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Sample records for bulbocavernosus myocutaneous flaps

  1. The platysma myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Baur, Dale A; Williams, Jonathan; Alakaily, Xena

    2014-08-01

    Reconstructing defects of the oral mucosa or skin of the lower one-third of the face can be accomplished by a variety of techniques. This article presents two versions of the platysma myocutaneous flap, which is a reliable, axial pattern, pedicled flap capable of providing excellent one-stage reconstruction of such defects. As discussed herein, the superiorly based and posteriorly based versions of the flap have wide application in the oral and facial region. Also provided is a review of other uses of this flap in head and neck surgery. PMID:24958382

  2. Rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for primary vaginal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J W; Soisson, A P; Fowler, J M; Carter, J R; Twiggs, L B; Carson, L F

    1993-12-01

    Reconstructive procedures are being performed with increasing frequency in conjunction with pelvic exenterations and other radical gynecologic surgeries. The most common reconstructive procedures include continent urinary diversion, rectosigmoid anastomosis, and vaginal reconstruction. Historically, the gracilis myocutaneous flap has been the procedure of choice for vaginal reconstruction. However, the gracilis myocutaneous flap has a history of partial to severe necrosis, a propensity to prolapse, and leaves ipsilateral donor scars on the thigh. In contrast, neovaginal reconstruction using a relatively new procedure, the distally based rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps, has the advantage of using a large, single flap that can be incorporated into the primary incision. This flap is mobilized on a long vascular pedicle, the rectus muscle. In relation to the underlying rectus muscle, the orientation of the cutaneous portion of this flap may be customized to accommodate the pelvic defect or the surgeon's preference. Depending on their primary orientation, they are referred to as either a vertical or transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. The versatility and reliability of the rectus flap is demonstrated here through the presentation of a small pilot series of seven patients. The technique was used for vaginal reconstruction, primarily in conjunction with pelvic exenteration. The flaps were mobilized from the supraumbilical area and had a flap viability of 100% for the 2 years that they have been followed. There were no postoperative incisional or flap infections. There was one infraumbilical fascial dehiscence. The advantages of primary pelvic reconstruction along with the description of the operative techniques are presented. PMID:8112640

  3. Gynecologic reconstruction with a rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: an update.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J W; Carter, J R; Saltzman, A K; Carson, L F; Fowler, J M; Twiggs, L B

    1996-06-01

    This series reports the outcomes and significant complications associated with the rectus myocutaneous flap when used for pelvic or inguinal reconstruction in patients with gynecologic cancers. Perioperative variables were retrospectively reviewed to identify social and medical risk factors as well as intraoperative and postoperative complications that predisposed to rectus flap failure. Fifteen patients with gynecologic malignancies underwent reconstructive procedures using a vertically oriented rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for either vaginal (n = 14) or inguinal (n = 1) reconstruction. The patients' primary cancers were cervical (n = 11), rectal (n = 1), ovarian (n = 1), vulvar (n = 1), and vaginal (n = 1). The median age was 50 years. The median follow-up was 17 months. All flaps were mobilized in conjunction with a radical salvage operation. There were no cases of vaginal prolapse and no abdominal wound infections. However, 4 patients (27%) had major postoperative morbidity in this small series. There was one wound dehiscence and three episodes of necrosis of the subcutaneous and cutaneous portions of the flap. All 4 of these patients required additional operative intervention or debridement. Eleven patients had complete healing of the flap. The rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap is a valuable option for gynecologic reconstructive procedures. Perioperative strategies for improving flap viability include the identification of risk factors that may compromise flap perfusions such as prior abdominal incisions, peripheral vascular disease, and obesity. Meticulous surgical technique is required to preserve the vascular pedicle. These strategies may be useful in preoperative counseling, the perioperative evaluation, and the intraoperative management. PMID:8641616

  4. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.C.; Davis, R.K.; Koltai, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary to a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis.

  5. Treatment of Sternal Wound Infection Using a Free Myocutaneous Flap.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-han; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Wang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-11-01

    Deep sternal wound infections are potentially life-threatening complications after cardiac operations because they can spread into the mediastinum and cause postoperative morbidity and mortality. We present a 65-year-old man with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting. A large sternal defect was left after debridement. After brief vacuum-assisted closure (VAC), a free myocutaneous flap of the anterolateral thigh (ALT) was used to fill the dead space. At the 9-month follow-up, the wound had healed completely without tissue loss or complications, and the patient returned to normal life. This was a successful treatment of a deep sternal wound with free flap coverage. PMID:26522542

  6. Paradoxical effects of heme arginate on survival of myocutaneous flaps

    PubMed Central

    Czopek, Alicja; Wigmore, Stephen J.; Kluth, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) contributes to partial flap and solid organ transplant failure. Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible, cytoprotective enzyme which protects against IRI in solid organ transplant models. Heme arginate (HA), a HO-1 inducer, is a promising, translatable, preconditioning agent. This study investigated the effects of preconditioning with HA on the clinical outcome of a myocutaneous IRI model. Forty male Lewis rats were randomized to intravenously receive 1) Control-NaCl, 2) HA, 3) HA and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), a HO-1 inhibitor; and 4) SnMP alone. Twenty-four hours later, an in situ transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was performed under isoflurane anesthesia. Viability of flaps was measured clinically and by laser-Doppler perfusion scanning. In vitro work on human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa) assessed the effects of HA, SnMP, and the iron chelator desferrioxamine on 1) cytotoxicity, 2) intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, and 3) ROS-mediated DNA damage. In contrast to our hypothesis, HA preconditioning produced over 30% more flap necrosis at 48 h compared with controls (P = 0.02). HA-containing treatments produced significantly worse flap perfusion at all postoperative time points. In vitro work showed that HA is cytotoxic to keratinocytes. This cytotoxicity was independent of HO-1 and was mediated by the generation of ROS by free heme. In contrast to solid organ data, pharmacological preconditioning with HA significantly worsened clinical outcome, thus indicating that this is not a viable approach in free flap research. PMID:24089372

  7. Paradoxical effects of heme arginate on survival of myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Marie-Claire; Czopek, Alicja; Wigmore, Stephen J; Kluth, David C

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) contributes to partial flap and solid organ transplant failure. Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible, cytoprotective enzyme which protects against IRI in solid organ transplant models. Heme arginate (HA), a HO-1 inducer, is a promising, translatable, preconditioning agent. This study investigated the effects of preconditioning with HA on the clinical outcome of a myocutaneous IRI model. Forty male Lewis rats were randomized to intravenously receive 1) Control-NaCl, 2) HA, 3) HA and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), a HO-1 inhibitor; and 4) SnMP alone. Twenty-four hours later, an in situ transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was performed under isoflurane anesthesia. Viability of flaps was measured clinically and by laser-Doppler perfusion scanning. In vitro work on human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa) assessed the effects of HA, SnMP, and the iron chelator desferrioxamine on 1) cytotoxicity, 2) intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, and 3) ROS-mediated DNA damage. In contrast to our hypothesis, HA preconditioning produced over 30% more flap necrosis at 48 h compared with controls (P = 0.02). HA-containing treatments produced significantly worse flap perfusion at all postoperative time points. In vitro work showed that HA is cytotoxic to keratinocytes. This cytotoxicity was independent of HO-1 and was mediated by the generation of ROS by free heme. In contrast to solid organ data, pharmacological preconditioning with HA significantly worsened clinical outcome, thus indicating that this is not a viable approach in free flap research. PMID:24089372

  8. A bilobed thoracoabdominal myocutaneous flap for large thoracic defects.

    PubMed

    Charanek, Ali M

    2014-04-01

    The author presents a surgical procedure for chest-wall soft tissue reconstruction due to large losses based on a modified thoracoabdominal myocutaneous flap. Designed in a bilobed shape, it rests on the superior epigastric vessels and may include the cranial one fourth of the rectus abdominis muscle and the premuscular fascia of external oblique muscle and constitutes one of the largest flaps based on a single minor artery. Local recurrent breast tumors and adjuvant therapy associated to obesity, high blood pressure, type II diabetes, and tobacco abuse on previously debilitated patients render the usual reconstructive procedure difficulties. These become indications for this flap, whose safety is improved by maintaining the deep fascia of the external oblique muscle attached to the flap to preserve the network of the arteries close to the fascia and a wide-ranging interarterial choke anastomosis alongside the lateral projection of the flap on the thorax. Thus, a wide range of angles allows us to reach even the opposite site of the thorax over the sterna area with an easy closure of the donor site facilitated by the vertical portion of the abdominal donor site. The flap was used in 55 patients, and no serious complications, including necrosis, notable dehiscence, hematoma, seroma, or abdominal wall weakness, were observed. The overall aspect is acceptable with the visible scars over the upper part of the abdomen. PMID:23503434

  9. The pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui Shan; Ji, Tong; Zhang, Chen Ping

    2014-08-01

    The pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (PLDMF) is not the first-line reconstructive option for most clinicians; however, when treating salvage patients or those with depleted neck vessels, the PLDMF provides a valuable armamentarium. Unlike the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap or the lower island trapezius flap, the PLDMF has greater versatility in soft tissue design and a longer arc of rotation. These advantages are of great importance in managing advanced reconstructive cases. PMID:24958381

  10. Use of a bilobed gracilis myocutaneous flap in perineal and genital reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Raj M; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2010-08-01

    The gracilis myocutaneous flap has limited functional donor site morbidity and effectively contours genitoperineal reconstructions. When harvested using a traditional vertical skin paddle, distal-tip necrosis (secondary to inconsistent perforator anatomy) is a well-documented complication. Orienting the skin paddle transversely provides a reliable alternative with a shorter rotational arc but results in a more conspicuous deformity and smaller skin paddle when primary closure is desired. On the basis of recent anatomic studies, we designed a pedicled gracilis myocutaneous flap with a bilobed cutaneous paddle to maximally incorporate both the transverse and longitudinal dimensions of the flap's nearly circular angiosome. The bilobed design allows harvest of a larger transverse skin flap (with a shorter arc of rotation) while a shorter, more dependable vertical skin flap is inset into the transverse flap donor site (rather than inside the critical wound bed). Herein, we detail our surgical technique and provide 2 illustrative case examples. PMID:20606582

  11. [Mediastinal tracheotomy in cervicofacial oncologic surgery. Contribution of the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap].

    PubMed

    Hamoir, M; Calteux, N; Robillard, T; Remacle, M; De Coninck, A; Van Den Eeckhaut, J

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of anterior mediastinal tracheostomy with myocutaneous Pectoralis Major flap are described. Resection of the manubrium, clavicular heads and the cartilages of the first and second ribs is necessary. The use of myocutaneous Pectoralis Major flap give good functional results. No infection or hemorrhage of mediastinal great vessels occurred. The indications of Anterior mediastinal tracheostomy are discussed. Stomal and peristomal recurrences following laryngectomy for carcinoma represents the indication of choice. Stomal recurrences are difficult to treat and the prognostic is poor. Prevention of the stomal recurrences is discussed. PMID:4014936

  12. Medial and Lateral Canthal Reconstruction with an Orbicularis Oculi Myocutaneous Island Flap

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jihyeon; Kwon, Sung Tack; Kim, Suk Wha

    2015-01-01

    Background The eyelid and canthal areas are common locations for cutaneous tumors. The medial canthus includes, among many other apparatuses, the canthal tendon and lacrimal canaliculi, and its characteristic thin and supple skin is hard to mimic and restore using tissue from other regions. Accordingly, reconstruction of the canthal area can prove challenging for surgeons. Although various methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps from adjacent regions, have been utilized for reconstructive purposes, they present known disadvantages. However, we were able to successfully reconstruct both lateral and medial canthal area defects by using orbicularis oculi myocutaneous island flaps. Methods Our study included seven patients who underwent medial or lateral canthal region reconstruction, using orbicularis oculi myocutaneous island flaps, between 2011 and 2014, following either cutaneous tumor excision or traumatic avulsion injury. Results Five patients had basal cell carcinoma, one had squamous cell carcinoma of the eyelid, and one had sustained a traumatic avulsion injury of the eyelid and canthal area. Entire flap loss was not observed in any patient, but one-a heavy smoker-showed partial flap loss, which healed with secondary intention and yielded acceptable results. Donor site morbidity was not observed, and all patients were satisfied with their surgical outcomes. Conclusions The canthal regions can be successfully reconstructed with orbicularis oculi myocutaneous island flaps. These flaps offer several key advantages, including similarity in texture, color, and thickness to the recipient site and a negligible incidence of donor site morbidity. PMID:25606488

  13. Pharmacologic manipulation of the microcirculation in cutaneous and myocutaneous flaps in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, C.Y.; Neligan, P.C.; Nakatsuka, T.; Sasaki, G.H.

    1985-04-01

    The vascular effects of isoxsuprine, diazoxide, and isoproterenol were studied in arterial buttock flaps and latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps in pigs. Capillary blood flow to the skin and muscles of these flaps was measured by the radioactive microsphere (15-mu diameter) technique 6 hours postoperatively under pentobarbital anesthesia. It was observed that isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, was not effective in augmentation of skin blood flow in the arterial buttock flaps. However, isoproterenol significantly increased capillary blood flow to the arterialized portion of latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps compared with controls. Isoxsuprine and diazoxide (vascular smooth muscle relaxants) significantly (p less than 0.05) increased total capillary blood flow to the skin of arterial buttock flaps and to the skin and muscles of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps. However, the increase in capillary blood flow occurred mainly in the arterialized portion of these flaps. The capillary blood flow, which was supplied by the small arteries in the distal portion of the arterial buttock and latissimus dorsi flaps, was not increased by treatment with isoxsuprine or diazoxide. Therefore, there was also no increase in the maximum distance of capillary blood flow from the pedicle to the distal end of the flaps. These observations led the authors to hypothesize that different sizes (diameters) of arteries in the skin and muscle have different reactivity (or sensitivity) to vasodilatory drugs. In the present experiment, the large dominant artery of the arterial buttock and latissimus dorsi flaps responded to isoxsuprine or diazoxide (vascular smooth-muscle relaxants), resulting in an increase in blood supply to the capillaries in the proximal portion of the flaps.

  14. Herpes Zoster in a Free Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap After Delayed Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hui; Ahn, Hee Chang; Chung, Min Sung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In concert with advances in surgical reconstruction techniques and improved survival after breast cancer, both the aesthetic and functional outcomes, especially sensory recovery, of breast reconstruction have been addressed. Most studies on sensory recovery in reconstructed breasts have utilized patients’ subjective responses to touch, pain, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, this report describes a case of herpes zoster that developed in a free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, which provides objective evidence of spontaneous reinnervation after breast reconstruction. PMID:25974118

  15. Immediate nipple reconstruction with thoracodorsal artery perforator flap in breast reconstruction by latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in patients with Poland's syndrome.

    PubMed

    He, Jinguang; Xu, Hua; Wang, Tao; Qiao, Yufei; Zhang, Yi; Dong, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    Loss of long-term projection is the major disadvantage of nipple reconstruction using local flaps. We report a technique of immediate perforator flap nipple reconstruction in breast reconstruction by latissimus dorsi (LD) myocutaneous flap in patients with Poland's syndrome. From March 2007 to July 2012, 12 female patients (age range, 15-21 years) underwent breast reconstructions and immediate nipple reconstructions. A thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP) flap was simultaneously raised on the LD muscle flap and folded by itself to form the nipple. Both the LD flap and TAP flaps survived postoperatively. The nipple projection was measured by a caliper, and the average loss was 29% by the 1-year follow-up. Eleven patients considered the aesthetic appearance of reconstructed breast and nipple to be very good or good. The immediate nipple reconstruction with TAP flap could be safely performed and results in considerable satisfaction in breast reconstruction by LD myocutaneous flap in patients with Poland's syndrome. PMID:25752505

  16. Complications and oncologic outcomes of pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Ongart; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Kongdan, Youwanush; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Sukpanich, Rupporn

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several techniques for harvesting the pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap after mastectomy in breast cancer patients. We examined the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique and determined factors associated with its complications and oncological outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the results of 168 TRAM flaps performed between January 2003 and December 2010, focusing on complications and oncologic outcomes. Results Among the 168 pedicled TRAM flap procedures in 158 patients, flap complications occurred in 34%. Most of the flap complications included some degree of fat necrosis. There was no total flap loss. Flap complications were associated with elderly patients and the presence of major donor site complications. Abdominal bulging and hernia occurred in 12% of patients. The bi-pedicled TRAM flap and higher body mass index (BMI) were significant factors associated with increased donor site complications. Seven patients (4%) developed loco-regional recurrence. Within a median follow-up of 27 months, distant metastasis and death occurred in 6% and 4% of patients, respectively. Conclusions The pedicled TRAM flap using the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique in the present study is consistent with the results from previous studies in flap complication rates and oncological outcomes. PMID:27563562

  17. Lateral gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap transposition to the midlateral femur: extending the arc of rotation.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi Raj; Broder, Kevin; Kulidjian, Anna; Bodor, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We report the successful use of an extended lateral gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap for coverage of the midlateral femur using successive delayed elevations. A 62-year-old man underwent wide resection of a liposarcoma of the right anterior thigh with free flap reconstruction and subsequent radiation therapy 10 years before. Four years later, the patient fractured his irradiated femur and was treated with a retrograde intramedullary nail, which subsequently became infected, causing osteomyelitis of the distal femur, septic arthritis of the knee joint, and nonunion of his pathologic fracture. Although advised by numerous surgeons to undergo above-knee amputation, we offered our motivated patient a multidisciplinary approach to clear his infection and pathology; implanted new orthopedic hardware; performed delayed flap reconstruction; and rehabilitated him back to painless, unassisted ambulation. The extended lateral gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap used provided perfused soft tissues and durable coverage for the patient's exposed orthopedic hardware of the midlateral femur, 14 cm above the joint line of the knee. By using this flap to cover a femur defect well above published heights, our patient avoided amputation after years of worsening incapacitation. PMID:24401809

  18. Breast reconstruction with a turbocharged transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap on the contralateral perforator.

    PubMed

    Sbalchiero, Juliano Carlos; de Albuquerque Leal, Paulo Roberto; dos Santos, César Cabello

    2014-11-01

    Seventeen patients were submitted to delayed unilateral breast reconstruction using pedicled, muscle-sparing turbocharged transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap based on the contralateral perforator vessels. The lateral portion of the rectus abdominis muscle on the pedicled side was preserved in 12 patients. Zones II and IV were included in the flap in all cases. Mean duration of surgery was 7 hours and 15 minutes. Four complications developed in the abdominal donor site: contralateral abdominal bulging (n=1), minor suture dehiscence (n=2), and epidermolysis at the border of the abdominal flap and umbilical scar (n=1). Three partial losses (10%-30%) occurred in the reconstructed breast (17.64% of cases), whereas 2 cases of fat necrosis were associated with partial losses. One patient developed deep vein thrombosis with pulmonary embolism; however, outcome was favorable. This proved a viable alternative for breast reconstruction, with satisfactory results in most patients and acceptable morbidity and surgical time. PMID:24625511

  19. Treatment of the severely infected frontal sinus with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flaps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Hwan; Youn, Seung Ki; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Sang Wha; Yi, Hyeong Joong; Kim, Chang Yeon

    2011-05-01

    In trauma patients with severe intracranial hemorrhaging, diagnosing facial bone fractures can be delayed. In frontal sinus fractures with nasofrontal duct obstruction, obliteration of the nasofrontal duct and the sinus is the current treatment of choice. But with inadequate management, ascending infections happen, and widely spread infections can involve the entire frontal soft tissues, which result in meningitis, encephalitis, and subcutaneous abscess pockets creating skin defects. In the treatment of these infections, radical debridement of all infected tissues including galea, pericranium, and surrounding soft tissues is obligatory; hence, available local vascularized flap options for obliteration of the postdebridement defect are scarce. In these situations, free-tissue transfer can be a treatment option. Although there have been numerous reports of using nonvascularized materials for obliteration of the frontal sinus, the material itself can serve as a nidus for infection, and it is generally accepted that well-vascularized tissues have greater ability to withstand local soft-tissue infection and osteomyelitis. Hence, we report 3 cases where we performed latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps for severe frontal sinus infections after frontal cranioplasty for severe hemorrhaging. Large bulks of muscle obliterated the nasofrontal duct and the dead space surrounding the entire frontal sinus. The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap is not a permanent solution for frontal sinus reconstruction, which requires a secondary bony reconstruction. However, when we face acute stages of intractable infections of the frontal sinus, it can control the infection and result in saving the patient's life. PMID:21558912

  20. Etanercept protects myocutaneous flaps from ischaemia reperfusion injury: An experimental study in a rat tram flap model.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Burak; Çevik, Özge; Çilingir, Özlem Tuğçe

    2016-08-01

    Background Being an inevitable component of free tissue transfer, ischemia-reperfusion injury tends to contribute to flap failure. TNF-α is an important proinflammatory cytokine and a prominent mediator of the ischemia-reperfusion injury. Etanercept, a soluble TNF-α binding protein, has shown anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in animal models of renal and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. We have designed an experimental study to investigate the effect of etanercept on myocutaneous ischemia-reperfusion injury on transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap model in rats. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: In group 1 (sham), the TRAM flap was raised and sutured back without further intervention. In group 2 (control), the flap was raised and the ischemia-reperfusion protocol was followed. In group 3, etanercept (10 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered 10 minutes before reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion period, biochemical and histolopathological evaluations were performed on serum and tissue samples. Results In the etanercept group the IMA and 8-OHdG levels (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively) were found significantly lower, and the GSH and SOD levels (p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively) significantly higher in comparison to the control group. The histopathological analysis has revealed a lower degree of hyalinization, degenerated muscle fibers and nuclear change in the etanercept group compared to the control group. Conclusion The results of our experimental study indicate that etanercept offers protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle tissue, enhancing the TRAM flap viability. The ability of etanercept to induce ischemic tolerance suggests that it may be applicable in free-flap surgery. PMID:26950289

  1. [Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with vertical rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal resection for cancer].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Novák, András; István, Gábor; Lóderer, Zoltán; Ledniczky, György; Ondrejka, Pál

    2012-10-01

    Perineal wound healing problems following extended abdomino-perineal resection of ano-rectal cancer represent a great challenge to the surgeon. Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with a myocutan flap was thought to reduce surgical wound healing complications. A review of the relevant literature was carried out on perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal rectal resection for cancer. The more commonly used neoadjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy as well as extended surgical radicality resulted in increased perioperative risks, therefore combined procedures between the colorectal and plastic surgical teams are inevitable. This case report illustrates the above trend. PMID:23086826

  2. Muscular, myocutaneous, and fasciocutaneous flaps in complex urethral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zinman, Leonard

    2002-05-01

    The ability to achieve a long-term, stable, stricture-free, hairless urethral lumen in patients with complex anterior stricture and compromised genital skin is one of the ongoing challenges of reconstructive urologic surgery. The conservative approach by endoscopic urethrotomy or dilatation with a self-catheterization schedule rarely affects a definitive cure except in the short filmy superficial strictures of the bulbous portion of the urethra. Genital fasciocutaneous island flaps are currently the golden standard for definitive, reliable resolution of anterior urethral strictures in patients who have not undergone a prior surgical procedure that may alter the penile or scrotal circulation, or those with skin loss from trauma, decubiti, radiation, or balanitis xerotica obliterans. PMID:12371235

  3. Reconstruction of large composite oromandibulomaxillary defects with free vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Butler, Charles E; Lewin, Jan S

    2004-02-01

    Large composite oromandibulomaxillary defects resulting from oncologic resection can be challenging to reconstruct with a single flap, and functional outcomes remain anecdotal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the authors' surgical experience and scientifically analyze and describe the functional outcomes associated with the use of the vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for reconstruction of these defects. The records of seven patients (mean age, 62 years) who underwent composite resection including hemimandibulectomy, partial maxillectomy, partial pharyngectomy, and floor-of-mouth resection followed by immediate free vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap reconstruction at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (1998 to 2002) were retrospectively reviewed. The tumor type was squamous cell carcinoma in all seven cases; four patients had T4 primary lesions and three had local recurrences. Radiotherapy was used preoperatively in each of the three recurrent cases (mean dose, 70.6 Gy) and postoperatively in three of the four patients with primary tumors (mean dose, 63.0 Gy). The mean length of hospitalization was 8.7 days. There were no major flap complications, fistulas, or donor-site complications. Partial flap necrosis (4 percent of flap area) occurred in one patient and dehiscence of the neck incision occurred in another. Both cases were managed with surgical débridement and closure. A third patient developed a 0.75-cm superficial suture line abscess that healed with dressing changes. The mean postoperative follow-up was 15 months. Six of the seven patients remained tube dependent for their nutrition despite some swallowing improvement; one patient returned to full oral intake. The most common swallowing deficit was impaired laryngeal excursion, which occurred in all six patients evaluated with videofluoroscopic examination and resulted in risk for aspiration in patients and frank aspiration in 83 percent. Speech was

  4. Initial experience with breast reconstruction using the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: a study of 45 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, E.; Bond, J.; Dolan, S.; Kirk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery for breast cancer has led to an increased interest in reconstruction following mastectomy. The transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been proven to give good results in terms of restoration of body symmetry with near normal contour and consistency. Furthermore, immediate reconstruction has the advantage of a single procedure with less psychological morbidity, and reduction in hospital stay and overall complication rate. The aim of this study was to review our experience with the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap procedure an initial series of 45 patients. The overall complication rate of 27% is similar to that reported in the literature, with no total flap loss and nine patients with partial flap loss. There was no delay in commencement of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy and we believe our ability to detect local recurrence has not been compromised. We consider that immediate breast reconstruction is now an integral part of the surgical treatment of breast cancer. PMID:10489808

  5. [Latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap combined with implant in breast reconstruction: The technique of the dorsal bra].

