, Marge

    1985-01-01

    A secondary teacher describes how she has her students use liquid white enamel. With the enameling process, students can create lasting, exciting artwork. They can exercise an understanding of design and color while learning the value of careful, sustained craft skills. (RM)

  10. Liquid propellant densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor I. (Inventor); Petrilla, Steve P. (Inventor); Lozano, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Super cooling the cryogenic liquid propellant in a vehicle propellant tank densities the propellant allowing the vehicle propellant tank to carry more fuel in the same volume tank while lowering the vapor pressure and thus the tank operating pressure. Lowering the tank operating pressure reduces the stress and therefore allows the walls of the tank to be thinner. Both the smaller tank volume and thinner tank wall results in an overall smaller and lighter vehicle with increased payload capability. The cryogenic propellant can be supercooled well below the normal boiling point temperature level by transporting the liquid propellant from the vehicle tanks to a ground based cooling unit which utilizes a combination of heat exchanger and compressor. The compressor lowers the coolant fluid bath pressure resulting in a low temperature boiling liquid which is subsequently used to cool the recirculating liquid. The cooled propellant is then returned to the vehicle propellant tank. In addition to reducing the vehicle size and weight the invention also allows location of the vent valve on the ground, elimination of on-board recirculation pumps or bleed systems, smaller and lighter engine pumps and valves, lighter and more stable ullage gas, and significant reduction in tank fill operation. All of these mentioned attributes provide lower vehicle weight and cost.

  11. Physics of liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Jens; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    Jets, i.e. collimated streams of matter, occur from the microscale up to the large-scale structure of the universe. Our focus will be mostly on surface tension effects, which result from the cohesive properties of liquids. Paradoxically, cohesive forces promote the breakup of jets, widely encountered in nature, technology and basic science, for example in nuclear fission, DNA sampling, medical diagnostics, sprays, agricultural irrigation and jet engine technology. Liquid jets thus serve as a paradigm for free-surface motion, hydrodynamic instability and singularity formation leading to drop breakup. In addition to their practical usefulness, jets are an ideal probe for liquid properties, such as surface tension, viscosity or non-Newtonian rheology. They also arise from the last but one topology change of liquid masses bursting into sprays. Jet dynamics are sensitive to the turbulent or thermal excitation of the fluid, as well as to the surrounding gas or fluid medium. The aim of this review is to provide a unified description of the fundamental and the technological aspects of these subjects.

  12. Crumpled liquid sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2010-11-01

    When a liquid jet of density ? impacts a solid disk at right angle, it expands radially into a thin sheet with velocity u and thickness h. The sheet possibly bends under the action of surface tension ? to form a stationary closed bell. For particular impacting conditions and pressure in the enclosure, spectacular stable shapes exhibiting sharp edges, sudden inflections and liquid points are observed. Those sharp wrinkles develop when the ratio We = ?u^2 h/? of the flow inertia to capillary confinement approaches a critical value Wec=2. There, the local curvature of the sheet in the direction of the flow ? diverges. However, accounting for finite thickness effects (i.e. ?h=O(1)), we show that two coexisting solutions for ? emerge, explaining the sudden inflection of the sheet, as if it were crumpled. The development of regularly spaced liquid points that form along the crumpled edge, breaking the initial axial symmetry is a consequence of the centripetal acceleration ?u^2 the liquid suffers as it flows past the edge. The resulting inertial destabilization induces thickness modulations with drapes like shapes on the sheet, forming an alternation of subcritical (WeWec) regions downstream.

  13. Cloud Liquid Water Measurements

    E-print Network

    Delene, David J.

    Water Content Probe Coil is heated to given temperature ~185 °C. Coil supplies energy in the form of Vaporization · cw - Specific Heat of Water · Tv - Boiling Temperature of Water · Ta ­ Ambient Temperature #12 of Vaporization · cw - Specific Heat of Water · Tv ­ Water Boiling Temperature Solve for Liquid Water Content · P

  14. Clean room wiping liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1991-12-01

    A water-based liquid containing isopropyl alcohol, ammonium hydroxide, and surfactants was developed to replace 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane for the dampening of clean room wiping cloths used to wipe clean benches, clean room equipment, and latex finger cots and gloves.

  15. Strongly Coupled Plasma Liquids

    E-print Network

    Z. Donko; P. Hartmann; G. J. Kalman

    2007-10-27

    This paper intends to review some of the prominent properties of strongly coupled classical plasmas having in mind the possible link with the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions. Thermodynamic and transport properties of classical liquid-state one-component plasmas are described and features of collective excitations are presented.

  16. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Wei-Jun

    2003-01-01

    When two liquid drops come into contact, a neck forms between them and grows rapidly. We are interested in the very early stage of the coalescence process, which can be characterized by the time dependence of the radius of the neck. The functional dependence of the size of the neck on time depends on the properties of the liquid. Experimentally, we are investigating a liquid in Stokes flow regime where the viscosity provides the principal retarding force to the surface tension. Recently, it has been predicted that the neck radius should change as t ln|t| in this regime. Theoretically, we have studied the situation when the velocity at each point on the surface is proportional to the local curvature and directed normal to the surface. This is the case that should be applicable to superfluid helium at low temperature when the mean free path of the thermal excitations are comparable to the size of liquid drops. For this system, the radius of the neck is found to be proportional to t(sup 1/3). We are able to find a simple expression for the shape of the interface in the vicinity of the neck.

  17. Properties of Liquid Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Freibert, Franz J.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Schwartz, Daniel S.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Migliori, Albert

    2012-08-02

    Unalloyed polycrystalline Pu displays extreme thermal expansion behavior, i.e., {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} increases by 25% in volume and {delta} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid decreases by 4.5% in volume. Thus, making it difficult to measure density into the liquid state. Dilatometer outfitted with CaF molten metal cell offers a proven capability to measure thermal expansion in molten metals, but has yet to be proven for Pu. Historic data from the liquid nuclear fuels program will prove extremely useful as a guide to future measurements. 3.3at% Ga changes Pu molten metal properties: 50% increase in viscosity and {approx}3% decrease in density. Fe may decrease the density by a small amount assuming an averaging of densities for Pu-Ga and Pu-Fe liquids. More recent Boivineau (2009) work needs some interpretation, but technique is being employed in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} nuclear fuels program (Pu Futures, 2012).

  18. Liquid Phase Heating Systems 

    E-print Network

    Mordt, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    excessive. Here, the High Temperature/Low Pressure (HT/LP) organic thermal liquids are applicable. The higher the temperature, the greater the potential fuel savings over a conventional steam system. Less expensive low pressure heat users may be used. Water...

  19. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  20. Ionic liquids in chemical engineering.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sebastian; Haumann, Marco; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The development of engineering applications with ionic liquids stretches back to the mid-1990s when the first examples of continuous catalytic processes using ionic liquids and the first studies of ionic liquid-based extractions were published. Ever since, the use of ionic liquids has seen tremendous progress in many fields of chemistry and engineering, and the first commercial applications have been reported. The main driver for ionic liquid engineering applications is to make practical use of their unique property profiles, which are the result of a complex interplay of coulombic, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. Remarkably, many ionic liquid properties can be tuned in a wide range by structural modifications at their cation and anion. This review highlights specific examples of ionic liquid applications in catalysis and in separation technologies. Additionally, the application of ionic liquids as working fluids in process machines is introduced. PMID:22432579

  1. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  2. Colloids at liquid crystal interfaces 

    E-print Network

    Pawsey, Anne Claire

    2014-06-28

    This thesis presents a study of colloidal particles dispersed in thermotropic liquid crystals. It has a specific focus on colloids in the presence of an interface between the liquid crystal and an isotropic fluid. Three ...

  3. Black Liquid Solar Collector Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichman, F. L.; Austen, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the details of constructing, and use of, a solar collector. Uses a black liquid to absorb the energy, the thermosyphon effect to drive the liquid through the collector, and a floodlamp as a surrogate sun. (GA)

  4. Rockets using Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    It is my task to discuss rocket propulsion using liquid oxygen and my treatment must be highly condensed for the ideas and experiments pertaining to this classic type of rocket are so numerous that one could occupy a whole morning with a detailed presentation. First, with regard to oxygen itself as compared with competing oxygen carriers, it is known that the liquid state of oxygen, in spite of the low boiling point, is more advantageous than the gaseous form of oxygen in pressure tanks, therefore only liquid oxygen need be compared with the oxygen carriers. The advantages of liquid oxygen are absolute purity and unlimited availability at relatively small cost in energy. The disadvantages are those arising from the impossibility of absolute isolation from heat; consequently, allowance must always be made for a certain degree of vaporization and only vented vessels can be used for storage and transportation. This necessity alone eliminates many fields of application, for example, at the front lines. In addition, liquid oxygen has a lower specific weight than other oxygen carriers, therefore many accessories become relatively larger and heavier in the case of an oxygen rocket, for example, the supply tanks and the pumps. The advantages thus become effective only in those cases where definitely scheduled operation and a large ground organization are possible and when the flight requires a great concentration of energy relative to weight. With the aim of brevity, a diagram of an oxygen rocket will be presented and the problem of various component parts that receive particularly thorough investigation in this classic case but which are also often applicable to other rocket types will be referred to.

