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Sample records for buprenorphine substitution treatment

  1. Buprenorphine substitution treatment in France: drug users' views of the doctor-user relationship

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Anne; Lert, France; Brodeur, Jean-Marc; Richard, Lucie

    2007-01-01

    The French system for drug substitution, or maintenance treatment, established in 1996, differs from the often strict conditions attached to methadone clinics in other countries. Because of the predominant role of general practitioners and the flexible prescription rules for Subutex® in France, the relationship between the physician and the drug user becomes a central element in the treatment. This article deals with the expectations that these users have of the physician, and their perception of his or her attitude towards them. In order to identify possible reasons for the absence of treatment compliance and of Subutex® misuse, it focuses on the users’ assessment of the physician’s response to the problems they report. This study, based on a diversified sample of 28 persons in treatment, showed 4 patterns of relationships between physicians and users, which differed in their focus: a) dosage, b) compliance, c) the person and d) obtaining a prescription. In all four case types, users had difficulty reporting other drug use or intravenous Subutex® injection within this relationship in which the stigma attached to drug dependence seems to reappear. Moreover, the lack of clarity about the treatment objectives and time frame limits the users’ ability to integrate the treatment into their lives and to commit themselves to it. The heterogeneity and fragility of the users’ situations are elements related to dependence that, during contact with the physician, require regular assessment of the individual’s situation and of the treatment objectives. This constant reappraisal of the situation with the physician should help to optimize the treatment and avoid the hiatus that can generate or continue “misuse.” PMID:17442473

  2. Opioid substitution treatment with sublingual buprenorphine in Manipur and Nagaland in Northeast India: what has been established needs to be continued and expanded

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Suresh; Natale, Richard D; Langkham, B; Sharma, Charan; Kabi, Rachel; Mortimore, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Manipur and Nagaland in northeast India report an antenatal HIV prevalence of > 1% and the current HIV prevalence among injecting drug users is 24% and 4.5% respectively. Through support from DFID's Challenge Fund, Emmanuel Hospital Association (EHA) established thirteen drop-in-centres across the two states to deliver opioid substitution treatment with sublingual buprenorphine for 1200 injecting drug users. Within a short span of time the treatment has been found to be attractive to the clients and currently 1248 injecting opioid users are receiving opioid substitution treatment. The project is acceptable to the drug users, the families, the communities, religious as well as the militant groups. The treatment centres operate all days of the week, have trained staff members, utilize standardized protocols and ensure a strict supervised delivery system to prevent illicit diversion of buprenorphine. The drug users receiving the substitution treatment are referred to HIV voluntary counselling and testing. As this treatment has the potential to change HIV related risk behaviours, what has been established in the two states needs to be continued and expanded with the support from the Government of India. PMID:19243636

  3. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate dependence.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R; Smith, David E

    2010-06-01

    Compelling clinical evidence establishes that buprenorphine is similar to methadone in efficacy for opiate detoxification and maintenance but safer than methadone in an overdose situation. The Drug Abuse Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) enabled US physicians with additional training to prescribe buprenorphine to a limited number of opiate-dependent patients. The sublingual tablets Subutex (buprenorphine alone) and Suboxone (a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone) meet the specifications of DATA 2000. Suboxone is intended to discourage intravenously administration and has less abuse potential than buprenorphine alone. Suboxone is generally recommended for maintenance treatment except for women who are pregnant. Subutex is recommended in treatment of pregnant women. A buprenorphine opiate withdrawal syndrome can occur in newborns. Although intravenous buprenorphine abuse is a significant public health problem in some countries, buprenorphine alone or in combination with naloxone has less potential for abuse than heroin and some prescription opiates, such as oxycodone. Pharmacotherapy from physicians' offices makes buprenorphine treatment acceptable to some opiate-dependent patients who would not accept treatment in traditional opiate-maintenance clinics. For reasons not adequately understood, some patients find discontinuation of buprenorphine following long-term use difficult. This article reviews the pharmacology of buprenorphine, summarizes evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine and provides clinical guidelines for treatment. PMID:20648912

  4. Buprenorphine: clinical pharmacokinetics in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Elkader, Alexander; Sproule, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine, a naturally occurring alkaloid of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. The pharmacology of buprenorphine is unique in that it is a partial agonist at the opioid mu receptor. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism and therefore has very low oral bioavailability; however, its bioavailability sublingually is extensive enough to make this a feasible route of administration for the treatment of opioid dependence. The mean time to maximum plasma concentration following sublingual administration is variable, ranging from 40 minutes to 3.5 hours. Buprenorphine has a large volume of distribution and is highly protein bound (96%). It is extensively metabolised by N-dealkylation to norbuprenorphine primarily through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. The terminal elimination half-life of buprenorphine is long and there is considerable variation in reported values (mean values ranging from 3 to 44 hours). Most of a dose of buprenorphine is eliminated in the faeces, with approximately 10-30% excreted in urine. Naloxone has been added to a sublingual formulation of buprenorphine to reduce the abuse liability of the product. The presence of naloxone does not appear to influence the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine. Buprenorphine crosses the placenta during pregnancy and also crosses into breast milk. Buprenorphine dosage does not need to be significantly adjusted in patients with renal impairment; however, since CYP3A activity may be decreased in patients with severe chronic liver disease, it is possible that the metabolism of buprenorphine will be altered in these patients. Although there is limited evidence in the literature to date, drugs that are known to inhibit or induce CYP3A4 have the potential to diminish or enhance buprenorphine N-dealkylation. It appears that the interaction between buprenorphine and benzodiazepines is more likely to be a pharmacodynamic (additive or synergistic) than a pharmacokinetic interaction. The relationship between buprenorphine plasma concentration and response in the treatment of opioid dependence has not been well studied. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of buprenorphine allow it to be a feasible option for substitution therapy in the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:15966752

  5. Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Meldon; Srivastava, Anita; Ordean, Alice; Cirone, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the use of buprenorphine for opioid-addicted patients in primary care. Quality of evidence The MEDLINE database was searched for literature on buprenorphine from 1980 to 2009. Controlled trials, meta-analyses, and large observational studies were reviewed. Main message Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist that relieves opioid withdrawal symptoms and cravings for 24 hours or longer. Buprenorphine has a much lower risk of overdose than methadone and is preferred for patients at high risk of methadone toxicity, those who might need shorter-term maintenance therapy, and those with limited access to methadone treatment. The initial dose should be given only after the patient is in withdrawal. The therapeutic dose range for most patients is 8 to 16 mg daily. It should be dispensed daily by the pharmacist with gradual introduction of take-home doses. Take-home doses should be introduced more slowly for patients at higher risk of abuse and diversion (eg, injection drug users). Patients who fail buprenorphine treatment should be referred for methadone- or abstinence-based treatment. Conclusion Buprenorphine is an effective treatment of opioid addiction and can be safely prescribed by primary care physicians. PMID:21402963

  6. HIV Treatment Access and Scale-Up for Delivery for IDU in Ukraine with Opiate Substitution Therapy with Buprenorphine - Programme Description and Policy Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Dvoryak, Sergey; Sylla, Laurie; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Injection drug use (IDU) accounts for 70% of HIV cases in Ukraine. Until buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) was introduced, few effective strategies aimed at achieving reduction in illicit drug use were available as a conduit to antiretroviral therapy (ARV) among IDUs. Description In October 2005, BMT was scaled-up using Global Fund resources in six regions within Ukraine. Entry criteria included opioid-dependence, HIV-1 seropositivity, age ?18 years and reported interest in BMT. All sites included a multidisciplinary team. To date, 207 patients have been initiated on BMT. Lessons Learned The existing infrastructure allows for further scale-up of and administration of BMT and the possibility of co-administration with ARV. The process for prescription and administration of buprenorphine and ARV is at times cumbersome and constrained by current regulations. Recommendations More IDU need BMT to improve overall health outcomes. Central to expanding access will be legislative changes to existing drug policy. Moreover, the cost of buprenorphine is prohibitively expensive. Sustainable substitution therapy in Ukraine requires lower negotiated prices for buprenorphine and/or the addition of methadone to the existing formulary for HIV+ drug users. PMID:17689382

  7. Buprenorphine-containing treatments: place in the management of opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Susan E

    2006-01-01

    Although the synthetic opioid buprenorphine has been available clinically for almost 30 years, its use has only recently become much more widespread for the treatment of opioid addiction. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine make it unique in the armamentarium of drugs for the treatment of opioid addiction. Buprenorphine has partial mu-opioid receptor agonist activity and is a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist; hence, it can substitute for other micro-opioid receptor agonists, yet is less apt to produce overdose reactions or dysphoria. On the other hand, buprenorphine can block the effects of opioids such as heroin (diamorphine) and morphine, and can even precipitate withdrawal in individuals physically dependent upon these drugs. Buprenorphine has significant sublingual bioavailability and a long half-life, making administration on a less than daily basis possible. Furthermore, its discontinuation is associated with only a mild withdrawal syndrome. Clinical trials have demonstrated that sublingual buprenorphine is effective in both maintenance therapy and detoxification of individuals addicted to opioids. The introduction of a sublingual formulation combining naloxone with buprenorphine further reduces the risk of diversion to illicit intravenous use. Because of its relative safety and lower risk of illegal diversion, buprenorphine has been made available in several countries for treating opioid addiction in the private office setting, greatly enhancing treatment options for this condition. PMID:16953647

  8. Buprenorphine Treatment for Narcotic Addiction: Not Without Risks

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    While most clinicians will never prescribe buprenorphine or combined buprenorphine/naloxone, familiarity with the risks of these pharmacological approaches to the treatment of narcotic addiction remains relevant. Overall, medication-assisted treatment has clearly resulted in meaningful gains for a number of individuals who are addicted to narcotics (i.e., opiates and opioids). However, a certain level of risk is inherent with these approaches. For example, both buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone may be diverted and misused (e.g., intravenously injected, intranasally administered), particularly buprenorphine. Likewise, when illicitly injected, both can cause infectious complications as well as result in death from overdose. The risk of death with buprenorphine overdose appears to be heightened with the coadministration of either benzodiazepines or sedative/hypnotics. To conclude, as with all interventions in medicine, buprenorphine treatment for narcotic addiction has a clinically fluctuating risk/benefit equation that must be continually monitored. PMID:25973324

  9. Smoking cessation treatment among office-based buprenorphine treatment patients.

    PubMed

    Nahvi, Shadi; Blackstock, Oni; Sohler, Nancy L; Thompson, Devin; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2014-08-01

    Opioid-dependent patients smoke at high rates, and office-based buprenorphine treatment provides an opportunity to offer cessation treatment. We examined tobacco use and smoking cessation treatment patterns among office-based buprenorphine treatment patients. We reviewed records of 319 patients treated with buprenorphine from 2005 to 2010. We examined smoking status, cessation medication prescriptions, and factors associated with receipt of cessation prescriptions. Mean age was 43.9 years; most were men (74.2%) and Hispanic (70.9%). At buprenorphine initiation, 21.9% had no documentation of smoking status, while 67.4% were current, 10% former, and 0.9% never smokers. Of current smokers, 16.8% received smoking cessation prescriptions. Patients retained (vs. not retained) in buprenorphine treatment were more likely to receive smoking cessation medications (26.3% vs. 11.2%, p<0.005). We observed a high tobacco use prevalence among buprenorphine patients, and limited provision of cessation treatment. This is a missed opportunity to impact the high tobacco use burden in opioid-dependent persons. PMID:24912863

  10. Buprenorphine maintenance: a new treatment for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory B; McAllister, Mark S

    2007-07-01

    Buprenorphine (Subutex) is a safe and effective treatment for opioid dependence, and has very low potential for abuse, especially when it is combined with naloxone (Narcan) in a single sublingual tablet (Suboxone). New regulations allow physicians who are certified in buprenorphine therapy to offer it in their offices, a development that can substantially increase patient access to treatment. PMID:17682629

  11. Medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction: methadone and buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Saxon, Andrew J.; Hser, Yih-Ing; Woody, George; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Among agents for treatment of opioid addiction, methadone is a full mu-opioid receptor agonist, whereas buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Both are long-acting. Buprenorphine has a superior safety profile. Methadone is formulated for oral administration and buprenorphine for sublingual administration. A subdermal buprenorphine implant with a 6-month duration of action is being considered for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Both medications reduce mortality rates and improve other outcomes. Data from a recent randomized controlled comparison of both medications (N = 1269) show better treatment retention with methadone but reduced illicit opioid use early in treatment with buprenorphine. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors were measured using the Risk Behavior Survey at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks for study completers. In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 14.4% of the completers randomized to treatment with buprenorphine (n = 340) and 14.1% of the completers randomized to methadone treatment (n = 391) shared needles. The percent sharing needles decreased to 2.4% for buprenorphine and 4.8 for methadone in the 30 days prior to Week 24 (p < 0.0001). In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, 6.8% of the completers randomized to buprenorphine and 8.2% of the completers randomized to methadone had multiple sexual partners, with only 5.2% and 5.1%, respectively, reporting multiple partners at Week 24 (p < 0.04). PMID:24436573

  12. Emerging adult age status predicts poor buprenorphine treatment retention

    PubMed Central

    Schuman-Olivier, Zev; Weiss, Roger D.; Hoeppner, Bettina B.; Borodovsky, Jacob; Albanese, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adults (18–25 years old) are often poorly retained in substance use disorder treatment. Office-based buprenorphine often enhances treatment retention among people with opioid dependence. In this study, we examined the records of a collaborative care buprenorphine treatment program to compare the treatment retention rates of emerging adults versus older adults. Subjects were 294 adults, 71 (24%) aged 18–25, followed in treatment with buprenorphine, nurse care management, and an intensive outpatient program followed by weekly psychosocial treatment. Compared to older adults, emerging adults remained in treatment at a significantly lower rate at 3 months (56% versus 78%) and 12 months (17% versus 45%), and were significantly more likely to test positive for illicit opioids, relapse, or drop out of treatment. Further research into factors associated with buprenorphine treatment retention among emerging adults is needed to improve treatment and long-term outcomes in this group. PMID:24953168

  13. Buprenorphine Implants for Treatment of Opioid Dependence: Randomized Comparison to Placebo and Sublingual Buprenorphine/Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Richard N.; Ling, Walter; Casadonte, Paul; Vocci, Frank; Bailey, Genie L.; Kampman, Kyle; Patkar, Ashwin; Chavoustie, Steven; Blasey, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey; Beebe, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate safety and efficacy of buprenorphine implants (BI) versus placebo implants (PI) for the treatment of opioid dependence. A secondary aim compared BI to open-label sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets (BNX). Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received either 4 buprenorphine implants (80 mg/implant) (n=114), 4 placebo implants (n=54), or open-label BNX (12–16 mg/d) (n=119). Setting 20 addiction treatment centers. Participants Adult outpatients (ages 18 to 65) with DSM-IV-TR opioid dependence. Measurements The primary efficacy endpoint was the percent of urine samples negative for opioids collected from weeks 1 to 24, examined as a cumulative distribution function (CDF). Findings The BI CDF was significantly different from placebo (P<.0001). Mean (95% CI) proportions of urines negative for opioids were: BI: 31.2% (25.3, 37.1) and PI: 13.4% (8.3, 18.6). BI subjects had a higher study completion rate relative to placebo (64% vs. 26%, P<.0001), lower clinician-rated (P<.0001) and patient-rated (P<.0001) withdrawal, lower patient-ratings of craving (P<.0001), and better subjects’ (P=.031) and clinicians’ (P=.022) global ratings of improvement. BI also resulted in significantly lower cocaine use (P=.0016). Minor implant-site reactions were comparable in the buprenorphine (27.2% [31/114]) and placebo groups (25.9% [14/54]). BI were non-inferior to BNX on percent urines negative for opioids [mean (95% CI): 33.5 (27.3, 39.6); CI for the difference of proportions, (?10.7, 6.2)]. Conclusions Compared with placebo, buprenorphine implants result in significantly less frequent opioid use, and are non-inferior to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets. PMID:23919595

  14. I Heard About It From a Friend: Assessing Interest in Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Aaron D.; Shah, Pooja A.; Sohler, Nancy L.; Lopez, Carolina M.; Starrels, Joanna L.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the United States, opioid abuse and dependence continue to be a growing problem, while treatment for opioid abuse and dependence remains fairly static. Buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence is safe and effective but underutilized. Prior research has demonstrated low awareness and use of buprenorphine among marginalized groups. This study investigates syringe exchange participants’ awareness of, exposure to, and interest in buprenorphine treatment. Methods Syringe exchange participants were recruited from a mobile unit performing outreach to nine street-side sites in New York City. Computer-based interviews were conducted to determine: (1) opioid users’ awareness of, exposure to, and interest in buprenorphine treatment; and (2) the association between awareness or exposure and interest in buprenorphine treatment. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between awareness, direct exposure (i.e. having taken buprenorphine), or indirect exposure (i.e. knowing someone who had taken buprenorphine) and interest in buprenorphine treatment. Results Of 158 opioid users, 70% were aware of, 32% had direct exposure to, and 31% had indirect exposure to buprenorphine; 12% had been prescribed buprenorphine. Of 138 opioid users who had never been prescribed buprenorphine, 57% were interested in buprenorphine treatment. In multivariate models, indirect exposure was associated with interest in buprenorphine treatment (AOR = 2.65, 95% CI: 1.22 – 5.77), but awareness and direct exposure were not. Conclusions Syringe exchange participants were mostly aware of buprenorphine and interested in treatment, but few had actually been prescribed buprenorphine. Because indirect exposure to buprenorphine was associated with interest in treatment, future interventions could capitalize on indirect exposure, such as through peer mentorship, to address underutilization of buprenorphine treatment. PMID:24588297

  15. Safety and tolerability of the switch from buprenorphine to buprenorphine/naloxone in an Italian addiction treatment centre.

    PubMed

    Stimolo, Clementina; Favero, Valentina Del; Zecchinato, Giancarlo; Buson, Roberto; Cusin, Davide; Pellachin, Patrizia; Simonetto, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Abuse and misuse of pharmacological therapies represent major challenges in the healthcare system, particularly in patients receiving long-acting opioid drugs for the treatment of heroin or opioid addiction. The partial mu-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine is used to treat opioid dependence, but diversion and misuse may occur. The sublingual combination formulation of buprenorphine and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (buprenorphine/naxolone) is associated with a reduced abuse potential, and has been shown to have promising efficacy for the treatment of opioid dependence. This observational study assessed the safety and efficacy of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy in patients with opioid dependence after therapeutic switch from buprenorphine monotherapy. A total of 94 patients being treated with buprenorphine monotherapy (average dose 8 mg/day; mean duration of therapy 840 days) were switched to buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy. Patients were asked to rate their level of satisfaction with buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment with respect to the management of withdrawal symptoms, and urinary toxicology tests were carried out before and 14 days after switching to combination therapy. Within 3 months, 75/94 patients (80%) previously treated with buprenorphine monotherapy had switched to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment (average dose buprenorphine 8 mg). Among patients receiving combination treatment for >3 months, 83% were receiving medication either weekly or fortnightly, based on the results of toxicological testing. A reduction in positive urinary toxicology tests was observed in patients within two weeks after being switched to combination treatment (before switch: 28, 9 and 2 positive tests for heroin, cocaine and heroin + cocaine, respectively vs 11, 3 and 1 after switch) and a total of 64 patients of the 75 who switched to combination therapy (85%) were satisfied with the management of withdrawal symptoms during buprenorphine/naloxone treatment. Few adverse events were reported and no patients dropped out of treatment. This study shows that switching from buprenorphine monotherapy to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy is effective and well tolerated, and associated with good control of withdrawal symptoms in the majority of patients. In addition, combination therapy reduced illicit drug use (based on negative urinary toxicology texts) and allowed the time between clinic visits to be increased. PMID:20450243

  16. Buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence: methods and design of the COBRA study.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Apelt, Sabine M; Bühringer, Gerhard; Gastpar, Markus; Backmund, Markus; Gölz, Jörg; Kraus, Michael R; Tretter, Felix; Klotsche, Jens; Siegert, Jens; Pittrow, David; Soyka, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Buprenorphine and methadone are the two established substitution drugs licensed in many countries for the treatment of opioid dependence. Little is known, however, about how these two drugs are applied and how they work in clinical practice. In this paper we present the aims, methods, design and sampling issues of a collaborative multi-stage epidemiological study (COBRA) to address these issues. Based on a nationally representative sample of substitution physicians, the study is designed as an observational, naturalistic study, consisting of three major parts. The first part was a national survey of substitution doctors (prestudy, n = 379 doctors). The second part was a cross-sectional study (n = 223 doctors), which consisted of a target-week assessment of 2,694 consecutive patients to determine (a) the severity and problem profiles and treatment targets; (b) the choice and dosage scheme of the substitution drug; (c) past and current interventions, including treatment of comorbid hepatitis C; and (d) cross-sectional differences between the two drugs with regard to comorbidity, clinical course, acceptance/compliance and social integration. The third part consists of a prospective-longitudinal cohort study of 48 methadone-treated and 48 buprenorphine-treated patients. The cohort is followed up over a period of 12 months to investigate whether course and outcome of the patients differ by type or treatment received in terms of clinical, psychosocial, pharmaco-economic and other related measures. The response rate among substitution doctors was 57.1%; that among eligible patients was 71.7%. Comparisons with the federal registers reveal that the final samples of doctors and patients may be considered nationally representative with regard to regional distribution, training, type of setting as well as the frequency of patients treated with buprenorphine or methadone. The COBRA study provides a unique comprehensive database, informing about the natural allocation and intervention processes in routine care and about the course and outcome of patients treated with buprenorphine or methadone. PMID:16097397

  17. Hypogonadism in men receiving methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Hallinan, R; Byrne, A; Agho, K; McMahon, C G; Tynan, P; Attia, J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and investigate the aetiology of hypogonadism in men on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance treatment (MMT, BMT). 103 men (mean age 37.6 +/- 7.9) on MMT (n = 84) or BMT (n = 19) were evaluated using hormone assays, body mass index (BMI), serological, biochemical, demographic and substance use measures. Overall 54% of men (methadone 65%; buprenorphine 28%) had total testosterone (TT) <12.0 nm; 34% (methadone 39%; buprenorphine 11%) had TT <8.0 nm. Both methadone- and buprenorphine-treated men had lower free testosterone, luteinising hormone and estradiol than age-matched reference groups. Methadone-treated men had lower TT than buprenorphine-treated men and reference groups. Prolactin did not differ between methadone, buprenorphine groups, and reference groups. Primary testicular failure was an uncommon cause of hypogonadism. Yearly percentage fall in TT by age across the patient group was 2.3%, more than twice that expected normally. There were no associations between TT and opioid dose, cannabis, alcohol and tobacco consumption, or chronic hepatitis C viraemia. On multiple regression higher TT was associated with higher alanine aminotransferase and lower TT with higher BMI. Men on MMT have high prevalence of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The extent of hormonal changes associated with buprenorphine needs to be explored further in larger studies. Men receiving long term opioid replacement treatment, especially methadone treatment, should be screened for hypogonadism. Wide interindividual differences in methadone metabolism and tolerance may in a cross-sectional study obscure a methadone dose relationship to testosterone in individuals. Future studies of hypogonadism in opioid-treated men should examine the potential benefits of dose reduction, choice of opioid medication, weight loss, and androgen replacement. PMID:17971165

  18. Buprenorphine-based regimens and methadone for the medical management of opioid dependence: selecting the appropriate drug for treatment.

    PubMed

    Maremmani, Icro; Gerra, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance therapy with methadone or buprenorphine-based regimens reduces opioid dependence and associated harms. The perception that methadone is more effective than buprenorphine for maintenance treatment has been based on low buprenorphine doses and excessively slow induction regimens used in early buprenorphine trials. Subsequent studies show that the efficacy of buprenorphine sublingual tablet (Subutex®) or buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual tablet (Suboxone®) is equivalent to that of methadone when sufficient buprenorphine doses, rapid induction, and flexible dosing are used. Although methadone remains an essential maintenance therapy option, buprenorphine-based regimens increase access to care and provide safer, more appropriate treatment than methadone for some patients. PMID:20958853

  19. A Retrospective Evaluation of Inpatient Transfer from High-Dose Methadone to Buprenorphine Substitution Therapy.

    PubMed

    Oretti, Rossana

    2015-10-01

    The product license of buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid substitution therapy indicates reducing methadone concentrations to 30 mg or less per day for a minimum of 1 week before transferring patients to buprenorphine and no sooner than 24 hours after the last methadone dose, because of the risk of precipitated withdrawal and a corresponding high risk of relapse to opioid use. There are few studies describing high-dose methadone transfers. This retrospective case review assessed the feasibility of transferring patients on methadone doses above 30 mg/day to buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone in the inpatient setting. Six of seven patients on 60-120 mg/day of methadone successfully completed the transfer, and four cases tested negative for opiates at long-term follow-up (6-15 months). This suggests that methadone transfer to buprenorphine can be performed rapidly without the need to taper methadone doses in patients indicated for a therapeutic switch. This small study is hypothesis-generating; larger, well-designed trials are needed to define a protocol that can be used routinely to improve and widen transfers to buprenorphine when indicated. PMID:26048187

  20. Buprenorphine: a (relatively) new treatment for opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Christopher; Valadez-Meltzer, Adela

    2005-12-01

    Opioid dependence is a significant and growing problem in the United States. For nearly a century, federal regulations have made it illegal for psychiatrists and other physicians to pharmacologically manage this condition in an office-based setting using opioids. The passage of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 has made it possible for all physicians to prescribe buprenorphine to patients in such a setting. Buprenorphine, a partial mu-opoid receptor agonist, has unique pharmacologic properties that distinguish it from methadone and other medications used in the treatment of opioid dependence. It has been shown to be as effective as methadone and is generally safe and well-tolerated. It is available in two sublingual formulations: Subutex, which contains only buprenorphine, and Suboxone, which also contains naloxone. Physicians who wish to prescribe either must obtain a special waiver from the federal government and are currently limited to prescribing it for 30 patients at a time. PMID:21124750

  1. Naltrexone and buprenorphine combination in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Fantoma, A; Zaimovic, A

    2006-11-01

    Naltrexone treatment has demonstrated some advantages for special populations of heroin addicted individuals, but patients' compliance seems to be very poor, with a low adherence and low retention rate. Kappa-opioid system overdrive seems to contribute to opioid protracted abstinence syndrome, with dysphoria and psychosomatic symptoms during naltrexone treatment. The objective of this observational study was to determine the effectiveness of a functional k antagonist in improving naltrexone treatment outcome. A partial mu agonist/kappa antagonist (buprenorphine) and a mu antagonist (naltrexone) were combined during a 12 weeks protocol, theoretically leaving k antagonism as the major medication effect. Sixty patients were submitted to outpatient rapid detoxification utilizing buprenorphine and opioid antagonists. Starting on the fifth day, 30 patients (group A) received naltrexone alone. Alternatively, 30 patients (group B) received naltrexone (50mg oral dose) plus buprenorphine (4 mg sublingual) for the 12 weeks of the observational study. The endpoints of the study were: retention in treatment, negative urinalyses, changes in psychological symptoms (Symptom Checklist-90 Revised: SCL-90) and craving scores (visual analysis scale (VAS)). Thirty-four subjects (56.67%) completed the 12 weeks study. Twenty-one patients (35.0%) had all urine samples negative for opiates and cocaine. nine subjects (15.0%) had urine samples negative for cocaine and opiates for the last 4 weeks of the study. five subjects (8.3%) continued to use cocaine during the 12 weeks of the study. No significant change in pupillary diameter after buprenorphine administration was evidenced during clinical observations from baseline across the weekly measurements. Retention rates in group A (naltrexone) and group B (naltrexone + buprenorphine) at week 12 were respectively 40% (12 patients) and 73.33% (22 patients), with a significant difference in favour of group B (p= 0.018). Patients treated with naltrexone in combination with buprenorphine (B patients) showed a significantly lower rate of positive urines for morphine (4.45%) and cocaine metabolites (9.09%) than those treated with naltrexone alone (A) (25%, morphine; 33.33% cocaine) (p< 0.05; p< 0.05). Irritability, depression, tiredness, psychosomatic symptoms and craving scores decreased significantly less in Group A patients than in group B patients. The dysfunction of opioid system with kappa receptors hyper-activation provoked by heroin exposure, probably underlying dysphoric and psychosomatic symptoms during naltrexone treatment, seems to be counteracted, at least in part, by buprenorphine. The combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone may significantly improve the outcome of opioid antagonists treatment in terms of retention, negative urinalyses, and reduced dysphoria, mood symptoms and craving. PMID:16401652

  2. Buprenorphine Prescribing Availability in a Sample of Ohio Specialty Treatment Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Molfenter, Todd; Sherbeck, Carol; Zehner, Mark; Starr, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Buprenorphine, a medication for treating opioid dependence, is underutilized in specialty addiction treatment organizations. Only physicians who have obtained a buprenorphine prescribing license or “waiver” may administer this medication. A limited number of physicians are pursuing this waiver, and a concern in the substance use disorder treatment field is that the shortage of prescribers could be contributing to the low use of buprenorphine at specialty addiction treatment centers. The objective of this study is to assess Ohio specialty treatment organizations’ access to buprenorphine prescribers and the barriers they encounter when seeking new physician prescribing capacity. Methods Forty-one Ohio specialty addiction treatment organizations were invited to complete a survey of their buprenorphine practices and availability of buprenorphine prescribers during August–October 2014. Data was collected on pharmacotherapies used in the treatment of opioid dependence, arrangements treatment organizations have with prescribing physicians, buprenorphine prescribing capacity, and barriers encountered in recruiting new physician prescribers. Results Thirty-seven treatment organizations responded, for a response rate of 90.2%. Seventy-eight percent (n=29) of the sample provided buprenorphine therapy. Of those treatment organizations, 48.3% (n=14) reported insufficient prescribing capacity. Of those, 50% (n=7) indicated they had to turn patients away from buprenorphine therapy due to limited physician prescribing capacity. Conclusion The study suggests that buprenorphine use is constrained by limited physician prescribing capacity, to the degree that 24.1% of the organizations surveyed using buprenorphine therapy had to turn patients away. Potential remedies include encouraging more specialty treatment organizations to have physicians on staff, removing the Drug Addiction Treatment Act (DATA 2000) cap that limits physician buprenorphine caseloads at 100 patients (after year 1), and developing strategies to recruit physicians into addiction treatment practice. Additional research is needed to increase the knowledge of physician prescribing capacity as a barrier to buprenorphine use, how to overcome these barriers, and to understand the extent physician capacity shortages are affecting buprenorphine use. PMID:26380328

  3. Comparison of Behavioral Treatment Conditions in Buprenorphine Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter; Hillhouse, Maureen; Ang, Alfonso; Jenkins, Jessica; Fahey, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims The Controlled Substances Act requires physicians in the United States to provide or refer to behavioral treatment when treating opioid-dependent individuals with buprenorphine; however no research has examined the combination of buprenorphine with different types of behavioral treatments. This randomized controlled trial compared the effectiveness of 4 behavioral treatment conditions provided with buprenorphine and medical management (MM) for the treatment of opioid dependence. Design After a 2-week buprenorphine induction/stabilization phase, participants were randomized to 1 of 4 behavioral treatment conditions provided for 16 weeks: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT=53); Contingency Management (CM=49); both CBT and CM (CBT+CM=49); and no additional behavioral treatment (NT=51). Setting Study activities occurred at an outpatient clinical research center in Los Angeles, California, USA. Participants Included were 202 male and female opioid-dependent participants. Measurements Primary outcome was opioid use, measured as a proportion of opioid-negative urine results over the number of tests possible. Secondary outcomes include retention, withdrawal symptoms, craving, other drug use, and adverse events. Findings No group differences in opioid use were found for the behavioral treatment phase (Chi-square=1.25, p=0.75), for a second medication-only treatment phase, or at weeks 40 and 52 follow-ups. Analyses revealed no differences across groups for any secondary outcome. Conclusion There remains no clear evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy and contingency management reduce opiate use when added to buprenorphine and medical management in opiates users seeking treatment. PMID:23734858

  4. Patterns of non-compliant buprenorphine, levomethadone, and methadone use among opioid dependent persons in treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The non-compliant use of opioid substitution treatment (OST) medicines is widespread and well-documented. However, less is known about characteristics of non-compliant OST medicine use and the factors that predict it. The two main goals of this study are to compare characteristics of non-compliant levomethadone, methadone, and buprenorphine use and to explore factors that may differentially predict it among opioid dependent persons in treatment. Methods Data from 595 opioid dependent patients with non-compliant OST medicine use were analyzed. Characteristics of use between substances were compared using chi-squared tests and predictive factors were explored through multinomial logistic regressions. Results Non-compliant levomethadone and methadone use was characterized by more frequent parallel consumption of other psychoactive substances and intravenous use, whereas buprenorphine was more often procured without a prescription. Regarding predictive factors, methadone was perceived to relieve withdrawal symptoms better than buprenorphine and levomethadone was perceived as being better at modulating the effects of other substances and worst at enhancing mood. Conclusions Patterns of non-compliant use differ according to OST medicine. These patterns are considered with the reduction of non-compliant use and the improvement of treatment in mind. PMID:24885218

  5. Bridging waitlist delays with interim buprenorphine treatment: initial feasibility.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, Stacey C; C Meyer, Andrew; Hruska, Bryce; Ochalek, Taylor; Rose, Gail; Badger, Gary J; Brooklyn, John R; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T; Moore, Brent A; Schwartz, Robert P

    2015-12-01

    Despite the effectiveness of agonist maintenance for opioid dependence, individuals can remain on waitlists for months, during which they are at significant risk for morbidity and mortality. Interim dosing, consisting of daily medication without counseling, can reduce these risks. In this pilot study, we examined the initial feasibility of a novel technology-assisted interim buprenorphine treatment for waitlisted opioid-dependent adults. Following buprenorphine induction during Week 1, participants (n=10) visited the clinic at Weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to ingest their medication under staff observation, provide a urine specimen and receive their remaining doses via a computerized Med-O-Wheel Secure device. They also received daily monitoring via an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) platform, as well as random call-backs for urinalysis and medication adherence checks. The primary outcome was percent of participants negative for illicit opioids at each 2-week visit, with secondary outcomes of past-month drug use, adherence and acceptability. Participants achieved high levels of illicit opioid abstinence, with 90% abstinent at the Week 2 and 4 visits and 60% at Week 12. Significant reductions were observed in self-reported past-month illicit opioid use (p<.001), opioid withdrawal (p<.001), opioid craving (p<.001) and ASI Drug composite score (p=.008). Finally, adherence with buprenorphine administration (99%), daily IVR calls (97%) and random call-backs (82%) was high. Interim buprenorphine treatment shows promise for reducing patient and societal risks during delays to conventional treatment. A larger-scale, randomized clinical trial is underway to more rigorously examine the efficacy of this treatment approach. PMID:26256469

  6. Spotlight on buprenorphine/naloxone in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Orman, Jennifer S; Keating, Gillian M

    2009-10-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) comprises the partial micro-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine in combination with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4 : 1 ratio. When buprenorphine/naloxone is taken sublingually as prescribed, the naloxone exerts no clinically significant effect, leaving the opioid agonist effects of buprenorphine to predominate. However, when buprenorphine/naloxone is parenterally administered in patients physically dependent on full agonist opioids, the opioid antagonism of naloxone causes withdrawal effects, thus reducing the abuse potential of the drug combination. Buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective maintenance therapy for opioid dependence and has generally similar efficacy to methadone, although more data are needed. Less frequent dispensing of buprenorphine/naloxone (e.g. thrice weekly) does not appear to compromise efficacy and can improve patient satisfaction. Buprenorphine/naloxone is more effective than clonidine as a medically supervised withdrawal therapy. Moreover, buprenorphine/naloxone is a generally well tolerated medically supervised withdrawal and maintenance treatment. Thus, sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone is a valuable pharmacotherapy for the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:19739698

  7. Buprenorphine/naloxone: a review of its use in the treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Orman, Jennifer S; Keating, Gillian M

    2009-01-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) comprises the partial mu-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine in combination with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4 : 1 ratio. When buprenorphine/naloxone is taken sublingually as prescribed, the naloxone exerts no clinically significant effect, leaving the opioid agonist effects of buprenorphine to predominate. However, when buprenorphine/naloxone is parenterally administered in patients physically dependent on full agonist opioids, the opioid antagonism of naloxone causes withdrawal effects, thus reducing the abuse potential of the drug combination. Buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective maintenance therapy for opioid dependence and has generally similar efficacy to methadone, although more data are needed. Less frequent dispensing of buprenorphine/naloxone (e.g. thrice weekly) does not appear to compromise efficacy and can improve patient satisfaction. Buprenorphine/naloxone is more effective than clonidine as a medically-supervised withdrawal therapy. Moreover, buprenorphine/naloxone is a generally well tolerated medically-supervised withdrawal and maintenance treatment. Thus, sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone is a valuable pharmacotherapy for the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:19368419

  8. Parenting and Concerns of Pregnant Women in Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Rachel A; Neumann, Anne M; King, Stella OC; Hoey, Robert F; Finnell, Deborah S; Blondell, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Opioid-dependent pregnant women are characterized by drug use during pregnancy and deficits in knowledge of newborn care and feeding, and of child development. We assessed parenting skills and concerns among pregnant women in buprenorphine treatment for prescription opioid-dependence. Study Design and Methods We interviewed 32 pregnant women who received buprenorphine treatment for prescription opioid dependence in a primary care setting and administered questionnaires, including the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory version 2 (AAPI-2) and Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Results AAPI-2 scores revealed medium risk of abuse for all five scales: inappropriate expectations of the child, low level of empathy, strong belief in corporal punishment, reversal of parent-child roles, and oppression of children’s power and independence. Primary concerns of participants were neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and their child’s health. Pregnant women who received buprenorphine for treatment of prescription opioid dependence showed a lack of appropriate parenting skills, but did not express concern about their ability to parent. Clinical Implications Our findings suggest need for nurses to assist prescription opioid-dependent pregnant women in acquiring additional parenting skills, to refer for educational parenting intervention, and to educate patients about NAS. PMID:25137081

  9. Opioid addicts at admission vs. slow-release oral morphine, methadone, and sublingual buprenorphine maintenance treatment participants.

    PubMed

    Giacomuzzi, S; Kemmler, G; Ertl, M; Riemer, Y

    2006-01-01

    With use of a randomized study design, quality of life (QOL) and physical symptoms of opioid addicts at admission were compared with slow-release oral morphine, methadone, and sublingual buprenorphine maintenance program participants after 6 months of treatment. The study was conducted from February to July 2004 in the outpatient drug user treatment center at University Department of Psychiatry at Innsbruck, providing maintenance treatment programs and detoxification in Tyrol, Austria. One hundred twenty opioid users seeking treatment were compared with 120 opioid-dependent patients retained for 6 months on a slow-release oral morphine, methadone, or sublingual buprenorphine maintenance program. The German version ("Berlin Quality of Life Profile") of the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile was used, and illicit opioid use was determined by urinalysis. Physical symptoms were measured by using the Opioid Withdrawal Scale. Urinalyses revealed a significantly lower consumption of cocaine and opioids in all three substitution groups than in patients at admission (p < 0.001 and p < or = 0.004, respectively). Both the buprenorphine and the methadone maintenance group showed significantly more favorable values than opioid clients at admission for stomach cramps (p < or = 0.002), muscular tension (p < or = 0.027), general pain (p < or = 0.001), feelings of coldness (p < or = 0.000), heart pounding (p < or = 0.008), runny eyes (p < or = 0.047), and aggressions (p < or = 0.009). Patients who received slow-release oral morphine treatment generally showed the least favorable QOL scores compared with patients at admission or sublingual buprenorphine and methadone clients. Patients in the sublingual buprenorphine or methadone program showed nearly the same QOL scores. The buprenorphine and the methadone maintenance group showed significantly more favorable values than opioid clients at admission regarding leisure time (p < or = 0.019), finances (p < or = 0.014), mental health (p < or = 0.010), and overall satisfaction (p < or = 0.010). Slow-release oral morphine is a well-established treatment for pain, but more research is required to evaluate it as a treatment for heroin dependence. The present data indicate that slow-release oral morphine could have some disadvantages compared with sublingual buprenorphine and methadone in QOL, physical symptoms, and additional consumption. The results further suggest that buprenorphine treatment is as effective as methadone in effects on quality of life and physical symptoms. PMID:16393744

  10. Adherence to Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment in Opioid Dependence Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandawar, Mrunal; Kandasamy, Arun; Chand, Prabhat; Murthy, Pratima; Benegal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Opioid Use disorders are emerging as a serious public health concern in India. Opioid substitution treatment is one of the emerging forms of treatment in this population which needs more evidence to increase its availability and address prejudices towards the same. Materials and Methods: This is a case control study with retrospective design reviewing the charts of patients with opioid dependence syndrome registered between January 2005 to December 2012. Adherence to treatment was the outcome variable assessed in this study. Results: The odds of the Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment (BMT) group remaining in treatment is 4.5 (P < 0.005) times more than Naltrexone Maintenance Treatment (NMT) group and 7 times (P < 0.001) more than Psychosocial intervention (PST) alone group. Discussion: We believe that these study findings will help in reducing the prejudice towards BMT and encourage further research in this field. Conclusion: BMT has a better adherence rate than other treatments in opioid use disorders. PMID:26664083

  11. Bringing Buprenorphine-Naloxone Detoxification to Community Treatment Providers: The NIDA Clinical Trials Network Field Experience

    PubMed Central

    Amass, Leslie; Ling, Walter; Freese, Thomas E.; Reiber, Chris; Annon, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, Allan J.; M.F.T.; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S.; Brown, Lawrence S.; Clark, Cynthia; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Krejci, Jonathan; Stine, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa; Brigham, Greg; Babcock, Dean; L.C.S.W.; Muir, Joan A.; Buchan, Betty J.; Horton, Terry

    2005-01-01

    In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone®) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based treatment programs. Opioid-dependent men and women were randomized to a thirteen-day buprenorphine-naloxone taper regimen for short-term opioid detoxification. The 234 buprenorphine-naloxone patients averaged 37 years old and used mostly intravenous heroin. Direct and rapid induction onto buprenorphine-naloxone was safe and well tolerated. Most patients (83%) received 8 mg buprenorphine-2 mg naloxone on the first day and 90% successfully completed induction and reached a target dose of 16mg buprenorphine-4 mg naloxone in three days. Medication compliance and treatment engagement was high. An average of 81% of available doses was ingested, and 68% of patients completed the detoxification. Most (80.3%) patients received some ancillary medications with an average of 2.3 withdrawal symptoms treated. The safety profile of buprenorphine-naloxone was excellent. Of eighteen serious adverse events reported, only one was possibly related to buprenorphine-naloxone. All providers successfully integrated buprenorphine-naloxone into their existing treatment milieus. Overall, data from the CTN field experience suggest that buprenorphine-naloxone is practical and safe for use in diverse community treatment settings, including those with minimal experience providing opioid-based pharmacotherapy and/or medical detoxification for opioid dependence. PMID:15204675

  12. Buprenorphine adoption in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Hannah K.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Johnson, J. Aaron; Roman, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN), a collaborative federal research initiative that brings together universities and community-based treatment programs (CTPs), has conducted multiple clinical trials of buprenorphine for opioid dependence. Part of the CTN’s mission is to promote the adoption of evidence-based treatment technologies. Drawing on a data collected during face-to-face interviews with administrators from a panel of 206 CTPs, this research examines the adoption of buprenorphine over a 2-year period. These data indicated that the adoption of buprenorphine doubled between the baseline and 24-month follow-up interviews. Involvement in a buprenorphine protocol continued to be a strong predictor of adoption at the 2-year follow-up, although adoption of buprenorphine tripled among those CTPs without buprenorphine-specific protocol experience. For-profit CTPs and those offering inpatient detoxification services were more likely to adopt buprenorphine over time. A small percentage of programs discontinued using buprenorphine. These findings point to the dynamic nature of service delivery in community-based addiction treatment and the continued need for longitudinal studies of organizational change. PMID:19577406

  13. Impact of research network participation on the adoption of buprenorphine for substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, Traci R; Abraham, Amanda J; Kovas, Anne E; McFarland, Bentson H; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing body of research supporting the use of buprenorphine and other medication assisted treatments (MATs) for the rapidly accelerating opioid epidemic in the United States. Despite numerous advantages of buprenorphine (accessible in primary care, no daily dosing required, minimal stigma), implementation has been slow. As the field progresses, there is a need to understand the impact of participation in practitioner-scientist research networks on acceptance and uptake of buprenorphine. This paper examines the impact of research network participation on counselor attitudes toward buprenorphine addressing both counselor-level characteristics and program-level variables using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for nesting of counselors within treatment programs. Using data from the National Treatment Center Study, this project compares privately funded treatment programs (N=345) versus programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (N=198). Models included 922 counselors in 172 CTN programs and 1203 counselors in 251 private programs. Results of two-level HLM logistic (Bernoulli) models revealed that counselors with higher levels of education, larger caseloads, more buprenorphine-specific training, and less preference for 12-step treatment models were more likely to perceive buprenorphine as acceptable and effective. Furthermore, buprenorphine was 50% more likely to be perceived as effective among counselors working in CTN-affiliated programs as compared to private programs. This study suggests that research network affiliation positively impacts counselors' acceptance and perceptions of buprenorphine. Thus, research network participation can be utilized as a means to promote positive attitudes toward the implementation of innovations including medication assisted treatment. PMID:24594902

  14. Impact of Research Network Participation on the Adoption of Buprenorphine for Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, Traci R.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Kovas, Anne E.; McFarland, Bentson H.; Roman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of research supporting the use of buprenorphine and other medication assisted treatments (MATs) for the rapidly accelerating opioid epidemic in the United States. Despite numerous advantages of buprenorphine (accessible in primary care, no daily dosing required, minimal stigma), implementation has been slow. As the field progresses, there is a need to understand the impact of participation in practitioner-scientist research networks on acceptance and uptake of buprenorphine. This paper examines the impact of research network participation on counselor attitudes toward buprenorphine addressing both counselor-level characteristics and program-level variables using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for nesting of counselors within treatment programs. Using data from the National Treatment Center Study, this project compares privately funded treatment programs (n=345) versus programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (n=198). Models included 922 counselors in 172 CTN programs and 1,203 counselors in 251 private programs. Results of two-level HLM logistic (Bernoulli) models revealed that counselors with higher levels of education, larger caseloads, more buprenorphine-specific training, and less preference for 12-step treatment models were more likely to perceive buprenorphine as acceptable and effective. Furthermore, buprenorphine was 50% more likely to be perceived as effective among counselors working in CTN-affiliated programs as compared to private programs. This study suggests that research network affiliation positively impacts counselors’ acceptance and perceptions of buprenorphine. Thus, research network participation can be utilized as a means to promote positive attitudes toward the implementation of innovations including medication assisted treatment. PMID:24594902

  15. Adoption of Evidence-Based Clinical Innovations: The Case of Buprenorphine Use by Opioid Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Christina M.; D’Aunno, Thomas A.; Pollack, Harold A.; Friedmann, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations’ technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs’ decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

  16. Adoption of evidence-based clinical innovations: the case of buprenorphine use by opioid treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Christina M; D'Aunno, Thomas A; Pollack, Harold A; Friedmann, Peter D

    2014-02-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations' technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs' decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

  17. Buprenorphine Treatment in an Urban Community Health Center: What to Expect

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Chinazo; Giovanniello, Angela; Sacajiu, Galit; Whitley, Susan; Mund, Pamela; Beil, Robert; Sohler, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite new opportunities to expand buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence, use of this treatment modality has been limited. Physicians may question their ability to successfully treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in a primary care setting. We describe a buprenorphine treatment program and treatment outcomes in an urban community health center. Methods We conducted retrospective chart reviews on the first 41 opioid-dependent patients treated with buprenorphine/naloxone. The primary outcome was 90-day retention in treatment. Results Patients’ mean age was 46 years, 70.7% were male, 58.8% Hispanic, 31.7% black, 57.5% unemployed, and 70.0% used heroin prior to treatment. Twenty-nine (70.7%) patients were retained in treatment at day 90. Compared to those not retained, patients retained in treatment were more likely to have used street methadone (0% versus 37.9%) and less likely to have used opioid analgesics (54.6% versus 20.7%) and alcohol (50.0% versus 13.8%) prior to treatment. Of the 25 patients with urine toxicology tests, 24% tested positive for opioids. Conclusions Buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence in an urban community health center resulted in a 90-day retention rate of 70.7%. Type of substance use prior to treatment appeared to be associated with retention. These findings can help guide program development. PMID:18928077

  18. Buprenorphine – an attractive opioid with underutilized potential in treatment of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ish K; Pillarisetti, Sivaram

    2015-01-01

    Despite proven clinical utility, buprenorphine has not been used widely for the treatment of chronic pain. Questions about “ceiling effect” or bell-shaped curve observed for analgesia in preclinical studies and potential withdrawal issues on combining with marketed ?-agonists continue to hinder progress in expanding full potential of buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and noncancer pain. Mounting evidence from clinical studies and conclusions drawn by a panel of experts strongly support superior safety and efficacy profile of buprenorphine vs marketed opioids. No ceiling on analgesic effect has been reported in clinical studies. The receptor pharmacology and pharmacokinetics profile of buprenorphine is complex but unique and contributes to its distinct safety and efficacy. The buprenorphine pharmacology also allows it to be combined with other ?-receptor opioids for additivity in efficacy. Transdermal delivery products of buprenorphine have been preferred choices for the management of pain but new delivery options are under investigation for the treatment of both opioid dependence and chronic pain. PMID:26672499

  19. Buprenorphine vs methadone treatment: A review of evidence in both developed and developing worlds.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Paul J; Remski, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a major health and social problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality that adversely affects social circumstances, productivity, and healthcare and law enforcement costs. In the UK and many other Western countries, both methadone and buprenorphine are recommended by the relevant agencies for detoxification from heroin and for opioid maintenance therapy. However, despite obvious benefits due to its unique pharmacotherapy (eg, greatly reduced risk of overdose), buprenorphine has largely failed to overtake methadone in managing opioid addiction. The experience from the developing world (based on data from India) is similar. In this article we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the use methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid addiction from both a developed and developing world perspective; and explore some of the reasons why buprenorphine has not fulfilled the expectations predicted by many in the addictions field. PMID:22346191

  20. Antidepressant Treatment Does Not Improve Buprenorphine Retention Among Opioid-Dependent Persons

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Michael D.; Herman, Debra S.; Kettavong, Malyna; Cioe, Patricia A.; Friedmann, Peter D.; Tellioglu, Tahir; Anderson, Bradley J

    2010-01-01

    Our goal was to determine whether treatment of depressive symptoms with escitalopram during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence, would improve treatment retention compared to placebo in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind trial. Treatment drop-out was defined as missing seven consecutive buprenorphine dosing days. Participants were 76% male, 80% non-Hispanic Caucasian, and 64% heroin users. At baseline, the mean Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) score was 28.4 (±9.7). Sixty-one percent of participants completed the 12 week buprenorphine protocol. Dropout rates were 33.3% and 44.0% among those randomized to escitalopram or placebo respectively (p=.19). Relative to baseline, mean BDI-II scores were significantly lower at all follow-up assessments, but the treatment by time interaction effect was not statistically significant (p = .18). Participants randomized to escitalopram also did not have a significantly lower likelihood of testing positive for either opiates or other drugs during follow-up. Depressive symptoms often resolved with buprenorphine treatment and the immediate initiation of escitalopram does not improve treatment retention, depression outcomes, or illicit drug use. Clinicians should determine the need for antidepressant treatment later in buprenorphine care. PMID:20598836

  1. Antidepressant treatment does not improve buprenorphine retention among opioid-dependent persons.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michael D; Herman, Debra S; Kettavong, Malyna; Cioe, Patricia A; Friedmann, Peter D; Tellioglu, Tahir; Anderson, Bradley J

    2010-09-01

    Our goal was to determine whether treatment of depressive symptoms with escitalopram during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence would improve treatment retention compared to placebo in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind trial. Treatment dropout was defined as missing seven consecutive buprenorphine dosing days. Participants were 76% male, 80% non-Hispanic Caucasian, and 64% heroin users. At baseline, the mean Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) score was 28.4 (+/-9.7). Sixty-one percent of participants completed the 12-week buprenorphine protocol. Dropout rates were 33.3% and 44.0% among those randomized to escitalopram or placebo, respectively (p = .19). Relative to baseline, mean BDI-II scores were significantly lower at all follow-up assessments, but the Treatment x Time interaction effect was not statistically significant (p = .18). Participants randomized to escitalopram also did not have a significantly lower likelihood of testing positive for either opiates or other drugs during follow-up. Depressive symptoms often resolved with buprenorphine treatment, and the immediate initiation of escitalopram does not improve treatment retention, depression outcomes, or illicit drug use. Clinicians should determine the need for antidepressant treatment later in buprenorphine care. PMID:20598836

  2. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate dependence: its pharmacology and social context of use in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R

    2004-05-01

    Buprenorphine's physiological effects are produced when it attaches to specific opiate receptors that are designated mu, kappa, or delta. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist at the mu receptor and an antagonist at the kappa receptor, produces typical morphine-like effects at low doses. At higher doses, it produces opiate effects that are less than those of full opiate agonists. Knowledge of the physiological effects of opiate receptors and the way they interact with opiate agonists, partial opiate agonists, and opiate antagonists is fundamental to understanding the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine in treatment of pain and opiate addiction. Knowledge of the historical and social context of opiate agonist treatment of opiate dependence is fundamental to understanding how nonpharmacological factors may limit the clinical adoption and utility of a safe and effective medication in treatment of opiate dependence. This article reviews the pharmacology of sublingual buprenorphine and the historical context of opiate agonist therapy; delineates classes of opiate receptors and their interaction with opiate agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists; and describes the commercially available pharmaceutical formulations of buprenorphine. It focuses on sublingual buprenorphine tablets, Subutex and Suboxone, the FDA-approved formulations of buprenorphine for treatment of opiate dependence. Sublingual buprenorphine, and the combination of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone, have unique pharmacological properties that make them a logical first-line intervention in the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:15279124

  3. Changes in Quality of Life following Buprenorphine Treatment: Relationship with Treatment Retention and Illicit Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P.; Myers, C. Patrick; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Olsen, Yngvild K.; Jaffe, Jerome H.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of substance abuse treatment outcomes that give priority to cessation of all drug use may obscure other tangible benefits of treatment that are important to patients. The aim of this study was to examine the association between changes in quality of life (QoL) and: (a) retention in treatment and (b) opioid use as measured by self-report and urine testing. Participants were 300 African American men and women starting outpatient buprenorphine treatment. Participants completed assessments at baseline, 3- and 6-months consisting of the World Health Organization’s Quality of Life brief scale, Addiction Severity Index, and urine testing for opioids. There were statistically significant increases over time across all four QoL domains: physical, psychological, environmental, and social. Self-reported frequency of opioid use was negatively associated with psychological QoL, but opioid urine test results were not significantly associated with any QoL domains. Continued treatment enrollment was significantly associated with higher psychological QoL and environmental QoL. Patients entering buprenorphine treatment experience improvements in QoL, which are amplified for patients who remain in treatment. Point-prevalence opiate urine test results obtained at each assessment were not associated with any of the QoL domains and may not accurately reflect improvements perceived by patients receiving buprenorphine treatment. PMID:25950595

  4. Changes in Quality of Life following Buprenorphine Treatment: Relationship with Treatment Retention and Illicit Opioid Use.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; Myers, C Patrick; O'Grady, Kevin E; Olsen, Yngvild K; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-01-01

    Studies of substance abuse treatment outcomes that give priority to cessation of all drug use may obscure other tangible benefits of treatment that are important to patients. The aim of this study was to examine the association between changes in quality of life (QoL) and: (1) retention in treatment; and (2) opioid use as measured by self-report and urine testing. Participants were 300 African American men and women starting outpatient buprenorphine treatment. Participants completed assessments at baseline, three and six months consisting of the World Health Organization's Quality of Life brief scale, Addiction Severity Index, and urine testing for opioids. There were statistically significant increases over time across all four QoL domains: physical, psychological, environmental, and social. Self-reported frequency of opioid use was negatively associated with psychological QoL, but opioid urine test results were not significantly associated with any QoL domains. Continued treatment enrollment was significantly associated with higher psychological QoL and environmental QoL. Patients entering buprenorphine treatment experience improvements in QoL, which are amplified for patients who remain in treatment. Point-prevalence opiate urine test results obtained at each assessment were not associated with any of the QoL domains and may not accurately reflect improvements perceived by patients receiving buprenorphine treatment. PMID:25950595

  5. State policy influence on the early diffusion of buprenorphine in community treatment programs

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Lori J; Abraham, Amanda J

    2008-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine was approved for use in the treatment of opioid dependence in 2002, but its diffusion into everyday clinical practice in community-based treatment programs has been slow. This study examines the net impact of efforts by state agencies, including provision of Medicaid coverage, on program-level adoption of buprenorphine as of 2006. Methods Interviews were conducted with key informants in 49 of the 50 state agencies with oversight responsibility for addiction treatment services. Information from these interviews was integrated with organizational data from the 2006 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services. A multivariate logistic regression model was estimated to identify the effects of state efforts to promote the use of this medication, net of a host of organizational characteristics. Results The availability of Medicaid coverage for buprenorphine was a significant predictor of its adoption by treatment organizations. Conclusion Inclusion of buprenorphine on state Medicaid formularies appears to be a key element in ensuring that patients have access to this state-of-the-art treatment option. Other potential barriers to the diffusion of buprenorphine require identification, and the value of additional state-level policies to promote its use should be evaluated. PMID:18570665

  6. Persistence During Stress-Challenge Associated With Lapse to Opioid Use During Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Strong, David R.; Brown, Richard A.; Sims, Meredith; Herman, Debra S.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lapse to opiate use after initiation of buprenorphine treatment is common and is a strong predictor of poor treatment retention and increased risk of chronic opiate use. Drug-cues and situations or events associated with distress are known to provoke craving and increase risk for lapse. The current study evaluated the predictive validity of a behavioral index of persistence during a stress-challenge among opiate users identified as affectively vulnerable to lapse risk due to elevated depressive symptoms. Methods Patients from on ongoing clinical trial (n=48) completed a stress-challenge task prior to receiving their first dose of buprenorphine. Results After controlling for levels of craving on their induction day, persistence on the stress-challenge task prior to initiating buprenorphine treatment was associated with successful transition to early abstinence, and lower rates of opiate use during the initial three months of buprenorphine treatment across antidepressant and placebo groups. Conclusions Results from this preliminary study suggest the promise of laboratory-based behavioral paradigms in facilitating understanding of important mechanisms of early lapse. Identifying individual behavioral responses to drug- and stress-cues prior to attempts at abstinence may facilitate delivery of adjunctive behavioral treatments to prevent early lapse. PMID:22864399

  7. The evidence doesn't justify steps by state Medicaid programs to restrict opioid addiction treatment with buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin E; Samnaliev, Mihail; Baxter, Jeffrey D; Leung, Gary Y

    2011-08-01

    Many state Medicaid programs restrict access to buprenorphine, a prescription medication that relieves withdrawal symptoms for people addicted to heroin or other opiates. The reason is that officials fear that the drug is costlier or less safe than other therapies such as methadone. To find out if this is true, we compared spending, the use of services related to drug-use relapses, and mortality for 33,923 Massachusetts Medicaid beneficiaries receiving either buprenorphine, methadone, drug-free treatment, or no treatment during the period 2003-07. Buprenorphine appears to have significantly expanded access to treatment because the drug can be prescribed by a physician and taken at home compared with methadone, which by law must be administered at an approved clinic. Buprenorphine was associated with more relapse-related services but $1,330 lower mean annual spending than methadone when used for maintenance treatment. Mortality rates were similar for buprenorphine and methadone. By contrast, mortality rates were 75 percent higher among those receiving drug-free treatment, and more than twice as high among those receiving no treatment, compared to those receiving buprenorphine. The evidence does not support rationing buprenorphine to save money or ensure safety. PMID:21821560

  8. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Margaret; Brown, Nancy J.; Moon, Mary A.; Schuman, Deborah J.; Thomas, Josephine; Wright, Denise L.

