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Sample records for building tribal capabilities

  1. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY RESOURCE TRIBES

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Lopez

    2003-04-01

    The CERT Tribal Internship Program is part of the education and training opportunities provided by CERT to accelerate the development of American Indian technical professionals available to serve Tribes and expand the pool of these professionals. Tribes are severely impacted by the inadequate number of Indian professionals available to serve and facilitate Tribal participation and support of the energy future of Tribes,and subsequently the energy future of the nation. By providing interns with hands-on work experience in their field of study two goals are accomplished: (1) the intern is provided opportunities for professional enhancement; and (2) The pool of Indian professionals available to meet the needs of Tribal government and Tribal communities in general is increased. As of January 17, 2003, Lance M Wyatt successfully completed his internship with the Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice on the Task Force that specifically focuses their work on Tribal nations. While working as an intern with the National Transportation Program, Albuquerque operations, Jacqueline Agnew received an offer to work for the Alaska Native Health Board in Anchorage, Alaska. This was an opportunity that Ms. Agnew did not feel she could afford to forego and she left her internship position in February 2003. At present, CERT is in the process of finding another qualified individual to replace the internship position vacated by Ms. Agnew. Mr. Wyatt's and Ms. Agnew's final comments are given.

  2. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-03-01

    The following activities were completed by the end of the quarter: (1) The CERT Executive Director invited a cross section of CERT member Tribes to participate in the project. By the end of the quarter, three Tribes had the invitation under active consideration, four Tribes expressed interest but wanted to see the detailed workplan prior to making a final decision and one Tribe, the Navajo Nation has accepted the invitation. (2) The CERT Board of Directors Executive Committee has endorsed two significant environmental policy priorities for consideration in the project. First, how does the federal Indian trust responsibility to land and natural resources as well as for the health, safety and political integrity of Indian Tribes affect the federal responsibility for facility cleanup and other statutory mandates under federal environmental statutes? And second, What are the protocols of government-to-government relations within a federal system of shared sovereignty and shared governmental responsibilities? And the corollaries to that question, What is the federal obligation for consultation with Tribes and how is that different and similar to consultation with states? And, What is the federal obligation to work cooperatively with Tribes and states in recognition of the three sovereigns of the American federal system? (3) The CERT consulted with political leaders and environmental staff of member and non-member Tribes. This consultation centered on three environmental policy priorities: issues concerning the intergovernmental interface between states, Tribes and federal government agencies and programs; Issues with the cleanup of federal facilities and activities that have damaged Tribal environmental resources; and issues concerning the DOE cleanup of federal facilities used in the production of nuclear weapons.

  3. Feasibility Analysis For Heating Tribal Buildings with Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Clairmont; Micky Bourdon; Tom Roche; Colene Frye

    2009-03-03

    This report provides a feasibility study for the heating of Tribal buildings using woody biomass. The study was conducted for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation in western Montana. S&K Holding Company and TP Roche Company completed the study and worked together to provide the final report. This project was funded by the DOE's Tribal Energy Program.

  4. Collaborations for Building Tribal Resiliency to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamzai, A.; Taylor, A.; Winton, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sixty-eight tribes are located in the U.S. Department of the Interior's South Central Climate Science Center (SCCSC) region. The SCCSC made it a priority to include the tribes as partners from its inception and both the Chickasaw Nation and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma participate in the center's activities as consortium members. Under this arrangement, the SCCSC employs a full-time tribal liaison to facilitate relations with the tribes, develop partnerships for climate-relevant projects, build tribal stakeholder capacity, and organize tribal youth programs. In 2014, the SCCSC published its Tribal Engagement Strategy (USGS Circular 1396) to outline its approach for developing tribal relationships. The conceptual plan covers each step in the multi-year process from initial introductory meetings and outreach to demonstrate commitment and interest in working with tribal staff, building tribal capacity in climate related areas while also building researcher capacity in ethical research, and facilitating the co-production of climate-relevant research projects. As the tribes begin to develop their internal capacity and find novel ways to integrate their interests, the plan ultimately leads to tribes developing their own independent research projects and integrating climate science into their various vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans. This presentation will outline the multiple steps in the SCCSC's Tribal Engagement Strategy and provide examples of our ongoing work in support of each step.

  5. Tribalism as a Foiled Factor of Africa Nation-Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okogu, J. O.; Umudjere, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper tends to examine tribalism as a foiled factor on Africa nation-building and proffers useful tips to salvaging the Africa land from this deadly social problem. Africans in times past had suffered enormous attacks, injuries, losses, deaths, destruction of properties and human skills and ideas due to the presence of tribalistic views in…

  6. Final Technical Report. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Audits of Tribally-Owned Governmental Buildings and Residential Tribal Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2015-03-27

    The Tribe is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings and low income housing sites. In 2009, the Tribe applied to the U. S. Department of Energy for funding to conduct energy audits of Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Findings from the energy audits would define the extent and types of energy efficiency improvements needed, establish a basis for energy priorities, strategies and action plans, and provide a benchmark for measuring improvements from energy efficiency implementations. In 2010, the DOE awarded a grant in the amount of $95,238 to the Tribe to fund the energy audits of nine governmental buildings and to pay for travel expenses associated with attendance and participation at the DOE annual program reviews. In 2011, the Tribe applied for and was awarded a DOE grant in the amount of $75,509 to conduct energy audits of the remaining 30 Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Repeating mobilization steps performed during the first DOE energy audits grant, the Tribe initiated the second round of governmental building energy audits by completing energy auditor procurement. The selected energy auditor successfully passed DOE debarment and Sault Tribe background clearances. The energy audits contract was awarded to U. P. Engineers and Architects, Inc. of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Tribe continued mobilizing for the energy audits by providing the energy auditor with one year of electric, gas and water utility invoice copies per building, as well as supplemental building information, such as operating hours. The Tribe also contacted building occupants to coordinate scheduling for the on-site energy audit inspections and arranged for facilities management personnel to guide the energy auditor through the buildings and answer questions regarding building systems.

  7. On Building Inexpensive Network Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shue, Craig A; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew; Allman, Mark; Taylor, Curtis R

    2011-01-01

    There are many deployed approaches for blocking unwanted traffic, either once it reaches the recipient's network, or closer to its point of origin. One of these schemes is based on the notion of traffic carrying capabilities that grant access to a network and/or end host. However, leveraging capabilities results in added complexity and additional steps in the communication process: Before communication starts a remote host must be vetted and given a capability to use in the subsequent communication. In this paper, we propose a lightweight mechanism that turns the answers provided by DNS name resolution---which Internet communication broadly depends on anyway---into capabilities. While not achieving an ideal capability system, we show the mechanism can be built from commodity technology and is therefore a pragmatic way to gain some of the key benefits of capabilities without requiring new infrastructure.

  8. 78 FR 77161 - Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity AGENCY: Bureau of... (Secretary), through the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), is soliciting grant proposals from Indian tribes for projects to build tribal capacity for energy resource development under...

  9. 76 FR 41297 - Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity AGENCY: Bureau of... (Secretary), through the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), is soliciting grant... development under the Department of the Interior's (DOI) Tribal Energy Development Capacity (TEDC)...

  10. Building Organisational Capability the Private Provider Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Organisational capability is recognised as a key to organisational success. The combination of human capital (peoples' skills and knowledge), social capital (relationships between people) and organisational capital (the organisation's processes), is central to building an organisation's capability. This paper, presented at the 2008 annual…

  11. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Lopez

    2003-07-01

    During this reporting period efforts were concentrated on finding a suitable candidate to replace the vacated internship position at the National Transportation Program in Albuquerque, New Mexico after the departure of Jacqueline Agnew. After completing an extensive search and interviews, Byron Yepa, a member of Jemez Pueblo, was selected to fill the internship vacancy. Intern Byron Yepa began his internship on June 12, 2003. Initially, Mr. Yepa was familiarized with the National Transportation Program facility, introduced to staff and was set up on the computer system. He began educating himself by reading a book which focused on the Nevada Test site and its impact on Indian Tribes. He is helping in the development of a geographic information system (GIS) project and will assist other departments with their projects. At the time of this report he was waiting for new software to aid in the development of that project.

  12. Survey of state and tribal emergency response capabilities for radiological transportation incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Vilardo, F J; Mitter, E L; Palmer, J A; Briggs, H C; Fesenmaier, J

    1990-05-01

    This publication is the final report of a project to survey the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and selected Indian Tribal jurisdictions to ascertain their emergency-preparedness planning and capabilities for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. The survey was conducted to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies with information concerning the current level of emergency-response preparedness of the states and selected tribes and an assessment of the changes that have occurred since 1980. There have been no major changes in the states' emergency-response planning strategies and field tactics. The changes noted included an increased availability of dedicated emergency-response vehicles, wider availability of specialized radiation-detection instruments, and higher proportions of police and fire personnel with training in the handling of suspected radiation threats. Most Indian tribes have no capability to evaluate suspected radiation threats and have no formal relations with emergency-response personnel in adjacent states. For the nation as a whole, the incidence of suspected radiation threats declined substantially from 1980 to 1988. 58 tabs.

  13. The Circle of Prosperity: Tribal Colleges, Tradition, and Technology -- Building Synergistic Cross-Community Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, C. L.

    2003-12-01

    For more than three decades, American Indian Tribal Colleges and Universities have been working to sustain what is ours: our land, our language, our communities, and our culture. Tribal Colleges have achieved success by helping our communities, located in some of the poorest and most geographically remote areas of the country, develop systems for higher education, research, and economic development that are accessible, culturally responsive, and place-based. American Indian higher education is holistic, focused on the mind, body, spirit, and family. Research is respectful of culture, mindful of community values, and essential to community well-being. Economic development strategies are based on national and international trends, but focused on relationships between local people and their land. In this environment, applied research flourishes and new knowledge, integrating traditional ways of knowing with western science, is created and used. In the 1990s, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, which is composed of 35 Tribal Colleges and Universities in the U.S. and Canada, launched a major initiative to expand and enhance this capacity through new collaborations and state-of-the-art information and communications technologies. Through a multi-phase effort, the Tribal Colleges developed and are currently implementing a dynamic and broad-based strategic plan. The goal: to reach a "Circle of Prosperity," a place where tribal traditions and new technologies are woven together to build stronger and more sustainable communities through enhanced STEM education and research programs. Our plan, the "Tribal College Framework for Community Technology," is a framework of strategic partnerships, resources, and tools that is helping us create locally based economic and social opportunities through information and communications technology and use of the Internet. During this presentation, we will: (a) discuss the innovative collaborative process we are using to build

  14. TriBITS (Tribal Build, Integrate, and Test System)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-05-16

    TriBITS is a configuration, build, test, and reporting system that uses the Kitware open-source CMake/CTest/CDash system. TriBITS contains a number of custom CMake/CTest scripts and python scripts that extend the functionality of the out-of-the-box CMake/CTest/CDash system.

  15. Tribal Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An unlikely promoter of tribal development, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has set the bar for collaboration and capacity building. At first glance, the NSF was an unlikely and even unpromising administrator for a program promoting tribal development. Unlike the Bureau of Indian Affairs or the Department of Education, the NSF did not have a…

  16. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory: Building partnerships and developing tools to support local Tribal community response to climate change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. D.; Wee, B.; Kuslikis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Response of Tribal nations and Tribal communities to current and emerging climate change challenges requires active participation of stakeholders who have effective access to relevant data, information and analytical tools. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory (TLC), currently under development, is a joint effort between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri), and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The vision of the TLC is to create an integrative platform that enables coordination between multiple stakeholders (e.g. Tribal resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, farmers, ranchers, and other local community members) to collaborate on locally relevant climate change issues. The TLC is intended to facilitate the transformation of data into actionable information that can inform local climate response planning. The TLC will provide the technical mechanisms to access, collect and analyze data from both internal and external sources (e.g. NASA's Giovanni climate data portal, Ameriflux or USA National Phenology Network) while also providing the social scaffolds to enable collaboration across Tribal communities and with members of the national climate change research community. The prototype project focuses on phenology, a branch of science focused on relationships between climate and the seasonal timing of biological phenomena. Monitoring changes in the timing and duration of phenological stages in plant and animal co­­­­mmunities on Tribal lands can provide insight to the direct impacts of climate change on culturally and economically significant Tribal resources . The project will leverage existing phenological observation protocols created by the USA-National Phenology Network and NEON to direct data collection efforts and will be tailored to the specific needs and concerns of the community. Phenology observations will be captured and managed within the Collaboratory

  17. Building EOS capability for Malaysia - the options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subari, M. D.; Hassan, A.

    2014-06-01

    Earth observation satellite (EOS) is currently a major tool to monitor earth dynamics and increase human understanding of earth surface process. Since the early 80s, Malaysia has been using EOS images for various applications, such as weather forecasting, land use mapping, agriculture, environment monitoring and others. Until now, all EOS images were obtained from foreign satellite systems. Realising on the strategic need of having its own capability, Malaysia embarked into EOS development programs in the early 90s. Starting with TiungSAT-1, a micro-satellite carrying small camera, then followed by RazakSAT, a small satellite carrying 2.5 m panchromatic (PAN) medium-aperture-camera, the current satellite program development, the RazakSAT-2, designed to carry a 1.0 m high resolution PAN and 4.0m multi-spectral camera, would become a strategic initiative of the government in developing and accelerating the nation's capability in the area of satellite technology and its application. Would this effort continue until all needs of the remote sensing community being fulfilled by its own EOS? This paper will analyze the intention of the Malaysian government through its National Space Policy and other related policy documents, and proposes some policy options on this. Key factors to be considered are specific data need of the EOS community, data availability and the more subjective political motivations such as national pride.