  5. Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  6. 3-Methylpiperidinium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Belhocine, Tayeb; Forsyth, Stewart A; Gunaratne, H Q Nimal; Nieuwenhuyzen, Mark; Nockemann, Peter; Puga, Alberto V; Seddon, Kenneth R; Srinivasan, Geetha; Whiston, Keith

    2015-04-28

    A wide range of room temperature ionic liquids based on the 3-methylpiperdinium cation core were produced from 3-methylpiperidine, which is a derivative of DYTEK® A amine. First, reaction with 1-bromoalkanes or 1-bromoalkoxyalkanes generated the corresponding tertiary amines (Rm?pip, R = alkyl or alkoxyalkyl); further quaternisation reactions with the appropriate methylating agents yielded the quaternary [Rmm?pip]X salts (X(-) = I(-), [CF3CO2](-) or [OTf](-); Tf = -SO2CF3), and [Rmm?pip][NTf2] were prepared by anion metathesis from the corresponding iodides. All [NTf2](-) salts are liquids at room temperature. [Rmm?pip]X (X(-) = I(-), [CF3CO2](-) or [OTf](-)) are low-melting solids when R = alkyl, but room temperature liquids upon introduction of ether functionalities on R. Neither of the 3-methylpiperdinium ionic liquids showed any signs of crystallisation, even well below 0 °C. Some related non-C-substituted piperidinium and pyrrolidinium analogues were prepared and studied for comparison. Crystal structures of 1-hexyl-1,3-dimethylpiperidinium tetraphenylborate, 1-butyl-3-methylpiperidinium bromide, 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylpiperidinium chloride and 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylpyrrolidinium bromide are reported. Extensive structural and physical data are collected and compared to literature data, with special emphasis on the systematic study of the cation ring size and/or asymmetry effects on density, viscosity and ionic conductivity, allowing general trends to be outlined. Cyclic voltammetry shows that 3-methylpiperidinium ionic liquids, similarly to azepanium, piperidinium or pyrrolidinium counterparts, are extremely electrochemically stable; the portfolio of useful alternatives for safe and high-performing electrolytes is thus greatly extended. PMID:25669485

  7. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  8. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    SciTech Connect

    Abbin, J.P.; Andrake, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  9. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko; David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2007-05-08

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  10. Stability of Magnetically Levitated Liquid Bridges of Arbitrary Volume Subjected to Axial and Lateral Gravity

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Philip L.

    Stability of Magnetically Levitated Liquid Bridges of Arbitrary Volume Subjected to Axial in water was used to form bridges held between two parallel collinear rods. Magnetic levitation was used bridge; magnetic levitation; Bond number. INTRODUCTION A liquid bridge supported by two circular disks

  11. Large and Small (Far and Near) Liquid Argon Detectors for Accelerator-Based Neutrino Physics

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    industry support for production, purification and storage of large quantities of liquid argon. Liquid. · Pixel size: 3 mm × 3 mm (wire planes) × 0.6 mm (via 400 ns time sampling). · = 1.4 g/cm3 , T = 89K at 1

  12. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the operating activities, upgrade activities, maintenance, and other activities regarding liquid and gaseous low level radioactive waste management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits, tours, and environmental restoration support.

  13. 21 CFR 862.2250 - Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mixture. Each of the constituents in a vaporized mixture of compounds is separated according to its vapor pressure. The device may include accessories such as columns, gases, column supports, and liquid...

  14. 21 CFR 862.2250 - Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mixture. Each of the constituents in a vaporized mixture of compounds is separated according to its vapor pressure. The device may include accessories such as columns, gases, column supports, and liquid...

  15. 21 CFR 862.2250 - Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mixture. Each of the constituents in a vaporized mixture of compounds is separated according to its vapor pressure. The device may include accessories such as columns, gases, column supports, and liquid...

  16. 21 CFR 862.2250 - Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mixture. Each of the constituents in a vaporized mixture of compounds is separated according to its vapor pressure. The device may include accessories such as columns, gases, column supports, and liquid...

  17. 21 CFR 862.2250 - Gas liquid chromatography system for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mixture. Each of the constituents in a vaporized mixture of compounds is separated according to its vapor pressure. The device may include accessories such as columns, gases, column supports, and liquid...

  18. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  19. MATERIAL TESTING OF LIQUID METAL

    E-print Network

    Huang, Wei

    16 MATERIAL TESTING OF LIQUID METAL STRAIN GAUGES BY MICHAEL TREPTE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE, DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING KEYWORDS: LIQUID METAL STRAIN GAUGE, HYPERSONIC be collected to ensure they will behave in a predictable manner. Liquid metal strain gauges (LMSGs), commonly

  20. Liquid Foams and K. Brakke

    E-print Network

    Brakke, Ken

    Liquid Foams D. Weaire, ¢¡ S.J. Cox ¤£ and K. Brakke¥ ¦ Department of Physics, Trinity College. Abstract The elegant structure of a liquid foam and its constituent parts have fascinated scientists, particularly for wet foams. 1 The structure of a liquid foam In 1873 the blind Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau

  1. Liquid/Gas Flow Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabris, Gracio

    1994-01-01

    Improved devices mix gases and liquids into bubbly or foamy flows. Generates flowing, homogeneous foams or homogeneous dispersions of small, noncoalescing bubbles entrained in flowing liquids. Mixers useful in liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic electric-power generator, froth flotation in mining industry, wastewater treatment, aerobic digestion, and stripping hydrocarbon contaminants from ground water.

  2. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  3. Liquid-Hydrogen Polygeneration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minderman, P.; Gutkowski, G.; Manfredi, L.; King, J.; Howard, F.

    1986-01-01

    Polygeneration system uses existing technology in integrated process to produce liquid hydrogen space-vehicle propellant and secondary products as gaseous nitrogen, electrical energy, and thermal energy. Makes commercial launch services economical. Lowers expected cost of liquid hydrogen by utilizing relatively cheap coal feedstocks and by reducing electrical costs associated with producing liquid hydrogen.

  4. Southern Hemisphere Craters on Mars with Possible Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobitz, B. M.; McKay, C. P.; Averner, M. M.

    2003-05-01

    Russell Crater (54.5S, 12.5E) is a 200-km crater in the southern highlands of Mars. While the carter rim is about 1.5 km in elevation, the crater surface is at 0 km elevation and hence the pressure there is above the triple point of liquid water (0.61 kPa). Using MOLA high resolution data and the Viking lander surface pressure measurements we have computed the expected pressure in craters in the southern hemisphere through the martian year. We have coupled this with direct measurements of temperature from TES to determine possible sites for liquid water in crater bottoms. We compare the distribution of sites for liquid water stability with the distribution of gullies. MOC or THEMIS images of these crater bottoms potentially can reveal surface morphology that confirm the presence of liquid water in these craters. This work was supported in part by NASA's Fundamental Space Biology Program.

  5. Temperature-dependent structural heterogeneity in calcium silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmore, C. J.; Weber, J. K. R.; Wilding, M. C.; Du, J.; Parise, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    X-ray diffraction measurements performed on aerodynamically levitated CaSiO3 droplets have been interpreted using a structurally heterogeneous liquid-state model. When cooled, the high-temperature liquid shows evidence of the polymerization of edge shared Ca octahedra. Diffraction isosbestic points are used to characterize the polymerization process in the pair-distribution function. This behavior is linear in the high-temperature melt but exhibits rapid growth just above the glass transition temperature around 1.2Tg . The heterogeneous liquid interpretation is supported by molecular-dynamics simulations which show the CaSiO3 glass has more edge-shared polyhedra and fewer corner shared polyhedra than the liquid model.

  6. Direct determination of chlorophenols in water samples through ultrasound-assisted hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction on-line coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yu-Ying; Tu, Yi-Ming; Jian, Zhi-Xuan; Wang, Hsaio-Wen; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2013-01-01

    In this study we on-line coupled hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (HF-LLLME), assisted by an ultrasonic probe, with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this approach, the target analytes - 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 3-chlorophenol (3-CP), 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), and 3,4-dichlorophenol (3,4-DCP) - were extracted into a hollow fiber (HF) supported liquid membrane (SLM) and then back-extracted into the acceptor solution in the lumen of the HF. Next, the acceptor solution was withdrawn on-line into the HPLC sample loop connected to the HF and then injected directly into the HPLC system for analysis. We found that the chlorophenols (CPs) could diffuse quickly through two sequential extraction interfaces - the donor phase - SLM and the SLM - acceptor phase - under the assistance of an ultrasonic probe. Ultrasonication provided effective mixing of the extracted boundary layers with the bulk of the sample and it increased the driving forces for mass transfer, thereby enhancing the extraction kinetics and leading to rapid enrichment of the target analytes. We studied the effects of various parameters on the extraction efficiency, viz. the nature of the SLM and acceptor phase, the compositions of the donor and acceptor phases, the fiber length, the stirring rate, the ion strength, the sample temperature, the sonication conditions, and the perfusion flow rate. This on-line extraction method exhibited linearity (r(2)?0.998), sensitivity (limits of detection: 0.03-0.05 ?g L(-1)), and precision (RSD%?4.8), allowing the sensitive, simple, and rapid determination of CPs in aqueous solutions and water samples with a sampling time of just 2 min. PMID:23237709

  7. 46 CFR 151.03-36 - Liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid. 151.03-36 Section 151.03-36...DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-36 Liquid. In this part liquid includes...

  8. 46 CFR 151.03-36 - Liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid. 151.03-36 Section 151.03-36...DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-36 Liquid. In this part liquid includes...

  9. 46 CFR 151.03-36 - Liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid. 151.03-36 Section 151.03-36...DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-36 Liquid. In this part liquid includes...

  10. 46 CFR 151.03-36 - Liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid. 151.03-36 Section 151.03-36...DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-36 Liquid. In this part liquid includes...

  11. 46 CFR 151.03-36 - Liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid. 151.03-36 Section 151.03-36...DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-36 Liquid. In this part liquid includes...

  12. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo; Anhui Provincial Key Lab of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009

    2014-03-15

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  13. Tubular optical microcavities of indefinite medium for sensitive liquid refractometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiwei; Fang, Yangfu; Liu, Zhaowei; Zhou, Lei; Mei, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Optical microcavities enable circulated light to intensively interact with a detecting liquid, thus promising high sensitivity in fluidic refractometers. Based on Mie scattering theory, we propose a tubular metamaterial device for liquid sensing, which utilizes anisotropic metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion called indefinite media (IM). Besides traditional whispering gallery modes (WGMs), such tubular cavities can support surface plasmon polariton (SPP) WGMs, enabling high sensitivity liquid detection. Three configurations of such metamaterial tubes for sensing are discussed: tube-in-liquid, hollow-tube-in-liquid and liquid-in-tube; these are analyzed using numerical formulas and compared with dielectric and metal materials. Compared with traditional dielectric media (DM), the IM tubular cavity exhibits a higher sensitivity (S), which is close to that of a metal tubular cavity. However, compared with metal media, such an IM cavity can achieve higher quality (Q) factors similar to the DM tubular cavity. Therefore, the IM tubular cavity can offer the highest figures of merit (QS) for the sensing performance among the three types of materials. Our results suggest a novel tubular optofluidic device based on metamaterials, which could be useful for liquid refractometers. PMID:26605851

  14. Child Support Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2002 of the Child Support Report, which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  15. Child Support Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2001 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  16. Child Support Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 1999 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Editorials and information on events and conferences of interest and funding…

  17. Child Support Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Phil, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document comprises the 12 issues for 2000 of the "Child Support Report," which explores problems related to child support enforcement, reports on federal and state government child support enforcement initiatives, and summarizes research related to child support. Featured regularly are editorials and information on events of interest and…

  18. Liquid Acquisition Device Testing with Sub-Cooled Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.; McQuillen, John B.