    PubMed

    Bruant-Rodier, C; Chiriac, S; Baratte, A; Dissaux, C; Bodin, F

    2016-06-01

    The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap combined with an implant is an effective breast reconstruction solution especially in irradiated patients. The authors describe the specific technical aspects that allow them to optimize the results of this intervention. In the back, the skin paddle is drawn in the shape of a horizontal spindle so as to conceal the residual scar under the bra. In breast area, a J-shaped contraincision barring the mastectomy scar ensures a harmonious positioning of the skin paddle to the inferolateral part of the breast. After a 180° rotation, the latissimus dorsi muscle envelops the implant like a bra. Its upper edge is attached at the bottom to define the new submammary fold. Under the pectoralis major muscle, its distal end comes to fill the décolleté above the implant. PMID:26117706

  6. Reconstruction of complex oro-facial defects using the myocutaneous sub-mental artery flap.

    PubMed

    Saleh, D B; Fourie, L; Mizen, K D

    2014-07-01

    Oro-facial defects require reconstruction that provides suitable colour match and texture. Moreover inner and outer cheek lining and bulk are key considerations. In cases of severe oro-facial infections concomitant mandibular abnormality, for example trismus, can mandate the need for tissue to obturate mandibular defects. We assessed the use of the myocutaneous sub-mental artery flap (MSA) in non-oncological patients with such defects. Twenty two consecutive patients were included in this case series. All patients were survivors of Cancrum Oris (NOMA). Demographic details, nutritional status and co-morbidities were recorded. Defects were classified according to the tissues destroyed; cheek, mandible, oral cavity, lip(s), nose and eye(s). Simultaneous procedures carried out were recorded. The surgical anatomy of the MSA is described. All patients had composite defects of the cheek and oral cavity plus another local anatomical structure. Adjunct procedures such as trismus release were carried out in 18/22 patients. Four patients required a return to theatre. There was no trismus recurrence observed. No flap losses were incurred. The MSA is a robust flap with minimal incidence of major complications. The MSA negates the need for microsurgical tissue transfer. Furthermore the MSA provides adequate bulk to obturate these defects. Future applications of the MSA may include complex oro-facial oncological defects. PMID:24209385

  7. Subclavicular Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap for Optimal Reconstruction of Large Orbitozygomatic Defects: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pingarron, Lorena; Ruiz, Julian; Rey, Juan; Maniegas, Lourdes; Roson, Silvia; Martinez, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of microvascular free flaps, the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) has been relegated to background for most reconstructive surgeons. The objective of this article is to show the advantages of cervicofacial defects reconstruction with PMMF using the subclavicular plane route in a challenging clinical case. An 83-year-old man presented with cutaneous temporomalar lesion with orbital spread. Tumor resection was performed, including 12 × 11 cm skin and subcutaneous tissue, overlying zygomatic and malar bone, and orbital exenteration. Radical parotidectomy and functional neck dissection were performed. PMMF was chosen as reconstructive option routing the pedicle to the subclavicular plane. The length of the pedicle was 31 cm. The subclavicular route for PMMF increases the flap's length and arc of rotation compared with the conventional supraclavicular one. This procedure decreases the bulk of the PMMF pedicle which makes it functionally and cosmetically favorable. By using this modification, we may widen the “safe” reconstructive possibilities. PMID:25136415

  8. Use of the platysma myocutaneous flap for cervical trachea reconstruction: an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    de Mello-Filho, F V; Mamede, R C; Sader, A A; Velludo, M A; Vicente, W V

    1993-10-01

    Cervical trachea reconstruction with a non-stented platysma myocutaneous door flap (NPMCF) was studied in 23 dogs. Window defects involving 5, 10, or 15 rings and the whole anterior tracheal wall were produced in 3 different groups of animals. A segmentary defect involving the resection of 3 tracheal rings but preserving the posterior membranous wall was created in another group. The results were evaluated by clinical follow-up of up to 100 days, by tracheoscopy 1 week after surgery, and by macroscopic and microscopic examination after the animals' natural death or sacrifice. The NPMCF proved to be adequate for the reconstruction of window defects limited to 5 and 10 rings, with success rates of 100% and 75%, respectively. The use of the NPMCF for tracheal reconstruction had the following main advantages: 1. relatively simple, easy, and expeditious surgery; 2. use of a single operative field; 3. availability of large amounts of donor tissue; 4. adequate thickness; 5. reliable irrigation; 6. resistance to environmental exposure as evidenced by absence of infection; and 7. 100% take rate with no granulomas or scar stenosis at the suture lines. However, luminal occlusion due to flap collapse was a 100% fatal complication when the NPMCP was used either for reconstruction of larger window tracheal defects (15 rings-group 3) or segmentary defects (group 4); this was the main limitation of the method, followed by hair growth with accumulation of secretions, which can be easily dealt with. It can be anticipated that this method has a potential for application in well-selected patients. PMID:8412455

  9. Squamous cell carcinoma of the heel with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction: case report and technical note.

    PubMed

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed Mahmoud; Barsoum, Adel K; Moneer, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer; however, it is relatively rare on the foot. Wide excision of SCC is the recommended surgical treatment. The extent of the excision may involve resection of muscles and bone in cases of deep lesions. The functional and anatomic properties and lack of sufficient locally available tissues make the reconstruction of post-oncosurgical defects of the foot a challenging process. Heel reconstruction poses the biggest challenge due to the unique weight-bearing requirements. We present a case of a Marjolin's ulcer on the heel in a 62-year-old woman complicating a chronic non-healing wound. The heel defect was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with delayed secondary closure. The outcome was successful both functionally and cosmetically. No further procedures were needed. PMID:27161144

  10. Risk factors of recipient site infection in head and neck cancer patients undergoing pectoralis major myocutaneous flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Hsien; Wong, Yong-Kie; Wang, Ching-Ping; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Lai, Chih-Sheng; Liu, Shih-An

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with infection at the recipient site of pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) of head and neck cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed head and neck cancer patients who underwent PMMF reconstruction and identified those with recipient site infection. Variables of patients with and without infection were compared and associated factors were investigated by logistic regression model. A total of 478 patients were included in the final analysis and 183 patients (38.3%) developed recipient site infection. Lower margin of skin island, concurrent tracheotomy, diabetes mellitus, mandibular plate reconstruction, prior radiation, and peri-operative blood transfusion were independent factors associated with recipient site infection of PMMF. Skin island of PMMF beyond the eighth intercostal space markedly increased the risk of recipient site infection after major head and neck cancer surgery. Recognition of relevant factors associated with infection may help surgeons to identify those at risk. PMID:25359197

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma of the heel with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction: case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed Mahmoud; Barsoum, Adel K.; Moneer, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer; however, it is relatively rare on the foot. Wide excision of SCC is the recommended surgical treatment. The extent of the excision may involve resection of muscles and bone in cases of deep lesions. The functional and anatomic properties and lack of sufficient locally available tissues make the reconstruction of post-oncosurgical defects of the foot a challenging process. Heel reconstruction poses the biggest challenge due to the unique weight-bearing requirements. We present a case of a Marjolin’s ulcer on the heel in a 62-year-old woman complicating a chronic non-healing wound. The heel defect was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with delayed secondary closure. The outcome was successful both functionally and cosmetically. No further procedures were needed. PMID:27161144

  12. Recurrent cystosarcoma phylloides of breast: extensive full-thickness excision of chest wall with immediate repair using steel mesh and a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Mindikoğlu, A N; Aktan, K

    1983-10-01

    The case of a young woman with a massive recurrent cystosarcoma phylloides of the breast is presented in whom a full thickness excision of the chest wall was carried out en bloc together with four ribs. The large full-thickness defect of the chest wall was reconstructed with stainless steel mesh and covered by a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The management of post-operative paradoxical movement is also described. PMID:6313105

  13. A modified pectoralis major myocutaneous flap technique with improved vascular supply and an extended rotation arc for oral defects: A case report

    PubMed Central

    KANNO, TAKAHIRO; NARIAI, YOSHIKI; TATSUMI, HIROTO; KARINO, MASAAKI; YOSHINO, AYA; SEKINE, JOJI

    2015-01-01

    The pedicled pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flap is versatile, and is widely used for the treatment of surgical defects following oral cancer resection. Although free-tissue transfer of a vascularized free flap is often preferred, the clinical benefits of the PMMC flap should not be overlooked. The conventional technique of harvesting a PMMC flap involves a single vascular supply from the pectoral branch of the thoracoacromial artery. However, this approach compromises the distal skin island of the flap, and requires an indirect blood supply via communicating vessels, which increases the potential risk of partial distal flap necrosis. When harvesting a PMMC flap for oral and maxillofacial reconstruction, preservation of the lateral thoracic artery and use of the subclavian route are alternatives that ensure sufficient blood supply and an increased rotation arc. Such an approach enables the harvesting of a PMMC flap that can reach the entire oral cavity, including the infraorbital region, palate, middle pterygopalatine fossa and nasopharynx, with no risk of vascular insufficiency to the distal skin island. In conclusion, the technique described in the present study was able to improve the blood supply of the distal PMMC flap and increase its rotation arc. PMID:26722234

  14. Quadratus lumborum catheters for breast reconstruction requiring transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Spence, Nicole Z; Olszynski, Patrycja; Lehan, Anne; Horn, Jean-Lois; Webb, Christopher A J

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with breast cancer may opt to undergo surgical reconstructive flaps at the time of or after mastectomies. These surgeries leave patients with significant postoperative pain and sometimes involve large surgical beds including graft sites from the abdomen to reconstruct the breast. Consequently, multimodal methods of pain management have become highly favored. Quadratus lumborum catheters offer an opioid-sparing technique that can be performed easily and safely. We present a case of a patient who underwent a breast flap reconstruction and had bilateral quadratus lumborum catheters placed for perioperative pain control. PMID:26984687

  15. New technical approach for the repair of an abdominal wall defect after a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmer, Daniel A; Conze, Joachim; Otto, Jens; Schumpelick, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Breast reconstruction with autologous tissue transfer is now a standard operation, but abnormalities of the abdominal wall contour represent a complication which has led surgeons to invent techniques to minimize the morbidity of the donor site. Case presentation We report the case of a woman who had bilateral transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap (TRAM-flap) breast reconstruction. The surgery led to the patient developing an enormous abdominal bulge that caused her disability in terms of abdominal wall and bowel function, pain and contour. In the absence of rectus muscle, the large defect was repaired using a combination of the abdominal wall component separation technique of Ramirez et al and additional mesh augmentation with a lightweight, large-pore polypropylene mesh (Ultrapro®). Conclusion The procedure of Ramirez et al is helpful in achieving a tension-free closure of large defects in the anterior abdominal wall. The additional mesh augmentation allows reinforcement of the thinned lateral abdominal wall. PMID:18416835

  16. [Myocutaneous latissimus dorsi sliding flap in reconstruction of the lower thoracic wall in chronic fistula caused by cystic echinococcosis of the liver].

    PubMed

    Mouton, W; Schweizer, W; Zuber, J C; Tschopp, H; Blumgart, L H

    1991-07-01

    We report the successful treatment of a 47-year-old man who had a 22-year history of chronic discharge from a hepatic echinococcal cyst. Before treatment in our unit there had been 8 previous attempts to control the fistula. By means of a right thoracoabdominal incision (with resection of the 7th and 8th ribs) it was possible to perform a cystectomy with subsequent marsupialisation of the residual cyst wall to the skin. However, after 2 weeks subsequent treatment with maximal Albendazol therapy there was still a big persistent cavity which required further débridement. This resulted in resolution of the infection and allowed a definitive closure of the big cavity and the thoracoabdominal wall using a myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap. The patient's subsequent course has been uneventful with no recurrence of the fistula. PMID:1938443

  17. Reconstruction with a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap after left first rib and clavicular chest wall resection for a metastasis from laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Caronia, Francesco Paolo; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Zanchini, Fabio; Santini, Mario; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; Castorina, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We presented a case of recurrent metastasis from epidermoid cancer that occurred in the left clavicle of a patient with a history of laryngeal cancer treated on April 2005 with extended hemilaryngectomy, neck dissection and chemoradiation therapy. On September 2008, he developed a left clavicular metastasis. The disease was initially well controlled by chemoradiotherapy but it recurred 17 months later. The optimal treatment plan was established by several multidisciplinary meetings and the patient subsequently underwent an en bloc resection of the left clavicle, first rib and all the other involved structures. Coverage of the thoracic defect was achieved using pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. The patient had a successful surgical outcome. At 1-year follow-up, he had no evidence of disease, a good cosmetic result and returned to normal daily activity. He died for bone metastasis with an overall 21 months post-surgical survival. PMID:25319560

  18. [Evaluation of patients' satisfaction after breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and immediate permanent breast implant].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Gőgh, Bettina; Novák, András; István, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    Current surgical treatment modalities for breast reconstruction include latissimus dorsi mycotaneous flap with immediate permanent breast implant (LDI). The aim of the present study was to analyze reconstruction with LDI in terms of quality of life, cosmesis and patient satisfaction. A chart analysis was carried out with the first ten patients who underwent breast reconstruction with LDI. The patients were interviewed and self-assessment quality of life was administered. They also underwent assessment of satisfaction and cosmesis. The high satisfaction and cosmesis scores in the breast reconstruction group indicate the superior results that can be achieved with breast reconstruction. PMID:24747404

  19. Presurgical Botulinum Toxin A Treatment Increases Angiogenesis by Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Subsequent Superiorly Based Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap Survival in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Hwan; Lee, Song Hyun; Park, Yun Joo; Lee, Young Seok; Rah, Dong Kyun; Kim, Sung Young

    2016-06-01

    To date, there have been several experimental studies to assess tissue viability of transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps. Botulinum toxin A (BoTA) has gained popularity in many clinical fields, for a variety of therapeutic and aesthetic purposes. In addition, there have been reports regarding the positive effect of BoTA on flap survival by various mechanisms. In this study, we hypothesized that pretreatment with BoTA could augment the survival of TRAM flaps via increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent angiogenesis.Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a BoTA group. Five days before superiorly based TRAM flap elevation, the BoTA group was pretreated with BoTA, whereas the control group was pretreated with normal saline. Gross flap survival rates were assessed, and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed for the evaluation of angiogenesis-related factors (CD34, HIF-1α, and VEGF).In the BoTA group, the gross flap survival rate was significantly higher than that in the control group on both ipsilateral (92.78.3 ± 5.05% vs 86.8 ± 3.88%, P = 0.009) and contralateral (91.57 ± 5.79% vs 74.28 ± 11.83%, P < 0.001) sides.The relative mRNA expression of CD34 and VEGF was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group in every zone, whereas the relative mRNA expression of HIF-1α was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group on contralateral sides. The relative protein expression of CD34, VEGF, and HIF-1α was significantly higher in the BoTA group than that in the control group in every zone.In conclusion, we demonstrate that presurgical BoTA treatment might increase angiogenesis by HIF-1α/VEGF, subsequently increase superiorly based TRAM flap survival in a rat model. PMID:25695458

  20. Use of Latissimus Dorsi Pedicled Myocutaneous Flap for Reconstruction in the Chest Area of an 8-Month-Old Female Infant with Ectopia Cordis

    PubMed Central

    Dastagir, Khaled; Breymann, Thomas; Heckmann, Andreas; Horke, Alexander; Vogt, Peter Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is characterized by a complete or partial malposition of the heart outside the thorax. Despite the interdisciplinary treatment, the repair of EC is still very difficult and offers new surgical challenges because of its complexity and various combinations with other anomalies. We report the successful outcome after using a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap in reconstructive surgery in the setting of chronic wound dehiscence in an 8-month-old female infant born with a thoracic EC and omphalocele. PMID:25798359

  1. Management of giant inferior triangle lumbar hernia (Petit's triangle hernia): A rare complication following delayed breast reconstruction with extended latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Arruda, Eduardo Gustavo; Sturtz, Gustavo; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lumbar triangle hernia after breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi flap (LDMF) is a very rare complication and few cases were previously described. Muscle mobilization and iatrogenic fascia defect are related etiologic factors. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors describe a rare case of lumbar hernia in a 58-year-old woman who underwent delayed left breast reconstruction with LDMF. Two months after surgery, a progressive symptomatic lower left lumbar bulge was observed. The CT scan confirmed the diagnosis and delineated an 18 cm lumbar defect filled with lower and large bowel. At operation, the defect was exposed and the hernia sac reduced. In order to obtain stability, the remained local muscle and fascia flaps were mobilized into the defect. Additional strength was achieved with a two-layer closure of prosthetic mesh (intra/extra peritoneal). The patient is currently in the 10th postoperative year of hernia repair and satisfactory lumbar wall contour was achieved. Neither the recurrence of lumbar hernia nor symptoms compliance was noted. DISCUSSION Lumbar hernia is an uncommon complication of LDMF harvest. Although it is a rare disease, general and plastic surgeons must be on alert to avoid complications and misdiagnosis. Seroma differential diagnosis is important in order to avoid bowel perforation due to aspiration. Defect reconstruction is necessary with a muscular and fascia flaps mobilization and synthetic mesh in order to obtain a stable repair. CONCLUSION The knowledge of this rare post-operative complication following delayed breast reconstruction is crucial to its surgical management. Early surgical intervention is warranted in order to avoid severe complications. PMID:24794025

  2. [Immediate vaginal reconstruction with a musculocutaneous flap from the gracilis muscle after extended abdomino-perineal resection].

    PubMed

    Sezeur, A; Hautefeuille, P; Trevidic, P

    1995-01-01

    Reconstruction of a functional vagina after radical abdomino-perineal resection is a difficult surgical problem. The use of the gracilis myocutaneous flap provides a satisfactory solution. This article describes the surgical procedure of immediate vaginal reconstruction using the gracilis myocutaneous flap. Unfortunately, this technique is still not widely used by surgical teams. Nevertheless, it is a useful flap because of its low morbidity and the satisfying result of the functional neovaginal cavity. PMID:8526447

  3. Keyhole Flap Nipple Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Camille G.; Iman, Al-Haj; Spiegel, Aldona J.; Cronin, Ernest D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Nipple-areola reconstruction is often one of the final but most challenging aspects of breast reconstruction. However, it is an integral and important component of breast reconstruction because it transforms the mound into a breast. We performed 133 nipple-areola reconstructions during a period of 4 years. Of these reconstructions, 76 of 133 nipple-areola complexes were reconstructed using the keyhole flap technique. The tissue used for the keyhole dermoadipose flap technique include transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flaps (60/76), latissimus dorsi flaps (15/76), or mastectomy skin flaps after tissue expanders (1/76). The average patient follow-up was 17 months. The design of the flap is based on a keyhole configuration. The base of the flap determines the width of the future nipple, whereas the length of the flap determines the projection. We try to match the projection of the contralateral nipple if present. The keyhole flap is simple to construct yet reliable. It provides good symmetry and projection and avoids the creation of new scars. The areola is then tattooed approximately 3 months after the nipple reconstruction.

  4. Keyhole Flap Nipple Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph I; Cash, Camille G; Iman, Al-Haj; Spiegel, Aldona J; Cronin, Ernest D

    2016-05-01

    Nipple-areola reconstruction is often one of the final but most challenging aspects of breast reconstruction. However, it is an integral and important component of breast reconstruction because it transforms the mound into a breast. We performed 133 nipple-areola reconstructions during a period of 4 years. Of these reconstructions, 76 of 133 nipple-areola complexes were reconstructed using the keyhole flap technique. The tissue used for the keyhole dermoadipose flap technique include transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flaps (60/76), latissimus dorsi flaps (15/76), or mastectomy skin flaps after tissue expanders (1/76). The average patient follow-up was 17 months. The design of the flap is based on a keyhole configuration. The base of the flap determines the width of the future nipple, whereas the length of the flap determines the projection. We try to match the projection of the contralateral nipple if present. The keyhole flap is simple to construct yet reliable. It provides good symmetry and projection and avoids the creation of new scars. The areola is then tattooed approximately 3 months after the nipple reconstruction. PMID:27579228

  5. [Flap-reconstruction in mouth and oropharynx. A clinical comparison of methods (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Eitschberger, E; Weidenbecher, M

    1981-10-01

    The possible methods for plastic reconstruction after resection of malignant tumors in the mouth and oropharynx are reported. A total of 165 patients, operated upon between 1973 and 1980, has been reviewed. The tumor was located 26 times in the tongue, 4 times within the base of the tongue, 27 times in the floor of the mouth, 10 times in the floor of the mouth and in the tongue and 80 times in the tonsils. For reconstruction 8 times the deltopectoral flap, 51 times the forehead flap, 42 times the tongue flap, 7 times the myocutaneous sternocleido-mastoideus island flap were used. 8 times other methods were applied, like for instance skin grafts, and in 41 cases a primary closure of the defect was possible. Complete necrosis of the flap were rare, more frequent in contrast were partial dehiscences with or without a fistula. Thus in the forehead flap 5 times a necrosis occurred whereas in 15 cases a dehiscence was seen. Even better results were achieved for the deltopectoral- and tongue flap. In contrast, the skin island of the myocutaneous sternocleidomastoideus flaps all became necrotic, but only once a temporary fistula developed. Of the pectoralis myocutaneous island flaps the first two became necrotic, probably due to lack of surgical experience. Taking into account the surgical expenditure, the functional as well as cosmetical results, the methods may be scaled according to clinical value as follows: The pectoralis major myocutaneous island flap and the tongue flap equally range on the first place, followed by the myocutaneous sternocleidomastoideus island flap, and on the 3. and 4. place by the deltopectoral and forehead flap. PMID:7287523

  6. [The gracilis muscle as musculocutaneous flap. Evaluation of 20 cases].