  18. Building effective R&D capabilities abroad.

    PubMed

    Kuemmerle, W

    1997-01-01

    In the past, companies kept most of their research and development activities in their home country because they thought it important to have R&D close to where strategic decisions were being made. But today many companies choose to establish R&D networks in foreign countries in order to tap the knowledge there or to commercialize products for those markets at a competitive speed. Adopting a global approach entails new, complex managerial challenges. It means linking R&D strategy to a company's overall business strategy. The first step in adopting such an approach is to build a team to lead the initiative--a team whose members are sufficiently senior to be able to mobilize resources at short notice. Second, companies must determine whether an R&D site's primary objective is to augment the expertise that the home base has the offer or to exploit that knowledge for use in the foreign country. That determination affects the choice of location and staff. For example, to augment the home base laboratory, a company would want to be near a foreign university; to exploit the home base laboratory it would need to be near large markets and manufacturing facilities. The best individual for managing both types of site combines the qualities of good scientist and good manager, knows how to integrate the new site with existing sites, understand technology trends, and is good at gaining access to foreign scientific communities. As more pockets of knowledge emerge around the globe and competition in foreign markets mounts, only those companies that embrace an informed approach to global R&D will be able to meet the new challenges. PMID:10165450

  19. The Impact of Place in Building Human Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    While it is accepted that there are "sensitive" and "critical" periods of life during which certain human capabilities are more readily acquired, and where the multiplied returns on our investment in human capability building are more significant, it is also argued that there are place-based contexts (society, nature, culture,…

  20. Building Technological Capability within Satellite Programs in Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Danielle Renee

    Global participation in space activity is growing as satellite technology matures and spreads. Countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America are creating or reinvigorating national satellite programs. These countries are building local capability in space through technological learning. They sometimes pursue this via collaborative satellite development projects with foreign firms that provide training. This phenomenon of collaborative satellite development projects is poorly understood by researchers of technological learning and technology transfer. The approach has potential to facilitate learning, but there are also challenges due to misaligned incentives and the tacit nature of the technology. Perspectives from literature on Technological Learning, Technology Transfer, Complex Product Systems and Product Delivery provide useful but incomplete insight for decision makers in such projects. This work seeks a deeper understanding of capability building through collaborative technology projects by conceiving of the projects as complex, socio-technical systems with architectures. The architecture of a system is the assignment of form to execute a function along a series of dimensions. The research questions explore the architecture of collaborative satellite projects, the nature of capability building during such projects, and the relationship between architecture and capability building. The research design uses inductive, exploratory case studies to investigate six collaborative satellite development projects. Data collection harnesses international field work driven by interviews, observation, and documents. The data analysis develops structured narratives, architectural comparison and capability building assessment. The architectural comparison reveals substantial variation in project implementation, especially in the areas of project initiation, technical specifications of the satellite, training approaches and the supplier selection process. The individual

  1. The Adaptation and Implementation of a Community-Based Participatory Research Curriculum to Build Tribal Research Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Tvli; Styne, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    We studied community-based participatory research in American Indian/Alaska Native communities. We have presented a case study describing a community–clinic–academic partnership with the goal of building tribal capacity and infrastructure to conduct health disparities research. The 2-year intensive training was guided by the framework of an evidence- and community-based participatory research curriculum, adapted and implemented with practice-based data collection activities and seminars to address issues specific to community-based participatory research with sovereign tribal nations. The initiative highlighted important challenges and opportunities in transdisciplinary partnerships; identified gaps in conducting health disparities research at the tribal, clinical, and university levels; and led to important policy change initiatives in all the partner settings. PMID:25905848

  2. Commitment to Building Prosperous Nations: Tribal Colleges Take Aim against Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The article reports that Tribal colleges and universities in the United States seek to promote culturally appropriate development and to improve the financial situations not only of their students but the tribal matrix they come from. A study by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium and the Institute for Higher Education Policy…

  3. Building technological capability within satellite programs in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Danielle; Weigel, Annalisa

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the process of building technological capability in government-led satellite programs within developing countries. The key message is that these satellite programs can learn useful lessons from literature in the international development community. These lessons are relevant to emerging satellite programs that leverage international partnerships in order to establish local capability to design, build and operate satellites. Countries with such programs include Algeria, Nigeria, Turkey, Malaysia and the United Arab Emirates. The paper first provides background knowledge about space activity in developing countries, and then explores the nuances of the lessons coming from the international development literature. Developing countries are concerned with satellite technology because satellites provide useful services in the areas of earth observation, communication, navigation and science. Most developing countries access satellite services through indirect means such as sharing data with foreign organizations. More countries, however, are seeking opportunities to develop satellite technology locally. There are objective, technically driven motivations for developing countries to invest in satellite technology, despite rich debate on this topic. The paper provides a framework to understand technical motivations for investment in satellite services, hardware, expertise and infrastructure in both short and long term. If a country decides to pursue such investments they face a common set of strategic decisions at the levels of their satellite program, their national context and their international relationships. Analysis of past projects shows that countries have chosen diverse strategies to address these strategic decisions and grow in technological capability. What is similar about the historical examples is that many countries choose to leverage international partnerships as part of their growth process. There are also historical examples from

  4. Building Space Science Capabilities at Minority Universities-the First Three Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, P. J.; Rosendhal, J. D.; Cooper, L. P.; Cohen, E. M.

    2003-12-01

    This poster will report outcomes and lessons learned from the first three years of NASA's Minority University and College Education and Research Partnership Initiative (MUCERPI) in Space Science-a consorted effort to build space science capabilities at minority institutions. Under this initiative, 15 minority institutions, including six Historically Black Colleges or Universities, three Hispanic Serving Institutions, three Tribal Colleges, and three minority-predominant institutions are now completing 3-year projects that were awarded as a result of the first MUCERPI solicitation, conducted in the year 2000. A preliminary analysis of outcomes self-reported by the grantees indicates that the MUCERPI program is succeeding in enhancing the ability of minority institutions to offer opportunities in space science to their students and to the communities they serve. Collectively, the grantees are engaged in research collaborations with 10 NASA space science missions or suborbital projects and in more than 50 working partnerships with major space science research groups. In academic programs, they have established on their campuses 25 new or redirected space science faculty positions, 11 new or revised space science degree programs, and 67 new or revised space science courses with a total enrollment to date of over 1,750 students. They are also engaged in a wide variety of teacher training, precollege outreach, and public outreach programs. From the results to date, it is clear that vibrant academic and research programs in astronomy and space science can be built at minority institutions provided that sponsoring Agencies offer serious opportunities to do so. The sponsoring Agencies need to play an active role in providing guidance and in engaging their usual cadre of sponsored researchers to serve as active partners in collaborations with interested minority institutions. Merely acting as a passive provider of funds is not enough to make a significant difference.

  5. Inter-Tribal Student Services (I.S.S.): Collaborative Action Education in Building and Guiding the Future Under-represented Geosciences Workforce Through Tribal Foundations, Mentorship and Professional Development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Inter-Tribal Student Services (I.S.S.) was created as an Indian Self-Determination Organization to meet the every growing Tribal and under-represented minorities (URM) geosciences workforce needs. I.S.S. is one of only a few Indian Self-Determined Organizations in the U.S. with a distinct focused on buidling the Tribal and URM geosciences and natural resources workforces. In past three years, I.S.S has worked in partnership with U.S. colleges/universities, state/federal agencies (Bureau of Indian Affairs), private and International organizations and most importantly U.S. Tribal Nations to ensure emerging high school students, undergraduates, graduate students and post doctorates have the opportunities for training in supportive and unique environments, navigational mentoring, and broad professional development to build and practice the skills required for blue-collar, scientific, and managerial positions. I.S.S. has been highly successful in filling workforce opportunities within the broad range of geosciences positions. I.S.S. students are proficient in understanding and maneuvering the complex landscapes of interdisciplinary research, multidisciplinary multi-partner projects, traditional/western philosophies as well as being highly proficient in all areas of problem solving and communications. Research and on-site projects have heightened the educational experiences of all participants, in addition to addressing a perplexing geosciences challenge grounded in a Tribal environment. A number of the I.S.S. participants and students have found geosciences positions in Tribes, state/federal agencies, enterprize as well as International organizations. I.S.S. practices and has infused all research and projects with intergenerational teaching/learning, participation solution-focused initiatives, and holistic/multicultural mentoring. The presentation will highlight the vision, design, implementation, outcomes and future directions of I.S.S and participants.

  6. Building IT capability in health-care organizations.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Naresh

    2006-05-01

    While computer technology has revolutionized industries such as banking and airlines, it has done little for health care so far. Most of the health-care organizations continue the early-computer-era practice of buying the latest technology without knowing how it might effectively be employed in achieving business goals. By investing merely in information technology (IT) rather than in IT capabilities they acquire IT components--primarily hardware, software, and vendor-provided services--which they do not understand and, as a result, are not capable of fully utilizing for achieving organizational objectives. In the absence of internal IT capabilities, health-care organizations have relied heavily on the fragmented IT vendor market in which vendors do not offer an open architecture, and are unwilling to offer electronic interfaces that would make their 'closed' systems compatible with those of other vendors. They are hamstrung as a result because they have implemented so many different technologies and databases that information stays in silos. Health systems can meet this challenge by developing internal IT capabilities that would allow them to seamlessly integrate clinical and business IT systems and develop innovative uses of IT. This paper develops a comprehensive conception of IT capability grounded in the resource-based theory of the firm as a remedy to the woes of IT investments in health care. PMID:16643706

  7. Capability Building in Educational Technology for Teachers in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jun, Han; Zhuzhu, Wang

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the project called Education Technology Capacity Building Plan for All Primary and Secondary Teachers now being implemented in China. Because information and communication technology skills training cannot match the demand of teachers' professional development, the Chinese Ministry of Education established…

  8. Scholarship in Higher Education: Building Research Capabilities through Core Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Judy

    2011-01-01

    As performativity within the academy continues to escalate, this paper considers the place for building research capacities through a scholarship in teaching and learning initiative at an Australian university. While the tensions that exist between discipline research and scholarship in teaching and learning remain, evaluation data for a central…

  9. NASA's Space Launch System: Building a New Capability for Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Stephen D.; Robinson, Kimberly F.

    2015-01-01

    Designed to enable human space exploration missions, including eventually landings on Mars, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) represents a unique launch capability with a wide range of utilization opportunities, from delivering habitation systems into the lunar vicinity to high-energy transits through the outer solar system. Substantial progress has been made toward the first launch of the initial configuration of SLS, which will be able to deliver more than 70 metric tons of payload into low Earth orbit (LEO). The vehicle will then be evolved into more powerful configurations, culminating with the capability to deliver more than 130 metric tons to LEO. The initial configuration will be able to deliver greater mass to orbit than any contemporary launch vehicle, and the evolved configuration will have greater performance than the Saturn V rocket that enabled human landings on the moon. SLS will also be able to carry larger payload fairings than any contemporary launch vehicle, and will offer opportunities for co-manifested and secondary payloads. Because of its substantial mass-lift capability, SLS will also offer unrivaled departure energy, enabling mission profiles currently not possible. The basic capabilities of SLS have been driven by studies on the requirements of human deep-space exploration missions, and continue to be validated by maturing analysis of Mars mission options. Early collaboration with science teams planning future decadal-class missions have contributed to a greater understanding of the vehicle's potential range of utilization. As this paper will explain, SLS is making measurable progress toward becoming a global infrastructure asset for robotic and human scouts of all nations by providing the robust space launch capability to deliver sustainable solutions for exploration.

  10. Building a LLNL Capability in Radioactive Ion Beam Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L A; Becker, J A; Garrett, P E; Younes, W; Schiller, A

    2002-01-31

    The purpose of this LDRD was to establish a program at LLNL in radioactive ion beam (RIB) experiments that would use these experiments to address a wide range physics issues in both stellar nucleosynthesis and stockpile stewardship radiochemistry. The LDRD was funded for a total of two years (fiscal years 2000 and 2001) and transferred to the Physical Data Research Program in fiscal year 2002. Reactions on unstable nuclei and isomeric states play a central role in the formation of elements in both stars and nuclear devices. However, the abilities of reaction models to predict cross sections on radioactive nuclei are uncertain at best. This can be attributed to the lack of experimental data to guide reaction-modeling efforts. Only the 10% of all bound nuclei that can be formed with stable targets and beams have been accessed and studied. The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) and existing RIB facilities offer an unprecedented opportunity to address many of the outstanding questions in nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics by enabling the observation of nuclear reactions with radioactive targets and/or beams. The primary goal of this LDRD is to develop three experimental capabilities for use with RIB experiments: (1) Level density and {gamma}-ray strength function measurements using statistical {gamma}-rays. (2) Charged particle-induced cross sections measurements on radioactive nuclei. (3) Neutron-induced cross section measurements on a radioactive target. RIA and RIB based experiments are the new frontier for nuclear physics. The joint DOE/NSF nuclear science advisory committee has named development of a RIA facility in the United States as the highest new construction priority. In addition to addressing the questions presented above, this LDRD has helped to establish a position for LLNL at the forefront of the international nuclear science community.

  11. Building Capability in Vocational Education and Training Providers: The TAFE Cut. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Hugh; Clayton, Berwyn

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on issues which affect the capability of technical and further education (TAFE) providers to meet their clients' and stakeholders' needs and draws extensively on the reports of the consortium research program which examined ways to help build vocational education and training (VET) provider and workforce capability. The paper…

  12. NASA's Tribal College Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoutsenberger, M.

    2003-12-01

    NASA has been interacting with the Tribal College and University (TCU) Community for over ten years. During this time, we have worked with TCU faculty, students, and administrators to build relationships and develop mutually beneficial programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. We have found learning about native perspectives and approaches to education and science to be enriching and of great value to our science community. NASA scientists, engineers, and educators have been very receptive to Tribal culture's traditional wisdom in its approach to the study of the earth and the cosmos. In this session we will share some of the lessons we have learned over the last decade and discuss past and present partnership programs with Tribal Colleges and Native serving institutions.

  13. Evaluation Training to Build Capability in the Community and Public Health Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeffery; Dickinson, Pauline

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, staff members in community and public health programs and projects are required to undertake evaluation activities. There is, however, limited capacity for, and understanding of, evaluation within this workforce. Building the capability of individual workers and thereby contributing to the overall capacity among the community and…

  14. Innovation through Initiatives -- A Framework for Building New Capabilities in Public Sector Research Organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Geffen, Charlette A.; Judd, Kathleen S.

    2004-12-01

    The accelerating pace of change in science and technology has resulted in new attention to the process of identifying and developing ideas that ultimately lead to new scientific capabilities and business opportunities for an organization. The need to refresh research programs and capabilities is as important in federally funded laboratories as it is for industry. This paper explores the critical success factors for new initiatives at a federal laboratory, and building on lessons learned through this study and in private industry, identifies a more systematic process that could potentially improve the effectiveness of these initiatives in achieving results.

  15. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part III.

