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Sample records for buried cambrian sandstones

  1. Diagenesis of Cambrian and lower Carboniferous sandstones, southwest Sinai, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, A.A.; Salem, A.M.K. ); McBride, E.F. )

    1996-01-01

    Quartzose and feldspathic Cambrian and Lower Carboniferous sandstones (fluvial > marine > eolian) deposited on the Arabian shield in southwestern Sinai were not buried more than 1 to 1.5 km until Late Cretaceous and younger time, when the deepest rocks reached 2.5 km. Porosity was reduced by compaction to about 26%. Grain rearrangement was the main mechanism of compaction; intergranular pressure solution and ductile grain deformation are insignificant. Cementation by iron oxide (5%), quartz (3%), calcite (2%), kaolinite (2%) and K-feldspar (< 1%) reduced porosity to 12-15% except in silcretes and some ferricretes, where porosity was reduced to non-reservoir quality. Cements have no selectivity for certain textures or stratigraphic positions.

  2. Diagenesis of Cambrian and lower Carboniferous sandstones, southwest Sinai, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, A.A.; Salem, A.M.K.; McBride, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    Quartzose and feldspathic Cambrian and Lower Carboniferous sandstones (fluvial > marine > eolian) deposited on the Arabian shield in southwestern Sinai were not buried more than 1 to 1.5 km until Late Cretaceous and younger time, when the deepest rocks reached 2.5 km. Porosity was reduced by compaction to about 26%. Grain rearrangement was the main mechanism of compaction; intergranular pressure solution and ductile grain deformation are insignificant. Cementation by iron oxide (5%), quartz (3%), calcite (2%), kaolinite (2%) and K-feldspar (< 1%) reduced porosity to 12-15% except in silcretes and some ferricretes, where porosity was reduced to non-reservoir quality. Cements have no selectivity for certain textures or stratigraphic positions.

  3. Cambrian-Ordovician Rose Run sandstone in northeastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, R.V.; Kostka, G.

    1987-09-01

    The Rose Run Sandstone Member of the Knox Group has been an elusive target for many years. Many wells had been drilled to the Rose Run in northeastern Ohio, but with very little success. The completion of the Park-Ohio 3 Rhoa in April of 1982 sparked renewed interest in the play. During its first 2 years of production, the 3 Rhoa produced more than 700 mmcf of gas and 700 bbl of condensate. Data obtained from a detailed core analysis and stratigraphic interpretation of the seismic data indicate a depositional environment more complex and variable than prior interpretations from well data alone. These depositional trends, combined with the local structural and erosional complexities at the unconformity, explain the prior lack of success in the Cambrian-Ordovician of northeastern Ohio.

  4. Quartz cementation mechanisms between adjacent sandstone and shale in Middle Cambrian, West Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lingli; Friis, Henrik

    2013-04-01

    Quartz is an important cementing material in siliciclastic sandstones that can reduce porosity and permeability severely. For efficiently predicting and extrapolating petrophysical properties such as porosity and permeability, the controls on the occurrence and the degree of quartz cementation need to be better understood. Because it is generally difficult to identify specific sources for quartz cement, many models attempting to explain quartz cementation conclude that external sources of silica are needed to explain the observed quantity of quartz cement, such as the mass transfer between sandstone and shale. Cambrian sandstones in Lithuania have abundant quartz cement which has significant effect on reservoir properties. The detrital quartz grains have been dissolved extensively along the shale-quartz contacts zones, making it a natural laboratory to study the influence of mass transfer between sandstone and shale to quartz cementation on petrophysical properties and reservoir quality. Our Cambrian shale samples in west Lithuania are mainly silty shale or siltstone (sample locations vary from 330 to 2090 m of burial depth). They are composed of quartz, clay and traces of feldspars, sericite, calcite, and pyrite. The clay minerals are mainly illite, with variable content of kaolinite and traces of chlorite. In the sandstone lamina, authigenic illite occurs as pore-filling cement which was composed of fibrous illite; pore-filling kaolinite is generally well crystallized and occurs as hexagonal plates arranged in booklets; quartz overgrowth are obvious in these sandstone laminas, especially in the contact zones between sandstone and shale. Dolomite and pyrite cementation are also present in some sandstone laminas but with few quartz overgrowth. Depositional facies and architecture played an important role in the precipitation of silica. Three different possible sources are distinguished for the quartz overgrowths in the intercalated sandstones: 1) Pressure

  5. Paleomagnetic study of Cambrian Potsdam Group sandstones, St. Lawrence Lowlands, Quebec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, M. K.; Rao, K. V.; Arnal, P.

    1981-11-01

    We report paleomagnetic results from oriented drill core samples collected at 10 sites (80 samples) from the Covey Hill and 19 sites (96 samples) from the overlying, fossiliferous Chaˆteauguay Formations of the gently dipping Late Cambrian Potsdam Group sandstones exposed in the St. Lawrence Lowlands of Quebec. Stepwise thermal demagnetization analyses ave revealed the presence of two predominant groups of coherent magnetizations C-1 and C-2, after simple correction for bedding tilt. The C-1 group magnetization is a stable direction ( D=332°, I=+18°) with unblocking temperatures ( T UB) between 550 and 650°C, present in the older Covey Hill Formation; this direction is probably a chemical remanence acquired during the Covey Hill diagenesis and carried predominantly by hematite. The C-2 group magnetization ( D=322°, I=+9°) is present at 13 sites of the younger Chaˆteauguay Formation; this is probably carried by magnetite and represents a penecontemporaneous, depositional DRM, characterized by T UB spectra 400-550°C. We believe that C-2 is relatively younger than C-1 based on a combination of arguments such as the presence of opposite polarities, internal consistency, similarity and common occurrence of C-1 and C-2 respectively in the Covey Hill and Chaˆteauguay members. The corresponding paleomagnetic poles C-1 (46°N, 149°E; dp, dm=3°, 5°) and C-2 (37°N, 156°E; dp, dm=2°, 5°) are not significantly different from most of the other Late Cambrian (Dresbachian-Franconian) poles derived from sediments exposed in the southern region (Texas) of the North American craton which are also believed to have been deposited during Croixian Sauk sea transgression similar to the Potsdam sandstones. Although adequate faunal control is lacking (in particular for the Covey Hill Formation), this comparison with the Cratonic poles suggests a Late Cambrian age to the Potsdam poles. The agreement between the results also gives the evidence for internal consistency of

  6. Origin of northern Gondwana Cambrian sandstone revealed by detrital zircon SHRIMP dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Avigad, D.; Kolodner, K.; McWilliams, M.; Persing, H.; Weissbrod, T.

    2003-01-01

    Voluminous Paleozoic sandstone sequences were deposited in northern Africa and Arabia following an extended Neoproterozoic orogenic cycle that culminated in the assembly of Gondwana. We measured sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb ages of detrital zircons separated from several Cambrian units in the Elat area of southern Israel in order to unravel their provenance. This sandstone forms the base of the widespread siliciclastic section now exposed on the periphery of the Arabian-Nubian shield in northeastern Africa and Arabia. Most of the detrital zircons we analyzed yielded Neoproterozoic concordant ages with a marked concentration at 0.55–0.65 Ga. The most likely provenance of the Neoproterozoic detritus is the Arabian-Nubian shield; 0.55–0.65 Ga was a time of posttectonic igneous activity, rift-related volcanism, and strike-slip faulting there. Of the zircons, 30% yielded pre-Neoproterozoic ages grouped at 0.9–1.1 Ga (Kibaran), 1.65–1.85 Ga, and 2.45–2.7 Ga. The majority of the pre-Neoproterozoic zircons underwent Pb loss, possibly as a consequence of the Pan-African orogeny resetting their provenance. Rocks of the Saharan metacraton and the southern Afif terrane in Saudi Arabia (∼1000 km south of Elat) are plausible sources of these zircons. Kibaran basement rocks are currently exposed more than 3000 km south of Elat (flanking the Mozambique belt), but the shape of the detrital zircons of that age and the presence of feldspar in the host sandstone are not fully consistent with such a long-distance transport. Reworking of Neoproteorozoic glacial detritus may explain the presence of Kibaran detrital zircons in the Cambrian of Elat, but the possibility that the Arabian-Nubian shield contains Kibaran rocks (hitherto not recognized) should also be explored.