    PubMed

    Gholam, D; Trevidic, P; Kleimann, P; Hautefeuille, P; Nicoletis, C

    1991-01-01

    The use of gracilis as muscular or myocutaneous flap is very well-known. The authors report 20 cases of gracilis flap including 13 reconstructions of the vaginal cavity following extended abdomino-perineal resection. Some technical points concerning the localization of the cutaneous part of the flap and the pedicle dissection are discussed. The use of gracilis flap is still limited in surgical teams following extended abdomino-perineal resection, nevertheless it is a very useful flap because of its low morbidity, the shortening of patient hospitalization and the very satisfying aesthetic result of the neo-vaginal cavity. PMID:1726389

  7. Free anterolateral thigh flap harvesting from paralytic limbs in post-polio syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Chen, Wei-Chen; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report two cases of poliomyelitis in which an anterolateral thigh myocutaneous free flap was harvested from the paralytic limb for oral reconstruction. We observed a decrease in the pedicle diameter of the anterolateral thigh flap, but the blood supply to the skin paddle was adequate. PMID:27583272

  8. Free anterolateral thigh flap harvesting from paralytic limbs in post-polio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Chen, Wei-Chen; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of poliomyelitis in which an anterolateral thigh myocutaneous free flap was harvested from the paralytic limb for oral reconstruction. We observed a decrease in the pedicle diameter of the anterolateral thigh flap, but the blood supply to the skin paddle was adequate. PMID:27583272

  9. Platysma flap using dual skin paddles.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, El Muiz A; Bhatia, Sunil K; Hammond, Doug E

    2016-07-01

    The platysma myocutaneous flap is rarely reported as an option for reconstruction in the head and neck. In our experience it is a reliable flap that is easy to raise, has a limited risk of morbidity at the donor site, and allows for early recommencement of oral function. We report a patient with an unusually aggressive orocutaneous fistula that complicated the simple extraction of teeth. We modified the platysma flap to provide two independent skin paddles so we could reconstruct both the intraoral and cutaneous defects simultaneously with a good clinical outcome. PMID:26947107

  10. Reconstruction Using Locoregional Flaps for Large Skull Base Defects.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Takaharu; Motomura, Hisashi; Ayabe, Shinobu

    2015-06-01

    We present a modified locoregional flap for the reconstruction of large anterior skull base defects that should be reconstructed with a free flap according to Yano's algorithm. No classification of skull base defects had been proposed for a long time. Yano et al suggested a new classification in 2012. The lb defect of Yano's classification extends horizontally from the cribriform plate to the orbital roof. According to Yano's algorithm for subsequent skull base reconstructive procedures, a lb defect should be reconstructed with a free flap such as an anterolateral thigh free flap or rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap. However, our modified locoregional flap has also enabled reconstruction of lb defects. In this case series, we used a locoregional flap for lb defects. No major postoperative complications occurred. We present our modified locoregional flap that enables reconstruction of lb defects. PMID:26225296

  11. Differences in blood flow volume and vascular resistance between free flaps: assessment in 58 cases.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Keisuke; Kamei, Yuzuru; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Shunjiro; Torii, Shuhei

    2009-01-01

    In free-flap transfer, blood flow in the transferred flap contributes to wound healing and to resistance against infection in the recipient site. Successful reconstructions using free tissue transfers may be required to define and choose flaps with abundant blood flow in necessary cases. We investigated blood flow in the flap by transit-time ultrasound flowmeter in 58 free-flap transfers. Flow volume was compared between flap tissues as vascular resistance in the flap was calculated. Fasciocutaneous and osteocutaneous flaps had relatively low blood flow volume, myocutaneous flaps had more, and intraperitoneal flaps had still higher blood flow volume. These differences were statistically significant. Vascular resistance significantly decreased in the same order of comparison. Our findings will help in selecting the most suitable flaps for reconstructive surgery. PMID:18942044

  12. Microsurgical free flaps: Controversies in maxillofacial reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    George, Rinku K.; Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructive microsurgery for oral and maxillofacial (OMF) defects is considered as a niche specialty and is performed regularly only in a handful of centers. Till recently the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC) was considered to be the benchmark for OMF reconstruction. This philosophy is changing fast with rapid advancement in reconstructive microsurgery. Due to improvement in instrumentation and the development of finer techniques of flap harvesting we can positively state that microsurgery has come of age. Better techniques, microscopes and micro instruments enable us to do things previously unimaginable. Supramicrosurgery and ultrathin flaps are a testimony to this. Years of innovation in reconstructive microsurgery have given us a reasonably good number of very excellent flaps. Tremendous work has been put into producing some exceptionally brilliant research articles, sometimes contradicting each other. This has led to the need for clarity in some areas in this field. This article will review some controversies in reconstructive microsurgery and analyze some of the most common microvascular free flaps (MFF) used in OMF reconstruction. It aims to buttress the fact that three flaps-the radial forearm free flap (RFFF), anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) and fibula are the ones most expedient in the surgeon's arsenal, since they can cater to almost all sizeable defects we come across after ablative surgery in the OMF region. They can thus aptly be titled as the workhorses of OMF reconstruction with regard to free flaps. PMID:23662264

  13. Nonmyocytic androgen receptor regulates the sexually dimorphic development of the embryonic bulbocavernosus muscle.

    PubMed

    Ipulan, Lerrie Ann; Suzuki, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Yuki; Murashima, Aki; Imai, Yuuki; Omori, Akiko; Nakagata, Naomi; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Valasek, Petr; Yamada, Gen

    2014-07-01

    The bulbocavernosus (BC) is a sexually dimorphic muscle observed only in males. Androgen receptor knockout mouse studies show the loss of BC formation. This suggests that androgen signaling plays a vital role in its development. Androgen has been known to induce muscle hypertrophy through satellite cell activation and myonuclei accretion during muscle regeneration and growth. Whether the same mechanism is present during embryonic development is not yet elucidated. To identify the mechanism of sexual dimorphism during BC development, the timing of morphological differences was first established. It was revealed that the BC was morphologically different between male and female mice at embryonic day (E) 16.5. Differences in the myogenic process were detected at E15.5. The male BC possesses a higher number of proliferating undifferentiated myoblasts. To identify the role of androgen signaling in this process, muscle-specific androgen receptor (AR) mutation was introduced, which resulted in no observable phenotypes. Hence, the expression of AR in the BC was examined and found that the AR did not colocalize with any muscle markers such as Myogenic differentiation 1, Myogenin, and paired box transcription factor 7. It was revealed that the mesenchyme surrounding the BC expressed AR and the BC started to express AR at E15.5. AR mutation on the nonmyocytic cells using spalt-like transcription factor 1 (Sall1) Cre driver mouse was performed, which resulted in defective BC formation. It was revealed that the number of proliferating undifferentiated myoblasts was reduced in the Sall1 Cre:AR(L-/Y) mutant embryos, and the adult mutants were devoid of BC. The transition of myoblasts from proliferation to differentiation is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. An increased expression of p21 was observed in the BC myoblast of the Sall1 Cre:AR(L-/Y) mutant and wild-type female. Altogether this study suggests that the nonmyocytic AR may paracrinely regulate the

  14. Maintenance of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus neuromuscular system is not influenced by physiological levels of glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Niel, Lee; Alves, Philip A; Pinzon, Natalia; Holmes, Melissa M; Lovern, Matthew B; Monks, D Ashley

    2012-08-01

    The spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) neuromuscular system mediates sexual reflexes, and is highly sexually dimorphic in rats. While maintenance of this system in adulthood is mainly dependent on androgens, there is also evidence to suggest that glucocorticoids may have a catabolic effect. We conducted a series of studies to fully examine the influence of basal glucocorticoids on the size of the SNB motoneurons and the associated bulbocavernosus (BC) and levator ani (LA) muscles. Specifically, we examined whether the muscles and motoneurons of the SNB neuromuscular system are affected by: (1) blockade of endogenous glucocorticoids via delivery of the antagonist RU-486 at doses ranging from low to high, (2) removal of endogenous glucocorticoids via adrenalectomy, or (3) restoration of physiological corticosterone levels via implants following adrenalectomy. In each study, we found that muscle and motoneuron size were unaffected by glucocorticoid manipulation. In contrast to previous results with supraphysiological levels of glucocorticoids, our results indicate that basal, nonstress levels of glucocorticoids do not influence the size of the BC/LA muscles or their associated SNB motoneurons. PMID:21412989

  15. Free Flap Reconstruction for Complex Scalp and Forehead Defects with Associated Full-Thickness Calvarial Bone Resections

    PubMed Central

    Larrañaga, Juan; Rios, Alfredo; Franciosi, Edgardo; Mazzaro, Eduardo; Figari, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Extensive defects of the scalp and forehead associated with calvarial bone resections demand complex reconstructions. Free flaps offer vascularized tissue of excellent quality and quantity. We report six patients with extensive scalp and forehead defects associated with calvarial bone resections reconstructed with free flaps. Five patients also required a cranioplasty. The flaps used were two anterolateral thigh flaps, one vastus lateralis flap, one myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap, one latissimus dorsi flap, and one radial forearm flap. All flaps survived with no partial necrosis. There were no donor site complications. One patient presented an exposure of the alloplastic material used for cranioplasty. We strongly recommend the use of free flaps for this kind of reconstruction. PMID:24294403

  16. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    PubMed

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap. PMID:9768175

  17. Pedicled Breast Flap for Soft Tissue Coverage of a Forearm Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zuriarrain, Alexander; Brooks, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Summary: This article presents the case of a 35-year-old woman who sustained a shotgun blast injury to the left forearm and chest wall causing significant soft tissue loss of the extensor compartment. The patient suffered a Gustilo IIIB open radial shaft fracture requiring orthopedic stabilization and plastic surgery intervention. As a result, the patient eventually was reconstructed with the use of a pedicled breast flap. Because of the patient’s macromastia and her large forearm wound and morbid obesity, an individualized approach was developed such that a breast flap was designed because of its proximity to the upper extremity. The advantage of this type of reconstruction is a more natural contour to the forearm with minimal donor site morbidity. Before creation of the flap, the patient expressed interest in a reduction mammaplasty because of her symptomatic macromastia. Overall, this was a 2-step operation whereby first the breast flap was created, and then a few weeks later, once the arm healed, the reduction mammaplasty was performed. Other types of flaps for upper extremity reconstruction include the rectus abdominis myocutaneous, transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous, vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous, groin, and latissumus dorsi. The pedicled breast flap is an innovative approach to upper extremity soft tissue coverage and can be tailored to the specific needs of patients similar to our case presentation. PMID:27104108

  18. The infrahyoid flap: a comprehensive review of an often overlooked reconstructive method.

    PubMed

    Deganello, Alberto; Leemans, C René

    2014-08-01

    The infrahyoid flap is a myocutaneous pedicled flap mainly nourished by the superior thyroid vessels through the perforators of the infrahyoid muscles. This thin and pliable flap provides a skin island of about 7 by 4 cm from the central part of the anterior neck. The flap can be transferred on its pedicle of superior thyroid artery and vein to reconstruct medium sized head and neck defects created after cancer ablation. We have successfully used this flap in a series of 40 cases with no total flap loss and with 1 case of superficial skin necrosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the clinical usefulness of this pedicled flap even in the microvascular free flap era. A comprehensive review of the available literature reporting on the infrahyoid flap has been carried out using a web search. The history of the infrahyoid flap, the surgical technique with technical innovations, the clinical utility and limitations of this flap, are reported and discussed. Among the 7 larger series (cohort larger than 50 cases) a total of 956 flaps were performed, and the global success rate was 91.7%, with failures being mainly related to partial skin necrosis, as the rate of total (skin and muscle) flap necrosis was only 1%. This flap is reliable, easy to harvest during neck dissection, oncologically safe, it does carry a negligible donor site morbidity. This paper highlights how the infrahyoid flap can represent an excellent reconstructive solution in selected patients and head and neck sites. PMID:24856306

  19. VRAM-pedicled island flap for the coverage of an exposed prosthetic vascular graft in the suprapubic area

    PubMed Central

    Rubino, C.; Faenza, M.; Campitiello, N.; Fornino, G.; Santanelli di Pompeo, F.; Accarino, G. C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The exposure of prosthetic vascular graft is a dangerous complication in revascularization procedures. In this case report, we describe a successful coverage of an exposed prosthetic femorofemoral vascular graft in the suprapubic area, with a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) island flap.

  20. VRAM-pedicled island flap for the coverage of an exposed prosthetic vascular graft in the suprapubic area.

    PubMed

    Rubino, C; Faenza, M; Campitiello, N; Fornino, G; Santanelli di Pompeo, F; Accarino, G C

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of prosthetic vascular graft is a dangerous complication in revascularization procedures. In this case report, we describe a successful coverage of an exposed prosthetic femorofemoral vascular graft in the suprapubic area, with a vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) island flap. PMID:27583274

  1. Coverage of Amputation Stumps Using a Latissimus Dorsi Flap With a Serratus Anterior Muscle Flap: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Jeon, Seung Bae; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Amputation of the extremities is a definitive reconstructive option, and surgeons should aim to preserve maximum overall function. If the exposed bone cannot be adequately covered using local tissues, the stump can be reconstructed using a number of well-described free flap transfer techniques. Between January 2002 and December 2011, 31 patients with severe injuries to the lower extremities underwent above-the-knee, below-the-knee, and Chopart and Ray amputations. Bony stumps were covered using latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps alone (group 1), or together with serratus anterior muscle flaps (group 2). The groups were compared with respect to age, flap survival, skin flap size, immediate complications, wound sloughing, deep ulceration, need for bone amputation, limb visual analog scale score, time to prosthesis, and follow-up duration. The mean area of the latissimus dorsi skin flap was 255.9 cm, and immediate complications occurred in 8 (25.8%) patients. In the double-padding group, there were fewer cases of deep ulceration than in the single-flap group, and prostheses could be worn sooner. There were no statistically significant differences in other parameters. Successful reconstruction of amputation stumps requires an adequate, durable, weight-bearing, and well-contoured soft tissue cover. A latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap together with a serratus anterior muscle flap provides well-vascularized muscle tissue and a durable skin paddle, leading to less ulceration than conventional flap techniques. PMID:25003415

  2. Vaginal reconstruction with pedicled vertical deep inferior epigastric perforator flap (diep) after pelvic exenteration. A consecutive case series.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Gwénael; Gangloff, Dimitri; Querleu, Denis; Frigenza, Melanie; Torrent, Juan Jose; Picaud, Laetitia; Gladieff, Laurence; Delannes, Martine; Mery, Eliane; Boulet, Berenice; Balague, Gisele; Martinez, Alejandra

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal reconstruction after pelvic exenteration (PE) represents a challenge for the oncologic surgeon. Since the introduction of perforator flaps, using pedicled vertical DIEP (deep inferior epigastric perforator) flap allows to reduce the donor site complication rate. From November 2012 to December 2014, 27 PEs were performed in our institution. 13 patients who underwent PE with vaginal reconstruction and programmed DIEP procedure for gynecologic malignancies were registered. Nine patients underwent PE for recurrent disease and four for primary treatment. Six of the 13 patients have a preoperative fistula. Anterior PE was performed in 10 patients, and total PE in 3 patients. A vertical DIEP flap was performed in 10 patients using one or two medial perforators. The reasons for abortion of vertical DIEP flap procedure were: failure to localizing perforator vessels in two cases, and unavailability of plastic surgeon in one case. A vertical fascia-sparring rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was then harvested. Median length of surgery was 335min, and 60min for DIEP harvesting and vaginal reconstruction. No flap necrosis occurred. One patient in the VRAM (vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous) group experienced a late incisional hernia and one patient in the DIEP flap group required revision for vaginal stenosis. In our experience, DIEP flap represents our preferred choice of flap for circumferential vaginal reconstruction after PE. To achieve a high reproducibility, the technically demanding pedicled vertical DIEP flap has to be harvested by a trained surgeon, after strict evaluation of the preoperative imaging with identification and localization of perforator vessels. PMID:26121919

  3. Extended V-Y Advancement Flap Reconstruction of a Large Posterior Upper Midline Trunk Defect

    PubMed Central

    Fukudome, Eugene Y.; Bharadia, Deepak R.; Helm, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Large posterior upper trunk defects can be challenging to reconstruct. Trapezius or latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps are principally utilized for reconstruction; however, some defects may not be amenable to this standard approach. Here, we describe a patient with a full-thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue loss of the upper back and inferior cervical region after dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans resection. A large, extended V-Y flap was used for closure of this wound secondary to its location, size, and orientation. This approach preserves shoulder function, allows for readvancement of the flap as needed, and is a reconstructive option for patients with large upper back defects.

  4. Extended V-Y Advancement Flap Reconstruction of a Large Posterior Upper Midline Trunk Defect.

    PubMed

    Fukudome, Eugene Y; Bharadia, Deepak R; Helm, Douglas L; Sinha, Indranil

    2016-05-01

    Large posterior upper trunk defects can be challenging to reconstruct. Trapezius or latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps are principally utilized for reconstruction; however, some defects may not be amenable to this standard approach. Here, we describe a patient with a full-thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue loss of the upper back and inferior cervical region after dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans resection. A large, extended V-Y flap was used for closure of this wound secondary to its location, size, and orientation. This approach preserves shoulder function, allows for readvancement of the flap as needed, and is a reconstructive option for patients with large upper back defects. PMID:27579237

  5. Return of lymphatic function after flap transfer for acute lymphedema.

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, S A; Van den Abbeele, A D; Losken, A; Swartz, M A; Jain, R K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goals of this work were to develop animal models of lymphedema and tissue flap transfer, and to observe physiologic changes in lymphatic function that occur in these models over time, both systemically with lymphoscintigraphy (LS) and locally using fluorescence microlymphangiography (FM). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although lymphedema has been managed by a combination of medical and surgical approaches, no effective long-term cure exists. Surgical attempts aimed at reconnecting impaired lymphatic channels or bypassing obstructed areas have failed. METHODS: The tails of rats (A groups) and mice (B groups) were used because of their different features. Lymphedema was created by ligation of the lymphatics at the tail base and quantified by diameter measurements there. In the experimental group, rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was transferred across the ligation. In addition to the ligation (A1 and B1) and ligation + flap (A2 and B2) groups, three control groups were included: sham flap with ligation (B4), sham flap alone (B5), and normal (A3 and B3) animals. Observations were made at weekly time points for lymphatic function and continuity. RESULTS: Lymphedema was successfully created in the mouse ligation groups (B1 and B4) and sustained for the entire length of observation (up to 14 weeks). Lymphatic continuity was restored in those animals with transferred flaps across the ligation site (A2 and B2), as seen both by LS and FM. Sham flaps did not visibly affect lymphatic function nor did they cause any visible swelling in the tail. CONCLUSIONS: Acute lymphedema developing after ligation of tail lymphatics in mice can be prevented by myocutaneous flap transfer. Restored lymphatic continuity and function were demonstrable using lymphoscintigraphy and fluorescence microlymphangiography. Images Figure 2. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:10077056

  6. The use of free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Macía, G; Picón, M; Nuñez, J; Almeida, F; Alvarez, I; Acero, J

    2016-02-01

    Skull base tumours are rare, comprising less than 1% of all tumours of the head and neck. Surgical treatment of these tumours involves the approach, the resection, and the reconstruction of the defect, which present a challenge due to the technical difficulty and anatomical complexity. A retrospective study of 17 patients with tumours involving the skull base, treated by resection and immediate reconstruction using microsurgical free flaps, is presented; 11 were men and six were women. The following types of flap were used: osteocutaneous fibula flaps, fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flaps, and myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flaps. The most common histology of the tumours was squamous cell carcinoma. The most frequent point of origin was the paranasal sinuses (58.8%). All of the free flaps used for reconstruction were viable. A cerebrospinal fluid fistula occurred in two patients, and in one of these cases, meningoencephalitis led to death. In conclusion, the reconstruction of large defects of the skull base after ablation requires a viable tissue that in many cases can be obtained only through the use of microvascular free flaps. The type of flap to be selected depends on the anatomical structures and size of the defect to be restored. PMID:26421478

  7. Predictive risk factors of free flap thrombosis in breast reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Hossein; Clark, Emily G; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Evans, Gregory R D; Nguyen, Audrey; Kobayashi, Mark R; Wirth, Garrett A

    2014-11-01

    Vascular thrombosis is one of the major postoperative complications of free flap microvascular breast reconstruction operations. It is associated with higher morbidity, higher cost, increased length of hospital stay, and potentially flap loss. Our purpose is to evaluate the rate of this complication and whether patient characteristics play a role. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, we examined the clinical data of patients who underwent free flap breast reconstruction between 2009 and 2010 in the United States. Multivariate and univariate regression analyses were performed to identify independent risk factors of flap thrombosis. A total of 15,211 patients underwent free flap breast reconstruction surgery (immediate reconstruction: 43%). The most common flap was the free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap (53.6%), followed by free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap (43.1%), free superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flap (2%), and free gluteal artery perforator (GAP) flap (1.3%). The overall rate of flap thrombosis was 2.4 %, with the highest rate seen in the SIEA group (11.4%) and the lowest in the TRAM group (1.7%). Peripheral vascular disease (adjusted odds ration [AOR] 10.61), SIEA flap (AOR, 4.76) and delayed reconstruction (AOR, 1.42) were found to be statistically significant risk factors for flap thrombosis. Other comorbidities were not linked. While the overall rate of flap thrombosis in free flap breast reconstruction was relatively low (2.4%), Plastic Surgeons should be aware that patients with peripheral vascular disease and those undergoing free SIEA flap are at higher risk of flap thrombosis and they should closely monitor flaps to increase the chance for early salvage. PMID:24665051

  8. What Is the Ideal Free Flap for Soft Tissue Reconstruction? A Ten-Year Experience of Microsurgical Reconstruction Using 334 Latissimus Dorsi Flaps From a Universal Donor Site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Seungki; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2015-07-01

    Microsurgical free tissue transfer is regarded as the best available method of tissue reconstruction for intractable defects. The ideal soft tissue flap is thought to be the anterolateral thigh flap. On the basis of 334 procedures involving the latissimus dorsi (LD) flap, we discuss the advantages of the LD flap over the current universal option, and we aimed to establish whether the LD could also gain universal status in all reconstructive fields.Three hundred thirty-four reconstructive procedures using the LD flap were performed in 322 patients between September 2002 and July 2012. In accordance with defect characteristics, we performed 334 procedures using flaps, which included the LD muscle flap with skin graft, the myocutaneous flap, the muscle-sparing flap, the perforator flap, the chimeric flap, and the 2-flap technique using the serratus anterior branch.Flap-related complications occurred in 21 patients (6.3%), including total and partial flap failure. In 253 cases, the donor site was closed primarily, and in the remaining cases, we used split-thickness skin grafts. Donor-site complications occurred in 20 cases (6%). In 11 of the 182 cases, no suitable perforators were identified during surgery.The advantages of the LD as a donor site include the possibility of various harvesting positions without position change, versatility of components, availability of muscle to fill extensive defects, and presence of thick fascia to enable full abdominal reconstruction. On the basis of our experience, we concluded that this flap has the potential to be used as widely as, or in preference to, the anterolateral thigh flap in most reconstructive areas. PMID:25785382

  9. Intercostal artery perforator propeller flap for reconstruction of trunk defects following sarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Zang, Mengqing; Yu, Shengji; Xu, Libin; Zhao, Zhenguo; Zhu, Shan; Ding, Qiang; Liu, Yuanbo

    2015-06-01

    Trunk defects following soft tissue sarcoma resection are usually managed by myocutaneous flaps or free flaps. However, harvesting muscle will cause functional morbidities and some trunk regions lack reliable recipient vessels. The intercostal arteries give off multiple perforators, which distribute widely over the trunk and can supply various pedicle flaps. Our purpose is to use various intercostal artery perforator propeller flaps for trunk oncologic reconstruction. Between November 2013 and July 2014, nine intercostal artery perforator propeller flaps were performed in seven patients to reconstruct the defects following sarcoma resection in different regions of the trunk, including the back, lumbar, chest, and abdomen. Two perforators from intercostal arteries were identified for each flap using Doppler ultrasound probe adjacent to the defect. The perforator with visible pulsation was chosen as the pedicle vessel. An elliptical flap was raised and rotated in a propeller fashion to repair the defects. There were one dorsal intercostal artery perforator flap, four dorsolateral intercostal artery perforator flaps, three lateral intercostal artery perforator flaps, and one anterior intercostal artery perforator flap. The mean skin paddle dimension was 9.38 cm in width (range 6-14 cm) and 21.22 cm in length (range 13-28 cm). All intercostal artery perforator flaps survived completely, except for marginal necrosis in one flap harvested close to the previous flap donor site. The intercostal artery perforator propeller flap provides various and valuable options in our reconstructive armamentarium for trunk oncologic reconstruction. To our knowledge, this is the first case series of using intercostal artery perforator propeller flaps for trunk oncologic reconstruction and clinical application of dorsolateral intercostal artery perforator flaps. PMID:25801799