    2008-01-01

    When transferring propellant in space, it is most efficient to transfer single phase liquid from a propellant tank to an engine. In earth s gravity field or under acceleration, propellant transfer is fairly simple. However, in low gravity, withdrawing single-phase fluid becomes a challenge. A variety of propellant management devices (PMD) are used to ensure single-phase flow. One type of PMD, a liquid acquisition device (LAD) takes advantage of capillary flow and surface tension to acquire liquid. Previous experimental test programs conducted at NASA have collected LAD data for a number of cryogenic fluids, including: liquid nitrogen (LN2), liquid oxygen (LOX), liquid hydrogen (LH2), and liquid methane (LCH4). The present work reports on additional testing with sub-cooled LOX as part of NASA s continuing cryogenic LAD development program. Test results extend the range of LOX fluid conditions examined, and provide insight into factors affecting predicting LAD bubble point pressures.

  19. King cobra genome supporting information SUPPORTING INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Castoe, Todd A.

    King cobra genome supporting information 1 SUPPORTING INFORMATION 1. SI MATERIALS AND METHODS 1.1 King cobra tissue acquisitions and processing All animal procedures complied with local king cobra that originated from Bali, Indonesia. Blood was obtained by caudal puncture and frozen

  20. Technical Support For Cisco Unity Connection support,

    E-print Network

    Stoiciu, Mihai

    Technical Support For Cisco Unity Connection support, contact 4090 or 413-597-4090, or send an email to telecom@williams.edu. TIP: If you forget your phone password, log on to the Cisco PCA and browse to the Change Phone Password page in the Cisco Unity Assistant to change it. The Cisco PCA URL

  1. Fuel transfer manipulator for liquid metal nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sturges Jr., R. H.

    1984-11-27

    A manipulator for transferring fuel assemblies between inclined fuel chutes for a liquid metal nuclear reactor. Hoisting means are mounted on a mount supported by beams rotatably attached by pins to the mount and to the floor. Rotation of the beams can be impelled by a one dimensional movement causing the manipulator to accomplish a complicated, two dimensional transfer.

  2. 14. VIEW OF THE LIQUID CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS. THE FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF THE LIQUID CHEMICAL STORAGE TANKS. THE FLOOR IS SURFACED WITH STAINLESS STEEL TO CONTAIN SPILLS AND FACILITATE CLEANING. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  3. Low heat-gain cryogenic-liquid transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hows, G. E.; Wright, B. J.

    1970-01-01

    Cryogenic-liquid transfer system, containing a ring structure with tensioned small diameter, high strength wires, provides adequate physical support for the piping, minimizes the conductive heat paths between the piping and jacket, and allows for thermal expansion and contraction of the piping.

  4. On the identification of liquid surface properties using liquid bridges.

    PubMed

    Kostoglou, M; Karapantsios, T D

    2015-08-01

    The term liquid bridge refers to the specific silhouette of a liquid volume when it is placed between two solid surfaces. Liquid bridges have been studied extensively both theoretically and experimentally during the last century due to their significance in many technological applications. It is worth noticing that even today new technological applications based on liquid bridges continue to appear. A liquid bridge has a well-defined surface configuration dictated by a rigid theoretical foundation so the potential of its utilization as a tool to study surface properties of liquids is apparent. However, it is very scarce in literature that the use of liquid bridges is suggested as an alternative to the well-established drop techniques (pendant/sessile drop). The present work (i) presents the theoretical background for setting up a liquid-bridge based surface property estimation problem, (ii) describes the required experimental equipment and procedures and (iii) performs a thorough literature review on the subject. A case with particular interest is that of liquid bridges made of electrically conducting liquids forming between two conducting solids; such a liquid bridge presents an integral electrical conductance value which is sensitive to the specific silhouette of the bridge. This enables the use of this integral conductance as shape descriptor instead of the conventional image processing techniques. Several attempts in literature for the estimation of liquid surface tension, liquid-solid contact angle and surfactant induced surface elasticity for conducting or non/conducting liquids are presented and the prospects of the technique are discussed. PMID:24819725

  5. Key comparison of liquid density standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Christian; Zelenka, Zoltan; Kajastie, Heikki; Madec, Tanguy; Wolf, Henning; Vámossy, Csilla; Lorefice, Salvatore; Garberg, Torgunn; Lenard, El?bieta; Spohr, Isabel; Mares, Gabriela; Spurný, Robert; Lumbreras, Angel; Medina, Nieves; Y Akçada?, Ümit; Perkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hydrostatic density determination for liquids is mainly performed by laboratories to provide means for calibrating liquid density measuring instruments such as oscillation-type density meters. From 2002 to 2005 the CIPM key comparison CCM.D-K2 'comparison of liquid density standards' was carried out piloted by the PTB. The aim was to compare the results of the density determination by the participating laboratories to support entries to the CMC tables in this sub-field. To provide further laboratories the possibility to support their entries to the CMC tables at the meeting of the EUROMET Working Group on Density in 2007 this comparison was agreed on. BEV (Austria) organized the comparison supported by the PTB (Germany). For the comparison samples of pentadecane, water, tetrachloroethylene and of an oil of high viscosity were measured in the temperature range from 5 °C to 60 °C at atmospheric pressure by hydrostatic weighing. The measurements were completed in 2008. The reference values of the first reports based on the draft of the CCM.D-K2. After the official publication of the CCM.D-K2 the reference values were recalculated and the report was finalised in 2015. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kershaw, J.R. )

    1989-01-01

    This book reviews the analysis of coal-derived liquids by modern spectroscopic techniques. All the major techniques used in the analysis of coal liquids are included with detailed chapters on mass, infrared, ultraviolet and luminescence, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Each method is critically evaluated and the limitations and problems that the complexity of typical coal liquids impose on each technique are discussed. The book also includes a discussion of solvent fractionation, chromatographic separations, and the pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of coal liquids. A detailed review of the composition of coal liquids from various coal liquefaction processes and a brief introduction to coal science are also included.

  7. Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Aladiev, I. T.; Dzhamardzhashvili, V. A.

    1981-09-01

    A liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic converter is described that is comprised of such hydraulically interconnected components as a heat source, a two-phase nozzle, a separator, a liquid diffuser, a liquid metal cooler, a magnetohydrodynamic generator and a means for heating and delivering liquid metal supplied from the cooler, all of said components being arranged successively so as to form a loop. A steam diffuser and a condenser are interconnected and hydraulically coupled to the separator and the means for heating and delivering liquid metal supplied from the cooler, respectively.

  8. Solid-Liquid and Liquid-Liquid Mixing Laboratory for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pour, Sanaz Barar; Norca, Gregory Benoit; Fradette, Louis; Legros, Robert; Tanguy, Philippe A.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-liquid and liquid-liquid mixing experiments have been developed to provide students with a practical experience on suspension and emulsification processes. The laboratory focuses on the characterization of the process efficiency, specifically the influence of the main operating parameters and the effect of the impeller type. (Contains 2…

  9. Device for holding and supplying with liquid metal an assembly for a nuclear reactor core

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaud, G.; Chiarelli, G.

    1982-10-05

    The fuel assembly is supported by means of a cylindrical supporting member which is introduced into a shore of the crossmember. The foot of the fuel assembly is introduced into the upper part of the cross-member. Orifices, coinciding with those made with the shore permit the introduction of the liquid metal into the supporting member and from there into the actual assembly. The supporting member is closed at its lower end. Application to the construction of the core of a fast neutron nuclear cooled with liquid sodium.

  10. Liquid hydrogen foil-bearing turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbrech, Richard J.; Gu, Alston; Rigney, Tom; Saville, Marshall; Rossoni, Mike

    1993-01-01

    The testing and performance evaluation of a liquid hydrogen turbopump with the rotor supported by foil bearings is discussed. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the long-life feature of a foil-bearing turbopump and to evaluate its operational characteristics. The demonstration has successfully shown the reliability, long life, and robust nature of foil-bearing turbopumps by operating for long periods of time, with many start and stop cycles and a wide speed range. It has also proven that foil-bearing turbopumps can start without total chilldown of the foil bearing, offering operational simplicity.

  11. Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lielpeteris, J. ); ))

    1989-01-01

    Liquid metal MHD is the subject of this book. It is of central importance in fields like metals processing, energy conversion, nuclear engineering (fast breeders or fusion reactors), geomagnetism and astrophysics. In some circumstances fluid flow phenomena are controlled by an existing magnetic field; the melts in induction furnaces or the liquid metal blanket around future tokamak fusion reactors being significant examples. In other cases the application of an external magnetic field (or of an electric current) may generate drastic modifications in the fluid motion and in the transfer rates; such effects may be used to develop new technologies (electromagnetic shaping) or to improve existing techniques (electromagnetic stirring in continuous casting). In the core of the Earth, fluid motion and magnetic fields are both present and their interaction governs important phenomena.

  12. Electrowetting of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Millefiorini, Stefano; Tkaczyk, Alan H; Sedev, Rossen; Efthimiadis, Jim; Ralston, John

    2006-03-01

    We have successfully demonstrated that imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based commercial room-temperature ionic liquids can electrowet (with a dc voltage) a smooth fluoropolymer (Teflon AF1600) surface. Qualitatively, the process is analogous to the electrowetting of aqueous electrolyte solutions: the contact angle versus voltage curve has a parabolic shape which saturates at larger voltages (positive or negative). On the other hand we observed several peculiarities: (i) the efficiency is significantly lower (by about an order of magnitude); (ii) the influence of the bulky cation is larger and the importance of the smaller anion is lesser, especially with respect to electrowetting saturation; (iii) there is an asymmetry in the saturation contact angles found for positive and negative voltages. The asymmetry may be correlated with the cation-anion asymmetry of the ionic liquids. The low efficiency may be caused by the presence of water and other impurities in these commercial materials. PMID:16506791

  13. Liquid filmification from menisci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruijt, Evan; Le Guludec, Erwan; Lix, Clément; Wagner, Marc; Quéré, David

    2015-10-01

    A wetting liquid brought in contact with a solid covered by microtextures invades the network of textures and fills it, creating a liquid film whose thickness is fixed by the texture height. However, this process of filmification can be opposed by the presence of surrounding menisci, residing for instance in corners at the edges of the film. We discuss the nature to be given to the texture to overcome the negative Laplace pressure associated with menisci. We also describe how the dynamics of filmification is impacted by the design of the texture, focussing on micropillars, lines and grooves, and how it can be optimized for some texture density. We conclude by discussing the distribution of textures generating a constant velocity of filmification instead of the slowing-down classically observed in impregnation processes.