    PubMed

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This is the last part of a series of three papers which discussed very comprehensively best practice applications in human resource management by drawing special inferences to the healthcare context. It emerged from parts I and II that high performing organisations plan and intend to build sustainable capability through a systematic consideration of the human element as the key asset and through a continuous process of training, developing, empowering and engaging people in all aspects of organisational excellence. Part III brings this debate to a close by demonstrating what brings about organisational excellence and proposes a road map for effective human resource development and management, based on world class standards. Healthcare human resource professionals can now rise to the challenge and plan ahead for building organisational capability and sustainable performance. PMID:10346320

  16. A comprehensive model to build improvement capability in a pediatric academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gerry M; Schoettker, Pamela J; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Luzader, Carolyn; Kotagal, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center developed a comprehensive model to build quality improvement (QI) capability to support its goal to transform its delivery system through a series of training courses. Two online modules orient staff to basic concepts and terminology and prepare them to participate more effectively in QI teams. The basic program (Rapid Cycle Improvement Collaborative, RCIC) is focused on developing the capability to use basic QI tools and complete a narrow-scoped project in approximately 120 days. The Intermediate Improvement Science Series (I(2)S(2)) program is a leadership course focusing on improvement skills and developing a broader and deeper understanding of QI in the context of the organization and external environment. The Advanced Improvement Methods (AIM) course and Quality Scholars Program stimulate the use of more sophisticated methods and prepare Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and external faculty to undertake QI research. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems (AILS) sessions enable interprofessional care delivery system leadership teams to effectively lead a system of care, manage a portfolio of projects, and to deliver on CCHMC's strategic plan. Implementing these programs has shown us that 1) a multilevel curricular approach to building improvement capability is pragmatic and effective, 2) an interprofessional learning environment is critical to shifting mental models, 3) repetition of project experience with coaching and feedback solidifies critical skills, knowledge and behaviors, and 4) focusing first on developing capable interprofessional improvement leaders, versus engaging in broad general QI training across the whole organization, is effective. PMID:24369867

  17. Building a Data Science capability for USGS water research and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appling, A.; Read, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    Interpreting and communicating water issues in an era of exponentially increasing information requires a blend of domain expertise, computational proficiency, and communication skills. The USGS Office of Water Information has established a Data Science team to meet these needs, providing challenging careers for diverse domain scientists and innovators in the fields of information technology and data visualization. Here, we detail the experience of building a Data Science capability as a bridging element between traditional water resources analyses and modern computing tools and data management techniques. This approach includes four major components: 1) building reusable research tools, 2) documenting data-intensive research approaches in peer reviewed journals, 3) communicating complex water resources issues with interactive web visualizations, and 4) offering training programs for our peers in scientific computing. These components collectively improve the efficiency, transparency, and reproducibility of USGS data analyses and scientific workflows.

  18. 78 FR 24212 - Tribal Management Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Management Grant Program Announcement Type: New and... competitive grant applications for the Tribal Management Grant (TMG) Program. This program is authorized under..., and activities (PFSA) and further develop and improve their health management capability. The...

  19. Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Don Shirey

    2008-02-28

    EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper model inputs. An

  20. Working with Indian Tribal Nations. A guide for DOE employees

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) employees and contractors frequently work with Indian tribes or nations as part of their jobs. The purpose of this guide is to help DOE employees and contractors initiate contact with tribes and build effective relationships. DOE maintains a unique government-to government relationship with tribal nations. This guide presents an overview of the history of the relationship between the tribes and the Federal government, as well as the laws and Executive Orders that define that relationship. The guide discusses the Federal government’s trust responsibility to the tribes, tribal treaty rights, and the Department of Energy’s American Indian policy. The guide also discusses important cultural differences that could lead to communication problems if not understood and provides examples of potential cultural misunderstandings. In particular the guide discusses tribal environmental beliefs that shape tribal responses to DOE actions. The guide also provides pointers on tribal etiquette during meetings and cultural ceremonies and when visiting tribal reservations. Appendix 1 gives examples of the tribal nations with whom DOE currently has Memoranda of Understanding. While this guide provides an introduction and overview of tribal relations for DOE staff and contractors, DOE has also designated Tribal Issues Points of Contacts at each of its facilities. A list of these Points of Contact for all DOE facilities is provided in Appendix 2. DOE staff and contractors should consult with the appropriate tribal representatives at their site before initiating contact with a tribal nation, because many tribes have rules and procedures that must be complied with before DOE staff or contractors may go on tribal lands or conduct interviews with tribal members. Appendix 3 is the complete DOE American Indian Policy. Appendices 4-6 are Executive Orders that govern the relationship of all federal agencies with tribal nations. DOE employees and staff are

  1. Financing of Tribal Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Laughlin, Jeanie

    In addition to higher education programs, tribal colleges offer welfare-to-work programs, adult education, vocational and agricultural training, and childcare, which makes their costs higher than those of conventional colleges. Most tribal colleges are small, resulting in higher than average per student costs. Tribal colleges charge an average of…

  2. BEopt(TM) Software for Building Energy Optimization: Features and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.; Anderson, R.; Horowitz, S.; Courtney, A.; Spencer, J.

    2006-08-01

    BEopt is a computer program designed to find optimal building designs along the path to ZNE. A user selects from predefined options in various categories to specify options to be considered in the optimization. Energy savings are calculated relative to a reference. The reference can be either a user-defined base-case building or a climate-specific Building America Benchmark building automatically generated by BEopt. The user can also review and modify detailed information on all available options in a linked options library spreadsheet. BEopt calls the DOE2 and TRNSYS simulation engines and uses a sequential search technique to automate the process of identifying optimal building designs along the path to ZNE. BEopt finds these optimal and near-optimal designs based on discrete building options reflecting realistic construction options. BEopt handles special situations with positive or negative interactions between options in different categories. The BEopt software includes a results browser that allows the user to navigate among different design points and retrieve detailed results regarding energy end-use and option costs in different categories. Multiple cases, based on a selected parameter such as climate, can be included in a BEopt project file for comparative purposes.

  3. Are "High Potential" Executives Capable of Building Learning-Oriented Organisations? Reflections on the French Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belet, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The author's interest in learning organisation development leads him to examine large French companies' practices regarding "high potential" executives policies and to question their selection and development processes and their capabilities to develop learning oriented organisations.The author also tries to explain why most large French…

  4. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-03-28

    California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and

  5. DOE's Tribal Energy Program Offers Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas C. MacCourt, Chair, Indian Law Practice, Ater Wynne LLP

    2010-06-01

    This handbook is an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or who seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. Building upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in tribal energy workshops conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, it is designed to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process. It includes information on how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; a general overview of key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and a detailed discussion of ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects. The guide also includes a glossary of some of the most commonly used technical terms.

  6. Building net-centric data strategies in support of a transformational MIW capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, M. A.; Stack, J.

    2010-04-01

    The Mine Warfare (MIW) Community of Interest (COI) was established to develop data strategies in support of a future information-based architecture for naval MIW. As these strategies are developed and deployed, the ability for these datafocused efforts to enable technology insertion is becoming increasingly evident. This paper explores and provides concrete examples as to the ways in which these data strategies are supporting the technology insertion process for software-based systems and ultimately contribute to the establishment of an Open Business Model virtual environment. It is through the creation of such a collaborative research platform that a truly transformation MIW capability can be realized.

  7. Development of a building wake/stack height numerical modeling capability

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; McCallen, R.C.

    1991-09-06

    We are developing state-of-the-art numerical tools which can be used to provide reliable estimates of potential emissions at various LLNL sites. In particular we have focused our efforts in generating models which can simulate the wind flow and dispersion of airborne pollutants around surface-mounted structures such as buildings or building complexes. To achieve this goal, we have adopted two different but complementary approaches in the modeling of this complex problem. The first approach employs a Reynolds-averaged set of equations whose solution results in a description of the mean flow and concentration pattern. In the second approach, we are developing a more advanced model based on the large eddy simulation (LES) concept. In this report, we describe the progress in the development of the two approaches. We begin by discussing the calculational procedure which has been chosen for the Reynolds-averaged model, namely: prediction of the mean flow via a turbulent flow model, and; employment of the calculated flow field to drive a particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC). The performance of this model is benchmarked against experimental data obtained for flow over a backward-facing step. The backward-facing step problem can be viewed as a simplification of a rectangular-shaped surface mounted obstacle. We next include a brief description of the LES method, the continuum and discretized LES equations, the numerical methodology, and some preliminary flow calculations. As with the Reynolds-averaged model, the backward- facing step is used to benchmark the LES model development. The results are in agreement with the calculations of other researchers. We conclude by discussing several improvements which will be considered as we continue the development of both the Reynolds-averaged and the LES models. 40 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Tribal Air Quality Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) (Flagstaff, Arizona) provides training and support for tribal professionals in the technical job skills needed for air quality monitoring and other environmental management tasks. ITEP also arranges internships, job placements, and hands-on training opportunities and supports an…

  9. 3 CFR - Tribal Consultation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... governments, established through and confirmed by the Constitution of the United States, treaties, statutes... Federal policies that have tribal implications, and are responsible for strengthening the government-to... between Federal officials and tribal officials has greatly improved Federal policy toward Indian...

  10. Building a computer-aided design capability using a standard time share operating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes how an integrated system of engineering computer programs can be built using a standard commercially available operating system. The discussion opens with an outline of the auxiliary functions that an operating system can perform for a team of engineers involved in a large and complex task. An example of a specific integrated system is provided to explain how the standard operating system features can be used to organize the programs into a simple and inexpensive but effective system. Applications to an aircraft structural design study are discussed to illustrate the use of an integrated system as a flexible and efficient engineering tool. The discussion concludes with an engineer's assessment of an operating system's capabilities and desirable improvements.

  11. Building human resources capability in health care: a global analysis of best practice--Part I.

    PubMed

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of three, covering very comprehensively human resource practices in a global and generic context. The series of papers presents practices which are directly of relevance to the health-care context, and which are based on proven, effective and pioneering approaches. The first paper covers practices based on British and European experiences, gathered from world-class organisations that have either been finalists or went on to win prestigious quality awards such as the British and European Quality Awards. The benchmarking analysis presented in this paper is based on the sub-criteria prescribed by the European Quality Awards Model, which include: how people resources are planned and improved; how the skills and capabilities of people are preserved and developed through recruitment, training and career progression; how people and teams agree targets and continuously review performance; how the involvement of everyone in continuous improvement is prompted and people empowered to take appropriate action; how effective top-down and bottom-up communication is achieved. PMID:10346313

  12. Native American Tribal Websites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Lists Web sites maintained by 38 different Native American nations that deal with topics ranging from tribal history, news, arts and crafts, tourism, entertainment, and commerce. Represented nations include Apache, Blackfeet, Creek, Iroquois, Mohegan, and Sioux. (CMK)

  13. Coastal Dune Building Capabilities of Native and Exotic Beach Grasses: Initial Results From a Moveable Bed Wind Tunnel Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnetske, P. L.; Seabloom, E. W.; Ruggiero, P.; Hacker, S. D.; Killian, J.; Maddux, T.; Cox, D.; Pattanapol, W.; Bokil, V.

    2008-12-01

    Coastal dune morphology results from the interplay between wind, waves, sediment supply, and vegetation. Over the last 100 years in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, two exotic beach grasses (Ammophila arenaria and A. breviligulata) have replaced much of the native beach grass (Elymus mollis), and formed large continuous, and relatively stable, foredunes where open low-lying dynamic dune systems had previously dominated. Field measurements demonstrate a correlation between dominant beach grass species and foredune height, suggesting the potential for an ecological control on coastal vulnerability. Over a 20 year period, and across a broad range of sediment supply along the coast, A. breviligulata is associated with lower foredune heights than A. arenaria. Based on these correlations, we hypothesize that the A. arenaria is more effective at entrapping and stabilizing sand which results in steep and tall foredune morphology along reaches where this species dominates. A moveable bed wind tunnel experiment is being performed at Oregon State University's O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory to test this hypothesis. Our experiments will quantify the relative sand trapping capabilities among the three beach grass species across different planting densities and wind speeds. Results from the experiment will help parameterize a computational fluid dynamics model describing dune building capabilities of different species, species' densities, wind speeds, and sediment supplies. Wind tunnel experiments and modeling results will be combined with field data, both biological and physical observations, to inform coastal protection measures and dune ecosystem management.

  14. TRIBAL MEDICINAL PLANTS OF CHITTOOR

    PubMed Central

    Vedavathy, S.; Sudhakar, A.; Mrdula, V.

    1997-01-01

    Medicinal plants used in tribal medicine from chittoor district have been surveyed and documented systematically. The paper deals with 202 medicinal plants, indexed along with important tribal applications for the cure of various ailments. PMID:22556807

  15. States and Tribes: Building New Traditions. A Broad Examination of the Condition of State-Tribal Relations and Opportunities for Mutually Beneficial Cooperation as the 21st Century Approaches, from a State Legislative Policy Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, James B., Ed.; Zelio, Judy A., Ed.

    This report summarizes efforts of the Task Force on State-Tribal Relations of the National Conference of State Legislatures to bring together state legislators, Native American leaders, and other parties interested in seeking new approaches to state-tribal relations. The report incorporates the results of a national survey of state-tribal…

  16. Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization - Human Capacity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Irenia Quitiquit Gabriel Ray

    2012-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to create jobs and to provide tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance for energy efficiency. The project will establish a Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program to provide training, outreach and education on energy assistance and conservation to low-income families. The Tribes' mission, under its Strategic Energy Plan of 2008, is to promote tribal efficiency, reduce energy costs, create jobs, economic opportunities, and incorporate energy planning in construction and economic development.