  7. RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY IN THE CAMBRIAN MOUNT SIMON SANDSTONE: IMPLICATIONS FOR CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkens, N. D.; Bowen, B.; Fischietto, N.; Ochoa, R.; Soong, Y.; Rupp, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is a deep saline aquifer that is a primary reservoir target for large scale carbon dioxide injection tests due to its proximity to CO2 sources, permeability, porosity, and the overlying Eau Claire Formation as a seal. While the Mount Simon Sandstone has ideal reservoir characteristics in some areas, there are extreme variations in porosity and permeability that cannot be explained by burial related compaction alone. It is critical to understand the behavior of previous diagenetic fluids, prior to injection, as they have formed the authigenic minerals that line pore spaces and will be in contact with the CO2 saturated fluids and may serve as predictors of future injected fluid behavior. This study focuses on the diagenetic history of the Mount Simon Sandstone, utilizing evidence of diagenetic fluid movement as well as experiments performed to assess mineralization and dissolution associated with carbon dioxide injection. This ongoing research uses a combination of techniques to provide a clearer picture of the diagenetic history and potential results of injection. These analyses range in scale from basin-wide down to nanometers, to explore both depth variations within wells to individual grain coatings deposited by diagenetic fluids. Techniques include gamma and neutron log interpretation, VNIR spectroscopy of well cuttings, detailed petrographic studies, X-Ray Diffraction, Fluid Inclusion Analysis, Cathodeluminescence studies, and SEM/EDX analysis. Previous studies of diagenetic minerals have shown a dichotomy between P/T conditions modeled and those found within fluid inclusions, suggesting a source of deeper diagenetic fluids had altered the Mount Simon Sandstone. Our approach expands on these earlier studies both in scale and methods, to discern both regional scale and microscale evidence of diagenetic fluids. To assess the impact of injected CO2, through collaboration with Indiana Geological Survey and the National Energy

  8. Depositional and diagenetic variability within the Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone: Implications for carbon dioxide sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, B.B.; Ochoa, R.I.; Wilkens, N.D.; Brophy, J.; Lovell, T.R.; Fischietto, N.; Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is the major target reservoir for ongoing geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations throughout the midwest United States. The potential CO2 reservoir capacity, reactivity, and ultimate fate of injected CO2 depend on textural and compositional properties determined by depositional and diagenetic histories that vary vertically and laterally across the formation. Effective and efficient prediction and use of the available pore space requires detailed knowledge of the depositional and diagenetic textures and mineralogy, how these variables control the petrophysical character of the reservoir, and how they vary spatially. Here, we summarize the reservoir characteristics of the Mount Simon Sandstone based on examination of geophysical logs, cores, cuttings, and analysis of more than 150 thin sections. These samples represent different parts of the formation and depth ranges of more than 9000 ft (>2743 m) across the Illinois Basin and surrounding areas. This work demonstrates that overall reservoir quality and, specifically, porosity do not exhibit a simple relationship with depth, but vary both laterally and with depth because of changes in the primary depositional facies, framework composition (i.e., feldspar concentration), and diverse diagenetic modifications. Diagenetic processes that have been significant in modifying the reservoir include formation of iron oxide grain coatings, chemical compaction, feldspar precipitation and dissolution, multiple generations of quartz overgrowth cementation, clay mineral precipitation, and iron oxide cementation. These variables provide important inputs for calculating CO2 capacity potential, modeling reactivity, and are also an important baseline for comparisons after CO2 injection. Copyright ??2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  9. Light- and heavy-mineral diagenesis in Cambrian Sandstones of Michigan's Upper Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Salvino, J.; Velbel, M.A.

    1986-08-01

    Sandstones of the Cambrian Munising Formation have a complex history of postdepositional alteration, including primary porosity reduction and intrastratal framework grain dissolution leading to secondary porosity formation. Primary porosity loss by carbonatization is evident in calcite- and dolomite-cemented samples. Feldspar overgrowths on detrital potassium feldspars effectively reduce primary pore space in 5-10% of the samples. Similarly, multiple generations of quartz overgrowths, distinguished by opaque inclusion rings, reduce porosity further. Authigenic pore-filling clays occur in more lithic-fragment-rich sands. Cemented samples clearly show that secondary porosity is associated with diagenetic alterations of feldspar and garnet. Feldspar dissolution occurs in detrital feldspar cores and as slightly corroded grain boundaries. Intrastratal dissolution of garnet is also evident. Thin sections show oversized pores associated with the garnet, and grain mounts show delicate imbricate wedge marks on garnet surfaces. Calcite also occurs as a fracture filling in, and replacement mineral on, garnet. Other heavy minerals (zircon and tourmaline) appear unaffected by diagenesis. The textural relationships of garnet dissolution vary with respect to the formation of early calcite and late dolomitic cements. The association between garnet and other diagenetic events constrains the chemistry of the intrastratal solutions, which affected garnet and formed overgrowths on feldspar and quartz.

  10. 500 Myr of thermal history elucidated by multi-method detrital thermochronology of North Gondwana Cambrian sandstone (Eilat area, Israel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.; Avigad, D.

    2009-04-01

    Following the Neoproterozoic Pan-African orogeny, the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) of North Africa and Arabia was eroded and then covered by Cambrian sandstones that record the onset of platform sedimentation. We applied K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar, zircon and apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology to detritus from Cambrian sandstones of southern Israel deposited at about 500 Ma. U-Pb detrital zircon ages from these sandstones predate deposition and record the earlier Neoproterozoic crustal evolution of the Pan-African orogens. 40Ar/39Ar ages from 50 single grains of K-feldspar yield a Cambrian mean of approximately 535 Ma. The 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum of a multi-grain K-feldspar aliquot displays diffusion behaviour compatible with >560 Ma cooling later affected by a heating event. Assuming that the high temperature domains of the K-feldspars have not been affected by subsequent (hydro)thermal events, and taking previously published K-Ar and Rb-Sr ages from other parts of the East African Orogen at face value, these ages apparently record Pan-African thermal resetting below a thick volcano-sedimentary pile similar to the Saramuj conglomerate in Jordan and/or the Hammamat in Egypt. Detrital zircon fission track (ZFT) ages cluster around 380 Ma, consistent with previous ZFT results from Neoproterozoic basement and sediments of the region, revealing that the Cambrian platform sequence experienced a middle Devonian thermal event and low-grade metamorphism. Regional correlation indicates that during Devonian time the sedimentary cover atop the Cambrian in Israel was never in excess of 2.5 km, requiring an abnormally steep geothermal gradient to explain the complete ZFT annealing. A basal Carboniferous unconformity can be traced from Syria to southern Saudi Arabia, suggesting that the observed Devonian ZFT ages represent a regional tectonothermal event. Similar Devonian ZFT ages were reported from ANS basement outcrops in the Eastern Desert, 500 km south of

  11. Halomonas sulfidaeris-dominated microbial community inhabits a 1.8 km-deep subsurface Cambrian Sandstone reservoir.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yiran; Kumar, Charu Gupta; Chia, Nicholas; Kim, Pan-Jun; Miller, Philip A; Price, Nathan D; Cann, Isaac K O; Flynn, Theodore M; Sanford, Robert A; Krapac, Ivan G; Locke, Randall A; Hong, Pei-Ying; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Liu, Wen-Tso; Mackie, Roderick I; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Wright, Chris L; Mikel, Mark A; Walker, Jared L; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Yannarell, Anthony C; Fouke, Bruce W