  14. Future liquid Argon detectors

    E-print Network

    A. Rubbia

    2013-03-30

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber offers an innovative technology for a new class of massive detectors for rare-event detection. It is a precise tracking device that allows three-dimensional spatial reconstruction with mm-scale precision of the morphology of ionizing tracks with the imaging quality of a "bubble chamber", provides $dE/dx$ information with high sampling rate, and acts as high-resolution calorimeter for contained events. First proposed in 1977 and after a long maturing process, its holds today the potentialities of opening new physics opportunities by providing excellent tracking and calorimetry performance at the relevant multi-kton mass scales, outperforming other techniques. In this paper, we review future liquid argon detectors presently being discussed by the neutrino physics community.

  15. What constitutes a simple liquid?

    E-print Network

    Trond S. Ingebrigtsen; Thomas B. Schrøder; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2012-01-27

    Simple liquids are traditionally defined as many-body systems of classical particles interacting via radially symmetric pair potentials. We suggest that a simple liquid should be defined instead by the property of having strong correlation between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble. There is considerable overlap between the two definitions, but also some notable differences. For instance, in the new definition simplicity is not a property of the intermolecular potential only because a liquid is usually only strongly correlating in part of its phase diagram. Moreover, according to the new definition not all simple liquids are atomic (i.e., with radially symmetric pair potentials) and not all atomic liquids are simple. The main part of the paper motivates the new definition of liquid simplicity by presenting evidence that a liquid is strongly correlating if and only if its intermolecular interactions may be ignored beyond the first coordination shell (FCS). This is demonstrated by NVT simulations of structure and dynamics of 15 atomic and molecular model liquids with a shifted-forces cutoff placed at the first minimum of the radial distribution function. No proof is given that the chemical characterization follows from the strong correlation property, but it is shown to be consistent with the existence of isomorphs in strongly correlating liquids' phase diagram. Finally, we note that the FCS characterization of simple liquids calls into question the basis for standard perturbation theory, according to which the repulsive and attractive forces play fundamentally different roles for the physics of liquids.

  16. Classical Liquids in Fractal Dimension

    E-print Network

    Marco Heinen; Simon K. Schnyder; John F. Brady; Hartmut Löwen

    2015-08-28

    We introduce fractal liquids by generalizing classical liquids of integer dimensions $d = 1, 2, 3$ to a fractal dimension $d_f$. The particles composing the liquid are fractal objects and their configuration space is also fractal, with the same non-integer dimension. Realizations of our generic model system include microphase separated binary liquids in porous media, and highly branched liquid droplets confined to a fractal polymer backbone in a gel. Here we study the thermodynamics and pair correlations of fractal liquids by computer simulation and semi-analytical statistical mechanics. Our results are based on a model where fractal hard spheres move on a near-critical percolating lattice cluster. The predictions of the fractal Percus-Yevick liquid integral equation compare well with our simulation results.

  17. Liquid manipulation via morphological transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Gurevich, Evgeny; Herminghaus, Stephan; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Decre, Michel

    2006-03-01

    Liquid deposited on rectangular grooves, has a variety of possible liquid morphologies determined by the contact angle, ?, and the exact channel geometry. In our experiments, electrowetting is used to tune ? reversibly from 100 to 50 ^o, leading to a reversible transition between a drop- like morphology at large ? and extended liquid filaments for small ?. The transition is capillarity-driven but the behavior of the liquid above the transition is influenced by the electrical properties of the liquid. The static length of the liquid filament is a function of the applied Voltage and is in perfect agreement with a simple transmission-line model. Emphasis is put on the dynamic aspects of the filling and the draining behavior that follow a modified Washburn law. In case of thin and elastic ridges separating two grooves the cross talk of the liquid morphologies with the elastic substrate has an ordering effect on the position of the droplets.

  18. RHIC The Perfect Liquid

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    Evidence to date suggests that gold-gold collisions the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are indeed creating a new state of hot, dense matter, but one quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions appears to be more like a "perfect" liquid.

  19. Liquid fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented. PMID:25247123

  20. Liquids with permanent porosity.

    PubMed

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F Costa; Cooper, Andrew I; James, Stuart L

    2015-11-12

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption-desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble 'scrambled' porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities. PMID:26560299

  1. Liquids with permanent porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Nicola; Del Pópolo, Mario G.; Melaugh, Gavin; Greenaway, Rebecca L.; Rätzke, Klaus; Koschine, Tönjes; Pison, Laure; Gomes, Margarida F. Costa; Cooper, Andrew I.; James, Stuart L.

    2015-11-01

    Porous solids such as zeolites and metal–organic frameworks are useful in molecular separation and in catalysis, but their solid nature can impose limitations. For example, liquid solvents, rather than porous solids, are the most mature technology for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide because liquid circulation systems are more easily retrofitted to existing plants. Solid porous adsorbents offer major benefits, such as lower energy penalties in adsorption–desorption cycles, but they are difficult to implement in conventional flow processes. Materials that combine the properties of fluidity and permanent porosity could therefore offer technological advantages, but permanent porosity is not associated with conventional liquids. Here we report free-flowing liquids whose bulk properties are determined by their permanent porosity. To achieve this, we designed cage molecules that provide a well-defined pore space and that are highly soluble in solvents whose molecules are too large to enter the pores. The concentration of unoccupied cages can thus be around 500 times greater than in other molecular solutions that contain cavities, resulting in a marked change in bulk properties, such as an eightfold increase in the solubility of methane gas. Our results provide the basis for development of a new class of functional porous materials for chemical processes, and we present a one-step, multigram scale-up route for highly soluble ‘scrambled’ porous cages prepared from a mixture of commercially available reagents. The unifying design principle for these materials is the avoidance of functional groups that can penetrate into the molecular cage cavities.

  2. RHIC The Perfect Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Evidence to date suggests that gold-gold collisions the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are indeed creating a new state of hot, dense matter, but one quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions appears to be more like a "perfect" liquid.

  3. Lyotropic liquid crystal phases of phytantriol in a protic ionic liquid with fluorous anion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Greaves, Tamar L; Kennedy, Danielle F; Weerawardena, Asoka; Kirby, Nigel; Song, Gonghua; Drummond, Calum J

    2014-10-21

    The phase behaviour of phytantriol in the protic ionic liquid (PIL) 1-methylimidazolium pentadecafluorooctanoate (MImOF) and four different MImOF-water compositions was investigated by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS), cross polarised optical microscopy (CPOM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). MImOF is a distinct protic ionic liquid in that it contains a fluorocarbon anion and a hydrocarbon cation. This leads to MImOF having an unusual liquid nanostructure, such that it contains fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and polar domains. No lyotropic liquid crystal phases were observed for phytantriol in neat MImOF. However, on addition of water, lamellar, cubic Ia3¯d and micellar phases were observed for specific MImOF-phytantriol-water compositions at room temperature, and up to 60 °C. The phase behaviour for phytantriol in the solvent mixture of 25 wt%-MImOF-75 wt%-water was the most similar to the phytantriol-water phase diagram. Only this MImOF-water composition supported the Ia3¯d cubic phase, which had a lattice parameter between 100-140 Å compared to 86-100 Å in deionised water, indicating significant swelling due to the MImOF. IR spectroscopy showed that a percentage of the water molecules were hydrogen bonded to the N-H of the MIm cation, and this water decreased the hydrogen bonding present between the cation and anion of the ionic liquid. This investigation furthers our understanding of the interaction of ionic liquids with solutes, and the important role that the different IL nanostructures can have on influencing these interactions. PMID:25177837

  4. Sliding Luttinger Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Charles

    2002-03-01

    The classification of non Fermi liquid phases in two dimensions remains a difficult problem. In this talk we consider an anisotropic system consisting of an array of weakly coupled one dimensional wires, which may be studied using the powerful technique of 1D bosonization. This anisotropic limit may be of relevance to the stripe phases of high temperature superconductors as well as stripes in the quantum Hall effect. For a range of forward scattering interactions the coupling between the wires is shown to be irrelevant, leading to a novel ``smectic metal", or ``sliding Luttinger liquid" (SLL) phase, which is the quantum analog of sliding phases of coupled classical XY models. The anisotropic transport properties of this phase exhibit power law singularities characteristic of the 1D Luttinger liquid. We go on to show that even when the SLL phase is unstable, the SLL fixed point provides a useful starting point for describing other strongly correlated states in 2D. In particular, we show that in a perpendicular magnetic field our approach provides an elegant new formulation of the fractional quantum Hall effect. This theory describes the gap structure, edge states and quasiparticle excitations for the entire hierarchy of the quantum Hall effect, as well novel crystals of Laughlin quasiparticles.

  5. Living liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed “active fluid,” has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter––living liquid crystals (LLCs)––that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  6. Living Liquid Crystals

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Shuang; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Aranson, Igor S

    2013-01-01

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles often termed active fluid has attracted enormous attention in broad scientific community because of it fundamentally non-equilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here we introduce a new class of active matter, living liquid crystals (LLCs) that combine living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of new intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (a) non-linear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by non-uniform director, (b) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (c) activity-triggered transition from a non-flowing uniform state ...

  7. Liquid Crystals in Tribology

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered. PMID:19865534

  8. Aging of SRC liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, T.; Jones, L.; Tewari, K. C.; Li, N. C.

    1981-02-01

    The viscosity of SRC-LL liquid increases when subjected to accelerated aging by bubbling oxygen in the presence of copper strip at 62°C. Precipitates are formed and can be separated from the aged liquid by Soxhlet extraction with pentane. A 30-70 blend of SRC-I with SRC-LL was subjected to oxygen aging in the absence of copper, and the viscosity increased dramatically after 6 days at 62°. The content of preasphaltene and its molecular size increase with time of aging, accompanied by decrease of asphaltene and pentane-soluble contents. For the preasphaltene fraction on aging, gel permeation chromatography shows formation of larger particles. ESR experiments show that with oxygen aging, spin concentration in the preasphaltene fraction decreases. Perhaps some semiquinone, together with di- and tri-substituted phenoxy radicals, generated by oxygen aging of the coal liquid, interact with the free radicals already present in coal to yield larger particles and reduce free radical concentration. We are currently using the very high-field (600-MHz) NMR spectrometer at Mellon Institute to determine changes in structural parameters before and after aging of SRC-II and its chromatographically separated fractions.