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses the clinical use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts…

  9. Developing and Implementing a New Prison-Based Buprenorphine Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinlock, Timothy W.; Gordon, Michael S.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Fitzgerald, Terrence T.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that buprenorphine treatment may be a promising intervention for incarcerated individuals with heroin addiction histories. However, its implementation varies from corrections-based methadone because of unique challenges regarding dosing, administration, and regulation. Describing the first randomized clinical trial of…

  10. French Experience with Buprenorphine : Do Physicians Follow the Guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Guillou Landreat, Morgane; Rozaire, Charles; Guillet, Jean yves; Victorri Vigneau, Caroline; Le Reste, Jean Yves; Grall Bronnec, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Opiate dependence affects about 15,479,000 people worldwide. The effectiveness of opiate substitution treatments (OST) has been widely demonstrated. Buprenorphine plays a particular role in opiate dependence care provision in France. It is widely prescribed by physicians and national opiate substitution treatment guidelines have been available since 2004. In order to study the prescribing of buprenorphine, we used a questionnaire sent by email, to a large sample of physicians. These physicians were either in practice, or belonged to an addiction treatment network or a hospital. The main objective of this work was to measure the extent to which the theoretical, clinical attitude of physicians towards prescribing buprenorphine (BHD) complied with the statutory guidelines. We showed that the physicians we interviewed rarely took into account the guidelines regarding buprenorphine prescription. The actual prescribing of Buprenorphine differed from the guidelines. Only 42% of independent Family Physicians (FPs), working outside the national health care system, had prescribed buprenorphine as a first-time prescription and 40% of FPs do not follow up patients on buprenorphine. In terms of compliance with the guidelines, 55% of FPs gave theoretical answers that only partially complied with the guidelines. The variations in compliance with the guidelines was noted according to different variables and took into particular account whether the physician were affiliated to a network or in training. PMID:26479400

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Buprenorphine and Naltrexone Treatments for Heroin Dependence in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Chawarski, Marek; Mazlan, Mahmud; Ng, Nora; Schottenfeld, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Aims To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia. Design We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; societal costs for participants’ time were estimated using Malaysia’s minimum wage. Costs were estimated from a provider and societal perspective and reported in 2004 US dollars. Setting Muar, Malaysia. Participants 126 patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Malaysia (2003–2005) receiving counseling and buprenorphine, naltrexone, or placebo for treatment of heroin dependence. Measurements Primary outcome measures included days in treatment, maximum consecutive days of heroin abstinence, days to first heroin use, and days to heroin relapse. Secondary outcome measures included treatment retention, injection drug use, illicit opiate use, AIDS Risk Inventory total score, and drug risk and sex risk subscores. Findings Buprenorphine was more effective and more costly than naltrexone for all primary and most secondary outcomes. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were below $50 for primary outcomes, mostly below $350 for secondary outcomes. Naltrexone was dominated by placebo for all secondary outcomes at almost all endpoints. Incremental treatment costs were driven mainly by medication costs, especially the price of buprenorphine. Conclusions Buprenorphine appears to be a cost-effective alternative to naltrexone that might enhance economic productivity and reduce drug use over a longer term. PMID:23226534

  12. Practice Guidance for Buprenorphine for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorders: Results of an Expert Panel Process

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Carrie M.; Lindsay, Dawn; Williams, Jessica; Ayers, Amanda; Schuster, James; Cilia, Alyssa; Flaherty, Michael T.; Mandell, Todd; Gordon, Adam J.; Stein, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although numbers of physicians credentialed to prescribe buprenorphine has increased over time, many credentialed physicians may be reluctant to treat individuals with opioid use disorders due to discomfort with prescribing buprenorphine. Though prescribing physicians are required to complete a training course, many have questions about buprenorphine and treatment guidelines have not been updated to reflect clinical experience in recent years. We report on an expert panel process to update and expand buprenorphine guidelines. Methods We identified candidate guidelines through expert opinion and a review of the literature and used a modified RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to assess the validity of the candidate guidelines. An expert panel completed two rounds of rating, with a meeting to discuss the guidelines between the first and second rating. Results Through the rating process, expert panel members rated 90 candidate guideline statements across eight domains, including candidacy for buprenorphine treatment, dosing of buprenorphine, psychosocial counseling, and treatment of co-occurring depression and anxiety. A total of 65 guideline statements (72%) were rated as valid. Expert panel members had agreement in some areas, such as the treatment of co-occurring mental health problems, but disagreement in others, including the appropriate dosing of buprenorphine given patient complexities. Conclusions Through an expert panel process, we developed an updated and expanded set of buprenorphine treatment guidelines; this additional guidance may increase credentialed physicians’ comfort with prescribing buprenorphine to patients with opioid use disorders. Future efforts should focus on appropriate dosing guidance and ensuring that guidelines can be adapted to a variety of practice settings. PMID:25844527

  13. Sublingual buprenorphine is effective in the treatment of chronic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malinoff, Herbert L; Barkin, Robert L; Wilson, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Many patients with chronic pain have less than optimal therapeutic outcomes after prolonged treatment with opiate analgesics. Worsening of pain perception, functional capacity, and mood often result. Medical detoxification is often undertaken in this situation. Ninety-five consecutive patients (49 men and 46 women; age range, 26-84) with chronic noncancer pain (maldynia) were referred by local pain clinics for detoxification from long-term opiate analgesic (LTOA) therapy. All patients had failed treatment as manifest by increasing pain levels, worsening functional capacity, and, in 8%, the emergence of opiate addiction. Length of prior LTOA therapy ranged from 1.5 to 27 years (mean, 8.8 years). After a minimum of 12 hours of abstinence from all opiate analgesics, patients were given low doses of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone (Reckitt Benckiser). Maintenance dosing was individualized to treat chronic pain. Daily SL dose of buprenorphine ranged from 4 to 16 mg (mean, 8 mg) in divided doses. Mean duration of treatment is 8.8 months (range, 2.4-16.6 months). At clinic appointments, patients were assessed for pain reports, functional capacity, and mood inventory. Eighty-six percent of patients experienced moderate to substantial relief of pain accompanied by both improved mood and functioning. Patient and family satisfaction was robust. Only 6 patients discontinued therapy secondary to side effects and/or exacerbation of pain. In this open-label study, SL buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone were well tolerated and safe and appeared to be effective in the treatment of chronic pain patients refractory to LTOA. PMID:16148422

  14. Preference for buprenorphine/naloxone and buprenorphine among patients receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy in France: a prospective, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Daulouède, Jean-Pierre; Caer, Yves; Galland, Pascal; Villeger, Pierre; Brunelle, Emmanuel; Bachellier, Jérôme; Piquet, Jean-Michel; Harbonnier, Jean; Leglise, Yves; Courty, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance treatment with buprenorphine tablets (Subutex) has been associated with reductions in heroin use; however, concerns for intravenous misuse exist. A buprenorphine/naloxone formulation (Suboxone) was designed to reduce this misuse risk while retaining buprenorphine's efficacy and safety. This prospective, open-label, multicenter trial compared preferences for buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone in 53 opioid-dependent patients stabilized on buprenorphine. Buprenorphine was first administered at the patient's current dose (Days 1-2), followed by a direct switch to buprenorphine/naloxone (Days 3-5). Global satisfaction rates were high and similar between buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone; however, patients preferred the tablet taste, size, and sublingual dissolution time of buprenorphine/naloxone. At the end of the study, 54% of patients preferred buprenorphine/naloxone, 31% preferred buprenorphine, and 15% had no preference; most patients (71%) wished to continue treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone. This study did not identify any impediments to a direct buprenorphine-to-buprenorphine/naloxone switch and revealed some characteristics that may facilitate treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone. PMID:19800758

  15. A pilot study of buprenorphine-naloxone combination tablet (Suboxone) in treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Bell, James; Byron, Gaye; Gibson, Amy; Morris, Amanda

    2004-09-01

    In Australia, maintenance treatment for opioid dependence involves supervised daily administration of a dose of methadone or buprenorphine. A sublingual tablet combining buprenorphine and naloxone in a 4:1 ratio (Suboxone) has been developed, designed to deter diversion and intravenous misuse, and may be suitable for unsupervised administration. The aim of this study was to investigate the tolerability of Suboxone, and investigate whether unsupervised administration can be effective in stabilized patients. Employed patients on buprenorphine maintenance, who had ceased heroin use, were switched to Suboxone and provided with weekly supplies of medication to take without supervised administration. Subjects were monitored closely with weekly clinical reviews, and research interviews at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Only 11% of people receiving buprenorphine met eligibility criteria. Seventeen subjects were recruited. Fifteen were retained for the full 6 months. No subject appeared destabilized by unsupervised dosing. Suboxone was well tolerated. The current trial demonstrated that unsupervised administration with regular clinical monitoring can be effective in selected patients. However, using access to unsupervised dosing to promote abstinence from heroin probably limits the potential benefits of unsupervised administration to a very small proportion of patients. PMID:15370011

  16. Treatment Outcomes of African American Buprenorphine Patients by Parole and Probation Status.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Gryczynski, Jan; Kelly, Sharon M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H; Olsen, Yngvild K; Schwartz, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    This secondary analysis compared outcomes of African-American adults newly-admitted to buprenorphine treatment who were on parole and probation to patients who were not under criminal justice supervision. Buprenorphine patients (N=300) were randomly assigned to receive either Intensive Outpatient Treatment (IOP) or Standard Outpatient Treatment (OP) treatment and were assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-months. There were no differences between groups in treatment retention. Among probationers/parolees, IOP was associated with lower 3-month treatment retention compared to OP, but among participants not on probation/parole the relationship was reversed (p=.004). Both conditions showed significant declines in heroin and cocaine use, illegal activity, and in meeting DSM-IV criteria for opioid and cocaine dependence. Probationers/parolees reported lower frequency of illegal activities at 3-months compared to non-probationers/parolees (p=.007). Buprenorphine treatment should be made more widely available to individuals on parole/probation as they respond as well to treatment as patients not supervised by the criminal justice system. PMID:25364037

  17. Buprenorphine for office-based treatment of patients with opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Manlandro, James J

    2005-06-01

    The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) was established to create a new paradigm for medication-assisted treatment of opiate addiction in the United States. Before enactment of DATA 2000, the use of opioid medications to treat opioid addiction was permissible only in federally approved treatment programs, ie, methadone clinics. The only medications permitted were Schedule II drugs (eg, methadone and l-a-acetylmethadol [LAAM]), which could only be dispensed, not prescribed. Under provisions of DATA 2000, qualified physicians in a medical office and other appropriate settings outside the opioid treatment program system may prescribe or dispense (or both), Schedule III, IV, and V opioid medications for treatment of opioid addiction if such medications have been specifically approved by the the US Food and Drug Administration for that indication. Opioid addiction treatment programs were commonly known as methadone clinics. They now may also dispense buprenorphine hydrochloride and the buprenorphine hydrochloride-naloxone combination. The information in this article is extracted (with revision) from: Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40. DHS Publication No. (SMA) 04-3939. Rockville, Md: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2004. The Clinical Guidelines document is in the public domain except for material indicated as reprinted from a copyrighted source. The author served on both the Expert Panel and the Consensus Panel that produced the guidelines, available in portable document format at http://buprenorphine.samhsa.gov/Bup%20Guidelines.pdf. PMID:16118361

  18. Addiction to Prescription Opioids: Characteristics of the Emerging Epidemic and Treatment with Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, John; Flower, Keith; Pletcher, Mark; Galloway, Gantt P.

    2015-01-01

    Dependence on and abuse of prescription opioid drugs is now a major health problem, with initiation of prescription opioid abuse exceeding cocaine in young people. Coincident with the emergence of abuse and dependence on prescription opioids, there has been an increased emphasis on the treatment of pain. Pain is now the “5th vital sign” and physicians face disciplinary action for failure to adequately relieve pain. Thus, physicians are whipsawed between the imperative to treat pain with opioids and the fear of producing addiction in some patients. In this article we characterize the emerging epidemic of prescription opioid abuse, discuss the utility of buprenorphine in the treatment of addiction to prescription opioids, and present illustrative case histories of successful treatment with buprenorphine. PMID:18837640

  19. Emergency Department–Initiated Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Gail; O’Connor, Patrick G.; Pantalon, Michael V.; Chawarski, Marek C.; Busch, Susan H.; Owens, Patricia H.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Fiellin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Opioid-dependent patients often use the emergency department (ED) for medical care. OBJECTIVE To test the efficacy of 3 interventions for opioid dependence: (1) screening and referral to treatment (referral); (2) screening, brief intervention, and facilitated referral to community-based treatment services (brief intervention); and (3) screening, brief intervention, ED-initiated treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone, and referral to primary care for 10-week follow-up (buprenorphine). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized clinical trial involving 329 opioid-dependent patients who were treated at an urban teaching hospital ED from April 7, 2009, through June 25, 2013. INTERVENTIONS After screening, 104 patients were randomized to the referral group, 111 to the brief intervention group, and 114 to the buprenorphine treatment group. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Enrollment in and receiving addiction treatment 30 days after randomization was the primary outcome. Self-reported days of illicit opioid use, urine testing for illicit opioids, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk, and use of addiction treatment services were the secondary outcomes. RESULTS Seventy-eight percent of patients in the buprenorphine group (89 of 114 [95% CI, 70%-85%]) vs 37% in the referral group (38 of 102 [95% CI, 28%-47%]) and 45% in the brief intervention group (50 of 111 [95% CI, 36%-54%]) were engaged in addiction treatment on the 30th day after randomization (P < .001). The buprenorphine group reduced the number of days of illicit opioid use per week from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 0.9 days (95% CI, 0.5-1.3) vs a reduction from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 2.3 days (95% CI, 1.7-3.0) in the referral group and from 5.6 days (95% CI, 5.3-5.9) to 2.4 days (95% CI, 1.8-3.0) in the brief intervention group (P < .001 for both time and intervention effects; P = .02 for the interaction effect). The rates of urine samples that tested negative for opioids did not differ statistically across groups, with 53.8% (95% CI, 42%-65%) in the referral group, 42.9% (95% CI, 31%-55%) in the brief intervention group, and 57.6% (95% CI, 47%-68%) in the buprenorphine group (P = .17). There were no statistically significant differences in HIV risk across groups (P = .66). Eleven percent of patients in the buprenorphine group (95% CI, 6%-19%) used inpatient addiction treatment services, whereas 37% in the referral group (95% CI, 27%-48%) and 35% in the brief intervention group (95% CI, 25%-37%) used inpatient addiction treatment services (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among opioid-dependent patients, ED-initiated buprenorphine treatment vs brief intervention and referral significantly increased engagement in addiction treatment, reduced self-reported illicit opioid use, and decreased use of inpatient addiction treatment services but did not significantly decrease the rates of urine samples that tested positive for opioids or of HIV risk. These findings require replication in other centers before widespread adoption. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00913770 PMID:25919527

  20. Buprenorphine pharmacotherapy and behavioral treatment: comparison of outcomes among prescription opioid users, heroin users and combination users.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Suzanne; Hillhouse, Maureen; Mooney, Larissa; Ang, Alfonso; Ling, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Most research examining buprenorphine has been conducted with heroin users. Few studies have examined buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for prescription opioid users. Data were from a randomized controlled trial of behavioral treatment provided for 16weeks on a platform of buprenorphine pharmacotherapy and medication management. We compared heroin (H, n=54), prescription opioid (PO, n=54) and combination heroin+prescription opioid (POH, n=71) users to test the hypothesis that PO users will have better treatment outcomes compared with heroin users. The PO group provided more opioid-negative urine drug screens over the combined treatment period (PO:70%, POH:40%, H:38%, p<0.001) and at the end of the combined treatment period (PO:65%, POH:31%, H:33%, p<0.001). Retention was lowest in the H group (PO:80%, POH:65%, H:57%, p=0.039). There was no significant difference in buprenorphine dose between the groups. PO users appear to have better outcomes in buprenorphine pharmacotherapy compared to those reporting any heroin use, confirming that buprenorphine pharmacotherapy is effective in PO users. PMID:25065489

  1. Direct Injection LC-MS-MS Analysis of Opiates, Methamphetamine, Buprenorphine, Methadone and Their Metabolites in Oral Fluid from Substitution Therapy Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiu-Chuan; Lee, Hsi-Tzu; Hsu, Ya-Ching; Huang, Mei-Han; Liu, Ray H; Chen, Tai-Jui; Lin, Dong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed, validated and applied to simultaneous analysis of oral fluid samples for the following 10 analytes: methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, 6-acetylcodeine, amphetamine, and methamphetamine. The oral fluid sample was briefly centrifuged and the supernatant was directly injected into the LC-MS-MS system operated under reverse-phase chromatography and electrospray ionization (ESI). Deuterated analogs of the analytes were adopted as the internal standards and found to be effective (except for buprenorphine) to compensate for potential matrix effects. Each analytical run took <10 min. Linearity range (r(2) > 0.99) established for buprenorphine and the other nine analytes were 5-100 and 1-100 ng/mL. Intra- and interday precision (% CV) ranges for the 10 analytes were 0.87-12.2% and 1.27-12.8%, while the corresponding accuracy (%) ranges were 91.8-113% and 91.9-111%. Limits of detection and quantitation established for these 10 analytes were in the ranges of 0.1-1.0 and 0.25-1.0 ng/mL (5 ng/mL for buprenorphine). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of 62 oral fluid specimens collected from patients participating in methadone and buprenorphine substitution therapy programs. Analytical results of methadone and buprenorphine were compared with data derived from GC-MS analysis and found to be compatible. Overall, the direct injection LC-MS-MS method performed well, permitting rapid analysis of oral fluid samples for simultaneous quantification of methadone, buprenorphine, opiate and amphetamine drug categories without extensive sample preparation steps. PMID:25935159

  2. Substitution treatment for opioid addicts in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Ingo Ilja; Stöver, Heino; Gerlach, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Background After a long and controversial debate methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) was first introduced in Germany in 1987. The number of patients in MMT – first low because of strict admission criteria – increased considerably since the 1990s up to some 65,000 at the end of 2006. In Germany each general practitioner (GP), who has completed an additional training in addiction medicine, is allowed to prescribe substitution drugs to opioid dependent patients. Currently 2,700 GPs prescribe substitution drugs. Psychosocial care should be made available to all MMT patients. Results The results of research studies and practical experiences clearly indicate that patients benefit substantially from MMT with improvements in physical and psychological health. MMT proves successful in attaining high retention rates (65 % to 85 % in the first years, up to 50 % after more than seven years) and plays a major role in accessing and maintaining ongoing medical treatment for HIV and hepatitis. MMT is also seen as a vital factor in the process of social re-integration and it contributes to the reduction of drug related harms such as mortality and morbidity and to the prevention of infectious diseases. Some 10 % of MMT patients become drug-free in the long run. Methadone is the most commonly prescribed substitution medication in Germany, although buprenorphine is attaining rising importance. Access to MMT in rural areas is very patchy and still constitutes a problem. There are only few employment opportunities for patients participating in MMT, although regular employment is considered unanimously as a positive factor of treatment success. Substitution treatment in German prisons is heterogeneous in access and treatment modalities. Access is very patchy and the number of inmates in treatment is limited. Nevertheless, substitution treatment plays a substantial part in the health care system provided to drug users in Germany. Conclusion In Germany, a history of substitution treatment spanning 20 years has meanwhile accumulated a wealth of experience, e.g. in the development of research on health care services, guidelines and the implementation of quality assurance measures. Implementing substitution treatment with concomitant effects and treatment elements such as drug history-taking, dosage setting, co-use of other psychoactive substances (alcohol, benzodiazepines, cocaine), management of 'difficult patient populations', and integration into the social environment has been arranged successfully. Also psychosocial counseling programmes adjuvant to substitution treatment have been established and, in the framework of a pilot project on heroin-based treatment, standardised manuals were developed. Research on allocating opioid users to the 'right' form of therapy at the 'right' point in time is still a challenge, though the pilot project 'heroin-based treatment' brought experience with patients who do not benefit from methadone treatment. There is also expertise in the treatment of specific co-morbidity such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis and psychiatric disorders. The promotion and involvement of self-help groups plays an important part in the process of successful substitution treatment. PMID:17270059

  3. [Heroin substitution treatments. Analysis of current solutions, trends, and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Guffens, J M

    2006-01-01

    Drugs used for treatment of narcotic addicts (buprenorphin at high concentration or methadone) have different advantages and disadvantages. The author has tried to insist on what can be complementary between both treatments. Two new formulations of buprenorphin at high concentration (Suboxone and Subutex NF) are described and proposed to replace Subutex. PMID:16700146

  4. The relative risk of fatal poisoning by methadone or buprenorphine within the wider population of England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Marteau, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the population-wide overdose risk emerging from the prescription of methadone and buprenorphine for opioid substitution treatment in England and Wales. Design Retrospective administrative data study. Setting National databases for England and Wales. Participants/cases Drug-related mortality data were drawn from the Office for National Statistics, and prescription data for methadone and buprenorphine were obtained from the National Health Service for the years 2007–2012. During this 6-year period, a total of 2366 methadone-related deaths and 52 buprenorphine-related deaths were registered, corresponding to 17?333?163 methadone and 2?602?374 buprenorphine prescriptions issued. The analysis encompassed poisoning deaths among members of the wider population of England and Wales who consumed, but were not prescribed these medications, in addition to patients prescribed methadone or buprenorphine. Main outcome measures Mortality risk: substance-specific overdose rate per 1000 prescriptions issued; relative risk ratio of methadone in relation to buprenorphine. Results During the years 2007–2012, the pooled overdose death rate was 0.137/1000 prescriptions of methadone, compared to 0.022/1000 prescriptions of buprenorphine (including buprenorphine-naloxone). The analysis generated a relative risk ratio of 6.23 (95% CI 4.79 to 8.10) of methadone in relation to buprenorphine. UK Borders Agency data were taken into consideration and revealed that only negligible amounts of methadone and buprenorphine were seized on entering UK territory between 2007 and 2012, suggesting domestic diversion. Conclusions Our analysis of the relative safety of buprenorphine and methadone for opioid substitution treatment reveals that buprenorphine is six times safer than methadone with regard to overdose risk among the general population. Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of prescribing methadone, and tighter regulations are needed to prevent its diversion. PMID:26024998

  5. Preliminary survey of office-based opioid treatment practices and attitudes among psychiatrists never receiving buprenorphine training to those who received training during residency

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Joji; Connery, Hilary S.; Ellison, Tatyana V.; Renner, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the characteristics, attitudes, and current prescribing practices of recently graduating psychiatrists who completed buprenorphine training during residency to those who never completed any training.. Methods A total of 359 psychiatrists completing residency training between 2008 and 2011 were recruited to complete an on-line survey. Results Responses from 93 psychiatrists were included for a response rate of 25.9%. Psychiatrists completing any buprenorphine training during residency were more likely to be male and report more favorable views of OBOT with buprenorphine than compared to those who never completed any training. Twenty (38.5%) of those psychiatrists who completed training during residency reported the current prescribing of buprenorphine. Conclusions Completion of buprenorphine training during residency may be a factor in shaping future attitudes towards OBOT and buprenorphine prescribing practices . Further research is needed to clarify the impact of buprenorphine training during residency. Scientific Significance Buprenorphine training during residency training may be a contributing factor in shaping future physician attitudes towards office-based opioid treatment and buprenorphine prescribing practices. PMID:25065457

  6. Buprenorphine Treatment and 12-step Meeting Attendance: Conflicts, Compatibilities, and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Monico, Laura B; Gryczynski, Jan; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Schwartz, Robert P; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-10-01

    This analysis examines patient experiences and outcomes with 12-step recovery group attendance during buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT), two approaches with traditionally divergent philosophies regarding opioid medications for treatment of opioid use disorder. Using quantitative (n = 300) and qualitative (n = 20) data collected during a randomized trial of counseling services in buprenorphine treatment, this mixed-methods analysis of African Americans in BMT finds the number of NA meetings attended in the prior 6 months was associated with a higher rate of retention in BMT (p < .001) and heroin/cocaine abstinence at 6 month follow-up (p = .005). However, patients whose counselors required them to attend 12-step meetings did not have better outcomes than patients not required to attend such meetings. Qualitative narratives highlighted patients' strategies for managing dissonant viewpoints on BMT and disclosing BMT status in community 12-step meetings. Twelve-step meeting attendance is associated with better outcomes for BMT patients over the first 6 months of treatment. However, there is no benefit to requiring meeting attendance as a condition of treatment, and clinicians should be aware of potential philosophical conflicts between 12-step and BMT approaches. PMID:25986647

  7. Comparison of prescriber evaluations and patient-directed self-reports in office-based practice for buprenorphine treatment of opiate-dependent individuals in France, 2002

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Estelle; Fatséas, Mélina; Daulouède, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Cécile; Dubernet, Jacques; Cattan, Laurent; Auriacombe, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional evaluation study was to compare data generated through prescriber assessments, and data generated from independent direct contact with opiate-dependent patients in office-based practice to evaluate buprenorphine treatment for modality of buprenorphine absorption, benzodiazepine use, and depressive symptoms. A group of buprenorphine office-based practice prescribers was selected to participate in this study. They were asked to screen for inclusion all their patients coming for a visit from February to August 2002. Once included by their prescribing physician, patients were given a series of self-administered questionnaires to be returned directly to the research staff, independently of their prescriber. Each prescriber was given a questionnaire to complete based on their knowledge and interview of the patient. Items assessed were history of current treatment, current substance use, buprenorphine treatment related behavior (daily frequency of intake, route of administration), benzodiazepine use and existence of a major depressive episode. Prescribers and patients’ questionnaires were compared. Concordance of both assessments was assessed by kappa statistics. The sensitivity and specificity as well as the positive and negative predictive values of prescriber collected information were compared to that of their patients’. There was an overall good correlation between both data sources on the procedures for buprenorphine use especially for intravenous use of buprenorphine. There were important variations: obtaining buprenorphine without a prescription or with a prescription made by another doctor, intravenous administration of buprenorphine, use of benzodiazepines, and depression were underestimated by prescribers. PMID:19920984

  8. [Buprenorphine transdermal patch (Norspan tape)].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Shinsuke; Ikeda, Tomohito

    2013-07-01

    Buprenorphine is a chemically synthesized opioid characterized as the partial mu agonist and kappa antagonist, and transdermal buprenorphine patch will be considered useful as a strong analgesic with fewer psychological side effects in the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain. Use of transdermal buprenorphine should be limited for pain relief of intractable muscle skeletal pain that cannot be alleviated with other analgesics. To avoid severe complication and drug abuse or addiction, assessment of pain and medical history including drug dependence by medical team are important before administration of transdermal buprenorphine. Moreover, side effects such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, erythema and itching, loss of appetite should be treated appropriately. When transdermal buprenorphine is administered to chronic pain patients, physicians must examine the condition of patients regularly at an outpatient clinic. Moreover, decreasing and discontinuation of opioid including transdermal buprenorphine should always be considered during the treatment. Most important objective of chronic pain treatment is to improve QOL and ADL of patients. PMID:23905402

  9. Interactions of buprenorphine and dipotassium clorazepate on anxiety and memory functions in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique; Quentin, Thomas; Moreaux, Fabien; Debruyne, Danièle; Boulouard, Michel; Coquerel, Antoine

    2006-11-01

    Buprenorphine, a partial mu-receptor agonist widely substituted for heroin in the treatment of addiction, is often misused in combination with benzodiazepines. Improved hedonic properties may result, but only at the cost of increased buprenorphine toxicity. In order to elucidate the appeal of the benzodiazepine-buprenorphine combination, the present study looked at its neuropsycho-pharmacological effects on various emotional and cognitive parameters in the mouse. On the basis of previous dose-response studies, the regimen used was buprenorphine 0.3mg/kg, s.c. plus dipotassium clorazepate 1, 4 and 16 mg/kg, i.p. Anxiety-like behaviour was assessed using the black and white test box, and memory processes were examined via the spontaneous alternation paradigm in the Y-maze, and passive avoidance tests. Spontaneous locomotor activity was also evaluated. High doses of clorazepate impaired buprenorphine-induced hyperactivity and anxiogenic-like effects. They also increased buprenorphine-induced spontaneous alternation impairment, but did not modify its impact on long-term memory processes. These results suggest that the positive reinforcement experienced with the buprenorphine-benzodiazepine combination may be attributable, at least in part, to an increase in buprenorphine's sedative effect associated with a decrease in anxiogenicity. PMID:16720083

  10. Facts about Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in treatment. Through counseling, you learn about the motivations and behaviors that led to your opioid addiction. ... Counseling can provide you with encouragement and with motivation to stick to treatment. It can help you ...

  11. Predictors of Abstinence: National Institute of Drug Abuse Multisite Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment Trial in Opioid-Dependent Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Warden, Diane; Minhajuddin, Abu; Fishman, Marc J.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Adinoff, Bryon; Trivedi, Madhukar; Weiss, Roger; Potter, Jennifer; Poole, Sabrina A.; Woody, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine predictors of opioid abstinence in buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal)-assisted psychosocial treatment for opioid-dependent youth. Method: Secondary analyses were performed of data from 152 youth (15-21 years old) randomly assigned to 12 weeks of extended Bup/Nal therapy or up to 2 weeks of Bup/Nal detoxification with weekly…

  12. Managing opioid addiction with buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Donaher, Paul A; Welsh, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Legislation has enabled physicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with an office-based maintenance program using buprenorphine, a partial mu-opioid receptor agonist. Clinical studies indicate buprenorphine effectively manages opioid addiction. Buprenorphine is more effective than placebo for managing opioid addiction but may not be superior to methadone if high doses are needed. It is comparable to lower doses of methadone, however. Treatment phases include induction, stabilization, and maintenance. Buprenorphine therapy should be initiated at the onset of withdrawal symptoms and adjusted to address withdrawal symptoms and cravings. Advantages of buprenorphine include low abuse potential and high availability for office use. Disadvantages include high cost and possible lack of effectiveness in patients who require high methadone doses. Most family physicians are required to complete eight hours of training before they can prescribe buprenorphine for opioid addiction. PMID:16719249

  13. Combined Abuse of Clonidine and Amitriptyline in a Patient on Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, Trent; Sigman, Erika J.; Clemons, Holly; Johnson, J. Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy is often prescribed in primary care to treat opioid dependence. Previous reports have described concomitant abuse of opioids and clonidine. In this case, a primary care patient on buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy demonstrating altered mental status, hallucinations, falls, and rebound hypertension was found to be concomitantly abusing clonidine and amitryptyline, which share metabolic pathways with buprenorphine. Clinicians should be aware of patients' combining amitryptyline, clonidine, and gabapentin with buprenorphine to achieve a mood altering state, avoid co-prescribing them if possible, and maintain communication with pharmacies and other providers when they are prescribed. PMID:25314340

  14. Comparative treatment and mortality correlates and adverse event profile of implant naltrexone and sublingual buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2009-10-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of implantable naltrexone as a new treatment for opiate dependence. This center has been one of the leaders in this form of treatment in Australia and has recently completed a registry-controlled review of our mortality data. As part of the study of the safety profile of this therapy, we were interested to review both the treatment correlates of previously presented mortality data and of adverse events. A total of 255 naltrexone implant therapy (NIT) and 2,518 buprenorphine (BUP) patients were followed for 1,322.22 and 8,030.02 patient-years, respectively. NIT patients had significantly longer days in treatment per episode (mean +/- standard deviation, 238.32 +/- 110.11 vs. 46.96 +/- 109.79), total treatment duration (371.21 +/- 284.64 vs. 162.50 +/- 245.76), and mean treatment times but fewer treatment episodes than BUP (all p < .0001). Serious local tissue reaction or infection each occurred in 1% of 200 NIT episodes. These data show that NIT economizes treatment resources without compromising safety concerns. PMID:19394789

  15. Clinical experience with fortnightly buprenorphine/naloxone versus buprenorphine in Italy: preliminary observational data in an office-based setting.

    PubMed

    Amato, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone is a new option for the management of opioid dependence. It has a reduced potential for abuse or misuse compared with methadone and buprenorphine alone, and has a long half-life allowing less frequent dosing. Buprenorphine/naloxone appears to be well suited for the management of opioid dependence in an office-based setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment in an office-based setting. Therefore, we evaluated the effect on misuse/diversion, quality of care, quality of life and service delivery. Seventy-eight patients were switched to buprenorphine/naloxone from either methadone or buprenorphine alone; the median duration of previous buprenorphine or methadone treatment was 10 years. Patients received buprenorphine/naloxone and were evaluated throughout a 1-year follow-up period. Treatment was self-administered by the patients every 2 weeks and the mean buprenorphine dosage at 1 year was 8 mg/day. Comparisons were made before and after the switch for patients who switched from buprenorphine alone to buprenorphine/naloxone. Switching to buprenorphine/naloxone was not associated with clinically relevant problems in 50% of patients studied. Buprenorphine/naloxone provided satisfactory coverage of withdrawal symptoms in 78.1% of patients, and 50% of patients were satisfied with buprenorphine/naloxone therapy. Seventy-eight per cent of patients reported improved psychosocial functioning. The majority of patients (approximately 85%) were negative for opioids during toxicological testing. A significantly higher proportion of treatment recipients were highly satisfied during buprenorphine/naloxone administration (p < 0.001 compared with buprenorphine given before the switch). Other outcomes were similar during buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone administration. Fortnightly self-administration of buprenorphine/naloxone appeared to be cost saving for the clinic. Buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective and safe treatment option for the outpatient management of opioid dependence. PMID:20450244

  16. Primary tumour growth in an orthotopic osteosarcoma mouse model is not influenced by analgesic treatment with buprenorphine and meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Husmann, K; Arlt, M J E; Jirkof, P; Arras, M; Born, W; Fuchs, B

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the treatment of bone pain in animal models of bone cancer. In the present study, the orthotopic 143-B human osteosarcoma xenotransplantation model was used to address the following questions: (1) Can repetitive analgesic treatment extend the experimental period by prolonging the time to reach humane endpoints and (2) Does repetitive analgesic treatment affect bone tumour development and metastasis? The analgesics, buprenorphine and meloxicam, were either applied individually or in combination at 12?h intervals as soon as the animals began to avoid using the tumour cell injected leg. While control mice treated with NaCl showed continuous body weight loss, the major criterion previously for terminating the experiments, animals treated with analgesic substances did not. The control mice had to be sacrificed 26 days after tumour cell injection, whereas the groups of animals with the different pain treatments were euthanized after an additional eight days. Importantly, primary intratibial tumour growth was not affected in any of the experimental groups by any of the pain treatment procedures. Between days 26 and 34 after tumour cell injection an increase of about 100% of the number of lung metastases was found for the groups treated with buprenorphine alone or together with meloxicam, but not for the group treated with meloxicam alone. In summary, the results indicated that both buprenorphine and meloxicam are suitable analgesics for prolonging the experimental periods in an experimental intratibial osteosarcoma mouse model. PMID:25650386

  17. Opioid Addiction and Abuse in Primary Care Practice: A Comparison of Methadone and Buprenorphine as Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Jean; Shim, Ruth S.; Gooden, Richard; Tyus, Dawn; Rust, George

    2014-01-01

    Opioid abuse and addiction have increased in frequency in the United States over the past 20 years. In 2009, an estimated 5.3 million persons used opioid medications nonmedically within the past month, 200 000 used heroin, and approximately 9.6% of African Americans used an illicit drug. Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in availability and access to mental health care, including substance use disorders. Primary care practitioners are often called upon to differentiate between appropriate, medically indicated opioid use in pain management vs inappropriate abuse or addiction. Racial and ethnic minority populations tend to favor primary care treatment settings over specialty mental health settings. Recent therapeutic advances allow patients requiring specialized treatment for opioid abuse and addiction to be managed in primary care settings. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 enables qualified physicians with readily available short-term training to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting, potentially making primary care physicians active partners in the diagnosis and treatment of opioid use disorders. Methadone and buprenorphine are effective opioid replacement agents for maintenance and/or detoxification of opioid-addicted individuals. However, restrictive federal regulations and stigmatization of opioid addiction and treatment have limited the availability of methadone. The opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine/naloxone combination has proven an effective alternative. This article reviews the literature on differences between buprenorphine and methadone regarding availability, efficacy, safety, side-effects, and dosing, identifying resources for enhancing the effectiveness of medication-assisted recovery through coordination with behavioral/psychological counseling, embedded in the context of recovery-oriented systems of care. PMID:23092049

  18. Buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine treatment during pregnancy: behavioral effects on the offspring in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Yuan, Zung Fan; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Lai, Mei-Dan; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Ho, Ing-kang; Chen, Shao-Tsu

    2015-01-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are widely used for treating people with opioid dependence, including pregnant women. Prenatal exposure to opioids has devastating effects on the development of human fetuses and may induce long-term physical and neurobehavioral changes during postnatal maturation. This study aimed at comparing the behavioral outcomes of young rats prenatally exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine during embryonic days 3–20. The cognitive function, social interaction, anxiety-like behaviors, and locomotor activity of offsprings were examined by novel object recognition test, social interaction test, light–dark transition test, elevated plus-maze, and open-field test between 6 weeks and 10 weeks of age. Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine did not affect locomotor activity, but significantly impaired novel object recognition and social interaction in both male and female offsprings in the same manner as morphine. Although prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine increased anxiety-like behaviors in the light–dark transition in both male and female offsprings, the effects were less pronounced as compared to that of morphine. Methadone affected elevated plus-maze in both sex, but buprenorphine only affected the female offsprings. These findings suggest that buprenorphine and methadone maintenance therapy for pregnant women, like morphine, produced detrimental effects on cognitive function and social behaviors, whereas the offsprings of such women might have a lower risk of developing anxiety disorders. PMID:25834439

  19. Transdermal buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and non-cancer pain - the results of multicenter studies in Poland.

    PubMed

    Przeklasa-Muszy?ska, Anna; Dobrogowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This was a multicenter, non-interventional, post-marketing study that aimed to evaluate the analgesic activity, safety of use, safety profile and adverse drug reactions of transdermal buprenorphine (Transtec 35, 52.5 and 70 ?g/h) during the treatment of moderate to severe chronic cancer and non-cancer pain. The study was performed in Poland by 339 doctors. The study involved 4,030 general practice outpatients (managed by primary care physicians), pain therapy center patients, specialist outpatient clinic patients as well as patients treated in inpatients units. The recruitment process began in September of 2007, and the study was completed in October of 2008. The study has been reported to the Central Register of Clinical Trials in Poland; it was also in accordance with the requirements of the Polish Pharmaceutical Law in force. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety of use and application of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with moderate to severe cancer pain and in patients with severe, non-malignant pain in the course of other diseases. Patients were enrolled if their pain was not well-controlled after using non-opioid analgesics. Another objective of the study was to monitor adverse drug reactions of transdermal buprenorphine reported by patients or noted by the doctors during the study visits. This first such multicenter study in Poland has confirmed high efficacy and good tolerability of buprenorphine and, therefore, confirmed its usefulness in the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain as well as in the treatment of severe pain in patients with non-cancer pain that cannot be effectively treated with non-opioid analgesics. PMID:22001981

  20. Patient Perspectives on Buprenorphine/Naloxone: A Qualitative Study of Retention During the Starting Treatment with Agonist Replacement Therapies (START) Study

    PubMed Central

    Teruya, Cheryl; Schwartz, Robert P.; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Hasson, Albert L.; Thomas, Christie; Buoncristiani, Samantha H.; Hser, Yih-Ing; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan J.; Glick, Naomi; Jacobs, Petra; McLaughlin, Paul; Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the barriers and facilitators of retention among patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone at eight community-based opioid treatment programs across the United States. Participants (n=105) were recruited up to three-and-a-half years after having participated in a randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone on liver function. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 67 patients provided with buprenorphine/naloxone who had terminated early and 38 patients who had completed at least 24 weeks of the trial. Qualitative data were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Barriers to buprenorphine/naloxone retention that emerged included factors associated with: (1) the design of the clinical trial, (2) negative medication or treatment experience, and (3) personal circumstances. The facilitators comprised: (1) positive experience with the medication, (2) personal determination and commitment to complete, and (3) staff encouragement and support. The themes drawn from interviews highlight the importance of considering patients’ prior experience with buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone, medication preference, personal circumstances, and motivation to abstain from illicit use or misuse of opioids, as these may influence retention. Ongoing education of patients and staff regarding buprenorphine/naloxone, especially in comparison to methadone, and support from staff and peers are essential. PMID:25364994

  1. Patient perspectives on buprenorphine/naloxone: a qualitative study of retention during the starting treatment with agonist replacement therapies (START) study.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Cheryl; Schwartz, Robert P; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Hasson, Albert L; Thomas, Christie; Buoncristiani, Samantha H; Hser, Yih-Ing; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan J; Glick, Naomi; Jacobs, Petra; McLaughlin, Paul; Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the barriers and facilitators of retention among patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone at eight community-based opioid treatment programs across the United States. Participants (n = 105) were recruited up to three and a half years after having participated in a randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone on liver function. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 67 patients provided with buprenorphine/naloxone who had terminated early and 38 patients who had completed at least 24 weeks of the trial. Qualitative data were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Barriers to buprenorphine/naloxone retention that emerged included factors associated with: (1) the design of the clinical trial; (2) negative medication or treatment experience; and (3) personal circumstances. The facilitators comprised: (1) positive experience with the medication; (2) personal determination and commitment to complete; and (3) staff encouragement and support. The themes drawn from interviews highlight the importance of considering patients' prior experience with buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone, medication preference, personal circumstances, and motivation to abstain from illicit use or misuse of opioids, as these may influence retention. Ongoing education of patients and staff regarding buprenorphine/naloxone, especially in comparison to methadone, and support from staff and peers are essential. PMID:25364994

  2. Long-acting opioid-agonists in the treatment of heroin addiction: why should we call them "substitution"?

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Maremmani, I; Capovani, B; Somaini, L; Berterame, S; Tomas-Rossello, J; Saenz, E; Busse, A; Kleber, H

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have documented the safety, efficacy, and effectiveness of long-acting opioids (L-AOs), such as methadone and buprenorphine, in the treatment of heroin addiction. This article reviews the pharmacological differences between L-AO medications and short-acting opioids (heroin) in terms of reinforcing properties, pharmacokinetics, effects on the endocrine and immune systems. Given their specific pharmacological profile, L-AOs contribute to control addictive behavior, reduce craving, and restore the balance of disrupted endocrine function. The use of the term "substitution," referring to the fact that methadone or buprenorphine replace heroin in binding to brain opioid receptors, has been generalized to consider L-AOs as simple replacement of street drugs, thus contributing to the widespread misunderstanding of this treatment approach. PMID:19360539

  3. “The chief of the services is very enthusiastic about it”: A qualitative study of the adoption of buprenorphine for opioid addiction treatment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Carla A.; McCarty, Dennis; Mertens, Jennifer; Lynch, Frances L.; Hilde, Anadam; Firemark, Alison; Weisner, Constance M.; Pating, David; Anderson, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Qualified physicians may prescribe buprenorphine to treat opioid dependence, but medication use remains controversial. We examined adoption of buprenorphine in two not-for-profit integrated health plans, over time, completing 101 semi-structured interviews with clinicians and clinician-administrators from primary and specialty care. Transcripts were reviewed, coded, and analyzed. A strong leader championing the new treatment was critical for adoption in both health plans. Once clinicians began using buprenorphine, patients’ and other clinicians’ experiences affected decisions more than did the champion. With experience, protocols developed to manage unsuccessful patients and changed to support maintenance rather than detoxification. Diffusion outside addiction and mental health settings was nonexistent; primary care clinicians cited scope-of-practice issues and referred patients to specialty care. With greater diffusion came questions about long-term use and safety. Recognizing how implementation processes develop may suggest where, when, and how to best expend resources to increase adoption of such treatments. PMID:24268947

  4. Buprenorphine and Buprenorphine/Naloxone Diversion, Misuse, and Illicit Use: An International Review

    PubMed Central

    Yokell, Michael A.; Zaller, Nickolas D.; Green, Traci C.; Rich, Josiah D.

    2011-01-01

    The diversion, misuse, and non-medically supervised use of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone by opioid users are reviewed. Buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are used globally as opioid analgesics and in the treatment of opioid dependency. Diversion of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone represents a complex medical and social issue, and has been widely documented in various geographical regions throughout the world. We first discuss the clinical properties of buprenorphine and its abuse potential. Second, we discuss its diversion and illicit use on an international level, as well as motivations for those activities. Third, we examine the medical risks and benefits of buprenorphine’s non-medically supervised use and misuse. These risks and benefits include the effect of buprenorphine’s use on HIV risk and the risk of its concomitant use with other medications and drugs of abuse. Finally, we discuss the implications of diversion, misuse, and non-medically supervised use (including potential measures to address issues of diversion); and potential areas for further research. PMID:21466501

  5. Buprenorphine is protective against the depressive effects of norbuprenorphine on ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Megarbane, Bruno . E-mail: bruno-megarbane@wanadoo.fr; Marie, Nicolas; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Gueye, Papa N.; Risede, Patricia; Monier, Claire; Noble, Florence; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-05-01

    High dose buprenorphine is used as substitution treatment in heroin addiction. However, deaths have been reported in addicts using buprenorphine. The role of norbuprenorphine, an N-dealkyl metabolite of buprenorphine, was hypothesized to explain these fatal cases. We determined the median intravenous lethal dose (LD{sub 5}) of norbuprenorphine in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of a single intravenous dose of 3 or 9 mg/kg norbuprenorphine alone on arterial blood gases were studied. Finally, the effect of pre- and post-administrations of buprenorphine on norbuprenorphine-induced changes on arterial blood gases were analyzed. Norbuprenorphine's LD{sub 5} was 10 mg kg{sup -1}. Norbuprenorphine 3 mg kg{sup -1} produces the rapid onset of sustained respiratory depression, as demonstrated at 20 min by a maximal significant increase in PaCO{sub 2} (8.4 {+-} 0.9 versus 5.7 {+-} 0.1 kPa), decrease in arterial pH (7.25 {+-} 0.06 versus 7.44 {+-} 0.01), and hypoxia (8.3 {+-} 0.6 versus 11.1 {+-} 0.2 kPa). Buprenorphine not only protected against the effects of 3 mg kg{sup -1} norbuprenorphine in a dose-dependent manner but also reversed the effects when given afterward. Binding experiments suggest a role for mu- and to a lesser extent for delta-opioid receptors in buprenorphine protective effect against norbuprenorphine-induced respiratory depression. In conclusion, our data clearly show that norbuprenorphine alone causes important deleterious effects on ventilation in rats. However, buprenorphine protective effect calls into question the role for norbuprenorphine in respiratory toxicity associated with buprenorphine use.

  6. Treatment Retention among Patients Randomized to Buprenorphine/Naloxone Compared to Methadone in A Multi-site Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Saxon, Andrew J.; Huang, David; Hasson, Al; Thomas, Christie; Hillhouse, Maureen; Jacobs, Petra; Teruya, Cheryl; McLaughlin, Paul; Wiest, Katharina; Cohen, Allan; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine patient and medication characteristics associated with retention and continued illicit opioid use in methadone (MET) versus buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP) treatment for opioid dependence. Design/Settings/Participants This secondary analysis included 1,267 opioid-dependent individuals participating in 9 opioid treatment programs between 2006 and 2009 and randomized to receive open-label BUP or MET for 24 weeks. Measurements The analyses included measures of patient characteristics at baseline (demographics; use of alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs; self-rated mental and physical health), medication dose and urine drug screens during treatment, and treatment completion and days in treatment during the 24 week trial. Findings The treatment completion rate was 74% for MET vs. 46% for BUP (p<.01); the rate among MET participants increased to 80% when the maximum MET dose reached or exceeded 60mg/day. With BUP, the completion rate increased linearly with higher doses, reaching 60% with doses of 30–32mg/day. Of those remaining in treatment, positive opioid urine results were significantly lower (OR=0.63, 95%CI=0.52–0.76, p<.01) among BUP relative to MET participants during the first 9 weeks of treatment. Higher medication dose was related to lower opiate use, more so among BUP patients. A Cox proportional hazards model revealed factors associated with dropout: (1) BUP (vs. MET, HR=1.61, CI:1.20–2.15), (2) lower medication dose (<16mg for BUP, <60mg for MET; HR=3.09, CI:2.19–4.37), (3) the interaction of dose and treatment condition (those with higher BUP dose were 1.04 times more likely to drop out than those with lower MET dose, and (4) being younger, Hispanic, and using heroin or other substances during treatment. Conclusions Provision of methadone appears to be associated with better retention in treatment for opioid dependence than buprenorphine, as does use of provision of higher doses of both medications. Provision of buprenorphine is associated with lower continued use of illicit opioids. PMID:23961726

  7. [The transdermal 7-day buprenorphine patch--an effective and safe treatment option, if tramadol or tilidate/naloxone is insufficient. Results of a non-interventional study].