    2014-06-01

    A low-diversity microbial community, dominated by the γ-proteobacterium Halomonas sulfidaeris, was detected in samples of warm saline formation porewater collected from the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone in the Illinois Basin of the North American Midcontinent (1.8 km/5872 ft burial depth, 50°C, pH 8, 181 bars pressure). These highly porous and permeable quartz arenite sandstones are directly analogous to reservoirs around the world targeted for large-scale hydrocarbon extraction, as well as subsurface gas and carbon storage. A new downhole low-contamination subsurface sampling probe was used to collect in situ formation water samples for microbial environmental metagenomic analyses. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that this H. sulfidaeris-dominated subsurface microbial community is indigenous and not derived from drilling mud microbial contamination. Data to support this includes V1-V3 pyrosequencing of formation water and drilling mud, as well as comparison with previously published microbial analyses of drilling muds in other sites. Metabolic pathway reconstruction, constrained by the geology, geochemistry and present-day environmental conditions of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, implies that H. sulfidaeris-dominated subsurface microbial community may utilize iron and nitrogen metabolisms and extensively recycle indigenous nutrients and substrates. The presence of aromatic compound metabolic pathways suggests this microbial community can readily adapt to and survive subsurface hydrocarbon migration. PMID:24238218

  12. Diagenesis of deeply buried Eagle Mills sandstones. Implications for paleo-fluid migration and porosity development

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.C.

    1995-10-01

    Eagle Mills strata (Triassic-Jurassic) unconformably overlie the Paleozoic basement complex and thus, form the basal sedimentary unit within the Gulf Coast basin. Jurassic-aged basaltic dikes and sills have intruded Eagle Mills strata. These sedimentary and igneous rocks are the earliest record of Gulf of Mexico rifting. Deeply buried (15,000 to 18,000 ft.) Eagle Mills sandstone have subarkosic and sublithic modal compositions. These sandstones exhibit evidence of a complex and prolonged diagnetic history, including: early chlorite cementation; early quartz and feldspar overgrowths; early calcite and dolomite cementation; dissolution of framework grains and early carbonate cements; kaolinite precipitation; late ferroan carbonate cementation; albitization; late chlorite and anhydrite replacement; saddle dolomite cementation; and pyritization. Pyrobitumens coat early chlorite rim cements indicating that most diagenesis post-dated hydrocarbon migration. Secondary porosity development coincided with a later burial dissolution event. The Eagle Mills paragenetic sequence records progressive burial into a high-temperature diagenetic regime where thermochemical sulfate reduction was the dominant process. Marked shifts in paleo-water chemistry are recorded by the Eagle Mills diagenetic sequence. Pervasive dissolution of detrital feldspars in some Eagle Mills sandstones provides unequivocal petrographic evidence for deep-seated sourcing of diagenetic fluids, which migrated along faults, and contributed to the diagenesis of overlying Mesozoic strata. These petrographic analyses support interpretations of geochemical/fluid-flux data for the Mesozoic Gulf Coast basin.

  13. A submarine welded ignimbrite-crystal-rich sandstone facies association in the Cambrian Tyndall Group, western Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Matthew J.; McPhie, Jocelyn

    1997-04-01

    Three occurrences of rhyolitic welded ignimbrite are intercalated within a submarine, below-storm-wave-base sedimentary succession in the Cambrian Tyndall Group, Mount Read Volcanics, western Tasmania. These occurrences are closely associated with very thick crystal-rich sandstone facies that is present at this stratigraphic level throughout the Tyndall Group. This facies is interpreted to comprise deposits from syn-eruptive, crystal-rich, submarine sediment gravity flows that were generated by interaction of subaerial pyroclastic flows with seawater. Removal of fine ash and pumice from the submarine flows by hydraulic sorting and flotation resulted in marked crystal enrichment in the deposits. Rapid, essentially syn-eruptive aggradation of crystal-rich sand led to temporary shoaling so that in some cases, subsequent pyroclastic flows deposited welded ignimbrite in shallow marine or possibly subaerial settings (e.g., Zig Zag Hill welded ignimbrite). Breccia units composed of welded ignimbrite clasts and crystal-rich matrix (e.g., Comstock and Anthony Road ignimbrite breccias) imply that some welded ignimbrite was submerged, providing clasts to syn-eruptive, submarine, crystal-rich sediment gravity flows. One example of welded ignimbrite (Cradle Mountain Link Road) may have been deposited in an entirely below-storm-wave-base environment. The distinctive facies association of welded ignimbrite, crystal-rich sandstone and ignimbrite-clast breccia in the Tyndall Group exemplifies the submarine record of a major rhyolitic explosive eruption in the source volcanic terrane.

  14. Provenance of north Gondwana Cambrian-Ordovician sandstone: U-Pb SHRIMP dating of detrital zircons from Israel and Jordan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolodner, K.; Avigad, D.; McWilliams, M.; Wooden, J.L.; Weissbrod, T.; Feinstein, S.

    2006-01-01

    A vast sequence of quartz-rich sandstone was deposited over North Africa and Arabia during Early Palaeozoic times, in the aftermath of Neoproterozoic Pan-African orogeny and the amalgamation of Gondwana. This rock sequence forms a relatively thin sheet (1-3 km thick) that was transported over a very gentle slope and deposited over a huge area. The sense of transport indicates unroofing of Gondwana terranes but the exact provenance of the siliciclastic deposit remains unclear. Detrital zircons from Cambrian arkoses that immediately overlie the Neoproterozoic Arabian-Nubian Shield in Israel and Jordan yielded Neoproterozoic U-Pb ages (900-530 Ma), suggesting derivation from a proximal source such as the Arabian-Nubian Shield. A minor fraction of earliest Neoproterozoic and older age zircons was also detected. Upward in the section, the proportion of old zircons increases and reaches a maximum (40%) in the Ordovician strata of Jordan. The major earliest Neoproterozoic and older age groups detected are 0.95-1.1, 1.8-1.9 and 2.65-2.7 Ga, among which the 0.95-1.1 Ga group is ubiquitous and makes up as much as 27% in the Ordovician of Jordan, indicating it is a prominent component of the detrital zircon age spectra of northeast Gondwana. The pattern of zircon ages obtained in the present work reflects progressive blanketing of the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield by Cambrian-Ordovician sediments and an increasing contribution from a more distal source, possibly south of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. The significant changes in the zircon age signal reflect many hundreds of kilometres of southward migration of the provenance. ?? 2006 Cambridge University Press.

  15. Tidal-bundle sequences in the Jordan Sandstone (Upper Cambrian), southeastern Minnesota, U.S.A.: Evidence for tides along inboard shorelines of the Sauk Epicontinental Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tape, C.H.; Cowan, Clinton A.; Runkel, Anthony C.

    2003-01-01

    This study documents for the first time tidal bundling in a lower Paleozoic sheet sandstone from the cratonic interior of North America, providing insights into the hydrodynamics of ancient epicontinental seas. The Jordan Sandstone (Upper Cambrian) in the Upper Mississippi Valley contains large-scale planar tabular cross-sets with tidal-bundle sequences, which were analyzed in detail at an exceptional exposure. Tidal-bundle sequences (neap-spring-neap cycles) were delineated by foreset thickening-thinning patterns and composite shale drapes, the latter of which represent accumulations of mud during the neap tides of neap-spring-neap tidal cycles. Fourier analysis of the bundle thickness data from the 26 measurable bundle sequences revealed cycles ranging from 15 to 34 bundles per sequence, which suggests a semidiurnal or mixed tidal system along this part of the Late Cambrian shoreline. We extend the tidal interpretation to widespread occurrences of the same facies in outcrops of lesser quality, where the facies is recognizable but too few bundles are exposed for tidal cycles to be measured. By doing so, this study shows that tidally generated deposits have a significant geographic and temporal extent in Upper Cambrian strata of central mid-continent North America. The deposition and preservation of tidal facies was related to the intermittent development of shoreline embayments during transgressions. The tidally dominated deposits filled ravined topographies that were repeatedly developed on the updip parts of the shoreface. Resulting coastal geomorphologies, accompanied perhaps by larger-scale changes in basinal conditions and/or configuration, led to changes in depositional conditions from wave-dominated to tide-dominated. Outcrops of the Jordan Sandstone tidal facies in the Upper Mississippi Valley represent the farthest inboard recorded transmission of ocean-generated tides in the Laurentian epicontinental seas, demonstrating that tidal currents were