  17. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 2. Building laboratory capability by selecting and developing analytical methodologies.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Matthew; Campisano, Romy; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Hall, Kathy; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Silvestri, Erin; Smith, Terry; Willison, Stuart; Ernst, Hiba

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples of analytically diverse types, including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface residue. Such samples may arise not only from contamination from the incident but also from the multitude of activities surrounding the response to the incident, including decontamination. This document summarizes a range of activities to help build laboratory capability in preparation for sample analysis following a catastrophic incident, including selection and development of fit-for-purpose analytical methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. Fit-for-purpose methods are those which have been selected to meet project specific data quality objectives. For example, methods could be fit for screening contamination in the early phases of investigation of contamination incidents because they are rapid and easily implemented, but those same methods may not be fit for the purpose of remediating the environment to acceptable levels when a more sensitive method is required. While the exact data quality objectives defining fitness-for-purpose can vary with each incident, a governing principle of the method selection and development process for environmental remediation and recovery is based on achieving high throughput while maintaining high quality analytical results. This paper illustrates the result of applying this principle, in the form of a compendium of analytical methods for contaminants of interest. The compendium is based on experience with actual incidents, where appropriate and available. This paper also discusses efforts aimed at adaptation of existing methods to increase fitness-for-purpose and development of innovative methods when necessary. The contaminants of interest are primarily those potentially released through catastrophes resulting from malicious activity

  18. Underfunded Miracles: Tribal Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houser, Schuyler

    Tribal colleges are attracting, retaining, and educating a new population of Native students. These 24 institutions are characterized by their location on reservations, governance by local boards, dedicated faculty and administrators, intercollegiate cooperation and collaboration, frugal management of material resources, and the central role of…

  19. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  20. Time-Based Capabilities of Occupants to Escape Fires in Public Buildings: A Review of Code Provisions and Technical Literature. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl, Fred I.; And Others

    Available technical literature pertaining to exit facility design and emergency escape provisions of the National Fire Protection Association's "Life Safety Code" (1976 Edition) are reviewed in order to determine the technical support for such provisions. The report focuses on the time-based capabilities of building occupants to effect rapid…

  1. Visions and Options: A Report on Five Forums Introducing the Research Consortium on Building Vocational Education and Training Provider Capability. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Berwyn; Robinson, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    This publication outlines the outcomes of forums held in 2005 to introduce the consortium research program which has investigated ways of building vocational education and training (VET) provider capability. It found a range of issues were of concern to participants as they considered how registered training organisations might position themselves…

  2. 50 CFR 223.204 - Tribal plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tribal plans. 223.204 Section 223.204... Threatened Marine and Anadromous Species § 223.204 Tribal plans. (a) Limits on the prohibitions. The... tribal agent in compliance with a Tribal resource management plan (Tribal Plan), provided that...

  3. 50 CFR 223.204 - Tribal plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tribal plans. 223.204 Section 223.204... Threatened Marine and Anadromous Species § 223.204 Tribal plans. (a) Limits on the prohibitions. The... tribal agent in compliance with a Tribal resource management plan (Tribal Plan), provided that...

  4. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon

  5. The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Azevedo, Ines Lima; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

    2009-05-14

    The increasing concern about climate change as well as the expected direct environmental economic impacts of global warming will put considerable constraints on the US building sector, which consumes roughly 48percent of the total primary energy, making it the biggest single source of CO2 emissions. It is obvious that the battle against climate change can only be won by considering innovative building approaches and consumer behaviors and bringing new, effective low carbon technologies to the building / consumer market. However, the limited time given to mitigate climate change is unforgiving to misled research and / or policy. This is the reason why Lawrence Berkeley National Lab is working on an open source long range Stochastic Lite Building Module (SLBM) to estimate the impact of different policies and consumer behavior on the market penetration of low carbon building technologies. SLBM is designed to be a fast running, user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual interface. The tool is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies. It also incorporates consumer preferences and passive building systems as well as interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains). Furthermore, everything is based on service demand, e.g. a certain temperature or luminous intensity, instead of energy intensities. The core objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the practical approach used, to start a discussion process between relevant stakeholders and to build collaborations.

  6. Analysis of Environmental Contamination resulting from Catastrophic Incidents: Part two: Building Laboratory Capability by Selecting and Developing Analytical Methodologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples with analytically diverse types including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface resid...

  7. 77 FR 16120 - Tribal Consultations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... FR 4471, amending VA's regulations governing Federal grants for the establishment, expansion, and.... SUMMARY: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Office of Tribal Government Relations (OTGR) will host...

  8. Report on Tribal Priority Allocations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    As part of Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) funding, Tribal Priority Allocations (TPA) are the principal source of funds for tribal governments and agency offices at the reservation level. According to their unique needs and circumstances, tribes may prioritize funding among eight general categories: government, human services, education, public…

  9. Building organizational technical capabilities: a new approach to address the office of environmental management cleanup challenges in the 21. century

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, J.J.; Rizkalla, E.I.

    2007-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the nations nuclear weapons program legacy wastes cleanup. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term, and a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. Several cleanup projects continued to experience schedule delays and cost growth. The schedule delays and cost growth have been attributed to several factors such as changes in technical scope, regulatory and safety considerations, inadequacy of acquisition approach and project management. This article will briefly review the background and schools of thought on strategic management and organizational change practiced in the United States over the last few decades to improve an organisation's competitive edge and cost performance. The article will briefly review examples such as the change at General Electric, and the recent experience obtained from the nuclear industry, namely the long-term response to the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The long-term response to Chernobyl, though not a case of organizational change, could provide some insight in the strategic management approaches used to address people issues. The article will discuss briefly EM attempts to accelerate cleanup over the past few years, and the subsequent paradigm shift. The paradigm shift targets enhancing and/or creating organizational capabilities to achieve cost savings. To improve its ability to address the 21. century environmental cleanup challenges and achieve cost savings, EM has initiated new corporate changes to develop new and enhance existing capabilities. These new and enhanced organizational capabilities include a renewed emphasis on basics, especially technical capabilities including safety, project management

  10. 75 FR 39730 - Tribal Economic Development Bonds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... for the issuance of tax-exempt bonds by Indian ] tribal governments under Section 7871. See 71 FR... Tribal Economic Development Bonds AGENCY: Department of the Treasury, Departmental Offices. ACTION... from Indian Tribal Governments regarding the Tribal Economic Development Bond provision in Section...

  11. Strengthening Indian Country through Tribal Youth Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Sarah S.

    2009-01-01

    Grants awarded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) Tribal Youth Program (TYP) support and enhance tribal efforts to prevent and control delinquency and improve the juvenile justice system for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth ages 17 and under. TYPs operate in tribal communities, supporting tribal efforts…

  12. Building enterprise-wide resilience by integrating business continuity capability into day-to-day business culture and technology.

    PubMed

    Alesi, Patrick

    2008-04-01

    This paper follows the development of the business continuity planning (BCP) programme at Lehman Brothers following the events of September 11th. Previous attempts to implement a `traditional' form of BCP had been ineffective, but following the events, the firm began to look at BCP in a new light. This paper deals with three main themes: creating a culture of resiliency, leveraging technology, and building flexible plans. Distributing accountability for BCP to business line managers, integrating BCP change management into the normal course of business, and providing every employee with personalised BCP information breeds a culture of resiliency where people are empowered to react to events without burdensome, hierarchical response and recovery procedures. Building a strong relationship with one's application development community can result in novel, customised BCP solutions; existing systems and data structures can be used to enhance an existing BCP. Even the best plans are often challenged by events; understanding that flexibility is essential to effective incident response is a critical element in the development of a proper business continuity plan. PMID:21339108

  13. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  14. Assessment of US shipbuilding current capability to build a commercial OTEC platform and a cold water pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Komelasky, M. C.

    1980-03-01

    Lowry and Hoffman Associates Inc. (LHA) performed for ORI an analysis of the shipbuilding requirements for constructing an OTEC plant, and the available shipyard assets which could fulfill these requirements. In addition, several shipyards were queried concerning their attitudes towards OTEC. In assessing the shipbuilding requirements for an OTEC plant, four different platform configurations were studied and four different designs of the cold water pipe (CWP) were examined. The platforms were: a concrete ship design proposed by Lockheed; concrete spar designs with internal heat exchangers (IHE) (Rosenblatt) and external heat exchangers (XHE) (Lockheed); and a steel ship design proposed by Gibbs and Cox. The types of materials examined for CWP construction were: steel, fiber reinforced plastic (FPR), elastomer, and concrete. The report is organized io three major discussion areas. All the construction requirements are synthesized for the four platforms and CWPs, and general comments are made concerning their availability in the US. Specific shipbuilders facilities are reviewed for their applicability to building an OTEC plant, an assessment of the shipyards general interest in the OTEC program is presented providing an insight into their nearterm commercial outlook. The method of determining this interest will depend largely on a risk analysis of the OTEC system. Also included are factors which may comprise this analysis, and a methodology to ascertain the risk. In the appendices, various shipyard specifications are presented, shipyard assessment matrices are given, graphs of various shipyard economic outlooks are provided, and definitions of the risk factors are listed. (WHK)

  15. 42 CFR 137.331 - May the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal based on a determination of Tribal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137.331 May the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal based on a determination of Tribal capacity or capability? No, the Secretary may not reject a final construction project proposal based on...

  16. Rosebud Sioux Tribal Education Department & Tribal Education Code: External Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RJS & Associates, Inc., Box Elder, MT.

    In 1990-91, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (South Dakota) established a tribal education department (TED) and enacted a tribal education code. Following a regional overview of Indian educational history, this document describes development of the TED and code, tribal education initiatives, schools serving tribal students, and evaluation findings. The TED…

  17. 7 CFR 281.4 - Determining Indian tribal organization capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... shall provide FNS with the following information: (i) Operation of government programs. The ITO shall...) Staffing. The ITO shall provide FNS with sufficient information to determine that personnel who will be... a Merit System of Personnel Administration or any standards later prescribed by the Office...

  18. 7 CFR 281.4 - Determining Indian tribal organization capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shall provide FNS with the following information: (i) Operation of government programs. The ITO shall...) Staffing. The ITO shall provide FNS with sufficient information to determine that personnel who will be... a Merit System of Personnel Administration or any standards later prescribed by the Office...

  19. 7 CFR 281.4 - Determining Indian tribal organization capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... any non-Indian participants. The ITO shall provide FNS with the following information: (i) Operation... Indian and non-Indian participants. (v) Staffing. The ITO shall provide FNS with sufficient information... standards equivalent to current standards for a Merit System of Personnel Administration or any...

  20. 7 CFR 281.4 - Determining Indian tribal organization capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall provide FNS with the following information: (i) Operation of government programs. The ITO shall...) Staffing. The ITO shall provide FNS with sufficient information to determine that personnel who will be... a Merit System of Personnel Administration or any standards later prescribed by the Office...

  1. 7 CFR 281.4 - Determining Indian tribal organization capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall provide FNS with the following information: (i) Operation of government programs. The ITO shall...) Staffing. The ITO shall provide FNS with sufficient information to determine that personnel who will be... a Merit System of Personnel Administration or any standards later prescribed by the Office...

  2. Extending a Mobile Device with Low-Cost 3d Modeling and Building-Scale Mapping Capabilities, for Application in Architecture and Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, M.; Clini, P.; Dellacasa, A.; Falzone, P.; La Camera, A.; Quattrini, R.; Sommariva, E.; Stephens, J.

    2015-02-01

    One of the most challenging problem in architecture is the automated construction of 3D (and 4D) digital models of cultural objects with the aim of implementing open data repositories, scientifically authenticated and responding to well accepted standards of validation, evaluation, preservation, publication, updating and dissemination. The realization of such an ambitious objective requires the adoption of special technological instruments. In this paper we plan to use portable devices (i.e. smartphones, tablets or PDAs eventually extended to wearable ones), extended with a small plug-in, for automatically extracting 3D models of single objects and building-scale mapping of the surrounding environment. At the same time, the device will provide the capability of inserting notes and observations. Where the instrument cannot be directly applied, for example for exploring the top of a complex building, we consider mounting our device, or using equivalent existing equipment, on a drone, in a modular approach for obtaining data de-facto interchangeable. The approach based on the expansion packs has the advantage of anticipating (or even promoting) future extensions of new mobile devices, when the spectrum of possible applications justify the corresponding increased costs. In order to experiment and verify this approach we plan to test it in two specific scenarios of the cultural heritage domain in which such devices seem particularly promising: Strada Nuova in Genoa and Palazzo Ducale in Urbino, both located in Italy.

  3. Native Geosciences: Strengthening the Future Through Tribal Traditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.; Quigley, I.; Douville, V.; Hollow Horn Bear, D.

    2008-12-01

    Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways in our natural sacred homelands and environments. Tribal cultures are the expression of deep understandings of geosciences shared through oral histories, language and ceremonies. Today, Native people as all people are living in a definite time of change. The developing awareness of "change" brings forth an immense opportunity to expand and elevate Native geosciences knowledge, specifically in the areas of earth, wind, fire and water. At the center of "change" is the need to balance the needs of the people with the needs of the environment. Native tradition and our inherent understanding of what is "sacred above is sacred below" is the foundation for an emerging multi-faceted approach to increasing the representation of Natives in geosciences. The approach is also a pathway to assist in Tribal language revitalization, connection of oral histories and ceremonies as well as building an intergenerational teaching/learning community. Humboldt State University, Sinte Gleska University and South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in partnership with Northern California (Hoopa, Yurok, & Karuk) and Great Plains (Lakota) Tribes have nurtured Native geosciences learning communities connected to Tribal Sacred Sites and natural resources. These sites include the Black Hills (Mato Paha, Mato Tiplia, Hinhan Kaga Paha, Mako Sica etc.), Klamath River (Ishkêesh), and Hoopa Valley (Natinixwe). Native geosciences learning is centered on the themes of earth, wind, fire and water and Native application of remote sensing technologies. Tribal Elders and Native geoscientists work collaboratively providing Native families in-field experiential intergenerational learning opportunities which invite participants to immerse themselves spiritually, intellectually, physically and emotionally in the experiences. Through this immersion and experience Native students and families strengthen the circle of our future Tribal

  4. 77 FR 895 - Tribal Child Welfare

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ...The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is issuing this interim final rule to implement statutory provisions related to the Tribal title IV-E program. Effective October 1, 2009, section 479B(b) of the Social Security Act (the Act) authorizes direct Federal funding of Indian Tribes, Tribal organizations, and Tribal consortia that choose to operate a foster care, adoption assistance......

  5. Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Lars; Francis, Carolee Dodge

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes is a prevalent disease in the United States. The emergence of Type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents within the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities brings increased public health and quality of life concerns. In this article, the authors describe an initiative titled "Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools K-12…

  6. Minnesota Tribal Coalition - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Triplett

    2006-12-19

    The project helped tribal leaders, staff and community members on the Grand Portage, Leech Lake, and White Earth Reservations better understand their community's energy usage, assess local resources that might be utilized to reduce energy consumption and begin to formulate appropriate development strategies. The principal guiding interest was to assess energy usage and the potential for wind resource development on each of the three reservations. Key tribal staff became familiar with wind energy technology and assessment methodologies that will be of continued use as each tribe moves forward with development projects. The findings were that wind resources are available at each reservation with varying degrees of potential for development. At White Earth moderate to excellent resources are present at White Earth village and along the U.S. 59 corridor sufficient to be tapped to serve several scattered tribal complexes. At Grand Portage a former community television repeater tower site provides a viable elevated location for a wind turbine to serve the tribal community settlement. At Leech Lake, while most constrained by tree cover, a site adjacent to a casino holds promise for the newer taller wind turbines now coming to market at ever-increasing taller rotor heights. The project developed considerable data of importance regarding the potential for wind development on and near each reservation.