  9. Liquid Hydrogen: Target, Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Harigel, G.G.

    2004-06-23

    In 1952 D. Glaser demonstrated that a radioactive source's radiation could boil 135 deg. C superheated-diethyl ether in a 3-mm O glass vessel and recorded bubble track growth on high-speed film in a 2-cm3 chamber. This Bubble Chamber (BC) promised improved particle track time and spatial resolution and cycling rate. Hildebrand and Nagle, U of Chicago, reported Liquid Hydrogen minimum ionizing particle boiling in August 1953. John Wood created the 3.7-cm O Liquid Hydrogen BC at LBL in January 1954. By 1959 the Lawrence Berkley Laboratory (LBL) Alvarez group's '72-inch' BC had tracks in liquid hydrogen. Within 10 years bubble chamber volumes increased by a factor of a million and spread to every laboratory with a substantial high-energy physics program. The BC, particle accelerators and special separated particle beams created a new era of High Energy Physics (HEP) experimentation. The BC became the largest most complex cryogenic installation at the world's HEP laboratories for decades. The invention and worldwide development, deployment and characteristics of these cryogenic dynamic target/detectors and related hydrogen targets are described.

  10. Electrowetting of liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, M. I.; Herbertson, D. L.; Elliott, S. J.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.

    2007-01-01

    Electrowetting of water drops on structured superhydrophobic surfaces are known to cause an irreversible change from a slippy (Cassie-Baxter) to a sticky (Wenzel) regime. An alternative approach to using a water drop on a superhydrophobic surface to obtain a non-wetting system is to use a liquid marble on a smooth solid substrate. A liquid marble is a droplet coated in hydrophobic grains, which therefore carries its own solid surface structure as a conformal coating. Such droplets can be considered as perfect non-wetting systems having contact angles to smooth solid substrates of close to 180°. In this work we report the electrowetting of liquid marbles made of water coated with hydrophobic lycopodium grains and show that the electrowetting is completely reversible. Marbles are shown to return to their initial contact angle for both ac and dc electrowetting and without requiring a threshold voltage to be exceeded. Furthermore, we provide a proof-of-principle demonstration that controlled motion of marbles on a finger electrode structure is possible.

  11. Liquid belt radiator design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teagan, W. P.; Fitzgerald, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Liquid Belt Radiator (LBR) is an advanced concept developed to meet the needs of anticipated future space missions. A previous study documented the advantages of this concept as a lightweight, easily deployable alternative to present day space heat rejection systems. The technical efforts associated with this study concentrate on refining the concept of the LBR as well as examining the issues of belt dynamics and potential application of the LBR to intermediate and high temperature heat rejection applications. A low temperature point design developed in previous work is updated assuming the use of diffusion pump oil, Santovac-6, as the heat transfer media. Additional analytical and design effort is directed toward determining the impact of interface heat exchanger, fluid bath sealing, and belt drive mechanism designs on system performance and mass. The updated design supports the earlier result by indicating a significant reduction in system specific system mass as compared to heat pipe or pumped fluid radiator concepts currently under consideration (1.3 kg/sq m versus 5 kg/sq m).

  12. Multiple liquid-liquid critical points and density anomaly in core-softened potentials

    E-print Network

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    REV IEW CO PY N O T FO R D ISTRIBU TIO N Multiple liquid-liquid critical points and density anomaly Abstract The relation between liquid-liquid phase transitions and waterlike density anomalies in core shown to present three liquid phases, two liquid-liquid phase transitions closely connected to two

  13. Liquid-liquid phase transitions for soft-core attractive potentials A. Skibinsky,1

    E-print Network

    Franzese, Giancarlo

    Liquid-liquid phase transitions for soft-core attractive potentials A. Skibinsky,1 S. V. Buldyrev,1. In the case of a narrow attractive well, it has been shown that this potential has two metastable gas-liquid the system has both a gas-liquid critical point C1 and a liquid-liquid critical point C2. For the liquid

  14. Spiers Memorial Lecture Recent experimental advances in studies of liquid/liquid

    E-print Network

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Spiers Memorial Lecture Recent experimental advances in studies of liquid/liquid interfaces Megan And November 2004 Liquid/liquid interfaces play a key role in many important processes. Studying techniques to examine liquid/liquid interfaces. Introduction Liquid surfaces and interfaces have a central

  15. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE supported

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Progress in DOE-supported coal liquefaction pilot plant projects is reported: company, location, contract, funding, process description, history and progress in the current quarter. Related projects discussed are: coking and gasification of liquefaction plant residues, filtration of coal liquids and refining of coal liquids by hydrogenation. (LTN)

  16. Igniters for Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Robin J.; Elam, Sandra K.; Peschel, William P.

    2008-01-01

    As part of NASA's technology development of liquid methane / liquid oxygen engines for future exploration missions, two different igniters were recently studied at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The first igniter tested was an impinging injection, spark-initiated torch igniter, and the second was a microwave-generated plasma igniter. The purpose of the ignition tests was to define the ignition limits under vacuum conditions and characterize the transient start-up performance as a function of propellant mixture ratio (MR), mass flow rates, inlet temperatures, and pre-ignition chamber pressure. In addition, for the impinging igniter two different spark plugs were tested, and for the microwave igniter the magnetron filament warm-up time and the magnetron input power were both varied. The results gathered from these tests indicated that the impinging igniter is capable of operating over an MR range of 2 - 27, with methane and oxygen inlet temperatures as low as -161 F and -233 F, respectively. The microwave igniter was tested over an MR range of 2 - 9, with methane and oxygen inlet temperatures as low as -90 F and -200 F, respectively. The microwave igniter achieved ignition over this range, although an upper ignition limit was determined for the oxidizer mass flow rate. In general, the torch exhaust temperatures for the microwave igniter were not as high as those attained with the impinging igniter. The microwave igniter, however, was hot-fired 17 times and was still operational, whereas the impinging igniter spark plugs experienced thermal shock and erosion over nine hot-fire tests. It was concluded that for the microwave igniter better mixing of the propellants might be required in order to both raise the torch exhaust temperature and decrease the required magnetron input power, and for the impinging igniter the spark plug position within the igniter chamber should be varied in future tests to identify a more optimal location. All of the igniter tests were supported by the Propulsion & Cryogenics Advanced Development project, which is part of NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program.

  17. Development of Automotive Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainz, G.; Bartlok, G.; Bodner, P.; Casapicola, P.; Doeller, Ch.; Hofmeister, F.; Neubacher, E.; Zieger, A.

    2004-06-01

    Liquid hydrogen (LH2) takes up less storage volume than gas but requires cryogenic vessels. State-of-the-art applications for passenger vehicles consist of double-wall cylindrical tanks that hold a hydrogen storage mass of up to 10 kg. The preferred shell material of the tanks is stainless steel, since it is very resistant against hydrogen brittleness and shows negligible hydrogen permeation. Therefore, the weight of the whole tank system including valves and heat exchanger is more than 100 kg. The space between the inner and outer vessel is mainly used for thermal super-insulation purposes. Several layers of insulation foils and high vacuums of 10-3 Pa reduce the heat entry. The support structures, which keep the inner tank in position to the outer tank, are made of materials with low thermal conductivity, e.g. glass or carbon fiber reinforced plastics. The remaining heat in-leak leads to a boil-off rate of 1 to 3 percent per day. Active cooling systems to increase the stand-by time before evaporation losses occur are being studied. Currently, the production of several liquid hydrogen tanks that fulfill the draft of regulations of the European Integrated Hydrogen Project (EIHP) is being prepared. New concepts of lightweight liquid hydrogen storage tanks will be investigated.

  18. Measure of equilibration in Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedyeva, Mariya; Kehrein, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We consider the properties of the Luttinger liquid in the echo protocol (forward evolution in time followed by the backward evolution of slightly perturbed system) and explore the relation of the Loschmidt echo (the overlap of the initial and final wavefunctions) and the measurable properties of the system. We first study the linear Luttinger liquid as an example of an integrable system and find that the momentum distribution function exhibits almost complete recurrence while the Loschmidt echo does not, as the diagonal basis is different during the forward and backward time evolution. For a nonlinear Luttinger liquid the recurrence strength of the momentum distribution function drops as the nonlinearity of the fermion dispersion relation grows. We conclude that there is no simple relation of the Loschmidt echo to the behavior of the observables and that more work is needed to understand how to interpret the echo in the context of experiment. This work was supported through SFB 1073 (project B03) of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

  19. Emergent tilt order in zigzagging polymer liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewe, Benjamin; Souslov, Anton; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    We study a liquid of zigzagging two-dimensional polymers that have bending rigidity. These are directed polymers whose conformations lie along the paths followed by pieces on a checkerboard. We observe that in the continuum limit the statistical physics of one such polymer can be described in terms of the Dirac equation for a particle having an imaginary mass. We exploit this observation to investigate a liquid of these polymers by means of quantum many-particle techniques in imaginary-time. We treat hard-core interactions between the polymers via a transmutation of quantum particle statistics, from Bose to Fermi, and we account for additional interactions between polymers by introducing two-body interactions between the fermion particles. A self-consistent approximation predicts a phase of tilted order, i.e., the polymers may develop a spontaneous preference to zig rather than zag (or vice versa). We study this behavior analytically, computing the phase diagram and response functions for the polymer liquid, and comment on the role played by fluctuations. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant DMR 12 07026.

  20. Liquid class predictor for liquid handling of complex mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Seglke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA); Lekin, Timothy P. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A method of establishing liquid classes of complex mixtures for liquid handling equipment. The mixtures are composed of components and the equipment has equipment parameters. The first step comprises preparing a response curve for the components. The next step comprises using the response curve to prepare a response indicator for the mixtures. The next step comprises deriving a model that relates the components and the mixtures to establish the liquid classes.