  16. Elasto-Plastic Constitutive Behavior in Three Lithofacies of the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone, Illinois Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewers, T.; Newell, P.; Broome, S. T.; Heath, J. E.; Bauer, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Mt. Simon Formation, a basal Cambrian sandstone underlying the Illinois Basin in the Central US, is a target for underground storage and waste injection which require an assessment of geomechanical behavior. The range of depositional environments, from braided streams and minor eolean features in the lower Mt Simon, to tidally-influenced near- and on-shore sands in the upper Mt. Simon, yield a heterogeneous formation with a range in porosity, permeability, and mechanical properties. We examine the experimental deformational behavior of three distinct Mt. Simon lithofacies via axisymmetric compressional testing. Initial yielding is confirmed with acoustic emissions in many of the tests and failure envelopes are determined for each lithofacies. The evolution of (assumed) isotropic elastic moduli are examined during testing by use of unload-reload cycles, which permit the separation of total measured strains into elastic and plastic (permanent) strains. The upper Mt Simon samples deform largely elastically at stresses encountered in the Illinois Basin, with very little modulus degradation. The lower Mt. Simon facies are weaker and deform plastically, with varying amounts of modulus degradation. Results are interpreted via petrographic observation of textural contrasts. This range in constitutive response is captured up to failure with a phenomenological elasto-plasticity model. Essential aspects to describe observed behavior used in the model include non-associative plasticity, stress-invariant dependent failure, an elliptical cap surface capturing shear effects on pore collapse, kinematic and isotropic hardening, nonlinear elasticity and elastic-plastic coupling, among other features. Static moduli derived from laboratory tests are compared to dynamic moduli from wellbore log response which can allow experimental results and model to be extrapolated to Mt. Simon occurrences across the basin. This work was funded in part by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface

  17. Seastacks buried beneath newly reported Lower Miocene sandstone, northern Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, A.E.; Hanna, F.M.

    1985-04-01

    Three large, isolated exposures of a light-gray, coarse-grained, thick-bedded sandstone unit occur in the northern San Rafael Mountains of Santa Barbara County, California. These rocks are moderately fossiliferous and contain Vertipecten bowersi, Amussiopecten vanvlecki, Aequipecten andersoni, Otrea howelli, shark teeth, whale bones, and regular echinoid spines. The fossils indicate that the sandstone unit, although previously reported as upper(.) Miocene, correlates best with the lower Miocene Vaqueros Formation. This unit was deposited in angular unconformity on a Cretaceous, greenish-gray turbidite sequence of interbedded sandstone and shale, and onlaps the unconformity erosion surface from west to east, the unit being thicker in the west and older at its base. The underlying Cretaceous sandstone beds are well indurated, and during the eastward transgression of the early Miocene sea, they resisted wave erosion and stood as seastacks offshore of the advancing coastline, thus creating a very irregular topographic surface upon which the Vaqueros Formation was deposited. Some seastacks were as much as 4 m tall, as indicated by inliers of Cretaceous rock surrounded by 4-m thick sections of the Vaqueros Formation.

  18. Recent Advances in Characterizing Depositional Facies and Pore Network Modeling in Context of Carbon Capture Storage: An Example from the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone in the Illinois Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiburg, J. T.; Nathan, W.; Best, J.; Reesink, A.; Ritzi, R. W., Jr.; Pendleton, J.; Dominic, D. F.; Tudek, J.; Kohanpur, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand subsurface flow dynamics, including CO2 plume migration and capillary trapping, a diverse set of geologic properties within the reservoir, from the pore scale to the basin scale, must be understood and quantified. The uncertainty about site-specific geology stems from the inherent variation in rock types, depositional environments, and diagenesis. In collaboration with geocellular and multiphase modeling, detailed characterization of the Lower Mt. Simon Sandstone (LMSS), a reservoir utilized for carbon capture storage, is supporting data-driven conceptual models to better understand reservoir heterogeneity and its relationship to reservoir properties. This includes characterization of sedimentary facies and pore scale modeling of the reservoir The Cambrian-age Lower Mt. Simon Sandstone (LMSS) is a reservoir utilized for two-different carbon capture storage projects in the Illinois Basin, USA. The LMSS is interpreted to have formed in a braided river environment comprising a hierarchy of stratification, with larger scale depositional facies comprising assemblages of smaller scale facies. The proportions, geometries, length scales, and petrophysical attributes of the depositional facies, and of the textural facies they comprise, are being quantified. Based on examination of core and analog outcrop in adjacent areas, the LMSS is comprised of five dominant depositional facies, the most abundant facies being planar to trough cross-bedded sandstones produced by subaqueous sand dunes. This facies has the best reservoir conditions with porosity up to 27% and permeability up to 470 mD. Three-dimensional pore network modeling via micro computed tomography of this facies shows well-connected and unobstructed pore throats and pore space. This presentation will outline the depositional heterogeneity of the LMSS, its relationship to diagenetic fabrics, and its influence on fluid movement within the reservoir.

  19. New prospects in Cambrian platform orthoquartzites in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Labecki, J.; Weil, W. ); Schleicher, M.; Kulke, H.; Koester, J. )

    1991-08-01

    Middle Cambrian orthoquartzites produce oil in two small fields northwest of Gdansk, Poland; few developed offshore discoveries exist in the southeastern Baltic Sea. This joint Polish-German study on these poorly porous sandstones is aimed at delineating areas of better reservoir quality development and thus of future prospects. In the Polish part of the East European platform, Cambrian deposits exist in four geologic provinces (Lublin slope, Podiassle depression, Warsaw synclinorium, Baltic syneclise). In these areas, the Cambrian, which in part is more than 500 m thick, has been buried to depths between 300 and approximately 6000 m. The Middle Cambrian orthoquartzitic sandstones represent a shallow-marine sequences with interbedded claystones. Their porosities range form 2 to 8%, and oil production is improved by natural fractures. A major source rock for the oil accumulations is represented by Upper Cambrian black shales (TOC values, 3-13%; thickness approximately 1-10 m in northern onshore Baltic syneclise, up to 50 m in southern Scania, Sweden). The Middle Cambrian shales show low TOC contents (average, 0.3-0.6%) and a thickness of approximately 200 m. Despite their low organic content, they also could have been contributed to the reservoired oil because both black shales show maturities within the oil window and both contain an oil-prone algal kerogen. Therefore, in the northeast Polish oil province the restricted pore volume of the orthoquartzites and not the source rock parameters represents the major limiting factor for larger oil accumulations. Future prospects will be difficult to predict because the occurrence of traps might be much more controlled by diagenesis than by (tectonic) structures.

  20. Isotopic and geochemical characterization of fossil brines of the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone and Ironton-Galesville Formation from the Illinois Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labotka, Dana M.; Panno, Samuel V.; Locke, Randall A.; Freiburg, Jared T.