  10. Abdominal perforator vs. muscle sparing flaps for breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liza C.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominally based free flaps have become the mainstay for women that desire to use their own tissue as a means of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. As the techniques have evolved, significant effort has been invested in finding the best means of minimizing morbidity to the abdominal donor site while ensuring a viable reconstructed breast that is aesthetically pleasing. This manuscript reviews and compares the muscle sparing free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (MsfTRAM), the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP), and the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flaps, regarding flap success rate, operative times, abdominal donor site morbidity and residual functionality, hospital lengths of stay and associated costs, impact of co-morbid conditions, and resilience after adjuvant radiation treatment. PMID:26161306

  11. Abdominal perforator vs. muscle sparing flaps for breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Butler, Paris D; Wu, Liza C

    2015-06-01

    Abdominally based free flaps have become the mainstay for women that desire to use their own tissue as a means of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. As the techniques have evolved, significant effort has been invested in finding the best means of minimizing morbidity to the abdominal donor site while ensuring a viable reconstructed breast that is aesthetically pleasing. This manuscript reviews and compares the muscle sparing free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (MsfTRAM), the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP), and the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flaps, regarding flap success rate, operative times, abdominal donor site morbidity and residual functionality, hospital lengths of stay and associated costs, impact of co-morbid conditions, and resilience after adjuvant radiation treatment. PMID:26161306

  12. Extending the use of the gracilis muscle flap in perineal reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Stephen J; Almasharqah, Riyadh; Fogg, Quentin A; Anderson, William

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of the perineum is required following oncological resections. Plastic surgical techniques can be used to restore the aesthetics and function of the perineum. The gracilis myocutaneous flap provides a substantial skin paddle, with minimal donor site morbidity. The flap is pedicled on a perforator from the medial circumflex femoral artery, giving it limited reach across the perineum. Tunnelling the flap under the adductor longus muscle may free up more of the arterial pedicle, increasing its reach. On three female cadavers, bilateral gracilis flaps were raised in the standard surgical manner, giving six flaps in total. With the flaps pedicled across the perineum, the distance from the tip of each flap was measured to the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). The flaps were then tunnelled under the adductor longus muscle. The distances to the ASIS were measured again. The average pedicle length was greater than 7 cm. Tunnelling the flap under the adductor longus muscle increased the reach by more than 4 cm on average. Cadaveric dissection has shown that tunnelling of the flap in a novel way increase its reach across the perineum. This additional flexibility improves its use clinically and is of benefit to plastic surgeons operating in perineal reconstruction. PMID:27221783

  13. The Free-style Gluteal Perforator Flap in the Thinning and Delay Process for Perineal Reconstruction After Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Horta, Ricardo; Nascimento, Ricardo; Silva, Alvaro; Amarante, Jose

    2016-06-01

    Perineal wounds present a special challenge for reconstructive surgeons. The vacuum-assisted closure device is useful as a temporizing measure or for wounds too large or contaminated for immediate reconstruction. Compared to traditional myocutaneous flaps, perforator flaps provide thinner fasciocutaneous flaps for perineal reconstruction with favorable results and fewer donor site morbidities. The upper and lower gluteal regions are rich in perforators, which allow for more versatile flap design according to the defect. The authors combined the principles of free-style perforator flaps, flap delay, and thinning of perforator flaps to restore perineal function and aesthetics. The procedure was undertaken in a 72-year-old female who was obese with the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis secondary to perineal abscess. After 3 months, the flap achieved adequate and durable reconstruction with acceptable aesthetic contour and patient satisfaction; there was no loss of function at donor sites. Clinical applications and technical refinements of freestyle pedicled perforator flaps can be extended to the perineal region. Because of its many advantages and its versatility, freestyle pedicled perforator flaps constitute a valued reconstructive option and, when indicated, an alternative to pedicled axial flaps or even free flaps, in addition to vacuum therapy, to simplify the reconstructive procedure. PMID:27434419

  14. Scars and perforator-based flaps in the abdominal region: A contraindication?

    PubMed Central

    Dragu, Adrian; Unglaub, Frank; Wolf, Maya B.; Beier, Justus P.; Schnabl, Saskia M.K.; Kneser, Ulrich; Leffler, Mareike; Horch, Raymund E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although multiple strategies for autologous breast reconstruction exist, a vertical midline scar in the abdominal wall as a result of previous laparatomy or abdominoplasty represents a major surgical challenge. To date, little research has been conducted on the regeneration potential of the abdominal wall’s superficial vascular, perforator and choke vessel system after surgery using a vertical approache. Methods We present the cases of 8 patients, of whom 7 underwent autologous breast reconstruction. One patient received a thigh reconstruction. All patients had a vertical abdominal midline scar as a result of a previous surgical intervention. In 3 of the 7 patients, the breast was reconstructed using an MS-2-vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) free flap. In 4 of these patients, an MS-2-transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) free flap was performed. The thigh reconstruction used a transverse deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) free flap. Clinical follow-up was done 12 months after operation. Results All 3 patients who received an MS-2-VRAM had good aesthetic results. Vertical midline scars had no negative effect on surgical outcomes, perfusion and tissue viability of the 4 MS-2-TRAM and transverse DIEP free flaps. Conclusion These clinical findings indicate that the regeneration potential of the abdominal wall’s superficial vascular system in the presence of vertical surgical scars has been greatly underestimated. Use of MS-2-VRAM free flaps in patients with vertical abdominal scars seems to be a suitable and successful alternative in the reconstruction algorithm. PMID:20334747

  15. [Repair of large urogenital necrosis of obstetrical origin by pedicled myocutaneous plasty of the greater lip. Technique and results].

    PubMed

    Falandry, L

    1991-03-01

    The vesicovaginal fistulae encountered in Africa are a real plague. Their origin is obstetrical as a rule, and they occur in young women, often in primiparas. They are seldom simple as they have been operated repeatedly and involve associated lesions and a large loss of substance, so that they raise complex problems of repair. The experience with the treatment of 230 obstetrical fistulae by the same surgeon in Africa leads the author to describe a repair technique fit for complex fistulae, especially those involving an extensive loss of substance and associated lesions (rectovaginal fistula, perineal destruction). With a low approach, the procedure consists in using a filler tissue, namely a skin flap removed from a greater lip, for which the vasculature is maintained by the preservation of a thick musculous and fatty pedicle, cut from the fibers of the bulbocavernosus muscle. Once sutured around the orifice of the fistula, this graft closes it while fostering its healing. Out of the 14 patients treated with this technique, the results achieved were regarded as good for 10 (72%), including 7 after a first operation and 3 after second surgery. In 9 cases, there were associated lesions, including 5 rectovaginal fistulae and 4 cases of complete tearing of the perineum. We have had 4 failures, including 3 definitive ones, and a partial failure with the persistence of urine incontinence in station due to be destruction of the ureter. When the simpler Martius' procedure (on which ours is patterned) is no longer sufficient, the use of a pedicled skin-fat graft taken from the greater lip allows considerably restricting the indications of palliative surgery. Our technique increases the percentage of success for fistulae regarded as irreparable or after the usual repair procedures have failed. PMID:2055973

  16. Peculiar indications for the pedicled or free rectus abdominis flap in reconstructive surgery. A review of our experience.

    PubMed

    Sinsel, N K; Guelinckx, P J

    1995-01-01

    Among all known flaps, the rectus abdominis muscle flap possesses an unique diversity in flap designs due to the special vascular supply of the abdominal wall. The axial vascularization of the rectus abdominis muscle gives ofF several musculocutaneous perforators, which are mainly located in the periumbilical region. Abdominal wall skin perfusion is guaranteed by spoke-wheel like vessels arising from these perforators. Subsequently several designs (muscle, myocutaneous and myosubcutaneous) are possible, by varying the included tissue and the position of the skin island. We described 7 cases where the rectus abdominis muscle was used as a muscle or myocutaneous flap for reconstruction of large defects. In most cases a pedicled transfer was necessary, possible and sufficient to reconstruct the difficult defects in various body regions. Great amounts of well perfused tissue can be transferred with still possible primary closure of the donor site. Due to its rich perfusion and constancy of vascular pattern, it represents an excellent and safe pedicled reconstructive procedure for large defects of the thorax, the abdomen, the forearm or the hip and pelvis where free tissue transfers are impossible or contraindicated. No other local transposition would have achieved this goal, due to the lack of volume and mobility. Moreover the flap is ideal for reconstruction of contour deficiencies due to the abundance of fat, as for example in breast or buttock reconstruction. However the flap is not the first choice for traumatic and infected wounds where fat tissue is not desired. PMID:8571724

  17. Vascular Endothelium Growth Factor, Surgical Delay, and Skin Flap Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lineaweaver, William C.; Lei, Man-Ping; Mustain, William; Oswald, Tanya M.; Cui, Dongmei; Zhang, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Cytokines may be a mechanism by which surgical delay can increase flap survival. We previously found that preoperative vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) administration in the rat transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap could improve skin paddle survival. In this study, we used partial elevation of the rat TRAM flap as a surgical delay to assess endogenous cytokine expression and tissue survival comparable to undelayed TRAM flaps. Methods: In Part I, TRAM flaps underwent surgical delay procedures; 7 days later, the flaps were completely elevated and reinset. At the same time, other flaps were raised and reinset without delay. Skin paddle survival in both groups was evaluated at 7 days. In Part II, skin biopsies from TRAM zones I to IV were taken at the time of delay and at intervals of 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Specimens were assessed for selected cytokine gene expression by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis (TR-PCR). Results: Surgical delay significantly (P < 0.001) increased skin paddle survival in the delayed TRAM flaps (16.14 ± 1.53 cm, 81.9%) compared with undelayed flaps (7.68 ± 3.16 cm, 40.9%). TGF-β and PDGF expressions were not changed by surgical delay, but basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and VEGF expressions increased significantly (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) after delay. Conclusions: In the rat TRAM model, surgical delay resulted in increased VEGF expression and increased skin paddle survival. These results correlate with previous studies showing the preoperative injection of VEGF increases skin paddle survival. VEGF may be an important element in the delay phenomenon and may be an agent for pharmacological delay. PMID:15166966

  18. Management of different kinds of head and neck defects with the submental flap for reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chun; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Lai, Wen-Sen; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Lee, Jih-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck surgeries often accompany with moderate-sized defects that require time-consuming reconstructions by free flaps. The submental flap is a versatile and time-effective option for reconstruction of orofacial defects providing acceptable cosmetic and functional results without requiring microsurgical techniques. A retrospective case series study of patients who underwent reconstruction with the submental flap between 2009 and 2013 was conducted. There were 36 patients (33 men and 3 women), with a mean age of 56.4 years, enrolled in this study. The primary lesion sites included oral cavity (24 patients), pharynx (8 patients), larynx (2 patients), neck (1 patient) as well as maxillary sinus (1 patient). All flaps were harvested as the myocutaneous flaps. All donor sites were closed primarily without the need of additional surgery. No complete loss of the flap was encountered and two cases developed marginal necrosis of the flap. The submental flap had a reliable pedicle and had minimal donor-site morbidity. It is an excellent flap option for patients with small- to medium-sized defects in head and neck region. PMID:25542248

  19. Surgical Approach for Repair of Rectovaginal Fistula by Modified Martius Flap

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, M.; Schwandner, T.; Hecker, A.; Behnk, A.; Baumgart-Vogt, E.; Wagenlehner, F.; Padberg, W.

    2014-01-01

    Rectovaginal fistulas (RVF) are rare but represent a challenge for both patients and surgeons. The most common cause of RVF is obstetric trauma, and treatment is based on fistula classification and localization of the fistula in relation to the vagina and rectum. Conventional therapy frequently fails, making surgery the most viable approach for fistula repair. One surgical procedure which offers adequate repair of lower and middle rectovaginal fistulas consists of interposition of a bulbocavernosus fat flap also called modified Martius flap. First described by Heinrich Martius in 1928, this approach has been continuously modified and adjusted over time and is used in the repair of various pelvic floor disorders. Overall success rates reported in the literature of the interposition of a Martius flap as an adjunct procedure in the surgical management of RVF are 65–100 %. We present a detailed description of the operation technique together with a discussion of the use of a dorsal-flapped modified Martius flap in the treatment of RVF. PMID:25364031

  20. Reconstruction of the pelvis and perineum with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kieran, I; Nugent, N; Riordain, M Ó; Kelly, J

    2012-11-01

    Reconstruction of the perineum and pelvic cavity in continuity is an uncommon and difficult challenge. This case describes a 66-year-old man who presented following recurrence of a Dukes' B rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma that had been treated nine years previously by anterior resection, 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy. His recurrent disease was treated with radical pelvic exenteration with formation of an end colostomy and urinary ileal conduit. A post-operative pelvic collection necessitated incisional drainage via the perineum. This resulted in a perineal defect in continuity with the pelvic cavity, neither of which healed in spite of alternate day packing with antiseptic dressings. The perineum and cavity were reconstructed successfully with a microvascular transfer of the latissimus dorsi using the primary gracilis pedicle as recipient donor vessels. PMID:23131218

  1. Resection and reconstruction of giant cervical metastatic cancer using a pectoralis major muscular flap transfer: A prospective study of 16 patients

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIANGMIN; LIU, FOLIN; LAN, XIAOLIN; HUANG, JING; LUO, KEQING; LI, SHAOJIN

    2015-01-01

    If not promptly or properly treated, certain cervical metastatic cancers that develop from unknown primary tumors may rapidly grow into giant tumors that can invade the blood vessels, muscle and skin. The present study examined the feasibility and efficacy of radical neck dissection combined with reconstruction using the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for the treatment of giant cervical metastatic cancers that have developed from unknown primary tumors and have invaded the skin. A total of 16 patients who met the inclusion criteria were subjected to radical neck dissection to adequately resect invaded skin, and the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap was used to repair the large skin defect created in the cervical region. Following the surgery, the patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The pectoralis major myocutaneous flap survived in all 16 patients, with no cases of flap necrosis. In addition, no post-operative lymphedema, paresthesia or dysfunction of an upper extremity occurred due to the cutting of a pectoralis major muscle. In 9 cases, patients were satisfied with their post-operative shoulder movement at the donor site; in the remaining 7 cases, patients felt greater weakness in this region following surgery relative to prior to surgery. The 14 male patients were generally satisfied with the post-operative appearance of the donor region, whereas the 2 female patients were dissatisfied with the appearance of this region. Follow-up for 6–53 months after the patients were discharged following surgery and chemotherapy revealed that the recurrence of cervical tumors in 6 cases. Overall, radical neck dissection combined with the use of the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for reconstruction is a feasible approach for the treatment of giant cervical metastatic cancers that have developed from unknown primary tumors and have invaded the skin. Post-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be administered to improve the local control rate and

  2. Systematic Review and Operative Technique of Recalcitrant Pressure Ulcers Using a Fillet Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe the indications, operative technique, outcomes, and systematic review of the literature on the reconstruction of patients with end-stage pressure ulcers using a fillet flap technique. In this technique, the femur, tibia, and fibula are removed from the thigh and leg, and the soft tissue is used as a pedicled, or free, myocutaneous flap for reconstruction. Long-term outcomes, salient surgical technique of flap elevation, and design are detailed for patients who had a fillet of leg flap for reconstruction of extensive pressure ulcers. Methods: The indications, surgical technique, and postoperative outcomes of 5 patients who had pedicled fillet flaps are reviewed including patient age, sex, underlying comorbidities, duration of paraplegia, operative technique, and complications. A systematic review of the literature was performed searching PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Medline with the following MeSH terms: pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, fillet flap, and fillet flap. Inclusion criteria were use of a fillet technique, article data on the number of reconstructions before fillet flap, complications, and English language. Results: Most of our patients were male 75% (n = 3) with an average age of 47.5 years, had been paralyzed for an average of 16 years, and had few medical comorbidities. Two patients (3 flaps) required hip disarticulation, 1 patient had a bilateral fillet flaps, and 3 patients had resection of tibia/fibula. After following patients for an average of 1.4 years (4 mo to 2 yr), complications were limited to 1 patient who had partial-thickness flap loss at the distal skin flap that healed by secondary intention and 1 patient who had ulcer recurrence because of noncompliance. Four articles met inclusion criteria for systematic review and 3 were excluded. Conclusions: The fillet of leg flap remains a useful and reliable method of reconstructing end-stage pressure ulcers. PMID:27622082

  3. Rotation flaps for coverage after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Leonardo Rafael; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Guimarães, Tales Mollica; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results obtained using local myocutaneous rotation flaps in cases of wound dehiscence after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing these surgical procedures were selected in the 2000-2012 period. The nine selected cases during this period were subjected to flap coverage due to skin dehiscence associated with infection. In eight cases we used rotation flaps of the medial gastrocnemius, and in one case we used advancing skin. RESULTS: Eighty nine percent of the cases were successful in the coverage of the prosthesis and the viability of the flaps. In four cases it was possible to maintain or review the prosthesis. Four other cases progressed to amputation due to failure on treatment of infections, and one case remained without the prosthesis. The functional evaluation showed an unsatisfactory outcome in 89% of cases. CONCLUSION: Coverage flaps are a good option for the treatment of cases of dehiscence with exposure of the prosthesis and the functional failure was associated with the inability to control the infection and the damage it caused. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453672

  4. Extensive full-thickness eyelid reconstruction with rotation flaps through “subcutaneous tunnel” and palatal mucosal grafts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jian-Xia; Zuo, Lan; Huang, Xin-Yu; Cui, Ji-Zhe; Wu, Shuai; Du, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    AIM To reconstruct the extensive full-thickness defects of eyelids is a challenge for the plastic surgeon because of their complex anatomy and special functions. This article presents and discusses an improved surgical technique in which the orbicularis oculi myocutaneous flap is rotated through a “subcutaneous tunnel” in conjunction with a palatal mucosal graft employed for lining. METHODS Data from 22 eyes with extensive full-thickness eyelid defects from various causes between 2009 and 2013 were analyzed in this study. After the different layers of eyelid were separated completely, a temporally based orbicularis oculi myocutaneous flap was designed following fishtail lines and was mobilized, leaving the base of the pedicle intact with a submuscular tissue attachment. The flap was then rotated through a “subcutaneous tunnel” to the defect, and the donor site was closed primarily. Posterior lamellar reconstruction was performed with a mucosal graft harvested from the hard palate. RESULTS All the flaps were survived without any healing problems. There was no corneal irritation, flap contraction, or significant donor-site morbidity in the follow-up period. The incision scars were almost invisible. The defects were repaired completely, and the evaluations showed satisfactory function and appearance. CONCLUSION This technique is an improved single-stage operation and can be applied to repair large, full-thickness eyelid defects from various causes. With our method, the functional and aesthetic results can be obtained in either the upper or lower eyelids. PMID:26308255

  5. Satisfaction following Unilateral Breast Reconstruction: A Comparison of Pedicled TRAM and Free Abdominal Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Schwitzer, Jonathan A.; Miller, H. Catherine; Pusic, Andrea L.; Matros, Evan; Mehrara, Babak J.; McCarthy, Colleen M.; Lennox, Peter A.; Van Laeken, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare patient satisfaction following unilateral pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) and free abdominal flap reconstruction. Methods: Patients who underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using pedicled TRAM or free abdominal flaps (muscle-sparing TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator flap) and completed the BREAST-Q were identified from 2 prospectively maintained databases. BREAST-Q scores were assessed and compared for Satisfaction with Breasts, Outcome, and Physical Well-being Chest/Abdomen. Results: Of the 138 patients who completed the BREAST-Q, 84 underwent pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction and 54 underwent free abdominal flap reconstruction. Overall, pedicled TRAM flap patients scored higher than free abdominal flap patients on all 4 BREAST-Q scales. This difference reached statistical significance in Satisfaction with Breasts (+7.74; P = 0.02). Similar results were found among patients who completed the BREAST-Q at <3 years postoperation. However, among patients at ≥3 years postoperation, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups, with the pedicled flap cohort scoring higher in Satisfaction with Breasts and Physical Well-being Chest and the free abdominal flap cohort scoring higher in Satisfaction with Outcome and Physical Well-being Abdomen scores. Conclusions: Patients who underwent unilateral pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction experienced greater initial breast satisfaction than patients who underwent unilateral free abdominal flap reconstruction, but satisfaction equalized between the two over time, suggesting that long-term satisfaction may be equivalent between the 2 methods of reconstruction. PMID:26495195

  6. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy between Breast Cancer Patients with and without Immediate Flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Hou, Ming-Feng; Wei, Shu-Yi; Lin, Sin-Daw; Luo, Kuei-Hau; Huang, Ming-Yii; Ou-Yang, Fu; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the long-term clinical outcomes of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) between breast cancer patients with and without immediate transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap reconstruction. Methods The study included 492 patients with stage II or III breast cancer who underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM) and chemotherapy followed by PMRT between 1997 and 2011. Cox regression model and Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate the differences between overall and disease-free survival rates in the 2 groups. Results Among 492 patients, 213 patients had immediate TRAM flap reconstruction. The mean follow-up was 7.2 years (range, 11–191 months). The 5-year and 10-year disease free survival rates were 81% and 76% for the TRAM flap group and 78% and 73% for the non-flap group. The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 89% and 73% for the TRAM flap group and 83% and 74% for the non-flap group. Conclusions There exists no statistically significant difference in the rates of local recurrence, distant metastasis, disease-free and overall survival when comparing immediate TRAM flap reconstruction with no reconstruction. Our results suggest that immediate TRAM flap reconstruction does not compromise long term clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients requiring PMRT. PMID:26863006

  7. Segmented vortex flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Segmented vortex flaps were suggested as a means of delaying the vortex spill-over causing thrust loss over the outboard region of single-panel flaps. Also proposed was hinge-line setback for exploiting leading-edge suction in conjunction with vortex flaps to improve the overall thrust per unit flap area. These two concepts in combination were tested on a 60-deg cropped delta wing model. Significant improvement in flap efficiency was indicated by a reduction of the flap/wing area from 11.4% of single-panel flap to 6.3% of a two segment delta flap design, with no lift/drag penalty at lift coefficients between 0.5 and 0.7. The more efficient vortex flap arrangement of this study should benefit the performance attainable with flaps of given area on wings of moderate leading-edge sweep.

  8. Breast reconstruction with single-pedicle TRAM flap in breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Dong; Huang, Wen-He; Qiu, Si-Qi; He, Li-Fang; Guo, Cui-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Qu; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is challenging in patients with low midline abdominal scar. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of immediate breast reconstruction using single-pedicle TRAM (SP-TRAM) flaps in patients with low midline abdominal scar. There were 4 strict selection criteria: 1) presence at least 3 perforators on the pedicle side; 2) perforators with regional average flow velocity of >20 cm/s; 3) upper edge of the abdominal scar at least 4 cm from the umbilicus; and 4) scar age >1 year. Eight breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar (scar group) and 20 without (control group) underwent immediate breast reconstruction with SP-TRAM flaps consisting of zone I and III and zone II tissues. Flap complications, donor-site complications, and cosmetic results were compared between the two groups. All flaps survived and both groups presented similar flap and donor site complications, including fat necrosis, seroma, hematoma, infection, delayed wound healing, and abdominal hernia, and patients in both groups had similar aesthetic results (p > 0.05). Thus, the study demonstrated that breast reconstruction using SP-TRAM flap was a safe approach in carefully selected patients with low midline abdominal scar. PMID:27406872

  9. Slotted variable camber flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Variable camber actuator assemblies broaden the range of speeds at which lift to drag performance is maximized for slotted flap wings. Lift is improved over a broader range of cruising speeds by varying wing camber with rotational flap movements that do not introduce wing slots and induced drag. Forward flaps are secured to forward flange links which extended from, and are a part of forward flap linkage assemblies. The forward flaps rotate about flap pivots with their rotational displacement controlled by variable camber actuator assemblies located between the forward flaps and the forward flange links. Rear flaps are held relative to the forward flaps by rear flap linkage assemblies which may act independently from the forward flap linkage assemblies and the variable camber actuator assemblies. Wing camber is varied by rotating the flaps with the variable camber actuator assemblies while the flaps are in a deployed or tucked position. Rotating the flaps in a tucked position does not introduce significant wing surface discontinuities, and reduces aircraft fuel consumption on most flight profiles.