  1. Morphology of Liquid-Liquid Phase Separated Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuqing; Molinero, Valeria

    2015-08-26

    The morphology of liquid-liquid phase separated aerosols has a strong impact on their rate of gas and water uptake, and the type and rate of heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere. However, it is extremely challenging to experimentally distinguish different morphologies (core-shell or partial wetting) of aerosols and to quantify the extent of wetting between the two phases. The aim of this work is to quantitatively predict the morphology of liquid-liquid aerosols from fundamental physical properties of the aerosol phases. We determine the equilibrium structure of liquid-liquid phase separated aerosols through free energy minimization and predict that the contact angle between the two liquids in the aerosol depends on the composition but not the amount of each phase. We demonstrate that for aerosols of diameter larger than ?100 nm, the equilibrium contact angle can be accurately predicted from the surface tensions of each liquid with the vapor and between the two liquids through an expression that is identical to Young's equation. The internal structure of smaller, ultrafine aerosols depends also on the value of the line tension between the two liquids and the vapor. The thermodynamic model accurately predicts the experimental morphology, core-shell or partial wetting, of all aerosols for which surface tensions are provided in the literature, and provides contact angles that cannot be accurately determined with state of the art experimental methods. We find that the contact angle of model atmospheric aerosols is rarely higher than 30°. We validate the thermodynamic predictions through molecular simulations of nonane-water droplets, and use the simulation data to compute line tension values that are in good agreement with theory and the analysis from experimental data in water-nonane droplets. Our finding of a simple analytical equation to compute the contact angle of liquid-liquid droplets should have broad application for the prediction of the morphology of two-phase atmospheric aerosols and its impact in their chemistry. PMID:26230969

  2. SUPERFUND TECHNICAL SUPPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under this task, technical support is provided to Regional Remedial Project Managers (RPMs)/On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs) at Superfund, RCRA, and Brownfields sites contaminated with hazardous materials by the Technical Support Center (TSC) for Monitoring and Site Characterization....

  3. Supported PV module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  4. Exercise support for therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, M. J.; Irick, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Constant-value weight-relieving apparatus, which moves on rollers on overhead track, supports weight of walking, stooping, squatting, or standing patient with combination of multiple pulleys and spring clusters. Individually preselected support force is constant for all movements.

  5. Fathers Can Support Breastfeeding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Fathers Supporting Breastfeeding Last Published: 12/20/2013 Email Updates Click ... in each of the materials. FATHERS CAN SUPPORT BREASTFEEDING Poster - FNS 354 Be a Part of the ...

  6. SUPERFUND REMOTE SENSING SUPPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task provides remote sensing technical support to the Superfund program. Support includes the collection, processing, and analysis of remote sensing data to characterize hazardous waste disposal sites and their history. Image analysis reports, aerial photographs, and assoc...

  7. MSUD Family Support Group

    MedlinePLUS

    Remember me Forgot login? | Register HOT NEWS Zebrafish Research Continues » As noted in Sandy Bulcher’s review of research supported by ... Projects Funded by the MSUD Family Support Group » Over the years, ...

  8. Neutral Buoyancy Portable Life Support System performance study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chi-Min; Conger, Bruce C.; Iovine, John V.

    1991-01-01

    The Neutral Buoyancy Portable Life Support System (NBPSS) has been designed to support astronaut underwater training activities associated with EVA operations. The performance of competing NBPSS configurations has been analyzed on the basis of a modified 'Metabolic Man' program. NBPSS success is dependent on the development of novel cryogen supply tank and liquid-cooling garment vaporizer. Attention is given to mass and thermal balances and the evaluation results for the vent-loop ejector and heat-exchanger designs.

  9. Culture and Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Heejung S.; Sherman, David K.; Taylor, Shelley E.

    2008-01-01

    Social support is one of the most effective means by which people can cope with stressful events. Yet little research has examined whether there are cultural differences in how people utilize their social support networks. A review of studies on culture and social support presents evidence that Asians and Asian Americans are more reluctant to…

  10. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  11. Solid-liquid critical behavior of water in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kenji; Koga, Kenichiro

    2015-07-01

    Nanoconfined liquid water can transform into low-dimensional ices whose crystalline structures are dissimilar to any bulk ices and whose melting point may significantly rise with reducing the pore size, as revealed by computer simulation and confirmed by experiment. One of the intriguing, and as yet unresolved, questions concerns the observation that the liquid water may transform into a low-dimensional ice either via a first-order phase change or without any discontinuity in thermodynamic and dynamic properties, which suggests the existence of solid-liquid critical points in this class of nanoconfined systems. Here we explore the phase behavior of a model of water in carbon nanotubes in the temperature-pressure-diameter space by molecular dynamics simulation and provide unambiguous evidence to support solid-liquid critical phenomena of nanoconfined water. Solid-liquid first-order phase boundaries are determined by tracing spontaneous phase separation at various temperatures. All of the boundaries eventually cease to exist at the critical points and there appear loci of response function maxima, or the Widom lines, extending to the supercritical region. The finite-size scaling analysis of the density distribution supports the presence of both first-order and continuous phase changes between solid and liquid. At around the Widom line, there are microscopic domains of two phases, and continuous solid-liquid phase changes occur in such a way that the domains of one phase grow and those of the other evanesce as the thermodynamic state departs from the Widom line. PMID:26100904

  12. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuhs, Bradley L.; Rounds, Mary Ann

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) developed during the 1960s as a direct offshoot of classic column liquid chromatography through improvements in the technology of columns and instrumental components (pumps, injection valves, and detectors). Originally, HPLC was the acronym for high-pressure liquid chromatography, reflecting the high operating pressures generated by early columns. By the late 1970s, however, high-performance liquid chromatography had become the preferred term, emphasizing the effective separations achieved. In fact, newer columns and packing materials offer high performance at moderate pressure (although still high pressure relative to gravity-flow liquid chromatography). HPLC can be applied to the analysis of any compound with solubility in a liquid that can be used as the mobile phase. Although most frequently employed as an analytical technique, HPLC also may be used in the preparative mode.

  13. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  14. Large Liquid Rocket Testing: Strategies and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim A.; Hebert, Bartt J.

    2005-01-01

    Rocket propulsion development is enabled by rigorous ground testing in order to mitigate the propulsion systems risks that are inherent in space flight. This is true for virtually all propulsive devices of a space vehicle including liquid and solid rocket propulsion, chemical and non-chemical propulsion, boost stage and in-space propulsion and so forth. In particular, large liquid rocket propulsion development and testing over the past five decades of human and robotic space flight has involved a combination of component-level testing and engine-level testing to first demonstrate that the propulsion devices were designed to meet the specified requirements for the Earth to Orbit launchers that they powered. This was followed by a vigorous test campaign to demonstrate the designed propulsion articles over the required operational envelope, and over robust margins, such that a sufficiently reliable propulsion system is delivered prior to first flight. It is possible that hundreds of tests, and on the order of a hundred thousand test seconds, are needed to achieve a high-reliability, flight-ready, liquid rocket engine system. This paper overviews aspects of earlier and recent experience of liquid rocket propulsion testing at NASA Stennis Space Center, where full scale flight engines and flight stages, as well as a significant amount of development testing has taken place in the past decade. The liquid rocket testing experience discussed includes testing of engine components (gas generators, preburners, thrust chambers, pumps, powerheads), as well as engine systems and complete stages. The number of tests, accumulated test seconds, and years of test stand occupancy needed to meet varying test objectives, will be selectively discussed and compared for the wide variety of ground test work that has been conducted at Stennis for subscale and full scale liquid rocket devices. Since rocket propulsion is a crucial long-lead element of any space system acquisition or development, the appropriate plan and strategy must be put in place at the outset of the development effort. A deferment of this test planning, or inattention to strategy, will compromise the ability of the development program to achieve its systems reliability requirements and/or its development milestones. It is important for the government leadership and support team, as well as the vehicle and propulsion development team, to give early consideration to this aspect of space propulsion and space transportation work.

  15. Water: The Strangest Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Anders

    2009-02-24

    Water, H2O, is familiar to everyone - it shapes our bodies and our planet. But despite its abundance, water has remained a mystery, exhibiting many strange properties that are still not understood. Why does the liquid have an unusually large capacity to store heat? And why is it denser than ice? Now, using the intense X-ray beams from particle accelerators, investigations into water are leading to fundamental discoveries about the structure and arrangement of water molecules. This lecture will elucidate the many mysteries of water and discuss current studies that are revolutionizing the way we see and understand one of the most fundamental substances of life.

  16. Simulation of liquid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Ceperley, D.M.

    1985-07-01

    The author discusses simulation methods for quantum mechanical systems at finite temperatures. Recently it has been shown that static properties of some quantum systems can be obtained by simulation in a straightforward manner using path integrals, albeit with an order of magnitude more computing effort needed than for the corresponding classical systems. Some dynamical information can be gleaned from these simulations as will be discussed below. But this is very limited - there is no quantum version of the molecular dynamics method. The path integral method is illustrated by discussing the application to liquid helium. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  17. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talcott, Stephen

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has many applications in food chemistry. Food components that have been analyzed with HPLC include organic acids, vitamins, amino acids, sugars, nitrosamines, certain pesticides, metabolites, fatty acids, aflatoxins, pigments, and certain food additives. Unlike gas chromatography, it is not necessary for the compound being analyzed to be volatile. It is necessary, however, for the compounds to have some solubility in the mobile phase. It is important that the solubilized samples for injection be free from all particulate matter, so centrifugation and filtration are common procedures. Also, solid-phase extraction is used commonly in sample preparation to remove interfering compounds from the sample matrix prior to HPLC analysis.

  18. Shock compression of preheated silicate liquids: 30 years of progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Tom Ahrens and his students pioneered, beginning around 1981, the technique of determining silicate liquid equations of state for geophysical applications using shock compression of pre-heated, encapsulated samples. In the last decade, we have ported this technique to the Caltech two-stage light gas gun and extended several pre-heated liquid Hugoniots to over 125 GPa. We now have enough compositions studied to perform several tests of the theory of linear mixing or, assuming linear mixing, to describe any liquid in the five-component CaO-MgO-FeO-Al2O3-SiO2 system. This data allows us to identify liquid compositions likely to be negatively or neutrally buoyant in the lower mantle and to form a preliminary description of the dynamics of partial melting of solid lower mantle or initial crystallization of a deep mantle magma ocean. The most robust and surprising feature of all studied liquids, which places very strong constraints on microscopic models for silicate liquid compression behavior, is anomalous increase of the Grüneisen parameter upon compression, with remarkably consistent q = dln ?/dlnV = -1.75 +/- 0.25. Thanks to long-term support by the National Science Foundation.