    2015-09-01

    Geochemical and isotopic characteristics of deep-seated saline groundwater provide valuable insight into the origin and evolving composition, water-rock interaction, and mixing potential of fossil brines. Such information may yield insight into intra- and interbasinal brine movement and relationships between brine evolution and regional groundwater flow systems. This investigation reports on the δ18O and δD composition and activity values, 87Sr/86Sr ratios and Sr concentrations, and major ion concentrations of the Cambrian-hosted brines of the Mt. Simon Sandstone and Ironton-Galesville Formation and discusses the evolution of these brines as they relate to other intracontinental brines. Brines in the Illinois Basin are dominated by Na-Ca-Cl-type chemistry. The Mt. Simon and overlying Ironton-Galesville brines exhibit total dissolved solids concentrations of ∼195,000 mg/L and ∼66,270 mg/L, respectively. The δD of brine composition of the Mt. Simon ranges from -34‰ to -22‰ (V-SMOW), and the Ironton-Galesville is ∼-53.2‰ (V-SMOW). The δ18O composition of the Mt. Simon brine ranges from -5.0‰ to -2.8‰ (V-SMOW), and the Ironton-Galesville brine is ∼-6.9‰ (V-SMOW). The 87Sr/86Sr values in the Mt. Simon brine range from 0.7110 to 0.7116. The less radiogenic Ironton-Galesville brine has an average 87Sr/86Sr value of 0.7107. Evaluation of δ18O and δD composition and activities and 87Sr/86Sr ratios suggests that the Mt. Simon brine is likely connate seawater and recirculating deep-seated brines that have been diluted with meteoric water and influenced by the dissolution of evaporites with a minimal halite contribution based on Cl/Br ratios. The Ironton-Galesville brine is also likely originally connate seawater that mixed with other brines and meteoric waters, including possibly Pleistocene glacial recharge. The Ca-excess vs. Na-deficiency comparison with the Basinal Fluid Line suggests the Mt. Simon and Ironton-Galesville brines have been

  1. Rapid Polar Wander in North America During the Early Cambrian: Paleomagnetic and Magnetostratigraphic Constraints from the Peurto Blanco Volcanics from Caborca, and the Tapeats Sandstone of the Grand Canyon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Elston, D. P.; Petterson, R.; Hagadorn, J. W.; Raub, T. D.; Evans, D. A.; Rose, E. C.; Weiss, B. P.; Barr, T. D.

    2006-12-01

    We report paleomagnetic directions from a volcaniclastic unit in the Early Cambrian Puerto Blanco Formation near Caborca in Sonora, Mexico, and from a restudy of the Tapeats Sandstone in the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Volcaniclastics in Caborca are found above carbonates of La Cienega Formation, which bear the Ediacaran index fossil Cloudina, and are overlain by siliciclastics bearing the Early Cambrian fossil Treptichnus pedum. Thin basaltic flows within the sequence show evidence of early oxidation of magnetite to hematite yielding a strong and stable remnant magnetization, and characteristic NRM directions obtained during progressive alternating field and thermal demagnetization from the units fall in two antipodal easterly westerly groups with moderate inclination. Volcanic clasts from the Puerto Blanco Formation show statistically random dispersion of components carried both by magnetite and by hematite, indicating multiple episodes of erosion and redeposition, and provide a positive conglomerate test. After correction for offset by the Sonora/Mojave megashear in Mesozoic time, these data imply a North magnetic pole at ~21º S latitude, 142º E longitude, suggesting that North America was at moderate southerly latitudes during the first part of Early Cambrian time. In contrast, near-equatorial paleolatitude is indicated for the earliest Middle Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone in the Grand Canyon and vicinity. Our extensive dm-resolution magnetostratigraphic study of this unit, involving stable data from about 250 samples from 7 sections, confirms an earlier report of Elston & Bressler (1977) which demonstrated a low-latitude, two-polarity characteristic remanence with stratigraphically-bounded polarity reversals. We provide positive reversal and conglomerate tests for this characteristic magnetization. The paleogeographic shift toward the equator during the last portion of Early Cambrian time helps account for the earlier appearance and higher abundance of carbonate

  2. Revealing provenance of quartz-rich sandstones using detrital quartz and zircon as source rock indicators: an example from the Cambrian of NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustsson, Carita; Rüsing, Tobias; Adams, Christopher J.; Zimmermann, Udo; Chmiel, Hannah; Kocabayoǧlu, Mert; Büld, Mareike; Berndt, Jasper; Kooijman, Ellen

    2010-05-01

    The most common light and heavy minerals in quartz-rich sandstones are quartz and zircon, respectively. Many studies aiming to trace the source areas of sedimentary rocks concentrate solely on U-Pb dating of zircon. We will demonstrate the provenance-discriminatory potential of combining cathodoluminescence (CL) colour wavelength spectra of detrital quartz with the morphology and in situ U-Pb ages of detrital zircon grains. The shallow-marine Cambrian Mesón Group in NW Argentina is particularly well-suited for a test of the combined quartz and zircon methodology, because it is dominated by non-metamorphosed sandstones having > 90 % quartz. Among the heavy minerals, zircon prevails. Whole-rock element chemical compositions indicate main input from felsic source rocks (Th/Sc > 1.0). Hence, transport of sedimentary material dominantly occurred from rocks containing quartz and zircon. Therefore, the use of these minerals as provenance indicators will reveal characteristics of the major sources. Quartz CL wavelength spectra typical for red, violet and bright blue luminescent quartz grains, as well as zircon grains having mainly oscillatory zoning, point to a dominance of magmatic source rocks. Brown-luminescent grains of metamorphic origin are rare. In the stratigraphically oldest unit of the Mesón Group (Lizoite Formation), volcanic quartz grains are common (> 30 %). Most zircon grains are euhedral and yield ages between 510 and 600 Ma, correlating with zircon ages from exposed magmatic rocks proximal to the depositional basin. Input from local and regional igneous complexes and the Sierras Pampeanas in the south suggests direct detrital transportation paths of ca. 100-1000 km. The geographical position of the source areas suggests that most of the transport took place via marine currents within the Mesón Group basin itself. Together with the low degree of abrasion and a dominance of zircons formed during one single growth stage, this suggests that the arenites may

  3. Hydrostratigraphic characterization of intergranular and secondary porosity in part of the Cambrian sandstone aquifer system of the cratonic interior of North America: Improving predictability of hydrogeologic properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Anthony C.; Tipping, R.G.; Alexander, E.C., Jr.; Alexander, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Upper Cambrian interval of strata in the cratonic interior of North America has a long history of inconsistent hydrogeologic classification and a reputation for marked and unpredictable variability in hydraulic properties. We employed a hydrostratigraphic approach that requires hydraulic data to be interpreted within the context of a detailed characterization of the distribution of porosity and permeability to arrive at a better understanding of these rocks. As a first step, we constructed a framework of hydrostratigraphic attributes that is a depiction of the spatial distribution of both rock matrix and secondary porosity, independent of hydraulic data such as pumping-test results. The locations of hundreds of borehole geophysical logs and laboratory measurements of rock sample matrix porosity and permeability were mapped on detailed (mostly 1:100,000 or greater), conventional, lithostratigraphic maps. Stratigraphic cross-sections, based on hundreds of natural gamma logs and thousands of water-well records, have provided a markedly improved depiction of the regional distribution of rock matrix hydrostratigraphic components. Borehole, core and outcrop observations of secondary porosity were also tied to detailed stratigraphic sections and interpolated regionally. As a second step, we compiled and conducted a large number of hydraulic tests (e.g., packer tests and borehole flowmeter logs) and analyzed thousands of specific capacity tests (converted to hydraulic conductivity). Interpretation of these data within the context of the hydrostratigraphic attributes allowed us to produce a new hydrogeologic characterization for this stratigraphic interval and gain important insights into geologic controls on hydraulic variability. There are a number of assumptions in herent in most previous hydrogeologic investigations of these strata, such as equivalency of lithostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units and the dominance of intergranular flow in sandstone, that are not

  4. Preservation of anomalously high porosity in deeply buried sandstones by grain-coating chlorite: Examples from the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenberg, S.N. )