    PubMed

    Schutter, U; Ritzdorf, I; Heckes, B

    2010-07-01

    The transdermal 7-day buprenorphine matrix patch provides a constant and user-friendly pain management when chronic musculoskeletal pain requires opioids. This analysis of clinical routine data evaluated the benefit of this treatment for patients previously receiving oral long-term treatment with weak opioids alone. Data of 310 patients previously treated with tramadol or tildate/naloxone and part of a multicentre observational study with 3295 patients were analyzed. In 89.7% of the 310 patients oral treatment with weak opioids was replaced by the 7-day buprenorphine patch due to insufficient analgesia. During treatment with the 7-day buprenorphine patch there was a clinically significant decrease of the mean pain intensity at rest during the day from 5.7 to 2.9, on physical effort during the day from 7.3 to 3.8 and at night from 5.2 to 2.3 (11-point NRS scale, p < or = 0.001). In addition, quality of life aspects such as mobility, self-reliance and quality of sleep improved, which are relevant for individual patient satisfaction with pain management. For patients with previous long-term tramadol or tilidate/naloxone treatment the switch to the 7-day buprenorphine matrix patch proved to be effective and safe for the management of chronic pain. The user-friendly 7-day application interval contributes to improving compliance and a reducing exposure to tablets. PMID:21591321

  8. Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine (OBOT-B): Statewide Implementation of the Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model in Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    LaBelle, Colleen T; Han, Steve Choongheon; Bergeron, Alexis; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Abuse Services' (BSAS) initiative to disseminate the office-based opioid treatment with buprenorphine (OBOT-B) Massachusetts Model from its development at Boston Medical Center (BMC) to its implementation at fourteen community health centers (CHCs) beginning in 2007. The Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model for the delivery of opioid agonist therapy with buprenorphine, in which nurses working with physicians play a central role in the evaluation and monitoring of patients, holds promise for the effective expansion of treatment for opioid use disorders. The training of and technical assistance for the OBOT nurses as well as a limited program assessment are described. Data spanning 6years (2007-2013) report patient demographics, prior treatment for opioid use disorders, history of overdose, housing, and employment. The expansion of OBOT to the fourteen CHCs increased the number of physicians who were "waivered" (i.e., enabling their prescribing of buprenorphine) by 375%, from 24 to 114, within 3years. During this period the annual admissions of OBOT patients to CHCs markedly increased. Dissemination of the Massachusetts Model of the Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine employing a collaborative care model with a central role for nursing enabled implementation of effective treatment for patients with an opioid use disorder at community health centers throughout Massachusetts while effectively engaging primary care physicians in this endeavor. PMID:26233698

  9. Patients more likely to engage in treatment at 30 days when given buprenorphine in the ED, referred for follow-up.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    A new randomized trial shows patients who present to the ED with opioid dependence are much more likely to engage in treatment when they receive buprenorphine along with coordinated follow-up than when they just receive a brief intervention and a facilitated referral for treatment or just screening and referral. However, barriers to prescribing are robust, and many ED leaders are not persuaded they should be in the business of providing treatment for addiction. In the trial, at 30 days 78% of patients in the buprenorphine group (89 of 114 patients) were engaged in addiction treatment, compared with just 45% of the patients in the brief intervention group (50 of 111 patients) and 37% of patients in the referral group (38 of 102 patients). To prescribe buprenorphine for addiction disease, providers must undergo training and pass a test to obtain a DEA waiver; they are limited to treating 100 patients. While experts note there are not enough providers to prescribe buprenorphine and provide the follow-up needed to patients with addiction disease, they also acknowledge concerns about drug diversion as well as potential problems with capacity if EDs take a larger role in treating addiction. PMID:26258203

  10. Timing of buprenorphine adoption by privately funded substance abuse treatment programs: The role of institutional and resource-based inter-organizational linkages

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Sarah A.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Knudsen, Hannah K.; Rothrauff, Tanja C.; Roman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying facilitators of more rapid buprenorphine adoption may increase access to this effective treatment for opioid dependence. Using a diffusion of innovations theoretical framework, we examine the extent to which programs’ inter-organizational institutional and resource-based linkages predict the likelihood of being an earlier, later, or non-adopter of buprenorphine. Data were derived from face-to-face interviews with administrators of 345 privately funded substance abuse treatment programs in 2007–2008. Results of multinomial logistic regression models show that inter-organizational and resource linkages were associated with timing of adoption. Programs reporting membership in provider associations were more likely to be earlier adopters of buprenorphine. Programs that relied more on resources linkages, such as the detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies and the NIDA website, were more likely to be earlier adopters of buprenorphine. These findings suggest that institutional and resource-based inter-organizational linkages may expose programs to effective treatments, thereby facilitating more rapid and sustained adoption of innovative treatment techniques. PMID:21831565

  11. Outcomes among buprenorphine-naloxone primary care patients after Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The extent of damage in New York City following Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 was unprecedented. Bellevue Hospital Center (BHC), a tertiary public hospital, was evacuated and temporarily closed as a result of hurricane-related damages. BHC’s large primary care office-based buprenorphine clinic was relocated to an affiliate public hospital for three weeks. The extent of environmental damage and ensuing service disruption effects on rates of illicit drug, tobacco, and alcohol misuse, buprenorphine medication supply disruptions, or direct resource losses among office-based buprenorphine patients is to date unknown. Methods A quantitative and qualitative semi-structured survey was administered to patients in BHC’s primary care buprenorphine program starting one month after the hurricane. Survey domains included: housing and employment disruptions; social and economic support; treatment outcomes (buprenorphine adherence and ability to get care), and tobacco, alcohol, and drug use. Open-ended questions probed general patient experiences related to the storm, coping strategies, and associated disruptions. Results There were 132 patients enrolled in the clinic at the time of the storm; of those, 91 patients were recruited to the survey, and 89 completed (98% of those invited). Illicit opioid misuse was rare, with 7 respondents reporting increased heroin or illicit prescription opioid use following Sandy. Roughly half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine-naloxone medication supply post-event, and self-lowering of daily doses to prolong supply was common. Additional buprenorphine was obtained through unscheduled telephone or written refills from relocated Bellevue providers, informally from friends and family, and, more rarely, from drug dealers. Conclusions The findings highlight the relative adaptability of public sector office-based buprenorphine treatment during and after a significant natural disaster. Only minimal increases in self-reported substance use were reported despite many disruptions to regular buprenorphine supplies and previous daily doses. Informal supplies of substitute buprenorphine from family and friends was common. Remote telephone refill support and a temporary back-up location that provided written prescription refills and medication dispensing for uninsured patients enabled some patients to maintain an adequate medication supply. Such adaptive strategies to ensure medication maintenance continuity pre/post natural disasters likely minimize poor treatment outcomes. PMID:24467734

  12. Dosing considerations with transdermal formulations of fentanyl and buprenorphine for the treatment of cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Skaer, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Opioids continue to be first-line pharmacotherapy for patients suffering from cancer pain. Unfortunately, subtherapeutic dosage prescribing of pain medications remains common, and many cancer patients continue to suffer and experience diminished quality of life. A large variety of therapeutic options are available for cancer pain patients. Analgesic pharmacotherapy is based on the patient’s self-report of pain intensity and should be tailored to meet the requirements of each individual. Most, if not all, cancer pain patients will ultimately require modifications in their opioid pharmacotherapy. When changes in a patient’s medication regimen are needed, adequate pain control is best maintained through appropriate dosage conversion, scheduling immediate release medication for withdrawal prevention, and providing as needed dosing for breakthrough pain. Transdermal opioids are noninvasive, cause less constipation and sedation when compared to oral opioids, and may improve patient compliance. A relative potency of 100:1 is recommended when converting the patient from oral morphine to transdermal fentanyl. Based on the limited data available, there is significant interpatient variability with transdermal buprenorphine and equipotency recommendations from oral morphine of 75:1–110:1 have been suggested. Cancer patients may require larger transdermal buprenorphine doses to control their pain and may respond better to a more aggressive 75–100:1 potency ratio. This review outlines the prescribing of transdermal fentanyl and transdermal buprenorphine including how to safely and effectively convert to and use them for those with cancer pain. PMID:25170278

  13. The effectiveness of opioid substitution treatments for patients with opioid dependence: a systematic review and multiple treatment comparison protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioids are psychoactive analgesic drugs prescribed for pain relief and palliative care. Due to their addictive potential, effort and vigilance in controlling prescriptions is needed to avoid misuse and dependence. Despite the effort, the prevalence of opioid use disorder continues to rise. Opioid substitution therapies are commonly used to treat opioid dependence; however, there is minimal consensus as to which therapy is most effective. Available treatments include methadone, heroin, buprenorphine, as well as naltrexone. This systematic review aims to assess and compare the effect of all available opioid substitution therapies on the treatment of opioid dependence. Methods/Design The authors will search Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Cochrane Clinical Trials Registry, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and the National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry. The title, abstract, and full-text screening will be completed in duplicate. When appropriate, multiple treatment comparison Bayesian meta-analytic methods will be performed to deduce summary statistics estimating the effectiveness of all opioid substitution therapies in terms of retention and response to treatment (as measured through continued opioid abuse). Discussion Using evidence gained from this systematic review, we anticipate disseminating an objective review of the current available literature on the effectiveness of all opioid substitution therapies for the treatment of opioid use disorder. The results of this systematic review are imperative to the further enhancement of clinical practice in addiction medicine. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42013006507. PMID:25239213

  14. Gender Differences Among Prisoners With Pre-Incarceration Heroin Dependence Participating in a Randomized Clinical Trial of Buprenorphine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Couvillion, Kathryn A.; Wilson, Monique E.; Schwartz, Robert P.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of the current study is to examine whether gender and other baseline characteristics were significantly associated with more severe patterns of drug use. It involves data from 260 male and female pre-release prison inmates with pre-incarceration heroin dependence who enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine. Three outcomes are examined: 1) Lifetime Intravenous drug use; 2) Lifetime number of drugs used; and 3) Heroin use in prison. Regarding lifetime intravenous drug use; race (p = .0001), education (p = .009), age (p = .0001), and psychological treatment (p = .028) were significant. Concerning lifetime number of drugs used; race (p =.0001) and age of first crime (p = .001) were significant. Finally, gender (p = .004), was the only significant variable in terms of using heroin while in prison. All of these differences may have important clinical, treatment, and research implications, which are discussed. PMID:23997546

  15. Therapeutic switch to buprenorphine/naloxone from buprenorphine alone: clinical experience in an Italian addiction centre.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Franco; Zaccone, Domenico; Battaglia, Egidio; Genco, Felice; Mellace, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological therapy has an important place in the management of opioid dependence. Methadone has been the mainstay of therapy but has a number of limitations. Buprenorphine monotherapy is another option, but misuse and diversion can have negative consequences. The opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, has been added to buprenorphine to create a combination product with a reduced potential for misuse and diversion. This study evaluated the use of buprenorphine/naloxone for 24 weeks as a pharmacological management of opioid-dependent patients after therapeutic switch from buprenorphine alone. Patients (n = 43) received sublingual tablets of buprenorphine/naloxone. The buprenorphine dose was 2-24 mg (mean 16). Patients saw a physician, including an interview using a structured data sheet, and had counselling each week. Assessments were performed at week 2 (period 1), week 6 (period 2), week 16 (period 3) and week 24 (period 4). Laboratory immunoenzymatic testing was performed weekly to detect drugs in the urine. The management of withdrawal symptoms was rated as 'satisfactory' by 67% of patients during period 1 and 91% during period 4. The majority of patients was highly satisfied with therapy and considered that buprenorphine/naloxone provided good control of cravings. Two patients dropped out of therapy, but all others continued to receive buprenorphine throughout the study. Approximately 50% of patients stated that they disliked the sensory properties (taste, colour, odour and feel) of buprenorphine/naloxone. Adverse effects were as would be expected on the basis of the mechanism of action of buprenorphine (i.e. opioid-induced constipation) and for patients undergoing drug withdrawal. Only 2% of patients attempted the intravenous misuse of buprenorphine/naloxone, none of whom experienced any gratifying effects. Opioid-dependent patients maintained on buprenorphine monotherapy can be safely switched to a sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablet without any loss of treatment effectiveness. Buprenorphine/naloxone can be administered in an outpatient or primary care setting, and effectively controls cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Patient satisfaction was high, making retention in treatment more likely. PMID:20450241

  16. [Treatment of chronic osteoarthritis pain: effectivity and safety of a 7 day matrix patch with a low dose buprenorphine].

    PubMed

    Schutter, Ulf; Ritzdorf, Ingrid; Heckes, Birgit

    2008-06-26

    Patients with osteoarthritis often suffer from chronic pain. If pain treatment with NSAIDS and coxibes is no longer indicated, a constant and user friendly opioid analgesia can be achieved with a low dose buprenorphine patch being applicated using an interval of 7 days. The use of this matrix patch was evaluated in a multicenter observational study on 4263 patients in clinical practice. During treatment a significant decrease of mean pain intensity on a 11-point scale could be observed from 6.9 points before using the patch to 2.9 points at the end of observation. Further effects were a decrease of additional analgetic medication and an improvement of aspects of life quality, e.g. mobility and quality of sleep. Only in 4.5% of the patients adverse effects were observed, reflecting the expected range of adverse effects of opioids. Thus it could be demonstrated that the use of the transdermal patch is an effective, user friendly and safe way of chronic pain relief for osteoarthritis patients. PMID:18712130

  17. Buprenorphine in cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2005-11-01

    Buprenorphine is a broad spectrum, highly lipophilic, and long-acting partial mu opioid receptor agonist that is noncross tolerant to other opioids. Buprenorphine can be given by several routes. Metabolism is through CYP3A4 and CYP2C8 and by conjugases. Constipation and sexual dysfunction appear to be less with buprenorphine than with other opioids. The recent development of a polymer matrix patch delivery system for buprenorphine prevents "dose dumping" and facilitates pain management in those unable to take oral analgesics. Sublingual buprenorphine has been combined with naloxone to prevent illicit conversion to parenteral administration. Buprenorphine has been used extensively to control cancer pain. In certain clinical situations, buprenorphine may have particular advantages over other opioids. PMID:16010532

  18. Training HIV Physicians to Prescribe Buprenorphine for Opioid Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Lynn E.; Tetrault, Jeanette; Bangalore, Deepa; Fiellin, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Few HIV physicians are trained to provide buprenorphine treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess the impact of an eight-hour course on the treatment of opioid dependence on HIV physicians' preparedness to prescribe buprenorphine. One hundred thirteen of 257 trained physicians (44%) provided HIV care. Post-course, the majority of…

  19. Adverse effects in children after unintentional buprenorphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Geib, Ann-Jeannette; Babu, Kavita; Ewald, Michele Burns; Boyer, Edward W

    2006-10-01

    Buprenorphine in sublingual formulation was recently introduced to the American market for treatment of opioid dependence. We report a series of 5 toddlers with respiratory and mental-status depression after unintentional buprenorphine exposure. Despite buprenorphine's partial agonist activity and ceiling effect on respiratory depression, all children required hospital admission and either opioid-antagonist therapy or mechanical ventilation. Results of routine urine toxicology screening for opioids were negative in all cases. Confirmatory testing was sent for 1 child and returned with a positive result. The increasing use of buprenorphine as a home-based therapy for opioid addiction in the United States raises public health concerns for the pediatric population. PMID:17015570

  20. CESAR FAX Buprenorphine Series March 31, 2003 to December 15, 2014

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    ..............................23 Number of Law Enforcement-Seized Buprenorphine Items Analyzed by U.S. Labs Increases Dramatically Finds Buprenorphine/Naloxone Effective in Treating Opioid Dependence in HIV-Infected Patients.....................................................................31 #12;TITLE ISSUE NUMBER Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Dependence in HIV

  1. Heroin-Dependent Inmates’ Experiences with Buprenorphine or Methadone Maintenancet

    PubMed Central

    Awgu, Ezechukwu; Magura, Stephen; Rosenblum, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are both efficacious treatments for opioid dependency, but they also have different pharmacological properties and clinical delivery methods that can affect their acceptability to patients. This study was intended to increase our knowledge of heroin-dependent individuals’ perceptions of methadone vs. buprenorphine maintenance based on actual experiences with each. The study sample consists of heroin-dependent men at the Rikers Island jail in New York City who were voluntarily randomly assigned to methadone or buprenorphine maintenance in jail. Methadone patients were more likely to report feeling uncomfortable the first few days, having side/withdrawal effects during treatment, and being concerned about continued dependency on medication after release. In contrast, buprenorphine patients’ main issue was the bitter taste. All of the buprenorphine patients stated that they would recommend the medication to others, with almost all preferring it to methadone. Ninety-three percent of buprenorphine vs. 44 percent of methadone patients intended to enroll in those respective treatments after release, with an added one-quarter of the methadone patients intending to enroll in buprenorphine instead. These results reinforce the importance of increasing access to buprenorphine treatment in the community for indigent heroin-dependent offenders. PMID:21053756

  2. Buprenorphine in combination with naloxone at a ratio of 15:1 does not enhance antinociception from buprenorphine in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, L S; Murrell, J C; Taylor, P M

    2012-06-01

    Naloxone can enhance the antinociceptive/analgesic effects of buprenorphine in humans and rats. The antinociceptive effects of a patented 15:1 buprenorphine:naloxone combination was investigated in cats using a thermal and mechanical nociceptive model. Twelve cats received buprenorphine 10 ?g/kg, naloxone 0.67 ?g/kg or a buprenorphine-naloxone combination intramuscularly in a randomised cross over study. Using thermal and mechanical analgesiometry validated in the cat, pre-treatment baselines were measured. Following test drug administration, thresholds were studied for the next 24h. Naloxone did not enhance the thermal antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine. The results from this study are in agreement with previously published work showing that naloxone antagonises the effects of clinically analgesic doses of buprenorphine. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds were not affected by buprenorphine. PMID:22030474

  3. Buprenorphine in the workers' compensation setting.

    PubMed

    Colameco, Stephen; Pohl, Mel

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic pain in low-dose transdermal patch formulations and for the treatment of addiction in high-dose sublingual tablets and films. Clinicians often prescribe these high-dose preparations "off label" for pain management. In the workers' compensation setting, it is particularly important to consider factors such as a) if the injured person has, and is being treated for co-occurring addiction as well as pain; b) if alternative therapies, including opioid withdrawal, were considered prior to initiating buprenorphine treatment; and c) the anticipated duration of treatment. This article reviews buprenorphine's approved indications, formulations, pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and special considerations in the workers' compensation setting. PMID:25162607

  4. Buprenorphine replacement therapy: a confirmed benefit.

    PubMed

    2006-04-01

    (1) The aim of replacement therapy for heroin addiction is to suppress craving for other opiates and to prevent opiate withdrawal symptoms. (2) In France, methadone was the first drug to be licensed for this use, in 1995, with very strict prescribing and dispensing conditions. Buprenorphine was approved in 1996, and was subject to less restrictive conditions. (3) In 2003 in France, an estimated 80 000 people were receiving replacement therapy with buprenorphine and 14 000 with methadone. (4) A meta-analysis of 13 comparative trials involving a total of 2544 patients showed that buprenorphine 6 to 12 mg initially reduced both opiate and benzodiazepine use, whereas doses of 2 to 4 mg had no marked impact on heroin use. This meta-analysis concluded that buprenorphine and methadone had similar efficacy in clinical trials in which the dose was adjusted to outcome. There were more dropouts with buprenorphine than with methadone. A daily dose of 16 mg appeared to be roughly equivalent to 60 mg/day methadone. (5) France appears to be the only country to have relied primarily on buprenorphine as replacement therapy for heroin addiction. This has been the case in France since 1996. The frequency of heroin overdose has fallen markedly in France since 1996, possibly due in part to the availability of replacement therapies. Overall mortality among drug users has also declined, but this is largely due to more effective treatment of HIV infection. (6) In France, a two-year cohort study of patients treated with buprenorphine and a survey conducted during the first year of buprenorphine replacement were funded by the manufacturer, Schering-Plough. The results showed that more than two-thirds of patients remained on treatment, and that, overall, the patients' general condition improved. (7) Opioid-like adverse effects are infrequent under normal conditions of use. There are reports of cases of hepatitis in patients taking buprenorphine, with or without a benzodiazepine. Attribution to buprenorphine is unclear, however, due to the lack of appropriate analyses. (8) Some of the key adverse effects occur during misuse: buprenorphine tablets are often injected, especially during the first few months of treatment (sometimes for more than two years). Injection carries a risk of infections; other potential long-term effects are poorly understood. Compared with methadone users, and regardless of the substances involved, buprenorphine users appear more likely to self-inject. (9) The consequences of sniffing crushed buprenorphine tablets have not been studied. (10) Deaths have been reported following buprenorphine overdose, but they appear to be less frequent than with methadone (0.2 and 0.7 deaths per 1000 users, respectively in 1998). (11) Approaches designed to help patients stop self-injecting have not been tested in comparative trials. Prescriptions of methadone syrup or an injection opiate may be worth trying when all other measures fail. PMID:16604748

  5. Abuse potential of intranasal buprenorphine versus buprenorphine/naloxone in buprenorphine-maintained heroin users.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Manubay, Jeanne M; Mogali, Shanthi; Metz, Verena; Comer, Sandra D

    2015-07-01

    In spite of the clinical utility of buprenorphine, parenteral abuse of this medication has been reported in several laboratory investigations and in the real world. Studies have demonstrated lower abuse liability of the buprenorphine/naloxone combination relative to buprenorphine alone. However, clinical research has not yet examined the utility of the combined formulation to deter intranasal use in a buprenorphine-maintained population. Heroin-using volunteers (n = 12) lived in the hospital for 8-9 weeks and were maintained on each of three sublingual buprenorphine doses (2, 8, 24 mg). Under each maintenance dose, participants completed laboratory sessions during which the reinforcing and subjective effects of intranasal doses of buprenorphine (8, 16 mg), buprenorphine/naloxone (8/2, 8/8, 8/16, 16/4 mg) and controls (placebo, heroin 100 mg, naloxone 4 mg) were assessed. Intranasal buprenorphine alone typically produced increases in positive subjective effects and the 8 mg dose was self-administered above the level of placebo. The addition of naloxone dose dependently reduced positive subjective effects and increased aversive effects. No buprenorphine/naloxone combination dose was self-administered significantly more than placebo. These data suggest that within a buprenorphine-dependent population, intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone has reduced abuse potential in comparison to buprenorphine alone. These data strongly argue in favor of buprenorphine/naloxone rather than buprenorphine alone as the more reasonable option for managing the risk of buprenorphine misuse. PMID:25060839

  6. Meloxicam and buprenorphine treatment after ovarian transplantation does not affect estrous cyclicity and follicular integrity in aged CBA/J mice.

    PubMed

    Le, Anna H; Bonachea, Luis A; Cargill, Shelley L

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is important for the survival of ovarian transplants and the restoration of ovarian functions. Without angiogenesis, transplanted ovarian tissue becomes more susceptible to tissue damage and necrosis. Administration of analgesics for pain management has been shown to decrease angiogenesis, which can influence transplant success especially in aged animals. Aging and the effects of hypoxia after transplantation decrease reproductive viability of the ovarian transplant; therefore, it is important to understand the additional effects of analgesics on aged animal models. The present study investigated the effects of two analgesics, buprenorphine, an opiate, and meloxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on the reproductive indicators related to estrous cyclicity and follicular integrity after ovarian transplantation of young ovaries into aged CBA/J mice. These aged females did not show any different reproductive responses when treated with either buprenorphine or meloxicam. No significant differences were observed in estrous cycle length, the onset of estrous cycling, the regularity of estrous cycles, and the proportion of viable follicles and total number of follicles per ovarian sample across treatment groups. PMID:25153315

  7. Meloxicam and Buprenorphine Treatment after Ovarian Transplantation Does Not Affect Estrous Cyclicity and Follicular Integrity in Aged CBA/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anna H.; Bonachea, Luis A.; Cargill, Shelley L.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is important for the survival of ovarian transplants and the restoration of ovarian functions. Without angiogenesis, transplanted ovarian tissue becomes more susceptible to tissue damage and necrosis. Administration of analgesics for pain management has been shown to decrease angiogenesis, which can influence transplant success especially in aged animals. Aging and the effects of hypoxia after transplantation decrease reproductive viability of the ovarian transplant; therefore, it is important to understand the additional effects of analgesics on aged animal models. The present study investigated the effects of two analgesics, buprenorphine, an opiate, and meloxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on the reproductive indicators related to estrous cyclicity and follicular integrity after ovarian transplantation of young ovaries into aged CBA/J mice. These aged females did not show any different reproductive responses when treated with either buprenorphine or meloxicam. No significant differences were observed in estrous cycle length, the onset of estrous cycling, the regularity of estrous cycles, and the proportion of viable follicles and total number of follicles per ovarian sample across treatment groups. PMID:25153315

  8. Preliminary buprenorphine sublingual tablet pharmacokinetic data in plasma, oral fluid and sweat during treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Choo, Robin; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine is currently under investigation as a pharmacotherapy to treat pregnant women for opioid dependence. This research evaluates buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenophine (NBUP), buprenorphine-glucuronide (BUP-Gluc) and norbuprenorphine-glucuronide (NBUP-Gluc) pharmacokinetics after high dose (14–20 mg) BUP sublingual tablet administration in three opioid-dependent pregnant women. Methods Oral fluid and sweat specimens were collected in addition to plasma specimens for 24 h during gestation weeks 28 or 29 and 34, and 2 months after delivery. Tmax was not affected by pregnancy; however, BUP and NBUP Cmax and AUC0–24h tended to be lower during pregnancy compared to postpartum levels. Results Statistically significant but weak positive correlations were found for BUP plasma and OF concentrations, and BUP/NBUP ratios in plasma and OF. Conclusion Statistically significant negative correlations were observed for times of specimen collection and BUP and NBUP OF/plasma ratios. BUP-Gluc and NBUP-Gluc were detected in only 5% of OF specimens. In sweat, BUP and NBUP were detected in only 4 of 25 (12 or 24 h) specimens in low concentrations (<2.4 ng/patch). These preliminary data describe BUP and metabolite pharmacokinetics in pregnant women and suggest that, like methadone, upward dose adjustments may be needed with advancing gestation. PMID:21860340

  9. Abuse liability of buprenorphine-naloxone tablets in untreated IV drug users.

    PubMed

    Alho, Hannu; Sinclair, David; Vuori, Erkki; Holopainen, Antti

    2007-04-17

    Buprenorphine (Subutex) is widely abused in Finland. A combination of buprenorphine plus naloxone (Suboxone) has been available since late 2004, permitting a comparison of the abuse of the two products among untreated intravenous (IV) users. A survey was distributed to attendees at a Helsinki needle exchange program over 2-weeks in April, 2005, At least 30% were returned anonymously. Survey variables included: years of prior IV opioid abuse, years of buprenorphine abuse, frequency, dosage, route of administration and reasons for use, concomitant IV abuse of other substances and amount paid on the street for both buprenorphine and buprenorphine+naloxone. Buprenorphine was the most frequently used IV drug for 73% of the respondents. More than 75% said they used IV buprenorphine to self-treat addiction or withdrawal. Most (68%) had tried the buprenorphine+naloxone combination IV, but 80% said they had a "bad" experience. Its street price was less than half that of buprenorphine alone. The buprenorphine+naloxone combination appears to be a feasible tool, along with easier access to addiction treatment, for decreasing IV abuse of buprenorphine. PMID:17055191

  10. Intravenous misuse of buprenorphine: characteristics and extent among patients undergoing drug maintenance therapy.

    PubMed

    Moratti, Enrico; Kashanpour, Hamid; Lombardelli, Tiziana; Maisto, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Sublingual buprenorphine [Subutex(R)] is used to treat opioid dependence. However, illicit intravenous (IV) injection of buprenorphine is a widespread problem. This survey investigated the IV misuse of buprenorphine among patients receiving drug replacement therapy at the Drug Addiction Centre in Udine, Italy. All patients who were receiving treatment with buprenorphine or methadone at the Drug Addiction Centre were invited to fill in a voluntary and anonymous questionnaire consisting of five questions. The questions asked if the patient had ever misused buprenorphine intravenously, when the misuse had occurred, the patient's reasons for misusing buprenorphine, the patient's perception of their experience, and the patient's perception of how widespread IV misuse of buprenorphine is. 307 patients completed the questionnaire, 93 and 214 of whom, respectively, were receiving buprenorphine and methadone. In total, 23.12% of patients admitted an IV misuse of buprenorphine, with a significantly greater prevalence among patients currently receiving buprenorphine (35.48%) than those receiving methadone (17.75%; p < 0.001). Younger patients were also more likely to have misused buprenorphine, and tended to have done so before coming to the Drug Addiction Centre. The most frequent motivation for IV misuse was treatment of heroin addiction or withdrawal symptoms (50.71%), while only 12.67% of patients reported that their motivation was to experience pleasure or euphoria. The majority of patients who had misused buprenorphine intravenously (53.52%) had a negative experience, and methadone recipients were significantly more likely to find the experience negative than buprenorphine recipients (68.42% vs 36.36%; p = 0.007). Almost half of the patients (45.93%) thought that at least 50% of patients had taken buprenorphine by IV injection. The results of our study confirm the widespread IV misuse of buprenorphine. Misuse was most common among patients currently receiving buprenorphine treatment and younger patients. For the majority of patients, the reason for IV misuse was to treat their dependence. We believe that the prevalence of buprenorphine misuse could be reduced by adopting appropriate clinical practices and treating patients with the buprenorphine/naloxone combination rather than buprenorphine alone. PMID:20450240

  11. Transdermal buprenorphine controls central neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Michelle; Sarantopoulos, Constantine; Gordon, Eva

    2012-01-01

    A 53-year-old male with peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy suffered an intracerebral hemorrhage resulting in right hemiparesis and hemisensory loss. Three months later, he developed constant and burning pain within the entire right side of his body. He was diagnosed with central pain syndrome and treated with antiepileptics and tricyclic antidepressants. Minimal analgesia was achieved, which was limited by intractable sedation and drowsiness. Patient was then treated with oral opioids (morphine and hydrocodone with acetaminophen) in escalating doses that produced cognitive impairment. After an opioid rotation was attempted, by switching morphine to transdermal fentanyl, there was no pain reduction or improved quality of life. A trial of buprenorphine was initiated, by administering transdermal patches in escalating doses in weekly intervals. Patient's pain was eventually successfully controlled with buprenorphine patch 60 ?g/h every 7 days. His self-reported Visual Analogue Scale pain scores decreased from an average of 8/10 to 2/10 or less. Patient's overall function and participation in home activities increased. Buprenorphine is a partial ?-receptor and a ?-? receptor antagonist known to block NMDA receptors and reduce hyperalgesia secondary to central sensitization.(1) Buprenorphine is also a partial agonist at the opioid receptor-like (ORL-1) receptor, which is found to be analgesic and antinociceptive at the level of the spinal cord.(1,2) The difference in analgesic responses between buprenorphine and other opioids may be due to different receptor G protein interactions and/or selective activation of neuronal K(ATP) channels by buprenorphine.(3) Deficient opening of K(ATP) channels has been shown to mediate neuropathic pain(4); therefore, activation of these channels by buprenorphine may contribute to its analgesic effect in neuropathic pain states wherein other opioids fail. More recently, there have been two case reports in which patients with neuropathic pain of different central etiology were successfully treated with buprenorphine.(5) Despite advances in understanding the pathology related to central pain, effective treatment options are limited. Buprenorphine may be an analgesic option for central pain management when opioids fail to reduce hypersensitivity or when patients exhibit intolerable side effects to other medications. PMID:23264319

  12. Buprenorphine decreases the CCL2-mediated chemotactic response of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Williams, Dionna W; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W

    2015-04-01

    Despite successful combined antiretroviral therapy, ? 60% of HIV-infected people exhibit HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV-infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9 were identified and had not been shown previously to be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

  13. Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dependence (addiction to opioid drugs, including heroin and narcotic painkillers). Buprenorphine is in a class of medications ... and ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra, in Technivie); opiate (narcotic) medications for pain control; phenothiazines (medications used for ...

  14. Office-Based Buprenorphine for Patients with Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lynn E.; Fiellin, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The profile of opioid dependence in the United States is changing. Abuse of prescription opioids is more common than that of illicit opioids. Recent data indicate that there are approximately 1.6 million individuals with prescription opioid abuse or dependence and 323,000 with heroin abuse or dependence. Despite this prevalence, nearly 80% of these individuals go untreated. One option for expanding treatment is the use of buprenorphine and the buprenorphine/naloxone combination. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist that can be prescribed by trained Internists and dispensed at pharmacies. The case-based discussion in this paper addresses the clinical presentation of a patient with opioid dependence and describes the relatively new practice of office-based treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone. It examines the different components of treatment, the role of the Internist in providing this treatment, and the logistics of treating this growing and multi-faceted patient population. PMID:18458279

  15. A woman's experience of tapering from buprenorphine during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Welle-Strand, Gabrielle Katrine; Kvamme, Odd; Andreassen, Andreas; Ravndal, Edle

    2014-01-01

    Although opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) is the treatment of choice for pregnant opioid-dependent patients, some professionals argue that tapering the medication dose will reduce the severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). This case description is based on the patient's detailed blog, and medical records from her general practitioner and the hospital. The patient is an employed, 32-year-old drug-abstinent woman in OMT. Her taper from 24 mg of buprenorphine started at 14 weeks' gestation and is slow, with withdrawal symptoms increasing gradually. In pregnancy week 31, she is off buprenorphine but she has severe withdrawal symptoms. She chose to go back on 4 mg of buprenorphine. The patient's son was born in pregnancy week 38+3, weighs 2950 g and does not require pharmacological treatment for NAS. The fetus most probably did experience fetal stress during the patient's tapering. It was the right decision by the patient to go back on buprenorphine. PMID:25540212

  16. Current knowledge of buprenorphine and its unique pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph; Aloisi, Anna Maria; Dahan, Albert; Filitz, Joerg; Langford, Richard; Likar, Rudolf; Mercadante, Sebastiano; Morlion, Bart; Raffa, Robert B; Sabatowski, Rainer; Sacerdote, Paola; Torres, Luis M; Weinbroum, Avi A

    2010-01-01

    Despite the increasing clinical use of transdermal buprenorphine, questions have persisted about the possibility of a ceiling effect for analgesia, its combination with other ?-opioid agonists, and the reversibility of side effects. In October 2008, a consensus group of experts met to review recent research into the pharmacology and clinical use of buprenorphine. The objective was to achieve consensus on the conclusions to be drawn from this work. It was agreed that buprenorphine clearly behaves as a full ?-opioid agonist for analgesia in clinical practice, with no ceiling effect, but that there is a ceiling effect for respiratory depression, reducing the likelihood of this potentially fatal adverse event. This is entirely consistent with receptor theory. In addition, the effects of buprenorphine can be completely reversed by naloxone. No problems are encountered when switching to and from buprenorphine and other opioids, or in combining them. Buprenorphine exhibits a pronounced antihyperalgesic effect that might indicate potential advantages in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Other beneficial properties are the compound's favorable safety profile, particularly in elderly patients and those with renal impairment, and its lack of effect on sex hormones and the immune system. The expert group agreed that these properties, as well as proven efficacy in severe pain and favorable tolerability, mean that buprenorphine can be considered a safe and effective option for treating chronic cancer and noncancer pain. PMID:20492579

  17. Transdermal buprenorphine in chronic pain: indications and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Kusnik, Stefan; Likar, Rudolf; Sittl, Reinhard

    2008-11-01

    Transdermal buprenorphine has been shown to be effective in managing moderate-to-severe cancer pain and severe pain that is unresponsive to nonopioid analgesics. In clinical trials, it provided better pain relief than placebo, despite a higher consumption of rescue analgesia by placebo patients. Analgesia was rated as satisfactory or better by 90% of patients in a long-term follow-up study and 94.6% considered the buprenorphine matrix patch to be user friendly. Transdermal buprenorphine is well tolerated; most adverse events are transient local reactions to the patch or systemic effects typical of treatment with opioids. Even in opioid-experienced volunteers, buprenorphine does not cause respiratory depression at doses up to 70-times higher than those used for analgesia. No problems have been encountered when switching from another opioid to transdermal buprenorphine, or in combining the buprenorphine patch with intravenous morphine or tramadol for breakthrough pain. There is a growing body of evidence that transdermal buprenorphine may be particularly useful for managing neuropathic pain. Most notably, it appears to be effective in treating hyperalgesic states and syndromes characterized by pronounced central sensitization. PMID:24410602

  18. A combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone blocks compulsive cocaine intake in rodents without producing dependence.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sunmee; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Misra, Kaushik K; Schlosburg, Joel E; Koob, George F

    2012-08-01

    Buprenorphine, a synthetic opioid that acts at both ? and ? opioid receptors, can decrease cocaine use in individuals with opioid addiction. However, the potent agonist action of buprenorphine at ? opioid receptors raises its potential for creating opioid dependence in non-opioid-dependent cocaine abusers. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone (a potent ? opioid antagonist with weaker ? and ? antagonist properties) could block compulsive cocaine self-administration without producing opioid dependence. The effects of buprenorphine and various doses of naltrexone on cocaine self-administration were assessed in rats that self-administered cocaine under conditions of either short access (noncompulsive cocaine seeking) or extended access (compulsive cocaine seeking). Buprenorphine alone reproducibly decreased cocaine self-administration. Although this buprenorphine-alone effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by naltrexone in both the short-access and the extended-access groups, the combination of the lowest dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine blocked cocaine self-administration in the extended-access group but not in the short-access group. Rats given this low dose of naltrexone with buprenorphine did not exhibit the physical opioid withdrawal syndrome seen in rats treated with buprenorphine alone, and naltrexone at this dose did not block ? agonist-induced analgesia. The results suggest that the combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone at an appropriate dosage decreases compulsive cocaine self-administration with minimal liability to produce opioid dependence and may be useful as a treatment for cocaine addiction. PMID:22875830

  19. Rewarding or aversive effects of buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone) depend on conditioning trial duration.

    PubMed

    Canestrelli, Corinne; Marie, Nicolas; Noble, Florence

    2014-09-01

    Buprenorphine is used as a sublingual medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. However, its misuse by i.v. injection may limit its acceptability and dissemination. A buprenorphine/naloxone (ratio 4:1) combination has been developed to reduce diversion and abuse. So far, the relevance of this combination has not been investigated in the animal models traditionally used to study the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. The aim of this study was to compare the rewarding effects, assessed by conditioned place preference (CPP), of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone combination following i.v. administration in mice. Animals were treated with different doses of buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone combination (ratio 4:1), and CPP conditioning trial duration was 5 or 30 min. At the longest trial duration, a bell-shaped dose-response curve was obtained with buprenorphine, which was shifted significantly to the right with naloxone combination. At the shortest trial duration, an aversive effect was observed with the buprenorphine/naloxone combination in animals, involving opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL1). These findings may explain the discrepancies reported in the literature as some authors have shown a reduced buprenorphine/naloxone misuse compared to buprenorphine in opioid abusers, while others have not. PMID:24606726

  20. Quantitation of Total Buprenorphine and Norbuprenorphine in Meconium by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine (Suboxone, Zubsolv, Buprenex, Butrans, etc.) is an opioid drug that has been used to treat opioid dependence on an outpatient basis, and is also prescribed for managing moderate to severe pain. Pregnant women may be prescribed buprenorphine as part of a treatment plan for opioid addiction. This chapter quantitates buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine in meconium by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). PMID:26660174

  1. Transdermal buprenorphine in pain management--experiences from clinical practice: Five case studies.

    PubMed

    Louis, F

    2006-10-01

    Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine. The transdermal formulation of buprenorphine has been available in Belgium for 3 years, during which time the Pain Clinic of the St Elisabeth of Verviers Hospital has gained experience in the use of transdermal buprenorphine for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain. This paper presents four cases of chronic, non-malignant pain, and one case of chronic cancer pain. By starting patients on low doses and slowly titrating upwards, transdermal buprenorphine matrix patches provided effective analgesia and were well tolerated. Low doses of transdermal buprenorphine were created by cutting the smallest available matrix patch (35 mug/h) into halves or quarters. The initial dose was then gradually titrated upwards to the dose needed for optimum pain relief by the patients. No problems were encountered in switching patients from prior analgesic therapy with other opioids to transdermal buprenorphine. PMID:16981980

  2. Safety and efficacy of buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid-dependent patients: an Italian observational study.

    PubMed

    Magnelli, Fernanda; Biondi, Lorita; Calabria, Roberto; Fiore, Angelo; Peluso, Eugenio; Vonella, Domenico; Rota, Amerigo Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Opioid dependence is a growing problem. Methadone is an established agent for the treatment of opioid dependence, but there is a risk of this agent being abused, a potential for interaction with antiretroviral agents and a risk of cardiac toxicity. Another option is the partial mu-opioid receptor opioid agonist buprenorphine, which has been used successfully to manage opioid dependence. While the risk of abuse is lower than that for methadone, there is still a risk. The sublingual combination formulation of buprenorphine and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (buprenorphine/naxolone) is a newer agent with reduced abuse potential, and has been shown to have promising efficacy for opioid dependence. We describe the results of an observational study investigating the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid-dependent patients. A total of 77 patients were included and were switched from buprenorphine to sublingual tables of buprenorphine/naloxone; the buprenorphine dosage was titrated to achieve good control of withdrawal symptoms. The prevalence of withdrawal symptoms, craving, constipation, cramps, insomnia, sexual activity, depression, sweating, distress, bone/joint pain and drowsiness were compared over the first 30 days of treatment (period 1) and the total 120-day study duration (period 2). The average buprenorphine/naloxone dose in period 1 was 7.3 mg/day and 12.7 mg/day in period 2. Most patients did not experience any withdrawal symptoms in either period 1 or period 2. Fewer than 20% of patients experienced any cravings over the 120-day study period. Importantly, the adverse effects observed were usually mild, with very few patients experiencing significant adverse effects. This study shows that buprenorphine/naloxone is an effective and well tolerated treatment for opioid withdrawal when the dosage is titrated to achieve good control of withdrawal symptoms. Switching from buprenorphine alone to buprenorphine/naloxone was possible with very little discomfort for the patient and effective retained patients in treatment. PMID:20450242

  3. From research to the real world: buprenorphine in the decade of the Clinical Trials Network.

    PubMed

    Ling, Walter; Jacobs, Petra; Hillhouse, Maureen; Hasson, Albert; Thomas, Christie; Freese, Thomas; Sparenborg, Steven; McCarty, Dennis; Weiss, Roger; Saxon, Andrew; Cohen, Allan; Straus, Michele; Brigham, Gregory; Liu, David; McLaughlin, Paul; Tai, Betty

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) established the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) in 1999 to bring researchers and treatment providers together to develop a clinically relevant research agenda. Initial CTN efforts addressed the use of buprenorphine, a mu-opioid partial agonist, as treatment for opioid dependence. Strong evidence of buprenorphine's therapeutic efficacy was demonstrated in clinical trials involving several thousand opioid-dependent participants, and in 2002, the Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence. With the advent of a sublingual tablet containing both buprenorphine and naloxone to mitigate abuse and diversion (Suboxone), buprenorphine appeared poised to be the first-line treatment for opioid addiction. Notwithstanding its many attributes, certain implementation barriers remained to be addressed in CTN studies, and these efforts have brought a body of knowledge on buprenorphine to frontline clinicians. The purpose of this article is to review CTN-based buprenorphine research and related efforts to overcome challenges to the implementation of buprenorphine therapy in mainstream practice. Furthermore, this article explores current issues and future challenges that may require additional CTN efforts. PMID:20307796

  4. Methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone are effective in reducing illicit buprenorphine and other opioid use, and reducing HIV risk behavior – Outcomes of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Otiashvili, David; Piralishvili, Gvantsa; Sikharulidze, Zura; Kamkamidze, George; Poole, Sabrina; Woody, George E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Determine the extent to which buprenorphine injectors continue treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone or methadone, and the impact of these treatments on substance use and HIV risk in the Republic of Georgia. Methods Randomized controlled 12-week trial of daily-observed methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone followed by a dose taper, referral to ongoing treatment, and follow-up at week 20 at the Uranti Clinic in Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia. Eighty consenting treatment-seeking individuals (40/group) aged 25 and above who met ICD-10 criteria for opioid dependence with physiologic features and reported injecting buprenorphine 10 or more times in the past 30 days. Opioid use according to urine tests and self-reports, treatment retention, and HIV risk behavior as determined by the Risk Assessment Battery. Results Mean age of participants was 33.7 (SD5.7), 4 were female, mean history of opioid injection use was 5.8 years (SD4.6), none were HIV+ at intake or at the 12-week assessment and 73.4% were HCV+. Sixty-eight participants (85%) completed the 12-week medication phase (33 from methadone and 35 from buprenorphine/naloxone group); 37 (46%) were in treatment at the 20-week follow-up (21 from methadone and 16 from the buprenorphine/naloxone group). In both study arms, treatment resulted in a marked reduction in unprescribed buprenorphine, other opioid use, and HIV injecting risk behavior with no clinically significant differences between the two treatment arms. Conclusions Daily observed methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone are effective treatments for non-medical buprenorphine and other opioid use in the Republic of Georgia and likely to be useful for preventing HIV infection. PMID:23916321

  5. Effect of telaprevir on the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine in volunteers on stable buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xia; Trevejo, Jose; van Heeswijk, Rolf P G; Smith, Frances; Garg, Varun

    2012-07-01

    This was an open-label, single-sequence trial in hepatitis C virus-negative volunteers on stable, individualized, buprenorphine maintenance therapy. Telaprevir at 750 mg every 8 h was coadministered with buprenorphine/naloxone (4:1 ratio as sublingual tablets) for 7 days with food. Pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone were measured over the 24-hour dosing interval on day -1 (buprenorphine/naloxone alone, reference) and day 7 of telaprevir coadministration (test). Geometric least-squares mean ratios and associated 90% confidence intervals of treatment ratios (test/reference) were calculated using log-transformed pharmacokinetic parameters. Opioid withdrawal symptoms were evaluated throughout the study (via questionnaires and pupillometry). Pharmacokinetic data were available for 14 and 13 volunteers on day -1 and day 7, respectively. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for buprenorphine was unchanged and the maximum concentration of drug in serum (C(max)) for buprenorphine, C(max) and AUC for norbuprenorphine, and C(max) naxolone were modestly decreased during coadministration with telaprevir. Geometric least-squares mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) for buprenorphine were 0.80 (0.69, 0.93) for the C(max) and 0.96 (0.84, 1.10) for the AUC from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24)); for norbuprenorphine, values were 0.85 (0.66, 1.09) for C(max) and 0.91 (0.71, 1.16) for AUC(0-24); for naloxone, the C(max) was 0.84 (0.62, 1.13). Coadministration of telaprevir did not increase withdrawal symptom frequency, and there were no serious adverse events reported during or after completion of telaprevir coadministration. Results suggest dose adjustment may not be necessary when telaprevir and buprenorphine/naloxone are coadministered. PMID:22564847

  6. Buprenorphine for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Raul; Copenhaver, David

    2013-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions, analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The use of transdermal buprenorphine for chronic pain management is discussed. A brief history of the medication is provided. The use of the medication in opioid maintenance, and withdrawal and other concerns are discussed. Possible side effects are described. PMID:24245573

  7. New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine–naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Soyka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine–naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

  8. New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine-naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

  9. Systematic review of adverse events of buprenorphine patch versus fentanyl patch in patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Robert F; Reid, Kim; di Nisio, Marcello; Aune, Dagfinn; Truyers, Carla; Hernandez, Adrian V; Misso, Kate; Riemsma, Rob; Kleijnen, Jos

    2012-07-01

    SUMMARY This systematic review compares convenience of administration, adverse events and tolerability of buprenorphine patch with fentanyl patch in patients with chronic pain. Methods of quantitative and qualitative research were combined. Seventeen databases were searched up to December 2010. A total of 49 unique trials (56 publications) were included. Patients regarded the use of patches, both transdermal buprenorphine and fentanyl, as easy and convenient. Compared with buprenorphine patch, fentanyl can cause more cases of constipation and could lead to a higher number of serious adverse events. There were no differences between buprenorphine patch and fentanyl patch regarding dizziness, somnolence, nausea and treatment discontinuation. Overall, transdermal administration of buprenorphine and fentanyl can be seen as an alternative pathway for delivering these drugs. Use of transdermal buprenorphine might be favorable in certain groups of patients, such as renally impaired, elderly and immunosuppressed patients. PMID:24654721

  10. The Implementation of Buprenorphine/Naloxone in College Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMaria, Peter A., Jr.; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Opiate abuse and dependence have become important concerns for college healthcare providers. The passage of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 and the approval of the combination buprenorphine/naloxone for office-based treatment of opiate dependence have increased the options available for college students and their healthcare providers. The…

  11. Utilizing buprenorphine–naloxone to treat illicit and prescription-opioid dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mauger, Sofie; Fraser, Ronald; Gill, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review current evidence on buprenorphine–naloxone (bup/nx) for the treatment of opioid-use disorders, with a focus on strategies for clinical management and office-based patient care. Quality of evidence Medline and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. Consensus reports, guidelines published, and other authoritative sources were also included in this review. Apart from expert guidelines, data included in this review constitute level 1 evidence. Findings Bup/nx is a partial ?-opioid agonist combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone in a 4:1 ratio. It has a lower abuse potential, carries less stigma, and allows for more flexibility than methadone. Bup/nx is indicated for both inpatient and ambulatory medically assisted withdrawal (acute detoxification) and long-term substitution treatment (maintenance) of patients who have a mild-to-moderate physical dependence. A stepwise long-term substitution treatment with regular monitoring and follow-up assessment is usually preferred, as it has better outcomes in reducing illicit opioid use, minimizing concomitant risks such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C transmission, retaining patients in treatment and improving global functioning. Conclusion Bup/nx is safe and effective for opioid detoxification and substitution treatment. Its unique pharmaceutical properties make it particularly suitable for office-based maintenance treatment of opioid-use disorder. PMID:24741316

  12. Management of opioid painkiller dependence in primary care: ongoing recovery with buprenorphine/naloxone.

    PubMed

    Hard, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Opioid painkiller dependence is a growing problem and best-practice management is not well defined. We report a case of a young woman exhibiting dependence on codeine, originally prescribed for myalgic encephalopathy, after escalating use over a 10-year period. In 2012, a consultation with a new general practitioner, who had extensive experience of patients with substance abuse, revealed the underlying dependence. After building trust for 6?months, she was able to admit to medication abuse, and was referred to the community drug and alcohol team. On presentation to the team, the patient had no pain issues and the dihydrocodeine use--600 tablets/week--solely reflected her dependence. The patient successfully underwent rapid induction with buprenorphine/naloxone as opioid substitution treatment over 2?days. She is currently stable, engaged with recovery support services and psychosocial counselling, and has just returned to work. She is maintained on a therapeutic dose of buprenorphine 10?mg/naloxone 2.5?mg. PMID:25432908

  13. Opioid Abstinence Reinforcement Delays Heroin Lapse during Buprenorphine Dose Tapering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n = 12) received $4.00 for completing…

  14. Urine specimen detection of concurrent nonprescribed medicinal and illicit drug use in patients prescribed buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Alexander Y; Ma, Joseph D; Best, Brookie M; Atayee, Rabia S

    2013-01-01

    Patients being treated with buprenorphine usually have a history of opioid dependence and may be predisposed to misuse of drugs. Concurrent drug misuse increases the risk of life-threatening drug interactions. This retrospective data analysis observed which nonprescribed and illicit drugs were most commonly detected in the urine of patients from pain management clinics taking buprenorphine with or without a prescription. GC, LC/MS and LC-MS-MS were used to quantify 20,929 urine specimens. The most prevalent illicit drug used in both the groups (prescribed and nonprescribed buprenorphine) was marijuana, followed by cocaine. The most prevalent nonprescribed medications abused by both the groups were benzodiazepines, followed by oxycodone and hydrocodone. The overall prevalence of illicit and nonprescribed drug use was significantly higher in subjects who used buprenorphine without a prescription versus prescribed use. Of the concurrent use of marijuana and cocaine with buprenorphine, cocaine is most concerning since it decreases exposure to buprenorphine (lower area under the concentration-time curve and maximum concentration). The concurrent use of nonprescribed benzodiazepines with buprenorphine can cause excess sedation leading to respiratory depression and even death. These findings highlight the importance of educating patients about these potential toxicities. Furthermore, pain providers should consider expanding the spectrum of drugs that they monitor in patients under treatment. PMID:24080973

  15. Drug Interactions of Clinical Importance among the Opioids, Methadone and Buprenorphine, and other Frequently Prescribed Medications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    McCance-Katz, Elinore F.; Sullivan, Lynn; Nallani, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Drug interactions are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Methadone and buprenorphine are frequently prescribed for the treatment of opioid addiction. Patients needing treatment with these medications often have co-occurring medical and mental illnesses that require medication treatment. The abuse of illicit substances is also common in opioid-addicted individuals. These clinical realities place patients being treated with methadone and buprenorphine at risk for potentially toxic drug interactions. A substantial literature has accumulated on drug interactions between either methadone or buprenorphine with other medications when ingested concomitantly by humans. This review summarizes current literature in this area. PMID:20132117

  16. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine: a comparison of sublingual tablet versus liquid after chronic dosing.

    PubMed

    Compton, Peggy; Ling, Walter; Chiang, C Nora; Moody, David E; Huber, Alice; Ling, Debbie; Charuvastra, Charles

    2007-06-01

    Although buprenorphine is approved for use in the outpatient treatment of opioid addiction in 2 tablet formulations, a monoproduct containing buprenorphine only (Subutex) and a buprenorphine/naloxone combination product (Suboxone), much of the clinical data that support the approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration were generated by using a sublingual liquid. To interpret the literature in prescribing parameters for tablet buprenorphine, this study was designed to determine steady state buprenorphine plasma levels for the 2 formulations and to assess the relative bioavailability of each. A randomized, double-blind, crossover study with dose increases was conducted during a 12-week period at an outpatient treatment clinic. Of the 184 subjects initially randomized to treatment, 133 (72.3%) were evaluated for the steady-state trough plasma concentration, 16 (8.7%) for relative bioavailability, and 31 (16.8%) for dose proportionality. At steady state, differences in the trough plasma concentrations of buprenorphine between the 2 formulations were found across all the dose levels. Average plasma concentration (Cavg) of the tablet at twice the milligram dose of the liquid was twice that of the liquid; intersubject variability was greater for the tablet. At double the dose of tablet, there is no difference in steady state plasma concentrations. The bioavailability seems equivalent for the 2 formulations across all the dose levels. PMID:21768940

  17. Buprenorphine therapy for opioid addiction in rural Washington: The experience of the early adopters

    PubMed Central

    Quest, Tyler L.; Merrill, Joseph O.; Roll, John; Saxon, Andrew J.; Rosenblatt, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The introduction of buprenorphine as office-based treatment for opioid dependence was designed to expand treatment capacity, but virtually there are no data about use of this medication in rural areas. Methods The survey of the first cohort of physicians in rural Washington State who obtained buprenorphine waivers (2002-2010) to determine the volume of treated patients, physician appraisal of the efficacy of this treatment, and perceived barriers to treatment was conducted. Twenty-four (73 percent) of the 33 rural buprenorphine-certified physicians practicing in the state were interviewed in 2010. Results Twenty physicians (83 percent) were actively prescribing buprenorphine/naloxone for treatment of addiction. Those currently prescribing averaged 23 active patients and had treated 125 patients since certification. All respondents reported that buprenorphine was efficacious in the treatment of addiction and 95 percent recommended that other rural colleagues adopt buprenorphine treatment. The following four major barriers were cited: 1) lack of adequate financial support from Medicaid, the largest source of third-party coverage for these patients; 2) unavailability of local mental health and behavioral addiction treatment services; 3) difficulty in finding consultants to assist in managing complex patients; and 4) shortages of other rural physicians providing this service. Conclusions Buprenorphine is viewed as a highly effective treatment of opioid addiction by early adopters in rural Washington State, but relatively few rural physicians currently provide this service. Inadequate insurance coverage, a shortage of effective links with consultants and colleagues, and the lack of mental health services are persistent barriers to the use of this modality in rural Washington State. PMID:22479882

  18. Effect of opioid substitution therapy on alcohol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nicolas C; Dietze, Paul; Lenné, Michael G; Redman, Jennifer R

    2006-04-01

    Forty opioid substitution patients (methadone, n = 14; LAAM, n = 14; and buprenorphine, n = 12) who were participating in a study on the impact of opiate substitution treatment on driving ability and 22 non-opiate-using control subjects were administered 14.7 g/70 kg of alcohol in two separate sessions, one 2-3 hours before opioid pharmacotherapy dosing and the other 1-2 hours after dosing. The mean blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in the post-opioid dose session was significantly lower than that in the pre-opioid dose session (p < .05). There was a significant effect of experimental group (LAAM, methadone, buprenorphine, or control) on BAC in sessions conducted 1-2 hours after the opioid substitution dose (p < .01). There was a trend for a reduced effect of experimental group on BAC in the pre-opioid substitution dose session (p = .06). The BAC of non-opioid substitution control subjects was significantly higher than that of the LAAM (before and after LAAM dosing) and methadone (after methadone dosing; p < .05) patients. These findings provide evidence for the first time of an interaction between opiates and alcohol in humans that is strongest at the time of peak opiate plasma levels in the hours after opioid dosing. PMID:16616162

  19. [Transdermal buprenorphine: a current overview of pharmacological and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Faymonville, M E; Libbrecht, D

    2008-11-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of chronic pain progresses; the complexity of the problem justifies our need for new molecules and new ways of administration that will help to further optimise and better individualize our pharmacologic therapies. Whereas acute pain can be considered an alarm signal, chronic pain constitutes, per se, a syndrome that requires a meticulous selection of the analgesic drug(s). Since pain is permanent, the continuous administration of the analgesic is recommended rather than an on demand administration. Transdermic modes of administration are of value for the treatment of chronic pain because they allow a progressive delivery of the active compound together with the maintenance of stable plasma levels of the drug. Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid that is available in the sublingual, injectable, or transdermic forms. The matrix patch of buprenorphine represents a major asset for the treatment of chronic pain, whether it be cancerous in origin, or not. Its efficacy and safety have been clearly demonstrated in randomised double blind trials as well as in post-marketing surveillance observations. Buprenorphine, administered as a transdermal therapeutic system, induces a dose-related pain relief, whatever the nature of the pain and the age of the patient. Buprenorphine also exerts an analgesic action on neuropathic pain. It differs from other opioids by its affinity as a partial agonist on mu and kappa receptors, and as a complete agonist of ORL-1 receptors. Therefore, transdermal buprenorphine will be useful to all physicians having to control severe pain by powerful opioids. PMID:19112993

  20. Low-dose naloxone provides an abuse-deterrent effect to buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R; Smith, Michael D; Unal, Cemal; Finn, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In developmental research, plasma buprenorphine concentrations comparable to a 2 mg buprenorphine-naloxone (BN) sublingual tablet have been achieved with a 0.75 mg dose of BN buccal film, a small, bioerodible polymer film for application to mucosal membranes. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, four-period crossover study in opioid-dependent subjects with chronic pain receiving >100 mg oral morphine equivalents daily who experienced withdrawal following a naloxone challenge dose. The objective of the study was to determine if intravenous (IV) naloxone doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg would produce a withdrawal response when coadministered with a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Fifteen subjects receiving 90-1,260 mg oral morphine equivalents per day enrolled and completed the study. Precipitated withdrawal occurred in 13% (2/15) of placebo-treated subjects and 47% (7/15) of buprenorphine-treated subjects. When combined with the 0.75 mg dose of buprenorphine, a 0.1 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence of precipitated withdrawal to 60%, and a 0.2 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence to 73%. By 15 minutes postdose, the mean change in Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score from predose was 3.0 for placebo, 6.9 for buprenorphine, 9.8 for BN 0.1 mg, and 12.4 for BN 0.2 mg. The mean COWS score with each active treatment was significantly greater than placebo (P<0.001), and the mean COWS score for each of the naloxone-containing treatments was significantly greater than for buprenorphine alone (P<0.001). Naloxone doses as low as 0.1 mg added an abuse-deterrent effect to a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. PMID:26604818

  1. Low-dose naloxone provides an abuse-deterrent effect to buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Lynn R; Smith, Michael D; Unal, Cemal; Finn, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In developmental research, plasma buprenorphine concentrations comparable to a 2 mg buprenorphine–naloxone (BN) sublingual tablet have been achieved with a 0.75 mg dose of BN buccal film, a small, bioerodible polymer film for application to mucosal membranes. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, four-period crossover study in opioid-dependent subjects with chronic pain receiving >100 mg oral morphine equivalents daily who experienced withdrawal following a naloxone challenge dose. The objective of the study was to determine if intravenous (IV) naloxone doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg would produce a withdrawal response when coadministered with a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Fifteen subjects receiving 90–1,260 mg oral morphine equivalents per day enrolled and completed the study. Precipitated withdrawal occurred in 13% (2/15) of placebo-treated subjects and 47% (7/15) of buprenorphine-treated subjects. When combined with the 0.75 mg dose of buprenorphine, a 0.1 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence of precipitated withdrawal to 60%, and a 0.2 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence to 73%. By 15 minutes postdose, the mean change in Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score from predose was 3.0 for placebo, 6.9 for buprenorphine, 9.8 for BN 0.1 mg, and 12.4 for BN 0.2 mg. The mean COWS score with each active treatment was significantly greater than placebo (P<0.001), and the mean COWS score for each of the naloxone-containing treatments was significantly greater than for buprenorphine alone (P<0.001). Naloxone doses as low as 0.1 mg added an abuse-deterrent effect to a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. PMID:26604818

  2. Sublingual buprenorphine for chronic pain: A survey of clinician prescribing practices

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Kristen; Gutierrez, Antonio; Haller, Deborah; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Sublingual buprenorphine, with and without naloxone, is indicated for the treatment of opioid use disorders. Although not approved for pain, some evidence suggests it may be a safe and effective alternative to conventional opioid analgesics, particularly for those with addiction problems. This study surveyed pain specialists to examine the extent to which sublingual buprenorphine was prescribed for chronic pain and explore associated clinician attitudes and characteristics. Method A 36-item survey examining clinician attitudes and characteristics related to sublingual buprenorphine and other opioids was distributed to 1,307 members of the American Pain Society, a multi-disciplinary professional group. Members were provided a paper copy of the survey and URL to an on-line version. A follow up letter was mailed after 2 weeks. Results Overall, 230 completed surveys were returned (18.5%). Of clinicians who prescribed opioids for chronic pain (92.5%), 19.7% reported prescribing sublingual buprenorphine for chronic pain at least once; of these prescribers, 39.6% did not have a DEA X-waiver to prescribe sublingual buprenorphine for opioid dependance. Prescribers were more likely than non-prescribers to find sublingual buprenorphine effective for chronic pain. Prescribers were also significantly more likely to view sublingual buprenorphine as safer than full agonists in terms of addiction, overdose, and drug interaction. No differences emerged between prescribers and non-prescribers regarding perceptions of potential for drug diversion or in terms of overall opioid prescribing behaviors. Discussion Results suggest that sublingual buprenorphine is indeed being used to treat chronic pain; however, the circumstances when this occurs are not entirely clear. PMID:23727654

  3. 40 CFR 268.3 - Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment. 268.3 Section 268.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS General § 268.3 Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment. (a) Except as provided...