  10. Reconstruction of knee joint soft tissue and patellar tendon defects using a composite anterolateral thigh flap with vascularized fascia lata.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yur-Ren; An, Po-Chung; Kuo, Mei-Hui; Kueh, Nai-Siong; Yao, Sheng-Fa; Jeng, Seng-Feng

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of a complex knee trauma with knee joint exposure and composite soft tissue and patellar tendon deficiency remains a challenging task. Multiple-stage reconstruction is time-consuming and produces considerable suffering for patients. Early mobilization following knee reconstruction has achieved good outcomes. Herein, we reported one-stage reconstruction with an ALT myocutaneous flap with vascularized fascia lata was utilized for one patient with a large complex knee joint soft tissue defect, and segmental deficiency of the patellar tendon. The fascia lata sheet was rolled to mimic a patellar tendon. The exposed knee joint was obturated by the vastus lateralis muscle of the ALT myocutaneous flap. The skin and soft tissue defect was reconstructed using the skin paddle of the ALT flap. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. An MRI examination demonstrated good continuity of the reconstructed patellar tendon. The active ROM of the injured knee reached 100 degrees (extension deficiency 20 degrees and flexion 120 degrees ) at 5 years. Objective functional assessment of the patella-femoral joint utilized a kinetic communicator machine (Kin-Com 500H, Chattecx, Chattanooga, TN, USA) revealed still mild extension insufficiency. However, the patient reported that he was able to perform normal daily activities without difficulty at 5-year follow-up. PMID:18215803

  11. The Use of Composite Flaps in the Management of Large Full-Thickness Defects of the Lower Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shuo; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Yuntong; Xue, Chunyu; Bi, Hongda; Dai, Haiying; Xing, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe a modified surgical procedure that uses a combination of the tarsoconjunctival flap, orbicularis myocutaneous advancement flap, and paranasal-island flap to correct extensive full-thickness lower eyelid defects in functioning eyes. From May 2010 to December 2013, a total of 15 patients had reconstructive surgeries of large to giant lower eyelid defect, with an average 19-month follow-up. The musculocutaneous flaps were harvested from both orbicularis and paranasal regions and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed. No major complications were observed in any of the patients. All the patients showed aesthetic eyelid contour, good color, and texture match as well as no obvious scar formation. The mean Marginal Reflex Distance-2 measured 4 months after surgery was 4.9 ± 0.4 mm. Reconstruction of a large defect in the lower eyelid with a tarsoconjunctival flap and the composite neighboring musculocutaneous flaps is a reliable and reproducible method. With proper design and well-executed precision, excellent functional and aesthetic results can be achieved by this elegant procedure without any major complications. PMID:26765467

  12. Reconstruction of severely infected gluteal osteoradionecrosis using negative-pressure wound therapy and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Dong Geun; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is mandatory for aggressive cancer treatment. Unfortunately, the high-energy radiation used can lead to severe osteoradionecrosis. Radical debridement of devitalized bone and soft tissue coupled with reconstruction using well-vascularized tissues is the accepted treatment for this condition. However, osteoradionecrosis cannot be controlled easily or rapidly. The aim of this study was to present the results of the use of serial negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in combination with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for treatment of gluteal osteoradionecrosis in a consecutive series of patients. Between January 2003 and December 2012, nine patients underwent reconstruction using serial NPWT and latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps. We applied negative-pressure dressings for at least 8 weeks. Final reconstruction was performed after the infection was controlled. The superior gluteal artery and vein were used as recipient vessels in all the cases. The mean interval between operation and radiation therapy was 28.3 ± 8.3 years, and the mean number of debridement performed was 6.3 ± 1. NPWT dressings were applied for 8-12 weeks (mean, 9.3 ± 2 weeks). The defects ranged in size from 14 × 8 cm to 18 × 15 cm. The flap size ranged from 15 × 10 cm to 18 × 15 cm. All flaps survived uneventfully except in one patient who experienced chronic seroma and wound dehiscence. There were no recurrences of osteomyelitis during the follow-up periods (mean, 14 ± 6.1 months). Based on the results obtained from this consecutive series of patients, we suggest that this methodology may provide an alternative approach for the treatment of severe osteoradionecrosis of the gluteal region. PMID:25641653

  13. Reconstruction of a Severely Crushed Leg with Interpositional Vessel Grafts and Latissimus Dorsi Flap

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Woo; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a near total amputation at the distal tibial level, in which the patient emphatically wanted to save the leg. The anterior and posterior tibial nerves were intact, indicating a high possibility of sensory recovery after revascularization. The patient had open fractures at the tibia and fibula, but no bone shortening was performed. The posterior tibial vessels were reconstructed with an interposition saphenous vein graft from the contralateral side and a usable anterior tibial artery graft from the undamaged ipsilateral distal portions. The skin and soft tissue defects were covered using a subatmospheric pressure system for demarcating the wound, and a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap for definite coverage of the wound. At 6 months after surgery, the patient was ambulatory without requiring additional procedures. Replantation without bone shortening, with use of vessel grafts and temporary coverage of the wound with subatmospheric pressure dressings before definite coverage, can shorten recovery time. PMID:22872848

  14. The ability of intra-operative perfusion mapping with laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography to predict mastectomy flap necrosis in breast reconstruction: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Munabi, Naikhoba C O; Olorunnipa, Olushola B; Goltsman, David; Rohde, Christine H; Ascherman, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    Mastectomy skin flap ischaemia leading to necrosis is a common occurrence. Laser-assisted indocyanine green (ICG) angiography can assist to locate these poorly perfused areas intra-operatively. Our study aims to identify specific perfusion values produced by ICG angiography that accurately predict mastectomy flap necrosis. A total of 42 patients undergoing autologous or implant-based breast reconstruction had mastectomy flaps imaged using laser-assisted ICG angiography at the completion of reconstruction. Intra-operative perfusion values were correlated with postoperative skin flap outcomes. Risk factors for abnormal perfusion were recorded and analysed. A total of 62 breast reconstructions were imaged, including 48 tissue expander reconstructions, six transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps, six deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and two direct-to-implant reconstructions. Eight cases (13%) of full-thickness skin necrosis were identified postoperatively. A SPY Elite(®) value of ≤ 7 accurately predicted the development of flap necrosis at 88% sensitivity and 83% specificity. False-positive cases (those with perfusion values ≤ 7 which did not develop necrosis) were more likely to have a smoking history and/or to have had an epinephrine-containing tumescent solution used during mastectomy. Excluding patients with smoking or epinephrine use, a SPY value of ≤ 7 predicted flap necrosis with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 97%. Thus, these data suggest that laser-assisted ICG angiography predicts postoperative outcomes with high accuracy. In our series, a SPY value of ≤ 7 correlated well with mastectomy flap necrosis. Furthermore, smoking and intra-operative injections containing epinephrine should be considered when evaluating low perfusion values as they can lead to false-positive test results. PMID:24507962

  15. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  16. Oral reconstruction with submental flap

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Submental flap is a useful technique for reconstruction of medium to large oral cavity defects. Hair bearing nature of this flap in men makes it less appropriate. Therefore, deepithelialized variant is introduced to overcome the problem of hair with this flap. Recently, application of this flap has been introduced in maxillofacial trauma patients. Materials and Methods: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is used for the reconstruction of oral cavity mucosal defects. Results: Four cases including two trauma patients and two squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of oral cavity were treated using deepithelialized orthograde submental flap. There were no complications in all four patients and secondary epithelialization occurred in raw surface of the flap which was exposed to oral cavity. Conclusion: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is very effective in reconstruction of oral cavity in men. The problem of hair is readily solved using this technique without jeopardizing flap blood supply. PMID:24205473

  17. Control of Flap Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  18. Blowing Flap Experiment: PIV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Bremmer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the flap vortex system. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  19. The microvascular anastomotic coupler for venous anastomoses in free flap breast reconstruction improves outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, Warren Matthew; Chowdhry, Muhammad; Patel, Nakul Gamanlal; Chow, Whitney T.H.; Griffiths, Matthew; Ramakrishnan, Venkat V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Venous couplers are ubiquitous around the world and are a useful tool for the reconstructive microsurgeon. A systematic review of coupler performance studies demonstrated a thrombosis rate range of 0% to 3%, whilst the average time of using the device is 5 minutes. There is sparse published data on cost analysis and the impact of operator experience on the anastomotic coupler device success. Improvements in outcomes other than time benefits have also not been shown. This study aims to address these deficiencies in the literature. Methods A retrospective clinical study was undertaken, aiming to compare equivalent groups of patients that had free flap surgery with venous micro-anastomoses with those that had sutured anastomoses. The cohort comprised all patients undergoing microsurgical breast reconstruction at the St Andrew’s Centre for Plastic Surgery & Burns from January 2009 to December 2014. Results Between January 2010 to December 2014, 1,064 patients underwent 1,206 free flap breast reconstructions. The average age of patients was 50 years. Seventy percent of patients underwent mastectomy and immediate reconstruction during this period with the remaining 30% having a delayed reconstruction. The 1,206 free flaps comprised of 83 transverse myocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flaps, and 1,123 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps. In total the coupler was used in 319 flaps, 26% of the cohort. There was a statistically significant clinical benefit in using the anastomotic coupler for venous anastomosis. Overall, the return to theatre rate was 12.69% whilst the overall flap loss rate was 0.75%. The overall coupler failure rate was significantly less at 1.4% whilst sutured vein failure rate was 3.57% (P=0.001). Conclusions The anastomotic coupler for venous anastomosis in free flap surgery is associated with reduced operating times, reduced take-backs to theatre and cost benefits. This is the first study to demonstrate clear clinical benefits

  20. Externally blown flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Putnam, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Tests of the noise produced by the impingement of the jet exhaust on the wing and flap for an externally blown flap system were conducted with a CF700 turbofan engine and an F-111B wing panel. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The presence of the wing next to the test nozzles increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection angle. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested. Tests showed that the single-slotted flap deflected 60 deg, produced less noise than the double-slotted flaps. Also, maintaining the maximum distance between the exit nozzle and flap system resulted in a minor reduction in noise.

  1. Recent advances for FLAP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Daniel; Davidsson, Öjvind; Whatling, Carl

    2015-07-01

    A number of FLAP inhibitors have been progressed to clinical trials for respiratory and other inflammatory indications but so far no drug has reached the market. With this Digest we assess the opportunity to develop FLAP inhibitors for indications beyond respiratory disease, and in particular for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We also show how recently disclosed FLAP inhibitors have structurally evolved from the first generation FLAP inhibitors paving the way for new compound classes. PMID:26004579

  2. Bilobed flap in sole surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conejo-Mir, J.; Bueno Montes, J.; Moreno Gimenez, J.C.; Camacho-Martinez, F.

    1985-09-01

    The bilobed flap is a simple reconstructive technique principally used to correct substantial defects in the facial region. The authors present their experience with this local flap in the difficult plantar area, with excellent short-term functional results. They describe the special characteristics of the bilobed flap in this zone, and comment on its indications and possible complications.

  3. 7-flap perineal urethrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Daniel C.; Morey, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    Perineal urethrostomy (PU) has been performed with success for the treatment of refractory and advanced urethral stricture disease for at least the past six decades. Here, we review the indications and outcomes of PU for indications such as complex hypospadias repair and urethral stricture disease resulting from trauma, infection, and failure of prior urethroplasty. We also describe the role of 7-flap PU, a novel alternative to the conventional approach that offers the surgeon added flexibility in tailoring urethrostomy creation based on intraoperative findings. The authors’ updated experience with 7-flap PU demonstrates a comparable 95% success rate in patients with a wide variety of stricture etiology. PU through either a conventional approach or a 7-flap technique is a valuable option for improving the quality of life in patients with debilitating urethral stricture disease. PMID:26816809

  4. Externally blown flap impingement noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of externally blown flap impingement noise was conducted using a full-scale turbofan engine and aircraft wing. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine exhaust system was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The daisy nozzle caused the jet velocity to decay about 35 percent at the flap. The presence of the wing next to the conical nozzle increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested.

  5. Noise Reduction of Aircraft Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V. (Inventor); Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A reduction in noise radiating from a side of a deployed aircraft flap is achieved by locating a slot adjacent the side of the flap, and then forcing air out through the slot with a suitable mechanism. One, two or even three or more slots are possible, where the slot is located at one;or more locations selected from a group of locations comprising a top surface of the flap, a bottom surface of the flap, an intersection of the top and side surface of the flap, an intersection of the bottom and side surfaces of the flap, and a side surface of the flap. In at least one embodiment the slot is substantially rectangular. A device for adjusting a rate of the air forced out through the slot can also be provided.

  6. The Deltopectoral Flap Revisited: The Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Flap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Amir; Atiyeh, Bishara; Karami, Reem; Adelman, David M; Papazian, Nazareth J

    2016-03-01

    Pharyngo-esophageal and tracheostomal defects pose a challenge in head and neck reconstruction whenever microanastomosis is extremely difficult in hostile neck that is previously dissected and irradiated. The deltopectoral (DP) flap was initially described as a pedicled flap for such reconstruction with acceptable postoperative results. A major drawback is still that the DP flap is based on 3 perforator vessels leading to a decreased arc of rotation. The DP flap also left contour deformities in the donor site. The internal mammary artery perforator flap was described as a refinement of the deltopectoral flap. It is a pedicled fasciocutaneous flap based on a single perforator, with comparable and reliable blood supply compared with the DP flap, giving it the benefit of having a wide arc of rotation. It is both thin and pliable, with good skin color match and texture. The donor site can be closed primarily with no esthetic deformity and minimal morbidity. The procedure is relatively simple and does not require microvascular expertise. In this report, the authors describe a patient in whom bilateral internal mammary artery perforator flaps were used for subtotal pharyngo-esophageal reconstruction and neck resurfacing. The flaps healed uneventfully bilaterally with no postoperative complications. PMID:26854779

  7. Uncommon Flaps for Chest Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    The omentum, external oblique musculocutaneous, and thoracoepigastric flaps are uncommonly used for chest wall reconstruction. Nevertheless, awareness and knowledge of these flaps is essential for reconstructive surgeons because they fill specific niche indications or serve as lifeboats when workhorse flaps are unavailable. The current report describes the anatomic basis, technical aspects of flap elevation, and indications for these unusual flaps. PMID:22294943

  8. Towards an advanced vortex flap system: The cavity flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    An extension of the vortex flap concept was explored with the aim of providing high-alpha flight control capability coupled with maneuver drag reduction for highly swept wing configurations. A retractable lower surface flap mounted on a translating hinge is proposed, allowing chordwise extension as well as deflection, the two movements being independently controlled. The frontal cavity formed by the partially extended and deflected flap captures a vortex above a certain angle of attack. The cavity vortex downwash alleviates the effective incidence of the wing leading edge, thus modulating vortex lift; at the same time, the induced suction in the cavity generates thrust. These postulated aerodynamic features of the cavity flap were validated through low speed tunnel pressure and visualization tests on a 65 deg swept oblique wing model, which also provided initial trends of the leading edge vortex alleviation and cavity suction with respect to flap extension, deflection and angle of attack. Force tests on a 60 deg delta model further showed the cavity flap L/D performance to compare favorably with the conventional vortex flap. A two segment flap arrangement with independently control led segments was envisaged for exploiting the vortex modulation capability of the cavity flap for pitch, roll and yaw control, in addition to drag reduction at high angles of attack.

  9. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Marlino, Sergio; Turrà, Francesco; Graziano, Pasquale; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Superficial ulnar artery is a rare finding but shows significant surgical implications. Its thinness and pliability make this flap an excellent solution for soft tissue reconstruction, especially in the head and neck region. We hereby report a successful free superficial ulnar artery perforator forearm flap transfer for tongue reconstruction. A 64-year-old man presenting with a squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue underwent a wide resection of the tumor, left radical neck dissection, and reconstruction of the tongue and the left tonsillar pillar with the mentioned flap. No complications were observed postoperatively. The flap survived completely; no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up was detected. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap has shown to be a safe alternative to other free tissue flaps in specific forearm anatomic conditions. PMID:25102397

  10. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Regional flaps - self-care; Distant flaps - self-care; Free flap - self-care; Skin autografting - self-care ... the dressing and area around it clean and free from dirt or sweat. Don't let the ...

  11. Externally blown flap noise research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center cold-flow model externally blown flap (EBF) noise research test program is summarized. Both engine under-the-wing and over-the-wing EBF wing section configurations were studied. Ten large scale and nineteen small scale EBF models were tested. A limited number of forward airspeed effect and flap noise suppression tests were also run. The key results and conclusions drawn from the flap noise tests are summarized and discussed.

  12. The vortex flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerge, Brandon T.

    The Vortex Flap is a new type of mechanically driven high-lift device consisting of a rotating cylinder placed underneath and near the trailing edge of an airfoil. Wind tunnel tests were designed and conducted in the Washington University Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Wind tunnel tests indicate that the Vortex Flap produces notable lift coefficient increments and increases maximum lift coefficients, particularly for the low Reynolds number range tested. The best configurations of the configurations investigated (not necessarily optimal) produce lift increments of 300-900% at low-to-moderate angles of attack, and increase the maximum lift coefficient on the order of 200%. The large lift increments found, particularly at low angles of attack, underscore the ability to drive the airfoil to high lift coefficients even at low angles of attack, a potentially useful characteristic for certain flight maneuvers. Regions of fairly high L/D (on the order of 10) as well as low L/D performance were identified. The nondimensional cylinder rotation speed was found to be the most important experimental parameter. Methods for correcting wind tunnel data were developed and outlined, and a Response Surface Method was applied to the corrected data for ease of interpretation. Performance comparisons between the Vortex Flap and other trailing-edge high-lift devices are included. To demonstrate the potential of the device, a Navy mission specification for a VTOL ship-borne UAV, currently filled by a rotary-wing aircraft, is analyzed using a hypothetical fixed wing aircraft and the Vortex Flap. It is demonstrated that, under certain reasonable wind-over-deck conditions, such an aircraft could hypothetically fill a VTOL mission.

  13. Flag flapping in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas; Shoele, Kourosh; Mittal, Rajat; Jha, Sourabh; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    We study the flapping of a flag in an inviscid channel flow. We focus especially on how quantities vary with channel spacing. As the channel walls move inwards towards the flag, heavier flags become more unstable, while light flags' stability is less affected. We use a vortex sheet model to compute large-amplitude flapping, and find that the flag undergoes a series of jumps to higher flapping modes as the channel walls are moved towards the flag. Meanwhile, the drag on the flag and the energy lost to the wake first rise as the walls become closer, then drop sharply as the flag moves to a higher flapping mode.

  14. The Versatile Modiolus Perforator Flap

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perforator flaps are well established, and their usefulness as freestyle island flaps is recognized. The whereabouts of vascular perforators and classification of perforator flaps in the face are a debated subject, despite several anatomical studies showing similar consistency. In our experience using freestyle facial perforator flaps, we have located areas where perforators are consistently found. This study is focused on a particular perforator lateral to the angle of the mouth; the modiolus and the versatile modiolus perforator flap. Methods: A cohort case series of 14 modiolus perforator flap reconstructions in 14 patients and a color Doppler ultrasonography localization of the modiolus perforator in 10 volunteers. Results: All 14 flaps were successfully used to reconstruct the defects involved, and the location of the perforator was at the level of the modiolus as predicted. The color Doppler ultrasonography study detected a sizeable perforator at the level of the modiolus lateral to the angle of the mouth within a radius of 1 cm. This confirms the anatomical findings of previous authors and indicates that the modiolus perforator is a consistent anatomical finding, and flaps based on it can be recommended for several indications from the reconstruction of defects in the perioral area, cheek and nose. Conclusions: The modiolus is a well-described anatomical area containing a sizeable perforator that is consistently present and readily visualized using color Doppler ultrasonography. We have used the modiolus perforator flap successfully for several indications, and it is our first choice for perioral reconstruction. PMID:27257591

  15. Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise - the Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, THomas F.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to reduce the noise radiating from a wing-flap side edge is being developed. As an airplane wing with an extended flap is exposed to a subsonic airflow, air is blown outward through thin rectangular chord-wise slots at various locations along the side edges and side surface of the flap to weaken and push away the vortices that originate in that region of the flap and are responsible for important noise emissions. Air is blown through the slots at up to twice the local flow velocity. The blowing is done using one or multiple slots, where a slot is located along the top, bottom or side surface of the flap along the side edge, or also along the intersection of the bottom (or top) and side surfaces.

  16. Deep circumflex iliac perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2003-07-01

    The increased freedom of the DCIP flap from the harvested iliac crest facilitates correct positioning. To ensure that the DCIP flap can be safely elevated, however, the presence of perforators (approximately 1 cm in diameter) must be confirmed preoperatively and intraoperatively. PMID:12916597

  17. Theory of flapping flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippisch, Alexander

    1925-01-01

    Before attempting to construct a human-powered aircraft, the aviator will first try to post himself theoretically on the possible method of operating the flapping wings. This report will present a graphic and mathematical method, which renders it possible to determine the power required, so far as it can be done on the basis of the wing dimensions. We will first consider the form of the flight path through the air. The simplest form is probably the curve of ordinary wave motion. After finding the flight curve, we must next determine the change in the angle of attack while passing through the different phases of the wave.

  18. Flap Edge Noise Reduction Fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhan, Meelan M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flap of the type that is movably connected to an aircraft wing to provide control of an aircraft in flight includes opposite ends, wherein at least a first opposite end includes a plurality of substantially rigid, laterally extending protrusions that are spaced apart to form a plurality of fluidly interconnected passageways. The passageways have openings adjacent to upper and lower sides of the flap, and the passageways include a plurality of bends such that high pressure fluid flows from a high pressure region to a low pressure region to provide a boundary condition that inhibits noise resulting from airflow around the end of the flap.

  19. Dancing girl flap: a new flap suitable for web release.

    PubMed

    Shinya, K

    1999-12-01

    To create a deep web, a flap must be designed to have a high elongation effect in one direction along the mid-lateral line of the finger and also to have a shortening effect in the other direction, crossing at a right angle to the mid-lateral line. The dancing girl flap is a modification of a four-flap Z-plasty with two additional Z-plasties. It has a high elongation effect in one direction (>550%) and a shortening effect in the other direction at a right angle (<33%), creating a deep, U-shaped surface. This new flap can be used to release severe scar contracture with a web, and is most suitable for incomplete syndactyly with webs as high as the proximal interphalangeal joint. PMID:10597822

  20. Keystone Flap: Versatile Flap for Reconstruction of Limb Defects

    PubMed Central

    Janna, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is always a constant search for a new solution to tackle defects in the limbs. The technique has to be simple, easily reproducible and performed within a short duration. The answer is keystone island flap keystone flap is a simple, less time consuming, durable and easily reproducible option to reconstruct most of the limb defects. Aim: The aim of this article is to study the usefulness of keystone flap in reconstruction of various upper and lower limb defects. Materials and Methods: This retrospective review involves study of 20 patients undergoing keystone flap reconstruction for various defects from 2012 to 2014. Patient demographic data, medical histories, comorbidities, surgical indications, defect characteristics and locations, hospitalization, complications and follow-up were evaluated and are presented as uncontrolled case series. Results: Ages of the patients were ranging from 18 to 65 y with an average of 38.75y. Among the defects, 10 were following trauma (50%), 5 were due to tumour resection (25%), 3 followed debridement of abscess (15%) and another 2 defects were due to surgical wound dehiscence (10%). The largest defect covered by this flap in our study measured 45 x 18 cm and the smallest defect was 8 x4 cm. The average intra-operative time was 45.5 min (range 20-90 min). Fourteen flaps were done to cover lower limb defects (70%), 4 for upper limb defects and 2 were for defects in the axilla. Partial flap necrosis was observed in one case. The average duration of hospital stay of patients was 3.45 d. All patients were followed until they achieved stable, healed wound.The overall success rate was 95%. Conclusion: Keystone flap can be safely used to cover various limb defects with minimal pain, a sensate cover and excellent cosmetic outcome, minimizing the need for microsurgical techniques or prolonged operative time. PMID:25954659

  1. Flap monitoring using infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Alex; Wright, Leigh P.; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Mao, Jian-min

    2006-02-01

    We report results of clinical trials on flap monitoring in 65 plastic surgeries. Hemoglobin oxygen saturation of flap tissue (StO II) was monitored non-invasively by using ODISsey TM tissue oximeter, an infrared spectroscopic device. StO II measurements were conducted both intra-operatively and post-operatively. From the intra-operative measurements, we observed that StO II values dropped when the main blood vessels supplying the flap were clamped in surgery, and that StO II jumped after anastomosis to a value close to its pre-operative value. From post-operative monitoring measurements for the 65 flap cases, each lasted two days or so, we found that the StO II values approach to a level close to the baseline if the surgery was successful, and that the StO II value dropped to a value below 30% if there is a perfusion compromise, such as vascular thrombosis.