    1993-07-01

    Five Lower to Middle Jurassic sandstone reservoirs from the Norwegian sector provide examples of deep porosity preservation caused by grain-coating, authigenic chlorite. Wide porosity variations in clean sandstones correlate with an abundance of grain-coating chlorite and consequent inhibition of quarts cementation. Maximum porosities tend to decrease with increasing depth but generally are 10-15% higher than would be predicted from regional trends of mean porosity vs. depth. It is proposed in this paper that the high chlorite content of the porous zones reflects syndepositional concentration of Fe-rich marine clays analogous to minerals of the modern verdine facies. Fe-clay mineralization would have been localized where Fe-rich river water was discharged into the sea. The syndepositional clays were transformed during burial diagenesis into grain coatings of radially oriented chlorite crystals. Petrographic relationships indicate that these coatings grew mainly before the beginning of quartz cementation and feldspar grain dissolution (probably within the first 2 km of burial) but after grain contacts had become adjusted by mechanical compaction. The Norwegian examples demonstrate that a wide range of nearshore marine sand-body types is susceptible to chlorite mineralization. The distribution of anomalous porosity and the proportion of the net sand affected depend upon sedimentary facies architecture and the pattern of discharge of Fe-rich river water during sand deposition. This phenomenon can be critically important for hydrocarbon exploration because it can provide good reservoir quality at depths far below the [open quotes]economic basement[close quotes] originally defined on the basis of sandstones lacking chlorite coatings. 58 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  5. CO{sub 2} Injectivity, Storage Capacity, Plume Size, and Reservoir and Seal Integrity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone and the Cambrian Potosi Formation in the Illnois Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leetaru, Hannes; Brown, Alan; Lee, Donald; Senel, Ozgur; Coueslan, Marcia

    2012-05-01

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins underlie most of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan. This interval also extends through much of the Midwest of the United States and, for some areas, may be the only available target for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We evaluated the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the basal Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir for sequestration potential. The two targets were the Cambrian carbonate intervals in the Knox and the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of these two formations was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the USDOE-funded Illinois Basin Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. Interpretations were completed using log analysis software, a reservoir flow simulator, and a finite element solver that determines rock stress and strain changes resulting from the pressure increase associated with CO{sub 2} injection. Results of this research suggest that both the St. Peter Sandstone and the Potosi Dolomite (a formation of the Knox) reservoirs may be capable of storing up to 2 million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for a 20-year period. Reservoir simulation results for the St. Peter indicate good injectivity and a relatively small CO{sub 2} plume. While a single St. Peter well is not likely to achieve the targeted injection rate of 2 million tonnes/year, results of this study indicate that development with three or four appropriately spaced wells may be sufficient. Reservoir simulation of the Potosi suggest that much of the CO{sub 2} flows into and through relatively thin, high permeability intervals, resulting in a large plume diameter compared with the St. Peter.

  6. Cambrian paleomagnetism of the Llano Uplift, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Doyle R.; van der Voo, Rob; Reeve, Scott C.

    1980-10-01

    Late Cambrian sandstones and limestones sampled from various members of the Riley and Wilberns formations of the Llano uplift show a progression of paleomagnetic pole positions as a function of age. The members, ages, and poles are the following for the Riley Formation: the Hickory Sandstone, Lower Dresbachian, 34°N, 145°E; the Cap Mountain Limestone, Dresbachian, 33°N, 140°E; the Lion Mountain Limestone, Upper Dresbachian, 24°N, 146°E. For, the Wilberns Formation they are the following: the Welge Sandstone/Morgan Creek Limestone, Lower and Middle Franconian, 24°N, 151°E; and the Point peak Shale, Upper Franconian, 6°N, 159°E. These poles are based on thermal, chemical, and alternating field demagnetizations and on vector analysis. Most directions are interpreted to be of reversed polarity, but the Cap Mountain Limestone also yielded normal polarity directions; all directions resided in hematite with blocking temperatures up to 680°C. Almost all Cambrian poles appear to fall in a broad streak between the equator at about 155°E (e.g., the poles from the Tapeats Sandstone and from the Late Cambrian Point Peak Shale of the Wilberns Formation) and about 60°N, 90°E, where Cambrian poles have been obtained by Elston and Bressler (1977) and French et al. (1977). Although, at the present time, partial to complete remagnetization or nondipole behavior of the geomagnetic field are adequate ad hoc hypotheses to explain some of the data, it is suggested that the simplest and most unifying hypothesis to explain all data involves a Cambrian loop of apparent polar wander with respect to North America. This loop occurs before the middle Late Cambrian, with the poles from the Llano uplift falling on the return track.

  7. Chlorite grain coats and preservation of primary porosity in deeply buried Springer Formation and lower Morrowan sandstones, southeastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, M.H.; Franks, P.C.; Larese, R.E.

    1987-08-01

    Petrographic studies of Upper Mississippian Springer and Lower Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) sandstones in six cores from the southeastern Anadarko basin, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma, reveal a complex diagenetic history that led to the destruction of much primary intergranular porosity. The Springer and lower Morrowan sandstones form prolific oil and gas reservoirs, despite the fine-grained nature of the rocks, the growth of authigenic clays, extensive cementation by quartz overgrowths and carbonate minerals, and burial depths of 11,500-14,800 ft. More than any other factors, the diagenetic creation and preservation of porosity are the major geologic controls on hydrocarbon production from these sandstones. Thin-section petrography and scanning electron microscopy show that porous intervals were formed mainly by extensive dissolution and leaching of detrital grains and authigenic cements. Locally, however, appreciable primary porosity was preserved in Cunningham (Springer Formation) and Primrose (Morrowan) sandstones (as much as 20% in one sample of Primrose sandstone) by the formation of chlorite grain coats on detrital quartz during the early stages of burial and diagenesis. The chlorite grain coats inhibited the occlusion of pore space by preventing pervasive cementation of the rocks by quartz overgrowths. Cross-plots of porosity versus the abundance of authigenic quartz and grain-coating chlorite document the relationship in two of the cores.

  8. Biosignatures in Middle Cambrian Paleosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodyskyj, L. B.; White, T. S.; Kump, L. R.

    2008-12-01

    Before the advent of plants with spores and body structures that are easily preserved in the fossil record, the evidence for terrestrial ecosystems is limited to observations of their effects on the chemistry of weathering surfaces. Seven paleosols and paleosaprolites from southeast South Dakota and northwest and central Iowa have been analyzed to assess the extent of abiotic weathering and the presence of biosignatures in the Midwestern US during the Middle Cambrian. Evidence for extensive weathering exists on a variety of basement material, from the 1800 Ma Harris granite to the 1100 Ma Keweenawan basalts. All of the weathering profiles are overlain by the Middle Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone, placing their most likely time of development shortly before the advent of vascular plants. All weathering horizons show high chemical indices of alteration, typically >85, and considerable leaching of mobile cations, such as Na, Ca, Mg, and Mn, which is consistent with tropical to subtropical weathering conditions expected for central Laurentia during this interval. Organic carbon contents of <0.2 wt% are present in all weathering horizons, indicating the potential presence of a terrestrial biota. Carbon isotope values for this organic matter are ~-25 permil for paleosols in the western portion of the study area, and ~-23 permil for paleosols in the eastern half. These results are consistent with a photosynthetic origin for the organic matter. Organic matter in the overlying sandstone tends to be lighter than the soil organic matter. At most sites, this difference is 1 permil, except at the Elk Point site, where the difference is 27 permil, suggesting methanotrophic influence on this organic matter. A strong biosignature present at most sites is the near-complete loss of P from the surface. P is an important limiting nutrient in the terrestrial environment. Near-complete apatite dissolution at the surface of most of the weathering horizons is best explained by leaching via

  9. Early Cambrian hydrocarbon potential in Southwestern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Sfara, R.M.; Benjamin, H.R.; Wolfe, P.J.