  7. Tribal Government Records Management Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reno/Sparks Indian Colony, Reno, NV.

    Following the passage of the 1972 Indian Self-Determination Act, the volume of tribal government records has exploded. This manual is a guide to establishing a system for the effective organization, maintenance, and disposition of such records. Section A discusses the major goals of a records management program, defines relevant terms, suggests…

  8. A Consortium of Universities Partnering with Tribal Colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seielstad, G. A.; Rattling Leaf, J.

    2003-12-01

    Institutions participating in the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC) are the Universities of North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming; North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana State Universities; the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; and Sinte Gleska University. UMAC?s purpose is to build learning communities integrating researchers with stakeholders, with the intent of leading a regional transition toward sustainability. No single culture has a monopoly on ideas for a sustainable future; in fact, the more diverse the input, the better the emergent ideas will be. The region spanned by the Consortium includes 20 Indian reservations and 18 tribal colleges/universities. The input from these institutions is an essential part of any integrated program to change lifestyles for the benefit of present and future generations. Success stories in education and in resource management, including management of cultural and sacred resources by tribal officials and educators, will be described.

  9. PROBABILISTIC MONITORING FOR TRIBAL AQUATIC RESOURCE: EPA'S NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT TRIBAL TRAINING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harvey, James, David Lawes, Vincent Cooke and Tom Heitmuller. In press. Probabilistic Monitoring for Tribal Aquatic Resources: EPA's National Coastal Assessment Tribal Training (Abstract). To be presented at the Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium, 20-24 September 2004, D...

  10. Integration of Geospatial Technologies and Enhancing Science Initiatives in the North Dakota Tribal Colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, B.

    2005-12-01

    The integration of geospatial technologies into the curriculum of Tribal Colleges (TCU's) has quietly emerged as one of the leading initiatives across Indian Country. Currently, there are over 54,000 American Indians residing on and managing greater than 3.8 million acres of Tribal land in North Dakota and parts of South Dakota. The reservations are undergoing extremely fast population growth within rural states that are experiencing rapid population declines. This poses an important dilemma. How will the Tribes meet (1) the resource needs of a growing population, (2) the demand for a skilled workforce, and (3) resource management goals in ways that contribute to Tribal infrastructure and equate to sustainable resource management? Creating cadres of indigenous scientists that possess skills in geospatial technologies to manage Tribal resources is the key to filling this important Tribal niche. Further, successfully building these cadres will require effective and viable partnerships among the academic, scientific and geospatial communities. The objective of this project is to illustrate the growing trend in geospatial applications and curriculum development occurring in TCU's to meet Tribal workforce demands and to identify successful partnership strategies for TCU's to link with private, State and Federal Agencies. Preliminary results suggest that developing strength-based collaborations that create an environment of investment and ownership by all participants proves an effective model for meeting partnership objectives. A number of these projects and the mechanisms that define the successful collaborations will be illustrated.

  11. 25 CFR 547.4 - How does a tribal government, tribal gaming regulatory authority, or tribal gaming operation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) As permitted by the tribal gaming regulatory authority, individual hardware or software components of... its gaming operation. (d) Emergency hardware and software modifications. (1) A tribal gaming regulatory authority, in its discretion, may permit modified hardware or software to be made available...

  12. 25 CFR 547.4 - How does a tribal government, tribal gaming regulatory authority, or tribal gaming operation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EQUIPMENT USED WITH THE PLAY OF CLASS II GAMES § 547.4 How does a tribal government, tribal gaming... affects the play of the Class II game be submitted, together with the signature verification required by... to correct a problem affecting the fairness, security, or integrity of a game or accounting system...

  13. 25 CFR 547.4 - How does a tribal government, tribal gaming regulatory authority, or tribal gaming operation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... EQUIPMENT USED WITH THE PLAY OF CLASS II GAMES § 547.4 How does a tribal government, tribal gaming... affects the play of the Class II game be submitted, together with the signature verification required by... to correct a problem affecting the fairness, security, or integrity of a game or accounting system...

  14. Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, C.R.

    1996-08-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan, the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan, and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement. The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts.

  15. Analysis of the barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Thomas Elisha

    Native American lands have significant renewable energy resource potential that could serve to ensure energy security and a low carbon energy future for the benefit of tribes as well as the United States. Economic and energy development needs in Native American communities match the energy potential. A disproportionate amount of Native American households have no access to electricity, which is correlated with high poverty and unemployment rates. Despite the vast resources and need for energy, the potential for renewable energy development has not fully materialized. This research explores this subject through three separate articles: 1) a case study of the Navajo Nation that suggests economic viability is not the only significant factor for low adoption of renewable energy on Navajo lands; 2) an expert elicitation of tribal renewable energy experts of what they view as barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands; and 3) a reevaluation of Native Nation Building Theory to include external forces and the role that inter-tribal collaboration plays with renewable energy development by Native nations. Major findings from this research suggests that 1) many Native nations lack the technical and legal capacity to develop renewable energy; 2) inter-tribal collaboration can provide opportunities for sharing resources and building technical, legal, and political capacity; and 3) financing and funding remains a considerable barrier to renewable energy development on tribal lands.

  16. 25 CFR 224.106 - If a tribe has enacted tribal laws, regulations, or procedures for challenging tribal action, how...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS TRIBAL ENERGY RESOURCE AGREEMENTS UNDER THE INDIAN TRIBAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT AND SELF DETERMINATION ACT Interested Party...

  17. Pseudomonas septicaemia following tribal tatoo marks.

    PubMed

    Mathur, D R; Sahoo, A

    1984-09-01

    It is tradition in Northern Nigeria to make tribal tatoo marks on the face of a newborn, commonly on both sides of the angle of the mouth. A case of fatal septicaemia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa following such tribal tatoo marks is reported. PMID:6506210

  18. Indian Tribal Sovereignty and Treaty Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Confluencia, Albuquerque, NM.

    Legal, philosophical, legislative, historical, and international aspects of the issue of Indian tribal sovereignty and treaty rights are presented in six articles based on transcripted proceedings of a forum held at San Diego State University April 12-14, 1978. In the introduction, Sam Deloria examines various definitions of tribal sovereignty. In…

  19. Healthy Tribal Colleges Create Healthy Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demarest, Donna

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that tribal colleges play a pivotal role in both the cultural resilience and in addressing the health problems of a tribal community. Relates Oglala Lakota College (South Dakota) Department of Nursing's leadership role in the development of community resources and identification of private and federal sources of funding. (VWC)

  20. 76 FR 12967 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ...: Administration for Children and Families' Office of Head Start (OHS), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Tribal Consultation Meetings to be held on March 25, 2011, and April 1, 2011. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for... Families, OHS leadership, and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including...

  1. Tribal child welfare. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is issuing this interim final rule to implement statutory provisions related to the Tribal title IV-E program. Effective October 1, 2009, section 479B(b) of the Social Security Act (the Act) authorizes direct Federal funding of Indian Tribes, Tribal organizations, and Tribal consortia that choose to operate a foster care, adoption assistance and, at Tribal option, a kinship guardianship assistance program under title IV-E of the Act. The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 requires that ACF issue interim final regulations which address procedures to ensure that a transfer of responsibility for the placement and care of a child under a State title IV-E plan to a Tribal title IV-E plan occurs in a manner that does not affect the child's eligibility for title IV-E benefits or medical assistance under title XIX of the Act (Medicaid) and such services or payments; in-kind expenditures from third-party sources for the Tribal share of administration and training expenditures under title IV-E; and other provisions to carry out the Tribal-related amendments to title IV-E. This interim final rule includes these provisions and technical amendments necessary to implement a Tribal title IV-E program. PMID:22242232

  2. Montana Tribal College Development Program (MTCDP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Univ., Bozeman. Office of Tribal Service.

    This report describes the Montana Tribal College Development Program (MTCDP), a project designed to meet the educational and economic needs of the state's American Indian tribal communities. The document also includes a detailed evaluation of the program based on research results. The MTCDP was designed to improve services of seven American Indian…

  3. 76 FR 48865 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of one-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs. The......

  4. 77 FR 13338 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ...Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of one-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs. The......

  5. 78 FR 11891 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ...Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of two 1-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs.......

  6. 77 FR 5027 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ...Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of a one-day Tribal Consultation Session to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs.......

  7. 78 FR 57858 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ...Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of two 1-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs.......

  8. 77 FR 48159 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ...Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, notice is hereby given of a one-day Tribal Consultation Session to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs. The purpose of this......

  9. 78 FR 20658 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ...Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of two 1-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs.......

  10. 76 FR 20674 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...Pursuant to the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of one-day Tribal Consultation Sessions to be held between the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs. The......

  11. Reflections on Tribal Governance in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Kenneth L., Ed.

    This document discusses tribal governance as part of the "Native American Week" on Montana State University's Bozeman campus. The document contains a commissioned paper, a panel discussion, a speech, and a list of legal documents of tribal governments in Montana. The commissioned paper, "Federal Indian Policy: A Summary," by Walter Fleming…

  12. A Tribal College with an "Edge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pember, Mary Annette

    2008-01-01

    Although 39 federally recognized American Indian tribes are headquartered in the state of Oklahoma, it comes as some surprise that there were no tribal colleges in the state until this century. During the past eight years, however, tribal colleges have been cropping up throughout the state, including the Comanche Nation College, the College of the…

  13. Choctaw Tribal Government: A New Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brescia, William, Ed.

    The first in a series of planned secondary curriculum materials about the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, the book traces Choctaw tribal government from before seventeenth century contact with the French to the present day. Chapter I treats tribal government in the period before contact with the French, when Choctaw family structure and…

  14. ODDJP's Tribal Youth Initiatives: Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Kay

    The violent crime rate among American Indians is twice that of the United States as a whole. Tribal communities are also beset by high rates of domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, alcohol abuse, and gang involvement. Given such factors, it is not surprising that tribal youth are exposed to multiple risk factors for delinquency. Indeed,…

  15. Approaches for Sustaining and Building Management and Leadership Capability in VET Providers: Literature Review on Leadership and Suggested Reading List. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Victor; Mitchell, John; Clayton, Berwyn; Smith, Larry

    2007-01-01

    This document provides a literature review and a list of suggested reading in support of "Approaches for Sustaining and Building Management and Leadership Capacity in Vocational Education and Training Providers" (ED499670), which examines the existing and potential strategies for sustaining and building greater levels of management and leadership…

  16. Barrow's Living Room: How a Tribal College Library Connects Communities across the Arctic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Erin

    2015-01-01

    More than just storerooms of information, tribal college libraries are gathering spaces that bring people together. The Tuzzy Consortium Library at IIisagvik College builds community by providing services and programs that reflect the values of Alaska's North Slope Iñupiaq people. The college library collaborates with different organizations to…

  17. The Future is Green: Tribal College Saving Water, Electricity--and Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Gelvin

    2005-01-01

    Tribal colleges and universities around the country are harnessing natural sources of energy on their campuses. Renewable energy and sustainable building design have many advantages--they save money and provide healthier learning and working environments while allowing people to live in greater harmony with the earth. This article discusses…

  18. Final Report: Human Capacity Building Grant for Renewable Energy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Sando, Wil

    2010-01-03

    Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprise (WSPWE), a Corporate Entity of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Oregon, developed and distributed written materials, held workshops and field trips to educate tribal members on renewable energy projects that are a possibility utilizing resources on reservation. In order to build stronger public and Tribal Council support for the development of renewable energy projects on the reservation, WSPWE conducted a 12 month public education and technical expertise development program. The objectives of this program were to: To build a knowledge base within the tribal community regarding renewable energy development potential and opportunities on reservation lands. To educate the tribal community regarding development process, impacts and benefits. To increase the technical expertise of tribal government and Tribal Council.

  19. Final Report: Human Capacity Building Grant for Renewable Energy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wil Sando

    2010-01-03

    Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprise (WSPWE), a Corporate Entity of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Oregon, developed and distributed written materials, held workshops and field trips to educate tribal members on renewable energy projects that are a possibility utilizing resources on reservation. In order to build stronger public and Tribal Council support for the development of renewable energy projects on the reservation, WSPWE conducted a 12 month public education and technical expertise development program. The objectives of this program were to: • To build a knowledge base within the tribal community regarding renewable energy development potential and opportunities on reservation lands. • To educate the tribal community regarding development process, impacts and benefits. • To increase the technical expertise of tribal government and Tribal Council.

  20. GMI Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strode, Sarah; Rodriguez, Jose; Steenrod, Steve; Liu, Junhua; Strahan, Susan; Nielsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe the capabilities of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM) with a special focus on capabilities related to the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom). Several science results based on GMI hindcast simulations and preliminary results from the ATom simulations are highlighted. We also discuss the relationship between GMI and GEOS-5.