  4. 40 CFR 268.3 - Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment. 268.3 Section 268.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS General § 268.3 Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment. (a) Except as provided...

  5. Comparison of subcutaneous and transdermal administration of buprenorphine for pre-emptive analgesia in dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Moll, Xavier; Fresno, Laura; García, Félix; Prandi, David; Andaluz, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of a 70 microg/h transdermal buprenorphine patch and of 20 microg/kg of buprenorphine administered subcutaneously (SC) for the relief of post-operative pain was determined in 24 healthy female dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy (OHE). Dogs were randomly assigned to three groups: (1) a control group that received no analgesics, (2) a BSC group that received buprenorphine SC (20 microg/kg), and (3) a BP group that received buprenorphine by a 70 microg/h transdermal patch. Dogs were scored for signs of pain at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 20, 26, 32 and 38 h after extubation using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and a modified University of Melbourne Pain Scale (UMPS). Mean NRS and UMPS scores for dogs in the BSC group (2.56 ± 0.23 and 3.05 ± 0.27, respectively) and the BP group (2.02 ± 0.24 and 2.67 ± 0.23, respectively) were significantly lower (P<0.05) compared with dogs in the control group (5.42 ± 0.38 and 7.89 ± 0.44, respectively), whereas differences between the two buprenorphine treatment groups were not significant. The results indicated that the analgesia produced by the 70 microg/h patch was similar to that induced by SC administration of 20 microg/kg of buprenorphine in dogs undergoing OHE, suggesting that the transdermal buprenorphine patch may be a useful alternative for pain management in dogs. PMID:20056555

  6. BUPRENORPHINE-NALXONE THERAPY IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone®, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggests that bup/nal may provide pain relief in chronic pain patients with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent chronic pain patients may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as well as improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  7. Abuse and diversion of buprenorphine sublingual tablets and film.

    PubMed

    Lavonas, Eric J; Severtson, S Geoffrey; Martinez, Erin M; Bucher-Bartelson, Becki; Le Lait, Marie-Claire; Green, Jody L; Murrelle, Lenn E; Cicero, Theodore J; Kurtz, Steven P; Rosenblum, Andrew; Surratt, Hilary L; Dart, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    Buprenorphine abuse is common worldwide. Rates of abuse and diversion of three sublingual buprenorphine formulations (single ingredient tablets; naloxone combination tablets and film) were compared. Data were obtained from the Researched Abuse, Diversion, and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS) System Poison Center, Drug Diversion, Opioid Treatment (OTP), Survey of Key Informants' Patients (SKIP), and College Survey Programs through December 2012. To control for drug availability, event ratios (rates) were calculated quarterly, based on the number of patients filling prescriptions for each formulation ("unique recipients of a dispensed drug," URDD) and averaged and compared using negative binomial regression. Abuse rates in the OTP, SKIP, and College Survey Programs were greatest for single ingredient tablets, and abuse rates in the Poison Center Program and illicit diversion rates were greatest for the combination tablets. Combination film rates were significantly less than rates for either tablet formulation in all programs. No geographic pattern could be discerned. PMID:24680219

  8. Management of opioid addiction with buprenorphine: French history and current management

    PubMed Central

    Poloméni, Pierre; Schwan, Raymund

    2014-01-01

    The way in which opioid addiction is managed in France is unique, as it is based on the prescription of buprenorphine by general practitioners and is dispensed by retail pharmacies. This policy has had a direct, positive impact on the number of deaths caused by heroin overdose, which was reduced by four-fifths between 1994 and 2002. In addition, certain associated comorbidities, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, have also been reduced; the incidence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in intravenous drug users fell from 25% in the mid-1990s to 6% in 2010. Since the implementation of this French model of opioid management, major scientific progress has been made, leading to a better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of addiction and of the management modalities required for its treatment. However, despite notable advances in scientific knowledge and in the implementation of devices, opioid addiction remains a major public health care issue in France, with 275,000–360,000 “problem drug users” being reported in 2011. The situation is still particularly worrying due to psychoactive substance use and misuse of opioid substitution treatments. Since 2003, there has been a persistent increase in the number of deaths and comorbidities related to opioid addiction, principally hepatitis C virus infection, which affects up to 40% of intravenous drug users. In France, the direct involvement of general practitioners in the management of opioid addiction is indisputable. Nevertheless, management could be optimized through better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disease, better knowledge of the pharmacology of opioid substitution treatments, and clear definition of short-, medium- and long-term treatment objectives. Data related to the management of opioid addiction by general practitioners in France have been published in 2005. Since then, the context has changed, other drugs were launched on the market such as generics of buprenorphine, methadone capsule, and Suboxone. Thus, an update seems necessary. This paper provides a description of opioid addiction management objectives and treatment modalities for general practitioners, based on currently available knowledge. PMID:24623988

  9. Pharmacologic treatments for opioid dependence: detoxification and maintenance options

    PubMed Central

    Kleber, Herbert D.

    2007-01-01

    While opioid dependence has more treatment agents available than other abused drugs, none are curative. They can, however, markedly diminish withdrawal symptoms and craving, and block opioid effects due to lapses. The most effective withdrawal method is substituting and tapering methadone or buprenorphine, ?-2 Adrenergic agents can ameliorate untreated symptoms or substitute for agonists if not available. Shortening withdrawal by precipitating it with narcotic antagonists has been studied, but the methods are plagued by safety issues or persisting symptoms. Neither the withdrawal agents nor the methods are associated with better long-term outcome, which appears mostly related to post-detoxification treatment. Excluding those with short-term habits, the best outcome occurs with long-term maintenance on methadone or buprenorphine accompanied by appropriate psychosocial interventions. Those with strong external motivation may do well on the antagonist naltrexone. Currently, optimum duration of maintenance on either is unclear. Better agents are needed to impact the brain changes related to addiction. PMID:18286804

  10. Induction of opioid-dependent individuals onto buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone soluble-films.

    PubMed

    Strain, E C; Harrison, J A; Bigelow, G E

    2011-03-01

    A sublingual soluble-film formulation of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid dependency. This preparation provides unit-dose, child-resistant packaging amenable to tracking and accountability, offers more rapid dissolution, and has a potentially preferred taste vs. tablets. This study compared the ability of buprenorphine (B) and B/N films to suppress spontaneous withdrawal in opioid-dependent volunteers. Participants were maintained on morphine and underwent challenge sessions to confirm sensitivity to naloxone-induced opioid withdrawal. Subjects were randomized to receive either B (16 mg, n = 18) or B/N (16/4 mg, n = 16) soluble films for 5 days. The primary outcome measure was the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score. Thirty-four subjects completed induction onto soluble films. There was a significant decrease in COWS scores but no significant differences between the groups. The results support the use of B and B/N soluble films as safe and effective delivery methods for opioid induction. PMID:21270789

  11. A Double Blind, within Subject Comparison of Spontaneous Opioid Withdrawal from Buprenorphine versus Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael T.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Campbell, Claudia M.; Strain, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that there is minimal withdrawal after the cessation of chronically administered buprenorphine and that opioid withdrawal symptoms are delayed compared with those of other opioids. The present study compared the time course and magnitude of buprenorphine withdrawal with a prototypical ?-opioid agonist, morphine. Healthy, out-of-treatment opioid-dependent residential volunteers (N = 7) were stabilized on either buprenorphine (32 mg/day i.m.) or morphine (120 mg/day i.m.) administered in four divided doses for 9 days. They then underwent an 18-day period of spontaneous withdrawal, during which four double-blind i.m. placebo injections were administered daily. Stabilization and spontaneous withdrawal were assessed for the second opioid using the same time course. Opioid withdrawal measures were collected eight times daily. Morphine withdrawal symptoms were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those of buprenorphine withdrawal as measured by mean peak ratings of Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS), Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS), all subscales of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), sick and pain (0–100) Visual Analog Scales, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and pupil dilation. Peak ratings on COWS and SOWS occurred on day 2 of morphine withdrawal and were significantly greater than on day 2 of buprenorphine withdrawal. Subjective reports of morphine withdrawal resolved on average by day 7. There was minimal evidence of buprenorphine withdrawal on any measure. In conclusion, spontaneous withdrawal from high-dose buprenorphine appears subjectively and objectively milder compared with that of morphine for at least 18 days after drug cessation. PMID:24227768

  12. A preliminary study comparing methadone and buprenorphine in patients with chronic pain and coexistent opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anne M; Blondell, Richard D; Jaanimägi, Urmo; Giambrone, Amanda K; Homish, Gregory G; Lozano, Jacqueline R; Kowalik, Urszula; Azadfard, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Patients with opioid addiction who receive prescription opioids for treatment of nonmalignant chronic pain present a therapeutic challenge. Fifty-four participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction were randomized to receive methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. At the 6-month follow-up examination, 26 (48.1%) participants who remained in the study noted a 12.75% reduction in pain (P = 0.043), and no participants in the methadone group compared to 5 in the buprenorphine group reported illicit opioid use (P = 0.039). Other differences between the two conditions were not found. Long-term, low-dose methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone treatment produced analgesia in participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction. PMID:23480249

  13. Buprenorphine maintenance and mu-opioid receptor availability in the treatment of opioid use disorder: implications for clinical use and policy

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Mark K.; Comer, Sandra D.; Fiellin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sublingual formulations of buprenorphine (BUP) and BUP/naloxone have well-established pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, and are safe and effective for treating opioid use disorder. Since approvals of these formulations, their clinical use has increased. Yet, questions have arisen as to how BUP binding to mu-opioid receptors (?ORs), the neurobiological target for this medication, relate to its clinical application. BUP produces dose- and time-related alterations of ?OR availability but some clinicians express concern about whether doses higher than those needed to prevent opioid withdrawal symptoms are warranted, and policymakers consider limiting reimbursement for certain BUP dosing regimens. Methods We review scientific data concerning BUP-induced changes in ?OR availability and their relationship to clinical efficacy. Results Withdrawal suppression appears to require ?50% ?OR availability, associated with BUP trough plasma concentrations ?1 ng/mL; for most patients, this may require single daily BUP doses of 4-mg to defend against trough levels, or lower divided doses. Blockade of the reinforcing and subjective effects of typical doses of abused opioids require <20% ?OR availability, associated with BUP trough plasma concentrations ?3 ng/mL; for most individuals, this may require single daily BUP doses >16-mg, or lower divided doses. For individuals attempting to surmount this blockade with higher-than-usual doses of abused opioids, even larger BUP doses and <10% ?OR availability would be required. Conclusion For these reasons, and given the complexities of studies on this issue and comorbid problems, we conclude that fixed, arbitrary limits on BUP doses in clinical care or limits on reimbursement for this care are unwarranted. PMID:25179217

  14. Effects of regulation on methadone and buprenorphine provision in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    McClure, Bridget; Mendoza, Sonia; Duncan, Laura; Rotrosen, John; Hansen, Helena

    2014-10-01

    Hurricane Sandy led to the closing of many major New York City public hospitals including their substance abuse clinics and methadone programs, and the displacement or relocation of thousands of opioid-dependent patients from treatment. The disaster provided a natural experiment that revealed the relative strengths and weaknesses of methadone treatment in comparison to physician office-based buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence, two modalities of opioid maintenance with markedly different regulatory requirements and institutional procedures. To assess these two modalities of treatment under emergency conditions, semi-structured interviews about barriers to and facilitators of continuity of care for methadone and buprenorphine patients were conducted with 50 providers of opioid maintenance treatment. Major findings included that methadone programs presented more regulatory barriers for providers, difficulty with dose verification due to impaired communication, and an over reliance on emergency room dosing leading to unsafe or suboptimal dosing. Buprenorphine treatment presented fewer regulatory barriers, but buprenorphine providers had little to no cross-coverage options compared to methadone providers, who could refer to alternate methadone programs. The findings point to the need for well-defined emergency procedures with flexibility around regulations, the need for a central registry with patient dose information, as well as stronger professional networks and cross-coverage procedures. These interventions would improve day-to-day services for opioid-maintained patients as well as services under emergency conditions. PMID:25163931

  15. The impact of cocaine use on outcomes in HIV-infected patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lynn E.; Botsko, Michael; Cunningham, Chinazo; O'Connor, Patrick G.; Hersh, David; Mitty, Jennifer; Lum, Paula J.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Fiellin, David A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cocaine use is common in opioid dependent HIV-infected patients but its impact on treatment outcomes in these patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone is not known. METHODS We conducted a prospective study in 299 patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone who provided baseline cocaine data and a subset of 266 patients who remained in treatment for greater than or equal to one quarter. Assessments were conducted at baseline and quarterly for one year. We evaluated the association between baseline and in-treatment cocaine use on buprenorphine/naloxone retention, illicit opioid use, antiretroviral adherence, CD4 counts, HIV RNA, and risk behaviors. RESULTS Sixty-six percent (197/299) of patients reported baseline cocaine use and 65% (173/266) of patients with follow-up data reported in-treatment cocaine use. Baseline and in-treatment cocaine use did not impact buprenorphine/naloxone retention, antiretroviral adherence, CD4 lymphocytes, or HIV risk behaviors. However, baseline cocaine use was associated with a 14.8 (95% CI=9.0–24.2) times greater likelihood of subsequent cocaine use (95% CI=9.0 – 24.2), a 1.4 (95% CI=1.02 – 2.00) times greater likelihood of subsequent opioid use, and higher Log10 HIV RNA (p? .016) over time. In-treatment cocaine use was associated with a 1.4 (95% CI=1.01–2.00) times greater likelihood of concurrent opioid use. CONCLUSIONS Given cocaine use negatively impacts opioid and HIV treatment outcomes, interventions to address cocaine use in HIV-infected patients receiving buprenorphine/naloxone treatment are warranted. PMID:21317595

  16. A review of buprenorphine diversion and misuse: the current evidence base and experiences from around the world.

    PubMed

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Walsh, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient opioid addiction treatment with sublingual buprenorphine pharmacotherapy has rapidly expanded in the United States and abroad, and, with this increase in medication availability, there have been increasing concerns about its diversion, misuse, and related harms. This narrative review defines the behaviors of diversion and misuse, examines how the pharmacology of buprenorphine alone and in combination with naloxone influence its abuse liability, and describes the epidemiological data on buprenorphine diversion and intravenous misuse, risk factors for its intravenous misuse, and the unintended consequences of misuse and diversion. Physician practices to prevent, screen for, and therapeutically respond to these behaviors, which are a form of medication nonadherence, are discussed, and gaps in knowledge are identified. Outpatient opioid addiction treatment with sublingual buprenorphine pharmacotherapy experiences from other countries that have varied health care systems, public policies, and access to addiction treatment are shared to make clear that diversion and misuse occur across the world in various contexts, for many different reasons, and are not limited to buprenorphine. Comparisons are made with other opioids with known abuse liability and medications with no known abuse. The objective was to facilitate understanding of diversion and misuse so that all factors influencing their expression (patient and provider characteristics and public policy) can be appreciated within a framework that also recognizes the benefits of addiction treatment. With this comprehensive perspective, further careful work can help determine how to minimize these behaviors without eroding the current benefits realized through improved addiction treatment access and expansion. PMID:25221984

  17. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships of transdermal buprenorphine and fentanyl in experimental human pain models.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Trine; Upton, Richard N; Foster, David J R; Christrup, Lona L; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2011-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling can be used to characterize the relationship between dose regimen of opioids, plasma concentration and effect of opioids, which in turn can lead to more rational treatment regimens of pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the concentration-effect relationship for transdermal buprenorphine and fentanyl in experimentally induced pain. Twenty-two healthy volunteers were randomized to receive transdermal patches with fentanyl (25 ?g/hr, 72 hr), buprenorphine (20 ?g/hr, 144 hr) or placebo. The experimental pain tests were pressure at the tibial bone, cutaneous thermal stimulation, cold pressor test (conditioning stimulus (3 ± 0.3°C cold water), nerve growth factor-induced muscle soreness and intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia. Experiments were carried out at baseline, 24, 48, 72 and 144 hr after application of patches. Time-course of placebo was described first and was afterwards added to the description of the time-courses of buprenorphine and fentanyl. This was either described by zero (no drug effect), linear or E(max) model concentration-effect relationships. Time-dependent changes in pain measures in the placebo arm were described by linear or quadratic functions. The time-course of fentanyl and buprenorphine plasma concentrations was complex but could be represented by cubic spline interpolation in the models. Buprenorphine significantly attenuated bone-associated pain, heat pain, nerve growth factor-induced soreness and cold pressor pain. Fentanyl significantly attenuated cold pressor pain for the administered dose regimens. Although the PK/PD relationship for both drugs could be described with similar models, tissue-differentiated analgesic effects between buprenorphine and fentanyl was shown. PMID:21138531

  18. The Reinforcing and Subjective Effects of Intravenous and Intranasal Buprenorphine in Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jermaine D.; Madera, Gabriela; Comer, Sandra D.

    2014-01-01

    Abuse of buprenorphine (BUP) by the intravenous (IV) route has been documented in several studies, and reports of intranasal (IN) abuse are increasing. However, no studies have directly compared the effects of BUP when it is administered intranasally and intravenously. The present secondary analysis used data from two separate studies to compare the reinforcing and subjective effects of IV and IN buprenorphine. One study evaluated IV buprenorphine (N=13) and the other evaluated IN buprenorphine (N=12). Participants were maintained on 2 mg sublingual (SL) BUP and tested with each intranasal or intravenous buprenorphine test dose (0 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg, 8 mg, and 16 mg). During morning laboratory sessions, participants received money (US $20) and sample doses of IN or IV BUP, and then completed subjective effects questionnaires. Later that day, they completed a self-administration task to receive 10% portions of the drug and/or money they previously sampled. In general, positive subjective ratings for both IV and IN BUP were significantly greater than placebo, with IV BUP having a greater effect than IN BUP. All active BUP doses (IV and IN) maintained significantly higher progressive ratio breakpoint values than placebo, but breakpoint values for IV BUP were greater than for IN BUP. Buprenorphine is an effective maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, valued for its ability to reduce the positive subjective effects of other opioids. Nevertheless, the present data demonstrate that in participants maintained on a low dose of SL BUP, the medication itself has abuse liability when used intravenously or intranasally. PMID:24793093

  19. 40 CFR 268.3 - Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... which treat wastes subsequently discharged to a water of the United States pursuant to a permit issued under section 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA), or which treat wastes in a CWA-equivalent treatment... restricted waste or the residual from treatment of a restricted waste as a substitute for adequate...

  20. 40 CFR 268.3 - Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... prohibited, unless the waste, at the point of generation, or after any bona fide treatment such as cyanide...) contaminated with an inorganic metal-bearing hazardous waste; (3) The waste, at point of generation, has... restricted waste or the residual from treatment of a restricted waste as a substitute for adequate...

  1. 40 CFR 268.3 - Dilution prohibited as a substitute for treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prohibited, unless the waste, at the point of generation, or after any bona fide treatment such as cyanide...) contaminated with an inorganic metal-bearing hazardous waste; (3) The waste, at point of generation, has... restricted waste or the residual from treatment of a restricted waste as a substitute for adequate...

  2. Parenteral buprenorphine-naloxone abuse is a major cause of fatal buprenorphine-related poisoning.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Margareeta; Heikman, Pertti; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-10-10

    Buprenorphine (BPN) medication for opioid maintenance treatment in Finland consists predominantly of buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX). Both BPN and BNX are associated with diversion, abuse and non-medically supervised use worldwide. Our purpose was to estimate the proportion of BNX to all BPN-related fatalities. The material consisted of 225 deceased drug abusers in Finland from January 2010 to June 2011 with a positive BPN and/or norbuprenorphine (NOR) and/or naloxone (NX) finding in urine. The data were divided into three groups based on the urine NX and BPN concentrations. The "Parenteral BNX" group (>100 ?g/l NX) was presumed to consist of injecting or snorting BNX abusers and the "Parenteral BPN" group (>50 ?g/l BPN, 0 ?g/l NX) of injecting or snorting BPN abusers, while the "Other BNX or BPN" group (?100 ?g/l NX, or ?50 ?g/l BPN combined with 0 ?g/l NX) was presumed to consist of mainly sublingual BNX or BPN users. In 12.4% of cases the NX urine concentration was higher than the threshold 100 ?g/l. In fatal BPN poisonings, the proportion of parenteral BNX was 28.4%. In the "Parenteral BNX", "Parenteral BPN" and "Other BNX or BPN" groups, the proportion of fatal BPN poisonings was 67.9, 31.0 and 22.6%, respectively. BNX abuse can be fatal. Among the 225 BPN-related fatalities, parenteral abuse of BNX was shown to be common (12.4%) and BNX poisoning was the underlying cause of death in 8.4%. Parenteral BNX caused fatal BPN poisoning proportionally more often than parenteral BPN. PMID:24053859

  3. Inpatient initiation of buprenorphine maintenance vs. detoxification: can retention of opioid-dependent patients in outpatient counseling be improved?

    PubMed

    Caldiero, Ryan M; Parran, Theodore V; Adelman, Christopher L; Piche, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone is an office-based opioid agonist released in 2003 in the United States for the maintenance of heroin- and other opioid-dependent patients. Concern has been raised that the medication will distract or otherwise inhibit patients from participating in a holistic recovery program or abstinence-based counseling. Using a retrospective chart review, the first thirty opioid-dependent patients induced on buprenorphine maintenance therapy in an inpatient detoxification unit were compared to thirty age- and gender-matched patients who underwent detoxification (with a tramadol taper) and referral to intensive outpatient treatment. The clinical outcomes were a comparison of completion rates for an intensive outpatient program (IOP) and retention in treatment after twelve weeks of aftercare therapy. Patients induced on buprenorphine maintenance over three days had similar relief of withdrawal symptoms to patients detoxified from opioids over five days with tramadol. Patients maintained on buprenorphine had a markedly increased initiation of IOP and remained in outpatient treatment longer than patients who were detoxified (8.5 wks vs. 0.4 wks, p < 0.001). This study indicates that induction and maintenance on buprenorphine may be more effective than detoxification for engaging and retaining patients in abstinence-based comprehensive outpatient addiction treatment. PMID:16449087

  4. Pronociceptive and Antinociceptive Effects of Buprenorphine in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn Cover a Dose Range of Four Orders of Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Katharina J.; Drdla-Schutting, Ruth; Honsek, Silke D.; Forsthuber, Liesbeth

    2015-01-01

    Due to its distinct pharmacological profile and lower incidence of adverse events compared with other opioids, buprenorphine is considered a safe option for pain and substitution therapy. However, despite its wide clinical use, little is known about the synaptic effects of buprenorphine in nociceptive pathways. Here, we demonstrate dose-dependent, bimodal effects of buprenorphine on transmission at C-fiber synapses in rat spinal cord dorsal horn in vivo. At an analgesically active dose of 1500 ?g·kg?1, buprenorphine reduced the strength of spinal C-fiber synapses. This depression required activation of spinal opioid receptors, putatively ?1-opioid receptors, as indicated by its sensitivity to spinal naloxone and to the selective ?1-opioid receptor antagonist naloxonazine. In contrast, a 15,000-fold lower dose of buprenorphine (0.1 ?g·kg?1), which caused thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in behaving animals, induced an enhancement of transmission at spinal C-fiber synapses. The ultra-low-dose buprenorphine-induced synaptic facilitation was mediated by supraspinal naloxonazine-insensitive, but CTOP-sensitive ?-opioid receptors, descending serotonergic pathways, and activation of spinal glial cells. Selective inhibition of spinal 5-hydroxytryptamine-2 receptors (5-HT2Rs), putatively located on spinal astrocytes, abolished both the induction of synaptic facilitation and the hyperalgesia elicited by ultra-low-dose buprenorphine. Our study revealed that buprenorphine mediates its modulatory effects on transmission at spinal C-fiber synapses by dose dependently acting on distinct ?-opioid receptor subtypes located at different levels of the neuraxis. PMID:26134641

  5. Endocrine and behavioural effects of transdermal buprenorphine in pain-suffering women of different reproductive ages.

    PubMed

    Aurilio, Caterina; Ceccarelli, Ilaria; Pota, Vincenzo; Sansone, Pasquale; Massafra, Cosimo; Barbarisi, Manlio; Pace, Maria Caterina; Passavanti, Maria Beatrice; Bravi, Fabio; Aloisi, Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a common problem in clinical practice and women are affected more often than men. Morphine is often used for long-term pain relief, but it induces side effects including endocrine alterations. The aim of the present study was to assess the behavioural and hormonal effects of transdermal buprenorphine in women suffering from persistent non-malignant pain. Hormones (LH, FSH, total and free testosterone, estradiol, cortisol) and pain measures (visual analogue scale, McGill Pain questionnaire, present pain intensity test) were evaluated at baseline and after 1, 3 and 6 months. Subjects were recruited in the Second University of Naples Pain Research Centre. Eighteen chronic pain women were included in the study, divided into pre- and post-menopausal groups. A transdermal buprenorphine patch (Buprenorphine TDS, 35 µg/h) was administered every 72 h. As expected, buprenorphine administration led to a decrease in pain intensity and no side effects suggestive of hypogonadism were recorded. Pain measures decreased at the first control visit (T1) in both groups. Total and free testosterone were not reduced by treatment (they tended to increase in both groups) while cortisol progressively recovered from the quite low levels detected at the beginning of treatment. These data confirm that buprenorphine is a safe and effective drug for pain relief in women. It is free from the adverse effects on gonadal hormones frequently associated with other opioid treatments. The lack of opioid-induced effects on gonadal hormones (i.e., hypogonadism) is important to guarantee safe long-term pain treatment. PMID:21937837

  6. Patient Perspectives Associated with Intended Duration of Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bentzley, Brandon S; Barth, Kelly S; Back, Sudie E; Aronson, Garrett; Book, Sarah W

    2015-09-01

    Patients with opioid use disorders frequently discontinue opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) prematurely, reducing retention and possibly limiting the efficacy of OMT. The current study is a cross-sectional survey of patients (N=69) enrolled in buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT). We examined patient demographics, BMT characteristics (e.g., dose, time in BMT), and patient perspectives regarding intended duration of BMT. In addition, patients' reasons for continuing or discontinuing BMT were investigated. Results revealed that the majority (82%) of participants reported wanting to continue BMT for at least 12months. Age at first drug use, time in BMT, concern about pain, and concern about relapse were all positively associated with intended duration of BMT. The following were negatively associated with intended duration of BMT: recent discussion with a treatment provider about BMT discontinuation, prior attempt to discontinue BMT, concern about withdrawal symptoms, experiencing pleasurable effects from taking buprenorphine, and perceived conflicts of BMT with life, work, or school obligations. The most common reasons for wanting to continue BMT included concerns about withdrawal symptoms, relapse, and pain. Although preliminary, the findings highlight key issues with regard to patients' perspectives of BMT. The results of this study provide information that may be useful in improving OMT programs and treatment outcomes. PMID:25899872

  7. Effects of Dexmedetomidine and Ketamine–Dexmedetomidine with and without Buprenorphine on Corticoadrenal Function in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    González-Gil, Alfredo; Villa, Alberto; Millán, Pilar; Martínez-Fernández, Leticia; Illera, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetics may influence adrenal function and consequently alter serum glucocorticoid concentrations, leading to erroneous interpretations of results from anesthetized rabbits. However, decreases in glucocorticoid concentrations may be advantageous in protocols designed to minimize the stress response to surgery. This study characterized the variations in adrenocortical function based on changes in corticosterone and cortisol levels after various doses and combinations of dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and buprenorphine. Each rabbit received all treatments with a minimal interexperiment interval of 10 d. Rabbits were allocated to 7 groups (n = 10 per group) and received either 1 mL saline solution; dexmedetomidine at 0.05, 0.15, or 0.25 mg/kg; ketamine (35 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (0.25 mg/kg) without or with buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg); or ketamine (35 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg). Blood was sampled before drug administration and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min and 24 h afterward. Serum glucocorticoid levels fell in all treatment groups except the one receiving ketamine–dexmedetomidine; in that group, serum glucocorticoids increased. Rabbits that received ketamine–dexmedetomidine–buprenorphine had the lowest serum glucocorticoid levels overall. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine reduces glucocorticoid secretion in rabbits but, when combined with ketamine, increases corticosterone and cortisol levels as well as heart and respiratory rates. The addition of buprenorphine to the ketamine–dexmedetomidine mixture reduces serum glucocorticoid levels. The influence of anesthetic drugs should be considered when designing a protocol to minimize the glucocorticoid response to surgery or when measuring glucocorticoid levels in rabbits. PMID:26045456

  8. Effects of Multimodal Analgesia with Low-Dose Buprenorphine and Meloxicam on Fecal Glucocorticoid Metabolites after Surgery in New Zealand White Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    PubMed Central

    Goldschlager, Gregg B; Gillespie, Virginia L; Palme, Rupert; Baxter, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of rabbits as companion animals and models for biomedical research, rabbits have not been extensively studied to identify an efficacious postsurgical analgesic that does not cause systemic complications. The synergy of NSAID and systemic opioids is well-documented, and their combined use reduces the amount of either drug required for adequate analgesia. We measured fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in rabbits after a minimally invasive vascular cut-down procedure. Rabbits received buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg SC every 12 h for 3 d), meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg SC every 24 h for 3 d), buprenorphine–meloxicam (0.01 mg/kg–0.1 mg/kg SC every 24 h for 3 d), or a single dose of 0.5% bupivacaine (0.5 mL) infused locally at the incision site. By day 3 after surgery, buprenorphine, meloxicam, and bupivacaine groups showed elevated FCM levels, which continued to rise until day 7 and then gradually returned to baseline by day 28. In the buprenorphine–meloxicam group, FCM was relatively unchanged until day 3, when treatment was discontinued, and then began to rise. Rabbits in the buprenorphine–meloxicam group gained more weight over the 28-d study than did those in the other 3 treatment groups. This study shows that in rabbits low-dose buprenorphine administered with meloxicam effectively mitigates the FCM response that develops after surgery without the adverse effects associated with higher doses. PMID:24041213

  9. Prenatal buprenorphine exposure decreases neurogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hung, Chih-Jen; Shen, Ching-Hui; Chen, Wen-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-02-10

    Perinatal opioid exposure has a negative effect on neurogenesis and produces neurological consequences. However, its mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed opioid agonist/antagonist, is an alternative medication for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of decreased neurogenesis and depression-like consequences following prenatal exposure to buprenorphine and sheds light on mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days and a cultured neurosphere model. Results of forced swimming test and tail suspension test showed that pups at postnatal day 21 had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by reduction of neuronal composition, biochemical parameters of neural stem/progenitor cells, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B phosphorylation, protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation. Results of parallel cell studies further demonstrated a negative impact of buprenorphine on cultured neurospheres, including proliferation, differentiation, BDNF expression and signaling, and PKA activity. Taken together, our results suggest that prenatal exposure to buprenorphine might result in depression-like phenotypes associated with impaired BDNF action and decreased neurogenesis in the developing brain of weanlings. PMID:24321744

  10. Implementation of drug substitution therapy in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Todadze, Khatuna; Lezhava, Gela

    2008-09-01

    The geopolitical uniqueness of the regional, socioeconomic situation and the existence of territories outside the control of the national government have facilitated the spread of drug use in Georgia. A special problem is injection of opiates, in particular heroin and Subutex (buprenorphine). It has been established that among registered HIV infected individuals the main route of transmission is injecting drug use. Although the prevalence of HIV among IDUs (injecting drug user) is only 1-3%, the high number of IDUs, and the high prevalence of hepatitis C in this population creates high risk of dramatic spread of HIV in Georgia. Beginning at the end of 2005, the GFATM (Global Fund against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria) supported methadone substitution programmes in Georgia. At present, three programmes are functioning. At the same time, they involve 230 patients altogether. The studies carried out by the Research Institute on Addiction, with the aim to control the efficacy of pilot programmes have revealed a dramatic improvement of psychophysical state of patients, with very high rate of resocialization and decriminalization, significant diminishment of drug-related risky behaviour. Obtained results indicate high efficiency of methadone substitution programmes in Georgia, as an important tool both for treatment of opioid dependence and harm reduction. In order to obtain a more significant impact on public health substitution therapy programmes have to be further expanded. PMID:18935776

  11. A non-rewarding, non-aversive buprenorphine/naltrexone combination attenuates drug-primed reinstatement to cocaine and morphine in rats in a conditioned place preference paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cordery, Sarah F; Taverner, Alistair; Ridzwan, Irna E; Guy, Richard H; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Husbands, Stephen M; Bailey, Christopher P

    2014-07-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin is a major public health issue with no effective relapse prevention treatment currently available. To this purpose, a combination of buprenorphine and naltrexone, a mixed very-low efficacy mu-opioid receptor agonist/kappa-opioid receptor antagonist/nociceptin receptor agonist, was investigated. The tail-withdrawal and the conditioned place preference (CPP) assays in adult Sprague Dawley rats were used to show that naltrexone dose-dependently blocked the mu-opioid receptor agonism of buprenorphine. Furthermore, in the CPP assay, a combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 3.0?mg/kg naltrexone was aversive. A combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0?mg/kg naltrexone was neither rewarding nor aversive, but still possessed mu-opioid receptor antagonist properties. In the CPP extinction and reinstatement method, a combination of 0.3?mg/kg buprenorphine and 1.0?mg/kg naltrexone completely blocked drug-primed reinstatement in cocaine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 3?mg/kg cocaine, drug prime was 3?mg/kg cocaine) and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement in morphine-conditioned rats (conditioned with 5?mg/kg morphine, drug prime was 1.25?mg/kg morphine). These data add to the growing evidence that a buprenorphine/naltrexone combination may be protective against relapse in a polydrug abuse situation. PMID:23240906

  12. The effects of the opioid pharmacotherapies methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine, alone and in combination with alcohol, on simulated driving.

    PubMed

    Lenné, Michael G; Dietze, Paul; Rumbold, Greg R; Redman, Jennifer R; Triggs, Thomas J

    2003-12-11

    While methadone is currently the primary pharmacotherapy used in the treatment of heroin dependence in Australia, levo-alpha-acetyl-methodol (LAAM) and buprenorphine are new pharmacotherapies that are being examined as alternatives to methadone maintenance treatment. The aim of this research is to consider the effects of the methadone, buprenorphine and LAAM, as used in maintenance pharmacotherapy for heroin dependence, upon simulated driving. Clients stabilised in methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine treatment programs for 3 months, and a control group of non-drug-using participants, took part in this study which involved operating a driving simulator over a 75 min period. All participants attended one session without alcohol and one session with alcohol at around the 0.05% blood alcohol level. Simulated driving skill was measured through standard deviations of lateral position, speed and steering wheel angle, and reaction time to a subsidiary task was also measured. While alcohol impaired all measures of driving performance, there were no differences in driving skills across the four participant groups. These findings suggest that typical community standards around driving safety should be applied to clients stabilised in methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine treatment. The findings are important in terms of the widespread implementation of these treatment options in Victoria given that a large proportion of pharmacotherapy clients drive. PMID:14643944

  13. Quantitation of Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Buprenorphine Glucuronide, Norbuprenorphine Glucuronide, and Naloxone in Urine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid drug that has been used to treat opioid dependence on an outpatient basis, and is also prescribed for managing moderate to severe pain. Some formulations of buprenorphine also contain naloxone to discourage misuse. The major metabolite of buprenorphine is norbuprenorphine. Both compounds are pharmacologically active and both are extensively metabolized to their glucuronide conjugates, which are also active metabolites. Direct quantitation of the glucuronide conjugates in conjunction with free buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone in urine can distinguish compliance with prescribed therapy from specimen adulteration intended to mimic compliance with prescribed buprenorphine.This chapter quantitates buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, their glucuronide conjugates and naloxone directly in urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Urine is pretreated with formic acid and undergoes solid phase extraction (SPE) prior to analysis by LC-MS/MS. PMID:26660175

  14. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile of intranasal crushed buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone tablets in opioid abusers

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, L.S.; Nuzzo, P.A.; Lofwall, M.R.; Moody, D.E.; Walsh, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Sublingual buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are efficacious opioid dependence pharmacotherapies, but there are reports of their diversion and misuse by the intranasal route. The study objectives were to characterize and compare their intranasal pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Setting An in-patient research unit at the University of Kentucky. Participants Healthy adults (n=10) abusing, but not physically dependent on, intranasal opioids. Measurements Six sessions (72 hours apart) tested five intranasal doses [0/0, crushed buprenorphine (2, 8 mg), crushed buprenorphine/naloxone (2/0.5, 8/2 mg)] and one intravenous dose (0.8 mg buprenorphine/0.2 mg naloxone for bioavailability assessment). Plasma samples, physiological, subject- and observer-rated measures were collected before and for up to 72 hours after drug administration. Findings Both formulations produced time- and dose-dependent increases on subjective and physiological mu-opioid agonist effects (e.g. ‘liking’, miosis). Subjects reported higher subjective ratings and street values for 8 mg compared to 8/2 mg, but these differences were not statistically significant. No significant formulation differences in peak plasma buprenorphine concentration or time-course were observed. Buprenorphine bioavailability was 38–44% and Tmax was 35–40 minutes after all intranasal doses. Naloxone bioavailability was 24% and 30% following 2/0.5 and 8/2 mg, respectively. Conclusions It is difficult to determine if observed differences in abuse potential between intranasal buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are clinically relevant at the doses tested. Greater bioavailability and faster onset of pharmacodynamic effects compared to sublingual administration suggests a motivation for intranasal misuse in non-dependent opioid abusers. However, significant naloxone absorption from intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone administration may deter the likelihood of intranasal misuse of buprenorphine/naloxone, but not buprenorphine, in opioid-dependent individuals. PMID:21395892

  15. A Review of Buprenorphine Diversion and Misuse: The Current Evidence Base and Experiences from Around the World

    PubMed Central

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient opioid addiction treatment with sublingual buprenorphine pharmacotherapy (OBOT) has rapidly expanded in the United States and abroad, and, with this increase in medication availability, there have been increasing concerns about its diversion, misuse and related harms. This narrative review defines the behaviors of diversion and misuse, examines how the pharmacology of buprenorphine alone and in combination with naloxone influence its abuse liability, and describes the epidemiological data on buprenorphine diversion and intravenous misuse, risk factors for its intravenous misuse and the unintended consequences of misuse and diversion. Physician practices to prevent, screen for, and therapeutically respond to these behaviors, which are a form of medication non-adherence, are discussed and gaps in knowledge are identified. OBOT experiences from other countries that have varied health care systems, public policies, and access to addiction treatment are shared in order to make clear that diversion and misuse occur across the world in various contexts, for many different reasons, and are not limited to buprenorphine. Comparisons are made with other opioids with known abuse liability as well as medications with no known abuse. The objective is to facilitate understanding of diversion and misuse so that all factors influencing their expression (patient and provider characteristics and public policy) can be appreciated within a framework that also recognizes the benefits of addiction treatment. With this comprehensive perspective, further careful work can help determine how to minimize these behaviors without eroding the current benefits realized through improved addiction treatment access and expansion. PMID:25221984

  16. Preparing cationic cotton linter cellulose with high substitution degree by ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fulong; Pang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Cuihua; Liu, Zong

    2015-11-01

    As an important cellulose derivative, cationic cellulose has becoming an attractive material. However, it remains challenging to produce cationic cellulose with high substitute degree. In this paper, we successfully increased the substitute degree of cationic cellulose by introducing ultrasonic treatment, which efficiently breaks hydrogen bonds of the chemical structure of cationic cellulose. Properties of cationic cellulose were studied by scanning electron spectroscope (SEM), contact angle, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Experimental results show that the cationic cellulose has rougher surface and lower crystallinity degree as compared to the original sample. TGA analysis verifies that the thermostability of CLC decreases after the cationic modification. The residual of the cationic cellulose (25 wt%) after pyrolysis increases significantly as compared to that of the original cellulose (15 wt%). PMID:26256343

  17. Efficacy and safety of transdermal buprenorphine: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 289 patients with severe cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Philippe; Denier, Willy; Douma, Joep; Hoerauf, Klaus; Samija, Mirko; Sopata, Maciej; Wolfram, Gernot

    2008-08-01

    Strong opioids are recommended for treating severe cancer pain in the advanced stages of the disease. Few data are available concerning the efficacy of buprenorphine in cancer pain. We compared transdermal buprenorphine 70 microg/h (BUP TDS) to placebo in an enriched design study. Opioid-tolerant patients with cancer pain requiring strong opioids in the dose range of 90-150 mg/d oral morphine equivalents entered a two-week run-in phase, during which they were converted to BUP TDS. Patients who could be stabilized on BUP TDS were randomized to BUP TDS or placebo patch for a two-week maintenance phase. Rescue medication (buprenorphine sublingual tablets 0.2mg) was allowed as required. Response was defined as a mean pain intensity of <5 (0-10 scale) and a mean daily buprenorphine sublingual tablet intake of < or =2 tablets during the maintenance phase. Of 289 patients who entered the run-in phase, 100 discontinued treatment due to lack of efficacy or adverse events; 189 patients continued treatment in the maintenance phase (94 BUP TDS, 95 placebo), of whom 31 discontinued treatment (7 BUP TDS, 24 placebo). A significant difference in the number of treatment responders was observed: 70 BUP TDS (74.5%, 65.7-83.3) vs. 47 placebo (50%, 39.9-60.1) (P=0.0003). This result was supported by a lower daily pain intensity, lower intake of buprenorphine sublingual tablets and fewer dropouts in the BUP TDS group. The incidence of adverse events was slightly higher for BUP TDS. In conclusion, BUP TDS 70 microg/h is an efficacious and safe treatment for patients with severe cancer pain. PMID:18411010

  18. A Randomized, Double-blind Evaluation of Buprenorphine Taper Duration in Primary Prescription Opioid Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Sigmon, Stacey C.; Dunn, Kelly E.; Saulsgiver, Kathryn; Patrick, Mollie E.; Badger, Gary J.; Heil, Sarah H.; Brooklyn, John R.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although abuse of prescription opioids (POs) is a significant public health problem, few experimental studies have investigated the treatment needs of this growing population. OBJECTIVE To evaluate, following brief stabilization with a combination of buprenorphine hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride dihydrate, the relative efficacy of 1-, 2-, and 4-week buprenorphine tapering regimens and subsequent naltrexone hydrochloride therapy in PO-dependent outpatients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A double-blind, 12-week randomized clinical trial was conducted in an outpatient research clinic. Following a brief period of buprenorphine stabilization, 70 PO-dependent adults were randomized to receive 1-, 2-, or 4-week tapers followed by naltrexone therapy. INTERVENTION During phase 1 (weeks 1–5 after randomization), participants visited the clinic daily; during phase 2 (weeks 6–12), visits were reduced to thrice weekly. Participants received behavioral therapy and urine toxicology testing throughout the trial. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The percentage of participants negative for illicit opioid use, retention, naltrexone ingestion, and favorable treatment response (ie, retained in treatment, opioid abstinent, and receiving naltrexone at the end of the study). RESULTS Opioid abstinence at the end of phase 1 was greater in the 4-week compared with the 2- and 1-week taper conditions (P = .02), with 63% (n = 14), 29% (n = 7), and 29% (n = 7) of participants abstinent in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week conditions, respectively. Abstinence at the end of phase 2 was also greater in the 4-week compared with the 2- and 1-week conditions (P = .03), with 50% (n = 11), 16% (n = 4), and 20% (n = 5) of participants abstinent in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week conditions, respectively. There were more treatment responders in the 4-week condition (P = .03), with 50% (n = 11), 17% (n = 4), and 21% (n = 5) of participants in the 4-, 2-, and 1-week groups considered responders at the end of treatment, respectively. Retention and naltrexone ingestion also were superior in the 4-week vs briefer tapers (both P = .04). Experimental condition (ie, taper duration) was the strongest predictor of treatment response, followed by buprenorphine stabilization dose. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This study represents a rigorous experimental evaluation of outpatient buprenorphine stabilization, brief taper, and naltrexone maintenance for treatment of PO dependence. Results suggest that a meaningful subset of PO-dependent outpatients may respond positively to a 4-week taper plus naltrexone maintenance intervention. PMID:24153411

  19. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ghasem; Khorsand, Mahmood; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri; Jarahi, Lida; Zirak, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5µg/kg sublingually) and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously). Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes), and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours). SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P<0.001). Postoperative mean heart rate in the buprenorphine group was four beats lower than the morphine group (P<0.001). Also, in the buprenorphine 48.6% and in the morphine group 86.7% of cases were conscious in recovery (P=0.001) with a higher rate of pruritus in the latter group (P=0.001). Conclusion: Sublingual buprenorphine administration before anesthesia induction in closed reduction surgery can lead to better postoperative pain control in comparison to intravenous morphine. Due to simple usage and longer postoperative sedation, sublingual buprenorphine is recommended as a suitable drug in closed reduction surgery. PMID:26550594

  20. Indicators of Buprenorphine and Methadone Use and Abuse: What Do We Know?

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of prescription opioids is a growing problem. The number of methadone pain pills distributed now exceeds liquid methadone used in opioid treatment, and the increases in buprenorphine indicators provide evidence of the need to monitor and intervene to decrease the abuse of this drug. The need for additional and improved data to track trends is discussed, along with findings as to the characteristics of the users and combinations of drugs. Data on toxicities related to methadone or buprenorphine, particularly in combination with other prescribed drugs, are presented and clinical implications and considerations are offered. These findings underscore the need for physicians to be aware of potential toxicities and to educate their patients regarding these issues. PMID:20132124

  1. Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions between Daclatasvir and Methadone or Buprenorphine-Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, R.; Luo, W.-L.; Wastall, P.; Kandoussi, H.; DeMicco, M.; Bruce, R. D.; Hwang, C.; Bertz, R.; Bifano, M.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common among people who inject drugs, including those managed with maintenance opioids. Pharmacokinetic interactions between opioids and emerging oral HCV antivirals merit evaluation. Daclatasvir is a potent pangenotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex recently approved for HCV treatment in Europe and Japan in combination with other antivirals. The effect of steady-state daclatasvir (60 mg daily) on stable plasma exposure to oral opioids was assessed in non-HCV-infected subjects receiving methadone (40 to 120 mg; n = 14) or buprenorphine plus naloxone (8 to 24 mg plus 2 to 6 mg; n = 11). No relevant interaction was inferred if the 90% confidence interval (CI) of the geometric mean ratio (GMR) of opioid area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUC?) or maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) with versus without daclatasvir was within literature-derived ranges of 0.7 to 1.43 (R- and S-methadone) or 0.5 to 2.0 (buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine). Dose-normalized AUC? for R-methadone (GMR, 1.08; 90% CI, 0.94 to 1.24), S-methadone (1.13; 0.99 to 1.30), and buprenorphine (GMR, 1.37; 90% CI, 1.24 to 1.52) were within the no-effect range. The norbuprenorphine AUC? was slightly elevated in the primary analysis (GMR, 1.62; 90% CI, 1.30 to 2.02) but within the no-effect range in a supplementary analysis of all evaluable subjects. Dose-normalized Cmax for both methadone enantiomers, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, were within the no-effect range. Standardized assessments of opioid pharmacodynamics were unchanged throughout daclatasvir administration with methadone or buprenorphine. Daclatasvir pharmacokinetics were similar to historical data. Coadministration of daclatasvir and opioids was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, these data suggest that daclatasvir can be administered with buprenorphine or methadone without dose adjustments. PMID:26124175

  2. Calcium Sulfate as Bone Graft Substitute in the Treatment of Osseous Bone Defects, A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar C, Yashavantha; K B, Nalini; Menon, Jagdish; Patro, Dilip Kumar; B H, Banerji

    2013-01-01

    Background: Calcium sulfate belongs to synthetic ceramic group of bone graft substitutes having an osteoconductive property. Calcium sulfate is an easily available, economic bone graft substitute. It is a bio-inert material which over a period of weeks get resorbed and fibrovascular tissue takes its place which eventually allows neovascularisation and bone formation within the area. Use of calcium sulfate as a bone graft substitutes avoids the complications and morbidity associated with autograft like infection, second surgery, and finite amount of graft. Material and Methods: A total of 15 patients with benign bone lesions and chronic osteomyelitis were operated and the osseous defects were filled with calcium sulfate which was comprehensively sterilized. Patients were followed with serial radiographs at six week intervals. Calcium sulfate resorption and new bone formation was studied. Results: Thirteen cases out of 15 showed calcium sulphate resorption and new bone incorporation. Calcaium sulphate resorption occurred at an average of 14.5 weeks (range,13-18weeks) whereas new bone incorporation occurred at an average of 6months ( range,5-7months). Thirteen patients out of these 15 cases returned to full activities of daily living. One patient had pathological fracture at the osseous defect postoperatively. One patient with GCT of distal end of tibia had recurrence of tumor and had to undergo second surgery. Conclusion: Although autogenous bone graft is the gold standard for bone grafting, it has limitations like finite amount, additional surgery and donor site morbidity. Calcium sulphate is safe, efficient and easily available bone graft substitute in the treatment of osseous defects. Most common complication encountered was aseptic serous discharge. Functional results were favorable in most of the cases. PMID:24551676

  3. Atipamezole Reverses Ketamine–Dexmedetomidine Anesthesia without Altering the Antinociceptive Effects of Butorphanol and Buprenorphine in Female C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izer, Jenelle M; Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Wilson, Ronald P

    2014-01-01

    Butorphanol and buprenorphine are common analgesics used in laboratory mice. Inadvertent attenuation of the antinociceptive effects of these analgesics via the administration of an anesthetic reversal agent could result in postprocedural pain and distress, with subsequent negative effects on animal welfare, study outcomes, and regulatory compliance. This study was undertaken to determine whether atipamezole reverses ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia and alters the antinociceptive effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. Atipamezole reliably reversed the anesthetic effects of ketamine–dexmedetomidine, and mice were ambulatory 17.4 ± 30.6 min after administration of the ?2-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Atipamezole alone had no significant effect on tail-flick latency and did not alter the antinociceptive properties of butorphanol or low-dose (0.05 mg/kg) or high-dose (0.1 mg/kg) buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. After reversal of ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia, tail-flick latency at 30, 60, and 150 min after analgesic treatment differed significantly between mice treated with atipamezole alone and those given atipamezole followed by butorphanol or high-dose buprenorphine. These results suggest that the analgesic effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine are not affected by atipamezole. Buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg) administered 30 min prior to or at the time of anesthesia resulted in a greater magnitude of antinociception after antagonism of anesthesia than when given at the time of reversal. Given these results, we recommend the use of ketamine–dexmedetomidine anesthesia with buprenorphine administered either preemptively or at the time of anesthetic induction to provide a defined period of surgical anesthesia that is effectively reversed by atipamezole. PMID:25650975

  4. Changes in Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) and Addiction Severity Index (ASI) among participants in Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) in Low and Middle Income Countries: An International Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Feelemyer, Jonathan P; Jarlais, Don C Des; Arasteh, Kamyar; Phillips, Benjamin W; Hagan, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Background Opioid substitution treatment (OST) can increase quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) and reduce addiction severity index (ASI) scores among participants over time. OST program participants have noted that improvement in quality of life is one of the most important variables to their reduction in drug use. However, there is little systematic understanding of WHOQOL-BREF and ASI domain changes among OST participants in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Methods Utilizing PRISMA guidelines we conducted a systematic literature search to identify OST program studies documenting changes in WHOQOL-BREF or ASI domains for participants in buprenorphine or methadone programs in LMIC. Standardized mean differences for baseline and follow-up domain scores were compared along with relationships between domain scores, OST dosage, and length of follow-up. Results There were 13 OST program studies with 1801 participants from seven countries eligible for inclusion in the review. Overall, statistically significant changes were noted in all four WHOQOL-BREF domain and four of the seven ASI domain scores (drug, psychological, legal, and family) documented in studies. Dosage of pharmacologic medication and length of follow-up did not affect changes in domain scores. Conclusion WHOQOL-BREF and ASI domain scoring is a useful tool in measuring overall quality of life and levels of addiction among OST participants. Coupled with measurements of blood-borne infection, drug use, relapse, and overdose, WHOQOL-BREF and ASI represent equally important tools for evaluating the effects of OST over time and should be further developed as integrated tools in the evaluation of participants in LMIC. PMID:24200104

  5. The use of high dosages of transdermal buprenorphine for pain management in palliative cancer patients: a case study.

    PubMed

    M J Clement, Paul; Beuselinck, Benoit; Van Beek, Karen; Georgette Mertens, P; Cornelissen, Paul; Menten, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a prevalent condition in patients with cancer, particularly in advanced stages of cancer. Although strong opioids are the mainstay of cancer pain management protocols, patients are often undertreated. Transdermal buprenorphine is currently available for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain and severe pain which does not respond to nonopioid analgesics; patch doses of 35, 52.5 and 70 µg/h are available (applied for up to 96 h), with no more than 2 transdermal patches at the same time, regardless of the strength. To date, there are no published reports in the literature of the use of high-dose transdermal buprenorphine (>140 µg/h). Herein, we present 2 cases of palliative cancer patients who received transdermal buprenorphine at doses titrated up to 210 and 175 µg/h, respectively, for the management of pain. Transdermal buprenorphine titrated to doses >140 µg/h provided adequate pain control and was well tolerated. Future studies to confirm these initial observations are warranted. PMID:23626556

  6. The effects of maternally administered methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone on offspring: review of human and animal data.