    1995-09-01

    A sedimentary basin, inferred to be of Early Cambrian age, has been recently identified in southwestern Ohio. A well drilled into this basin in 1926 penetrated 404 m of sedimentary rocks below the Middle Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone. This is the only well in Ohio to have penetrated limestone below the Mt. Simon Sandstone. Since 1992 Wright State University has gathered about 35 km of seismic data in this area. The seismic data suggest that these strata dip south into a large basin. The seismic character of the limestone interval at the well extends to a thickness of at least 1000 m. In addition, material underlying the limestone has reflection characteristics similar to the Late Proterozoic Middle Run Sandstone that exists about 40 km to the southwest. The surface on which Mount Simon Sandstone was deposited appears to be a mature karst surface and there was a natural gas show at this horizon. An oil show existed in an 8 m thick arkose within the limestone. All of the limestone encountered in the well was rich in organic material. Since there were gas and oil shows in the old well and the material appears younger than the Middle Run Sandstone, we feel this basin has hydrocarbon production potential.

  10. Ohio operators setting sights on objectives in Cambrian, Ordovician

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-02-04

    Exploration for gas in rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age is on the upswing as the Devonian Clinton and Medina tight gas sands play starts to wind down in the Ohio portion of the Appalachian basin. The area's intrepid independent operators refer to the objective formations as Ordovician Trempealeau dolomite, Rose Run sandstone, Copper Ridge dolomite, Knox dolomite, Beekmantown dolomite, and Cambrian Rome and Mount Simon sandstones. Rose Run drilling is centered in Coshocton, Holmes, and Tuscarawas counties. The formation underlies roughly the eastern half of the state and is the subject of a detailed geologic investigation.

  11. Corrigendum to "Isotopic and geochemical characterization of fossil brines of the Cambrian Mt. Simon sandstone and Ironton-Galesville formation from the Illinois Basin, USA" [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 165 (2015) 342-360

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labotka, Dana M.; Panno, Samuel V.; Locke, Randall A.; Freiburg, Jared T.

    2016-08-01

    The original Fig. 4 incorrectly represented data from Clayton et al. (1966). The deuterium values were reported in percent deuterium and mistaken by the authors as per mille. The corrected Fig. 4 Corrigendum is given and shows the data from Clayton et al. (1966) plotting in a similar manner as other published data for groundwater in the Illinois Basin. The data from Clayton et al. (1966) was not used in the discussion of the deep-seated Cambrian brines, and, therefore, this misrepresentation does not affect the conclusions of the original manuscript. The authors apologize for the oversight.

  12. The Cambrian of Bennett Island (New Siberian Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danukalova, M. K.; Kuzmichev, A. B.; Korovnikov, I. V.

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents new data on the Cambrian stratigraphy of Bennett Island, one of the least explored East Arctic islands. The section, about 500 m of total thickness, comprises four lithological units that store a record of the deposition history: (1) clastic sediments including storm sandstones; (2) shallow-marine mudstone; (3) lagoonal variegated mudstone and limestone; (4) black shale. It is suggested to classify the units as formations with their proper names. The section spans all epoches of the Cambrian stratigraphy constrained by trilobite fossils. In the Cambrian, territory of the island belonged to Siberia rather than to some exotic terrane, judging by abundant endemic Siberian trilobite species in the Bennett section. This inference is supported by synchronicity in recorded deposition events of Bennett Island and northeastern Siberia (Kharaulakh Mountains). The Cambrian sediments of the two areas were deposited in different parts of a single shallow sea which extended as far as Taimyr.

  13. Remagnetized cratonic Cambrian strata from southern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillett, Stephen L.

    1982-08-01

    Stratigraphic sections of Cambrian strata in southeastern Nevada are akin to thin, cratonic facies exposed in the Grand Canyon; their structural setting is much more complicated, however, from Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonism. Paleomagnetic samples from two sections through these strata appear to have been completely remagnetized. Coarse-grained, lightcolored sandstone from the Tapeats Sandstone yields scattered magnetizations, residing in hematite, that appear to reflect protracted diagenetic acquisition of remanence. A hematitic sandstone in the Bright Angel Shale yields relatively consistent `Paleozoic' directions of magnetization, but petrographic study shows that the hematite results from diagenetic oxidation, and stratigraphic arguments suggest that the oxidation was not penecontemporaneous. Gray limestones of the Jangle and Muav Limestones yield a magnetization, residing in magnetite, that may reflect late Tertiary remagnetization, being imposed during uplift related to the onset of Basin and Range deformation. In any case, this magnetization differs greatly in direction from a hematite magnetization reported from slightly younger Muav Limestone in the Grand Canyon. Both the sampling sites also appear to have been tectonically rotated, but whether this rotation is true or a geometric artifact of the tilt correction cannot be determined from the present data. These results suggest that paleomagnetic data from rocks as old as Cambrian must be scrutinized very carefully before their magnetizations can be accepted as penecontemporaneous, and such scrutiny must include geologic data.

  14. Stranded on a Late Cambrian shoreline: Medusae from central Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagadorn, James W.; Dott, Robert H., Jr.; Damrow, Dan

    2002-02-01

    Fossilized impressions of soft-bodied organisms are exceptionally rare in coarse-grained strata. Fossilized mass-stranding events of soft-bodied organisms are even rarer. The Upper Cambrian Mt. Simon Wonewoc Sandstone in central Wisconsin contains at least seven horizons characterized by hundreds of decimeter-sized impressions of medusae; these represent one of only two fossilized mass-stranding deposits. Medusae exhibit features nearly identical to those observed in modern scyphozoan strandings, including impressions of subumbrellar margins and gastrovascular cavities. This deposit provides insights about soft-tissue preservation in Phanerozoic marginal marine sediments, and suggests that large soft-bodied pelagic organisms were abundant in Cambrian seas.

  15. Paleomagnetic poles and polarity zonation from Cambrian and Devonian strata of Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elston, D.P.; Bressler, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Basal Paleozoic Tapeats Sandstone (Early and Middle Cambrian) in northern and central Arizona exhibits mixed polarity and a low-latitude paleomagnetic pole. Carbonates of Middle and early Late Cambrian age, and directly superposed carbonate and carbonate-cemented strata of latest Middle(?) and early Late Devonian age, are characterized by reversed polarity and high-latitude poles. The high-latitude Middle Cambrian pole, which appears to record a large but brief excursion of the polar wandering path, is considered provisional pending additional work. The Devonian data from Arizona indicate that a shift of the pole to a "late Paleozoic" position had occurred by Middle Devonian time. ?? 1977.

  16. A Precambrian-Cambrian oil play in southern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lillis, P.G.; Palacas, J.G.; Warden, A.

    1995-06-01

    The potential of the Precambrian Chuar Group as a petroleum source rock in southern Utah and northern Arizona resulted in the drilling of two wildcat wells in 1994. Both wells penetrated the Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone (the target reservoir rock) and presumably Precambrian rocks. The first well, Burnett Federal 36-1, was drilled east of Kanab, Utah (sec.36, T.34S., R.3W.) to a total depth of 5,365 ft and encountered Precambrian (?) reddish-brown sedimentary rocks at 4,790 ft. The Tapeats Sandstone had live oil shows and minor CO{sub 2} (?) gas shows. The second well, BHP Federal 28-1, was drilled near Capitol Reef (sec.28, T.33S., R.7E.) to a total depth of 6,185 ft and encountered the Tapeats Sandstone at 5,922 ft and Precambrian (?) phyllite at 6,125 ft. The upper Paleozoic rocks had abundant live oil/tar shows, and the Cambrian Bright Angel Shale and Tapeats Sandstone had numerous oil shows. There were no gas shows in the well except for a large CO{sub 2} gas kick in the Tapeats Sandstone. A drill-stem test from 5,950 to 6,185 ft yielded mostly CO{sub 2} (92%) and nitrogen gas (6%) and minor amounts of helium, argon, hydrogen, and methane. The {delta}{sup 13}C of the CO{sub 2} is -3.9 per mil PDB. The chemical composition of the extracted oil in the Cambrian sandstones is significantly different than oils produced from the Upper Valley field (upper Paleozoic reservoirs) and the tar sands that are widespread throughout southern and central Utah. However, the oil composition is similar in several aspects to the composition of some of the Precambrian Chuar Group bitumen extracts from the Grand Canyon area in Arizona. The encouraging features of both wells are the good reservoir characteristics and oil shows in the Tapeats Sandstone. In the BHP well the oil appears to be a new oil type, possibly derived from Precambrian or Cambrian source rocks.