  1. Genetic portrait of Tamil non-tribal and Irula tribal population using Y chromosome STR markers.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Rajshree; Krishnamoorthy, Kamalakshi; Balasubramanian, Lakshmi; Kunka Mohanram, Ramkumar

    2016-03-01

    The 17 Y chromosomal short tandem repeat loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit were used to analyse the genetic diversity of 517 unrelated males representing the non-tribal and Irula tribal population of Tamil Nadu. A total of 392 unique haplotypes were identified among the 400 non-tribal samples whereas 111 were observed among the 117 Irula tribal samples. Rare alleles for the loci DYS458, DYS635 and YGATAH4.1 were also observed in both population. The haplotype diversity for the non-tribal and Irula tribal population were found to be 0.9999, and the gene diversity ranged from 0.2041 (DYS391) to 0.9612 (DYS385). Comparison of the test population with 26 national and global population using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and determination of the genetic distance matrix using phylogenetic molecular analysis indicate a clustering of the Tamil Nadu non-tribal and Irula tribal population away from other unrelated population and proximity towards some Indo-European (IE) and Asian population. Data are available in the Y chromosome haplotype reference database (YHRD) under accession number YA004055 for Tamil non-tribal and YA004056 for the Irula tribal group. PMID:26024794

  2. Doctors for Tribal Areas: Issues and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Mavalankar, Dileep

    2016-01-01

    Health parameters of tribal population had always been a concern for India's march towards Millennium development Goals (MDG's). Tribal population contributes 8.6% of total population, in spite of efforts and commitment of Government of India towards MGD, India lagged far behind from achieving and optimal health of tribal population will be a concern for achieving Sustainable development Goals SDG's also. Some of the common health problems of the tribal population face are deficiency of essential components in diet like energy malnutrition, protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Goiter, Gastrointestinal disorders, particularly dysentery and parasitic infections are very common. High prevalence of genetic disorders like sickle cell anemia and others are endemic in few tribes of India. Tribal Health is further compounded issues by social issues like excessive consumption of alcohol, poor access to contraceptive, substance abuse and gender based violence. Besides other reasons, like poor budget allocation, difficult to reach, poor access to health care facility, severe shortage of qualified health workers and workforce led to poor governance of health sector in tribal areas. Present view point reflects on the issues of inadequacy of doctors in tribal area and suggests possible solutions. PMID:27385868

  3. Doctors for Tribal Areas: Issues and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Mavalankar, Dileep

    2016-01-01

    Health parameters of tribal population had always been a concern for India's march towards Millennium development Goals (MDG's). Tribal population contributes 8.6% of total population, in spite of efforts and commitment of Government of India towards MGD, India lagged far behind from achieving and optimal health of tribal population will be a concern for achieving Sustainable development Goals SDG's also. Some of the common health problems of the tribal population face are deficiency of essential components in diet like energy malnutrition, protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Goiter, Gastrointestinal disorders, particularly dysentery and parasitic infections are very common. High prevalence of genetic disorders like sickle cell anemia and others are endemic in few tribes of India. Tribal Health is further compounded issues by social issues like excessive consumption of alcohol, poor access to contraceptive, substance abuse and gender based violence. Besides other reasons, like poor budget allocation, difficult to reach, poor access to health care facility, severe shortage of qualified health workers and workforce led to poor governance of health sector in tribal areas. Present view point reflects on the issues of inadequacy of doctors in tribal area and suggests possible solutions. PMID:27385868

  4. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  5. 50 CFR 223.204 - Tribal plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... impact on the biological requirements of the species, and will assess the effect of the Tribal Plan on... plans that address fishery harvest, artificial production, research, or water or land management,...

  6. 50 CFR 223.204 - Tribal plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... impact on the biological requirements of the species, and will assess the effect of the Tribal Plan on... plans that address fishery harvest, artificial production, research, or water or land management,...

  7. Looking into the Hearts of Native Peoples: Nation Building as an Institutional Orientation for Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brayboy, Bryan McKinley Jones; Castagno, Angelina E.; Solyom, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we suggest that graduate programs in predominantly white institutions can and should be sites of self-education and tribal nation building. In arguing this, we examine how a particular graduate program and the participants of that program engaged tribal nation building, and then we suggest that graduate education writ large must…

  8. The tribal girl child in Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Bhanti, R

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the status of the girl child among tribes in India. Tribes have son preference but do not discriminate against girls by female infanticide or sex determination tests. Girls do not inherit land, but they are not abused, hated, or subjected to rigid social norms. Girls are not veiled and are free to participate in dancing and other recreational programs. There is no dowry on marriage. The father of the bridegroom pays a brideprice to the father of the girl. Widowed or divorced women are free to marry again. Daughters care for young children, perform housework, and work in the field with their brothers. In the tribal village of Choti Underi girls were not discriminated against in health and nutrition, but there was a gender gap in education. Both girls and boys were equally exposed to infection and undernourishment. Tribals experience high rates of infant and child mortality due to poverty and its related malnutrition. Child labor among tribals is a way of life for meeting the basic needs of the total household. A recent report on tribals in Rajasthan reveals that 15-20% of child labor involved work in mines that were dangerous to children's health. Girl children had no security provisions or minimum wages. Tribal children were exploited by human service agencies. Child laborers were raped. Government programs in tribal areas should focus on improving living conditions for children in general. Special programs for girls are needed for providing security in the workplace and increasing female educational levels. More information is needed on the work burden of tribal girls that may include wage employment as well as housework. PMID:12158009

  9. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2013-09-26

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will conduct energy audits of nine Tribally-owned governmental buildings in three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to provide a basis for evaluating and selecting the technical and economic viability of energy efficiency improvement options. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will follow established Tribal procurement policies and procedures to secure the services of a qualified provider to conduct energy audits of nine designated buildings. The contracted provider will be required to provide a progress schedule to the Tribe prior to commencing the project and submit an updated schedule with their monthly billings. Findings and analysis reports will be required for buildings as completed, and a complete Energy Audit Summary Report will be required to be submitted with the provider?s final billing. Conducting energy audits of the nine governmental buildings will disclose building inefficiencies to prioritize and address, resulting in reduced energy consumption and expense. These savings will allow Tribal resources to be reallocated to direct services, which will benefit Tribal members and families.

  10. Military Base Off-Taker Opportunities for Tribal Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Nangle, J.

    2013-05-01

    This white paper surveys DOD installations that could have an increased potential interest in the purchase of energy from renewable energy projects on tribal lands. Identification of likely purchasers of renewable energy is a first step in the energy project development process, and this paper aims to identify likely electricity customers that tribal commercial-scale projects could serve. This white paper builds on a geospatial analysis completed in November 2012 identifying 53 reservations within 10 miles of military bases (DOE 2012). This analysis builds on those findings by further refining the list of potential opportunity sites to 15 reservations (Table ES-1), based on five additional factors: 1) The potential renewable resources required to meet the installation energy loads; 2) Proximity to transmission lines; 3) Military installation energy demand; 4) State electricity prices; 5) Local policy and regulatory environment.

  11. Building a clinical leadership community to drive improvement: a multi-case educational study to inform 21st century clinical commissioning, professional capability and patient care.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Marion; Verner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The new NHS requires transformational leadership; people with the knowledge and motivation to make effective change combined with an understanding of the system they work in. The aim of the Practice Leaders' Programme (PLP) is to generate the conditions needed to focus the energy and collaborative creativity required for innovation to enhance leadership skills across the health economy improving patient care. The PLP engaged 60 local leaders from central England in a new approach enabling them to influence others. It has informed educational policy and practice and helped change professional behaviours. Each participant implemented improvements in care and participated in six action learning sets (ALS) and up to six coaching sessions. Evidence of progress, learning and impact was identified in project reports, reflective diaries and evaluations. The ALS brought together key individuals from clinical and management disciplines across a diverse organisation to redesign a system by developing a shared vision for improving the quality of patient care. The links forged, the projects initiated, and the skills cultivated through the PLP produced ongoing benefits and outcomes beyond the course itself. Coaching sessions helped participants focus their efforts to achieve maximum impact and to become resilient in managing service change effectively. The programme has evolved over four years, building on recommendations from external evaluation which identified statistically significant increases in leadership competences. Further enhancement of this programme secured an International Health Improvement Award. Three key findings of positive impact have emerged; personal growth, service improvement, and legacy and sustainability. PMID:23356759

  12. 45 CFR 309.70 - What provisions governing jurisdiction must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... include in its Tribal IV-D plan a description of the population subject to the jurisdiction of the Tribal... least 100 children under the age of majority in the population subject to the jurisdiction of the...

  13. 45 CFR 309.70 - What provisions governing jurisdiction must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... include in its Tribal IV-D plan a description of the population subject to the jurisdiction of the Tribal... least 100 children under the age of majority in the population subject to the jurisdiction of the...

  14. 45 CFR 309.70 - What provisions governing jurisdiction must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... include in its Tribal IV-D plan a description of the population subject to the jurisdiction of the Tribal... least 100 children under the age of majority in the population subject to the jurisdiction of the...

  15. 45 CFR 309.70 - What provisions governing jurisdiction must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... include in its Tribal IV-D plan a description of the population subject to the jurisdiction of the Tribal... least 100 children under the age of majority in the population subject to the jurisdiction of the...

  16. 45 CFR 309.70 - What provisions governing jurisdiction must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... include in its Tribal IV-D plan a description of the population subject to the jurisdiction of the Tribal... least 100 children under the age of majority in the population subject to the jurisdiction of the...

  17. A History and Case Study at a Selected Tribal College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oltrogge, Micheal P.

    2010-01-01

    "A History and Case Study at a Selected Tribal College" focuses on a tribally chartered two-year institution of higher education. The selected Tribal College serves Native American and non-Native American populations on two separate and distinct reservations and one urban location. This study surveys the history to answer basic foundational and…

  18. 77 FR 2732 - Tribal Consultation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Families (ACF) will host a Tribal Consultation to consult on ACF programs and tribal priorities. DATES... political relationship with Indian tribal governments, established through and confirmed by the Constitution... that special relationship, pursuant to Executive Order 13175 of November 6, 2000, executive...

  19. Bringing Thunder: Tribal College Presidents Explore Indigenous New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pease-Pretty, Janine

    2002-01-01

    Describes visit of American tribal college and university presidents, faculty, and staff to Maori tribal colleges and schools in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Suggests that findings from the study of Maori educational systems will affect tribal education in the U.S. (NB)

  20. Association of Community Tribal Schools: Organizational Information Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Community Tribal Schools, Sisseton, SD.

    This booklet provides information on the Association of Community Tribal Schools (ACTS) (South Dakota). The mission of ACTS is to assist community tribal schools in preparing students for lifelong learning and for their role in strengthening and perpetuating traditional tribal societies. Specifically, ACTS promotes the advancement of Indian…

  1. American Indian Education: The Role of Tribal Education Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackety, Dawn M.; Bachler, Susie; Barley, Zoe; Cicchinelli, Lou

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the roles and responsibilities, organization and funding of Tribal Education Departments (TEDs) in the Central Region states. Tribal education departments are departments within tribes responsible for supporting the education of tribal members, created by the sovereign governments of federally recognized American Indian…

  2. 25 CFR 23.21 - Noncompetitive tribal government grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noncompetitive tribal government grants. 23.21 Section 23... Noncompetitive tribal government grants. (a) Grant application information and technical assistance. Information... Superintendent or Area Director. Pre-award and ongoing technical assistance to tribal governments shall...

  3. 25 CFR 23.21 - Noncompetitive tribal government grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Noncompetitive tribal government grants. 23.21 Section 23... Noncompetitive tribal government grants. (a) Grant application information and technical assistance. Information... Superintendent or Area Director. Pre-award and ongoing technical assistance to tribal governments shall...

  4. 42 CFR 137.3 - Effect on existing Tribal rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect on existing Tribal rights. 137.3 Section 137.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.3 Effect on existing Tribal rights. Nothing in this...

  5. 40 CFR 49.6 - Tribal eligibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TRIBAL CLEAN AIR ACT AUTHORITY Tribal Authority § 49.6 Tribal eligibility requirements. Sections 301(d)(2... the same manner as a State for the Clean Air Act provisions identified in § 49.3 if the Indian tribe... purposes of the Clean Air Act and all applicable regulations....

  6. 36 CFR 61.8 - Tribal programs. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tribal programs. 61.8 Section 61.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES FOR STATE, TRIBAL, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS § 61.8 Tribal programs....

  7. 36 CFR 61.8 - Tribal programs. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tribal programs. 61.8 Section 61.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES FOR STATE, TRIBAL, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS § 61.8 Tribal programs....

  8. 36 CFR 61.8 - Tribal programs. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tribal programs. 61.8 Section 61.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES FOR STATE, TRIBAL, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS § 61.8 Tribal programs....

  9. 36 CFR 61.8 - Tribal programs. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tribal programs. 61.8 Section 61.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES FOR STATE, TRIBAL, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS § 61.8 Tribal programs....

  10. 47 CFR 54.414 - Reimbursement for Tribal Link Up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reimbursement for Tribal Link Up. 54.414... Tribal Link Up. (a) Eligible telecommunications carriers that are receiving high-cost support, pursuant... reimbursement for providing Tribal Link Up, eligible telecommunications carriers must follow the procedures...

  11. 47 CFR 54.414 - Reimbursement for Tribal Link Up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reimbursement for Tribal Link Up. 54.414... Tribal Link Up. (a) Eligible telecommunications carriers that are receiving high-cost support, pursuant... reimbursement for providing Tribal Link Up, eligible telecommunications carriers must follow the procedures...

  12. 47 CFR 54.414 - Reimbursement for Tribal Link Up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reimbursement for Tribal Link Up. 54.414... Tribal Link Up. (a) Eligible telecommunications carriers that are receiving high-cost support, pursuant... reimbursement for providing Tribal Link Up, eligible telecommunications carriers must follow the procedures...

  13. 25 CFR 162.015 - May a lease contain a preference consistent with tribal law for employment of tribal members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... law for employment of tribal members? 162.015 Section 162.015 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS General Provisions Lease Administration § 162.015 May a lease contain a preference consistent with tribal law for employment of tribal members?...

  14. 25 CFR 162.015 - May a lease contain a preference consistent with tribal law for employment of tribal members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... law for employment of tribal members? 162.015 Section 162.015 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS General Provisions Lease Administration § 162.015 May a lease contain a preference consistent with tribal law for employment of tribal members?...

  15. 78 FR 21861 - Tribal Consultation on the Draft Regulations Governing the Tribal Transportation Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Consultations and Informational Meetings. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Indian Affairs is announcing tribal... informational sessions regarding the following topics: On July 6, 2012, Moving Ahead for Progress in the...

  16. Rx for Indian Country: Tribal College Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwedel, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Tribal colleges and universities are working in their communities to identify factors that negatively impact health and are training the next generation of healthcare workers to deal with them. And they are making a difference--not just in the lives of their students, but in the lives of future patients.

  17. The Tribalism of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, David B.; Chew, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Scholarly research focusing on teaching and learning has experienced extraordinary growth in the last 20 years. Although this is generally good news for the profession of teaching, a troubling form of tribalism has emerged that inhibits the advancement of teaching practice. In this essay, we trace the development of scholarly inquiry into teaching…

  18. 76 FR 18583 - Draft Tribal Consultation Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... President will consult with American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes, tribal organizations and urban Indian organizations regarding Federal policies that directly affect Indian Country and urban Indian communities. Table... drug-related crime, violence, and disease. In addition to its leadership role in developing...

  19. 77 FR 23283 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... at 60 FR 50651, 50653 (September 29, 1995)). If, however, DOL were to form an advisory committee... network of Indian women organizations that collaborate on finding ways to end domestic violence and abuse... tribes and members of urban AI/AN groups that are not located on Indian tribal lands....

  20. The MBA--Tribal Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bread, Donald J.

    The only graduate program in the United States devoted entirely to tribal management is designed to educate and prepare students for employment with Indian tribes and organizations and with federal and state agencies. The highly academically structured 34-hour program addresses concerns often ignored in corporate management and public…

  1. 78 FR 44459 - Tribal Self-Governance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service 42 CFR Part 137 Tribal Self-Governance CFR Correction In Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 to 399, revised as of October 1, 2012, on page 932,...