    PubMed

    Farid, W O; Dunlop, S A; Tait, R J; Hulse, G K

    2008-06-01

    Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current "gold standard", and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a micro-opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial micro-opioid receptor agonist and a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term. PMID:19305793

  7. The Effects of Maternally Administered Methadone, Buprenorphine and Naltrexone on Offspring: Review of Human and Animal Data

    PubMed Central

    Farid, W.O; Dunlop, S.A; Tait, R.J; Hulse, G.K

    2008-01-01

    Most women using heroin are of reproductive age with major risks for their infants. We review clinical and experimental data on fetal, neonatal and postnatal complications associated with methadone, the current “gold standard”, and compare these with more recent, but limited, data on developmental effects of buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Methadone is a µ-opioid receptor agonist and is commonly recommended for treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, it has undesired outcomes including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Animal studies also indicate detrimental effects on growth, behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry, and increased perinatal mortality. Buprenorphine is a partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and a ?-opioid receptor antagonist. Clinical observations suggest that buprenorphine during pregnancy is similar to methadone on developmental measures but is potentially superior in reducing the incidence and prognosis of NAS. However, small animal studies demonstrate that low doses of buprenorphine during pregnancy and lactation lead to changes in offspring behaviour, neuroanatomy and biochemistry. Naltrexone is a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Although data are limited, humans treated with oral or sustained-release implantable naltrexone suggest outcomes potentially superior to those with methadone or buprenorphine. However, animal studies using oral or injectable naltrexone have shown developmental changes following exposure during pregnancy and lactation, raising concerns about its use in humans. Animal studies using chronic exposure, equivalent to clinical depot formulations, are required to evaluate safety. While each treatment is likely to have maternal advantages and disadvantages, studies are urgently required to determine which is optimal for offspring in the short and long term. PMID:19305793

  8. Buprenorphine for Cancer Pain: Is It Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed

    Prommer, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Buprenorphine (BUP) is a semisynthetic derivative of the opium alkaloid thebaine found in the poppy Papaver somniferum. Its chemical structure contains the morphine structure but differs by having a cyclopropylmethyl group. Buprenorphine is a potent µ opioid agonist. Buprenorphine undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism in the liver and gut. The development of a transdermal BUP formulation in 2001 led to its evaluation in cancer pain. This article provides the practitioner with an update on the current role of BUP in cancer care. It highlights data suggesting effectiveness in various types of cancer pain. The article reviews pharmacology, routes of administration, adverse effects, drug interactions, and cost considerations. PMID:25163678

  9. Psychological Barriers to Tobacco Cessation in Indian Buprenorphine-Naloxone Maintained Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Piyali; Jain, Raka; Jhanjee, Sonali; Sreenivas, V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of smoking in opioid agonist treatment programmes remains high, leading to significant tobacco related health hazards and mortality. This is the first study from India addressing tobacco cessation and related barriers among recipients of buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment. Aims: The purpose of the study was to investigate Indian buprenorphine-naloxone maintained patients’ willingness to quit tobacco use, to determine its possible association with demographic, agonist maintenance treatment, tobacco use related variables and personal health and risk perceptions related to health hazards associated with tobacco use. Settings and Design: The study was cross-sectional, observational. It was conducted in the out-patient department of a national level de-addiction centre in India. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five males on buprenorphine-naloxone treatment were assessed using Tobacco Use Characteristics, Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND and FTND-ST), Readiness to Change questionnaire (RCQ), Smoker's Perceived Health Risk Evaluation (SPHERE), Importance of Intervention scale and a semi-structured questionnaire. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics, Kruskal-Wallis Chi-square test, Spearman rank order correlation, paired-t test, ANOVA (STATA 9.2 statistical package). Results: Around 65.4% of the subjects were smokers, 9% were using smokeless tobacco only whereas 25.6% were using both. Mean duration of tobacco use was 20 ± 1.5 years. Only 20% had past quit attempts. Only 24% were in action phase of change. Personal health and risk perceptions were poor and only 61.62% considered intervention tobacco smoking cessation important. Conclusions: Higher severity of nicotine dependence, low perception of harm from tobacco warrant immediate attention and need for on-site treatment opportunity.

  10. Trends of People Using Drugs and Opioid Substitute Treatment Recorded in England and Wales General Practice (1994-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Hilary R.; Nazareth, Irwin; Petersen, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Background Illicit drug use is a multifaceted public-health problem with potentially serious impacts. The United Kingdom has one of the highest prevalence of illegal drug use in Europe. Reduction of overall illegal drug use in England and Wales has decreased from 11% to 8.2% (2012/13) over the past 10 years. People who use drugs often seek help from their family doctors. Aims To investigate General Practitioners (family doctors) first recording of drug use and opioid substitute treatment in primary care settings. Design A descriptive study design. Males and females (16-64 years old) were extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. Setting England and Wales primary care. Method The first recording of drug use and opioid substitution treatment in primary care was estimated for the period (1994-2012). Poisson regressions were conducted to estimate incidence risk ratios (IRR). Results We identified 33,508 first recordings of drug use and 10,869 individuals with prescriptions for opioid substitute treatment. Overall, males (IRR 2.02, 95% CI:1.97–2.07), people in the age-group; 16-24 (IRR 6.7, 95% CI:6.4–6.9) compared to those over 25 years and the most deprived (IRR 4.2, 95% CI:3.9–4.4) were more likely to have a recording of drug use. Males (IRR 1.2 95% CI:1.2–1.3), in the age-group; 25-34 (IRR 1.8 95% CI:1.7–1.9) and the most deprived (IRR 3.9 95% CI:3.6–4.3) were the groups more likely to have a opioid substitute treatment prescription. Conclusion It is evident from this study that there is little recording of drug use and opioid substitute treatment in primary care. Most drug users do not receive treatment in primary care. PMID:25923806

  11. Considerations on the role of buprenorphine in recovery from heroin addiction from a UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Nutt, David J

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom Drug Strategy emphasises recovery as a key focus in the treatment of drug dependence. A framework for recovery is defined in the Recovery-Orientated Drug Treatment report, written by an expert working group, and comprises four key phases: engagement and stabilisation, including the establishment of treatment goals; preparation for change, involving engagement in psychosocial and pharmacological interventions; active change, including detoxification and medical withdrawal; and completion, including interventions that strengthen community integration. A body of evidence supports the benefits of buprenorphine, a partial agonist at mu opioid receptors, in supporting individualised recovery based on this framework, specifically in relation to the potential for rapid stabilisation, flexibility to transition to other treatment options or achieve abstinence, effective blocking of on-top use of illicit drugs, the treatment of comorbidities through the minimisation of drug-drug interactions, and a good safety profile. In addition, the newer abuse-deterrent formulation of buprenorphine combined with the opioid antagonist naloxone is likely to strengthen recovery-orientated systems of care due to its potential to reduce misuse and diversion. Progress through the recovery journey and the ability to sustain recovery will depend on individual needs and goals and on the amount of recovery capital that individuals have developed. PMID:25389219

  12. Implementation of a collaborative care management program with buprenorphine in primary care: A comparison between opioid-dependent patients and chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Joji; Matthews, Michele L.; Brick, David; Nguyen, Minh-Thuy; Jamison, Robert N.; Ellner, Andrew L.; Tishler, Lori W.; Weiss, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To implement a collaborative care management program with buprenorphine in a primary care clinic. Design Prospective observational study. Setting A busy urban academic primary care clinic affiliated with a tertiary care hospital. Participants Opioid dependent patients or chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically were recruited for the study. A total of 45 participants enrolled. Interventions Patients were treated with buprenorphine and managed by a supervising psychiatrist, pharmacist care manager and health coaches. The care manager conducted buprenorphine inductions and all follow-ups visits. Health coaches offered telephonic support. The psychiatrist supervised both the care manager and health coaches. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were treatment retention at 6 months, and change in the proportion of aberrant toxicology results and opioid craving scores from baseline to 6 months. After data collection, clinical outcomes were compared between opioid dependent patients and chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically. Overall, 55.0% (25/45) of participants remained in treatment at 6 months. PCPs’ attitudes about opioid dependence treatment were surveyed at baseline and at 18-months. Results Forty-three patients (95.6%) accepted treatment and 25 (55.0%) remained in treatment at 6 months. The proportion of aberrant urine toxicology results decreased significantly from baseline to 6 months (p<0.01). Craving scores significantly decreased from baseline to 6 months (p<0.01). Opioid dependent patients, as opposed to chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically, were significantly more likely to complete 6 months of treatment (p<0.05). PCPs’ confidence in treating opioid dependence in primary care increased significantly from baseline to 18-months post-implementation (p<0.01). Conclusion Collaborative care management for opioid dependence with buprenorphine may be feasible in a primary care clinic. More research is needed to understand the role of buprenorphine in managing chronic pain patients using opioids non-medically. PMID:24944066

  13. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Facility Locator Buprenorphine Physician Locator Find a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health ... Service . Privacy Policy . Home | About the Locator | Find Facilities Near You | Find Facilities by City, County, State ...

  14. Who prescribes buprenorphine for rural patients? The impact of specialty, location and practice type in Washington State?,??

    PubMed Central

    Kvamme, Erik; Catlin, Mary; Banta-Green, Caleb; Roll, John; Rosenblatt, Roger

    2013-01-01

    We determined the specialty, geographic location, practice type and treatment capacity of waivered clinicians in Washington State. We utilized the April 2011 Drug Enforcement Agency roster of all waivered buprenorphine prescribers and cross-referenced the data with information from the American Medical Association and online resources. Waivered physicians, as compared to Washington State physicians overall, are more likely to be primary care providers, be older, less likely to be younger than 35years, and more likely to be female. Isolated rural areas have the lowest provider to population ratios. Ten counties lack either a buprenorphine provider or a methadone clinic. In rural areas, waivered physicians work predominately in federally-subsidized safety-net settings, which underscores the need for continued governmental support of primary care and mental health in these settings. PMID:22939650

  15. Morphine and buprenorphine do not alter leukocyte cytokine production capacity, early apoptosis, or neutrophil phagocytic function in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Monibi, Farrah A; Dodam, John R; Axiak-Bechtel, Sandra M; Amorim, Juliana; Zhang, Yan; Tsuruta, Kaoru; Mann, F A; DeClue, Amy E

    2015-04-01

    Opioids have immunomodulatory properties in many species, but there is little information pertaining to these properties in dogs. Our objective was to compare the in vivo effects of morphine, buprenorphine, and control solution on innate immune system function and apoptosis in healthy dogs. Six adult dogs received a 24-hour infusion of morphine, buprenorphine, or control solution (saline) in a randomized, controlled, crossover block design. Leukocyte apoptosis, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst were evaluated using flow cytometry. Lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and peptidoglycan-stimulated leukocyte production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 were determined using canine specific multiplex assays. No significant treatment effects were detected among groups. These data suggest that healthy dogs could be less sensitive to the immunomodulatory effects of acute opioid administration compared with other species. Larger investigations in healthy and immunologically challenged dogs are recommended prior to application of these results in clinical patients. PMID:25660046

  16. Buprenorphine Response as a Function of Neurogenetic Polymorphic Antecedents: Can Dopamine Genes Affect Clinical Outcomes in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS)?

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Jacobs, William; McLaughlin, Thomas; Gold, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    There is a plethora of research indicating the successful treatment of opioid dependence with either buprenorphine alone or in combination with naloxone (Suboxone®). However, we encourage caution in long-term maintenance with these drugs, albeit, lack of any other FDA approved opioid maintenance compound to date. Our concern has been supported by severe withdrawal (even with tapering of the dosage of for example Suboxone® which is 40 times more potent than morphine) from low dose of buprenorphine (alone or with naloxone). In addition our findings of a long-term flat affect in chronic Suboxone® patients amongst other unwanted side effects including diversion and suicide attempts provides impetus to reconsider long-term utilization. However, it seems prudent to embrace genetic testing to reveal reward circuitry gene polymorphisms especially those related to dopaminergic pathways as well as opioid receptor(s) as a way of improving treatment outcomes. Understanding the interaction of reward circuitry involvement in buprenorphine effects and respective genotypes provide a novel framework to augment a patient's clinical experience and benefits during opioid replacement therapy. PMID:25664200

  17. The causal effect of opioid substitution treatment on HAART medication refill adherence

    PubMed Central

    Nosyk, Bohdan; Min, Jeong E.; Colley, Guillaume; Lima, Viviane D.; Yip, Benita; Milloy, M.-J.S.; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background People who inject drugs (PWID) account for roughly 13% of the prevalent HIV/AIDS population outside of sub-Saharan Africa, and access to opioid substitution treatment (OST) is limited in many settings globally. OST likely facilitates access to HAART, yet sparse evidence is available to support this hypothesis. Our objective was to determine the causal impact of OST exposure on HAART adherence among HIV-positive PWID in a Canadian setting. Methods We executed a retrospective cohort study using linked population-level data for British Columbia, Canada (January 1996–March 2010). We considered HIV-positive PWID after meeting HAART initiation criteria. A marginal structural model was estimated on a monthly timescale using inverse probability of treatment weights. The primary outcome was 95% HAART adherence, according to pharmacy refill compliance. Exposure to OST was defined as 95% of OST receipt, and we controlled for a range of fixed and time-varying covariates. Results Our study included 1852 (63.3%) HIV-positive PWID with a median follow-up of 5.5 years; 34% were female and 39% had previously accessed OST. The baseline covariate-adjusted odds of HAART adherence following OST exposure was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.72–2.24), although the adjusted odds estimated within the marginal structural model was 1.68 (1.48–1.92). Findings were robust to sensitivity analyses on model specification. Conclusion In a setting characterized by universal healthcare and widespread access to both office-based OST and HAART, OST substantially increased the odds of HAART adherence. This underlines the need to address barriers to OST globally to reduce the disease burden of both opioid dependence and HIV/AIDS. PMID:25915170

  18. Ability to Work and Employability of Patients in Opioid Substitution Treatment Programs in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Bilban, Marjan; Kasteli?, Andrej; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana

    2008-01-01

    Aim To assess the ability to work and employability of individuals taking part in opioid substitution treatment programs (OSTP). Methods The study was composed of two surveys. In the first survey, 237 of 480 patients enrolled in OSTP responded to the questionnaire about their employment status, opinion about employment, and perception of assignments before and during OSTP. In the second survey, 66 of 100 employers responded to the questionnaire on the occurrence, perception, and management of addiction problems in their companies. Results Unemployment rate in individuals enrolled in OSTP was 43.5% and decreased during OSTP by 10.5% (P?=?0.027). Irregular use of OSTP medications was the most important factor for unemployment (odds ratio, 2.44; P?=?0.016). OSTP was highly effective in achieving a positive change in patients’ perception of different kinds of assignments previously perceived as beyond their abilities. Thus, perception of mentally demanding assignments (P?

  19. [Application of a seven-day buprenorphine transdermal patch in multimorbid patients on long-term ibuprofen or diclofenac].

    PubMed

    Böhme, K; Heckes, B; Thomitzek, K

    2011-01-13

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the benefit of a seven-day buprenorphine transdermal patch for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain previously receiving long-term treatment with ibuprofen or diclofenac alone. Data of a subgroup of 703 patients were analysed which were part of a multicenter observational study with 3,295 patients. These patients had previously received ibuprofen or diclofenac and were characterized by older age,the presence of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal risk factors and the existence of chronic musculoskeletal pain. The switch to the seven-day buprenorphine patch resulted in a clinically significant decrease of the mean pain intensity at rest during the day from 5.3 to 2.9, on physical effort during the day from 7.1 to 3.3, and at night from 4.9 to 1.9 at the end of the study (11-point NRS scale, pbuprenorphine due to the lack of cardiac, renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. Constant analgesia, improvement of daily activities and reduction of tablets were reported as important advantages of the seven-day patch. In conclusion, the seven-day buprenorphine patch is a valuable therapeutic option for patients with insufficient analgesia on long-term ibuprofen or diclofenac. PMID:21598463

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of multiple sublingual buprenorphine tablets in dose-escalation trials.

    PubMed

    Ciraulo, Domenic A; Hitzemann, Robert J; Somoza, Eugene; Knapp, Clifford M; Rotrosen, John; Sarid-Segal, Ofra; Ciraulo, Ann Marie; Greenblatt, David J; Chiang, C Nora

    2006-02-01

    In this investigation, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties were determined of multiple doses of sublingual tablets containing either buprenorphine alone or buprenorphine and naloxone. Subjects were experienced opiate users who received escalating doses (4-24 mg) of buprenorphine either alone or in combination with naloxone. Peak concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curves (AUCs) increased for both buprenorphine and naloxone with escalating doses. Significant differences were found across the range of doses administered for dose-adjusted Cmax for both tablet formulations and for the dose-adjusted AUCs for the buprenorphine-naloxone tablets. For both formulations, the maximal buprenorphine-induced decreases in respiratory rate and pupil diameter did not vary significantly across doses. Several of the subjective effects of buprenorphine did not increase as the dose of buprenorphine administered was increased. These findings are consistent with the ceiling effect associated with the partial agonist actions of buprenorphine. They also indicate a lack of dose proportionality for buprenorphine sublingual tablets, at least during the times at which levels of this agent are highest. PMID:16432270

  1. Effect of Steady-State Faldaprevir on the Pharmacokinetics of Steady-State Methadone and Buprenorphine-Naloxone in Subjects Receiving Stable Addiction Management Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, David; Schobelock, Michael J.; Riesenberg, Robert R.; Vince, Bradley D.; Webster, Lynn R.; Adeniji, Abidemi; Elgadi, Mabrouk

    2014-01-01

    The effects of steady-state faldaprevir on the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of steady-state methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone were assessed in 34 healthy male and female subjects receiving stable addiction management therapy. Subjects continued receiving a stable oral dose of either methadone (up to a maximum dose of 180 mg per day) or buprenorphine-naloxone (up to a maximum dose of 24 mg-6 mg per day) and also received oral faldaprevir (240 mg) once daily (QD) for 8 days following a 480-mg loading dose. Serial blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic analysis. The pharmacodynamics of the opioid maintenance regimens were evaluated by the objective and subjective opioid withdrawal scales. Coadministration of faldaprevir with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone resulted in geometric mean ratios for the steady-state area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24,ss), the steady-state maximum concentration of the drug in plasma (Cmax,ss), and the steady-state concentration of the drug in plasma at 24 h (C24,ss) of 0.92 to 1.18 for (R)-methadone, (S)-methadone, buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and naloxone, with 90% confidence intervals including, or very close to including, 1.00 (no effect), suggesting a limited overall effect of faldaprevir. Although individual data showed moderate variability in the exposures between subjects and treatments, there was no evidence of symptoms of opiate overdose or withdrawal either during the coadministration of faldaprevir with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone or after faldaprevir dosing was stopped. Similar faldaprevir exposures were observed in the methadone- and buprenorphine-naloxone-treated subjects. In conclusion, faldaprevir at 240 mg QD can be coadministered with methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone without dose adjustment, although given the relatively narrow therapeutic windows of these agents, monitoring for opiate overdose and withdrawal may still be appropriate. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01637922.) PMID:25385094

  2. Randomised trial comparing buprenorphine and diamorphine for chest pain in suspected myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, M J; Fraser, A R; Hampton, J R

    1979-08-01

    Buprenorphine, a new powerful analgesic agent, was used to treat chest pain in patients with suspected myocardial infarction. Initial studies showed no significant changes in systemic or pulmonary artery blood pressure or in heart rate after intravenous buprenorphine. Sublingual buprenorphine also appeared effective in relieving pain, but its onset of action was considerably delayed compared with the intravenous route. A randomised double-blind controlled trial of equivalent doses of buprenorphine and diamorphine showed no significant difference between the drugs in terms of pain relief and duration of action. The occurrence of nausea, vomiting, and other side effects was similar in the two groups. The onset of action of buprenorphine was slightly but significantly slower than that of diamorphine. Since buprenorphine seems to be comparable with diamorphine in action and is not a controlled drug, it may prove useful in both general and hospital practice. PMID:383195

  3. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Buprenorphine in Macaques (Macaca mulatta and Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Halliday, Lisa C; Moody, David E; Fang, Wenfang B; Lindeblad, Matthew; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2013-01-01

    Buprenorphine is the cornerstone of pain management in nonhuman primates, but the pharmacokinetics of this widely used drug are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of buprenorphine (0.01 and 0.03 mg/kg IM) and sustained-release buprenorphine (0.2 mg/kg SC) in 2 macaque species (M. mulatta and M. fascicularis) by using mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetics did not differ significantly between species, and buprenorphine was dose-proportional at the tested doses. The low and high doses of buprenorphine had elimination half-lives of 2.6 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ± 2.0 h, respectively, but the low-dose data were constrained by the sensitivity of the analytical method. Sustained-release buprenorphine had an elimination half-life of 42.6 ± 26.2 h. The AUC0-Tlast of buprenorphine were 9.1 ± 4.3 and 39.0 ± 25.1 ng×h/mL for the low and high doses, respectively, and sustained-release buprenorphine had an AUC0-Tlast of 177 ± 74 ng×h/mL. Assuming a hypothesized therapeutic buprenorphine plasma concentration threshold of 0.1 ng/mL in macaques, these results suggest that buprenorphine doses of 0.01 mg/kg IM should be administered every 6 to 8 h, whereas doses of 0.03 mg/kg IM can be administered every 12 h. These results further demonstrate that a single 0.2-mg/kg SC injection of sustained-release buprenorphine maintains plasma concentrations above 0.1 ng/mL for 5 d in macaques. These findings support a new dosing strategy using sustained-release buprenorphine to improve pain management, decrease animal stress, improve animal welfare, and simplify the postoperative management of nonhuman primates in laboratory animal and zoological settings. PMID:23562033

  4. Buprenorphine + naloxone: new combination. Opiate dependence: no proof of reduced risk of self-administered injection.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    (1) Two drugs with similar efficacy are available in France for heroin replacement therapy: methadone and buprenorphine. (2) Buprenorphine is sold in the form of sublingual tablets, but some patients dissolve and inject them. Methadone is the main alternative for these patients. Other intravenous opiate derivatives can also be tried, although they have not been approved for this indication. (3) In order to help prevent patients from injecting themselves with buprenorphine, a sublingual combination of buprenorphine + naloxone is to be marketed in France. (4) From a pharmacological point of view, this combination makes sense. Naloxone, an opiate antagonist, is very poorly absorbed with sublingual administration, but if it is injected intravenously, it will antagonise the effects of buprenorphine. However, clinical studies are needed to determine whether or not this prevents injection. (5) A double-blind trial in 326 patients compared replacement therapy with buprenorphine 16 mg + naloxone 4 mg/day versus buprenorphine 16 mg + placebo. The addition of naloxone did not reduce the efficacy of sublingual buprenorphine, but the frequency with which patients injected the drugs was not studied in this trial. (6) This combination of buprenorphine + naloxone has not been directly compared with methadone. (7) In addition to the classical adverse effects of opiates, buprenorphine can cause hepatic adverse effects. (8) Little evidence is available on the effects of intravenous injection of buprenorphine + naloxone. According to an epidemiological survey conducted in Finland, where the combination is also marketed, about 8% of patients regularly inject it intravenously. (9) Patients who are likely to inject buprenorphine should be switched to methadone. PMID:18087797

  5. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine hydrochloride following intramuscular and intravenous administration to American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustavsen, Kate A.; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Knych, Heather K.; Petritz, Olivia A.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Buprenorphine was rapidly absorbed, and bioavailability was good after IM administration to American kestrels. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were > 1 ng/mL for 9 hours after both IM and IV administration. These results, in combination with those of a pharmacodynamic study, suggested that the analgesic effects of buprenorphine could last at least 6 to 9 hours in this species. Further investigations of the duration of analgesic effects, multiple-dose protocols, and potential adverse effects of buprenorphine are warranted in American kestrels and other raptors.

  6. Long-term administration of high doses of transdermal buprenorphine in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Leppert, Wojciech; Kowalski, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine is often administered by the transdermal route (transdermal buprenorphine [TB]) in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain. However, high doses of TB of 140 µg/h are rarely used. Patients and methods Three cancer patients with severe neuropathic Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) pain scores of 8–10 who were successfully treated with high doses of TB up to 140 µg/h along with other opioids and adjuvant analgesics. Results TB was administered for a long period of follow-up (9 months to 4 years, including 34–261 days of treatment with the dose of 140 µg/h), which allowed achievement of satisfactory analgesia (NRS 3–5) and good treatment tolerance. In all three patients, TB dose was gradually titrated from 35 to 140 µg/h, and all patients used morphine at least for some time for breakthrough and background pain management along with adjuvant analgesics. Two patients continued the treatment with TB until the end of life, and one patient is still receiving the treatment. Conclusion TB at doses of up to 140 µg/h in cancer patients with severe neuropathic pain seems to be effective and safe in combination with other opioids and with adjuvant analgesics, and may significantly improve patients’ quality of life. Clinical studies may explore higher than maximal 140 µg/h TB doses recommended by a manufacturer, and also in combination with other opioids and adjuvant analgesics. PMID:26675083

  7. Enzyme immunoassay validation for the detection of buprenorphine in urine.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Kintz, P; Lohner, S; Ludes, B

    2003-03-01

    A solid-phase enzyme immunoassay involving microtiter plates was proposed by Microgenics to screen buprenorphine in urine. The intra-assay precision at 10 ng/mL was 7.7% (coefficient of variation). The immunoassay was determined to have no cross-reactivity with codeine, dihydrocodeine, morphine, ethylmorphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, methadone, pholcodine, propoxyphene, dextromoramide, and dextromethorphan at 1 and 10 mg/L. A low cross-reactivity (3% at 1 ng/mL) was observed at low concentrations of norbuprenorphine. After comparing this new immunological test (Singlestep ELISA) for 76 urine specimens with our validated high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC-ES-MS) procedure, an optimum cutoff concentration of 2 ng/mL was determined for the kit. At this cutoff, the screening assay was able to determine more than 90% of true results with 43.4% true positives and 48.7% true negatives. Four positive urines (5.3%) were not confirmed by HPLC-ES-MS. In only one case, the negative urine test was confirmed as positive by HPLC-ES-MS (buprenorphine: 62.5 ng/mL). Buprenorphine concentrations determined by HPLC-ES-MS ranged from 1.2 to 1052 ng/mL. Of the four potential adulterants (hypochloride 50 mL/L, sodium nitrite 50 g/L, liquid soap 50 mL/L, and sodium chloride 50 g/L) that might be added to a positive urine specimen, none were able to cause a false-negative response by the immunoassay. The results of this study support the concept that the Singlestep ELISA for buprenorphine determination in urine should be considered as a new, valided screening procedure. PMID:12670004

  8. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that SUBOXONE (buprenorphine hydrochloride (HCl) and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 milligrams (mg)/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg, were not withdrawn from sale for reasons of safety or effectiveness. This determination will allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for buprenorphine HCl and naloxone HCl sublingual tablets, 2......

  9. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual Tablets, 2 Milligrams/0.5 Milligrams and 8 Milligrams/2 Milligrams, Were... (buprenorphine hydrochloride (HCl) and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 milligrams (mg)/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg... (buprenorphine HCl and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg, are the subject of NDA...

  10. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  11. Depression-like effect of prenatal buprenorphine exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Jen; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Wen-Ying; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Studies indicate that perinatal opioid exposure produces a variety of short- and long-term neurobehavioral consequences. However, the precise modes of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed agonist/antagonist at the opioid receptors, is currently being used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of depression-like consequence following prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine and sheds light on potential mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days. Results showed that pups at postnatal day 21 but not the dams had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors using a forced swimming test and tail suspension test, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by elevation of oxidative stress, reduction of plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serotonin, and attenuation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B (TrkB) phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, protein kinase A activity, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and CREB DNA-binding activity. Since BDNF/serotonin and CREB signaling could orchestrate a positive feedback loop, our findings suggest that the induction of oxidative stress, reduction of BDNF and serotonin expression, and attenuation of CREB signaling induced by prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine provide evidence of potential mechanism for the development of depression-like neurobehavior. PMID:24367510

  12. [High-dose buprenorphine for outpatient palliative pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Gastmeier, K; Freye, E

    2009-04-01

    The case of a 78-year-old patient with cancer-related pain and additionally mixed-pain syndrome is presented. Pain therapy with buprenorphine TTS 210 microg/h every 3 days was sufficient in the beginning, later the therapy was changed because of increasing problems of tape fixing during fever periods under chemotherapy to a continuous infusion of buprenorphine intravenously via an external medication pump. During the course of therapy it became necessary to increase the dose to 99.9 mg/day buprenorphine. Under this medication a sufficient pain reduction (median NRS 2-3) over a period of 135 days could be achieved. At the same time the patient was vigilant and cooperative without signs of intoxication until the end of life at home in the presence of his family.If no signs of intoxication occur under extreme opioid therapy and a sufficient pain therapy can be achieved, a rotation to another opioid is not necessary. However, outpatient palliative care requires a frequent adaptation to the individually varying opioid demand of the patient and time-consuming nursing care. PMID:19066981

  13. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments. PMID:22616934

  14. Lack of Reduction in Buprenorphine Injection After Introduction of Co-Formulated Buprenorphine/Naloxone to the Malaysian Market

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Govindasamy, Sumathi; Sylla, Laurie; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Diversion of buprenorphine (BPN) has been described in settings where it is legally prescribed and has resulted in increasing concern. To address this concern, co-formulation of buprenorphine/naloxone (BPN/NLX) replaced buprenorphine alone in Malaysia in December 2006. Methods To assess the significance of BPN/NLX introduction, 41 BPN/NLX injectors in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were recruited using a modified snowball recruitment technique. Results In January 2007, all subjects had previously injected BPN alone. During the transition from injecting BPN alone to co-formulated BPN/NLX, the mean daily BPN injection dose increased from 1.88 mg (range 1.0–4.0 mg) to 2.49 mg/day (p < .001). Overall, 18 (44%) subjects increased their daily amount of injection while 22 (54%) had no change in dose; only one subject reduced the amount of injection. Development of opioid withdrawal symptoms was the primary outcome, however the only symptom that was significantly associated with BPN/NLX dosage was the report of “stomach pains” (p = .01). In logistic regression analysis, the development of opioid withdrawal symptoms was associated with increased benzodiazepine injection and increased syringe sharing. Conclusion and Scientific Significance These data suggests that the introduction of BPN/NLX did not reduce injection related risk behaviors such as syringe sharing and was associated with increased benzodiazepine use. Evidence-based approaches to treat BPN injection are urgently needed. PMID:19212931

  15. Pharmacokinetic Interactions Between Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Tipranavir/Ritonavir in HIV-Negative Subjects Chronically Receiving Buprenorphine/Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.; Moody, David E.; Lin, Shen-Nan; Fang, Wenfang B.; Sabo, John P.; Wruck, Jan M.; Piliero, Peter J.; Conner, Carolyn; Andrews, Laurie; Friedland, Gerald H.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-infected patients with opioid dependence often require opioid replacement therapy. Pharmacokinetic interactions between HIV therapy and opioid-dependence treatment medications can occur. HIV-seronegative subjects stabilized on at least 3 weeks of buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) therapy sequentially underwent baseline and steady-state pharmacokinetic evaluation of open-label, twice daily tipranavir 500 mg co-administered with ritonavir 200 mg (TPV/r). Twelve subjects were enrolled and 10 completed the study. Prior to starting TPV/r, the geometric mean BUP AUC0-24h and Cmax were 43.9 ng?hr/mL and 5.61 ng/mL, respectively. After achieving steady-state with TPV/r (?7 days), these values were similar at 43.7 ng?hr/mL and 4.84 ng/mL, respectively. Similar analyses for norBUP, the primary metabolite of BUP, demonstrated a reduction in geometric mean for AUC0-24h [68.7 to 14.7 ng?hr/mL; ratio=0.21 (90% CI 0.19–0.25)] and Cmax [4.75 to 0.94 ng/mL; ratio=0.20 (90% CI 0.17–0.23)]. The last measurable NLX concentration (Clast) in the concentration-time profile, never measured in previous BUP/NLX interaction studies with antiretroviral medications, was decreased by 20%. Despite these pharmacokinetic effects on BUP metabolites and NLX, no clinical opioid withdrawal symptoms were noted. TPV steady-state AUC0-12h and Cmax decreased 19% and 25% respectively, and Cmin was relatively unchanged when compared to historical control subjects receiving TPV/r alone. No dosage modification of BUP/NLX is required when co-administered with TPV/r. Though mechanistically unclear, it is likely that decreased plasma RTV levels while on BUP/NLX contributed substantially to the decrease in TPV levels. BUP/NLX and TPV/r should therefore be used cautiously to avoid decreased efficacy of TPV in patients taking these agents concomitantly. PMID:19726139

  16. Clinical effects of buprenorphine on open field behaviour and gait symmetry in healthy and lame weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Ellen; van Nes, Arie; Back, Willem; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-12-01

    Lameness in pigs decreases animal welfare and economic profit for the farmer. An important reason for impaired welfare in lame animals is pain due to lameness. No direct measurement of pain is possible in animals, and methods to indirectly detect and quantify the amount of pain an animal is experiencing are urgently needed. In this study, two methods to assess pain associated with lameness in pigs were evaluated to determine if they were sensitive enough to detect a lameness reduction as an effect of an experimental analgesic medication. Asymmetry associated with lameness was objectively quantified using pressure mat kinetic parameters: peak vertical force (PVF), load rate (LR), vertical impulse (VI) and peak vertical pressure (PVP). Locomotor activity was assessed in an open field test. A dose of 0.04?mg/kg buprenorphine, a strong analgesic, was used to treat 10 lame pigs, while eight other lame pigs, treated with physiological saline solution, served as controls. Buprenorphine decreased lameness-associated asymmetry for pressure mat LR (P?=?0.002), VI (P?=?0.003) and PVP (P?=?0.001) and increased activity of the lame pigs in the open field (P?=?0.023), while saline-treated animals did not show any changes in asymmetry and became less active in the open field (P?<0.001). It was concluded that measurement of gait asymmetry by pressure mat analysis and locomotor activity in an open field test are both sensitive enough to detect the analgesic effects of buprenorphine when used to treat moderate to severe clinical pain in a relatively small group of affected pigs. The methods used in this study may also provide promising additional tools for future research into early pain recognition and lameness treatment in pigs. PMID:26521014

  17. Sustained-Release Buprenorphine (RBP-6000) Blocks the Effects of Opioid Challenge With Hydromorphone in Subjects With Opioid Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Azmi F; Greenwald, Mark K; Vince, Bradley; Fudala, Paul J; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Liu, Yongzhen; Jones, J P; Heidbreder, Christian

    2016-02-01

    A major goal for the treatment of opioid use disorder is to reduce or eliminate the use of illicit opioids. Buprenorphine, a ?-opioid receptor partial agonist and kappa opioid receptor antagonist, is now being developed as a monthly, sustained-release formulation (RBP-6000). The objective of this study was to demonstrate that RBP-6000 blocks the subjective effects and reinforcing efficacy of the ?-opioid receptor agonist hydromorphone (intramuscularly administered) in subjects with moderate or severe opioid use disorder. Subjects were first inducted and dose stabilized on sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone (8-24 mg daily; dose expressed as the buprenorphine component), then received two subcutaneous injections of RBP-6000 (300 mg) on Day 1 and Day 29. Hydromorphone challenges (6 mg, 18 mg or placebo administered in randomized order) occurred on 3 consecutive days of each study week before and after receiving RBP-6000. Subjects reported their responses to each challenge on various 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Subjects also completed a choice task to assess the reinforcing efficacy of each hydromorphone dose relative to money. At baseline, mean "drug liking" VAS scores for hydromorphone 18 mg and 6 mg versus placebo were 61 mm (95% confidence interval, 52.3-68.9) and 45 mm (95% confidence interval, 37.2-53.6), respectively. After 300 mg RBP-6000 was administered, mean VAS score differences from placebo were less than 10 mm through week 12. The reinforcing efficacy of hydromorphone decreased in a parallel manner. This study demonstrated that RBP-6000 at a 300 mg dose provides durable and potent blockade of the subjective effects and reinforcing efficacy of hydromorphone in subjects with moderate or severe opioid use disorder. PMID:26650971

  18. Substituted diphenyl ethers as a broad-spectrum platform for the development of chemotherapeutics for the treatment of tularaemia

    PubMed Central

    England, Kathleen; am Ende, Christopher; Lu, Hao; Sullivan, Todd J.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Bowen, Richard A.; Knudson, Susan E.; Knudson, Dennis L.; Tonge, Peter J.; Slayden, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease classifies Francisella tularensis as a Category A priority pathogen. Despite the availability of drugs for treating tularaemia, the mortality in naturally acquired cases can still approach 30%. In addition, the usefulness of existing drugs for treatment in response to exposure or for prophylaxis is limited because of toxicity and delivery concerns. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the lead alkyl-substituted diphenyl ether, SBPT04, in the F. tularensis murine model of infection. Methods SBPT04 was delivered by intraperitoneal (ip) and oral (po) routes, and mice were monitored for morbidity, mortality and relapse of disease. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed to evaluate bioavailability. Phase I and Phase II metabolism of SBPT04 was assessed in mouse and human microsomes. Results SBPT04, a potent inhibitor of the enoyl-ACP reductase enzyme ftuFabI, has efficacy against F. tularensis in the murine model of infection when delivered by both ip and po routes. SBPT04 delivered ip cleared infection by day 4 of treatment, and SBPT04 delivered po resulted in delayed dissemination. Importantly, SBPT04 delivered ip or po demonstrated efficacy with no signs of relapse of disease. Pharmacokinetic studies show increased serum concentrations following ip delivery compared with po delivery, which correlates with the observed survival rate of 100%. Conclusions In addition to being a potent lead, this work substantiates substituted diphenyl ethers as a platform for the development of novel broad-spectrum chemotherapeutics to other bacterial agents in addition to F. tularensis. PMID:19734171

  19. Budgetary impact analysis of buprenorphine-naloxone combination (Suboxone®) in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioid addiction is a worldwide problem. Agonist opioid treatment (AOT) is the most widespread and frequent pharmacotherapeutic approach. Methadone has been the most widely used AOT, but buprenorphine, a partial ?-opiod agonist and a ?-opiod antagonist, is fast gaining acceptance. The objective was to assess the budgetary impact in Spain of the introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone (B/N) combination. Methods A budgetary impact model was developed to estimate healthcare costs of the addition of B/N combination to the therapeutic arsenal for treating opioid dependent patients, during a 3-year period under the National Health System perspective. Inputs for the model were obtained from the specialized scientific literature. Detailed information concerning resource consumption (drug cost, logistics, dispensing, medical, psychiatry and pharmacy supervision, counselling and laboratory test) was obtained from a local expert panel. Costs are expressed in euros (€, 2010). Results The number of patients estimated to be prescribed B/N combination was 2,334; 2,993 and 3,589 in the first, second and third year respectively. Total budget is €85,766,129; €79,855,471 and €79,137,502 in the first, second and third year for the scenario without B/N combination. With B/N combination the total budget would be €86,589,210; €80,398,259 and €79,708,964 in the first, second and third year of the analyses. Incremental cost/patient comparing the addition of the B/N combination to the scenario only with methadone is €10.58; €6.98 and €7.34 in the first, second and third year respectively. Conclusion Addition of B/N combination would imply a maximum incremental yearly cost of €10.58 per patient compared to scenario only with methadone and would provide additional benefits. PMID:22828157

  20. Substitutes or complements? Diagnosis and treatment with non-conventional and conventional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Aida Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portugal has a strong tradition of conventional western healthcare. So it provides a natural case study for the relationship between Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) and Western Medicine (WM). This work aims to test the relationship between CAM and WM users in the diagnosis and treatment stages and to estimate the determinants of CAM choice. Methods: The forth Portuguese National Health Survey is employed to estimate two single probit models and obtain the correlation between the consumption of CAM and WM medicines in the diagnosis and treatment stages. Results: Firstly, both in the diagnosis and the treatment stage, CAM and WM are seen to be complementary choices for individuals. Secondly, self-medication also shows complementarity with the choice of CAM treatment. Thirdly, education has a non-linear relationship with the choice of CAM. Finally, working status, age, smoking and chronic disease are determinant factors in the decision to use CAM. Conclusion: The results of this work are relevant to health policy-makers and for insurance companies. Patients need freedom of choice and, for the sake of safety and efficacy of treatment, WM and CAM healthcare ought to be provided in a joint and integrated health system. PMID:25844385

  1. Crushed and Injected Buprenorphine Tablets: Characteristics of Princeps and Generic Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bouquié, Régis; Wainstein, Laura; Pilet, Paul; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Deslandes, Guillaume; Clouet, Johann; Dailly, Eric; Jolliet, Pascale; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Self-injection of high-dose buprenorphine is responsible for well-described complications. In 2011, we have been alerted by unusual but serious cutaneous complication among injection buprenorphine users. A prospective data collection identified 30 cases of necrotic cutaneous lesions after injection of filtered buprenorphine solution, among which 25 cases occurred following injection of buprenorphine generics. The main goal of our study was to put forward particularities that could explain the cutaneous complications, by qualitatively and quantitatively confronting particles present in Subutex and generics solutions. We used the same protocol that injected-buprenorphine users: generic or subutex tablets were crushed in sterile water and filtered through 2 filters commonly used (cotton-pad and sterifilt). Solutions were analyzed by laser granulometry, flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy. We have highlighted the wide variation of the quantity and the size of the particles present in solution between the two drugs after cotton-pad filtration. The proportion of particles <10 µm is systematically higher in the generic solutions than with Subutex. All of the insoluble particles found in generic solutions contain silica, whereas non- organic element was to be identified in the insoluble particles of Subutex. One skin biopsy obtained from one patient who developed a necrotic lesion after intravenous injection of filtrated solution of buprenorphine generic, shows non-organic elements. Identification of particles in situ enables us to confirm the presence of silica in the biopsy. Actually the monitoring of patient receiving generic of buprenorphine must be strengthened. PMID:25474108

  2. Availability of buprenorphine on the Internet for purchase without a prescription

    PubMed Central

    Bachhuber, Marcus A.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2012-01-01

    Background Use of illicit buprenorphine is increasingly recognized, but it is unknown if the Internet currently represents an accessible source. Methods A series of Internet searches were conducted. Twenty searches were performed on two different search engines. The first 100 results of each search were classified into categories based on content. All Internet pharmacies were searched for buprenorphine preparations and if available, sites were examined to determine if a prescription was required for purchase, for the cost of buprenorphine, the geographical origin of the pharmacy, and evidence of validation by an online pharmacy verification service. Results Of the 2,000 links examined, 1422 were unique. Six percent of links were to illicit commercial sites, 2% were to legitimate commercial sites, and 2% were to illicit portal sites, which contained links to many illicit commercial sites. Twenty pharmacies offering buprenorphine for purchase without a prescription were identified. The monthly cost of a typical starting dose of 2 mg buprenorphine daily ranged between $232 and $1,163 USD. No pharmacies were listed by online pharmacy verification services. Conclusion Twenty online pharmacies advertising buprenorphine formulations for sale without a prescription were identified. Prices varied widely between illicit pharmacies but were uniformly more expensive than legitimate pharmacies. Illicitly obtained buprenorphine formulations appear to be relatively inaccessible and at high cost on the Internet. PMID:23201172

  3. Comparative assessment of cultured skin substitutes and native skin autograft for treatment of full-thickness burns.

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, S T; Goretsky, M J; Greenhalgh, D G; Kagan, R J; Rieman, M T; Warden, G D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Comparison of cultured skin substitutes (CSSs) and split-thickness autograft (STAG) was performed to assess whether the requirement for autologous skin grafts may be reduced in the treatment of massive burns. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Cultured skin substitutes consisting of collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates populated with autologous fibroblasts and keratinocytes have been demonstrated to close full-thickness skin wounds in athymic mice and to express normal skin antigens after closure of excised wounds in burn patients. METHODS: Data were collected from 17 patients between days 2 and 14 to determine incidence of exudate, incidence of regrafting, coloration, keratinization, and percentage of site covered by graft (n = 17). Outcome was evaluated on an ordinal scale (0 = worst; 10 = best) beginning at day 14, with primary analyses at 28 days (n = 10) and 1 year (n = 4) for erythema, pigmentation, epithelial blistering, surface roughness, skin suppleness, and raised scar. RESULTS: Sites treated with CSSs had increased incidence of exudate (p = 0.06) and decreased percentage of engraftment (p < 0.05) compared with STAG. Outcome parameters during the first year showed no differences in erythema, blistering, or suppleness. Pigmentation was greater, scar was less raised, but regrafting was more frequent in CSS sites than STAG. No differences in qualitative outcomes were found after 1 year, and antibodies to bovine collagen were not detected in patient sera. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that outcome of engrafted CSSs is not different from STAG and that increased incidence of regrafting is related to decreased percentage of initial engraftment. Increased rates of engraftment of CSSs may lead to improved outcome for closure of burn wounds, allow greater availability of materials for grafting, and reduce requirements for donor skin autograft. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:8526581

  4. Dexamethasone hepatic induction in rats subsequently treated with high dose buprenorphine does not lead to respiratory depression

    SciTech Connect

    Hreiche, Raymond; Megarbane, Bruno . E-mail: bruno-megarbane@wanadoo.fr; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Monier, Claire; Risede, Patricia; Milan, Nathalie; Descatoire, Veronique; Pessayre, Dominique; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-12-15

    In humans, asphyxic deaths and severe poisonings have been attributed to high-dosage buprenorphine, a maintenance therapy for heroin addiction. However, in rats, intravenous buprenorphine at doses up to 90 mg kg{sup -1} was not associated with significant effects on arterial blood gases. In contrast, norbuprenorphine, the buprenorphine major cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A-derived metabolite, is a potent respiratory depressant. Thus, our aim was to study the consequences of CYP3A induction on buprenorphine-associated effects on resting ventilation in rats. We investigated the effects on ventilation of 30 mg kg{sup -1} buprenorphine alone or following cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A induction with dexamethasone, using whole body plethysmography (N = 24) and arterial blood gases (N = 12). Randomized animals in 4 groups received sequential intraperitoneal dosing with: (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]), or (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]). Buprenorphine alone caused a significant rapid and sustained increase in the inspiratory time (P < 0.001), without significant effects on the respiratory frequency, the tidal volume, the minute volume, or arterial blood gases. In dexamethasone-pretreated rats, there was no significant alteration in the respiratory parameters, despite CYP3A induction and significant increase of the ratio of plasma norbuprenorphine-to-buprenorphine concentrations. In conclusion, dexamethasone did not modify the effects of 30 mg kg{sup -1} buprenorphine on rat ventilation. Our results suggest a limited role of drug-mediated CYP3A induction in the occurrence of buprenorphine-attributed respiratory depression in addicts.

  5. Safety studies of post-surgical buprenorphine therapy for mice.

    PubMed

    Traul, Karl A; Romero, Jennell B; Brayton, Cory; DeTolla, Louis; Forbes-McBean, Nadine; Halquist, Matthew S; Karnes, H Thomas; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Tomlinson, Michael J; Tyler, Betty M; Ye, Xiaobu; Zadnik, Patricia; Guarnieri, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The use of appropriate analgesia in laboratory mice may be suboptimal because of concerns about adverse events (AE). Target Animal Safety trials were conducted to determine the safety of an extended-release suspension of buprenorphine. Drug or control suspensions were injected subcutaneously in surgically-treated BALB/c mice anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine to mimic post-operative conditions in which the compound might commonly be administered. Single and repeat five-fold (5×) excesses of the 3.25 mg/kg intended dose were used to provoke potential AE. Trials included prospective measurements of weight changes, blood chemistry, hematology, and histopathology. Clinical and histopathology findings were similar in drug-treated and control mice in a four-day trial using a single 16.25 mg/kg, 5× overdose of the drug. In a 12-day trial, which used a total buprenorphine dose of 48.75 mg/kg, clinical and histopathology values were also similar in control and drug-treated female mice. In the male arm of the repeat-overdose trial, two of eight mice died on the morning of day 12, three days following the third 16.25 mg/kg overdose administration. Histopathology did not reveal a cause of death. In a 14-month trial using a single 3.25 mg/kg dose of the drug, no significant findings identified potential AE. These findings indicate a high tolerance to an extended-release buprenorphine suspension administered post-operatively in mice with appropriate husbandry. PMID:25305141

  6. Intravenous use of illicit buprenorphine/naloxone to reverse an acute heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Yokell, Michael A; Zaller, Nickolas D; Green, Traci C; McKenzie, Michelle; Rich, Josiah D

    2012-01-01

    A case of heroin overdose reversed through the intravenous (IV) administration of a crushed sublingual tablet of buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) by a lay responder is described. Although the sublingual administration of buprenorphine/naloxone to reverse an overdose has been reported elsewhere, this is the first report of IV administration. Healthcare professionals should be aware that injection drug users may respond to an opioid overdose by injecting buprenorphine/naloxone and should consequently counsel all opioid-using patients on the proper response to an overdose. Physicians should also consider prescribing naloxone to at-risk patients. The work of community-based naloxone distribution programs should be expanded. PMID:22479887

  7. Managing treatment resistant violent adolescents: a step forward by substituting seclusion for mechanical restraint?

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas C; Sheitman, Brian B; Kraus, John E; Mayo, James; Leidy, LuAnn

    2008-05-01

    Despite a growing consensus that seclusion or restraint should never be used with children or adolescents, there are a few patients who are resistant to treatment, and are persistently violent. The purpose of this study was to measure the efficacy of installing a padded seclusion room to decrease the use of mechanical restraints, a potentially more emotionally traumatic and dangerous intervention than seclusion. After padded room installation, the number of monthly mechanical restraint events per 1000 patient days decreased by 93.7%, from 21.2 to 1.3. A padded seclusion room may offer a safer, albeit a less than desirable alternative to mechanical restraint. PMID:18058220

  8. Use of a transdermal matrix patch of buprenorphine in cats: preliminary pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data.

    PubMed

    Murrell, J C; Robertson, S A; Taylor, P M; McCown, J L; Bloomfield, M; Sear, J W

    2007-04-28

    Six domestic shorthair cats, aged three to four years and weighing 5.1 to 7.4 kg, were used to assess the thermal antinociceptive effect of a transdermal buprenorphine patch, designed to supply 35 mug buprenorphine/hour, which was applied to the shaved thorax. The cats' thermal thresholds were tested before the patch was applied and two, four, six, eight, 10, 12, 14 and 16 hours after it had been applied, and then every six hours until it was removed after 72 hours, and for a further 24 hours afterwards. Blood was collected at each time to measure the plasma concentration of buprenorphine. The patches did not produce a significant change in the thermal thresholds of the cats throughout the testing period. The mean (sd) peak plasma buprenorphine concentration was 10 (0.81) ng/ml. PMID:17468320

  9. Multimedia trade off: Material substitution results in reduced VOC emissions and increased organic loading to liquid phase treatment processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yonge, D.R.; Trussler, S.; Claiborn, C.; Watts, R.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental concern regarding VOC emissions has resulted in efforts directed toward defining reliable and cost effective methods of emission reduction. One method that has attracted considerable interest is material substitution; the replacement of a hazardous material used in an industrial process or operation with one that is of less concern. A specific example of material replacement is the use of glycol ethers in place of more volatile surface cleaning agents. Such replacement significantly reduces VOC emissions, but often at the expense of increases in liquid phase contaminant loading. A comprehensive study was undertaken to define the fate of glycol ethers during metal surface cleaning operations. Information was also obtained regarding their impact of pretreatment operations and biodegradability. It was determined that the glycol ethers studied were amenable to catalyzed peroxide oxidation but that treatment process modification would be necessary to maintain desired effluent quality. Oxidation process optimization yielded evidence of the formation of an oxidation by-product that is interfering with OH{circ} formation or acting as an OH{circ} quenching agent. Preliminary biodegradation studies indicated that diethylene glycol monobutyl ether is biodegradable under aerobic conditions with no observed detrimental effects on sludge settling.