  2. Full scale upper surface blown flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, L. J.; Homyak, L.; Jones, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A highly noise suppressed TF 34 engine was used to investigate the noise of several powered lift configurations involving upper surface blown (USB) flaps. The configuration variables were nozzle type (i.e. slot and circular with deflector), flap chord length, and flap angle. The results of velocity surveys at both the nozzle exit and the flap trailing edge are also presented and used for correlation of the noise data. Configurations using a long flap design were 4 db quieter than a short flap typical of current trends in USB flap design. The lower noise for the long flap is attributed primarily to the greater velocity decay of the jet at the flap trailing edge. The full-scale data revealed substantially more quadrupole noise in the region near the deflected jet than observed in previous sub-scale tests.

  3. Perforator Flaps in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chana, Jagdeep S.; Odili, Joy

    2010-01-01

    Free tissue transfer has revolutionized the management of complex head and neck defects. Perforator flaps represent the most recent advance in the development of free flap surgery. These flaps are based on perforating vessels and can be harvested without significant damage to associated muscles, thereby reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with muscle-based flaps. Elevation of perforator flaps requires meticulous technique and can be more challenging than raising muscle-based flaps. Use of a Doppler device enables reliable identification of the perforating vessels and aids in the design of free-style free flaps, where the flaps are designed purely according to the perforator located. The major advantage of free-style free flaps is that an unlimited number of flaps can potentially be designed on much shorter pedicles. The anterolateral thigh flap is the most commonly used perforator flap in head and neck reconstruction. Its use is described in detail, as is use of other less common perforator flaps. This article also describes head and neck reconstruction in a region-specific manner and gives a short-list of suitable flaps based on the location of the defect. PMID:22550446

  4. Modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Song, Dajiang; Li, Jinsong; Xu, Jian; Lv, Hongbin

    2015-04-01

    The paper aims to improve the operative technique of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvesting, further minimise morbidity of donor site, and improve the effect of recipient site reconstruction. From March 2005 to March 2011, 55 cases of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvested by different methods were performed to reconstruct the defects of the extremities. Twenty-nine cases were reconstructed with a traditional deep circumflex iliac artery osteomusculocutaneous flap. Twenty-six cases were repaired with modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps. In 29 cases with a traditional DCIA osteomusculocutaneous flap, two cases showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Flapnecrosis was significant in two cases. Arterial compromise occurred in one case 5 days after operation completion and led to flap failure. Three flaps developed postoperative venous congestion, but only one flap received re-exploration. In the other two cases, some stitches were removed for decompression. All three flaps survived. In two cases, marginal flap necrosis occurred, but no secondary skin grafting was required. In 26 cases with modified flap transplantation, one case showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. All flaps survived totally. Osseous integration was achieved in all 55 cases in 3 ∼ 9 months after operation. The modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap technique enhances flap safety, provides the additional advantages of reducing donor-site morbidity, and improves the recipient-site contour. PMID:25001367

  5. The Role of Muscle Flaps for Salvage of Failed Perforator Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the most heroic efforts, sometimes free flaps fail. Perforator free flaps are not invincible and can suffer the same fate. The real challenge is how to decide what is the next best choice for achieving the desired outcome. Methods: Over the past decade, 298 free perforator flaps were used in our institution. Total failure occurred in 16 patients, and partial failure requiring a second free flap occurred in an additional 6 patients for a true success rate of 93%. All failures had some form of secondary vascularized tissue transfer, which included the use of muscle flaps in 9 (41%) different patients. Results: Initial flap salvage after a failed perforator free flap was attempted with 12 perforator and 5 muscle free flaps as well as 1 perforator and 2 muscle local flaps. These were not all successful, with loss of 3 muscle free flaps and 3 perforator flaps. Tertiary free flap coverage was successful in 3 cases using 2 muscle flaps and 1 perforator free flap. Local fasciocutaneous flaps or primary wound closure was used in the remaining individuals. Conclusions: Microsurgical tissue transfers can be the most rewarding and at the same time the most challenging reconstructive endeavor. Persistence in achieving the desired outcome can require multiple steps. Perforator flaps are an important asset to obtain this goal. However, muscle flaps can still be a useful alternative, and the message is that they should not be overlooked as sometimes a viable option. PMID:26893989

  6. Experience in Reconstruction for Small Digital Defects With Free Flaps.

    PubMed

    Hung, Min-Hsiang; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Chao, Wai-Nang

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the digits resulting in soft tissue or bone loss require reconstruction. Traditionally, local flaps, such as homodigital flaps, heterodigital flaps, pedicled flaps, or distant flaps, are used for digital resurfacing. However, free tissue transfers can be used in selected patients. In this study, we present the use of different free flaps including groin skin flaps, groin osteocutaneous flaps, groin chimeric flaps, second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps, and partial toe flaps for digital reconstruction. A total of 19 digits were treated with 16 free flaps in our hospital. Of the flaps used, 5 were free groin skin flaps, 4 were free partial toe flaps, 3 were free groin chimeric flaps, 2 were free groin osteocutaneous flaps, and 2 were free second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps. The average flap size was 4.7 × 2.0 cm (range, 1.5 × 1 to 5 × 4 cm), and the average operative time was 6.0 hours (range, 4-9 hours). All flaps survived without partial or total necrosis. In conclusion, the free flap is a reliable and safe alternative for digital reconstruction. Moreover, the free groin flap provides not only a chimeric pattern for multiple fingers coverage but also an osteocutaneous pattern for thumb lengthening. The free second dorsal metacarpal artery flap provides a tenocutaneous pattern for tendon reconstruction and soft tissue coverage simultaneously, and the free partial toe flap is an excellent alternative for pulp reconstruction in terms of aesthetic appearance and functional outcome. PMID:26808771

  7. Karydakis flap for post-proctectomy perineal sinus: A case series and review

    PubMed Central

    Au, S.; Moyes, L.H.; Telfer, J.R.C.; Anderson, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Persistent perineal sinus (PPS) may occur in up to 38% of patients undergoing proctectomy. The available therapeutic options range from simple but ineffective to relatively successful but complex. The Karydakis procedure is a straightforward day-case operation, commonly performed by general surgeons in the treatment of pilonidal disease, a not dissimilar pathology to PPS. This report is the first in the literature describing the use of Karydakis procedure in patients who developed PPS after proctectomy for Crohn’s disease. Presentation of case Two patients, both of whom suffered from Crohn’s disease and a PPS, underwent a Karydakis procedure as first-line treatment for PPS. Case 1 had a relatively superficial PPS while Case 2 had a deeper, more complex and longstanding PPS. Both patients had no post-operative complications and were discharged on the same day. They achieved complete healing in eight weeks and eight months respectively. The follow up range was 8–16 months. Discussion Various techniques, including complex myocutaneous flap reconstruction, have been described in the literature to treat PPS. In contrast to these complex techniques, Karydakis operation is a simple day case procedure that was successful in treating PPS in our patients. While there is robust data regarding low recurrence rates following a Karydakis flap for pilonidal disease, there is no existing data for the indication outlined in this report. Conclusion While it requires further assessment, the Karydakis operation has potential as a simple, safe and effective first-line treatment in selected patients with PPS while not precluding more complex operative options in the future. PMID:27138449

  8. Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fengshan; Wang, Guangnan; Li, Gaoshan; Ping, Juan; Mao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to summarize the treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers using combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap. Patients and methods Each degloved finger was debrided under microscopic guidance and embedded in the superficial layer of the abdominal fascia. The abdominal skin was sutured to the skin on the back and side of the hand to promote circumferential healing. After removal, the only remaining injured region was on the flexor surface, and this was repaired by multiple dorsal toe flaps, toe-web flaps, and dorsalis pedis flaps to provide blood vessels and sensory nerves. All fingers had proper flap thickness 3–6 months after surgery, and required only lateral Z-plasty modification with web deepening and widening to narrow the fingers and extend their relative length. Results We completed flap-graft and finger narrowing for 25 fingers in eight patients. Abdominal skin flaps and dorsal toe flaps were grafted, and resulted in both firmness and softness, providing finger flexibility. The dorsal toe flap provided good blood circulation and sensory nerves, and was used to cover the finger-flexor surface to regain sensation and stability when holding objects. During the 1–8 years of follow-up, sensation on the finger-flexor side recovered to the S3–4 level, and patient satisfaction based on the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire was 4–5. Flap ulcers or bone/tendon necrosis were not observed. Conclusion Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap was effective and reliable. PMID:26229479

  9. PIV Measurements on a Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several blowing flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main-element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the vortex system or accelerated the merging of the side vortex to the flap top surface. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  10. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  11. Free thin paraumbilical perforator-based flaps.

    PubMed

    Koshima, I; Moriguchi, T; Soeda, S; Tanaka, H; Umeda, N

    1992-07-01

    A free paraumbilical perforator-based flap fed by a muscle perforator from the inferior deep epigastric artery and with no muscle was used in 13 patients. Among them, a free thin paraumbilical perforator-based flap with a thin layer of fat, to protect the subdermal plexus of the vessels, was used in seven patients. The dominant pedicle perforator of this thin flap is usually located around the umbilicus and a large flap can be obtained. Its critical length-to-breath ratio is considered to be 4:3. The advantages of this flap are a long and large vascular pedicle, rare postoperative abdominal herniation, little bulkiness of the flap, and a relatively large skin territory. The disadvantages are technical difficulties in dissection of the perforator and anatomical variation in the location of the perforator. We believe this flap largely overcomes the problems of the conventional rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. PMID:1386718

  12. New model of flap-gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2015-07-21

    A new modelling approach is presented for describing flap-gliding flight in birds and the associated mechanical energy cost of travelling. The new approach is based on the difference in the drag characteristics between flapping and non-flapping due to the drag increase caused by flapping. Thus, the possibility of a gliding flight phase, as it exists in flap-gliding flight, yields a performance advantage resulting from the decrease in the drag when compared with continuous flapping flight. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization for the mathematical relations describing flap-gliding flight, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that there is an energy saving of flap-gliding flight in the entire speed range compared to continuous flapping flight. The energy saving reaches the highest level in the lower speed region. The travelling speed of flap-gliding flight is composed of the weighted average of the differing speeds in the flapping and gliding phases. Furthermore, the maximum range performance achievable with flap-gliding flight and the associated optimal travelling speed are determined. PMID:25841702

  13. The bilobed flap for popliteal defect reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kelahmetoglu, Osman; Yagmur, Caglayan; Aslan, Ozan; Firinciogullari, Remzi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bilobed flaps were first introduced to close small nasal defects. We reconstructed a defect of the popliteal fossa using a random-pattern bilobed flap. We recommend the use of random-pattern bilobed flaps as a reliable technique for covering defects of the popliteal fossa.

  14. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a...

  15. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a...

  16. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a...

  17. Efficient flapping flight of pterosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strang, Karl Axel

    In the late eighteenth century, humans discovered the first pterosaur fossil remains and have been fascinated by their existence ever since. Pterosaurs exploited their membrane wings in a sophisticated manner for flight control and propulsion, and were likely the most efficient and effective flyers ever to inhabit our planet. The flapping gait is a complex combination of motions that sustains and propels an animal in the air. Because pterosaurs were so large with wingspans up to eleven meters, if they could have sustained flapping flight, they would have had to achieve high propulsive efficiencies. Identifying the wing motions that contribute the most to propulsive efficiency is key to understanding pterosaur flight, and therefore to shedding light on flapping flight in general and the design of efficient ornithopters. This study is based on published results for a very well-preserved specimen of Coloborhynchus robustus, for which the joints are well-known and thoroughly described in the literature. Simplifying assumptions are made to estimate the characteristics that can not be inferred directly from the fossil remains. For a given animal, maximizing efficiency is equivalent to minimizing power at a given thrust and speed. We therefore aim at finding the flapping gait, that is the joint motions, that minimize the required flapping power. The power is computed from the aerodynamic forces created during a given wing motion. We develop an unsteady three-dimensional code based on the vortex-lattice method, which correlates well with published results for unsteady motions of rectangular wings. In the aerodynamic model, the rigid pterosaur wing is defined by the position of the bones. In the aeroelastic model, we add the flexibility of the bones and of the wing membrane. The nonlinear structural behavior of the membrane is reduced to a linear modal decomposition, assuming small deflections about the reference wing geometry. The reference wing geometry is computed for

  18. Four-flap Breast Reconstruction: Bilateral Stacked DIEP and PAP Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, James L.; Allen, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In cases of bilateral breast reconstruction when the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) free flap alone does not provide sufficient volume for body-specific reconstruction, stacking each DIEP flap with a second free flap will deliver added volume and maintain a purely autologous reconstruction. Stacking the profunda artery perforator (PAP) flap with the DIEP flap offers favorable aesthetics and ideal operative efficiency. We present the indications, technique, and outcomes of our experience with 4-flap breast reconstruction using stacked DIEP/PAP flaps. Methods: The authors performed 4-flap DIEP/PAP breast reconstruction in 20 patients who required bilateral reconstruction without adequate single donor flap volume. The timing of reconstruction, average mastectomy/flap weights, and operative time are reported. Complications reviewed include fat necrosis, dehiscence, hematoma, seroma, mastectomy flap necrosis, and flap loss. Results: Twenty patients underwent 4-flap DIEP/PAP breast reconstruction. Surgical time averaged 7 hours and 20 minutes. The primary recipient vessels were the antegrade and retrograde internal mammary vessels. No flap losses occurred. Complications included 1 hematoma, 1 incidence of arterial and venous thrombosis successfully treated with anastomotic revision, 1 incidence of thigh donor site dehiscence, and 3 episodes of minor mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Conclusions: Four-flap breast reconstruction is a favorable autologous reconstructive option for patients requiring bilateral reconstruction without adequate single donor flap volume. Stacking DIEP/PAP flaps as described is both safe and efficient. Furthermore, this combination provides superior aesthetics mirroring the natural geometry of the breast. Bilateral stacked DIEP/PAP flaps represent our first choice for breast reconstruction in this patient population. PMID:26090273

  19. Scrotal reconstruction with modified pudendal thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Mopuri, Nabil; O'Connor, Edmund Fitzgerald; Iwuagwu, Fortune C

    2016-02-01

    Scrotal skin loss can occur following trauma, Fournier's gangrene, post tumour excision, burns, etc. There are many techniques described in the literature including residual scrotal skin mobilization, skin grafts, pedicled and free flaps. The management is complex and challenging shown by the multiplicity of flaps and techniques described in the literature. We used a modified pudendal thigh flap to reconstruct scrotal defects in five patients. This study describes the vascularity of the flap, technique of elevation and the inset of the flap. The elevation and particularly the insetting make it different from other flaps raised on this vascular network for scrotal reconstruction. This pedicled flap is robust, reliable, resilient and produces a neo-scrotum that looks natural in appearance, offers good-quality skin cover and cushion to the testes as well as protective sensation. PMID:26774357

  20. Cost-effectiveness of monitoring free flaps.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Shiva; Sharp, David; Jardim, Christopher; Batstone, Martin D

    2016-06-01

    Methods of free flap monitoring have become more sophisticated and expensive. This study aims to determine the cost of free flap monitoring and examine its cost effectiveness. We examined a group of patients who had had free flaps to the head and neck over a two-year period, and combined these results with costs obtained from business managers and staff. There were 132 free flaps with a success rate of 99%. The cost of monitoring was Aus $193/flap. Clinical monitoring during this time period cost Aus$25 476 and did not lead to the salvage of any free flaps. Cost equivalence is reached between monitoring and not monitoring only at a failure rate of 15.8%. This is to our knowledge the first study to calculate the cost of clinical monitoring of free flaps, and to examine its cost-effectiveness. PMID:27015730

  1. Force Generation by Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Donnelly, M.

    1996-11-01

    Aquatic animals like fish use flapping caudal fins to produce axial and cross-stream forces. During WW2, German scientists had built and tested an underwater vehicle powered by similar flapping foils. We have examined the forces produced by a pair of flapping foils. We have examined the forced produced by a pair of flapping foils attached to the tail end of a small axisymmetric cylinder. The foils operate in-phase (called waving), or in anti-phase (called clapping). In a low-speed water tunnel, we have undertaken time-dependent measurements of axial and cross-stream forces and moments that are exerted by the vortex shedding process over the entire body. Phase-matched LDV measurements of vorticity-velocity vectors, as well as limited flow visualization of the periodic vortex shedding process have also been carried out. The direction of the induced velocity within a pair of shed vortices determines the nature of the forces produced, viz., thrust or drag or cross-stream forces. The clapping mode produces a widely dispersed symmetric array of vortices which results in axial forces only (thrust and rag). On the other hand, the vortex array is staggered in the waving mode and cross-stream (maneuvering) forces are then generated.

  2. Flap--edge flowfield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, John D.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    1997-11-01

    Recent studies of airframe noise suggest that the wing and flap trailing--edges as well as the flap side--edge are areas of significant noise generation. To identify the fluid dynamic processes associated with these noise sources, we are examining the flow--field around a NACA 63--215 Mod B main element airfoil configured with a half--span Fowler flap. The tests are performed in a low--speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of ~ 6.0×10^5. A hot wire traverse system is used to map the mean velocities and turbulence intensities in the near wake region of the flow. Measurements of the pressure fluctuations along the flap side--edge and in the cove of the airfoil configuration are made with pressure transducers mounted inside the airfoil. The experimental data are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical simulation of a slightly higher Reynolds number flow ( ~ 1.5×10^6) around a geometrically similar airfoil configuration.

  3. Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Flap after Parotidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Morsi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most patients after either superficial or total parotidectomy develop facial deformity and Frey syndrome, which leads to a significant degree of patient dissatisfaction. Objective Assess the functional outcome and esthetic results of the superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) flap after superficial or total parotidectomy. Methods A prospective cohort study for 11 patients subjected to parotidectomy using a partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap. The functional outcome (Frey syndrome, facial nerve involvement, and ear lobule sensation) and the esthetic results were evaluated subjectively and objectively. Results Facial nerve palsy occurred in 5 cases (45%), and all of them recovered completely within 6 months. The Minor starch iodine test was positive in 3 patients (27%), although only 1 (9%) subjectively complained of gustatory sweating. The designed visual analog score completed by the patients themselves ranged from 0 to 3 with a mean of 1.55 ± 0.93; the scores from the blinded evaluators ranged from 1 to 3 with a mean 1.64 ± 0.67. Conclusion The partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap offers a reasonable cosmetic option for reconstruction following either superficial or total parotidectomy by improving the facial deformity. The flap also lowers the incidence of Frey syndrome objectively and subjectively with no reported hazard of the spinal accessory nerve. PMID:26491478

  4. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  5. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Baytinger, V. F. Kurochkina, O. S. Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  6. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  7. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  8. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  9. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  10. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils with Fowler Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Anderson, Walter B

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests made of a Clark y airfoil with a Clark y Fowler flap and of an NACA 23012 airfoil with NACA Fowler flaps. Some of the tests were made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel and others in the 5-foot vertical wind tunnel. The pressures were measured on the upper and lower surfaces at one chord section both on the main airfoils and on the flaps for several angles of attack with the flaps located at the maximum-lift settings. A test installation was used in which the model was mounted in the wind tunnel between large end planes so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. The data are given in the form of pressure-distribution diagrams and as plots of calculated coefficients for the airfoil-and-flap combinations and for the flaps alone.

  11. Davis flap: the glory still present

    PubMed Central

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Upper third defects of the ear are too large to be closed primarily without distorting the auricle. Full thickness defects can be reconstructed with local flaps. In this article, Davis flap was used to fill the upper third defects of the ear with some modifications. Patients and methods: Eight patients underwent reconstruction of full thickness auricular defects with Davis flaps from July 2012 to December 2014. The posterior surface of the flap and the raw area of conchal area were covered by full thickness graft taken from posterior surface of ear. Results: All flaps survived. No congestion was noted. The donor sites and skin grafts healed uneventfully. Conclusion: Davis flap is a simple and reproducible tool for reconstruction of upper third of ear. PMID:27274439

  12. Benefits of using omental pedicle flap over muscle flap for closure of open window thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Kuwata, Taiji; Takenaka, Masaru; Oka, Soichi; Hirai, Ayako; Imanishi, Naoko; Kuroda, Koji; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Open window thoracotomy (OWT) as well as its closure are challenging. Transposition of omental pedicle and muscle flaps is often performed for OWT closure; however, the better technique among the two is unknown. The purpose of this series was to evaluate the outcomes of using both omental pedicle and muscle flaps for the aforementioned closure. Methods This was an observational retrospective cohort study on 27 consecutive patients who underwent OWT closure at a single institution between January 2005 and December 2014. The operation was performed using either omental pedicle or muscle flap with thoracoplasty. We compared both techniques in terms of the patient background [sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) before OWT and serum albumin levels before OWT closure], presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, rate of bronchopleural fistula (BPF), duration of OWT, recurrence of local infection, morbidity, duration of indwelling drainage after operation, success, mortality and postoperative hospital stay. Results There were 9 (33.3%) omental pedicle flap procedures and 18 (66.7%) muscle flap procedures. The rate of local recurrence after closure of OWT was significantly higher with muscle flap than with omental pedicle flap (0% vs. 50.0%, P=0.012). The median duration of postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter with omental pedicle flap than that with muscle flap (16.0 vs. 41.5 days, P=0.037). Mortality was observed in 2 patients (11.2%) in the muscle flap group and no patient in the omental pedicle flap group. Success rate was similar between the two groups (100% for omental pedicle flap vs. 83.3% for muscle flap). Conclusions Omental pedicle flap was superior to muscle flap in terms of reducing local recurrence and shortening postoperative hospital stay. However, mortality, morbidity and success rates were not affected by the choice of flap. PMID:27499959

  13. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... flaps or slats retracted on one side and extended on the other, the motion of flaps or slats on opposite...) For airplanes with flaps or slats that are not subjected to slipstream conditions, the structure...

  14. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... flaps or slats retracted on one side and extended on the other, the motion of flaps or slats on opposite...) For airplanes with flaps or slats that are not subjected to slipstream conditions, the structure...

  15. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... flaps or slats retracted on one side and extended on the other, the motion of flaps or slats on opposite...) For airplanes with flaps or slats that are not subjected to slipstream conditions, the structure...

  16. Four Flaps Technique for Neoumbilicoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Taek; Kwon, Chan; Rhee, Seung Chul; Cho, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    The absence or disfigurement of the umbilicus is both cosmetically and psychologically distressing to patients. The goal of aesthetically pleasing umbilical reconstruction is to create a neoumbilicus with sufficient depth and good morphology, with natural-looking superior hooding and minimal scarring. Although many reports have presented techniques for creating new and attractive umbilici, we developed a technique that we term the "four flaps technique" for creating a neoumbilicus in circumstances such as the congenital absence of the umbilicus or the lack of remaining umbilical tissue following the excision of a hypertrophic or scarred umbilicus. This method uses the neighboring tissue by simply elevating four flaps and can yield sufficient depth and an aesthetically pleasing shape with appropriate superior hooding. PMID:26015893

  17. Craniotomy flap osteomyelitis: a diagnostic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenkopf, B.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Bauman, J.M.; Cawthon, M.A.; Patton, J.A.; Friedman, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Nine cases of suspected craniotomy flap osteomyelitis evaluated by combined bone and gallium scanning are presented. In six cases, the clinical data were inconclusive and evaluation by radionuclide imaging provided an accurate negative diagnosis. The other three cases considered positive by this technique were proven infected at subsequent exploration and flap removal. The use of radionuclide bone and gallium imaging should be considered in cases of possible craniotomy flap osteomyelitis.