  2. Subsistence Exposure Scenarios for Tribal Applications

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Barbara; Harding, Anna; Harris, Stuart; Berger, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The article provides an overview of methods that can be used to develop exposure scenarios for unique tribal natural resource usage patterns. Exposure scenarios are used to evaluate the degree of environmental contact experienced by people with different patterns of lifestyle activities, such as residence, recreation, or work. in 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton's Executive Order 12898 recognized that disproportionately high exposures could be incurred by people with traditional subsistence lifestyles because of their more intensive contact with natural resources. Since then, we have developed several tribal exposure scenarios that reflect tribal-specific traditional lifeways. These scenarios are not necessarily intended to capture contemporary resource patterns, but to describe how the resources were used before contamination or degradation, and will be used once again in fully traditional ways after cleanup and restoration. The direct exposure factors for inhalation and soil ingestion rates are the same in each tribal scenario, but the diets are unique to each tribe and its local ecology, natural foods, and traditional practices. Scenarios, in part or in whole, also have other applications, such as developing environmental standards, evaluating disproportionate exposures, developing sampling plans, planning for climate change, or evaluating service flows as part of natural resource damage assessments. PMID:25197207

  3. 77 FR 4471 - Tribal Veterans Cemetery Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register (76 FR 28925), that proposed to amend regulations in 38 CFR... architect, the true conditions. The following information will be covered in the report: * * * * * (c... Washington, DC, to provide an opportunity for the State or Tribal Organization and its architects to...

  4. 50 CFR 223.204 - Tribal plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Restrictions Applicable to Threatened Marine and Anadromous Species § 223.204 Tribal plans. (a) Limits on the prohibitions. The prohibitions of § 223.203(a) of this subpart relating to threatened species of salmonids listed in § 223.102...

  5. 77 FR 5442 - Indian Tribal Government Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... published in the Federal Register on Monday, January 23, 2012 (77 FR 3210) that announced a public hearing...-133223-08) that was published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, November 8, 2011 (76 FR 69188). The... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans AGENCY:...

  6. Tribal Colleges Reach beyond the Tribe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashburn, Elyse

    2007-01-01

    Turtle Mountain Community College was established to serve Chippewa Indians, but, in any given year, roughly 10 percent of its students are not members of any federally recognized tribe. Many of the 34 other public tribal colleges and universities in the United States have similar makeups. In all, such institutions educate about 5,000 non-Indian…

  7. 76 FR 55678 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ...This document contains the final Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Tribal Consultation Policy outlining the policy to engage in meaningful consultation with federally recognized tribes and the procedures and processes to be followed by tribes and the ACF bureaus and offices when the need for consultation is requested or...

  8. Tribal Resources Directory of ACF Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This directory aims to provide useful information for American Indian tribes and Native American communities about programs funded by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) that benefit tribal and other Native American service populations. Included are profiles of ACF programs that tribes and eligible Native American organizations may…

  9. Manager Pumped on Tribal College Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Jean E.

    2005-01-01

    This column relates the story of Dylan Olson, a struggling business student at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College (Cloquet, Minnesota). During construction of a new gas and convenience store on the Fond du Lac Reservation, Olson recognized an opportunity, applied for the manager's position, and was hired. Olson's experience illustrates the…

  10. Environmental Careers: On Tribal Lands and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Kevin; Montero, Jesse

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the growing need for trained professionals in tribal government environmental programs, recommended education for such positions, and opportunities for local people to get on-the-job training. Lists resource organizations for environmental careers, and describes nine jobs in environmental fields. Offers advice to Native American students…

  11. LRBOI Tribal Renewable Energy-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, David A.

    2013-12-17

    In 2011, a DOE Tribal energy Program first Steps Human Capacity was awarded to the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians (LRBOI). The main purpose of the grant was to increase human capacity of LRBOI, to understand the components of renewable energy and the importance of energy efficiency. This report summarizes the activities, the outcomes, and the lessons learned during this grant.

  12. Tribal Aging Programs: A Basic Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Council on Aging, Albuquerque, NM.

    A national training session for administrators of tribal aging programs held by the National Indian Council on Aging in November 1979 was the basis for the training manual. The seven chapter titles reflect workshop topics with the text of each chapter incorporating material presented in the workshops and examples of model programs on reservations.…

  13. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn

  14. Health Disparities Research Among Small Tribal Populations: Describing Appropriate Criteria for Aggregating Tribal Health Data.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Emily R; Blacksher, Erika; Echo-Hawk, Abigail L; Bassett, Deborah; Harris, Raymond M; Buchwald, Dedra S

    2016-07-01

    In response to community concerns, we used the Tribal Participatory Research framework in collaboration with 5 American-Indian communities in Washington, Idaho, and Montana to identify the appropriate criteria for aggregating health data on small tribes. Across tribal sites, 10 key informant interviews and 10 focus groups (n = 39) were conducted between July 2012 and April 2013. Using thematic analysis of focus group content, we identified 5 guiding criteria for aggregating tribal health data: geographic proximity, community type, environmental exposures, access to resources and services, and economic development. Preliminary findings were presented to focus group participants for validation at each site, and a culminating workshop with representatives from all 5 tribes verified our final results. Using this approach requires critical assessment of research questions and study designs by investigators and tribal leaders to determine when aggregation or stratification is appropriate and how to group data to yield robust results relevant to local concerns. At project inception, tribal leaders should be consulted regarding the validity of proposed groupings. After regular project updates, they should be consulted again to confirm that findings are appropriately contextualized for dissemination. PMID:27268030

  15. Tribal and stakeholder involvement in systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, L.; Swartz, G.; Cooley, C.

    1997-10-01

    Beginning in early 1995, U.S. Department of Energy began an experiment to link tribal and stakeholder representatives into technology assessment activities related to an Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. The INTS study moved outside the framework of after-the-fact public involvement by providing the opportunity for technical and non-technical stakeholders alike to work together in the early predecision stages of the criteria development and assessment of options for innovative mixed waste treatment. The stakeholders gained an appreciation of the intense level of effort required to complete such an analysis. The engineers and scientists conducting the systems analyses had the opportunity (some for the first time) to learn more about tribal and stakeholder issues and how they might apply to the technical tasks related to technology assessment and selection.

  16. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  17. Tribal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  18. Power to the People: Tribal Activists Transform Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talahongva, Patty

    2010-01-01

    When everyone told them it couldn't be done, Joe McDonald, Ed.D., remembers how firmly tribal leaders stuck to their guns and helped draft federal legislation to fund the tribal college system. When her own husband questioned her efforts to get a college degree, Alvena Oldman ignored his cutting remarks and kept on taking classes. When people try…

  19. 7 CFR 281.7 - Indian tribal organization failure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indian tribal organization failure. 281.7 Section 281... ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 281.7 Indian tribal organization failure. When Performance Reporting System... set forth in § 281.3 (c) and (d). If ITO failure is determined, FNS shall require the...

  20. 7 CFR 281.7 - Indian tribal organization failure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Indian tribal organization failure. 281.7 Section 281... RESERVATIONS § 281.7 Indian tribal organization failure. When Performance Reporting System reviews indicate... failure is determined, FNS shall require the appropriate agency of the State government to...

  1. 40 CFR 233.61 - Determination of Tribal eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of Tribal eligibility. 233.61 Section 233.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING 404 STATE PROGRAM REGULATIONS Eligible Indian Tribes § 233.61 Determination of Tribal eligibility. An Indian Tribe may apply to the...

  2. 40 CFR 233.61 - Determination of Tribal eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination of Tribal eligibility. 233.61 Section 233.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING 404 STATE PROGRAM REGULATIONS Eligible Indian Tribes § 233.61 Determination of Tribal eligibility. An Indian Tribe may apply to the...

  3. Producing a Tribal Citizenry Literate in Law and Jurisprudence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between American Indians and the U.S. federal government and state governments is complicated. It is a relationship that controls almost all aspects of tribal life and has resulted in American Indians being the most legislated people in the United States. For many years tribal people relied on non-Native attorneys to help navigate…

  4. 47 CFR 54.1004 - Service to Tribal Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the areas supported. (1) A winning bidder's engagement with the applicable Tribal government shall... such engagement. A copy of the certification and summary shall be sent to the appropriate Tribal... provide a summary of the results of such engagement. A copy of the certification and summary shall be...

  5. 47 CFR 54.1004 - Service to Tribal Lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the areas supported. (1) A winning bidder's engagement with the applicable Tribal government shall... such engagement. A copy of the certification and summary shall be sent to the appropriate Tribal... provide a summary of the results of such engagement. A copy of the certification and summary shall be...

  6. Tribal Child Care and Development Fund: Guide for New Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Bureau, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Tribal Child Care and Development Fund administrators work each day to ensure that the children and families in tribal communities have the child care services that best meet their needs. The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), a federal block grant for States, Tribes, and Territories, is a key resource to help increase the availability,…

  7. Colorado River Basin Development Its Potential Impact on Tribal Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackenberg, Robert A.

    1976-01-01

    Since no mechanism presently exists for the effective distribution of tribal income to tribal members, the wealth created by development of natural resources on the American Indian reservations of the Colorado River Basin will not substantially alter the quality of Indian life. (JC)

  8. 75 FR 65611 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION: Proposed collection; comment... recommendations made in the report was that the USPTO create and maintain an accurate and comprehensive database... database. The USPTO database of official tribal insignias assists trademark attorneys in their...

  9. 78 FR 60861 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION: Proposed... maintain an accurate and comprehensive database containing the official insignia of all federally and state... Appropriations directed the USPTO to create this database. The USPTO database of official tribal...

  10. 40 CFR 145.52 - Requirements for Tribal eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Tribal eligibility. 145.52 Section 145.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Tribal governing body which is currently “carrying out substantial governmental duties and powers” over...

  11. 25 CFR 151.8 - Tribal consent for nonmember acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Tribal consent for nonmember acquisitions. 151.8 Section 151.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LAND ACQUISITIONS § 151.8 Tribal consent for nonmember acquisitions. An individual Indian or tribe may acquire land in trust status on a reservation other than its...

  12. Agriculture Signs Agreement to Provide Services to Tribal Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribal College, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Describes the memorandum of agreement created by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium and the Secretary of Agriculture in an effort to assure that tribal colleges can participate fully in federal agriculture programs. Discusses the activities and improvements of tribal colleges made possible by four $50,000 grants from the United States…

  13. Geographic science for public and Tribal lands management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torregrosa, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    There are more than 650 million acres of U.S. public and Tribal lands, most found west of the Mississippi River. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey's Western Geographic Science Center are working to increase the scientific information available for natural resource decision making, while continuing productive collaborations with Federal land managers, Tribal leaders, and local communities.

  14. Training Tribal Lay Advocates at Sitting Bull College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Students in Sitting Bull College's lay advocate program develop a well-rounded understanding of the law, enabling them to represent defendants in tribal courts. The program offers legal training for its students--and illustrates how American Indian nations can broaden legal representation for Native defendants in tribal courts. It is one of only…

  15. 28 CFR 90.50 - Indian tribal governments discretionary program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Indian tribal governments discretionary program. 90.50 Section 90.50 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST...) Indian tribal governments under the Violence Against Women Act do not need to have law...

  16. 28 CFR 90.50 - Indian tribal governments discretionary program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Indian tribal governments discretionary program. 90.50 Section 90.50 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST...) Indian tribal governments under the Violence Against Women Act do not need to have law...

  17. 28 CFR 90.50 - Indian tribal governments discretionary program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Indian tribal governments discretionary program. 90.50 Section 90.50 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST...) Indian tribal governments under the Violence Against Women Act do not need to have law...

  18. 28 CFR 90.50 - Indian tribal governments discretionary program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Indian tribal governments discretionary program. 90.50 Section 90.50 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) VIOLENCE AGAINST...) Indian tribal governments under the Violence Against Women Act do not need to have law...

  19. 77 FR 13996 - Indian Tribal Government Plans; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... the Federal Register on Wednesday, February 29, 2012 (77 FR 12226) relating to Indian tribal... advance proposed rulemaking (REG-133223-08) which was the subject of FR. Doc. 2012-4850, is corrected as... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans; Correction...

  20. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  1. Concepts and Significance of Tribal History/Literature Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Dave

    The emphasis of this paper is that American Indian tribal history and literature should be in context with major developments that are taking place nationally. Such movements as urbanism, self-determination, cultural pluralism, tribalism and institutional relationships each have special meaning in the affairs of the Indian communities. It is…

  2. 44 CFR 201.7 - Tribal Mitigation Plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MITIGATION PLANNING § 201.7 Tribal Mitigation Plans. The... reduce risks from natural hazards, serving as a guide for decision makers as they commit resources to reducing the effects of natural hazards. (a) Plan requirement. (1) Indian tribal governments applying...

  3. Tribal Community College Libraries: Perceptions of the College Presidents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metoyer-Duran, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    Examines the perceptions of tribal community college presidents to determine their view of the library's role both currently and in the future and to investigate information literacy as a concept to guide the design of library and information services. Highlights include preserving tribal culture and meeting the community's educational needs.…

  4. 47 CFR 54.413 - Link Up for Tribal lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Link Up for Tribal lands. 54.413 Section 54.413 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Low-Income Consumers § 54.413 Link Up for Tribal lands. (a) Definition. For purposes of this...

  5. Tribal College and University Accreditation: A Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putman, T. Elizabeth Mennell

    In the context of tribal colleges, accreditation is a complex issue. This study, which is a replication of a study by J. McDonald in 1982, is an examination of how the perceptions of tribal college faculty, staff, and governing board members toward the importance and impact of accreditation have changed since 1982. Surveys were administered to the…

  6. TRIBAL SOLID WASTE CODES, ORDINANCES, AND REGULATION ON INDIAN COUNTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the document is to address the TRIBAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT CODE in Indian Country. This document is not a regulation and should not be used as such to establish a Tribal Authority and Inherent Sovereign Power to manage and regulate solid waste environmental code...

  7. 36 CFR 61.9 - Grants to tribal programs. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grants to tribal programs. 61.9 Section 61.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES FOR STATE, TRIBAL, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS § 61.9 Grants to...

  8. 36 CFR 61.9 - Grants to tribal programs. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grants to tribal programs. 61.9 Section 61.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES FOR STATE, TRIBAL, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS § 61.9 Grants to...