  19. Cavitating Jet Method and System for Oxygenation of Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Georges L.

    2012-01-01

    Reclamation and re-use of water is critical for space-based life support systems. A number of functions must be performed by any such system including removal of various contaminants and oxygenation. For long-duration space missions, this must be done with a compact, reliable system that requires little or no use of expendables and minimal power. DynaJets cavitating jets can oxidize selected organic compounds with much greater energy efficiency than ultrasonic devices typically used in sonochemistry. The focus of this work was to develop cavitating jets to simultaneously accomplish the functions of oxygenation and removal of contaminants of importance to space-structured water reclamation systems. The innovation is a method to increase the concentration of dissolved oxygen or other gasses in a liquid. It utilizes a particular form of novel cavitating jet operating at low to moderate pressures to achieve a high-efficiency means of transporting and mixing the gas into the liquid. When such a jet is utilized to simultaneously oxygenate the liquid and to oxidize organic compounds within the liquid, such as those in waste water, the rates of contaminant removal are increased. The invention is directed toward an increase in the dissolved gas content of a liquid, in general, and the dissolved oxygen content of a liquid in particular.

  20. Interacting Dirac liquid in three-dimensional semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Barnes, Edwin; Condensed Matter Theory Center Team

    2015-03-01

    We study theoretically the properties of the interacting Dirac liquid, a novel three-dimensional many-body system which was recently experimentally realized and in which the electrons have a chiral linear relativistic dispersion and a mutual Coulomb interaction. We find that the ``intrinsic'' Dirac liquid, where the Fermi energy lies exactly at the nodes of the band dispersion, displays unusual Fermi liquid properties, whereas the ``extrinsic'' system with finite detuning or doping behaves as a standard Landau Fermi liquid. We present analytical and numerical results for the self-energy and spectral function based on both Hartree-Fock and the random phase approximation (RPA) theories and compute the quasiparticle lifetime, residue, and renormalized Fermi velocity of the extrinsic Dirac liquid. A full numerical calculation of the extrinsic RPA spectral function indicates that the Fermi liquid description breaks down for large-energy excitations. Furthermore, we find an additional plasmaron quasiparticle sideband in the spectral function which is discontinuous around the Fermi energy. Our predictions should be observable in ARPES and STM measurements. This work is supported by LPS-CMTC.

  1. Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect

    Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L.

    1993-11-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

  2. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  3. Elementary excitations and flow in the liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Takeshi

    2013-03-01

    A new mode of excitation is introduced to elucidate the dynamics in simple liquids at the atomic scale. Some properties of liquid defy easy explanations. For instance, in liquids phonons are overdamped with a very short lifetime. Nevertheless the Dulong-Petit law (CV ~ 3kB) is widely observed at high temperatures. As temperature is reduced the specific heat markedly increases in the supercooled state, only to drop down sharply at the glass transition. Viscosity shows an Arrhenian behavior at high temperatures, but increases rapidly toward the glass transition in the supercooled state. We suggest that these perplexing observations can be naturally explained in terms of the local configurational excitations (LCE's) which locally change the atomic connectivity by an atom losing or gaining one nearest neighbor. We show that the lifetime of LCE, ?LC, is equal to the Maxwell relaxation time, ?M, at temperatures above the crossover temperature, TA. Above TA the phonon mean-free path, ? =cT?LC , where cT is the transverse sound velocity, becomes shorter than the interatomic distance, resulting in phonon localization. Therefore LCE's are the elementary excitations in the liquid. They are independent of each other above TA, but below TA LCE's interact through phonon exchange, resulting in the rapid increase in ?M , culminatingintheglasstransition . LCE' sarealsothemechanism of flow at low temperature under strong shear stress. In this case, however, losing and gaining of the neighbors are strongly coupled, so that ?M = LC / 2 [ 1 ] . Wealsodiscussdynamicheterogeneityin terms of LCE interactions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  4. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  5. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  6. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, M.

    1982-06-15

    A liquid metal reactor comprising a vessel containing the core and liquid metal, at least one heat exchanger ensuring a heat exchange between said liquid metal and a second fluid, a first duct connecting said vessel with the inlet of said exchanger and a second duct connecting said vessel with the outlet of said exchanger. Means are provided for restricting the movement of said exchanger in two directions perpendicular to the direction of said first duct.

  7. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis. PMID:26150330

  8. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    DOEpatents

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  9. Surface Tension Confines Cryogenic Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castles, Stephen H.; Schein, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    New type of Dewar provides passive, constant-temperature cryogenic cooling for scientific instruments under normal-to low-gravity conditions. Known as Surface-Tension-Contained Liquid Cryogen Cooler (STCLCC), keeps liquid cryogen in known location inside the Dewar by trapping liquid inside spongelike material. Unique sponge material fills most of volume of inner tank. Sponge is all-silica, open-cell material similar to that used for Space Shuttle thermal-protection tiles.

  10. Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-05-04

    The Cloud Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool (SEET) is a user driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) that estimates cloud supercooled liquid water (SLW) content in terms of vertical column and total mass from Moderate resolution Imaging Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spatially derived cloud products and realistic vertical cloud parameterizations that are user defined. It also contains functions for post-processing of the resulting data in tabular and graphical form.

  11. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid lead-bismuth and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Both liquid Hg and Pb-Bi eutectic have been proposed as possible target materials for spallation neutron sources. During the 1950s and 1960s, a substantial program existed at BNL as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel Reactor program on compatibility of Bi, Pb, and their alloys with structural materials. Subsequently, compatibility studies of Hg with structural materials were performed in support of development of Rankine-cycle Hg turbines for nuclear applications. This paper reviews our understanding of the corrosion/mass-transfer reactions of structural materials with these liquid-metal coolants. Topics discussed include the basic solubility relations of Fe, Cr, Ni, and refractory metals in these liquid metals, results of inhibition studies, role of oxygen on corrosion, and specialized topics such as cavitation corrosion and liquid-metal embrittlement. Emphasis is on utilizing the understanding gained in this earlier work on the development of heavy-liquid-metal targets in spallation neutron sources.

  12. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  13. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Webster, Elizabeth (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc (Madison, WI)

    1993-01-01

    A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

  14. Heat exchanger support

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.K.; Weitzel, P.S.

    1988-09-13

    This patent describes a support structure for in-bed heat exchanger tubes of a fluidzed bed boiler having wall means defining a fluidized bed region and a freeboard region above the fluidized bed region, the wall means including tubular means disposed near a transition zone between the fluidized bed and freeboard regions, the structure comprising support tubes having opposite ends extending respectively through the wall means and over the tubular means for support thereby, each support tube having at least one upright portion disposed in the fluidized bed region, and at least one heat exchanger tube being supportingly secured to the upright portion.

  15. Study of liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary propulsion systems for the space tug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Design concepts are considered that permit use of a liquid-liquid (as opposed to gas-gas) oxygen/hydrogen thrust chamber for attitude control and auxiliary propulsion thrusters on the space tug. The best of the auxiliary propulsion system concepts are defined and their principal characteristics, including cost as well as operational capabilities, are established. Design requirements for each of the major components of the systems, including thrusters, are developed at the conceptual level. The competitive concepts considered use both dedicated (separate tanks) and integrated (propellant from main propulsion tanks) propellant supply. The integrated concept is selected as best for the space tug after comparative evaluation against both cryogenic and storable propellant dedicated systems. A preliminary design of the selected system is established and recommendations for supporting research and technology to further the concept are presented.

  16. SSI effects for a tank containing two liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1994-06-01

    Following a brief review of a mechanical model which permits consideration of the flexibility of the tank wall and the supporting medium, the effects of the soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of a laterally excited tank that contains two liquids are examined. The quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, base shear and moments. The results are compared with those obtained with no soil-structure interaction. Only the impulsive component of response is examined; the convective component is for all practical purposes unaffected by soil-structure interaction. It is shown that for the conditions considered, soil-structure interaction reduces the peak response of the tank-liquid system.

  17. Neutron crosstalk between liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Prasad, M. K.; Snyderman, N. J.

    2015-09-01

    A method is proposed to quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between liquid scintillators. Using a spontaneous fission source, this method can be utilized to quickly characterize an array of liquid scintillators in terms of crosstalk. The point model theory due to Feynman is corrected to account for these multiple scatterings. Using spectral information measured by the liquid scintillators, fractions of multiple scattering can be estimated, and mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation can be improved. Monte Carlo simulations of mono-energetic neutron sources were performed to estimate neutron crosstalk. A californium source in an array of liquid scintillators was modeled to illustrate the improvement of the mass reconstruction.

  18. Wicking of liquids in screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of the wicking rates of liquids in various screens. Evaluation of the parameters characterizing the wicking process resulted in the development of an expression which defined the wicking velocity in terms of screen and system geometry, liquid properties, and gravitational effects. Experiment data obtained both in normal gravity and in weightlessness demonstrated that the model successfully predicted the functional relation of the liquid properties and the distance from the liquid source to the wicking velocity. Because the pore geometry in the screens was complex, several screen geometric parameters were lumped into a single constant which was determined experimentally for each screen.

  19. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals

    E-print Network

    Nuno M. Silvestre; Maria Carolina Figueirinhas Pereira; Nelson R. Bernardino; Margarida M. Telo da Gama

    2015-07-16

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal.

  20. Surface phenomena in liquid metal alloys with application to development of a liquid metal ion source of B and As

    SciTech Connect

    Bozack, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    A liquid metal ion (LMI) source is a low volatility liquid metal film which flows to the apex of a solid needle support structure. Subsequent application of a high electric field deforms the liquid and results in ion emission. Considerable interest has been shown in development of LMI sources capable of producing a variety of technologically important ions. For implantation of silicon, for example, B is the preferred p-type dopant, while As and P are the preferred n-type dopants. It has been difficult to construct long-lived ion sources based upon these species because B possesses a high melting point and reacts strongly with most refractory metal supports, while As and P have high vapor pressures. To overcome these difficulties, the material and thermochemical properties of liquid metal alloy surfaces were studied. A number of successful contact systems were identified for B, while the development of a LMI source of As was completely solved. To lower the chemical reactivity of B alloys, it was necessary to utilize nonmetallic support structures. In these cases wettability of B based alloys is governed by surface segregation of low-level, low-surface tension impurities within the alloys that inhibit reaction between the alloy and substrate. Coating the substrate with a material having a high affinity to carbon (e.g., B, or Si) acts to tie up the segregated material and promote wetting.