  10. The Anti-Suicidal Potential of Buprenorphine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, Joan M.; Kalapatapu, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    The very strong relationship between suicide, depressive disorders and substance use disorders is well recognized. Certain pain syndromes are significantly associated with suicide, irrespective of co-occurring medical or psychiatric diagnosis. Chronic pain, depression, substance use disorders and suicide appear to involve overlapping neural pathways and brain regions that function in the processing of emotional and physical pain, as well as maintaining reward and anti-reward circuitry. In this article, we employ a clinical case to illustrate how various stressors disrupted the balance between pain and opioid-facilitated analgesia. This disruption resulted in excessive use of short-acting opioids to treat pain with ensuing allostatic overload and culmination in chronic suicidal ideation with a suicide attempt. Sublingual buprenorphine was selected to treat the opioid use disorder. We propose that the unique pharmacodynamics of this drug served to stabilize dysregulated neural circuits, neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, allowing the mitigation of pain, assuaging opioid cravings, easing depression and resolving suicidal ideation. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe the possible anti-suicidal effect of sublingual buprenorphine. PMID:25084802

  11. Diversion of buprenorphine/naloxone coformulated tablets in a region with high prescribing prevalence.

    PubMed

    Monte, Andrew A; Mandell, Todd; Wilford, Bonnie B; Tennyson, Joseph; Boyer, Edward W

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this article was to characterize practices of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) diversion in a region with a high prescribing prevalence. A cross-sectional, open-ended survey was administered to individuals entering opioid addiction treatment programs in two New England states. The authors obtained formative information about the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, practices, and street economy of B/N diversion. The authors interviewed 51 individuals, 49 of which were aware of B/N medication. Of that number, 100% had diverted B/N to modulate opiate withdrawal symptoms arising from attempted "self-detoxification," insufficient funds to purchase preferred illicit opioids, or inability to find a preferred source of drugs. Thirty of 49 (61%) participants obtained the illicit drug from an individual holding a legitimate prescription for B/N. A high proportion of individuals in the study locations who sought treatment for opioid addiction self-reported the purchase and use of diverted B/N. The diversion of B/N may be minimized by modifying educational, treatment, monitoring, and dispensing practices. PMID:20155591

  12. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations after the application of a 70 microg/h transdermal patch in dogs. Preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Andaluz, A; Moll, X; Ventura, R; Abellán, R; Fresno, L; García, F

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine after transdermal application in dogs (n = 4). A 70 microg/h transdermal buprenorphine patch was applied to the ventral abdomen of four healthy beagles. Blood samples were collected through a preplaced jugular catheter before and at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, 48 and every 6 h until 108 h after the patch application. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were measured using a (125)I-labelled radioimmunoassay (RIA) assay. No adverse effects were observed in any of the dogs. Concentrations of buprenorphine were detected in plasma after the application of the transdermal buprenorphine patch on the four experimental animals. Buprenorphine plasma concentrations increased during the first 36 h and then remained in the 0.7-1.0 ng/mL range during the study period. A decrease in plasma buprenorphine concentration was not observed during the study. Although analgesia could not be demonstrated the present study shows the ability of buprenorphine transdermal delivery systems developed for human use to deliver measurable concetrations of buprenorphine in dogs. PMID:19754919

  13. Antinociceptive actions of morphine and buprenorphine given intrathecally in the conscious rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, R. M.; Olley, J. E.; Tyers, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    1 The antinociceptive effects of morphine and buprenorphine given intrathecally and subcutaneously have been compared in the conscious rat. 2 In the paw pressure test, when given subcutaneously buprenorphine 0.001-0.1 mg/kg s.c., was approximately 100 times more potent than morphine 0.1-3 mg/kg s.c., but in the hot plate test, buprenorphine 0.03-3.0 mg/kg s.c., produced a bell-shaped dose-response curve of low maximum effect and was about equipotent with morphine 0.03-3 mg/kg s.c. 3 When given intrathecally buprenorphine 10 micrograms and morphine, 10-60 micrograms, were approximately equipotent in both paw pressure and hot plate tests. Furthermore, morphine produced these effects at 1/25th of the minimum effective parenteral dose while the dose of buprenorphine exceeded the parenteral dose. 4 It is concluded that the predominant site of the analgesic action of buprenorphine is supraspinal. The significance of these findings in relation to the role of spinal opiate receptors is discussed. PMID:6687818

  14. Occurrence, behavior and removal of typical substituted and parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a biological wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Meng; Qi, Weixiao; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-04-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent is the major source for substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (SPAHs) to the receiving rivers, as well as the parent PAHs. Some of the SPAHs showed higher toxicities and levels than their parent PAHs. The occurrence and behavior of typical SPAHs were investigated in a representative biological WWTP in Beijing, China. Methyl PAHs (MPAHs) (149-221 ng/L in the influent; 29.6-56.3 ng/L in the effluent; 202-375 ng/g in the activated sludge), oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) (139-155 ng/L; 69.9-109 ng/L; 695-1533 ng/g) and PAHs (372-749 ng/L; 182-241 ng/L; 2402-3321 ng/g) existed, but nitrated PAHs (NPAHs) were not detected. 2-Methylnaphthalene, anthraquinone, 9-fluorenone and 2-methylanthraquinone were the predominant SPAHs. OPAHs were deduced to be formed from PAHs especially during summer, based on the ratios variation and removal efficiencies of the two seasons, and the surplus mass in the outflows. Low molecular weight compounds (2-3 rings) might be mainly removed by mineralization/transformation and adsorption in the anaerobic unit, and by volatilization in the aerobic unit. High molecular weight compounds (4-6 rings) might be mainly removed by adsorption in the anaerobic unit. The total outflows of SPAHs and PAHs were 66 g/d in summer and 148 g/d in winter from the WWTP to the receiving river. The percentage of OPAHs was higher in summer than in winter. PMID:24440761

  15. Comparative Trial to Study the Effectiveness of Clonidine Hydrochloride and Buprenorphine-Naloxone in Opioid Withdrawal – A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Samina; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Abbas, Zaffar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Prevalence of opioid addiction has alarmingly increased over the recent years. In South Asian region alone there are more than 10 million opioid abusers amounting to 2% of world population. Detoxification remains to be the first step for the successful treatment of opioid addiction. The present study was carried out to compare the relative efficacy and safety of buprenorphine –naloxone and clonidine hydrochloride in the detoxification of opioid-dependents. Materials and Methods: Present trial was conducted at De- addiction centre of Institute of Mental and Neurosciences (IMNS), GMC Srinagar. Fifty four (54) treatment seeking subjects, 15-50 years of age, fulfilling DSM-1V TR (American Psychiatric association`s Mental Disorders-1V text revision) criteria for opioid dependence were included and randomized into two groups. The groups received either clonidine hydrochloride (Group A) or buprenorphine- naloxone (Bup-Nax) (Group B) for the duration of 10 days. The efficacy of the two drugs in controlling the opioid withdrawal was evaluated by Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS) and their effect on the desire for the abused substance was measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The safety of the two drugs was measured by taking the side effect profile of the two compared drugs into consideration. Results: There was significant difference of COWS-score between the two groups which was evident from day 3 (14.85 ± 3.43 vs. 11.67 ± 2.40, p<0.005) and continued till day 6 (2.56 ± 1.40 vs. 0.30 ± 0.61, p<0.005), for Group A and group B respectively. The effect of two drugs in controlling the craving for the abused substance also showed significant difference from day 2 (66.30 ± 10.80 vs. 47.40 ± 12.90, p<0.005) till day 5 (7.78 ± 6.41 vs. 1.85 ± 6.22, p<0.005), for Group A and Group B respectively. Conclusion: Administration of buprenorphine-naloxone was more efficient in reducing the signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal and in controlling the craving for the abused substance during the first few days of detoxification. PMID:25738001

  16. Spontaneous Reductions in Smoking during Double-blind Buprenorphine Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Mollie E.; Dunn, Kelly E.; Badger, Gary J.; Heil, Sarah H.; Higgins, Stephen T.; Sigmon, Stacey C.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests a positive association between administration of psychoactive drugs and rates of cigarette smoking. Prevalence of smoking among opioid-dependent individuals, for example, is four times greater than the general population. We recently completed a randomized double-blind trial evaluating outpatient buprenorphine taper for prescription opioid (PO) abusers, which provided an unique opportunity to examine naturalistic changes in smoking among participants who detoxified without resumption of illicit opioid use. Participants received no smoking-cessation services and were not encouraged to alter their smoking in any way. A subset of 10 opioid-dependent smokers, who were randomized to receive the same 4-week buprenorphine taper and successfully completed detoxification, were included in the present study. They provided staff-observed urine specimens thrice-weekly throughout the 12-week trial. Specimens were analyzed onsite via enzyme-multiplied immunoassay for urinary cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine that provides a sensitive biochemical measure of smoking status. Mean cotinine levels were significantly different across study phases, with significantly lower cotinine levels during taper (1317.5 ng/ml) and post-taper (1015.8 ng/ml) vs. intake (1648.5 ng/ml) phases (p’s<.05). Overall, mean cotinine levels decreased by 38% between intake and end-of-study, reflecting a reduction of approximately eight cigarettes per day. These data provide additional evidence that opioids influence smoking and extend prior findings to include primary PO abusers, rigorous double-blind opioid dosing conditions and urinary cotinine. These results also suggest that, while likely insufficient for complete cessation, patients who successfully taper from opioids may also experience concurrent reductions in smoking and thus may be ideal candidates for smoking cessation services. PMID:24845165

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Sustained-Release and Transdermal Buprenorphine in Göttingen Minipigs (Sus scrofa domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Allison J; Garcia, Kelly D; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Jenkins, Gary J; Nunamaker, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The opioid buprenorphine has been shown to provide adequate postoperative analgesia in both companion and laboratory animals. However, its use is still hindered by the need for multiple parenteral injections to achieve continuous analgesia. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a pharmacokinetic analysis of 2 new long-acting formulations of buprenorphine—an injectable sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and a transdermal buprenorphine (TDB) patch—in healthy Göttingen minipigs by using liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry. Administration of 0.18 mg/kg SC SRB and 30 ?g/h TDB achieved AUC0-Tlast of 221.6 ± 26.8 and 25.2 ± 3.9 ng × h/mL, respectively, compared with 9.7 ± 1.4 ng*h/mL for 0.02 mg/kg IV buprenorphine. By using a hypothesized therapeutic plasma buprenorphine concentration threshold of 0.1 ng/mL, therapeutic concentrations were achieved at the first study time point (5 to 30 min) and lasted an average of 8.0 ± 1.3 h for intravenous buprenorphine and 264.0 ± 32.2 h for SRB. TDB achieved therapeutic concentrations in 12 to 24 h after patch application, which lasted until the patch was removed at 72 h. The results of this study suggest that SRB and TDB are long-acting alternatives for pain management, and their use could decrease animal handling and stress, thereby simplifying pain management and improving welfare in laboratory swine. PMID:25650977

  18. Pharmacokinetics of sustained-release and transdermal buprenorphine in Göttingen minipigs (Sus scrofa domestica).

    PubMed

    Thiede, Allison J; Garcia, Kelly D; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Jenkins, Gary J; Nunamaker, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-01

    The opioid buprenorphine has been shown to provide adequate postoperative analgesia in both companion and laboratory animals. However, its use is still hindered by the need for multiple parenteral injections to achieve continuous analgesia. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a pharmacokinetic analysis of 2 new long-acting formulations of buprenorphine-an injectable sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and a transdermal buprenorphine (TDB) patch-in healthy Göttingen minipigs by using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Administration of 0.18 mg/kg SC SRB and 30 ? g/h TDB achieved AUC(0-Tlast) of 221.6 ± 26.8 and 25.2 ± 3.9 ng × h/mL, respectively, compared with 9.7 ± 1.4 ng*h/mL for 0.02 mg/kg IV buprenorphine. By using a hypothesized therapeutic plasma buprenorphine concentration threshold of 0.1 ng/mL, therapeutic concentrations were achieved at the first study time point (5 to 30 min) and lasted an average of 8.0 ± 1.3 h for intravenous buprenorphine and 264.0 ± 32.2 h for SRB. TDB achieved therapeutic concentrations in 12 to 24 h after patch application, which lasted until the patch was removed at 72 h. The results of this study suggest that SRB and TDB are long-acting alternatives for pain management, and their use could decrease animal handling and stress, thereby simplifying pain management and improving welfare in laboratory swine. PMID:25650977

  19. Opioid partial agonist buprenorphine dampens responses to psychosocial stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Bershad, Anya K; Jaffe, Jerome H; Childs, Emma; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-02-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that opioid drugs have stress-dampening effects. In animal models, opioid analgesics attenuate responses to isolation distress, and in humans, opioids reduce stress related to anticipation of physical pain. The stress-reducing effects of opioid drugs may contribute to their abuse potential. Despite this evidence in laboratory animals, the effects of opioids on responses to psychosocial stress have not been determined in humans. Here we examined the effects of buprenorphine, a ?-opioid partial agonist used to treat opioid dependence and pain, on subjective and physiological responses to a stressful public speaking task in healthy adults. We hypothesized that buprenorphine would reduce subjective and physiological stress responses. Healthy adult volunteers (N=48) were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 0.2mg sublingual buprenorphine, or 0.4mg sublingual buprenorphine in a two-session study with a stressful speaking task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) and a non-stressful control task. During the sessions, the participants reported on their mood states, provided subjective appraisals of the task, and measures of salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure at regular intervals. Stress produced its expected effects, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and subjective ratings of anxiety and negative mood. In line with our hypothesis, both doses of buprenorphine significantly dampened salivary cortisol responses to stress. On self-report ratings, buprenorphine reduced how threatening participants found the tasks. These results suggest that enhanced opioid signaling dampens responses to social stress in humans, as it does in laboratory animals. This stress-dampening effect of buprenorphine may contribute to the non-medical use of opioid drugs. PMID:25544740

  20. The effectiveness of a long-acting transdermal fentanyl solution compared to buprenorphine for the control of postoperative pain in dogs in a randomized, multicentered clinical study.

    PubMed

    Linton, D D; Wilson, M G; Newbound, G C; Freise, K J; Clark, T P

    2012-08-01

    A prospective, double-blinded, positive-controlled, multicenter, noninferiority clinical study was conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a long-acting transdermal fentanyl solution (TFS) for the control of postoperative pain. Four hundred forty-five client-owned dogs of various breeds were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of TFS (2.6 mg/kg [?50 ?L/kg]) (N = 223) applied 2-4 h prior to surgery or buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) (N = 222) administered intramuscularly 2-4 h prior to surgery and every 6 h through 90 h. There were 159 (35.7%) males and 286 (64.3%) females ranging from 0.5 to 16 years of age and 3 to 98.5 kg enrolled. Pain was scored using the modified Glasgow Composite Pain Scale with an a priori dropout criteria of ? 8 (20 maximum score). The one-sided upper 95% confidence interval of the mean difference between fentanyl and buprenorphine treatment failures was 5.6%, which was not greater than the a priori selected margin difference of 15%. Adverse events attributed to either treatment were minimal in impact and were approximately equal between groups. Sustained plasma fentanyl concentrations provided by a single pre-emptive dose of TFS are safe and effective and are noninferior to repeated injections of buprenorphine in controlling postoperative pain over 4?days. This long-acting fentanyl formulation provides veterinarians with a novel, registered option for the control of postoperative pain in dogs that improves dosing compliance and potentially mitigates the disadvantages of oral, parenteral, and patch delivered opioids. PMID:22731776

  1. Effect of Rifampin and Nelfinavir on the Metabolism of Methadone and Buprenorphine in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes

    E-print Network

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Effect of Rifampin and Nelfinavir on the Metabolism of Methadone and Buprenorphine in Primary that primary cultures of human hepato- cytes could predict potential drug interactions with methadone, or nelfinavir before incubation with methadone or buprenorphine. Culture me- dia (0­60 min) was analyzed

  2. The unique role of transdermal buprenorphine in the global chronic pain epidemic.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Scholten, Willem; Smith, Kevin J; Leighton-Scott, James; Willis, Jenna C; Henningfield, Jack E

    2015-06-01

    Pain is a global epidemic, exacerbated by barriers to access of opioid analgesics. Regulations about opioids attempt to protect public health from the risks of harmful use of opioids, diversion, and dependence. Transdermal buprenorphine is an effective opioid analgesic agent with unique properties that may make it particularly well suited for more widespread use. It is a versatile analgesic product with demonstrated safety and effectiveness in cancer and noncancer pain populations. Its pharmacological properties make it a first-line opioid analgesic for geriatric patients and patients with renal dysfunction; no dosing adjustments need to be made. The 7-day transdermal delivery system is convenient for patients and promotes compliance. A low dose of buprenorphine can provide effective and well-tolerated pain relief. Although buprenorphine has been associated with certain opioid-related adverse effects, such as dizziness and nausea, it is associated with a lower rate of constipation than many other opioid analgesics. The potential for nonmedical use of buprenorphine is relatively low compared with other opioid agents. Buprenorphine has a relatively low likeability for nonmedical use and the transdermal matrix patch renders the substance particularly difficult to extract for illicit purposes. PMID:26205326

  3. Reduced fear-recognition sensitivity following acute buprenorphine administration in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ipser, Jonathan C; Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Phillips, Nicole; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Thomas, Kevin; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In rodents, the endogenous opioid system has been implicated in emotion regulation, and in the reduction of fear in particular. In humans, while there is evidence that the opioid antagonist naloxone acutely enhances the acquisition of conditioned fear, there are no corresponding data on the effect of opioid agonists in moderating responses to fear. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mu-opioid agonist buprenorphine would decrease fear sensitivity with an emotion-recognition paradigm. Healthy human subjects participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, in which they performed a dynamic emotion recognition task 120min after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. In the recognition task, basic emotional expressions were morphed between their full expression and neutral in 2% steps, and presented as dynamic video-clips with final frames of different emotional intensity for each trial, which allows for a fine-grained measurement of emotion sensitivity. Additionally, visual analog scales were used to investigate acute effects of buprenorphine on mood. Compared to placebo, buprenorphine resulted in a significant reduction in the sensitivity for recognizing fearful facial expressions exclusively. Our data demonstrate, for the first time in humans, that acute up-regulation of the opioid system reduces fear recognition sensitivity. Moreover, the absence of an effect of buprenorphine on mood provides evidence of a direct influence of opioids upon the core fear system in the human brain. PMID:22651957

  4. A Question About the Safety of Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Benzodiazepine Drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Drug overdose is the leading cause of injury death in the United States, and most deaths are related to prescription drugs. A substantial proportion of these deaths involve opioid or benzodiazepine drugs, and many overdoses include a combination of both drug classes. Buprenorphine/naloxone has an unusual pharmacology that distinguishes it from other opioid drugs. Animal and human studies have found that buprenorphine is associated with a ceiling to its cardio-respiratory depressant effect at higher doses, such that it may have a wider safety margin compared to other opioid drugs. Compared to buprenorphine alone, buprenorphine/naloxone is associated with less cardiorespiratory depression. Drug safety data from the National Poison Data System, Drug Abuse Warning Network, and other sources suggest that the safety of buprenorphine/naloxone is favorable compared to the morbidity and mortality associated with other opioid drugs and other classes of psychotropic drugs. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(12), 11-14.]. PMID:26653090

  5. Pharmacokinetics of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn; Knych, Heather K; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Wack, Raymund F

    2015-03-01

    Information regarding analgesics in pinnipeds is limited. This study aimed to establish the pharmacokinetic parameters of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine (Buprenorphine SR) in juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) with regard to its potential to provide long-lasting analgesia that requires infrequent dosing. Seals (n=26) were administered a single dose of sustained release buprenorphine at 0.12 mg/kg s.c. Blood samples were collected from the extradural intervertebral vein at 0 hr and at three or four of the following time points: 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 96, 120, and 144 hr. Seals were examined daily for systemic and local adverse reactions. Plasma was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine concentrations. A noncompartmental analysis for pharmacokinetic parameters was calculated using standard methods and equations. An average maximum concentration of 1.21 ng/ml (0.3-2.9 ng/ml) was detected 12 hr postadministration. Concentrations were quantifiable up to 144 hr postadministration but were below those expected to provide analgesia in some other species. No systemic adverse effects were noted in healthy seals receiving sustained release buprenorphine. Cellulitis or abscesses at the injection site were observed in 6/26 (23%) seals between 24 and 168 hr postadministration. Adverse local effects suggest that this drug should be used with caution in northern elephant seals. PMID:25831576

  6. Clinical Efficacy of Sustained-Release Buprenorphine with Meloxicam for Postoperative Analgesia in Beagle Dogs Undergoing Ovariohysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Stolarik, DeAnne F; Ma, Junli; Wilsey, Amanda S; Jenkins, Gary J; Medina, Chris L

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to compare the efficacy, adverse effects, and plasma buprenorphine concentrations of sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) and buprenorphine after subcutaneous administration in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. In a prospective, randomized, blinded design, 20 healthy adult female Beagle dogs underwent routine ovariohysterectomy and received multimodal analgesia consisting of meloxicam and one of two buprenorphine formulations. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive either SRB (0.2 mg/kg SC, once) or buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg SC every 12 h for 3 d). Blinded observers assessed all dogs by using sedation scores, pain scores, temperature, HR, RR, and general wellbeing. Dogs were provided rescue analgesia with 0.02 mg/kg buprenorphine SC if the postoperative pain score exceeded a predetermined threshold. Blood samples were collected, and mass spectrometry was used to determine plasma buprenorphine concentrations. Data were analyzed with a linear mixed model and Tukey–Kramer multiple comparison. Age, body weight, anesthetic duration, surgical duration, sevoflurane concentration, and cardiorespiratory variables did not differ significantly between groups. Dogs in both formulation groups had comparable postoperative sedation and pain scores. One dog from each formulation group had breakthrough pain requiring rescue analgesia. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations remained above a hypothesized therapeutic concentration of 0.6 ng/mL for 136.0 ± 11.3 and 10.67 ± 0.84 h for SRB and buprenorphine, respectively. Based on the results of this study, multimodal analgesic regimens consisting of meloxicam and either buprenorphine or SRB are equally efficacious in managing pain associated with an ovariohysterectomy and show comparable side effects. PMID:25255072

  7. Extended release naltrexone injection is performed in the majority of opioid dependent patients receiving outpatient induction: a very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine open label trial

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Wu, Li-Tzy; Peindl, Kathleen S.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Woody, George E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The approval of extended release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol®) has introduced a new option for treating opioid addiction, but studies are needed to identify its place within the spectrum of available therapies. The absence of physiological opioid dependence is a necessary and challenging first step for starting XR-NTX. Outpatient detoxification gives poor results and inpatient detoxification is either unavailable or too brief for the physiological effects of opioids to resolve. Here we present findings from an open label study that tested whether the transition from opioid addiction to XR-NTX can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting using very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine. METHODS Twenty treatment seeking opioid addicted individuals were given increasing doses of naltrexone starting at 0.25 mg with decreasing doses of buprenorphine starting at 4 mg during a 7-day outpatient XR-NTX induction procedure. Withdrawal discomfort, craving, drug use, and adverse events were assessed daily until the XR-NTX injection, then weekly over the next month. RESULTS Fourteen of the 20 participants received XR-NTX and 13 completed weekly assessments. Withdrawal, craving, and opioid or other drug use were significantly lower during induction and after XR-NTX administration compared with baseline, and no serious adverse events were recorded. CONCLUSIONS Outpatient transition to XR-NTX combining upward titration of very low dose naltrexone with downward titration of low dose buprenorphine was safe, well tolerated, and completed by most participants. Further studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to see if this approach is useful for naltrexone induction. PMID:24602363

  8. Substitute Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kevin R.; Hawkins, Amber

    2000-01-01

    In summer 1999, a group of Park City, Utah, school administrators, personnel directors, human-resource specialists, and substitute teacher coordinators brainstormed on improving the recruitment, training, and retention of substitute teachers. Providing effective preservice and on-the-job training and professional recognition are key suggestions.…

  9. Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Nicole; Cohen, George

    2014-01-01

    In a relatively short timespan, a wealth of new skin substitutes made of synthetic and biologically derived materials have arisen for the purpose of wound healing of various etiologies. This review article focuses on providing an overview of skin substitutes including their indications, contraindications, benefits, and limitations. The result of this overview was an appreciation of the vast array of options available for clinicians, many of which did not exist a short time ago. Yet, despite the rapid expansion this field has undergone, no ideal skin substitute is currently available. More research in the field of skin substitutes and wound healing is required not only for the development of new products made of increasingly complex biomolecular material, but also to compare the existing skin substitutes. PMID:25371771

  10. Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among adolescents and young adults in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine has been described as a growing problem in Sweden in recent years, and has been associated with an increased drug-related mortality. Critics claim that the substances have become popular among adolescents and that they function as a gateway to heroin use. The aim of this study is to investigate, firstly, the extent to which illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine occurs among adolescents and young adults in Sweden, and secondly, at what stage in a user’s drug career these substances tend to appear. Methods The study is based on surveys and structured interviews on drug use among various populations of young people, in addition to qualitative interviews with 86 informants who, in their professional capacity, encounter adolescents or young adults who are using illicit drugs. Results Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is rare among young people in Sweden. According to high school surveys, less than 0.1% have tried these substances. Among young drug users in general, few have tried the substances, and there is nothing to indicate that they act as gateway drugs. Among adolescents and young adults with severe drug problems, however, the illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common (54% in a compulsory care sample). These substances normally enter the drug career late, and few use them as their main drug of choice. Other prescription drugs, like benzodiazepines and tramadol, are used by adolescents to a far greater extent. Diversion and illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is not seen as a serious problem by the professionals interviewed. A general view is that the substances are mainly used by people with a heroin or polydrug addiction, often for “self-medication” purposes. However, several informants express concern that methadone and buprenorphine may cause fatalities among young drug users without an opioid tolerance. Conclusions Illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine among young drug users is not a widespread problem in Sweden. Harm-reduction measures should target drug users with more severe problems, among whom illicit use of methadone and buprenorphine is more common and pose a medical risk. Illicit use of other prescription drugs, which are less controlled and more widely used by young people, is an important issue for further research. PMID:24139199

  11. A dose-effect study of repeated administration of buprenorphine/naloxone on performance in opioid-dependent volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mintzer, Miriam Z; Correia, Christopher J; Strain, Eric C

    2004-05-10

    Based on its unique pharmacological profile, buprenorphine may produce less impairment in psychomotor and cognitive performance than methadone. However, the few studies that have investigated the performance effects of buprenorphine in opioid-abusing volunteers examined effects of single acute doses rather than effects of repeated dosing and included a very limited range of measures. The present inpatient study evaluated dose-related effects of repeated administration of the buprenorphine/naloxone combination product (8/2, 16/4, 32/8 mg, sublingual tablets) in eight opioid-dependent volunteers on performance of a broad range of tasks, following a period of 7-10 days of dosing at each level, in a double-blind, within-subject, crossover design. The testing battery included measures of psychomotor speed, time perception, conceptual flexibility, focused attention, working memory, long-term/episodic memory, and metamemory. Supporting the hypothesis of limited impairment with buprenorphine, results revealed minimal impairment in performance as buprenorphine/naloxone dose was increased four-fold. The only significant effect of dose was an impairment in episodic/long-term memory (recognition memory) performance at the highest dose (32/8 mg) relative to the two lower doses. Future studies incorporating larger sample sizes and non-drug controls, as well as directly comparing buprenorphine to methadone and LAAM are needed to further test the hypothesis of limited impairment with buprenorphine. PMID:15099664

  12. Antinociceptive efficacy and plasma concentrations of transdermal buprenorphine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Korbinian; Schuster, Tibor; Levionnois, Olivier; Matis, Ulrike; Bergadano, Alessandra

    2011-03-01

    To assess the antinociceptive efficacy of transdermal (TD) buprenorphine (B) in dogs, a prospective, positive-controlled experimental study was performed in 10 healthy Beagles. In an open label crossover design, the dogs initially received intravenous B (IVB, 0.02 mg kg(-1)) as a positive control, followed by TDB (52.5 ?g h(-1)) 4 months later. Blood was collected at regular intervals for determination of the plasma concentrations of B ([B]) and its metabolite norbuprenorphine. The antinociceptive efficacy was assessed using thermal and mechanical models of nociception. The peak concentration [B] was 1.54 ng mL(-1) (±1.98) 60 h after TDB application, although three dogs had no measurable [B] after TDB. Maximum thermal threshold (TT) was 52.6 °C (±0.48) at 1h after IVB administration and 51.63 °C (±1.01) 72 h after TDB application. The significant increase in TT indicated that effective antinociception was achieved beyond 36 h after the application of TDB, lasting until patch removal. There was hysteresis between [B] and the antinociceptive effect. PMID:20206560

  13. Subcutaneous Implants of Buprenorphine-Cholesterol-Triglyceride Powder in Mice

    PubMed Central

    DeTolla, L.; Sanchez, R.; Khan, E.; Tyler, B.; Guarnieri, M.

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous drug implants are convenient systems for the long-term delivery of drugs in animals. Lipid carriers are logical tools because they generally allow for higher doses and low toxicity. The present study used an US Food and Drug Administration Target Animal Safety test system to evaluate the safety of a subcutaneous implant of a cholesterol-triglyceride-buprenorphine powder in 120 BALB/c mice. Mice were evaluated in 4- and 12-day trials with 1- and 5-fold doses of the intended 3?mg/kg dose of drug. One male mouse treated with three 3?mg/kg doses and surgery on days 0, 4, and 8 died on day 9. The cause of death was not determined. In the surviving 119 mice there was no evidence of skin reaction at the site of the implant. Compared to control animals treated with saline, weight measurements, clinical pathology, histopathology, and clinical observations were unremarkable. These results demonstrate that the lipid carrier is substantially safe. Cholesterol-triglyceride-drug powders may provide a valuable research tool for studies of analgesic and inflammatory drug implants in veterinary medicine. PMID:26464927

  14. The safety of high-dose buprenorphine administered subcutaneously in cats.

    PubMed

    Sramek, M K; Haas, M C; Coleman, G D; Atterson, P R; Hamlin, R L

    2015-10-01

    The safety of a proprietary formulation of buprenorphine hydrochloride administered subcutaneously (SC) to young cats was investigated in a blinded, randomized study. Four cohorts of eight cats aged approximately 4 months were administered saline, 0.24, 0.72 or 1.20 mg/kg/day buprenorphine SC for nine consecutive days, representing 0×, 1×, 3× and 5× of the intended dose. Cats were monitored daily for evidence of clinical reactions, food and water intake and adverse events (AEs). Physical examinations, clinical pathology, vital signs and electrocardiograms (ECGs) were evaluated at protocol-specified time points. Complete necropsy and histopathologic examinations were performed following humane euthanasia. Four buprenorphine-treated cats experienced AEs during the study, two unrelated and two related to study drug administration. The two cats with AEs considered related to drug administration had clinical signs of hyperactivity, difficulty in handling, disorientation, agitation and dilated pupils in one 0.24 mg/kg/day cat and one 0.72 mg/kg/day cat. All of these clinical signs were observed simultaneously. There were no drug-related effects on survival, injection response, injection site inspections, body weight, food or water consumption, bleeding time, urinalysis, respiration rate, heart rate, ECGs, blood pressures, body temperatures, macroscopic examinations or organ weights. Once daily buprenorphine s.c. injections at doses of 0.24, 0.72 and 1.20 mg/kg/day for 9 consecutive days were well tolerated in young domestic cats. PMID:25623082

  15. Perioperative Pain Management for Patients on Chronic Buprenorphine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Sy-Yeu S; Isserman, Rebecca; Chen, Linda; Ashburn, Michael; Liu, Renyu

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a patient with a Type I Chiari malformation who was receiving buprenorphine for chronic pain who underwent two separate urogynecologic procedures for removal of vaginal mesh with two different pain management regimens. For the first procedure at an outside hospital, the patient’s usual dose of buprenorphine (8 mg sublingual every 8 hours) was continued up through her surgery and then a full opioid receptor agonist was used for postoperative pain management. The patient complained that this resulted in very poor pain control for her in the postoperative period. Prior to her second procedure, which was performed at our institution, buprenorphine was switched to a full opioid agonist (oral hydromorphone 4 mg every 4 to 6 hours, maximum 20 mg per day) for 5 days prior to surgery; postoperative pain was managed with full opioid receptor agonists. The patient again reported suboptimal pain control in spite of substantially increased doses of opioids. This case report highlights the difficulty of perioperative pain management for patients on chronic buprenorphine and emphasizes the need for additional investigation. PMID:24307971

  16. Improved memory for reward cues following acute buprenorphine administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Syal, Supriya; Ipser, Jonathan; Terburg, David; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2015-03-01

    In rodents, there is abundant evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the processing of reward cues, but this system has remained understudied in humans. In humans, the happy facial expression is a pivotal reward cue. Happy facial expressions activate the brain's reward system and are disregarded by subjects scoring high on depressive mood who are low in reward drive. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mixed mu-opioid agonist/kappa-antagonist, buprenorphine, would influence short-term memory for happy, angry or fearful expressions relative to neutral faces. Healthy human subjects (n38) participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, and performed an emotional face relocation task after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. We show that, compared to placebo, buprenorphine administration results in a significant improvement of memory for happy faces. Our data demonstrate that acute manipulation of the opioid system by buprenorphine increases short-term memory for social reward cues. PMID:25569708

  17. 67 FR 62354 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Rescheduling of Buprenorphine From Schedule V to Schedule III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-10-07

    ...symptoms (act as a deterrent) in individuals...buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid naive individuals...4 mg) produced opioid agonist-like effects...not be a serious deterrent to injection by...sublingually, is not a deterrent for abuse by most...many objectives of opioid replacement...

  18. Pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic characterization of a novel sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablet formulation in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andreas; Hjelmström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context Bitter taste, as well as dissolve time, presents a significant challenge for the acceptability of formulations for oral transmucosal drug delivery. Objective To characterize a novel sublingual tablet formulation of buprenorphine/naloxone with regards to pharmacokinetics, dissolve time and formulation acceptability. Methods Dry mixing techniques were employed to produce a small and fast dissolving buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual tablet formulation, OX219 (Zubsolv®), using sucralose and menthol as sweetener and flavor to mask the bitter taste of the active ingredients. Two cross-over studies were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate pharmacokinetics, dissolve time and acceptability of OX219 5.7/1.4?mg tablets compared to the commercially available buprenorphine/naloxone formulations Suboxone® tablets and films (8/2?mg). Results Buprenorphine exposure was equivalent in OX219 and Suboxone tablets. Sublingual dissolve times were significantly shorter for OX219 than for Suboxone tablets and were similar to Suboxone films. The OX219 formulation received significantly higher subjective ratings for taste and overall acceptability than both Suboxone formulations. OX219 was preferred over Suboxone tablet and film formulations by 77.4% and 88.9% of subjects, respectively. Conclusions A sublingual tablet formulation with an improved acceptability has been successfully developed. PMID:24099551

  19. Comparison of methadone and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification (LEEDS trial): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat MJ; Sheard, Laura; Adams, Clive E; Rushforth, Bruno J; Harrison, Wendy; Bound, Nicole; Hart, Roger; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2011-01-01

    Background Many opiate users require prescribed medication to help them achieve abstinence, commonly taking the form of a detoxification regime. In UK prisons, drug users are nearly universally treated for their opiate use by primary care clinicians, and once released access GP services where 40% of practices now treat drug users. There is a paucity of evidence evaluating methadone and buprenorphine (the two most commonly prescribed agents in the UK) for opiate detoxification. Aim To evaluate whether buprenorphine or methadone help to achieve drug abstinence at completion of a reducing regimen for heroin users presenting to UK prison health care for detoxification. Design Open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial in three prison primary healthcare departments in the north of England. Method Prisoners (n = 306) using illicit opiates were recruited and given daily sublingual buprenorphine or oral methadone, in the context of routine care, over a standard reduced regimen of not more than 20 days. The primary outcome measure was abstinence from illicit opiates at 8 days post detoxification, as indicated by urine test (self-report/clinical notes where urine sample was not feasible). Secondary outcomes were also recorded. Results Abstinence was ascertained for 73.7% at 8 days post detoxification (urine sample = 52.6%, self report = 15.2%, clinical notes = 5.9%). There was no statistically significant difference in the odds of achieving abstinence between methadone and buprenorphine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81 to 3.51; P = 0.163). Abstinence was associated solely with whether or not the participant was still in prison at that time (15.22 times the odds; 95% CI = 4.19 to 55.28). The strongest association for lasting abstinence was abstinence at an earlier time point. Conclusion There is equal clinical effectiveness between methadone and buprenorphine in achieving abstinence from opiates at 8 days post detoxification within prison. PMID:22137413

  20. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following intravenous and buccal administration in cats, and effects on thermal threshold.

    PubMed

    Hedges, A R; Pypendop, B H; Shilo-Benjamini, Y; Stanley, S D; Ilkiw, J E

    2014-06-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine, following i.v. and buccal administration, and the relationship between buprenorphine concentration and its effect on thermal threshold. Buprenorphine (20 ?g/kg) was administered intravenously or buccally to six cats. Thermal threshold was determined, and arterial blood sampled prior to, and at various times up to 24 h following drug administration. Plasma buprenorphine concentration was determined using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Compartment models were fitted to the time-concentration data. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models were fitted to the concentration-thermal threshold data. Thermal threshold was significantly higher than baseline 44 min after buccal administration, and 7, 24, and 104 min after i.v. administration. A two- and three-compartment model best fitted the data following buccal and i.v. administration, respectively. Following i.v. administration, mean ± SD volume of distribution at steady-state (L/kg), clearance (mL·min/kg), and terminal half-life (h) were 11.6 ± 8.5, 23.8 ± 3.5, and 9.8 ± 3.5. Following buccal administration, absorption half-life was 23.7 ± 9.1 min, and terminal half-life was 8.9 ± 4.9 h. An effect-compartment model with a simple effect maximum model best predicted the time-course of the effect of buprenorphine on thermal threshold. Median (range) ke0 and EC50 were 0.003 (0.002-0.018)/min and 0.599 (0.073-1.628) ng/mL (i.v.), and 0.017 (0.002-0.023)/min and 0.429 (0.144-0.556) ng/mL (buccal). PMID:24862514

  1. Parallel buprenorphine phMRI responses in conscious rodents and healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Lino; Upadhyay, Jaymin; Chang, Pei-Ching; Bishop, James; Anderson, Julie; Baumgartner, Richard; Schwarz, Adam J; Coimbra, Alexandre; Wallin, Diana; Nutile, Lauren; George, Edward; Maier, Gary; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Iyengar, Smriti; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Bleakman, David; Hargreaves, Richard; Borsook, David

    2013-04-01

    Pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) is one method by which a drug's pharmacodynamic effects in the brain can be assessed. Although phMRI has been frequently used in preclinical and clinical settings, the extent to which a phMRI signature for a compound translates between rodents and humans has not been systematically examined. In the current investigation, we aimed to build on recent clinical work in which the functional response to 0.1 and 0.2 mg/70 kg i.v. buprenorphine (partial µ-opioid receptor agonist) was measured in healthy humans. Here, we measured the phMRI response to 0.04 and 0.1 mg/kg i.v. buprenorphine in conscious, naive rats to establish the parallelism of the phMRI signature of buprenorphine across species. PhMRI of 0.04 and 0.1 mg/kg i.v. buprenorphine yielded dose-dependent activation in a brain network composed of the somatosensory cortex, cingulate, insula, striatum, thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and cerebellum. Similar dose-dependent phMRI activation was observed in the human phMRI studies. These observations indicate an overall preservation of pharmacodynamic responses to buprenorphine between conscious, naive rodents and healthy human subjects, particularly in brain regions implicated in pain and analgesia. This investigation further demonstrates the usefulness of phMRI as a translational tool in neuroscience research that can provide mechanistic insight and guide dose selection in drug development. PMID:23370795

  2. A randomized trial of one-day vs. three-day buprenorphine inpatient detoxification protocols for heroin dependence.

    PubMed

    Hopper, John A; Wu, Joanna; Martus, Wesley; Pierre, James D

    2005-01-01

    Detoxification from opioids remains an important first step in the treatment of many patients with opioid dependence. Several pharmacologic regimens have been used for opioid detoxification. In the United States, the partial mu-opioid agonist, buprenorphine (BUP) is the most recently approved pharmacotherapy for opioid detoxification and replacement. The literature in recent years has described detoxification protocols using a single high dose of BUP and a three-day BUP regimen. In many settings, such as drug-free programs, a single-dose detoxification protocol would be of significant benefit. There have been no prior studies comparing one-day and three-day BUP-assisted opioid withdrawal. In this pilot study, we conducted an open-label, randomized trial of one-day vs. three-day BUP/naloxone sublingual tablet-assisted opioid withdrawal. Twenty patients from a therapeutic community treatment program were randomly assigned to receive either 32 mg sublingual BUP over one hour (one-day group), or 32 mg sublingual BUP over three days (three-day group). Nine of 10 subjects (90 percent) in each group completed seven days in the detoxification protocol. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in all other outcome variables, including retention in the treatment program, intensity of withdrawal signs and symptoms, amounts of adjunct medications used, and ability to produce opiate-free urine. This study further validates the feasibility of the single high dose of BUP as a rapid detoxification method. PMID:17315409

  3. Lack of adverse effects during a target animal safety trial of extended-release buprenorphine in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Alan; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Wilkerson, Gina; McKnight, Patrick; Guarnieri, Michael

    2015-12-18

    Extended-release buprenorphine is an effective analgesic in laboratory animals, and its safety has been established in mice but not in rats. The authors used a target animal safety trial to evaluate the safety of extended-release buprenorphine in rats. Fischer 344 rats received post-surgical subcutaneous injections of 1.3 mg, 3.9 mg or 6.5 mg buprenorphine per kg body weight (two times, six times or ten times the intended dose, respectively), and their body weight, clinical signs and symptoms, clinical pathology and histopathology were monitored for 4 d. Body weight was not significantly different in rats that received buprenorphine compared with control rats. Signs of nausea-related behavior were observed in 25% of the rats treated with buprenorphine. Clinical pathology results for all rats were normal, and gross and microscopic histopathology examinations identified no substantial abnormalities, suggesting that this behavior was of minor consequence. Other adverse events previously reported to occur with opiate therapy, including weight loss and dermal lesions at drug injection sites, were not observed in this study. The results of this study show that post-surgical administration of an extended-release buprenorphine product is safe in Fischer 344 rats and does not necessarily cause substantial adverse effects, confirming that opiate therapy is a viable choice in laboratory animal medicine. PMID:26684956

  4. An international perspective on using opioid substitution treatment to improve hepatitis C prevention and care for people who inject drugs: Structural barriers and public health potential.

    PubMed

    Perlman, David C; Jordan, Ashly E; Uuskula, Anneli; Huong, Duong Thi; Masson, Carmen L; Schackman, Bruce R; Des Jarlais, Don C

    2015-11-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are central to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic. Opioid substitution treatment (OST) of opioid dependence has the potential to play a significant role in the public health response to HCV by serving as an HCV prevention intervention, by treating non-injection opioid dependent people who might otherwise transition to non-sterile drug injection, and by serving as a platform to engage HCV infected PWID in the HCV care continuum and link them to HCV treatment. This paper examines programmatic, structural and policy considerations for using OST as a platform to improve the HCV prevention and care continuum in 3 countries-the United States, Estonia and Viet Nam. In each country a range of interconnected factors affects the use OST as a component of HCV control. These factors include (1) that OST is not yet provided on the scale needed to adequately address illicit opioid dependence, (2) inconsistent use of OST as a platform for HCV services, (3) high costs of HCV treatment and health insurance policies that affect access to both OST and HCV treatment, and (4) the stigmatization of drug use. We see the following as important for controlling HCV transmission among PWID: (1) maintaining current HIV prevention efforts, (2) expanding efforts to reduce the stigmatization of drug use, (3) expanding use of OST as part of a coordinated public health approach to opioid dependence, HIV prevention, and HCV control efforts, (4) reductions in HCV treatment costs and expanded health system coverage to allow population level HCV treatment as prevention and OST as needed. The global expansion of OST and use of OST as a platform for HCV services should be feasible next steps in the public health response to the HCV epidemic, and is likely to be critical to efforts to eliminate or eradicate HCV. PMID:26050614

  5. Buprenorphine 5, 10 and 20??g/h transdermal patch: a review of its use in the management of chronic non-malignant pain.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L

    2011-12-24

    This article reviews the pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy and tolerability profile of the 7-day lower-dose (5, 10 and 20??g/h) buprenorphine transdermal patch (BuTrans®, Norspan®) in the management of chronic non-malignant pain, with a focus on European labelling for the drug. Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic that acts primarily as a partial agonist at the mu opioid receptor. The transdermal formulation provides continuous delivery of buprenorphine, resulting in relatively consistent plasma drug concentrations throughout the 7-day dosing interval. The analgesic efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee has been demonstrated in several randomized controlled trials, which have shown the formulation to be equivalent to sublingual buprenorphine, noninferior to prolonged-release tramadol tablets, noninferior to codeine plus paracetamol (acetaminophen) combination tablets (when transdermal buprenorphine was used together with regularly scheduled oral paracetamol) and generally superior to a matching transdermal placebo patch. Transdermal buprenorphine was significantly more effective than placebo in reducing chronic low back pain of at least moderate severity in two randomized, double-blind, crossover trials. Other clinical trials, including a randomized, double-blind, maintenance-of-analgesia study, have also demonstrated the analgesic efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with chronic non-malignant pain of various causes. In general, serious adverse events with transdermal buprenorphine are similar to those for other opioid analgesics. Transdermal buprenorphine has a ceiling effect for respiratory depression, and the main risk is when it is combined with other CNS depressants. The most frequently reported adverse events with transdermal buprenorphine are headache, dizziness, somnolence, constipation, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, pruritus, erythema, application site pruritus and application site reactions. Transdermal buprenorphine was better tolerated than sublingual buprenorphine in a 7-week, randomized, double-blind trial in patients with osteoarthritis pain. Nevertheless, as with other opioids, persistence with transdermal buprenorphine therapy is difficult for many patients because of adverse events or other reasons. Thus, transdermal buprenorphine has generally demonstrated good efficacy and tolerability in clinical trials in chronic non-malignant pain, providing effective background analgesia as part of pain management strategies for patients with osteoarthritis, low back pain and other persistent pain syndromes of at least moderate severity. It also has favourable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, which have beneficial clinical implications, most notably the convenience of once-weekly administration and no need for dosage adjustments in the elderly or those with compromised renal function, making it an opioid of choice in these patients, and a useful therapeutic option overall in the management of chronic non-malignant pain. PMID:22141389

  6. The 'Expanded HIV care in opioid substitution treatment' (EHOST) cluster-randomized, stepped-wedge trial: A study protocol.

    PubMed

    Nosyk, B; Krebs, E; Min, J E; Ahamad, K; Buxton, J; Goldsmith, C; Hull, M; Joe, R; Krajden, M; Lima, V D; Olding, M; Wood, E; Montaner, J S G

    2015-11-01

    The public health response to HIV/AIDS has turned its focus onto optimizing health care system delivery to maximize case identification, access and sustained engagement in antiretroviral treatment (ART). Opioid Agonist Treatment (OAT) provides a critical opportunity for HIV testing and linkage to ART. The EHOST study is a cluster-randomized, stepped-wedge trial to evaluate a prescriber-focused intervention to increase HIV testing rates, and optimize ART engagement and retention outcomes among individuals engaged in OAT. The study will encompass all drug treatment clinics currently admitting patients for the treatment of opioid use disorder across the province of British Columbia, encompassing an estimated 90% of the OAT caseload. The trial will be executed over a 24-month period, with groups of clinics receiving the intervention in 6-month intervals. Evaluation of the proposed intervention's effectiveness will focus on three primary outcomes: (i) the HIV testing rate among those not known to be HIV positive; (ii) the rate of ART initiation among those not on ART; and (iii) the rate of ART continuation among those on ART. A difference-in-differences analytical framework will be applied to estimate the intervention's effect. This approach will assess site-specific changes in primary outcomes across clusters while adjusting for potential residual heterogeneity in patient case mix, volume, and quality of care across clinics. Statistical analysis of outcomes will be conducted entirely with linked population-level administrative health datasets. Facilitated by established collaborations between key stakeholders across the province, the EHOST intervention promises to optimize HIV testing and care within a marginalized and hard-to-reach population. PMID:26342295

  7. Experiences from a Community Based Substance Use Treatment Centre in an Urban Resettlement Colony in India

    PubMed Central

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Ranjan, Rajeev; Dhawan, Anju; Yadav, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Background. There are limited community based treatment services for drug dependence in India. Rural areas and urban resettlement colonies are in particular deficient in such services. Aims. The current study aimed at preliminary assessment of substance use disorder management services at a community based substance use treatment clinic in an urban resettlement colony. Methods. The study was carried out at community based substance use treatment centre in a resettlement colony in India. The records of the centre were chart reviewed. Results. A total of 754 patients were registered at the clinic during the study period. Heroin was the primary drug of abuse for 63% of the patients. The mean duration of follow-up for the patients with opioid and alcohol dependence was 13.47 (SD ± 10.37; range 0–39) months. A total of 220 patients of opioid dependence were prescribed substation or abstinence directed therapy. Buprenorphine (87), slow release oral morphine (SROM) (16), and dextropropoxyphene (98) were used for opioid substitution. Conclusion. It is possible to deliver substance use disorder treatment services in community setting. There is a need to develop area specific community based treatment services for substance abuse in socially disadvantaged populations such as urban resettlement colonies. PMID:25431739

  8. The SAR development of substituted purine derivatives as selective CB2 agonists for the treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Rossella; Astles, Peter C; Sanderson, Adam J; Hollinshead, Sean P; Johnson, Michael P; Chambers, Mark G

    2014-12-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) and the associated joint pain are highly prevalent and a leading cause of disability. We have previously reported the identification of a series of purines as selective CB2 agonists and the identification of compound 1 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of joint pain. In this article we describe the further SAR development of the purine scaffold leading to the discovery of compound 6 as a potent, CNS penetrating CB2 agonist with high selectivity for CB2 over CB1 and oral efficacy in animal models of chronic OA pain. PMID:25466177

  9. Determination of buprenorphine, fentanyl and LSD in whole blood by UPLC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Berg, Thomas; Jørgenrud, Benedicte; Strand, Dag Helge

    2013-04-01

    A sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method has been developed and validated for the quantification of buprenorphine, fentanyl and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in whole blood. Sample preparation was performed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with methyl tert-butyl ether. UPLC-MS-MS analysis was performed with a mobile phase consisting of ammonium formate (pH 10.2) and methanol. Positive electrospray ionization MS-MS detection was performed with two multiple reaction monitoring transitions for each of the analytes and the deuterium labeled internal standards. Limit of detection values of buprenorphine, fentanyl and LSD were 0.28, 0.044 and 0.0097 ng/mL and limit of quantification values were 0.94, 0.14 and 0.036 ng/mL, respectively. Most phospholipids were removed during LLE. No or only minor matrix effects were observed. The method has been routinely used at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health since September 2011 for qualitative and quantitative detections of buprenorphine, fentanyl and/or LSD in more than 400 whole blood samples with two replicates per sample. PMID:23423312

  10. Effect of fentanyl versus buprenorphine on the pupil size in phacoemulsification cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Anaraki, Abdolreza Najafi; Akrami, Abbas; Motamed, Niloofar; Seydali, Elham

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite several recent innovations in phacoemulsification surgery, importance of pupil diameter in this surgery is becoming more evident. Purpose: To compare the effect of opioid agonist (fentanyl) versus opioid agonist–antagonist (buprenorphine) on pupil diameter in cataract surgery and to choose the best opioid in high-risk phacoemulsification surgery. Methods: In this randomized double-blinded clinical trial, 60 patients who were candidates for elective phacoemulsification surgery were randomly divided into two equal groups: experimental (buprenorphine, 0.3 ?g/kg) and control (fentanyl, 1 ?g/kg). Pupil diameter was measured preinjection and at several times postinjection. Blood pressure was recorded at several intervals, as well as shivering, nausea and vomiting, and recovery time. Results: Mean (SD) recovery time was significantly less in the control group (19.46±5.43) than in the experimental group (33.23±10.75) (P<0.0001). The constriction effect (ie, pupillary diameter in mm) was significantly lower in the experimental group (0.53±0.45) than in the control group (1.06±0.52) (P=0.0001). The percentages of constriction effect in experimentaland control groups were 7.68% and 15.07%, respectively. The eye was two times more constricted in the control group in comparison with the experimental group after induction of anesthesia. Conclusion: Buprenorphine is a better solution to decrease pupil constriction in comparison with fentanylinhigh-risk phacoemulsification surgery. PMID:23162402

  11. Buprenorphine 5, 10 and 20??g/h transdermal patch: a guide to its use in chronic non-malignant pain.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L; Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2012-04-01

    Buprenorphine lower-dose (5, 10 and 20??g/h) transdermal patches, which are administered once every 7 days, are indicated in the management of chronic non-malignant pain. This review focuses on the labelling of this formulation (BuTrans®) in the EU. The analgesic efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee has been demonstrated to be equivalent to sublingual buprenorphine, noninferior to prolonged-release tramadol and generally superior to a matching transdermal placebo patch. When used together with regularly scheduled oral paracetamol (acetaminophen), transdermal buprenorphine was noninferior to codeine plus paracetamol. Transdermal buprenorphine has also shown analgesic efficacy in patients with chronic non-malignant pain of various causes. PMID:22369187

  12. In vivo receptor binding of the opiate partial agonist, buprenorphine, correlated with its agonistic and antagonistic actions.

    PubMed Central

    Dum, J. E.; Herz, A.

    1981-01-01

    1 In order to gain more insight into the mechanisms behind the actions of opiate partial agonists, an analysis of the dual agonist/antagonist properties of the partial agonist, buprenorphine, was made in conjunction with in vivo binding studies on the drug in the rat. 2 Buprenorphine revealed a bell-shaped dose-response curve for antinociception peaking at approx. 0.5 mg/kg subcutaneously. It antagonized morphine antinociception at doses which normally have agonistic effects and produced maximum antagonistic effects at doses above those having prominent agonistic activity. The withdrawal precipitating potency of buprenorphine as measured in highly morphine-dependent rats was present at doses above those having agonistic activity. The entire dose-response curve for buprenorphine was shifted symmetrically to the right by the opiate antagonist, naltrexone. 3 The dose-dependent occupation of receptors in vivo by buprenorphine seemed to be almost complete over the agonist dosage range; almost no further receptor occupation over the antagonist range was seen. 4 The possibility is discussed that site-to-site receptor interactions leading to cooperativity of effect may be the best explanation of these results. PMID:6271322

  13. The analgesic drug buprenorphine inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro, but is proinflammatory in rat adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hall, T J; Jagher, B; Schaeublin, M; Wiesenberg, I

    1996-06-01

    We have examined the effect of the micro-opioid analgesic buprenorphine on osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro and in the rat adjuvant arthritis model. In the bone slice assay buprenorphine inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption with an IC50 of 1 microM. This effect was not mimicked by the micro-opioid agonist ([D-Ala, N-Me-Phe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin and was not prevented by the micro-opioid antagonist naloxone. Since other agents that inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption, such as bisphosphonates and calcitonin prevent bone erosion in the rat adjuvant arthritis model, we also examined the effect of buprenorphine in this model. Surprisingly, buprenorphine exacerbated inflammation measured by paw volume and increased joint destruction assessed by X-ray scores, in the injected paws and particularly in the non-injected paws. These studies also show that attempts to ameliorate animal suffering in this chronic model by using centrally acting analgesics such as buprenorphine may lead to complications in interpreting screening results obtained with novel, potential anti-arthritic compounds. PMID:8814462

  14. Cross-reactivity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay in drugs-of-abuse screening: influence of dose and metabolites of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Jon Andsnes; Schjøtt, Jan; Fossan, Kjell O; Riedel, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA) for buprenorphine is applied for both urine drugs-of-abuse screening and compliance monitoring. Sensitivity, specificity, and optimal cutoff of this assay have differed between studies. This may indicate that cross-reactivity has to be taken into account during assay evaluation. We therefore investigated the performance of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay for use in our patient population and explored the impact of cross-reactivity on assay accuracy. Methods The CEDIA buprenorphine assay and high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry were employed to analyze drugs-of-abuse in urine samples from a healthy drug-naïve male volunteer after intake of two tablets of a prescription drug containing 400 mg paracetamol +30 mg codeine phosphate, and in urine samples (n=2,272) from drug-addicted patients. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to express the diagnostic accuracy of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. Results CEDIA buprenorphine was positive in one urine sample from the drug-naïve person after intake of the prescription drug. Twenty-five (1.1%) of the patient urine samples were positive for buprenorphine by CEDIA, but negative by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Codeine, morphine, and their respective metabolites were prevalent in samples that were false positive for buprenorphine. The specificity of the CEDIA buprenorphine assay increased to 99.7% when the cutoff was increased from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL. Conclusion Intake of a therapeutic dose of codeine can yield a false-positive CEDIA buprenorphine result. Additive effects from metabolites of codeine contribute to cross-reactivity in concentrations much lower than listed in the manufacturer’s cross-reactivity guide. Raising the cutoff from 5 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL increased the diagnostic accuracy. Clinicians should be informed about the risk of false-positive results with the CEDIA buprenorphine assay. PMID:26604854

  15. In vivo efficacy of oral and intralesional administration of 2-substituted quinolines in experimental treatment of new world cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Fournet, A; Ferreira, M E; Rojas De Arias, A; Torres De Ortiz, S; Fuentes, S; Nakayama, H; Schinini, A; Hocquemiller, R

    1996-01-01

    The antileishmanial efficacies of 2-n-propylquinoline, chimanines B and D, 2-n-pentylquinoline, 2-phenylquinoline, 2-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenylethyl) quinoline, and two total alkaloidal extracts of Galipea longiflora were evaluated in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania amazonensis or Leishmania venezuelensis. Animals were treated for 4 to 6 weeks postinfection with a quinoline by the oral route at 50 mg/kg of body weight twice daily for 15 days or by five intralesional injections at intervals of 4 days with a quinoline at 50 mg/kg of body weight. The reference drug, N-methylglucamine antimonate (Glucantime), was administered by subcutaneous or intralesional injection (regimens of 14, 28, or 56 mg of pentavalent antimony [Sbv] per kg of body weight daily). Twice-daily oral treatment with chimanine B at 50 mg/kg resulted in a decrease in lesion weight by 70% (P < 0.001) and a decrease in the parasite loads by 95% (P < 0.001). Five injections of chimanine B at intervals of 4 days reduced the lesion weight by 74% and the parasite loads in the lesion by 90% compared with the values for the group of untreated mice. Subcutaneous administration of N-methylglucamine antimonate at 28 mg of Sbv kg per day for 15 days reduced the parasite burden by 95% (P < 0.001), and five intralesional injections at the same concentration reduced the parasite burden by 96% (P < 0.001). Other 2-substituted quinolines, 2-n-propylquinoline administered by the oral and intralesional routes, 2-phenylquinoline administered by the oral route, 2-n-pentylquinoline administered by intralesional injection, and two total alkaloidal extracts of G. longiflora administered by the oral route, had intermediate effects. These findings suggest that chimanine B may be chosen as a lead molecule in the development of oral therapy against leishmaniasis. PMID:8913444

  16. PLASMA SUBSTITUTES

    PubMed Central

    Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Miller, L. L.; Alling, E. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1946-01-01

    Hemoglobin and globin alone, supplemented, or modified in various ways are seriously considered as plasma substitutes. Human globin given to doubly depleted (anemic and hypoproteinemic) dogs by vein contributes to the production of new hemoglobin and plasma protein, but there is some toxicity and weight loss. Dog hemoglobin given intraperitoneally is better tolerated and somewhat more completely utilized with more blood proteins formed and less weight loss. Dog globin (tryptic digest) given by vein in anemic dogs is associated with a moderate production of new hemoglobin. Horse globin by mouth contributes to the formation of new hemoglobin in the standard anemic dog. Dog hemoglobin given intraperitoneally in protein fasting, non-anemic dogs is well utilized to maintain nitrogen and weight balance. A dl-isoleucine supplement fails to improve this utilization of hemoglobin for maintenance in the dog. A small supplement of dl-methionine greatly improves the utilization of dog hemoglobin for maintenance in the dog and further addition of isoleucine is without effect. The intermediary metabolism of dog hemoglobin is not yet worked out. Electrophoretic analyses (Table 6) suggest that globin appears in the peripheral circulation after intraperitoneal injections of hemoglobin. PMID:19871535

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis from buprenorphine and oral tolerance to other opioid derivatives in three patients.