  18. Axial pattern skin flaps in cats.

    PubMed

    Remedios, A M; Bauer, M S; Bowen, C V; Fowler, J D

    1991-01-01

    The major direct cutaneous vessels identified in the cat include the omocervical, thoracodorsal, deep circumflex iliac, and caudal superficial epigastric arteries. Axial pattern skin flaps based on the thoracodorsal and caudal superficial epigastric arteries have been developed in cats. Rotation of these flaps as islands allows skin coverage to the carpus and metatarsus, respectively. The thoracodorsal and caudal superficial epigastric flaps provide a practical, one-step option in the reconstruction of large skin defects involving the distal extremities of cats. PMID:2011063

  19. Wing flapping with minimum energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A technique employed by Prandtl and Munk is adapted for the case of a wing in flapping motion to determine its lift distribution. The problem may be reduced to one of minimizing induced drag for a specified and periodically varying bending moment at the wing root. It is concluded that two wings in close tandem arrangement, moving in opposite phase, would eliminate the induced aerodynamic losses calculated

  20. Basic Perforator Flap Hemodynamic Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Youlun; Ding, Maochao; Wang, Aiguo; Zhuang, Yuehong; Chang, Shi-Min; Mei, Jin; Hallock, Geoffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A mathematical model to help explain the hemodynamic characteristics of perforator flaps based on blood flow resistance systems within the flap will serve as a theoretical guide for the future study and clinical applications of these flaps. Methods: There are 3 major blood flow resistance network systems of a perforator flap. These were defined as the blood flow resistance of an anastomosis between artery and artery of adjacent perforasomes, between artery and vein within a perforasome, and then between vein and vein corresponding to the outflow of that perforasome. From this, a calculation could be made of the number of such blood flow resistance network systems that must be crossed for all perforasomes within a perforator flap to predict whether that arrangement would be viable. Results: The summation of blood flow resistance networks from each perforasome in a given perforator flap could predict which portions would likely survive. This mathematical model shows how this is directly dependent on the location of the vascular pedicle to the flap and whether supercharging or superdrainage maneuvers have been added. These configurations will give an estimate of the hemodynamic characteristics for the given flap design. Conclusions: This basic mathematical model can (1) conveniently determine the degree of difficulty for each perforasome within a perforator flap to survive; (2) semiquantitatively allow the calculation of basic hemodynamic parameters; and (3) allow the assessment of the pros and cons expected for each pattern of perforasomes encountered clinically based on predictable hemodynamic observations.

  1. A water tunnel study of Gurney flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Several Gurney flap configurations were tested in the NASA Langley 16 x 24 inch Water Tunnel. These devices provided an increased region of attached flow on a wing upper surface relative to the wing without the flaps. The recirculation region behind the flap was visualized and shown to be consistent with hypotheses stated in previous research. Although the test Reynolds number for this study was several orders of magnitude below those in previous investigations, the effect of the Gurney flaps is in qualitative agreement with them. This is as would be expected from first order effects for high lift devices.

  2. Arterialized Venous Bone Flaps: An Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Borumandi, Farzad; Higgins, James P.; Buerger, Heinz; Vasilyeva, Anna; Benlidayi, Memmet Emre; Sencar, Leman; Gaggl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In arterialized venous flaps (AVFs) the venous network is used to revascularize the flap. While the feasibility of AVFs in soft tissues has been reported there is no study on osseous AVFs. In this study we aim to assess the flap survival of osseous AVFs in a pig model. Medial femoral condyle flaps were elevated in 18 pigs. Three groups were created: AVF (n = 6), conventional arterial flap (cAF, n = 6) and bone graft (BG, n = 6). The AVFs were created by anastomosis of genicular artery with one vena comitans while leaving one efferent vein for drainage. After 6 months the specimens were harvested. The histology and histomorphometry of of the bone in cAF and AVF was significantly superior to bone grafts with a higher bone volume in AVFs (p = 0.01). This study demonstrates that osseous free flaps may be supported and survive using the technique of arterialization of the venous network. The concept of AVFs in osseous flaps may be feasible for revascularization of free flaps with an inadequate artery but well developed veins. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to assess the feasibility of clinical use of arterialized venous bone flaps. PMID:27558705

  3. An investigation of the flap edge flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, John David

    To identify and understand the fluid dynamic processes associated with flow in the region of a flap side edge, a NACA 63-215 Mod B main element with a half-span Fowler flap was tested in the JIAA Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Stanford University. Measurements were made using a variety of techniques to capture the effects of the flap edge vortex. Pressure sensitive paint was applied to the upper surface of both the flap and main element, as well as to the flap side edge. Fast response pressure transducers were mounted interior to the model to measure surface pressure fluctuations on the flap side edge. Single component hotwire data was taken in the near wake region of the flap edge. In addition to the data experimentally obtained, a computational data set of a geometrically similar model at a flight Reynolds number was used for comparison. The data indicates the presence of a dual vortex structure along the flap side edge. This structure is seen to grow, merge, and ultimately become a single symmetric vortex as it progresses downstream. Surface pressure fluctuations on the side edge scale as three power laws with free stream velocity as different flow regions are encountered. By varying the model rigging, indications of a confined source region for the pressure fluctuations were observed. A spatial survey of the correlation between flap side edge surface pressure fluctuations and the near-wake fluctuating velocity field shows increased correlation coefficients for the region surrounding the vortex core.

  4. Arterialized Venous Bone Flaps: An Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Borumandi, Farzad; Higgins, James P; Buerger, Heinz; Vasilyeva, Anna; Benlidayi, Memmet Emre; Sencar, Leman; Gaggl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In arterialized venous flaps (AVFs) the venous network is used to revascularize the flap. While the feasibility of AVFs in soft tissues has been reported there is no study on osseous AVFs. In this study we aim to assess the flap survival of osseous AVFs in a pig model. Medial femoral condyle flaps were elevated in 18 pigs. Three groups were created: AVF (n = 6), conventional arterial flap (cAF, n = 6) and bone graft (BG, n = 6). The AVFs were created by anastomosis of genicular artery with one vena comitans while leaving one efferent vein for drainage. After 6 months the specimens were harvested. The histology and histomorphometry of of the bone in cAF and AVF was significantly superior to bone grafts with a higher bone volume in AVFs (p = 0.01). This study demonstrates that osseous free flaps may be supported and survive using the technique of arterialization of the venous network. The concept of AVFs in osseous flaps may be feasible for revascularization of free flaps with an inadequate artery but well developed veins. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to assess the feasibility of clinical use of arterialized venous bone flaps. PMID:27558705

  5. A new classification of spreader flap techniques.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Jochen; Kovacevic, Milos

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce various spreader flap technique modifications to adjust the width of the middle nasal vault in patients who underwent rhinoplasties with humpectomy. Decisive modifications of current spreader flap techniques were performed to allow a more natural restoration of the middle nasal vault and the internal nasal valve after humpectomy. Additional steps provide tools to adjust the width and shape of the middle nasal vault according to patients' requirements. The techniques were categorized into "basic spreader flaps," "flaring spreader flaps," "support spreader flaps," and "interrupted spreader flaps." The various spreader flap techniques were used during 576 primary septorhinoplasties in patients with hump noses, hump/crooked noses, or hump/tension noses. The average follow-up was 19 months. Patients who received basic spreader flaps or a flaring spreader flaps tended to show a slightly too wide middle nasal vault, revision surgery was necessary in four of these cases. All other patients showed an appropriate width in the middle nasal vault and an aesthetically pleasing course of the dorsal aesthetic lines. No signs of inverted v deformities or collapse of the internal nasal valve were observed in any of the patients. Patients who had reported impaired nasal breathing preoperatively described clearly improved subjective symptoms. The described techniques appear to be appropriate and highly promising as a supplement to existing procedures for reconstructing the middle nasal vault and internal nasal valves. No additional cartilage grafts are needed. PMID:24327250

  6. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    PubMed

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. PMID:24343130

  7. [The super extended sub-mental flap or combo sub-mental flap].

    PubMed

    Martin, D

    2014-08-01

    The author presents a technical variation of the sub-mental flap including in a conventional pedicled flap both sub-mental axes and their anastomoses on the midline. The assessment of the first flaps raised according to this method confirms the improvement of the distal blood supply. It allows the possibility to harvest "super extended" flaps reaching the contralateral auricular lobula. This variation can be considered as an axial flap which only the tip, located beyond the mandibular angle, is at random. The evolution of the sub-mental flap from its original description to this variation called "combo sub-mental flap" is then presented. Its reliability and the technical simplification it provides will have to be assessed in the future. PMID:24840945

  8. Secondary onlay free flap reconstruction of glossectomy defects following initial successful flap restoration.

    PubMed

    Rihani, Jordan; Lee, Thomas; Ducic, Yadranko

    2013-08-01

    Patients who undergo tongue reconstruction over time may develop gradual worsening of dysarthria and dysphagia secondary to flap atrophy. At our institution, these patients undergo a secondary flap onlay procedure for augmentation of the neotongue. We review a total of 11 patients with total glossectomy defect who underwent secondary tongue augmentation with secondary onlay free flap consisting of radial forearm free flap (n = 6) and rectus free flap (n = 5). There was improvement in swallowing in 7 of 11 patients. Five (45.4%) patients achieved gastric tube independence. Seven (63.6%) patients achieved a varying degree of oral intake. All patients achieved tracheostomy independence. Dysarthria was improved in all patients. There were no flap failures. Therefore, a secondary onlay flap technique is feasible and may improve dysphagia and dysarthria to achieve gastric tube and tracheostomy independence in total glossectomy patients with delayed tongue atrophy. PMID:23625797

  9. Distally based sural artery flap without sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Motamed, Sadrollah; Yavari, Masood; Mofrad, Hamid Reza Hallaj; Rafiee, Reza; Shahraki, Feaz Niazi

    2010-01-01

    The distal third of the tibia, ankle and heel area is difficult to reconstruct. For small to medium size defects, local flaps are often an easier alternative than free flap. In lower limb surgery, the sural flap is based on this principle and this flap is becoming increasingly popular. The distally based superficial sural artery flap, first described as a distally based neuro skin flap by masquelet et al., is a skin island flap supplied by the vascular axis of the sural nerve. The main disadvantage of distally based sural artery flap is sacrifice of the sural nerve because it is described the concept of neurocutaneus island flap. We describe one case of reverse sural flap without sural nerve .The aim of this paper is to establish the reliability of this flap even without sural nerve. PMID:21133008

  10. Thumb Reconstruction Using Foucher’s Flap

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Nardi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extensive pulp defects of the thumb, with the exposure of tendon or bone, are challenging reconstructive problems. Surgical treatment includes the use of local, regional, and free flaps. AIM: This paper is focused in Foucher’s neuro vascular flap. First DMCA or Foucher’s pedicle flap is a successful thumb reconstruction method, especially in patients not disturbed by its cosmetic appearance. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The first dorsal metacarpal artery (FDMCA) arises from the radial artery in the first intermetacarpal space, just distal to the tendon of the extensor pollicis longus. Pulp area of the thumb is the area where Foucher’s flap is more utilizable. This technique has other applications such as first web reconstruction, thumb lengthening, and following resection of tumors on the dorsum of the hand. RESULTS: We have in study 7 cases with work related trauma in two years period of time, between 2012 and 2014. We had only one partial flap survival and all the other flaps survived entirely. We have also taken in consideration subjective satisfaction with a range score from 4 to 10, cold intolerance, flap area and donor site sensibility with a range score from low to medium to normal. CONCLUSION: Careful pedicle discovery, secured elevation, pedicle strangulation prevention are very important for flap survival.

  11. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap...

  12. Free flap pulse oximetry utilizing reflectance photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Zaman, T; Kyriacou, P A; Pal, S K

    2013-01-01

    The successful salvage of a free flap is dependent on the continuous monitoring of perfusion. To date there is no widely accepted and readily available post-operative monitoring technique to reliably assess the viability of free flaps by continuously monitoring free flap blood oxygen saturation. In an attempt to overcome the limitations of the current techniques a reflectance photoplethysmographic (PPG) processing system has been developed with the capability of real-time estimation of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels implemented in LabVIEW. This system was evaluated in clinical measurements on five patients undergoing breast reconstruction using Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator (DIEP) flap. Good quality PPG signals were obtained from the flaps and fingers simultaneously. The estimated free flap SpO2 values were in broad agreement with the oxygen saturation readings from the commercial pulse oximeter. The results suggest that reflectance free flap photoplethysmography can be used as a continuous monitoring technique to non-invasively monitor the perfusion of free flaps. PMID:24110620

  13. The posterior calf fascial free flap.

    PubMed

    Walton, R L; Matory, W E; Petry, J J

    1985-12-01

    Six posterior calf fascial free flaps were employed to reconstruct defects of the upper and lower extremities. One flap failed due to a constricting dressing. Two flaps sustained partial loss secondary to bleeding and hematoma formation. One flap dehisced at the distal suture line due to mobility of an underlying fracture. All surviving flaps eventually healed and resulted in stable, thin coverage. Donor-site morbidity has been minimal. Shortcomings of this flap model have been defined in the peculiarities of its thinness, diffuse vascular oozing, the extent of the vascular territory, and in postoperative monitoring. These problems are analyzed and recommendations for their resolution are presented. Fascia represents a unique tissue which offers an exciting new dimension in the reconstruction of certain defects--particularly those in which thinness is a desirable option. In the posterior calf model, the inclusion of fat represents an alternative modification that allows the surgeon to tailor the design to a variety of problems where fascia alone is too thin and a cutaneous flap is too thick. This concept may find its greatest application in wounds involving the hand or foot. We believe that this and other fascial flap prototypes may offer an ideal solution for reconstruction of major wounds of the extremities. PMID:3906718

  14. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap...

  15. Use of free flaps in burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Tvrdek, M; Nejedlý, A; Kletenský, J; Pros, Z; Broz, L

    1994-01-01

    The present currently used method of treating and reconstructing injuries caused by electric current and deep thermal injuries is compared with the method of early reconstruction using free flaps. Brief summary of present experience substantiating this method is presented. The three presented clinical cases show subacute reconstruction in this type of injury by free flaps transfer. PMID:7618395

  16. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  17. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  18. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  19. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  20. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  1. Piezoelectrically actuated insect scale flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sujoy; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2010-04-01

    An energy method is used in order to derive the non-linear equations of motion of a smart flapping wing. Flapping wing is actuated from the root by a PZT unimorph in the piezofan configuration. Dynamic characteristics of the wing, having the same size as dragonfly Aeshna Multicolor, are analyzed using numerical simulations. It is shown that flapping angle variations of the smart flapping wing are similar to the actual dragonfly wing for a specific feasible voltage. An unsteady aerodynamic model based on modified strip theory is used to obtain the aerodynamic forces. It is found that the smart wing generates sufficient lift to support its own weight and carry a small payload. It is therefore a potential candidate for flapping wing of micro air vehicles.

  2. Scrubbing noise of externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the aeroacoustic mechanism that produces externally blown flap (EBF) scrubbing noise, i.e. a surface-radiated noise which is generally strongest normal to UTW deflected flaps. Scrubbing noise was not radiated from portions of the surface adjacent to strong, locally coherent turbulent eddies. Instead, scrubbing noise seemed to come from weak loading fluctuations that were coherent along the scrubbed span. These loading fluctuations probably were induced by the convected large-scale vortex structure of the attached exhaust jet. Deflecting a UTW flap would reduce the distance between the vortex trajectory and the flap surface, increasing the resulting dipole noise and rotating its directivity. In contrast, deflecting a USB flap would increase this distance, so that observable scrubbing noise would be radiated only from the undeflected forward portion of the wing.

  3. Facial artery flaps in facial oncoplastic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Tommaso

    2013-10-01

    The face is one of the common sites for cutaneous cancer localization. It is well known that the face is the localization of more than 50% of skin cancers. Nowadays, the principles of modern "oncoplasty" recommend the complete excision of the cancer and the reconstruction with respect to cosmetic features of the face in terms of good color, good softness, and good texture of the flaps, utilized in cancer repair. The oncological and cosmetic results of facial reconstruction are strictly linked and the modern plastic and reconstructive surgeon must respect both oncological and cosmetic aspects. For that reason the best solution in facial cancer repair is the utilization of locoregional flaps based on the tributary vessels of the facial artery. In consideration of the dimension of recipient area to repair, the retroangular flap (RAF) or the submental flap could be used. This article is voted to illustrate a very large and long-term casuistry dedicated to these flaps. PMID:24037925

  4. The clinical application of anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Shieh, Shyh-Jou

    2011-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap can provide a large skin paddle nourished by a long and large-caliber pedicle and can be harvested by two-team work. Most importantly, the donor-site morbidity is minimal. However, the anatomic variations decreased its popularity. By adapting free-style flap concepts, such as preoperative mapping of the perforators and being familiar with retrograde perforator dissection, this disadvantage had been overcome gradually. Furthermore, several modifications widen its clinical applications: the fascia lata can be included for sling or tendon reconstruction, the bulkiness could be created by including vastus lateralis muscle or deepithelization of skin flap, the pliability could be increased by suprafascial dissection or primary thinning, the pedicle length could be lengthening by proximally eccentric placement of the perforator, and so forth. Combined with these technical and conceptual advancements, the anterolateral thigh flap has become the workhorse flap for soft-tissue reconstructions from head to toe. PMID:22567234

  5. Fasciocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.N.; Whetzel, T.; Mathes, S.J.; Vasconez, L.O.

    1987-07-01

    A skin and fascia flap from the medial thigh is proposed for vaginal and perineal reconstruction. Dissection, vascular injection, and radiographs of 20 fresh cadaver limbs uniformly demonstrated the presence of a communicating suprafascial vascular plexus in the medial thigh. Three to four nonaxial vessels were consistently found to enter the proximal plexus from within 5 cm of the perineum. Preservation of these vessels permitted reliable elevation of a 9 X 20 cm fasciocutaneous flap without using the gracilis muscle as a vascular carrier. Fifteen flaps in 13 patients were used for vaginal replacement and coverage of vulvectomy, groin, and ischial defects. Depending on the magnitude of the defect, simultaneous and independent elevation of the gracilis muscle provided additional vascularized coverage as needed. Our experience indicates that the medial thigh fasciocutaneous flap is a durable, less bulky, and potentially sensate alternative to the gracilis musculocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction.

  6. Pudendal thigh flap for repair of rectovaginal fistula.

    PubMed

    Sathappan, S; Rica, M A I

    2006-08-01

    The pudendal thigh flap or the Singapore flap is a versatile flap that can be used in the repair of recto-vaginal fistulae. Apart from the potential problem of hair growth, this neurovascular flap proves to be surprisingly simple in technique, robust and has a high potential for normal or near-normal function. PMID:17240589

  7. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in amore » group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.« less

  8. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing-wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  9. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers.

    PubMed

    Becker, Alexander D; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing-wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups. PMID:26439509

  10. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  11. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups. PMID:26439509

  12. Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash.

  13. New drag laws for flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agre, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2014-11-01

    Classical aerodynamic theory predicts that a steadily-moving wing experiences fluid forces proportional to the square of its speed. For bird and insect flight, however, there is currently no model for how drag is affected by flapping motions of the wings. By considering simple wings driven to oscillate while progressing through the air, we discover that flapping significantly changes the magnitude of drag and fundamentally alters its scaling with speed. These measurements motivate a new aerodynamic force law that could help to understand the free-flight dynamics, control, and stability of insects and flapping-wing robots.

  14. Dynamic response of a piezoelectric flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alok; Khandwekar, Gaurang; Venkatesh, S.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Dutta, S.

    2015-03-01

    Piezo-composite membranes have advantages over motorized flapping where frequencies are high and certain coupling between bending and twisting is useful to generate lift and forward flight. We draw examples of fruit fly and bumble bee. Wings with Piezo ceramic PZT coating are realized. The passive mechanical response of the wing is characterized experimentally and validated using finite element simulation. Piezoelectric actuation with uniform electrode coating is characterized and optimal frequencies for flapping are identified. The experimental data are used in an empirical model and advanced ratio for a flapping insect like condition for various angular orientations is estimated.

  15. The plane problem of the flapping wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, Walter

    1954-01-01

    In connection with an earlier report on the lifting vortex sheet which forms the basis of the following investigations this will show how the methods developed there are also suitable for dealing with the air forces for a wing with a circulation variable with time. The theory of a propulsive wing flapping up and down periodically in the manner of a bird's wing is developed. This study shows how the lift and its moment result as a function of the flapping motion, what thrust is attainable, and how high is the degree of efficiency of this flapping propulsion unit if the air friction is disregarded.

  16. Blended Cutout Flap for Reduction of Jet-Flap Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft system includes a wing and a trailing edge device coupled to the wing. The trailing edge device is movable relative to the wing, and includes a leading edge and a trailing edge having a center flap portion and a plurality of outer edge portions integrally combined with the center flap portion such that the center flap portion is shorter in width than that of outer edge portions.

  17. ["Separation delay" on random flap: an experimental and clinical practice on delayed flap].

    PubMed

    Zhao, S Q

    1990-08-01

    A new technique of delayed flap, that is called "Separation delay" by the authors, has succeeded in animal experiment and clinical practice. In the years of 1985-1989, 11 cases of random skin flaps on the patients had been performed with the new method. All the flaps look like table tennis rackets. It's pedicle is very narrow, simultaneously, the flap itself is very large. So it is quite suitable for repairing a neighbouring wound surface. It can be rotated 180 degrees. "The Separation delay" is a handy way without microsurgical technique. It is also an useful and reliable technique for resurfacing wound on plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:2086104

  18. Propeller Flap Reconstruction in Post Oncological Thigh Defect: "The Move in Flap".

    PubMed

    Nambi, G I; Salunke, Abhijeet Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the limb after tumor resection is challenging question for oncosurgeons. The management differs from reconstruction of post traumatic defects due to the complexity of the primary surgery and subsequent radiation. The conventional propeller flap is based on a perforator which is located close to the defect; but in present case the perforator was located far away from the defect. So we describe it as "Move in flap" as the flap rotated a large volume of soft tissue lying between the defect and the perforator. We present a case of post oncological thigh defect with reconstruction using a propeller flap based on distal anteromedial perforator. PMID:26405422

  19. Locoregional use of lateral thoracic artery perforator flap as a propeller flap.

    PubMed

    Baghaki, Semih; Cevirme, Mirza; Diyarbakirli, Murat; Tatar, Cihad; Aydin, Yagmur

    2015-05-01

    Although thoracodorsal system is a fundamental source of various flaps, lateral thoracic region has not been a popular flap donor area. There is limited data on the use of lateral intercostal artery perforator flap and lateral thoracic artery perforator flap. In this case series, lateral thoracic artery perforator flap has been used in locoregional (axilla, pectoral region, and arm) reconstruction as an island or propeller flap.Eighteen patients have been operated on between September 2010 and January 2013. The age of the patients ranged between 16 and 68 years with a median of 38 years. A thorough chart review has been performed with preoperative and postoperative photographs. Duration of hospitalization, complication rate and long term results have been documented.Nine patients had severe burn contracture of axilla, 7 patients had axillary hidradenitis suppurativa, 1 patient had giant neurofibroma of arm, and 1 patient had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of pectoral area. Seventeen flaps survived totally, and in 1 flap, distal superficial slough of skin has been observed. No recurrence in hidradenitis or peripheral nerve sheath tumor has been observed. Donor site scar is well hidden in anatomical position. The range of motion of affected extremities returned to normal after reconstruction.Lateral thoracic area provides a reliable flap option with a wide arc of rotation when lateral thoracic artery perforators are used. PMID:25875722

  20. P-47 Thunderbolt with dive recovery flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1946-01-01

    Caption: 'The dive recovery flaps on this P-47 Thunderbolt are barely visible underneath the wings. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (pages 52-53 and 130), by James Schultz.

  1. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cabbabe, E.B.; Herbold, D.R.; Sunwoo, Y.C.; Baroudi, I.F.

    1983-06-01

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented.