  9. 36 CFR 61.9 - Grants to tribal programs. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grants to tribal programs. 61.9 Section 61.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES FOR STATE, TRIBAL, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS § 61.9 Grants to...

  10. 36 CFR 61.9 - Grants to tribal programs. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grants to tribal programs. 61.9 Section 61.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES FOR STATE, TRIBAL, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAMS § 61.9 Grants to...

  11. 44 CFR 201.7 - Tribal Mitigation Plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tribal Mitigation Plans. 201.7 Section 201.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...-wide or watershed plans) may be accepted, as appropriate, as long as the Indian tribal government...

  12. An Act of Sovereignty: Governing Tribal Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crazy Bull, Cheryl; Lindquist, Cynthia; Gipp, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Governance at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) affirms the connection between the sovereignty of tribal nations and regional accreditation standards. Shared governance, where faculty, administrators, and trustees all contribute to oversight and decision-making, is a central component at TCUs and has unique implications for tribal…

  13. 25 CFR 163.36 - Tribal forestry program financial support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tribal forestry program financial support. 163.36 Section 163.36 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.36 Tribal forestry program financial support. (a)...

  14. 25 CFR 163.13 - Indian tribal forest enterprise operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian tribal forest enterprise operations. 163.13 Section 163.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.13 Indian tribal forest enterprise...

  15. 25 CFR 163.36 - Tribal forestry program financial support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tribal forestry program financial support. 163.36 Section 163.36 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.36 Tribal forestry program financial support. (a)...

  16. 25 CFR 163.36 - Tribal forestry program financial support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Tribal forestry program financial support. 163.36 Section 163.36 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.36 Tribal forestry program financial support. (a)...

  17. 25 CFR 163.13 - Indian tribal forest enterprise operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indian tribal forest enterprise operations. 163.13 Section 163.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.13 Indian tribal forest enterprise...

  18. 25 CFR 163.36 - Tribal forestry program financial support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tribal forestry program financial support. 163.36 Section 163.36 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.36 Tribal forestry program financial support. (a)...

  19. 25 CFR 163.4 - Secretarial recognition of tribal laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. 163.4 Section 163.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS General Provisions § 163.4 Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. Subject to the...

  20. 25 CFR 163.4 - Secretarial recognition of tribal laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. 163.4 Section 163.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS General Provisions § 163.4 Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. Subject to the...

  1. 25 CFR 163.36 - Tribal forestry program financial support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tribal forestry program financial support. 163.36 Section 163.36 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.36 Tribal forestry program financial support. (a)...

  2. 25 CFR 163.4 - Secretarial recognition of tribal laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. 163.4 Section 163.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS General Provisions § 163.4 Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. Subject to the...

  3. 25 CFR 163.13 - Indian tribal forest enterprise operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indian tribal forest enterprise operations. 163.13 Section 163.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.13 Indian tribal forest enterprise...

  4. 25 CFR 163.4 - Secretarial recognition of tribal laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. 163.4 Section 163.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS General Provisions § 163.4 Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. Subject to the...

  5. 25 CFR 163.13 - Indian tribal forest enterprise operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Indian tribal forest enterprise operations. 163.13 Section 163.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.13 Indian tribal forest enterprise operations....

  6. 25 CFR 163.13 - Indian tribal forest enterprise operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indian tribal forest enterprise operations. 163.13 Section 163.13 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.13 Indian tribal forest enterprise...

  7. 25 CFR 163.4 - Secretarial recognition of tribal laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. 163.4 Section 163.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS General Provisions § 163.4 Secretarial recognition of tribal laws. Subject to the...

  8. Genetic counselling in tribals in India

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Dipika; Das, Kishalaya

    2011-01-01

    Genetic counselling in tribals unlike general population residing in cities and near villages is a difficult task due of their lower literacy and poor socio-economic status. However, sustained effort is essential with a close interaction in the local language, certain misbeliefs need to be removed gradually taking into account their socio-cultural background. The present communication deals with our experience in counselling for haemoglobinopathies during Neonatal Screening Programme undertaken for sickle cell disease in Kalahandi district of Orissa and Community Screening Programmes in primitive tribes of India in four States viz. Orissa, Gujarat, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra. Counselling during neonatal screening programme was very well accepted demonstrating the benefit to the small babies as regards the morbidity. Premarital marriage counselling was also accepted by them. The success rate as followed up for 5 years is almost 50 per cent, the limitation being long follow up. Genetic counselling in these areas has to be continuous to achieve success and therefore the need for setting up of permanent centres in the tribal areas in India. PMID:22089621

  9. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery .

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  10. 40 CFR 49.3 - General Tribal Clean Air Act authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Tribal Clean Air Act authority... ASSISTANCE TRIBAL CLEAN AIR ACT AUTHORITY Tribal Authority § 49.3 General Tribal Clean Air Act authority... respect to all provisions of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations, except for those......

  11. 40 CFR 49.9 - EPA review of tribal Clean Air Act applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA review of tribal Clean Air Act... FEDERAL ASSISTANCE TRIBAL CLEAN AIR ACT AUTHORITY Tribal Authority § 49.9 EPA review of tribal Clean Air... the requirements of § 49.6 for purposes of a Clean Air Act provision, the Indian tribe is eligible...

  12. 25 CFR 61.10 - Review of applications by tribal authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review of applications by tribal authorities. 61.10 Section 61.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT PREPARATION OF ROLLS OF INDIANS § 61.10 Review of applications by tribal authorities. (a) If tribal review...

  13. IAC - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. With the goal of supporting the unique needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems, IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a data base, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automatic data transfer among analysis programs. IAC 2.5, designed to be compatible as far as possible with Level 1.5, contains a major upgrade in executive and database management system capabilities, and includes interfaces to enable thermal, structures, optics, and control interaction dynamics analysis. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation interfaces are supplied for building and viewing models. Advanced graphics capabilities are provided within particular analysis modules such as INCA and NASTRAN. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model

  14. Malaria situation in India with special reference to tribal areas

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ravendra K.; Thakor, H.G.; Saha, K.B.; Sonal, G.S.; Dhariwal, A.C.; Singh, Neeru

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: In India, malaria is a major public health problem in States having predominantly tribal population. The objective of this analysis was to find out the incidence of malaria in various States/districts having varied proportions of tribal population using National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) data. Methods: States and districts were classified into three categories based on proportions of Scheduled Tribes (ST) population as <10, 10-29.9 and 30 per cent + ST population. Five year average (2008-2012) of all important malaria indicators collected by NVBDCP was taken to normalize the effect of annual fluctuations in malaria incidence. Results: State level analysis revealed that ten States/UTs with 30 per cent or more tribal population comprising only three per cent of total population, contributed 14 per cent of total malaria, 21 per cent Plasmodium falciparum and 29 per cent of deaths due to malaria. Similarly, district level analysis showed that districts with 30 per cent or more tribal population comprising about eight per cent country's population contributed to 46 per cent of total malaria cases, 70 per cent P. falciparum and 47 per cent malarial deaths in the country. Interpretation & conclusions: Our analysis showed that the neglect of the ethnic communities in tribal areas would be detrimental to the overall reduction of morbidity and mortality due to malaria. The fight against the increasing burden of malaria in tribal belt requires adoption of multiple approaches and socio-economic development of the tribal communities. PMID:26139770

  15. Lessons Learned on Effective Co-production of Drought Science and Decision Support Tools with the Wind River Reservation Tribal Water Managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeeley, S.; Ojima, D. S.; Beeton, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Wind River Reservation in west-central Wyoming is home of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho Tribes. The reservation has experienced severe drought impacts on Tribal livelihoods and cultural activities in recent years. Scientists from the North Central Climate Science Center, the National Drought Mitigation Center, the High Plains Regional Climate Center, and multiple others are working in close partnership with the tribal water managers on a reservation-wide drought preparedness project that includes a technical assessment of drought risk, capacity building to train managers on drought and climate science and indicators, and drought planning. This talk will present project activities to date along with the valuable and transferrable lessons learned on effective co-production of actionable science for decision making in a tribal context.

  16. Defining and Assessing Enterprise Capability in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Hughes, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an instrument for assessing enterprise capability in schools. The approach to assessing enterprise capability builds on previous work by including three dimensions: self-efficacy, aspirations and knowledge and awareness. We find significant but weak associations between these three constructs suggesting that…

  17. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peone, Tim L.

    2003-03-01

    The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of a training program that builds teachers’ capability to identify and appropriately refer middle and high school students with mental health problems in Brazil: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Brazil, like many countries, there has been a failure to identify mental health problems (MHP) in young people and refer them to appropriate care and support. The school environment provides an ideal setting to do this. Therefore, effective programs need to be developed to train teachers to identify and appropriately refer children with possible MHP. We aimed to evaluate teachers’ ability to identify and appropriately refer students with possible MHP, and the effectiveness of a psychoeducational strategy to build teachers’ capability in this area. Methods To meet the first objective, we conducted a case-control study using a student sample. To meet the second, we employed longitudinal design with repeated measures before and after introducing the psychoeducational strategy using a teacher sample. In the case control study, the Youth Self-Report was used to investigate internalizing and externalizing problems. Before training, teachers selected 26 students who they thought were likely to have MHP. Twenty-six non-selected students acted as controls and were matched by gender, age and grade. The underlying principle was that if teachers could identify abnormal behaviors among their actual students, those with some MHP would likely be among the case group and those without among the control group. In the longitudinal study, 32 teachers were asked to evaluate six vignettes that highlighted behaviors indicating a high risk for psychosis, depression, conduct disorder, hyperactivity, mania, and normal adolescent behavior. We calculated the rates of correct answers for identifying the existence of some MHP and the need for referral before and after training; teachers were not asked to identify the individual conditions. Results Teachers were already able to identify the most symptomatic students, who had both internalizing and externalizing problems, as possibly having MHP, but teachers had difficulty in identifying students with internalizing problems

  19. 76 FR 22114 - National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Tribal Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Tribal Report AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-Day Notice and request for comments; New Information...

  20. 45 CFR 1370.2 - State and Indian tribal grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.2 State and Indian tribal grants. Each grantee...

  1. 45 CFR 1370.2 - State and Indian tribal grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.2 State and Indian tribal grants. Each grantee...

  2. 45 CFR 1370.2 - State and Indian tribal grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.2 State and Indian tribal grants. Each grantee...

  3. 45 CFR 1370.2 - State and Indian tribal grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.2 State and Indian tribal grants. Each grantee...

  4. 45 CFR 1370.2 - State and Indian tribal grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.2 State and Indian tribal grants. Each grantee...

  5. 42 CFR 137.3 - Effect on existing Tribal rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.3 Effect on existing... any other applicable law....

  6. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  7. 45 CFR 309.65 - What must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV-D plan in order to demonstrate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV-D plan in order to demonstrate capacity to operate a Tribal IV-D program? 309.65 Section 309.65 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT...

  8. Watershed development practices for ecorestoration in a tribal area - A case study in Attappady hills, South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnudas, Subha; Savenije, Hubert H. G.; Zaag, Pieter Van der

    Attappady is a rural area in Kerala, South India, that has suffered from severe land degradation and which is inhabited by a poor and predominantly tribal population. The combination of severe land degradation, poverty and a tribal population make Attappady hydrologically and socially unique. Ecological degradation and deforestation followed the gradual building up of land pressure resulting from immigration by more wealthy outsiders. The hills of Attappady were once the forest land of Kerala. Recently it was on the verge of complete degradation. This paper explains how an ecorestoration project involving soil and water conservation interventions, the introduction of agro-forestry, nutritional diversification, income generation activities and training was implemented in a participatory manner. The project had positive impacts on both the environment and the livelihoods of the people living in the watershed, but it also suffered from drawbacks. This paper reports on the successes as well as the lessons learned from this unique ecorestoration project.

  9. Exploring Pathways to Trust: A Tribal Perspective on Data Sharing

    PubMed Central

    James, Rosalina; Tsosie, Rebecca; Sahota, Puneet; Parker, Myra; Dillard, Denise; Sylvester, Ileen; Lewis, John; Klejka, Joseph; Muzquiz, LeeAnna; Olsen, Polly; Whitener, Ron; Burke, Wylie

    2014-01-01

    National Institutes of Health data-sharing policies aim to maximize public benefit derived from genetic studies by increasing research efficiency and the use of a pooled data resource for future studies. While broad access to data may lead to benefits for populations underrepresented in genetic studies, such as indigenous groups, tribes have ownership interest in their data. The Northwest-Alaska Pharmacogenetic Research Network, a partnership involving tribal organizations and universities conducting basic and translational pharmacogenetic research, convened a meeting to discuss the collection, management, and secondary use of research data, and of the processes surrounding access to data stored in federal repositories. This article reports on tribal perspectives that emerged from the dialogue and discusses the implications of tribal government sovereign status on research agreements and data-sharing negotiations. There is strong tribal support for efficient research processes that expedite the benefits from collaborative research, but there is also a need for data sharing procedures that take into account tribal sovereignty and appropriate oversight of research ¬ such as tribally-based research review processes and review of draft manuscripts. We also note specific ways in which accountability could be encouraged by National Institutes of Health as part of the research process. PMID:24830328

  10. California Tribal Nations Technical Water Research

    SciTech Connect

    Ben, C; Coty, J

    2005-08-15

    was necessary to confine the analysis to a smaller geographic area, yet still represent the diversity of tribes and context within which tribal water issues arise. The state of California provides this opportunity. California has 106 federally recognized tribes. California is diverse in its geography, environment, demographics, and economic bases; California tribes demonstrate similar diversity. Additionally, no central repository of national or state tribal water issues exists and information must be aggregated, in general, tribe by tribe. This presents research challenges and, for this report, these were overcome by developing a method to essentially ''sub-sample'' the 106 federally recognized tribes in the state, while making every effort to maintain a sub-sample that broadly represents all of the 106 tribes. n an effort to develop an equitable and appropriate method with which to identify this set of representative tribes, multiple entities were contacted for guidance. Consultation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Indian Health Services (IHS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and Tribal Environmental Directors, provided key information and recommendations to guide the research process. It is hoped that an appropriate representation of the diversity of tribes across the state has been achieved; this includes an adequate representation of similarities and differences between Californian tribes on key water research issues (and the same between regions). This research occurred over a limited time period (i.e., three months) and given a general concern that this may not be sufficient, any information and conclusions in this report should be viewed with this in mind. Finally, it is hoped that this research allows for an (enhanced) informed capacity to better propose further dialog between tribes and LLNL to continue to exchange water research perspectives and define potential research