  1. DETAIL OF THE LIQUID HYDROGEN AND LIQUID OXYGEN VENT VALVES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE LIQUID HYDROGEN AND LIQUID OXYGEN VENT VALVES, SIXTH LEVEL OF THE EXTERNAL TANK CHECK-OUT CELLS, HB-2, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. Polymers at liquid-liquid interfaces: Photophysics and photoredox chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, S.E.

    1990-11-01

    Research continued on polymers at liquid-liquid interfaces. This quarter, work concentrated on: preparation of poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid-co-chromophore) polymers; studies of vinylnapthalene-maleic acid polymers as emulsifying agents for water-octane; and assembly of optical fiber reticon-based transient absorption system. 3 refs., 1 fig. (CBS)

  3. Performance of sonication and microfluidization for liquid-liquid emulsification.

    PubMed

    Maa, Y F; Hsu, C C

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate and compare liquid-liquid emulsions (water-in-oil and oil-in-water) prepared using sonication and microfluidization. Liquid-liquid emulsions were characterized on the basis of emulsion droplet size determined using a laser-based particle size analyzer. An ultrasonic-driven benchtop sonicator and an air-driven microfluidizer were used for emulsification. Sonication generated emulsions through ultrasound-driven mechanical vibrations, which caused cavitation. The force associated with implosion of vapor bubbles caused emulsion size reduction and the flow of the bubbles resulted in mixing. An increase in viscosity of the dispersion phase improved the sonicator's emulsification capability, but an increase in the viscosity of the dispersed phase decreased the sonicator's emulsification capability. Although sonication might be comparable to homogenization in terms of emulsification efficiency, homogenization was relatively more effective in emulsifying more viscous solutions. Microfluidization, which used a high pressure to force the fluid into microchannels of a special configuration and initiated emulsification via a combined mechanism of cavitation, shear, and impact, exhibited excellent emulsification efficiency. Of the three methodologies, sonication generated more heat and might be less suitable for emulsion systems involving heat-sensitive materials. Homogenization is in general a more effective liquid-liquid emulsification method. The results derived from this study can serve as a basis for the evaluation of large-scale liquid-liquid emulsification in the microencapsulation process. PMID:10231884

  4. Nanomaterials at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces-A Review.

    PubMed

    Divya, V; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2015-09-01

    The charge transfer processes occurring at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions are of considerable importance in diverse fields of chemistry and biology. The introduction to nanoparticles and analysis of nanostructures in diverse branches of science and engineering are provided. The chemical and electrochemical techniques pertaining to the synthesis of metal nanoparticles, polymeric nanostructures and metal-polymer nanocomposites at liquid/liquid interfaces are surveyed. The unique features pertaining to the chemical synthesis of metal nanoparticles while employing diverse electrolytes and solvents are outlined. The advantages of various electrochemical synthetic protocols such as four-electrode assembly, thin film electrode, Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy and Solid/liquid/liquid interfaces for the study of nanoparticles at liquid/liquid interfaces are emphasized. The crucial role played by the liquid/liquid interfaces in altering the morphological patterns of metal nanoparticles, conducting polymers and metal-polymer nanocomposites is indicated. A few typical novel applications of these nanomaterials in fabrication of biosensors, electrochemical supercapacitors, and electrocatalysts have been outlined. PMID:26716259

  5. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr. ); Cochran, H.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  7. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Albert K. (Western Springs, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Groove Village, IL)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small quantity of barium to liquid metal NaK or sodium has been found to promote foam formation and improve bubble retention in the liquid metal. A stable liquid metal foam will provide a more homogeneous liquid metal flow through the channel of a two-phase liquid metal MHD power generator to improve operating efficiency.

  8. Method of foaming a liquid metal

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.K.; Johnson, C.E.

    1980-01-15

    The addition of a small quantity of barium to liquid metal NaK or sodium has been found to promote foam formation and improve bubble retention in the liquid metal. A stable liquid metal foam will provide a more homogeneous liquid metal flow through the channel of a two-phase liquid metal MHD power generator to improve operating efficiency.

  9. Polymer Crystallization at Curved Liquid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda

    Liquid/liquid interface, either flat or curved, is a unique template for studying self-assembly of a variety of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles and nanorods. The resultant monolayer films can be ordered or disordered depending on the regularity of the nanomaterials. Integration of nanoparticles into two-dimensional structure leads to intriguing collective properties of the nanoparticles. Crystallization can also be guided by liquid/liquid interface. Due to the particular shape of the interface, crystallization can happen in a different manner comparing to the normal solution crystallization. In this dissertation, liquid/liquid interface is employed to guide the crystallization of polymers, mainly focusing on using curved liquid/liquid interface. Due to the unique shape of the interface and feasibility to control the curvature, polymer crystallization can take place in different manner and lead to the formation of curved or vesicular crystals. Curved liquid/liquid interface is typically created through o/w emulsions. With the presence of surfactant, the emulsions are controlled to be stable at least for the polymer crystallization periods. The difference to normal solution crystallization is: the nuclei will diffuse to the curved interface due to the Pickering effect and guide the crystallization along the curved liquid/liquid interface. If the supercooling can be controlled to be very small, crystal growth in the bulk droplets can be avoided. The advantages of this strategy are: 1) the formation process of vesicular type crystals can be monitored by controlling the polymer supply; 2) curved crystals, bowl-like structures and enclosed capsules can be easily obtained comparing to the self-assembly method for vesicle formation; 3) the obtained vesicles will be made of polymer crystals, which will possess the extraordinary mechanical properties. Based on the nucleation type, this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part is focused on the self-assembly behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at curved liquid/liquid interface and the crystallization behavior of polymers at curved liquid/liquid interface while SWCNTs in presence. A few crystalline polymers, such as polyethylene (PE), poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA), and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), and water/oil systems were used to study the behavior. The formation of nano speckle structure is a crystallization-driven process due to heterogeneous nucleation and crystal growth of polymers at curved liquid/liquid interface. The second part deals with the homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth at curved liquid/liquid interface. Both PE and PLLA were used to conduct the study. For PE, 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB), water, and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were used for the emulsion system. The emulsification system for PLLA is p-xylene, water, and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Surfactant concentration can be employed to control the droplet size, thus controlling the final crystal vesicle's size. By controlling the initial polymer concentration, crystal shells with different morphology, such as curved crystal, bowl-like crystals, and crystal vesicles (named lamellaesome) can be obtained. The formation of these unique structures was templated by the curved interface. The formation process and detailed crystal structure are analyzed based on electron diffraction data from different sized lamellaesomes. Mechanical properties of the crystal vesicles and their encapsulation abilities will be discussed. At the end of this dissertation, a summary of my work and future outlook will be given.

  10. Supporting Information S1 Supporting Information for

    E-print Network

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Organic Aerosol Particles Carlena J. Ebben,% Benjamin F. Strick,% Mary Alice Upshur, Hilary M. Chase, Jennifer L. Achtyl, Regan J. Thomson,* and Franz M. Geiger* 1 Department of Chemistry, Northwestern28 #12;Supporting Information S2 1. General Methods. All reactions were carried out under a nitrogen

  11. Technical support A dedicated support staff for

    E-print Network

    Schiller, Stephan

    , fiber and high power pump lasers 4Range of electronic, rf and microwave test and diagnostic equipment 44, Atomic and at the Institute for Experimental Physics, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany language courses available free of charge on campus Support and contact details Study in Düsseldorf

  12. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    DOEpatents

    Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Hoyt, Andrea E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides (1) curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 where R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are radicals selected from the group consisting of maleimide, substituted maleimide, nadimide, substituted naimide, ethynyl, and (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 where R.sup.3 is hydrogen with the proviso that the two carbon atoms of (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 are bound on the aromatic ring of A.sup.1 or A.sup.3 to adjacent carbon atoms, A.sup.1 and A.sup.3 are 1,4-phenylene and the same where said group contains one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, or propyl, alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, A.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of 1,4-phenylene, 4,4'-biphenyl, 2,6-naphthylene and the same where said groups contain one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro, lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, and propyl, lower alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl or fluoroalkoxy, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, and B.sup.1 and B.sup.2 are selected from the group consisting of --C(O)--O-- and --O--C(O)--, (2) thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions comprised of heat-cured segments derived from monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 as described above, (3) curable blends of at least two of the polyester monomers and (4) processes of preparing the curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers.

  13. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, Thomas H. (Aurora, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member.

  14. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, T.H.; Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1988-11-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member. 7 figs.

  15. Turbine meters for liquid measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Hammock, W.

    1995-12-01

    The turbine meter has become very popular for the measurement of liquids of low and medium viscosities. Its compact size, high flow rate, low maintenance and superior linearity make it especially attractive for liquid hydrocarbon applications. When a turbine meter is properly applied within a correctly designed flow system, its best performance can be realized.

  16. MOMENTUM LIQUIDATION UNDER PARTIAL INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Ekström, Erik

    MOMENTUM LIQUIDATION UNDER PARTIAL INFORMATION ERIK EKSTR¨OM1 AND MARTIN VANNEST°AL Abstract. Momentum is the notion that an asset that has performed well in the past will continue to do so for some period. We study the optimal liquidation strategy for a momentum trade in a setting where the drift

  17. Liquid ethylene-propylene copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.; Ingham, J. D.; Humphrey, M. F.

    1975-01-01

    Oligomers are prepared by heating solid ethylene-propylene rubber in container that retains solid and permits liquid product to flow out as it is formed. Molecular weight and viscosity of liquids can be predetermined by process temperature. Copolymers have low viscosity for given molecular weight.

  18. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of preserving a liquid biological sample, comprising the step of: contacting said liquid biological sample with a preservative comprising, sodium benzoate in an amount of at least about 0.15% of the sample (weight/volume) and citric acid in an amount of at least about 0.025% of the sample (weight/volume).

  19. Molecular Cell It's Raining Liquids

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    of Membraneless Organelles Lin Guo1 and James Shorter1,* 1Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Perelman revealed that diverse membraneless organelles originate via liquid-liquid phase separation, but how termed organelles. Non-membrane- bound organelles such as ribonucleopro- tein (RNP) granules differ from

  20. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.