    PubMed

    Huilaja, Laura; Riekki, Riitta; Immonen, Aila; Tasanen, Kaisa

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal buprenorphine (TDB) is a widely used analgesic for moderate pain. TDB is generally well tolerated, but both irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occur at patch application sites. Oral opioid tolerance in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to TDB remains controversial. Here, we describe 3 patients with allergic contact dermatitis to TDB who subsequently used oral opioid derivatives without adverse reactions. Thus, oral intolerance to opioid derivatives is not a rule in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to TDB, but the possibility should be taken into consideration. PMID:24280659

  18. [Modification of the analgetic effects (buprenorphine, pentazocine, pethidine) on respiration and haemodynamics by epidural, halothane- or neuroleptanaesthesia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wüst, H J; Moritz, K G; Sandmann, W; Richter, O

    1980-04-01

    In 38 patients buprenorphine, meperidine and pentazocine were given in a single dose for postoperative pain relief 20 hours after the end of anaesthesia. Measuring the parameters of the high- and low-pressure system as well as the metabolism the authors found that the effects of these analgetic medicaments, intravenously injected were significantly influenced by fentanyl, halothane or diazepam, given under the course of operation. Especially buprenorphine, injected after epidural anaesthesia in combination with diazepam sedation, proved to have a rather negative effect, because it caused a strong depression of respiration and circulation. On the other hand buprenorphine had, given after neuroleptanaesthesia, a neutralizing - and pentazocine and pethidine in combination with neuroleptanaesthesia a stimulating influence on the circulation. After halothane-anaesthesia the effect of the analegtics on the cardiovascular system was, when buprenorphine was given, depressing and when pentazocine was given indifferent. Similar reactions, but more pronounced, could be seen in the epidural group. With certain reservations, caused by the preliminary character of this study, the following conclusions can be drawn for the anaesthetic practice: 1 Choosing analgetic drugs for postoperative pain relief, the anaesthesist has to be aware of the interactions, possibly resulting from the medicaments, given during anaesthesia. 2. The number of medicaments, given during anaesthesia, should be kept small, considering the eventual interactions and the unintentional secondary effects. PMID:7396100

  19. Buprenorphine-elicited alteration of adenylate cyclase activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells coexpressing ?-, ?-opioid and nociceptin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Chen; Ho, Ing-Kang; Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine, a maintenance drug for heroin addicts, exerts its pharmacological function via ?- (KOP), ?-opioid (MOP) and nociceptin/opioid receptor-like 1 (NOP) receptors. Previously, we investigated its effects in an in vitro model expressing human MOP and NOP receptors individually or simultaneously (MOP, NOP, and MOP+NOP) in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Here, we expanded this cell model by expressing human KOP, MOP and NOP receptors individually or simultaneously (KOP, KOP+MOP, KOP+NOP and KOP+MOP+NOP). Radioligand binding with tritium-labelled diprenorphine confirmed the expression of KOP receptors. Immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry indicated that the expressed KOP, MOP and NOP receptors are N-linked glycoproteins and colocalized in cytoplasmic compartments. Acute application of the opioid receptor agonists— U-69593, DAMGO and nociceptin— inhibited adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in cells expressing KOP, MOP and NOP receptors respectively. Buprenorphine, when applied acutely, inhibited AC activity to ~90% in cells expressing KOP+MOP+NOP receptors. Chronic exposure to buprenorphine induced concentration-dependent AC superactivation in cells expressing KOP+NOP receptors, and the level of this superactivation was even higher in KOP+MOP+NOP-expressing cells. Our study demonstrated that MOP receptor could enhance AC regulation in the presence of coexpressed KOP and NOP receptors, and NOP receptor is essential for concentration-dependent AC superactivation elicited by chronic buprenorphine exposure. PMID:26153065

  20. Buprenorphine-elicited alteration of adenylate cyclase activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells coexpressing ?-, ?-opioid and nociceptin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Chen; Ho, Ing-Kang; Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Buprenorphine, a maintenance drug for heroin addicts, exerts its pharmacological function via ?- (KOP), ?-opioid (MOP) and nociceptin/opioid receptor-like 1 (NOP) receptors. Previously, we investigated its effects in an in vitro model expressing human MOP and NOP receptors individually or simultaneously (MOP, NOP, and MOP+NOP) in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Here, we expanded this cell model by expressing human KOP, MOP and NOP receptors individually or simultaneously (KOP, KOP+MOP, KOP+NOP and KOP+MOP+NOP). Radioligand binding with tritium-labelled diprenorphine confirmed the expression of KOP receptors. Immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry indicated that the expressed KOP, MOP and NOP receptors are N-linked glycoproteins and colocalized in cytoplasmic compartments. Acute application of the opioid receptor agonists- U-69593, DAMGO and nociceptin- inhibited adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in cells expressing KOP, MOP and NOP receptors respectively. Buprenorphine, when applied acutely, inhibited AC activity to ~90% in cells expressing KOP+MOP+NOP receptors. Chronic exposure to buprenorphine induced concentration-dependent AC superactivation in cells expressing KOP+NOP receptors, and the level of this superactivation was even higher in KOP+MOP+NOP-expressing cells. Our study demonstrated that MOP receptor could enhance AC regulation in the presence of coexpressed KOP and NOP receptors, and NOP receptor is essential for concentration-dependent AC superactivation elicited by chronic buprenorphine exposure. PMID:26153065

  1. Adding an Internet-delivered Treatment to an Efficacious Treatment Package for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Darren R.; Landes, Reid D.; Jackson, Lisa; Marsch, Lisa A.; Mancino, Michael; Chopra, Mohit P.; Bickel, Warren K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the benefit of adding an internet-delivered behavior therapy to a buprenorphine medication program and voucher-based motivational incentives. Method A block-randomized, unblinded, parallel, 12-week treatment trial was conducted with 170 opioid-dependent adult patients (mean age 34.3 years; 54.1% male; 95.3% white). Participants received an internet-based community reinforcement approach intervention plus contingency management (CRA+) and buprenorphine, or contingency management alone (CM-alone) plus buprenorphine. The primary outcomes, measured over the course of treatment, were longest continuous abstinence, total abstinence, and days retained in treatment. Results Compared to those receiving CM-alone, CRA+ recipients exhibited on average 9.7 total days more of abstinence, 95% CI: (2.3, 17.2), and had a reduced hazard of dropping out of treatment, Hazard Ratio (HR)=0.47; 95% CI: (0.26, 0.85). Prior treatment for opioid dependence significantly moderated the additional improvement of CRA+ for longest continuous days of abstinence. Conclusions These results provide further evidence that an internet-based CRA+ treatment is efficacious and adds clinical benefits to a contingency management/medication based program for opioid dependence. PMID:25090043

  2. Evaluation of the One-Step ELISA kit for the detection of buprenorphine in urine, blood, and hair specimens.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Etienne, S; Villain, M; Ludes, B; Kintz, P

    2004-07-16

    A solid-phase enzyme immunoassay involving microtiter plates was recently proposed by International Diagnostic Systems corporation (IDS) to screen for buprenorphine in human serum. The performance of the kit led us to investigate its applicability in other biological matrices such as urine or blood, and also hair specimens. Low concentrations of buprenorphine were detected with the ELISA test and confirmed by HPLC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations measured by HPLC/MS: 0.3 ng/mL in urine, 0.2 ng/mL in blood, and 40 pg/mg in hair). The intra-assay precision values were 8.7% at 1 ng/mL of urine (n = 8), 11.5% at 2 ng/mL in serum (n = 8), and 11.5% at 250 pg/mg of hair (n = 8), respectively. The immunoassay had no cross-reactivity with dihydrocodeine, ethylmorphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, pholcodine, propoxyphene, dextromoramide, dextrometorphan at 1 and 10 mg/L, or codeine, morphine, methadone, and its metabolite EDDP. A 1% cross-reactivity was measured for a norbuprenorphine concentration of 50 ng/mL. Finally, the immunoassay was validated by comparing authentic specimens results with those of a validated HPLC/MS method. From the 136 urine samples tested, 93 were positive (68.4%) after the ELISA screening test (cutoff: 0.5 ng/mL) and confirmed by HPLC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations: 0.3-2036 ng/mL). From the 108 blood or serum samples screened, 27 were positive (25%) after the ELISA test with a cutoff value of 0.5 ng/mL (buprenorphine concentrations: 0.2-13.3 ng/mL). Eighteen hair specimens were positive (72%) after the screening (cutoff: 10 pg/mg) and confirmed by LC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations: 40-360 pg/mg). The ELISA method produced false positive results in less than 21% of the cases, but no false negative results were observed with the immunological test. Four potential adulterants (hypochloride 50 mL/L, sodium nitrite 50 g/L, liquid soap 50 mL/L, and sodium chloride 50 g/L) that were added to 10 positive urine specimens (buprenorphine concentrations in the range 5.3-15.6 ng/mL), did not cause a false negative response by the immunoassay. PMID:15240036

  3. Heat treatment effects on structural and dielectric properties of Mn substituted CuFe2O4 and ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjith Kumar, E.; Arunkumar, T.; Prakash, T.

    2015-09-01

    Manganese substituted copper and zinc ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by an auto-combustion technique using metal nitrates and urea. The nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, and TEM techniques. The effect of annealing temperature on structural and dielectric properties of Mn substituted spinel ferrite nanoparticles was analyzed. The presenting elements in the prepared samples are recorded by EDX. TEM analysis clearly showed the particles are in the nanometer range. The dielectric loss and dielectric constant have been measured in the frequency range of 100 kHz-5 MHz. The variation in structural and dielectric properties of the prepared and annealed samples are discussed.

  4. Poly-substance use and antisocial personality traits at admission predict cumulative retention in a buprenorphine programme with mandatory work and high compliance profile

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Continuous abstinence and retention in treatment for alcohol and drug use disorders are central challenges for the treatment providers. The literature has failed to show consistent, strong predictors of retention. Predictors and treatment structure may differ across treatment modalities. In this study the structure was reinforced by the addition of supervised urine samples three times a week and mandatory daily work/structured education activities as a prerequisite of inclusion in the program. Methods Of 128 patients consecutively admitted to buprenorphine maintenance treatment five patients dropped out within the first week. Of the remaining 123 demographic data and psychiatric assessment were used to predict involuntary discharge from treatment and corresponding cumulative abstinence probability. All subjects were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, and the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90), the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), all self-report measures. Some measures were repeated every third month in addition to interviews. Results Of 123 patients admitted, 86 (70%) remained in treatment after six months and 61 (50%) remained in treatment after 12 months. Of those discharged involuntarily, 34/62 individuals were readmitted after a suspension period of three months. Younger age at intake, poly-substance abuse at intake (number of drugs in urine), and number of conduct disorder criteria on the SCID Screen were independently associated with an increased risk of involuntary discharge. There were no significant differences between dropouts and completers on SCL-90, SSP, SOC or AUDIT. Conclusion Of the patients admitted to the programme 50% stayed for the first 12 months with continuous abstinence and daily work. Poly-substance use before intake into treatment, high levels of conduct disorder on SCID screen and younger age at intake had a negative impact on retention and abstinence. PMID:21569440

  5. The Differential Effects of Buprenorphine and Methadone on Adolescent Mice. 

    E-print Network

    Barwatt, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    of these treatments for that age group. A recent study conducted in our lab has indicated potential risks in chronic exposure to certain opioids, specifically, morphine during adolescence. Morphine exposure was observed to change the signaling of D2/D3 dopamine...

  6. Bone Graft Substitution and Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Nauth, Aaron; Lane, Joseph; Watson, J Tracy; Giannoudis, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Selection of appropriate bone graft or bone graft substitute requires careful recognition of the bone healing needs of the patient's specific clinical problem and a thorough understanding of the different properties possessed by the available bone grafts and substitutes. Although autogenous iliac crest bone graft remains the gold standard of treatment for delayed unions, nonunions, and bone defects, there are a number of promising alternatives available, and emerging evidence suggests that they can be very effective when used in the proper setting. Among these, reamer-irrigator-aspirator bone graft, bone marrow concentrate, bone morphogenetic proteins, and calcium phosphate cements have received a great deal of attention in the literature. This review describes these grafts in detail along with the evidence for their use. In addition, a framework is provided for selecting the appropriate graft or substitute based on their provided properties. PMID:26584264

  7. Substitute Addiction: A Concern for Researchers and Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Steve; Black, David S.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of the role of substitute addictions remains unclear. This article examines the range and possible reward functions of substitute addictions. We suggest that prevention education and treatment need to take into account substitute addictions as an influential aspect of recovery. Research is needed to better understand the…

  8. Faculty Development in Small-Group Teaching Skills Associated with a Training Course on Office-Based Treatment of Opioid Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Jeffrey G.; Holmboe, Eric S.; Becker, William C.; Fiellin, David A.; Jara, Gail B.; Martin, Judith

    2005-01-01

    The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA-2000) allows qualified physicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with schedule III-V medications, such as buprenorphine, in practices separate from licensed, accredited opioid treatment programs. Physicians may attain this qualification by completing 8-hours of training in treating opioid…

  9. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Sustained-Release and Standard Buprenorphine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Tannia S; Clark, David D; Jr, Robert F Hoyt

    2014-01-01

    Effective pain medication is important for animal stewardship and valid research results. We compared the pharmacokinetic assessments of standard, immediate-release buprenorphine (Bup IR) and a sustained-release buprenorphine formulation (Bup SR Lab) in male C57BL/6J mice, a mouse strain commonly used in biomedical research. We postulated that the administration of Bup SR Lab would achieve a more persistent blood drug concentration (>1 ng/mL) compared with single-dose Bup IR. The study assumed a blood buprenorphine concentration of 1 ng/mL as the minimum that may result in adequate analgesia, as previously reported. The 7 experimental groups included Bup IR (0.03, 0.05, 0.1, and 2 mg/kg), Bup SR Lab (0.3 and 1.2 mg/kg), and saline placebo (0.7 mL/100 g). Blood sampling occurred at 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h for evaluation by using a forensic ELISA. Bup IR at 0.03 and 0.05 mg/kg and Bup SR Lab at 0.3 mg/kg failed to obtain maximal blood concentrations (Cmax) above 1 ng/mL. All other doses (0.1 and 2 mg/kg Bup IR and 1.2 mg/kg Bup SR Lab) reached a Cmax above 1 ng/mL within 3 h after injection. In addition, 1.2 mg/kg Bup SR Lab and 2 mg/kg Bup IR provided blood concentrations above 1 ng/mL for up to 12 h, and 0.1 mg/kg Bup IR achieved this criterion for as long as 3 h. In conclusion, Bup SR Lab at 1.2 mg/kg and Bup IR at 0.1 or 2.0 mg/kg achieve or surpass the published threshold for adequate analgesia in mice. PMID:25199095

  10. Rifampin reduces oral morphine absorption: a case of transdermal buprenorphine selection based on morphine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Fudin, Jeffrey; Fontenelle, Dania Vanesta; Payne, Annette

    2012-12-01

    A 51-year-old male was referred to the Stratton Veterans Affairs Medical Center Pain Service after hospital admission for endocarditis with a history of heroin use and chronic low back pain. During his hospital stay he experienced a reduction in his serum morphine level ostensibly as a result of concomitant rifampin administration. We hypothesize that diminished absorption was from rifampin-mediated intestinal P-glycoprotein induction, ultimately decreasing serum free morphine and metabolites. The case became more complex in an attempt to balance managed pain, history of substance abuse, completion of antibiotic therapy, and a reasonable pain regimen upon discharge. Ultimately, the patient was titrated onto a buprenorphine transdermal patch, the initiation of which was based on serum free morphine and an extrapolated oral morphine dose by calculation. PMID:23216174

  11. Novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treatment of opioid-induced neonatal abstinence syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McLemore, Gabrielle L.; Lewis, Tamorah; Jones, Catherine H.; Gauda, Estelle B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The non-medical use of prescription drugs, in general, and opioids, in particular, is a national epidemic, resulting in enormous addiction rates, healthcare expenditures, and overdose deaths. Prescription opioids are overly prescribed, illegally trafficked, and frequently abused, all of which have created a new opioid addiction pathway, adding to the number of opioid-dependent newborns requiring treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), and contributing to challenges in effective care in maternal and fetal/neonatal (M-F/N) medicine. The standard of care for illicit or prescription opioid dependence during pregnancy is opioid agonist (methadone or buprenorphine) substitution therapy, which are also frequently abused. The next generation of pharmacotherapies for the treatment of illicit or prescription opioid addiction in the M-F/N interactional dyad must take into consideration the interplay between genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Addiction to illicit drugs during pregnancy presents unique challenges to effectively treat the mother, and the developing fetus and infant after delivery. New pharmacotherapies should be safe to the developing fetus, effective in treating the physical and psychological consequences of addiction in the mother, and reduce the incidence and severity of NAS in the infant after birth. More pharmacotherapeutic options should be available to the physician such that a more individualized rather than a one-drug/strategy-fits-all approach can be used. A myriad of new and exciting pharmacotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of opioid dependence and addiction are on the horizon. This review focuses on such three strategies: (i) pharmacotherapeutic targeting of the serotoninergic system; (ii) mixed opioid immunotherapeutics (vaccines); (iii) pharmacogenomics as a therapeutic strategy to insure personalized care. We review and discuss how these strategies may offer additional treatment modalities for the treatment of M-F/N during pregnancy and the treatment of the infant after birth. PMID:23059064

  12. Buprenorphine for postoperative analgesia: Axillary brachial plexus block versus intramuscular administration in a placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Deepali; Malde, Anila

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Peripheral administration of opioids has been suggested for prolongation of regional analgesia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study was undertaken to compare the effect of regional (axillary brachial plexus block [ABPB]) versus intramuscular (IM) buprenorphine (2 ?g/kg) in adults. Material and Methods: Seventy-five adults undergoing upper limb surgery received ABPB with local anaesthetic (15 ml 0.5% bupivacaine, 15 ml 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:200,000, 9 ml normal saline [NS]). In addition, regional group RB (n = 25) received buprenorphine 2 ?g/kg in ABPB and 1 ml NS IM. Systemic Group SB (n = 25) received 1 ml NS in ABPB and buprenorphine 2 ?g/kg IM. Group C (n = 25) received 1 ml NS in ABPB and IM. Onset, duration of sensory and motor block, hemodynamic parameters, sedation score, pain scores using visual analog scale, duration of postoperative analgesia, rescue analgesic (RA) requirement, adverse events, and patient satisfaction were noted. Results: Demographics, onset and duration of sensory, motor block were similar. RB group had longest duration of analgesia (20.61 ± 1.33 h) compared to SB (10.91 ± 0.90 h) and control group (5.86 ± 0.57 h) (P < 0.05 RB vs. SB/C and SB vs. C). RA requirement was highest in the control group and least in RB group (P = 0.000 RB vs. SB/C and SB vs. C). SB group had a maximum number of side effects (P = 0.041, SB vs. RB/C). Patient satisfaction was highest with group RB (P < 0.05 RB vs. SB/C, and P = 0.06 SB vs. C). Conclusion: Buprenorphine 2 ?g/kg in axillary plexus block provides significantly prolonged analgesia with less RA requirement and greater patient satisfaction compared to IM administration. This is highly suggestive of action on peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:26330716

  13. The in vivo glucuronidation of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine determined by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Moody, David E; McCance-Katz, Elinore F

    2006-04-01

    The opioid partial agonist medication, buprenorphine (BUP), and its primary metabolite, norbuprenorphine (NBUP), are extensively glucuronidated. Sensitive analytical methods that include determination of buprenorphine-3-glucuronide (BUPG) and norbuprenorphine-3-glucuronide (NBUPG) are needed to more fully understand the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine. A method has now been developed that uses solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. BUP-d4, NBUP-d3, and morphine-3-glucuronide-d3 were used as internal standards. The lower limit of quantitation was 0.1 and 0.5 ng/mL for each of the analytes in 1-mL of human plasma and urine, respectively, except for NBUP in urine in which it was 2.5 ng/mL. The analytes were stable under the following conditions: plasma and urine at room temperature, up to 20 hours; plasma and urine at -20 degrees C for 119 and 85 days, respectively; plasma freeze-thaw, up to 3 cycles; processed sample, up to 96 hours at -20 degrees C and up to 48 hours on the autosampler; stock solutions at room temperature and at -20 degrees C, up to 6 hours and 128 days, respectively. In plasma collected from 5 subjects on maintenance daily sublingual doses of 16 mg BUP and 4 mg naloxone, respective 0- to 24-hour areas under the curve were 32, 88, 26, and 316 ng/mL x h for BUP, NBUP, BUPG, and NBUPG. In urine samples respective percent of daily dose excreted in the 24-hour urine were 0.014%, 1.89%, 1.01%, and 7.76%. This method allowed us to determine that NBUPG is a major metabolite present in plasma and urine of BUP. Because urinary elimination is limited ( approximately 11% of daily dose), the role of NBUPG in total clearance of buprenorphine is not yet known. PMID:16628138

  14. Review of Bone Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Landon S.; Gage, Earl; Langevin, Claude-Jean; Herrera, Fernando; Breithaupt, Andrew D.; Gordon, Chad R.; Afifi, Ahmed M.; Zins, James E.; Meltzer, Hal; Gosman, Amanda; Cohen, Steve R.; Holmes, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Bone substitutes are being increasingly used in craniofacial surgery and craniomaxillofacial trauma. We will review the history of the biomaterials and describe the ideal characteristics of bone substitutes, with a specific emphasis on craniofacial reconstruction. Some of the most commonly used bone substitutes are discussed in more depth, such as calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite ceramics and cements, bioactive glass, and polymer products. Areas of active research and future directions include tissue engineering, with an increasing emphasis on bioactivity of the implant. PMID:22110809

  15. Medication-assisted treatment of opiate dependence is gaining favor.

    PubMed

    Jerry, Jason M; Collins, Gregory B

    2013-06-01

    People addicted to opiates are more likely to avoid returning to these drugs if they participate in a program that includes taking maintenance doses of methadone or buprenorphine than with an abstinence program. Although medical opinion has long been divided on the issue of abstinence vs medication-assisted treatment, the latter seems to be gaining respect as an evidence-based approach. PMID:23733899

  16. Opioid use in Albuquerque, New Mexico: a needs assessment of recent changes and treatment availability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New Mexico has consistently high rates of drug-induced deaths, and opioid-related treatment admissions have been increasing over the last two decades. Youth in New Mexico are at particular risk: they report higher rates of nonmedical prescription opioid use than those over age 25, are more likely than their national counterparts to have tried heroin, and represent an increasing proportion of heroin overdoses. Methods Commissioned by the City of Albuquerque, semistructured interviews were conducted from April to June of 2011 with 24 substance use treatment agencies and eight key stakeholders in Albuquerque to identify recent changes in the treatment-seeking population and gaps in treatment availability. Themes were derived using template analysis and data were analyzed using NVivo 9 software. Results Respondents reported a noticeable increase in youth seeking treatment for opioid use and a general increase in nonmedical prescription opioid use. Most noted difficulties with finding buprenorphine providers and a lack of youth services. Additionally, stigma, limited interagency communication and referral, barriers to prescribing buprenorphine, and a lack of funding were noted as preventing opioid users from quickly accessing effective treatment. Conclusions Recommendations for addressing these issues include developing youth-specific treatment programs, raising awareness about opioid use among youth, increasing the availability of buprenorphine through provider incentives and education, developing a resource guide for individuals seeking treatment in Albuquerque, and prioritizing interagency communication and referrals. PMID:24942534

  17. Managing Substitute Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kevin R.

    1999-01-01

    This news brief presents information on managing substitute teaching. The information is based on issues discussed at a summit meeting which included public school administrators and personnel directors from around the nation. The main topics of concern focused around four core components related to the management of substitute teaching:…

  18. Switching from transdermal drugs: an observational "N of 1" study of fentanyl and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Fulfaro, Fabio; Aielli, Federica; Verna, Lucilla; Ficorella, Corrado; Casuccio, Alessandra; Riina, Salvatore; Intravaia, Giuseppe; Mangione, Salvatore

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm that the concomitant presence of transdermal fentanyl (TTS FE) and buprenorphine (TTS BU) may be feasible without important consequences, using doses presumed to be equianalgesic. A prospective "N of 1" study was carried out in a sample of volunteers with cancer pain receiving stable doses of TTS FE or TTS BU, with adequate pain and symptom control. In the study design, each patient provided data before and after a switch from one opioid to the other and then back to the previous one. Sixteen patients receiving daily stable doses of 0.6 or 1.2mg of TTS FE were switched to TTS BU using an FE-BU ratio of 0.6-0.8. After three days, the TTS BU patch was removed and TTS FE patch was placed for another three days. Six patients receiving TTS BU were switched to TTS FE and then rotated back to TTS BU with the same dosing considerations. No statistical differences in changes in pain and symptom intensity during switching and between the two different sequences were observed. No significant changes in rescue doses of oral morphine were reported at the same intervals. Cancer patients receiving stable doses of TTS FE or TTS BU can be safely switched to the alternative transdermal opioid. Further studies should be performed to gather data about the use of TTS BU with other opioids, at different doses, and in different clinical conditions. PMID:17629666

  19. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  4. A statistical experimental design approach to evaluate the influence of various penetration enhancers on transdermal drug delivery of buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeh, S.Mojtaba; Moghimi-Ardakani, Ali; Mohamadnia, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    A series of drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems (patch) with different chemical penetration enhancers were designed to deliver drug through the skin as a site of application. The objective of our effort was to study the influence of various chemical penetration enhancers on skin permeation rate and adhesion properties of a transdermal drug delivery system using Box–Behnken experimental design. The response surface methodology based on a three-level, three-variable Box–Behnken design was used to evaluate the interactive effects on dependent variables including, the rate of skin permeation and adhesion properties, namely peel strength and tack value. Levulinic acid, lauryl alcohol, and Tween 80 were used as penetration enhancers (patch formulations, containing 0–8% of each chemical penetration enhancer). Buprenorphine was used as a model penetrant drug. The results showed that incorporation of 20% chemical penetration enhancer into the mixture led to maximum skin permeation flux of buprenorphine from abdominal rat skin while the adhesion properties decreased. Also that skin flux in presence of levulinic acid (1.594 ?g/cm2 h) was higher than Tween 80 (1.473 ?g/cm2 h) and lauryl alcohol (0.843 ?g/cm2 h), and in mixing these enhancers together, an additional effect was observed. Moreover, it was found that each enhancer increased the tack value, while levulinic acid and lauryl alcohol improved the peel strength but Tween 80 reduced it. These findings indicated that the best chemical skin penetration enhancer for buprenorphine patch was levulinic acid. Among the designed formulations, the one which contained 12% (wt/wt) enhancers exhibited the highest efficiency. PMID:25750749

  5. A statistical experimental design approach to evaluate the influence of various penetration enhancers on transdermal drug delivery of buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, S Mojtaba; Moghimi-Ardakani, Ali; Mohamadnia, Fatemeh

    2015-03-01

    A series of drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems (patch) with different chemical penetration enhancers were designed to deliver drug through the skin as a site of application. The objective of our effort was to study the influence of various chemical penetration enhancers on skin permeation rate and adhesion properties of a transdermal drug delivery system using Box-Behnken experimental design. The response surface methodology based on a three-level, three-variable Box-Behnken design was used to evaluate the interactive effects on dependent variables including, the rate of skin permeation and adhesion properties, namely peel strength and tack value. Levulinic acid, lauryl alcohol, and Tween 80 were used as penetration enhancers (patch formulations, containing 0-8% of each chemical penetration enhancer). Buprenorphine was used as a model penetrant drug. The results showed that incorporation of 20% chemical penetration enhancer into the mixture led to maximum skin permeation flux of buprenorphine from abdominal rat skin while the adhesion properties decreased. Also that skin flux in presence of levulinic acid (1.594 ?g/cm(2) h) was higher than Tween 80 (1.473 ?g/cm(2) h) and lauryl alcohol (0.843 ?g/cm(2) h), and in mixing these enhancers together, an additional effect was observed. Moreover, it was found that each enhancer increased the tack value, while levulinic acid and lauryl alcohol improved the peel strength but Tween 80 reduced it. These findings indicated that the best chemical skin penetration enhancer for buprenorphine patch was levulinic acid. Among the designed formulations, the one which contained 12% (wt/wt) enhancers exhibited the highest efficiency. PMID:25750749

  6. Sugar substitutes during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Eliza; Koren, Gideon; Bozzo, Pina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Question I have a pregnant patient who regularly consumes sugar substitutes and she asked me if continuing their use would affect her pregnancy or child. What should I tell her, and are there certain options that are better for use during pregnancy? Answer Although more research is required to fully determine the effects of in utero exposure to sugar substitutes, the available data do not suggest adverse effects in pregnancy. However, it is recommended that sugar substitutes be consumed in moderate amounts, adhering to the acceptable daily intake standards set by regulatory agencies. PMID:25392440

  7. Sugar Substitutes: Aspartame

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sugar substitute. It is a combination of 2 amino acids: aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It is about 200 ... to metabolize phenylalanine, which is one of the amino acids in aspartame. If you are concerned that consuming ...

  8. Medically assisted recovery from opiate dependence within the context of the UK drug strategy: methadone and Suboxone (buprenorphine-naloxone) patients compared.

    PubMed

    McKeganey, Neil; Russell, Christopher; Cockayne, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    The focus of drug policy in the UK has shifted markedly in the past 5 years to move beyond merely emphasising drug abstinence towards maximising individuals' opportunities for recovery. The UK government continues to recognise the prescribing of narcotic medications indicated for opiate dependence as a key element of these individuals' recovery journey. This article describes a small, naturalistic comparison of the efficacy of the two most commonly prescribed opiate substitute medications in the UK--methadone hydrochloride (methadone oral solution) and Suboxone (buprenorphine-naloxone sublingual tablets)--for reducing current heroin users' (n = 34) days of heroin use, and preventing short-term abstainers (n = 37) from relapsing to regular heroin use. All patients had been prescribed either methadone or Suboxone for maintenance for 6 months prior to intake. Results showed that when controlling for a number of patient-level covariates, both methadone and Suboxone significantly reduced current users' days of heroin use between the 90 days prior to intake and at the 8-month follow-up, with Suboxone yielding a significantly larger magnitude reduction in heroin use days than methadone. Methadone and Suboxone were highly and equally effective for preventing relapse to regular heroin use, with all but 3 of 37 (91.9%) patients who were abstinent at intake reporting past 90-day point prevalence heroin abstinence at the 8-month follow-up. Overall, prescribing methadone or Suboxone for eight continuous months was highly effective for initiating abstinence from heroin use, and for converting short-term abstinence to long-term abstinence. However, the study design, which was based on a relatively small sample size and was not able randomise patients to medication and so could not control for the effects of potential prognostic factors inherent within each patient group, means that these conclusions can only be made tentatively. These positive but preliminary indications of the comparative efficacy of methadone and Suboxone for treating opiate dependence now require replication in a well-powered, randomised controlled trial. PMID:22703715

  9. Substitution of anticonvulsant drugs

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Runge, Uwe; Witte, Otto W; Stefan, Hermann; Hufnagel, Andreas; Mayer, Thomas; Krämer, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Changing from branded drugs to generic alternatives, or between different generic formulations, is common practice aiming at reducing health care costs. It has been suggested that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) should be exempt from substitution because of the potential negative consequences of adverse events and breakthrough seizures. Controlled data are lacking on the risk of substitution. However, retrospective data from large medical claims databases suggest that switching might be associated with increased use of AED and non-AED medications, and health care resources (including hospitalization). In addition, some anecdotal evidence from patients and health care providers’ surveys suggest a potentially negative impact of substitution. Well-controlled data are needed to assess the real risk associated with substitution, allowing health care professionals involved in the care of patients with epilepsy to make informed decisions. This paper reviews currently available literature, based on which the authors suggest that the decision to substitute should be made on an individual basis by the physician and an informed patient. Unendorsed or undisclosed substitution at the pharmacy level should be discouraged. PMID:19707254

  10. Opioids and the management of chronic severe pain in the elderly: consensus statement of an International Expert Panel with focus on the six clinically most often used World Health Organization Step III opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone).

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph; Böger, Rainer H; Budd, Keith; Dahan, Albert; Erdine, Serdar; Hans, Guy; Kress, Hans-Georg; Langford, Richard; Likar, Rudolf; Raffa, Robert B; Sacerdote, Paola

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY OF CONSENSUS: 1. The use of opioids in cancer pain: The criteria for selecting analgesics for pain treatment in the elderly include, but are not limited to, overall efficacy, overall side-effect profile, onset of action, drug interactions, abuse potential, and practical issues, such as cost and availability of the drug, as well as the severity and type of pain (nociceptive, acute/chronic, etc.). At any given time, the order of choice in the decision-making process can change. This consensus is based on evidence-based literature (extended data are not included and chronic, extended-release opioids are not covered). There are various driving factors relating to prescribing medication, including availability of the compound and cost, which may, at times, be the main driving factor. The transdermal formulation of buprenorphine is available in most European countries, particularly those with high opioid usage, with the exception of France; however, the availability of the sublingual formulation of buprenorphine in Europe is limited, as it is marketed in only a few countries, including Germany and Belgium. The opioid patch is experimental at present in U.S.A. and the sublingual formulation has dispensing restrictions, therefore, its use is limited. It is evident that the population pyramid is upturned. Globally, there is going to be an older population that needs to be cared for in the future. This older population has expectations in life, in that a retiree is no longer an individual who decreases their lifestyle activities. The "baby-boomers" in their 60s and 70s are "baby zoomers"; they want to have a functional active lifestyle. They are willing to make trade-offs regarding treatment choices and understand that they may experience pain, providing that can have increased quality of life and functionality. Therefore, comorbidities--including cancer and noncancer pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and postherpetic neuralgia--and patient functional status need to be taken carefully into account when addressing pain in the elderly. World Health Organization step III opioids are the mainstay of pain treatment for cancer patients and morphine has been the most commonly used for decades. In general, high level evidence data (Ib or IIb) exist, although many studies have included only few patients. Based on these studies, all opioids are considered effective in cancer pain management (although parts of cancer pain are not or only partially opioid sensitive), but no well-designed specific studies in the elderly cancer patient are available. Of the 2 opioids that are available in transdermal formulation--fentanyl and buprenorphine--fentanyl is the most investigated, but based on the published data both seem to be effective, with low toxicity and good tolerability profiles, especially at low doses. 2. The use of opioids in noncancer-related pain: Evidence is growing that opioids are efficacious in noncancer pain (treatment data mostly level Ib or IIb), but need individual dose titration and consideration of the respective tolerability profiles. Again no specific studies in the elderly have been performed, but it can be concluded that opioids have shown efficacy in noncancer pain, which is often due to diseases typical for an elderly population. When it is not clear which drugs and which regimes are superior in terms of maintaining analgesic efficacy, the appropriate drug should be chosen based on safety and tolerability considerations. Evidence-based medicine, which has been incorporated into best clinical practice guidelines, should serve as a foundation for the decision-making processes in patient care; however, in practice, the art of medicine is realized when we individualize care to the patient. This strikes a balance between the evidence-based medicine and anecdotal experience. Factual recommendations and expert opinion both have a value when applying guidelines in clinical practice. 3. The use of opioids in neuropathic pain: The role of opioids in neuropathic pain has been under debate in the

  11. Client and Counselor Attitudes Toward the Use of Medications for Treatment of Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, Traci; Daley, Marilyn; Fuller, Bret E.; Thomas, Cindy P.; McCarty, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Attitudes, perceived social norms and intentions were assessed for 376 counselors and 1083 clients from outpatient, methadone and residential drug treatment programs regarding four medications used to treat opiate dependence: methadone, buprenorphine, clonidine, and ibogaine. Attitudes, social norms and intentions to use varied by treatment modality. Methadone clients and counselors had more positive attitudes toward the use of methadone, while their counterparts in residential and outpatient settings had neutral or negative assessments. Across modalities, attitudes, perceived social norms, and intentions toward the use of buprenorphine were relatively neutral. Assessments of clonidine and ibogaine were negative for clients and counselors in all settings. Social normative influences were dominant across settings and medications in determining counselor and client intentions to use medications, suggesting that perceptions about beliefs of peers may play a critical role in use of medications to treat opiate dependence. PMID:17306729

  12. The substitutability of reinforcers.

    PubMed

    Green, Leonard; Freed, Debra E

    1993-07-01

    Substitutability is a construct borrowed from microeconomics that describes a continuum of possible interactions among the reinforcers in a given situation. Highly substitutable reinforcers, which occupy one end of the continuum, are readily traded for each other due to their functional similarity. Complementary reinforcers, at the other end of the continuum, tend to be consumed jointly in fairly rigid proportion, and therefore cannot be traded for one another except to achieve that proportion. At the center of the continuum are reinforcers that are independent with respect to each other; consumption of one has no influence on consumption of another. Psychological research and analyses in terms of substitutability employ standard operant conditioning paradigms in which humans and nonhumans choose between alternative reinforcers. The range of reinforcer interactions found in these studies is more readily accommodated and predicted when behavior-analytic models of choice consider issues of substitutability. New insights are gained into such areas as eating and drinking, electrical brain stimulation, temporal separation of choice alternatives, behavior therapy, drug use, and addictions. Moreover, the generalized matching law (Baum, 1974) gains greater explanatory power and comprehensiveness when measures of substitutability are included. PMID:16812696

  13. The Cry of the Substitute Teacher...Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seney, Heidi

    1974-01-01

    This article by a substitute teacher objects to the status and treatment of "subs" and makes a series of requests for such things as lesson plans, school information (including maps) and the feeling of being welcomed by the staff. (JA)

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Infected Brachial Pseudoaneurysm in an Intravenous Drug Abuser: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Boieru, Raluca; Georg, Yannick; Ramlugun, Dharmesh; Martinot, Martin; Camin, Amelie; Matysiak, Lucien; Kretz, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old male, admitted in the emergency room with a nonruptured brachial pseudoaneurysm after buprenorphine injection, with no signs of distal acute ischemia. After endovascular treatment with a nitinol covered stent associated with adapted antibiotherapy and 35 days of hospitalizations, the patient was discharged with good short results but stent need to be removed at 6 months for thrombosis and partial exposure through the wound. PMID:26142880

  15. 40 CFR 721.8780 - Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl (PMNs P-96-767 and P-96-773) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described in paragraph...

  16. 40 CFR 721.8780 - Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl (PMNs P-96-767 and P-96-773) are subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described in paragraph...

  17. The Age of Substitutability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goeller, H. E.; Weinberg, Alvin M.

    1976-01-01

    Dwindling mineral resources might cause a shift from nonrenewable resources to renewable resources and inexhaustible elements such as iron and aluminum. Alternative energy sources such as breeder, fusion, solar, and geothermal power must be developed for production and recycling of materials. Substitution and, hence, living standards ultimately…

  18. SUBSTITUTION REACTIONS FOR THE DETOXIFICATION OF HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Treatment is one of several treatment techniques used for the remediation of toxic and hazardous chemicals. Chemical treatment in this report is defined as substitution of halogens by hydrogens for the conversion of halogenated organic toxicant into its native hydrocarb...

  19. Baseline characteristics and treatment outcomes in prescription opioid dependent patients with and without co-occurring psychiatric disorder

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Margaret L.; Dodd, Dorian R.; Potter, Jennifer S.; Rice, Lindsay S.; Dickinson, William; Sparenborg, Steven; Weiss, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the growing prevalence of prescription opioid dependence and the considerable rates of additional psychopathology in drug dependence, we examined the association between the presence of a co-occurring Axis I psychiatric disorder and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics in this secondary analysis of patients entering a treatment study for dependence on prescription opioids. Treatment outcomes were also compared. Methods Patients dependent on prescription opioids participated in a multi-site, two-phase, randomized, controlled trial to assess different lengths of buprenorphine-naloxone pharmacotherapy and different intensities of counseling (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00316277). Among the 653 participants entering the first phase of the trial, 360 entered the second phase, receiving 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone treatment; they are reported here. Half of those participants (180/360) had a current co-occurring psychiatric disorder in addition to substance dependence. Results Sociodemographic characteristics were similar overall between those with and without a co-occurring psychiatric disorder, but women were 1.6 times more likely than men to have a co-occurring disorder. On several clinical indicators at baseline, participants with a co-occurring disorder had greater impairment. However, they had better opioid use outcomes at the conclusion of 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone stabilization than did participants without a co-occurring disorder. Conclusions Prescription opioid dependent patients with a co-occurring psychiatric disorder had a better response to buprenorphine-naloxone treatment despite demonstrating greater impairment at baseline. Additional research is needed to determine the mechanism of this finding and to adapt treatments to address this population. PMID:24219166

  20. Simultaneous determination of opiates, methadone, buprenorphine and metabolites in human urine by superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Ru; Chen, Chin-Lun; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Chen, Shao-Tsu; Lua, Ahai-Chuang

    2013-04-15

    For monitoring compliance of methadone or buprenorphine maintenance patient, a method for the simultaneous determination of methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, opiates (morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine) in urine by superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. After enzyme digestion and liquid-liquid extraction, reverse-phase separation was achieved in 5.2 min and quantification was performed by multiple reaction monitoring. Chromatographic separation was performed at 40 °C on a reversed phase Poroshell column with gradient elution. The mobile phase consisted of water and methanol, each containing 0.1% formic acid, at a flow rate of 0.32 mL/min. Intra-day and inter-day precision were less than 12.1% and accuracy was between -9.8% and 13.7%. Extraction efficiencies were more than 68%. Although ion suppression was detected, deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. Carryover was minimal, less than 0.20%. All analytes were stable at room temperature for 16 h, 4 °C for 72 h, and after three freeze-thaw cycles. The assay also fulfilled compound identification criteria in accordance with the European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. We analyzed 62 urine samples from patients received maintenance therapy and found that 54.8% of the patient samples tested were detected for morphine, codeine, or 6-monoacetylmorphine. This method provides a reliable and simultaneous quantification of opiates, maintenance drugs, and their metabolites in urine samples. It facilitates the routine monitoring in individuals prescribed the drug to ensure compliance and help therapeutic process. PMID:23507455

  1. Engagement and Substance Dependence in a Primary Care-Based Addiction Treatment Program for People Infected with HIV and People at High-Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Walley, Alexander Y; Palmisano, Joseph; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Chaisson, Christine; Raj, Anita; Samet, Jeffrey H; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-12-01

    To improve outcomes for people with substance dependence and HIV infection or at risk for HIV infection, patients were enrolled in a primary care-based addiction treatment program from 2008-2012 that included a comprehensive substance use assessment, individual and group counseling, addiction pharmacotherapy and case management. We examined whether predisposing characteristics (depression, housing status, polysubstance use) and an enabling resource (buprenorphine treatment) were associated with engagement in the program and persistent substance dependence at 6 months. At program enrollment 61% were HIV-infected, 53% reported heroin use, 46% reported alcohol use, 37% reported cocaine use, and 28% reported marijuana use in the past 30 days, 72% reported depression, 19% were homeless, and 53% had polysubstance use. Within 6-months 60% had been treated with buprenorphine. Engagement (defined as 2 visits in first 14 days and 2 additional visits in next 30 days) occurred in 64%; 49% had substance dependence at 6-months. Receipt of buprenorphine treatment was associated with engagement (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 8.32 95% CI: 4.13-16.77). Self-reported depression at baseline was associated with substance dependence at 6-months (AOR 3.30 95% CI: 1.65-6.61). Neither housing status nor polysubstance use was associated with engagement or substance dependence. The FAST PATH program successfully engaged and treated patients in a primary care-based addiction treatment program. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, was a major driver of addiction treatment engagement. Given depression's association with adverse outcomes in this clinical population, including mental health treatment as part of integrated care holds potential to improve addiction treatment outcomes. PMID:26298399

  2. Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... States, smallpox vaccine, antivirals, and vaccinia immune globulin (VIG) can be used. Learn more about smallpox vaccine, antivirals, and VIG treatments . Resource CDC's Smallpox Vaccine Information for the ...

  3. Geographic variability in HIV and injection drug use in Ukraine: Implications for integration and expansion of drug treatment and HIV care

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Nickolas; Mazhnaya, Alonya; Larney, Sarah; Islam, Zahed; Shost, Alyona; Prokhorova, Tatiana; Rybak, Natasha; Flanigan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Background Ukraine has the highest HIV burden of any European country with much of the current HIV epidemic concentrated among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) and their sexual partners. Opiate substitution therapy (OST) is limited in Ukraine and expansion of OST is urgently needed to help stem the tide of the HIV epidemic. Methods We accessed publicly available data in Ukraine in order to explore geographic variability with respect to prevalence of HIV, PWIDs and OST programmes. Results The regions of Ukraine with the largest number of opioid dependent persons (the south and eastern portions of the country) correspond to the regions with the highest HIV prevalence and HIV incidence. The number of opioid PWIDs per 100,000 population as well as the number of all OST treatment slots per 100,000 varied significantly across the three HIV prevalence categories. Overall, the proportion of individuals receiving either methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) or buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) was quite low: average across categories: 7.3% and 0.4%, respectively. Additionally, less than half of OST patients receiving MMT or BMT were HIV positive patients. Conclusion There is significant geographic variability in both numbers of HIV positive individuals and numbers of PWIDs across Ukraine, however, there may be a more concentrated epidemic among PWIDs in many regions of the country. Scale up of addiction treatment for PWID, especially OST, can have a significant impact on preventing injection related morbidity, such as HIV and HCV infection. Ukraine can learn from the mistakes other nations have made in denying critical treatment opportunities to PWID. PMID:25304049

  4. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10497 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted...10497 Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted...generically as substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10497 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted...10497 Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted...generically as substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and...

  11. A Family of Routes to Substituted Phenols, Including Meta-Substituted Phenols.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenjie; Clive, Derrick L J

    2015-12-18

    A new family of routes to substituted phenols has been developed. 2-Bromo-3-methoxycyclohex-2-en-1-ones are readily deprotonated at C-6, and the resulting anions react smoothly with a variety of electrophiles; treatment with DBU in PhMe at room temperature then results in efficient aromatization to benzene derivatives of a regiochemically defined substitution pattern. This sequence affords phenolic azides (ArN3), sulfides (ArSR, ArSAr'), selenides (ArSePh), alcohols [ArCH(OH)R], amino derivatives [ArCH(NHSO2Ar')R), and 1,2-benzenediols. A complementary set of substitution patterns is obtained by DIBAL-H reduction or reaction with a Grignard reagent before aromatization; the latter process gives compounds in which the newly introduced substituent is meta to the phenolic hydroxyl. PMID:26589285

  12. Effect of buprenorphine as an adjunct with plain local anesthetic solution in supraclavicular brachial plexus block on quality and duration of postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Surekha; Debata, Debasis; Doshi, Chaula; Vyas, Varsha; Sinha, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is ideal for upper limb surgical procedures. Buprenorphine, an agonist antagonist opioid has been used as an adjunct to prolong analgesia. We aimed to evaluate the quality and duration of postoperative analgesia by addition of buprenorphine to local anesthetic solution. Material and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind control study was conducted on 50 healthy patients of ASA Grade I/II of age group 20-70 years scheduled for orthopedic and reconstructive surgery of upper limb under supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patients were allocated into two groups, 25 in each group viz.: Group B (buprenorphine group) received 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine + 15 ml 2% lignocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000) + 4 ml normal saline + 1500 units hyaluronidase + 3 ?g/kg buprenorphine diluted to 1 ml normal saline. Group C (control group) received 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine + 15 ml 2% lignocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000) + 4 ml normal saline + 1500 units hyaluronidase + 1 ml normal saline. The parameters observed were onset and duration of sensory and motor block, quality and duration of analgesia and side-effects. Results: The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was significantly longer in Group B (16.04 ± 3.19 h) than in Group C (6.20 ± 0.74 h). There was no difference between two groups on mean onset of sensory block. The mean duration motor block was significantly longer in Group B (4.93 ± 0.94 h) than in Group C (2.25 ± 0.62 h) [P < 0.05]. The mean duration of sensory block was also significantly longer in Group B (5.71 ± 0.94 h) than in Group C (4.94 ± 0.70 h) with P < 0.05. Conclusion: Addition of 3 ?g/kg buprenorphine to 0.5% bupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block prolonged duration of postoperative analgesia and sensory blockade without an increase in side effects.

  13. Trifluoromethyl-substituted polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Current work sponsored by the grant at Southwest Texas State University is directed toward the synthesis and characterization of: (1) N-alkylated polyamides derived from o-fluorinated diacids; (2) highly fluorinated polyethers; (3) polyesters derived from 2-hydroxy-2-propyl substituted arenes and/or 2,5-difluoroterephthalic acid; and (4) silicon-containing fluoropolymers. Work during the period from 1 July to 31 Dec. 1993 focused primarily on items 3 and 4 and on the development of a phosphorus containing modification of '12F-PEK.'

  14. Polyimides comprising substituted benzidines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A new class of polyimides and copolyimides made from substituted benzidines and aromatic dianhydrides and other aromatic diamines. The polyimides obtained with said diamines are distinguished by excellent thermal, excellent solubility, excellent electrical properties such as very low dielectric constants, excellent clarity and mechanical properties making the polyimides ideally suited as coating materials for microelectronic apparatii, as membranes for selective molecular or gas separation, as fibers in molecular composites, as high tensile strength, high compression strength fibers, as film castable coatings, or as fabric components.

  15. Explicit Substitutions and All That

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala-Rincon, Mauricio; Munoz, Cesar

    2000-01-01

    Explicit substitution calculi are extensions of the lambda-calculus where the substitution mechanism is internalized into the theory. This feature makes them suitable for implementation and theoretical study of logic-based tools such as strongly typed programming languages and proof assistant systems. In this paper we explore new developments on two of the most successful styles of explicit substitution calculi: the lambda sigma- and lambda S(e)-calculi.

  16. Explicit Substitutions and All That

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala-Rincon, Mauricio; Munoz, Cesar; Busnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Explicit substitution calculi are extensions of the Lambda-calculus where the substitution mechanism is internalized into the theory. This feature makes them suitable for implementation and theoretical study of logic-based tools such as strongly typed programming languages and proof assistant systems. In this paper we explore new developments on two of the most successful styles of explicit substitution calculi: the lambda(sigma)- and lambda(s(e))-calculi.

  17. Treatment of opioid dependence in the setting of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Young, Jessica L; Martin, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    Opioid dependence in the setting of pregnancy provides a distinct set of challenges for providers. Treatment plans must take into consideration psychiatric and medical comorbidities while balancing risks and benefits for the maternal-fetal dyad. Treatment is best offered through a comprehensive treatment program designed to effectively deliver opioid agonist maintenance treatment along with psychosocial and obstetric care. As misuse of prescription analgesics increases in the United States, identification of the problem in pregnancy will become more important because this misuse is expected to lead to an increased prevalence of opioid dependence in pregnancy. Buprenorphine as maintenance treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy has promise and may offer some benefits, but more research is needed, especially regarding induction of actively addicted women during pregnancy. For the present, methadone maintenance remains the standard of care for agonist treatment of opioid dependence in pregnancy against which other treatments must be compared. PMID:22640765

  18. Trifluoromethyl-substituted tetrathiafulvalenes

    PubMed Central

    Jeannin, Olivier; Barrière, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Summary A series of tetrathiafulvalenes functionalized with one or two trifluoromethyl electron-withdrawing groups (EWG) is obtained by phosphite coupling involving CF3-substituted 1,3-dithiole-2-one derivatives. The relative effects of the EWG such as CF3, CO2Me and CN on the TTF core were investigated from a combination of structural, electrochemical, spectrochemical and theoretical investigations. Electrochemical data confirm the good correlations between the first oxidation potential of the TTF derivatives and the ?meta Hammet parameter, thus in the order CO2Me < CF3 < CN, indicating that, in any case, the mesomeric effect of the substituents is limited. Besides, crystal structure determinations show that the deformation of the unsymmetrically substituted dithiole rings, when bearing one, or two different EWG, and attributed to the mesomeric effect of ester or nitrile groups, is not notably modified or counter-balanced by the introduction of a neighboring trifluoromethyl group. DFT calculations confirm these observations and also show that the low energy HOMO–LUMO absorption band found in nitrile or ester-substituted TTFs is not found in TTF-CF3, where, as in TTF itself, the low energy absorption band is essentially attributable to a HOMO?LUMO + 1 transition. Despite relatively high oxidation potentials, these donor molecules with CF3 EWG can be involved in charge transfer complexes or cation radical salts, as reported here for the CF3-subsituted EDT-TTF donor molecule. A neutral charge transfer complex with TCNQ, (EDT-TTF-CF3)2(TCNQ) was isolated and characterized through alternated stacks of EDT-TTF-CF3 dimers and TCNQ in the solid state. A radical cation salt of EDT-TTF-CF3 is also obtained upon electrocrystallisation in the presence of the FeCl4 ? anion. In this salt, formulated as (EDT-TTF-CF3)(FeCl4), the (EDT-TTF-CF3)+• radical cations are associated two-by-two into centrosymmetric dyads with a strong pairing of the radical species in a singlet state. PMID:26124867

  19. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  20. Integration by Substitution and using

    E-print Network

    Vickers, James

    Integration by Substitution and using Partial Fractions 13.5 Introduction The first technique described here involves making a substitution to simplify an integral. We let a new variable equal to use a table of integrals be familiar with the technique of expressing an algebraic fraction

  1. MICROWAVE PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS

    E-print Network

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    MICROWAVE PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS V. Církva, J. Kurfürstová, M. Hájek Institute of microwave photochemistry of substituted phenols in an original photoche- mical reactor consisting of EDL-(2-tert-butylphenoxy)phenol (3). The ratio and type of photoproducts were dependent on temperature, type

  2. 40 CFR 721.9100 - Substituted quinoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Substituted quinoline. 721.9100 Section 721.9100...Substances § 721.9100 Substituted quinoline. (a) Chemical substance and significant...identified generically as substituted quinoline (PMN P-93-1183) is subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9100 - Substituted quinoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Substituted quinoline. 721.9100 Section 721.9100...Substances § 721.9100 Substituted quinoline. (a) Chemical substance and significant...identified generically as substituted quinoline (PMN P-93-1183) is subject...