  2. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin infection Surgery for skin cancer Venous ulcers , pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that do not heal After mastectomy or amputation Donor sites for grafts and flaps are chosen ... surgery than the wound due to newly exposed nerve endings.

  3. A dynamical system for interacting flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Anand; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation into the dynamics of interacting flapping swimmers. Our study is motivated by the recent experiments of Becker et al., who studied a one-dimensional array of self-propelled flapping wings that swim within each other's wakes in a water tank. They discovered that the system adopts certain ``schooling modes'' characterized by specific spatial phase relationships between swimmers. To rationalize these phenomena, we develop a discrete dynamical system in which the swimmers are modeled as heaving airfoils that shed point vortices during each flapping cycle. We then apply our model to recent experiments in the Applied Math Lab, in which two tandem flapping airfoils are free to choose both their speed and relative positions. We expect that our model may be used to understand how schooling behavior is influenced by hydrodynamics in more general contexts. Thanks to the NSF for its support.

  4. Bilateral pedicled gracilis flap for scrotal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Daigeler, Adrien; Behr, Björn; Mikhail, Bassem Daniel; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Wallner, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Trauma, infection and cancer can cause severe scrotal defects. The demand to a definitive reconstruction in terms of aesthetics and function is high. Primary closure, skin grafts and local fasciocutaneous flaps do not meet these high demands in most cases. The authors treated a series of patients requiring scrotal reconstruction with bilateral pedicled gracilis muscle flaps and split thickness skin grafts, resulting in satisfying aesthetic and functional outcomes. PMID:27318782

  5. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  6. Dynamic responses of a two-dimensional flapping foil motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xi-Yun; Liao, Qin

    2006-09-01

    The investigation of a flapping foil, which is used as a basic mode of the flapping-based locomotion in insects, birds, and fish, is performed by solving the Navier-Stokes equations numerically. In this Brief Communication we provide insight into the understanding of dynamics of a flapping foil. A critical flapping Reynolds number based on the flapping frequency and amplitude, above which a forward flapping movement occurs, is predicted. The dynamics of the flapping foil are analyzed in two dynamic responses, i.e., an oscillatory movement and a steady movement, which depend on the density ratio between the foil and the surrounded fluid. The steady movement response is related to the forward flapping motion. The Strouhal number that governs a vortex shedding for the forward flapping foil is calculated and lies in the range where flying and swimming animals will be likely to tune for high propulsive efficiency.

  7. The Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate on Flap Viability of Rat Perforator Abdominal Flaps.

    PubMed

    Aksakal, İbrahim Alper; Küçüker, İsmail; Önger, Mehmet Emin; Engin, Murat Sinan; Keleş, Musa Kemal; Demir, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    Background Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a substance abundant in green tea. In this study, the effects of EGCG on perforator flap viability were investigated. Methods A total of 40 rats were assigned to four groups of 10 each. In each subject, a 4 × 6 cm abdominal skin flap was raised and adapted back onto its place. In the control group, no further procedures were taken. In the flap group, 40 mg/kg/d EGCG was injected into the flap. In the gavage group, 100 mg/kg/d EGCG was given through a feeding tube. In the intraperitoneal group, 50 mg/kg/d EGCG was injected intraperitoneally. On the 7th postoperative day, flaps were photographed and the viable areas were measured and compared via a one-way analysis of variance. Results The ratios of viable and contracted flap area were 9.15/12.01, 4.59/16.46, 11.56/11.20, and 11.65/10.77 cm(2) for the control, flap group, gavage group, and intraperitoneal group, respectively. While the flap group yielded the worst results in the sense of flap contraction and viability (p < 0.001), the gavage and intraperitoneal groups were significantly better than those of the control group (p = 0.03). Histologically, epidermal, papillary dermal, and capillary tissue volumes were evaluated. In comparison to the control group, the flap group yielded significantly increased epidermal and dermal volumes (p = 0.03), however, these values were significantly decreased (p = 0.04) in the gavage and intraperitoneal groups. Capillary volumes were significantly decreased in EGCG treatment groups (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our experiment has shown that oral and intraperitoneal administration of EGCG increases the perforator flap viability when compared with controls, while direct injection decreases the viability. PMID:26919381

  8. The dog-ear flap as an alternative for breast reconstruction in patients who have already undergone a DIEAP flap.

    PubMed

    Colebunders, Britt; Depypere, Bernard; Van Landuyt, Koenraad

    2016-05-01

    Breast reconstruction in patients who have previously undergone deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap (DIEAP) reconstruction or abdominoplasty is often challenging. Depending on patients' body habitus, several second-choice flaps have been described such as the transverse upper gracilis (TUG) flap, profundus femoris artery perforator (PFAP) flap, superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap, and lumbar artery perforator (LAP) flap. Patients who have undergone a DIEAP flap reconstruction or abdominoplasty occasionally present with dog ears on both sides of the abdominal scar. The adipose tissue and skin of these dog ears are supplied by perforators of the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA). The DCIA flap was first described in 1979 by Taylor. We introduce this abdominal "dog-ear" flap for autologous breast reconstruction. PMID:26951847

  9. Maxillofacial reconstruction with nasolabial and facial artery musculomucosal flaps.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Daniel Cameron; Lam, Din; Oh, Esther S

    2014-08-01

    The nasolabial and facial artery musculomucosal (FAMM) flaps are predictable methods to reconstruct perioral and intraoral defects with vascularized tissue. The nasolabial flap can be harvested as an axial or random patterned flap, whereas the FAMM flap is truly an axial patterned flap, with either a superior or an inferior base. Both flaps have been widely used to provide predictable results, with low morbidity. Future studies are needed to further prove their use in compromised patients, including patients with a history of head and neck radiation and neck dissections. PMID:25086694

  10. The evolving breast reconstruction: from latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap to a propeller thoracodorsal fasciocutaneous flap

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to give an update on the use of the propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP/TDAP-flap) within the field of breast reconstruction. The TAP-flap can be dissected by a combined use of a monopolar cautery and a scalpel. Microsurgical instruments are generally not needed. The propeller TAP-flap can be designed in different ways, three of these have been published: (I) an oblique upwards design; (II) a horizontal design; (III) an oblique downward design. The latissimus dorsi-flap is a good and reliable option for breast reconstruction, but has been criticized for morbidity and complications. The TAP-flap does not seem to impair the function of the shoulder or arm and the morbidity appears to be scarce. However, an implant is often needed in combination with the TAP-flap, which results in implant related morbidity over time. The TAP-flap seems to be a promising tool for oncoplastic and reconstructive breast surgery and will certainly become an invaluable addition to breast reconstructive methods. PMID:25207206

  11. Combined posterior flap and anterior suspended flap dacryocystorhinostomy: A modification of external dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Amarendra; Saikia, S. P.; Bhuyan, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: External dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) remains a reliable surgical technique for the treatment of obstruction of lacrimal drainage system beyond the common canalicular opening. Aim: To describe a simple modified double flap external DCR technique. Materials and Methods: Ninety six consecutive cases of chronic dacryocystitis with or without mucocele were selected irrespective of age and sex. In a modification to routine external DCR, a modified technique was followed, where both anterior and posterior flaps of lacrimal sac and nasal mucosa are created and sutured. Two double armed sutures were used to join the edges of anterior flaps, and elevate them anteriorly to avoid adhesion or apposition with underlying sutured posterior flaps, and to approximate the deep plane of the wound. Results: At the end of average follow-up period of 13 months, we observed 98.9% objective and 96.8% subjective success rates. The average operation time was 45 minutes. No significant intraoperative or postoperative complications were noticed. Conclusion: We believe that combined posterior flap and anterior suspended flap DCR technique is simple to perform and has the advantage of both double flap DCR and anterior suspension of anterior flaps. The results of the study showed the efficacy of this simple modification. PMID:20606867

  12. Comparing semilunar coronally positioned flap to standard coronally positioned flap using periodontal clinical parameters.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Carlos Augusto; da Silva, Wilson Aparecido Dias; Tonet, Karine; Secundes, Mayron Barros; Nassar, Patricia Oehlmeyer

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of 2 surgical root coverage techniques--semilunar coronally positioned flap and coronally advanced flap--using the clinical parameters of periodontal tissues from patients with Miller Class I gingival recession. Twenty patients (20-50 years of age) were selected. Basic periodontal treatment was performed, and plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, clinical attachment level, and height of the attached gingiva were determined. Each patient was placed into 1 of 2 groups: Group 1 patients underwent the semilunar coronally positioned flap technique, and Group 2 patients underwent the coronally advanced flap technique. Patients were assessed for 180 days. Both groups showed significant reduction of plaque and gingival indices and an improvement in clinical attachment levels and probing depth. However, results showed the standard coronally positioned flap technique was deemed more effective due to significant clinical attachment level gains. PMID:24598495

  13. Design and experimental results for a turbine with jet flap stator and jet flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettner, J. L.; Blessing, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    The overall performance and detailed stator performance of a negative hub reaction turbine design featuring a moderately low solidity jet flap stator and a jet flap rotor were determined. Testing was conducted over a range of turbine expansion ratios at design speed. At each expansion ratio, the stator jet flow and rotor jet flow ranged up to about 7 and 8 percent, respectively, of the turbine inlet flow. The performance of the jet flap stator/jet flap rotor turbine was compared with that of a turbine which used the same jet flap rotor and a conventional, high solidity plan stator. The effect on performance of increased axial spacing between the jet stator and rotor was also investigated.

  14. Extended thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Rancati, Alberto; Escudero, Ezequiel; Artero, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    A total of 45 patients underwent partial or total autologous breast reconstruction after skin-sparing mastectomy, skin-reducing mastectomy, and quadrantectomy using a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap. The detailed surgical technique with its variations is explained in this report. The propeller, flip-over, conventional perforator, and muscle-sparing flaps have been described and evaluated. The flaps were partially or completely de-epithelialized. The conventional TDAP can be enlarged or "extended" as the traditional latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous (LD-MC) flap by incorporating the superior and inferior fat compartments. It can be referred to as the "extended TDAP flap". This technique augments the flap volume. In addition, this flap can serve as a scaffold for lipofilling to obtain autologous breast reconstruction in medium to large cases. There were two complete failures due to technical errors during flap elevation. Distal partial tissue suffering was observed in four flaps. These flaps were longer than usual; they reached the midline of the back. It is advisable to discard the distal medial quarter of the flap when it is designed up to the midline to avoid steatonecrosis or fibrosis. A retrospective analysis of the 39 flaps that survived completely revealed a satisfactory result in 82% of the cases. The main disadvantage of this procedure is the final scar. The TDAP flap is a reliable and safe method for partial or total breast autologous reconstruction. PMID:26645006

  15. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the...

  16. Flapping wing PIV and force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Benjamin H.

    Flapping wing aerodynamics has been of interest to engineers recently due in part to the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) MAV (Micro-Aerial Vehicle) initiative. MAVs are small unmanned aerial vehicles with length scales similar to birds and insects. Flapping wing MAVs would serve as mobile and stealthy sensing platforms capable of gathering intelligence in hazardous and physically inaccessible locations. Traditional means of lift and thrust generation become inefficient when scaled to these sizes, therefore a flapping wing propulsion system will be necessary. The design of a flapping wing MAV requires the ability to measure forces and velocities around the wing. Three components of velocity were measured in the wake of a two dimensional (2D) flapping airfoil model using a novel application of stereoscopic DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry). One component of force was measured using a newly proposed method outlined in the dissertation. The force measurement technique relies on a specific sequence of data acquisition, which has the benefit of reducing measurement uncertainty and noise. No experiments of this type have been conducted, and no direct aerodynamic force data exists for the low Reynolds numbers applicable to flapping wing MAVs. The well-established stereoscopic DPIV technique produces relatively low uncertainties while the new force measurement technique has not been previously tested. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that aerodynamic forces are attainable for chord Reynolds numbers as low as 1,000, which is significantly lower than previous studies. PIV measurements reveal symmetric and asymmetric wake topologies for a NACA 0012 and flat plate airfoil. A sinusoidally heaving flat plate airfoil produces highly deflected wakes for a wider range of flapping conditions than a NACA 0012 airfoil. Deflected wakes are of potentially interest since both lift and thrust components of force are developed. The flat plate also

  17. Flow field of flexible flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallstrom, Erik

    The agility and maneuverability of natural fliers would be desirable to incorporate into engineered micro air vehicles (MAVs). However, there is still much for engineers to learn about flapping flight in order to understand how such vehicles can be built for efficient flying. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for capturing high quality flow field data around flexible flapping wings in a hover environment and to interpret it to gain a better understanding of how aerodynamic forces are generated. The flow field data was captured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and required that measurements be taken around a repeatable flapping motion to obtain phase-averaged data that could be studied throughout the flapping cycle. Therefore, the study includes the development of flapping devices with a simple repeatable single degree of freedom flapping motion. The acquired flow field data has been examined qualitatively and quantitatively to investigate the mechanisms behind force production in hovering flight and to relate it to observations in previous research. Specifically, the flow fields have been investigated around a rigid wing and several carbon fiber reinforced flexible membrane wings. Throughout the whole study the wings were actuated with either a sinusoidal or a semi-linear flapping motion. The semi-linear flapping motion holds the commanded angular velocity nearly constant through half of each half-stroke while the sinusoidal motion is always either accelerating or decelerating. The flow fields were investigated by examining vorticity and vortex structures, using the Q criterion as the definition for the latter, in two and three dimensions. The measurements were combined with wing deflection measurements to demonstrate some of the key links in how the fluid-structure interactions generated aerodynamic forces. The flow fields were also used to calculate the forces generated by the flapping wings using momentum balance methods which yielded

  18. Deltopectoral Flap in the Era of Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R. C. L.; Chan, J. Y. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Our study aimed to review the role of deltopectoral (DP) flap as a reconstructive option for defects in the head and neck region in the microvascular era. Methods. All patients who received DP flap reconstruction surgery at the Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, between 1999 and 2011 were recruited. Demographic data, indications for surgery, defect for reconstruction, and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results. Fifty-four patients were included. All but two patients were operated for reconstruction after tumour resection. The remaining two patients were operated for necrotizing fasciitis and osteoradionecrosis. The majority of DP flaps were used to cover neck skin defect (63.0%). Other reconstructed defects included posterior pharyngeal wall (22.2%), facial skin defect (11.1%), and tracheal wall (3.7%). All donor sites were covered with partial thickness skin graft. Two patients developed partial flap necrosis at the tip and were managed conservatively. The overall flap survival rate was 96.3%. Conclusions. Albeit the technical advancements in microvascular surgery, DP still possesses multiple advantages (technical simplicity, reliable axial blood supply, large size, thinness, and pliability) which allows it to remain as a useful, reliable, and versatile surgical option for head and neck reconstruction. PMID:25374953

  19. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  2. Unexpected flap thickness in laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Giledi, Osama; Daya, Sheraz M

    2003-09-01

    We report a case of an unexpected thick flap during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) that led to abandonment of surgery. This report illustrates the importance of stromal bed measurements after flap creation in LASIK. A thicker-than-expected flap can lead to a thinner-than-anticipated residual cornea and subsequent ectasia or even perforation during laser ablation. It is possible that reports of ectasia in normal thickness corneas reflect thicker-than-anticipated flaps. PMID:14522308

  3. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  5. Calculation of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of wing-flap configurations with externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Spangler, S. B.; Nielsen, J. N.; Goodwin, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was carried out to extend and improve an existing method for predicting the longitudinal characteristics of wing flap configurations with externally blown flaps (EBF). Two potential flow models were incorporated into the prediction method: a wing and flap lifting-surface model and a turbofan engine wake model. The wing-flap model uses a vortex-lattice approach to represent the wing and flaps. The jet wake model consists of a series of closely spaced vortex rings normal to a centerline which may have vertical and lateral curvature to conform to the local flow field beneath the wing and flaps. Comparisons of measured and predicted pressure distributions, span load distributions on each lifting surface, and total lift and pitching moment coefficients on swept and unswept EBF configurations are included. A wide range of thrust coefficients and flap deflection angles is considered at angles of attack up to the onset of stall. Results indicate that overall lift and pitching-moment coefficients are predicted reasonably well over the entire range. The predicted detailed load distributions are qualitatively correct and show the peaked loads at the jet impingement points, but the widths and heights of the load peaks are not consistently predicted.

  6. Prospective evaluation of outcome measures in free-flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John L; Eadie, Patricia A; Orr, David; Al-Rawi, Mogdad; O'Donnell, Margaret; Lawlor, Denis

    2004-08-01

    Free-flap failure is usually caused by venous or arterial thrombosis. In many cases, lack of experience and surgical delay also contribute to flap loss. The authors prospectively analyzed the outcome of 57 free flaps over a 28-month period (January, 1999 to April, 2001). The setting was a university hospital tertiary referral center. Anastomotic technique, ischemia time, choice of anticoagulant, and the grade of surgeon were recorded. The type of flap, medications, and co-morbidities, including preoperative radiotherapy, were also documented. Ten flaps were re-explored (17 percent). There were four cases of complete flap failure (6.7 percent) and five cases of partial failure (8.5 percent). In patients who received perioperative systemic heparin or dextran, there was no evidence of flap failure (p = .08). The mean ischemia time was similar in flaps that failed (95 +/- 29 min) and in those that survived (92 +/- 34 min). Also, the number of anastomoses performed by trainees in flaps that failed (22 percent), was similar to the number in flaps that survived (28 percent). Nine patients received preoperative radiotherapy, and there was complete flap survival in each case. This study reveals that closely supervised anastomoses performed by trainees may have a similar outcome to those performed by more senior surgeons. There was no adverse effect from radiotherapy or increased ischemia time on flap survival. PMID:15356760

  7. Clinical outcomes of suture delay in forehead flap.

    PubMed

    Isik, Daghan; Kiroglu, Faruk; Isik, Yasemin; Goktas, Ugur; Atik, Bekir

    2012-01-01

    The delay phenomenon is a surgical procedure performed to raise a wider skin flap and to improve the survival of skin flaps. Surgery, chemicals, sutures, and lasers can be used for the delay procedure. In this study, delayed forehead flaps created by suturing were used for coverage of nasal skin defects in eleven patients. In 7 patients, the cross-paramedian forehead flap was used to increase the extent of flap lengthening. In the first session, suture delay was performed on both sides of the forehead flap margin. In the second session, the flap was elevated and sutured to its new position, 7 to 10 days after the initial surgery. All flaps were completely viable, and patient satisfaction was optimal in all cases. The positive effect of surgical delay on flap survival has been shown in experimental and clinical studies. However, experimentally, suture delay or chemical delay procedures have been shown to be beneficial in flap survival only. Suture delay seems to be an inexpensive, effective, easily performed, atraumatic, and safe technique, especially among patients with systemic diseases such as diabetes or cardiovascular diseases, smoking patients who may lose the flap, or patients who need very wide and long flaps. PMID:22337378

  8. Sural Versus Perforator Flaps for Distal Medial Leg Wounds.

    PubMed

    Schannen, Andrew P; Truchan, Lisa; Goshima, Kaoru; Bentley, Roger; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue coverage of distal medial ankle wounds is a challenging problem in orthopedic surgery because of the limited local tissues and prominent instrumentation. Traditionally, these wounds required free tissue transfer to achieve suitable coverage and subsequent bony union. To better respect the reconstructive ladder and to avoid the inherent difficulty of free flap coverage, rotational flaps have been used to cover these wounds. Both sural fasciocutaneous flaps and rotational fasciocutaneous perforator (propeller) flaps have been described for distal medial soft tissue coverage. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent distal medial leg coverage with the use of either sural flaps or rotational fasciocutaneous perforator flaps. The authors identified 14 patients by Current Procedural Terminology code who met the study criteria. The average age and degree of medical comorbidities were comparable in the 2 groups. The authors reviewed their medical records to evaluate fracture healing, flap size, complications, and return to normal shoe wear. All 7 sural flaps healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. Of the 7 perforator flaps, 6 healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. One perforator-based flap was complicated by superficial tip necrosis and went on to heal with local wound care. All patients returned to normal shoe wear. Both sural artery rotational flaps and posterior tibial artery-based rotational flaps are viable options for coverage of the distal medial leg. Coverage can be achieved reliably without microsurgery, anticoagulation, or monitoring in the intensive care unit. PMID:26652325

  9. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  12. CHARACTERISTICS OF FLAP GATES AT THE END OF DRAIN PIPES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flap gates are commonly used at the end of pipe drains and pump outlets to prevent back flows of water and entry of small animals. Flap gates are relatively inexpensive, with low maintenance costs, but can trap debris in their hinge systems. Many texts refer to studies performed on flap gates at t...

  13. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  14. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  15. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  16. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  17. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  20. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  1. Collective Flow Enhancement by Tandem Flapping Wings.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Peters, Jacob M; Combes, Stacey A; Wood, Robert J

    2015-10-30

    We examine the fluid-mechanical interactions that occur between arrays of flapping wings when operating in close proximity at a moderate Reynolds number (Re≈100-1000). Pairs of flapping wings are oscillated sinusoidally at frequency f, amplitude θ_{M}, phase offset ϕ, and wing separation distance D^{*}, and outflow speed v^{*} is measured. At a fixed separation distance, v^{*} is sensitive to both f and ϕ, and we observe both constructive and destructive interference in airspeed. v^{*} is maximized at an optimum phase offset, ϕ_{max}, which varies with wing separation distance, D^{*}. We propose a model of collective flow interactions between flapping wings based on vortex advection, which reproduces our experimental data. PMID:26565499

  2. Collective Flow Enhancement by Tandem Flapping Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Peters, Jacob M.; Combes, Stacey A.; Wood, Robert J.

    2015-10-01

    We examine the fluid-mechanical interactions that occur between arrays of flapping wings when operating in close proximity at a moderate Reynolds number (Re ≈100 - 1000 ). Pairs of flapping wings are oscillated sinusoidally at frequency f , amplitude θM, phase offset ϕ , and wing separation distance D*, and outflow speed v* is measured. At a fixed separation distance, v* is sensitive to both f and ϕ , and we observe both constructive and destructive interference in airspeed. v* is maximized at an optimum phase offset, ϕmax, which varies with wing separation distance, D*. We propose a model of collective flow interactions between flapping wings based on vortex advection, which reproduces our experimental data.

  3. [Andrological complications after pancystoprostatovesiculectomy surgery: utility of the bulbocavernosus reflex].

    PubMed

    Musci, R; Franchini, V; Strada, G; De Cobelli, O; Meroni, T; Sala, M; Rocco, F

    1994-02-01

    The technique for radical cystoprostatectomy was modified to avoid injury to the branches of pelvic plexus that innervate the corpora cavernosa (monolateral neurovascular bundle preservation or "Nerve sparing technique"). The studies of Walsh and coll. demonstrated that the branches of pelvic plexus that innervate the corpora cavernosa are situated between the rectum and urethra and penetrate the urogenital diaphragm near to the muscular wall of the urethra. Injuries to the pelvic plexus can occur during 1) division of posterior pedicle of bladder (the seminal vesicle can be used as a landmark intraoperatively to avoid injury to pelvic plexus), 2) during apical dissection of prostate with transection of the urethra. The return of sexual function postoperatively is related to preservation of autonomic innervation; the excision of the neurovascular bundle on one side may prevent impotence in 68% patients. Our study was undertaken to identify the cause of impotence in men undergoing radical cystoprostatectomy with "Nerve sparing technique" using bulbo cavernous reflex. Our results suggest that bulbo cavernosus reflex may not be a sensitive clinical tool to establish a diagnosis of neurogenic erectile dysfunction after pelvic surgery. The Authors examine the recent neuro-uro-physiological diagnostic methods for the study of neurogenic erectile dysfunction. PMID:8012425

  4. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions...

  5. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223—Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions...

  6. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... for the Double Cover Flap TED ER02JN04.003...

  7. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... for the Double Cover Flap TED ER02JN04.003...

  8. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... for the Double Cover Flap TED ER02JN04.003...

  9. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  10. Flap-edge aeroacoustic measurements and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2003-03-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a small aperture directional array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that the prediction models capture much of the physics. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. The complexity of the directivity results demonstrate the strong role of edge source geometry and frequency in