  4. Comparative evaluation of adding different opiates (morphine, meperidine, buprenorphine, or fentanyl) to lidocaine in duration and quality of axillary brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Saryazdi, Hamid; Yazdani, Alireza; Sajedi, Parvin; Aghadavoudi, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no agreement about the effect of adding opioids to local anesthetics in peripheral nerve blocks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding different opioids with equipotent doses of lidocaine in axillary brachial plexus block using ultrasonography and nerve locator guidance. Materials and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial study, 72 adult patients aged 18–65 years old scheduled for orthopedic surgery of the forearm and hand with axillary brachial plexus block were selected and randomly allocated to four groups. Meperidine (pethidine), buprenorphine, morphine, and fentanyl with equipotent doses were added in 40cc of 1% lidocaine in P, B, M, and F groups, respectively. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks, severity of patients’ pain, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, and adverse events (such as nausea and pruritus) during perioperative period were recorded. Results: The onset time for the sensory block was similar in the four groups. The onset time for the motor block was significantly faster in morphine and pethidine groups (P = 0.006). The duration of sensory and motor blocks was not statistically different among the four groups. The quality of motor blockade was complete in 100% of patients receiving pethidine or morphine and 77.8% of patients receiving buprenorphine or fentanyl (P = 0.021). Conclusion: In the upper extremity surgeries performed under axillary brachial plexus block addition of morphine or pethidine to lidocaine may be superior to other opioids (i.e. fentanyl and buprenorphine) due to better quality and quantity of motor blockade and faster onset of the block. PMID:26645017

  5. Validated Method for the Quantification of Buprenorphine in Postmortem Blood Using Solid-Phase Extraction and Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Limon Khatun; Andrews, Rebecca; Paterson, Sue

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive and fully validated method was developed for the quantification of buprenorphine in postmortem blood. After a two-step protein precipitation process using acetonitrile, buprenorphine was purified using mixed-mode (C8/cation exchange) solid-phase extraction cartridges. Endogenous water-soluble compounds and lipids were removed from the cartridges before the samples were eluted, concentrated and derivatized using N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide. The samples were analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (2D GC-MS) in selective ion-monitoring mode. A low polarity Rxi(®)-5MS (30 m × 0.25 mm I.D. × 0.25 µm) was used as the primary column and the secondary column was a mid-polarity Rxi(®) -17Sil MS (15 m × 0.32 mm I.D. × 0.25 µm). The assay was linear from 1.0 to 50.0 ng/mL (r(2) > 0.99; n = 6). Intraday (n = 6) and interday (n = 9) imprecisions (percentage relative standard deviation, % RSD) were <5% and the average recovery was 60%. The limit of detection (LOD) of the method was 0.5 ng/mL and limit of quantification was 1.0 ng/mL. 2D GC-MS improved the LOD of buprenorphine by 20-fold compared with analysis on a conventional GC-MS. The method was highly selective with no interference from endogenous compounds or from 62 commonly encountered drugs. To prove method applicability to forensic postmortem cases, 14 authentic postmortem blood samples were analyzed. PMID:25962609

  6. Vitreous substitutes: challenges and directions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qian-Ying; Fu, Yue; Hui, Yan-Nian

    2015-01-01

    The natural vitreous body has a fine structure and complex functions. The imitation of the natural vitreous body by vitreous substitutes is a challenging work for both researchers and ophthalmologists. Gases, silicone oil, heavy silicone oil and hydrogels, particularly the former two vitreous substitutes are clinically widely used with certain complications. Those, however, are not real artificial vitreous due to lack of structure and function like the natural vitreous body. This article reviews the situations, challenges, and future directions in the development of vitreous substitutes, particularly the experimental and clinical use of a new artificial foldable capsular vitreous body. PMID:26085987

  7. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  8. Electrophilic Substitution Reactions of Indoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, Richard J.

    The topic of this chapter is electrophilic substitution of indole and its derivatives. The indole ring is highly reactive at its 3-position toward protonation, halogenation, alkylation and acylation. Electrophilic substitution can be combined with inter- or intramolecular addition at C-2. Intramolecular alkylation by iminium ions (Pictet-Spengler reaction) is particularly useful. Enantioselectivity can be achieved in many conjugate addition reactions. These reactions have been applied to synthesis of both natural products and drugs.

  9. Long term outcomes of pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence: does methadone still lead the pack?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Portilla, Maria Paz; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Bascaran, Maria Teresa; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Bobes, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to update and summarize the scientific knowledge on the long term outcomes of the different pharmacological treatment options for opioid dependence currently available and to provide a critical discussion on the different treatment options based on these results. We performed a literature search using the PubMed databases and the reference lists of the identified articles. Data from research show that the three pharmacological options reviewed are effective treatments for opioid dependence with positive long term outcomes. However, each one has its specific target population and setting. While methadone and buprenorphine are first line options, heroin-assisted treatment is a second line option for those patients refractory to treatment with methadone with concomitant severe physical, mental, social and/or functional problems. Buprenorphine seems to be the best option for use in primary care offices. The field of opioid dependence treatment is poised to undergo a process of reinforcement and transformation. Further efforts from researchers, clinicians and authorities should be made to turn new pharmacological options into clinical reality and to overcome the structural and functional obstacles that maintenance programmes face in combatting opioid dependence. PMID:23145768

  10. Improvement in Psychopathology Among Opioid-Dependent Adolescents During Behavioral-Pharmacological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah K.; Marsch, Lisa A.; Badger, Gary J.; Solhkhah, Ramon; Hofstein, Yariv

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in behavioral and emotional problems among opioid-dependent adolescents during a four week combined behavioral and pharmacological treatment. Methods We examined scales of behavioral and emotional problems in youth using the Youth Self Report (YSR) measure at the time of substance abuse treatment intake and changes in scale scores during treatment Participants were 36 adolescents (ages 13–18 eligible) who met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence. Participants received a 28-day outpatient, medication-assisted withdrawal with either buprenorphine, or clonidine, as part of a double-blind, double-dummy comparison of these medications. All participants received a common behavioral intervention, composed of three individual counseling sessions per week, and incentives contingent on opioid-negative urine samples (collected three times/week) attendance and completion of weekly assessments. Results: Although a markedly greater number of youth who received buprenorphine remained in treatment relative to those who received clonidine, youth who remained in treatment showed significant reductions during treatment on two YSR grouping scales (Internalizing Problems and Total Problems) and four of the empirically based syndrome scales (Somatic, Social, Attention and Thought). On YSR competence and adaptive scales, no significant changes were observed. There was no evidence that changes in any scales differed across medication condition. Conclusions Youth who were retained demonstrated substantive improvements in a number of clinically meaningful behavioral and emotional problems, irrespective of pharmacotherapy provided to them. PMID:22107875

  11. Simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates and nicotine metabolites in sweat by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.

    2013-01-01

    A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, cotinine, and trans-3?-hydroxycotinine quantification in sweat was developed and comprehensively validated. Sweat patches were mixed with 6 mL acetate buffer at pH 4.5, and supernatant extracted with Strata-XC-cartridges. Reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile in 15 min. Quantification was achieved by multiple reaction monitoring of two transitions per compound. The assay was a linear 1–1,000 ng/patch, except EME 5–1,000 ng/patch. Intra-, inter-day and total imprecision were <10.1%CV, analytical recovery 87.2–107.7%, extraction efficiency 35.3– 160.9%, and process efficiency 25.5–91.7%. Ion suppression was detected for EME (?63.3%) and EDDP (?60.4%), and enhancement for NBUP (42.6%). Deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 °C, 72 h at 4 °C, and after three freeze/thaw cycles. The method was applied to weekly sweat patches from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman; 75.0% of sweat patches were positive for BUP, 93.8% for cocaine, 37.5% for opiates, 6.3% for methadone and all for tobacco biomarkers. This method permits a fast and simultaneous quantification of 14 drugs and metabolites in sweat patches, with good selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:21125263

  12. Deviant smooth pursuit in preschool children exposed prenatally to methadone or buprenorphine and tobacco affects integrative visuomotor capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Melinder, Annika; Konijnenberg, Carolien; Sarfi, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Although an increasing number of children are born to mothers in opioid maintenance therapy (OMT), little is known about the long-term effects of these opioids. Previous studies suggest an association between prenatal OMT exposure and difficulties in eye movement control. Also, the effects of tobacco smoking on eye movements have been reported. The present study examined the influence of eye movements, i.e. smooth pursuit, on visuomotor capabilities in children of smoking mothers in OMT. Design The study comprised a 2 (OMT versus contrast group) × 2 (slow versus fast smooth pursuit) between-subject factorial design. Setting The cognitive developmental research unit at the University of Oslo, Norway. Participants Participants were 26 4-year-old children of tobacco-smoking women in OMT and 23 non-exposed 4-year-old children, with non-smoking mothers, matched by gender and age. Measurement Eye movements and smooth pursuit were recorded using a Tobii 1750 eyetracker. Visuomotor functions were examined by Bender test. Findings The OMT group tracked slowly moving objects with smooth pursuit in a similar manner to their non-exposed peers. When fast smooth pursuit was measured, the OMT group of children tracked the object more slowly than the contrast group, P = 0.02, ?p2 = 0.11. A regression analysis showed that fast smooth pursuit predicted children’s performance on a visuomotor task, R2 = 0.37. Conclusion Impaired eye-tracking skills in 4-year-old children exposed to methadone or buprenorphine and tobacco prenatally could inhibit the development of some cognitive functions in later life. PMID:23734878

  13. 14 CFR 1260.55 - Reports substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reports substitution. 1260.55 Section 1260.55 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.55 Reports substitution. Reports Substitution October 2000 Technical Reports may be substituted for...

  14. Risk Factors for Relapse and Higher Costs Among Medicaid Members with Opioid Dependence or Abuse: Opioid Agonists, Comorbidities, and Treatment History.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin E; Baxter, Jeffrey D; Aweh, Gideon; O'Connell, Elizabeth; Fisher, William H; Barton, Bruce A

    2015-10-01

    Clinical trials show that opioid agonist therapy (OAT) with methadone or buprenorphine is more effective than behavioral treatments, but state policymakers remain ambivalent about covering OAT for long periods. We used Medicaid claims for 52,278 Massachusetts Medicaid beneficiaries with a diagnosis of opioid abuse or dependence between 2004 and 2010 to study associations between use of methadone, buprenorphine or other behavioral health treatment without OAT, and time to relapse and total healthcare expenditures. Cox Proportional Hazards ratios for patients treated with either methadone or buprenorphine showed approximately 50% lower risk of relapse than behavioral treatment without OAT. Expenditures per month were from $153 to $233 lower for OAT episodes compared to other behavioral treatment. Co-occurring alcohol abuse/dependence quadrupled the risk of relapse, other non-opioid abuse/dependence doubled the relapse risk and severe mental illness added 80% greater risk compared to those without each of those disorders. Longer current treatment episodes were associated with lower risk of relapse. Relapse risk increased as prior treatment exposure increased but prior treatment was associated with slightly lower total healthcare expenditures. These findings suggest that the effectiveness of OAT that has been demonstrated in clinical trials persists at the population level in a less controlled setting and that OAT is associated with lower total healthcare expenditures compared to other forms of behavioral treatment for patients with opioid addiction. Co-occurring other substance use and mental illness exert strong influences on cost and risk of relapse, suggesting that individuals with these conditions need more comprehensive treatment. PMID:25997674

  15. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  16. Point substitutions in Japanese alloalbumins.

    PubMed Central

    Arai, K; Madison, J; Huss, K; Ishioka, N; Satoh, C; Fujita, M; Neel, J V; Sakurabayashi, I; Putnam, F W

    1989-01-01

    We have completed the structural study of five rare types of inherited albumin variants (alloalbumins) discovered in the Biochemical Genetics Study of 15,581 unrelated children in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We have also identified the structural change in five other alloalbumin specimens detected during clinical electrophoresis of sera from Japanese living near Tokyo. Each of the five albumin variants from Nagasaki and Hiroshima has a single amino acid substitution. All of these substitutions differ, and none has been reported in non-Japanese populations. No instances of proalbumin variants or of albumin B (the most frequent alloalbumins in Caucasians) were detected in the children in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. However, one instance of a variant proalbumin and two examples of albumin B occurred in Japanese from the vicinity of Tokyo. In addition a previously unreported point substitution was found in albumin Tochigi, which is present in two unrelated persons from Tochigi prefecture. Four of the point mutations in the Japanese alloalbumins are in close proximity in a short segment of the polypeptide chain (residues 354-382) in which three additional point substitutions have been reported in diverse populations. These results, combined with earlier data, suggest that point substitutions are grouped in certain segments of the albumin molecule. Images PMID:2762316

  17. Structure-activity studies for a novel series of tricyclic substituted hexahydrobenz[e]isoindole alpha(1A) adrenoceptor antagonists as potential agents for the symptomatic treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Meyer, M D; Altenbach, R J; Basha, F Z; Carroll, W A; Condon, S; Elmore, S W; Kerwin, J F; Sippy, K B; Tietje, K; Wendt, M D; Hancock, A A; Brune, M E; Buckner, S A; Drizin, I

    2000-04-20

    In search of a uroselective agent that exhibits a high level of selectivity for the alpha(1A) receptor, a novel series of tricyclic hexahydrobenz[e]isoindoles was synthesized. A generic pharmacophoric model was developed requiring the presence of a basic amine core and a fused heterocyclic side chain separated by an alkyl chain. It was shown that the 6-OMe substitution with R, R stereochemistry of the ring junction of the benz[e]isoindole and a two-carbon spacer chain were optimal. In contrast to the highly specific requirements for the benz[e]isoindole portion and linker chain, a wide variety of tricyclic fused heterocyclic attachments were tolerated with retention of potency and selectivity. In vitro functional assays for the alpha(1) adrenoceptor subtypes were used to further characterize these compounds, and in vivo models of vascular vs prostatic tone were used to assess uroselectivity. PMID:10780916

  18. Substitution systems and nonextensive statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2015-12-01

    Substitution systems evolve in time by generating sequences of symbols from a finite alphabet: At a certain iteration step, the existing symbols are systematically replaced by blocks of Nk symbols also within the alphabet (with Nk, a natural number, being the length of the kth block of the substitution). The dynamics of these systems leads naturally to fractals and self-similarity. By using B-calculus (García-Morales, 2012) universal maps for deterministic substitution systems both of constant and non-constant length, are formulated in 1D. It is then shown how these systems can be put in direct correspondence with Tsallis entropy. A 'Second Law of Thermodynamics' is also proved for these systems in the asymptotic limit of large words.

  19. Substitution Systems and Nonextensive Statistics

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Garcia-Morales

    2015-07-07

    Substitution systems evolve in time by generating sequences of symbols from a finite alphabet: At a certain iteration step, the existing symbols are systematically replaced by blocks of $N_{k}$ symbols also within the alphabet (with $N_{k}$, a natural number, being the length of the $k$-th block of the substitution). The dynamics of these systems leads naturally to fractals and self-similarity. By using $\\mathcal{B}$-calculus [V. Garcia-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] universal maps for deterministic substitution systems both of constant and non-constant length, are formulated in 1D. It is then shown how these systems can be put in direct correspondence with Tsallis entropy. A `Second Law of Thermodynamics' is also proved for these systems in the asymptotic limit of large words.

  20. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 ...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject to...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 ...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject to...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt (generic). 721.2577 Section 721...substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt (generic). Link to an amendment published...substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt (PMNs P-00-0364 and...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 ...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject to...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 ...azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN P-96-1263) is subject to...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical...benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2577 Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl...chemical substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2577 Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl...chemical substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2577 Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl...chemical substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2577 Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl...chemical substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl...Substances § 721.6920 Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl...substance identified as butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl...Substances § 721.6920 Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl...substance identified as butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl...Substances § 721.6920 Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl...substance identified as butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl...Substances § 721.6920 Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl...substance identified as butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene,...

  18. Azo Group-Assisted Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitutions in Haloarene Derivatives: Preparation of Substituted

    E-print Network

    Kaszynski, Piotr

    in nucleophilic aromatic substitution, and serves as a "neutral" mask for the amino group. The Ph-NdN- group, it accelerates the rate of substitution of chlorine in 4-substituted 1-chloro-2- * Author for correspondence

  19. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  20. Current and Potential Pharmacological Treatment Options for Maintenance Therapy in Opioid-Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tetrault, Jeanette M.; Fiellin, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid dependence, manifesting as addiction to heroin and pharmaceutical opioids is increasing. Internationally, there are an estimated 15.6 million illicit opioid users. The global economic burden of opioid dependence is profound both in terms of HIV and hepatitis C virus transmission, direct healthcare costs, and indirectly through criminal activity, absenteeism and lost productivity. Opioid agonist medications, such as methadone and buprenorphine, that stabilize neuronal systems and provide narcotic blockade are the most effective treatments. Prolonged provision of these medications, defined as maintenance treatment, typically produces improved outcomes when compared with short-duration tapers and withdrawal. The benefits of opioid agonist maintenance include decreased illicit drug use, improved retention in treatment, decreased HIV risk behaviours and decreased criminal behaviour. While regulations vary by country, these medications are becoming increasingly available internationally, especially in regions experiencing rapid transmission of HIV due to injection drug use. In this review, we describe the rationale for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence, discuss emerging uses of opioid antagonists such as naltrexone, and sustained-release formulations of naltrexone and buprenorphine, and provide a description of the experimental therapies. PMID:22235870

  1. Photocatalytic and Antibacterial Activity of Titanium, Fluorine and Silver Co-Substituted Hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhyarani, M.; Rameshbabu, N.; Venkateswarlu, K.; Ravisankar, K. V.; Ashok, M.; Anandan, S.

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA), an analogue of the mineral component of bone tissue has been widely used in medicine as bone replacing material. To impart specific properties, HA can be chemically modified by anionic and cationic substitutions during synthesis. Thus the present study was focused in synthesizing nanocrystalline Ti, Ag and F co-substituted HA by microwave synthesis. The prepared powders were characterized by XRD and FTIR for their crystal size, cystallinity and functional groups respectively. XRD spectra reveal that crystal size of prepared powders was in the range of 21-25 nm in as synthesized condition and 45-51 nm in 900 ?C heat-treated condition. Complete decomposition of HA to tri calcium phosphate was observed for Ti substituted HA powder after heat-treatment. Addition of F improved the thermal stability of Ti substituted HA as indicated by predominant phase of HA after heat-treatment. The photocatalytic activity of co-substituted HA powders was examined by degradation of methylene blue (5 × 10-5 M concentration) under visible light irradiation and the results were compared with pure HA. The degradation efficiency of co-substituted HA with respect to methylene blue was twice as high as that of pure HA. Ti and Ag has improved the visible light photocatalytic activity of HA, further F co-substitution has not affected the photocatalytic activity of substituted HA. The antibacterial effect of prepared powders was observed against 1 × 105 cells/mL of Escherichia coli using spread plate method at 24 h incubation period. Ag co-substituted HA showed complete inhibition of growth of Escherichia coli. Thus, among Ti, Ti-F, Ti-F-Ag substituted HA powders, Ti-F-Ag co-substituted HA with excellent visible light photocatalytic activity and anti-bacterial property is expected to be a potential candidate for biomedical applications.

  2. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1643 - Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. 721... § 721.1643 Benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-. ...generically as a benzenesulfonic acid, amino substituted phenylazo-...

  7. Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Services Locator Buprenorphine Physician Locator Find a Facility in Your State To locate the drug and ... Service . Privacy Policy . Home | About the Locator | Find Facilities Near You | Find Facilities by City, County, State ...

  8. Decline and Fall of the Substitute Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Herbert E.

    1979-01-01

    This article argues for the abolition of substitute teachers on the grounds that they waste student time and school district money and that the position degrades the individuals who act as substitutes. (JMF)

  9. 47 CFR 76.110 - Substitutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.110 Substitutions. Whenever, pursuant...such community unit may, consistent with these rules and the sports blackout rules at § 76.111, substitute a program from...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  15. Efficient Cryptanalysis of Homophonic Substitution Amrapali Dhavare

    E-print Network

    Stamp, Mark

    technique to the "Zodiac 340" cipher, which is an unsolved message created by the infamous Zodiac killer. Keywords: homophonic substitution cipher, simple substitution cipher, hill climb, heuristic search, Zodiac. Our motivation for considering homophonic substitution ciphers is the unsolved "Zodiac 340," which

  16. Math 114 Worksheet 8 Trigonometric Substitution

    E-print Network

    Perry, Peter A.

    Math 114 Worksheet 8 Trigonometric Substitution The idea: Trigonometric substitution is a u-substitution technique that helps compute integrals such as 1 9 - x2 dx, 1 4x2 + 20 dx, x2 - 4 dx that involve square know about trigonometric integrals to compute the re- sulting integral in . Of course, at the end, we

  17. Maternal stress and behavioral adaptation in methadone- or buprenorphine-exposed toddlers.

    PubMed

    Sarfi, Monica; Sundet, Jon Martin; Waal, Helge

    2013-12-01

    The current study examined the relationship between early interaction, parenting stress, maternal psychological distress symptoms, and behavior problems and health-related quality of life among children born to mothers in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) in Norway during the period 2005-2007 (N = 36). This group was compared with a normative sample of mothers without substance abuse problems and their children (N = 36). There were significant group differences (p < .01) in perceived child problems in toddlerhood. In a regression model, mothers' self-reported psychological distress symptoms in terms of depression and anxiety symptoms significantly predicted child behavior problems (p < .01) and health-related quality of life (p < .01) rather than parenting stress. No significant, unique effect of exposure was found after controlling for other factors that could influence developmental outcomes. These findings add to the growing evidence on the importance of maternal psychological well-being for child development, and underscore the need to address opioid-maintained women's personal maladjustment and the constellation of stress experienced by mothers in recovery. PMID:23999378

  18. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  11. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  12. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  13. A pharmaceutical industry perspective on the economics of treatments for alcohol and opioid use disorders.

    PubMed

    Gastfriend, David R

    2014-10-01

    Individuals with alcohol and/or drug use disorders often fail to receive care, or evidence-based care, yet the literature shows health economic benefits. Comparative effectiveness research is emerging that examines approved approaches in terms of real, total healthcare cost/utilization. Comprehensive retrospective insurance claims analyses are few but tend to be nationally distributed and large. The emerging pattern is that, while treatment in general is cost effective, specific therapeutics can yield different health economic outcomes. Cost/utilization data consistently show greater savings with pharmacotherapies (despite their costs) versus psychosocial treatment alone. All FDA-approved addiction pharmacotherapies (oral naltrexone, extended-release naltrexone, acamprosate, disulfiram, buprenorphine, buprenorphine/naloxone, and methadone) are intended for use in conjunction with psychosocial management, not as stand-alone therapeutics; hence, pharmacotherapy costs must offer benefits in addition to abstinence alone or psychological therapy. Patient persistence is problematic, and (despite its cost) extended-release pharmacotherapy may be associated with lower or no greater total healthcare cost, mostly due to reduced hospitalization. The reviewed studies use rigorous case-mix adjustment to balance treatment cohorts but lack the randomization that clinical trials use to protect against confounding. Unlike trials, however, these studies can offer generalizability to diverse populations, providers, and payment models--and are of particular salience to payers. PMID:25236185

  14. A pharmaceutical industry perspective on the economics of treatments for alcohol and opioid use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gastfriend, David R

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with alcohol and/or drug use disorders often fail to receive care, or evidence-based care, yet the literature shows health economic benefits. Comparative effectiveness research is emerging that examines approved approaches in terms of real, total healthcare cost/utilization. Comprehensive retrospective insurance claims analyses are few but tend to be nationally distributed and large. The emerging pattern is that, while treatment in general is cost effective, specific therapeutics can yield different health economic outcomes. Cost/utilization data consistently show greater savings with pharmacotherapies (despite their costs) versus psychosocial treatment alone. All FDA-approved addiction pharmacotherapies (oral naltrexone, extended-release naltrexone, acamprosate, disulfiram, buprenorphine, buprenorphine/naloxone, and methadone) are intended for use in conjunction with psychosocial management, not as stand-alone therapeutics; hence, pharmacotherapy costs must offer benefits in addition to abstinence alone or psychological therapy. Patient persistence is problematic, and (despite its cost) extended-release pharmacotherapy may be associated with lower or no greater total healthcare cost, mostly due to reduced hospitalization. The reviewed studies use rigorous case-mix adjustment to balance treatment cohorts but lack the randomization that clinical trials use to protect against confounding. Unlike trials, however, these studies can offer generalizability to diverse populations, providers, and payment models—and are of particular salience to payers. PMID:25236185

  15. Visual evoked potential latencies of three-year-old children prenatally exposed to buprenorphine or methadone compared with non-opioid exposed children: The results of a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Whitham, Justine N; Spurrier, Nicola J; Baghurst, Peter A; Weston, Paul; Sawyer, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the latency of pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (VEP) of 36-month old children exposed to opioid pharmacotherapy in utero to that of a group of non-exposed children. Pregnant women were enrolled as part of an open-label non-randomised flexible dosing longitudinal study. Participants were 21 children whose mothers were treated with buprenorphine- (n=11) or methadone-pharmacotherapy (n=10) during pregnancy, and 15 children not exposed to opioids in pregnancy. One-way between groups analyses of variance (ANOVA) were conducted to test the statistical significance of differences between the mean latencies of the peak response to two different sized checkerboard patterns (48' and 69' of retinal arc). Standard multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine whether there was a significant relationship between group status and VEP latencies after adjusting for the effect of covariates. VEP latencies ranged from 98 to 112 milliseconds (ms) for checks of 48' arc, and from 95 to 113ms for checks of 69' arc. Latencies were comparable across groups. After adjusting for covariates children prenatally exposed to methadone or buprenorphine did not differ significantly from non-opioid exposed children in their responses to either check size. Nor were there any significant differences in VEP latencies between children prenatally exposed to methadone and children prenatally exposed to buprenorphine. Head circumference (HC) was significantly associated with P100 latencies for both check sizes. Data from this controlled, non-randomised study suggest that neither buprenorphine nor methadone appear to have any long-term effects on visual maturity assessed at 36months of age. PMID:26432025

  16. Resonant photodissociation in substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Tim; McAcy, Collin; Foote, David; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2011-05-01

    Cyclic aromatic molecules are abundant in organic chemistry, with a wide variety of applications, including pharmacology, pollution studies and genetic research. Among the simplest of these molecules is benzene (C6H6) , with many relevant molecules being benzene-like with a single atomic substitution. In such a substitution, the substituent determines a characteristic perturbation of the electronic structure of the molecule. We discuss the substitution of halogens into the ring (C6H5X), and its effects on the dynamics of ionization and dissociation of the molecule without the focal volume effect. In particular, using 800-nm, 50-fs laser pulses, we present results in the dissociation of fluorobenzene, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and iodobenzene into the phenyl ring (C6H5) and the atomic halogen, and the subsequent ionization of these fragments. The impact of the ``heavy atom effect'' on a 1 (? , ?*) -->3 (n , ?*) singlet-triplet intersystem crossing will be emphasized. Currently under investigation is whether such a dissociation can be treated as an effective source of the neutral substituent. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0355235.

  17. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  18. Bone grafts and their substitutes.

    PubMed

    Fillingham, Y; Jacobs, J

    2016-01-01

    The continual cycle of bone formation and resorption is carried out by osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts under the direction of the bone-signaling pathway. In certain situations the host cycle of bone repair is insufficient and requires the assistance of bone grafts and their substitutes. The fundamental properties of a bone graft are osteoconduction, osteoinduction, osteogenesis, and structural support. Options for bone grafting include autogenous and allograft bone and the various isolated or combined substitutes of calcium sulphate, calcium phosphate, tricalcium phosphate, and coralline hydroxyapatite. Not all bone grafts will have the same properties. As a result, understanding the requirements of the clinical situation and specific properties of the various types of bone grafts is necessary to identify the ideal graft. We present a review of the bone repair process and properties of bone grafts and their substitutes to help guide the clinician in the decision making process. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(1 Suppl A):6-9. PMID:26733632

  19. Mobile opioid agonist treatment and public funding expands treatment for disenfranchised opioid-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gerod; Neighbors, Charles J; Iheoma, Jude; Dauber, Sarah; Adams, Merribeth; Culleton, Robert; Muench, Fred; Borys, Suzanne; McDonald, Rebecca; Morgenstern, Jon

    2014-04-01

    The New Jersey Medication Assisted Treatment Initiative (NJ-MATI) sought to reduce barriers to treatment by providing free, opioid agonist treatment (OAT, methadone or buprenorphine) via mobile medication units (MMUs). To evaluate barriers to OAT, logistic regression was used to compare opioid dependent patients enrolled in NJ-MATI to those entering treatment at fixed-site methadone clinics or non-medication assisted treatment (non-MAT). Client demographic and clinical data were taken from an administrative database for licensed treatment providers. The MMUs enrolled a greater proportion of African-American, homeless, and uninsured individuals than the fixed-site methadone clinics. Compared to non-MAT and traditional methadone clients, NJ-MATI patients were more likely to be injection drug users and daily users but less likely to have a recent history of treatment. These observations suggest that the patient-centered policies associated with NJ-MATI increased treatment participation by high severity, socially disenfranchised patients who were not likely to receive OAT. PMID:24468235

  20. Use This Test to Spruce Up Your Substitute Teacher Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendor, Elizabeth

    1982-01-01

    Presents and interprets an 18-question test to determine how well a school's substitute teacher program functions. Topics covered include substitute teacher screening and preparation, lists of substitutes, lesson plans, staff and student evaluation of substitutes, substitutes' salaries, legal considerations, and making substitutes feel needed.…

  1. Sensory substitution as an artificially acquired synaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jamie; Wright, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    In this review we explore the relationship between synaesthesia and sensory substitution and argue that sensory substitution does indeed show properties of synaesthesia. Both are associated with atypical perceptual experiences elicited by the processing of a qualitatively different stimulus to that which normally gives rise to that experience. In the most common forms of sensory substitution, perceptual processing of an auditory or tactile signal (which has been converted from a visual signal) is experienced as visual-like in addition to retaining auditory/tactile characteristics. We consider different lines of evidence that support, to varying degrees, the assumption that sensory substitution is associated with visual-like experiences. We then go on to analyse the key similarities and differences between sensory substitution and synaesthesia. Lastly, we propose two testable predictions: firstly that, in an expert user of a sensory substitution device, the substituting modality should not be lost. Secondly that stimulation within the substituting modality, but by means other than a sensory substitution device, should still produce sensation in the normally substituted modality. PMID:22885223

  2. Intertemporal Substitution and Hyperbolic Discounting

    E-print Network

    Geraats, Petra M.

    2006-03-14

    ) In contrast to the sophisticated case, the naive consumption rate al- ways has a closed-form solution.8 Setting ? = 1 gives the consump- tion rate under exponential discounting: ?E = 1? ³ R1??? ´1/?, which is the intended future consumption rate of the naive... in an exchange economy’, Journal of Political Economy 111(5), 959–989. Mankiw, N. G., Rotemberg, J. J. and Summers, L. H. (1985), ‘In- tertemporal substitution in macroeconomics’, Quarterly Jour- nal of Economics 100(1), 225–251. Mulligan, C. B. (2002), ‘Capital...

  3. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  4. Substitutional doping in nanocrystal superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargnello, Matteo; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Wong, Eric; Datta, Bianca; Damodhar, Divij; Doan-Nguyen, Vicky V. T.; Herzing, Andrew A.; Kagan, Cherie R.; Murray, Christopher B.

    2015-08-01

    Doping is a process in which atomic impurities are intentionally added to a host material to modify its properties. It has had a revolutionary impact in altering or introducing electronic, magnetic, luminescent, and catalytic properties for several applications, for example in semiconductors. Here we explore and demonstrate the extension of the concept of substitutional atomic doping to nanometre-scale crystal doping, in which one nanocrystal is used to replace another to form doped self-assembled superlattices. Towards this goal, we show that gold nanocrystals act as substitutional dopants in superlattices of cadmium selenide or lead selenide nanocrystals when the size of the gold nanocrystal is very close to that of the host. The gold nanocrystals occupy random positions in the superlattice and their density is readily and widely controllable, analogous to the case of atomic doping, but here through nanocrystal self-assembly. We also show that the electronic properties of the superlattices are highly tunable and strongly affected by the presence and density of the gold nanocrystal dopants. The conductivity of lead selenide films, for example, can be manipulated over at least six orders of magnitude by the addition of gold nanocrystals and is explained by a percolation model. As this process relies on the self-assembly of uniform nanocrystals, it can be generally applied to assemble a wide variety of nanocrystal-doped structures for electronic, optical, magnetic, and catalytic materials.

  5. Substitutional doping in nanocrystal superlattices.

    PubMed

    Cargnello, Matteo; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; Diroll, Benjamin T; Wong, Eric; Datta, Bianca; Damodhar, Divij; Doan-Nguyen, Vicky V T; Herzing, Andrew A; Kagan, Cherie R; Murray, Christopher B

    2015-08-27

    Doping is a process in which atomic impurities are intentionally added to a host material to modify its properties. It has had a revolutionary impact in altering or introducing electronic, magnetic, luminescent, and catalytic properties for several applications, for example in semiconductors. Here we explore and demonstrate the extension of the concept of substitutional atomic doping to nanometre-scale crystal doping, in which one nanocrystal is used to replace another to form doped self-assembled superlattices. Towards this goal, we show that gold nanocrystals act as substitutional dopants in superlattices of cadmium selenide or lead selenide nanocrystals when the size of the gold nanocrystal is very close to that of the host. The gold nanocrystals occupy random positions in the superlattice and their density is readily and widely controllable, analogous to the case of atomic doping, but here through nanocrystal self-assembly. We also show that the electronic properties of the superlattices are highly tunable and strongly affected by the presence and density of the gold nanocrystal dopants. The conductivity of lead selenide films, for example, can be manipulated over at least six orders of magnitude by the addition of gold nanocrystals and is explained by a percolation model. As this process relies on the self-assembly of uniform nanocrystals, it can be generally applied to assemble a wide variety of nanocrystal-doped structures for electronic, optical, magnetic, and catalytic materials. PMID:26310766

  6. Buprenorphine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePLUS

    ... longer needed by carefully removing the adhesive backing, folding the sticky sides of each patch together so ... substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist if you have ...

  7. 3D Printing of Octacalcium Phosphate Bone Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Komlev, Vladimir S.; Popov, Vladimir K.; Mironov, Anton V.; Fedotov, Alexander Yu.; Teterina, Anastasia Yu.; Smirnov, Igor V.; Bozo, Ilya Y.; Rybko, Vera A.; Deev, Roman V.

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatible calcium phosphate ceramic grafts are able of supporting new bone formation in appropriate environment. The major limitation of these materials usage for medical implants is the absence of accessible methods for their patient-specific fabrication. 3D printing methodology is an excellent approach to overcome the limitation supporting effective and fast fabrication of individual complex bone substitutes. Here, we proposed a relatively simple route for 3D printing of octacalcium phosphates (OCP) in complexly shaped structures by the combination of inkjet printing with post-treatment methodology. The printed OCP blocks were further implanted in the developed cranial bone defect followed by histological evaluation. The obtained result confirmed the potential of the developed OCP bone substitutes, which allowed 2.5-time reducing of defect’s diameter at 6.5?months in a region where native bone repair is extremely inefficient. PMID:26106596

  8. 3D Printing of Octacalcium Phosphate Bone Substitutes.

    PubMed

    Komlev, Vladimir S; Popov, Vladimir K; Mironov, Anton V; Fedotov, Alexander Yu; Teterina, Anastasia Yu; Smirnov, Igor V; Bozo, Ilya Y; Rybko, Vera A; Deev, Roman V

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatible calcium phosphate ceramic grafts are able of supporting new bone formation in appropriate environment. The major limitation of these materials usage for medical implants is the absence of accessible methods for their patient-specific fabrication. 3D printing methodology is an excellent approach to overcome the limitation supporting effective and fast fabrication of individual complex bone substitutes. Here, we proposed a relatively simple route for 3D printing of octacalcium phosphates (OCP) in complexly shaped structures by the combination of inkjet printing with post-treatment methodology. The printed OCP blocks were further implanted in the developed cranial bone defect followed by histological evaluation. The obtained result confirmed the potential of the developed OCP bone substitutes, which allowed 2.5-time reducing of defect's diameter at 6.5?months in a region where native bone repair is extremely inefficient. PMID:26106596

  9. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10497 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (PMNs P-06-276 and P-06-279)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10497 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis... ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (PMNs P-06-276 and P-06-279)...

  16. Substitute Your Way to a Real Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    For some, substitute teaching is a career choice. However, for the majority of new teachers, it is often a necessary gateway to landing a first job. Either way, it is a great way to sharpen one's skills. This article presents tips from principals, teachers, and human resource directors to make the most of the substitute teaching experience…

  17. 40 CFR 721.323 - Substituted acrylamide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted acrylamide. 721.323 Section 721.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.323 Substituted acrylamide....

  18. Carboranylmethylene-substituted phosphazenes and polymers thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allcock, H. R.; Scopelianos, A. G. (inventors)

    1984-01-01

    Carboranylmethylene-substituted cyclophosphazenes are described which can be thermally polymerized into carboranylmethylene-substituted phosphazene polymers. The polymers are useful as thermally stable coatings. Also, due to the characteristics of these polymers in acting as a ligand for transition metals, metalocarboranylmethylene phosphazene polymers are described which can act as immobilized catalyst systems, and are electrically conductive and superconductive.

  19. 19 CFR 191.32 - Substitution drawback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Substitution drawback. 191.32 Section 191.32 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Unused Merchandise Drawback § 191.32 Substitution drawback. (a) General. Section 313(j)(2) of the Act, as amended (19...

  20. 19 CFR 191.32 - Substitution drawback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Substitution drawback. 191.32 Section 191.32 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Unused Merchandise Drawback § 191.32 Substitution drawback. (a) General. Section 313(j)(2) of the Act, as amended (19...

  1. 19 CFR 191.32 - Substitution drawback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitution drawback. 191.32 Section 191.32 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Unused Merchandise Drawback § 191.32 Substitution drawback. (a) General. Section 313(j)(2) of the Act, as amended (19...

  2. Educators Take Another Look at Substitutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2012-01-01

    The mythology surrounding the substitute teacher is not a pretty one: Paper airplanes, lost learning, bullying. But as schools collect more information about teacher absenteeism and its consequences, districts and schools are exploring ways to professionalize substitute teaching--or experiment with alternative ways of coping with teacher absences.…

  3. Substitutes for Leadership: An Empirical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jon P.; Dorfman, Peter W.

    The leadership substitutes hypothesis has been used to explain the occasional successes and frequent failures of leadership predictions. Three hypotheses were formulated to test the viability of the leadership substitutes concepts. Questionnaires were administered to hospital managers (N=63) and engineers (N=71). Instrumental and supportive leader…

  4. Substitute Teachers as Effective Classroom Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatfelter, Andrew Gary

    2006-01-01

    Over the course of their kindergarten through twelfth grade education, children in American public schools will spend the equivalent of one school year under the guidance of a substitute teacher. Yet in most districts, substitutes are given the keys to the classroom without a day's training. While requirements vary by state, some may hold advanced…

  5. Automated Substitute Notification: Technology Improves Sub Dispatching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernasconi, Chuck

    2000-01-01

    Information technology has automated the process of substitute teacher dispatching. This article describes such automated systems, examining the advantages of using the Internet for automated staffing. It concludes that for districts that take advantage of this new technology, using the Internet can make automating absence reporting and substitute

  6. Body-scaled affordances in sensory substitution.

    PubMed

    Travieso, David; Gómez-Jordana, Luis; Díaz, Alex; Lobo, Lorena; Jacobs, David M

    2015-12-15

    The research field on sensory substitution devices has strong implications for theoretical work on perceptual consciousness. One of these implications concerns the extent to which the devices allow distal attribution. The present study applies a classic empirical approach on the perception of affordances to the field of sensory substitution. The reported experiment considers the perception of the stair-climbing affordance. Participants judged the climbability of steps apprehended through a vibrotactile sensory substitution device. If measured with standard metric units, climbability judgments of tall and short participants differed, but if measured in units of leg length, judgments did not differ. These results are similar to paradigmatic results in regular visual perception. We conclude that our sensory substitution device allows the perception of affordances. More generally, we argue that the theory of affordances may enrich theoretical debates concerning sensory substitution to a larger extent than has hitherto been the case. PMID:26587958

  7. [Prophylaxis of dental caries using sugar substitutes].

    PubMed

    Eberle, G

    1984-12-01

    Among the three measures, which are capable of producing a preventive effect against caries only when applied combined, i.e. adequate fluoride supply, proper mouth hygiene and healthy nutrition, the latter is dealt with in greater detail. The use of sugar substitutes is discussed under the aspects of caries prevention, substitute composition and production technology as well as from a medical point of view. Among the presently available sugar substitutes with nutritive value are mentioned Xylite, Lycasine, Mannite, Sorbite, Palatinite, the non-calorific substitutes such as the natural Aspartame as well as the synthetic sweetening agents Saccharine and Cyclamate. The possibilities and limitations of using these sugar substitutes in the prevention of caries in adults and children are presented. PMID:6532015

  8. The subjective, reinforcing, and analgesic effects of oxycodone in patients with chronic, non-malignant pain who are maintained on sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Comer, Sandra D

    2011-01-01

    Some sources suggest that significant misuse of opioid drugs exists among patients with chronic pain. However, the risk factors and motivation behind their abuse may differ from those of other opioid abusers. This study sought to examine the abuse liability of oxycodone among patients with chronic, non-malignant pain who met the DSM-IV criteria for opioid abuse. Eighteen opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain lived on an in-patient unit of the New York State Psychiatric Institute during the 7-week study. Participants were given oral oxycodone (0, 10, 20, 40, and 60 mg/70 kg) while maintained on various doses of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nx; 2/0.5, 8/2, and 16/4 mg/day). Doses of both medications were administered under double-blind conditions. Oxycodone produced an overall positive, but less robust, subjective profile than previously reported in recreational opioid users without pain. Furthermore, unlike our findings in recreational opioid users and more similar to effects in non-drug-abusing individuals, oxycodone failed to serve as a reinforcer. As for the maintenance drug, Bup/Nx produced a dose-related reduction in some of the effects of acutely administered oxycodone. These data suggest that sublingual Bup/Nx has the potential as an analgesic medication and further research should investigate its use in treating patients with chronic pain who abuse opioids. PMID:20980992

  9. 40 CFR 721.10626 - 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted methylene biscarbomonocycle, 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted... § 721.10626 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted...identified generically as 1,4-butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10626 - 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted methylene biscarbomonocycle, 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted... § 721.10626 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted...identified generically as 1,4-butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and...

  11. 40 CFR 721.7255 - Polyethyleneamine crosslinked with substituted polyethylene glycol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Polyethyleneamine crosslinked with substituted polyethylene glycol (generic). 721.7255...Polyethyleneamine crosslinked with substituted polyethylene glycol (generic). (a) Chemical...polyethyleneamine crosslinked with substituted polyethylene glycol with substituted...

  12. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840...840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance and significant...an alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840...840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance and significant...an alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840...840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance and significant...an alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4365 - Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). 721.4365 Section...721.4365 Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (PMN P-99-0313) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4365 - Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). 721.4365 Section...721.4365 Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (PMN P-99-0313) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4365 - Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). 721.4365 Section...721.4365 Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (PMN P-99-0313) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840...840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance and significant...an alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4365 - Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). 721.4365 Section...721.4365 Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (PMN P-99-0313) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4365 - Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). 721.4365 Section...721.4365 Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (PMN P-99-0313) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840...840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance and significant...an alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject...

  2. 19 CFR 143.16 - Substitution of warehouse entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Substitution of warehouse entry. 143.16 Section 143.16...Entry § 143.16 Substitution of warehouse entry. The importer may substitute an entry for warehouse at any time within 1 year from the...

  3. 19 CFR 143.16 - Substitution of warehouse entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Substitution of warehouse entry. 143.16 Section 143.16...Entry § 143.16 Substitution of warehouse entry. The importer may substitute an entry for warehouse at any time within 1 year from the...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 ...Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant...substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 ...Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3565 - Ethylenediamine, substituted, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ethylenediamine, substituted, sodium salt. 721.3565 Section 721.3565 ...Ethylenediamine, substituted, sodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...as ethylenediamine, substituted, sodium salt (PMN P-97-328) is subject to...

  7. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 ...Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant...substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 ...Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant...substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). 721...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). ...chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted oxetanes. (PMNs...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). 721...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). ...chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted oxetanes. (PMNs...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). 721...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). ...chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted oxetanes. (PMNs...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). 721...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). ...chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted oxetanes. (PMNs...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5546 - Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). 721...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5546 Halogen substituted oxetanes (generic). ...chemical substances identified generically as halogen substituted oxetanes. (PMNs...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10711 - Alkyl substituted catechol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Alkyl substituted catechol (generic). 721.10711 Section...Substances § 721.10711 Alkyl substituted catechol (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as alkyl substituted catechol (PMN P-13-197) is subject...

  15. 36 CFR 223.189 - Prohibitions against substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibitions against substitution. 223.189...Act of 1990 Program § 223.189 Prohibitions against substitution. (a) Direct substitution prohibition. Except as otherwise provided...

  16. 36 CFR 223.189 - Prohibitions against substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prohibitions against substitution. 223.189...Act of 1990 Program § 223.189 Prohibitions against substitution. (a) Direct substitution prohibition. Except as otherwise provided...

  17. 36 CFR 223.189 - Prohibitions against substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prohibitions against substitution. 223.189...Act of 1990 Program § 223.189 Prohibitions against substitution. (a) Direct substitution prohibition. Except as otherwise provided...

  18. 36 CFR 223.189 - Prohibitions against substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prohibitions against substitution. 223.189...Act of 1990 Program § 223.189 Prohibitions against substitution. (a) Direct substitution prohibition. Except as otherwise provided...

  19. 36 CFR 223.189 - Prohibitions against substitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Prohibitions against substitution. 223.189...Act of 1990 Program § 223.189 Prohibitions against substitution. (a) Direct substitution prohibition. Except as otherwise provided...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4596 - Diazo substituted carbomonocyclic metal complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Diazo substituted carbomonocyclic metal complex. 721.4596 Section 721...4596 Diazo substituted carbomonocyclic metal complex. (a) Chemical substance and...generically as a diazo substituted carbomonocyclic metal complex (PMN P-94-1039) is...

  1. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640 Section 721.640...Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and...identified generically as amine substituted metal salts (PMNs...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1760 - Substituted benzotriazole derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Substituted benzotriazole derivatives. 721.1760 Section 721.1760...721.1760 Substituted benzotriazole derivatives. (a) Chemical substances and significant...generically as substituted benzotriazole derivatives (PMNs P-93-374 and...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2025 - Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. 721.2025 Section 721.2025... Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. (a) Chemical substance and significant...as a substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative (PMN P-91-487) is subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2025 - Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. 721.2025 Section 721.2025... Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. (a) Chemical substance and significant...as a substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative (PMN P-91-487) is subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1760 - Substituted benzotriazole derivatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Substituted benzotriazole derivatives. 721.1760 Section 721.1760...721.1760 Substituted benzotriazole derivatives. (a) Chemical substances and significant...generically as substituted benzotriazole derivatives (PMNs P-93-374 and...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2025 - Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. 721.2025 Section 721...721.2025 Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. (a) Chemical substance...generically as a substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative (PMN P-91-487)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2025 - Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. 721.2025 Section 721...721.2025 Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. (a) Chemical substance...generically as a substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative (PMN P-91-487)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2025 - Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. 721.2025 Section 721...721.2025 Substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative. (a) Chemical substance...generically as a substituted phenylimino carbamate derivative (PMN P-91-487)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic). 721.3080 Section...Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical...identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester (PMN P-85-730) is...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic). 721.3080 Section...Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical...identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester (PMN P-85-730) is...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic). 721.3080 Section...Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical...identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester (PMN P-85-730) is...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic). 721.3080 Section...Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical...identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester (PMN P-85-730) is...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic). 721.3080 Section...Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical...identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester (PMN P-85-730) is...

  14. Electrophoretic deposition of zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangfei; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Shengmin

    2014-06-01

    Zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method were used to coat stainless steel plates by electrophoretic deposition in n-butanol with triethanolamine as a dispersant. The effect of zinc concentration in the synthesis on the morphology and microstructure of coatings was investigated. It is found that the deposition current densities significantly increase with the increasing zinc concentration. The zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is inferred that hydroxyapatite and triethanolamine predominate in the chemical composition of coatings. With the increasing Zn/Ca ratios, the contents of triethanolamine decrease in the final products. The triethanolamine can be burnt out by heat treatment. The tests of adhesive strength have confirmed good adhesion between the coatings and substrates. The formation of new apatite layer on the coatings has been observed after 7days of immersion in a simulated body fluid. In summary, the results show that dense, uniform zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings are obtained by electrophoretic deposition when the Zn/Ca ratio reaches 5%. PMID:24863199

  15. Modeling competitive substitution in a polyelectrolyte complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, B.; Muthukumar, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have simulated the invasion of a polyelectrolyte complex made of a polycation chain and a polyanion chain, by another longer polyanion chain, using the coarse-grained united atom model for the chains and the Langevin dynamics methodology. Our simulations reveal many intricate details of the substitution reaction in terms of conformational changes of the chains and competition between the invading chain and the chain being displaced for the common complementary chain. We show that the invading chain is required to be sufficiently longer than the chain being displaced for effecting the substitution. Yet, having the invading chain to be longer than a certain threshold value does not reduce the substitution time much further. While most of the simulations were carried out in salt-free conditions, we show that presence of salt facilitates the substitution reaction and reduces the substitution time. Analysis of our data shows that the dominant driving force for the substitution process involving polyelectrolytes lies in the release of counterions during the substitution.

  16. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Groszyk, Ewa; Kwiatkowska-Ró?ycka, Dagmara

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions) and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency. PMID:24949423

  17. Hydrogenolysis of differently substituted methoxyphenols

    SciTech Connect

    Bredenberg, J.B.; Huuska, M.; Toropainen, P. )

    1989-12-01

    The partial hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the three isomeric methoxyphenols was studied in a flow reactor under 5 MPa hydrogen pressure in the temperature range 275-325 C with a sulfided CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The reactivities of the compounds were in the order p > o > m, the p-compound giving the highest amount of hydrocarbons and the o-compound monophenols. Ring substitution by methyl groups was in the order m {much gt} o > p. Increase in sulfidation increased the reactivity. Most reactions were run at a LHSV of 2.2 h{sup {minus}1}. An increase of up to tenfold in the space velocity for the m-compound gave a decreasing conversion and a lower ring methylation but about the same selectivity of resorcinol and phenol. The differing reactivities are ascribed to the difference in the orientation of the chemisorbed molecules once the methyl group has been split off: there is a planar sorption of them- and p-compounds and an inclined sorption by the o-compound.

  18. General Education Requirement Individual Substitution Form Student's Name _________________________________________________________________________________________

    E-print Network

    General Education Requirement Individual Substitution Form Student's Name ________________________________________________________________ Reason for requested substitution of general education course (Refer to OSU Policy 2-0212 ­ Approval of General Education Classes

  19. Emerging drugs of abuse: current perspectives on substituted cathinones.

    PubMed

    Paillet-Loilier, Magalie; Cesbron, Alexandre; Le Boisselier, Reynald; Bourgine, Joanna; Debruyne, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    Substituted cathinones are synthetic analogs of cathinone that can be considered as derivatives of phenethylamines with a beta-keto group on the side chain. They appeared in the recreational drug market in the mid-2000s and now represent a large class of new popular drugs of abuse. Initially considered as legal highs, their legal status is variable by country and is rapidly changing, with government institutions encouraging their control. Some cathinones (such as diethylpropion or pyrovalerone) have been used in a medical setting and bupropion is actually indicated for smoking cessation. Substituted cathinones are widely available from internet websites, retail shops, and street dealers. They can be sold under chemical, evocative or generic names, making their identification difficult. Fortunately, analytical methods have been developed in recent years to solve this problem. Available as powders, substituted cathinones are self-administered by snorting, oral injestion, or intravenous injection. They act as central nervous system stimulants by causing the release of catecholamines (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) and blocking their reuptake in the central and peripheral nervous system. They may also decrease dopamine and serotonin transporter function as nonselective substrates or potent blockers and may inhibit monoamine oxidase effects. Nevertheless, considerable differences have been found in the potencies of the different substituted cathinones in vitro. Desired effects reported by users include increased energy, empathy, and improved libido. Cardiovascular (tachycardia, hypertension) and psychiatric/neurological signs/symptoms (agitation, seizures, paranoia, and hallucinations) are the most common adverse effects reported. Severe toxicity signs compatible with excessive serotonin activity, such as hyperthermia, metabolic acidosis, and prolonged rhabdomyolysis, have also been observed. Reinforcing potential observed in animals predicts a high potential for addiction and abuse in users. In case of overdose, no specific antidote exists and no curative treatment has been approved by health authorities. Therefore, management of acute toxic effects is mainly extrapolated from experience with cocaine/amphetamines. PMID:24966713

  20. Emerging drugs of abuse: current perspectives on substituted cathinones

    PubMed Central

    Paillet-Loilier, Magalie; Cesbron, Alexandre; Le Boisselier, Reynald; Bourgine, Joanna; Debruyne, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    Substituted cathinones are synthetic analogs of cathinone that can be considered as derivatives of phenethylamines with a beta-keto group on the side chain. They appeared in the recreational drug market in the mid-2000s and now represent a large class of new popular drugs of abuse. Initially considered as legal highs, their legal status is variable by country and is rapidly changing, with government institutions encouraging their control. Some cathinones (such as diethylpropion or pyrovalerone) have been used in a medical setting and bupropion is actually indicated for smoking cessation. Substituted cathinones are widely available from internet websites, retail shops, and street dealers. They can be sold under chemical, evocative or generic names, making their identification difficult. Fortunately, analytical methods have been developed in recent years to solve this problem. Available as powders, substituted cathinones are self-administered by snorting, oral injestion, or intravenous injection. They act as central nervous system stimulants by causing the release of catecholamines (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) and blocking their reuptake in the central and peripheral nervous system. They may also decrease dopamine and serotonin transporter function as nonselective substrates or potent blockers and may inhibit monoamine oxidase effects. Nevertheless, considerable differences have been found in the potencies of the different substituted cathinones in vitro. Desired effects reported by users include increased energy, empathy, and improved libido. Cardiovascular (tachycardia, hypertension) and psychiatric/neurological signs/symptoms (agitation, seizures, paranoia, and hallucinations) are the most common adverse effects reported. Severe toxicity signs compatible with excessive serotonin activity, such as hyperthermia, metabolic acidosis, and prolonged rhabdomyolysis, have also been observed. Reinforcing potential observed in animals predicts a high potential for addiction and abuse in users. In case of overdose, no specific antidote exists and no curative treatment has been approved by health authorities. Therefore, management of acute toxic effects is mainly extrapolated from experience with cocaine/amphetamines. PMID:24966713