  17. The Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Derek E G

    2015-10-01

    The sudden appearance of fossils that marks the so-called 'Cambrian explosion' has intrigued and exercised biologists since Darwin's time. In On the Origin of Species, Darwin made it clear that he believed that ancestral forms 'lived long before' their first fossil representatives. While he considered such an invisible record necessary to explain the level of complexity already seen in the fossils of early trilobites, Darwin was at a loss to explain why there were no corresponding fossils of these earlier forms. In chapter 9 of the Origin, entitled 'On the imperfection of the geological record', he emphasized the 'poorness of our palaeontological collections' and stated categorically that 'no organism wholly soft can be preserved'. Fortunately much has been discovered in the last 150 years, not least multiple examples of Cambrian and Precambrian soft-bodied fossils. We now know that the sudden appearance of fossils in the Cambrian (541-485 million years ago) is real and not an artefact of an imperfect fossil record: rapid diversification of animals coincided with the evolution of biomineralized shells. And although fossils in earlier rocks are rare, they are not absent: their rarity reflects the low diversity of life at this time, as well as the low preservation potential of Precambrian organisms (see Primer by Butterfield, in this issue). PMID:26439348

  18. The Cambrian Evolutionary Explosion: Novel Evidence from Fossils Studied by X-ray Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    The Cambrian explosion (from 542 million years to 488 million years ago) is one of the greatest mysteries in evolutionary biology. It wasn't until this period that complex organisms became common and diverse. the magnitude of the event can be understood based on the contrast between the biota and the degree of diversity of the fossils from both sides. great advances have been made in Cambrian palaeontology over the past century, especially the discovery of the well-preserved soft-bodied fauna from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale and the Lower Cambrian Maotianshan Shale deposits. The Cambrian side of the "Cambrian explosion" is richly illustrated and contrasts greatly with the Precambrian side. The study of these extraordinarily preserved fossil biota is extremely difficult. A major challenge is 3-D reconstruction and determining the patter of the cell organization in Weng'an embryos and their buried structures in Maotianshan Shale fossils. This talk will show that two recent technological approaches, propagation phase contrast synchrotron x-ray microtomography and microtomography, provide unique analytical tools that permit the nondestructive computational examination and visualization of the internal and buried characters in virtual sections in any plane, and virtual 3-D depictions of internal structures.

  19. Paleotectonic implications of arkose beds in Park Shale (Middle Cambrian), Bridger Range, south-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Fryxell, J.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-08-01

    The Cambrian System in the Bridger Range of south-central Montana is part of a 450 to 500-m (1475 to 1640-ft) thick transgressive-regressive sequence of fine-grained clastic and carbonate rocks. In south-central Montana, the Park Shale is 50 m (165 ft) of green, micaceous shale with interbedded siltstone at the base and intercalated limestone at the top. However, in the northern Bridger Range, the lower 30 m (100 ft) is a prominent interval of interbedded arkosic sandstone and micaceous shale. These arkosic sandstone beds are localized in the northern Bridger Range and are unknown in the southern Bridgers and in Cambrian outcrops of surrounding areas. The occurrence of Park sandstone beds that contain orthoclase and plagioclase grains and pebbles of quartzofeldspathic gneiss requires 1) the presence of a localized island of Precambrian crystalline rock, an erosional remnant that must have risen at least 200 m (650 ft) above the surrounding Cambrian/Precambrian erosion surface and was exposed above the depositional interface through most of the Middle Cambrian, or 2) an island of Precambrian crystalline rock that was exposed by late Middle Cambrian reactivation of zones of Precambrian structural weakness. The most spatially and lithologically feasible tectonic feature along which late Middle Cambrian movement might have produced an island or series of islands is the Willow Creek-Jefferson Canyon fault zone, along which significant movement occurred during deposition of the LaHood Formation (Precambrian Y); the fault zone structurally divides the northern and southern parts of the Bridger Range, and later Paleozoic movement has been documented along this zone.

  20. Origin of the Cambrian-Ordovician sedimentary cycles of Wisconsin using tectonic subsidence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watso, D.C.; deV Klein, G. )

    1989-10-01

    Cambrian-Ordovician stratigraphy of the Wisconsin dome is organized into five cycles consisting of basal quartzose sandstone, overlain by glauconitic sandstone and capped by limestone or dolostone. Unconformities at the base of each cycle are found to be coeval with known times of rapid tectonic subsidence in the Illinois basin at approximately 512, 502, 495, and 461 Ma. These times of rapid basin subsidence in the Illinois basin are interpreted to represent resurgent faulting events concurrent with thermal subsidence. Such regional extensional faulting would cause concomitant minor uplift of the Wisconsin dome, developing erosional unconformities observed at the base of each Cambrian-Ordovician stratigraphic cycle. Because sea level was rising at a constant global rate during deposition of the Cambrian-Ordovician cycles, stabilization of minor uplift permitted local transgression and deposition of a successive cycle. Repeated faulting during thermal subsidence in the Illinois basin caused repeated minor uplift on the Wisconsin dome, each time initiating a new stratigraphic cycle. Exceptions to this model include initial Late Cambrian transgression onto the midcontinent and a global drop in sea level at 485 Ma. The findings suggest that geodynamic models proposing a two-stage process from mechanical fault-controlled subsidence to thermal subsidence during evolution of extensional basins may need to be modified to include the occurrence of coeval extensional faulting and thermal subsidence during initial stages of basin thermal subsidence.

  1. Calibrating rates of early Cambrian evolution.

    PubMed

    Bowring, S A; Grotzinger, J P; Isachsen, C E; Knoll, A H; Pelechaty, S M; Kolosov, P

    1993-09-01

    An explosive episode of biological diversification occurred near the beginning of the Cambrian period. Evolutionary rates in the Cambrian have been difficult to quantify accurately because of a lack of high-precision ages. Currently, uranium-lead zircon geochronology is the most powerful method for dating rocks of Cambrian age. Uranium-lead zircon data from lower Cambrian rocks located in northeast Siberia indicate that the Cambrian period began at approximately 544 million years ago and that its oldest (Manykaian) stage lasted no less than 10 million years. Other data indicate that the Tommotian and Atdabanian stages together lasted only 5 to 10 million years. The resulting compression of Early Cambrian time accentuates the rapidity of both the faunal diversification and subsequent Cambrian turnover. PMID:11539488

  2. Calibrating rates of early Cambrian evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowring, Samuel A.; Grotzinger, John P.; Isachsen, Clark E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Pelechaty, Shane M.; Kolosov, Peter

    1993-01-01

    An explosive episode of biological diversification occurred near the beginning of the Cambrian period. Evolutionary rates in the Cambrian have been difficult to quantify accurately because of a lack of high-precision ages. Currently, uranium-lead zircon geochronology is the most powerful method for dating rocks of Cambrian age. Uranium-lead zircon data from lower Cambrian rocks located in northeast Siberia indicate that the Cambrian period began about 544 million years ago and that its oldest (Manykaian) stage lasted no less than 10 million years. Other data indicate that the Tommotian and Atdabanian stages together lasted only 5 to 10 million years. The resulting compression of Early Cambrian time accentuates the rapidity of both the faunal diversification and subsequent Cambrian turnover.

  3. Trace fossils and bioturbation in peritidal facies of the Potsdam-Theresa Formations (Cambrian-Ordovician), Northwest Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerstedt, T.W. ); Erickson, J.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The Cambrian-Ordovician Potsdam Sandstone, Theresa Formation, and Canadian correlatives in the St. Lawrence Lowlands preserve tide-dominated facies during the basal Cambrian transgression. Low intertidal sand flats in the upper Potsdam contain a Skolithos Ichnofacies dominated by Diplocraterion parallelum in clean, herringbone cross-bedded sandstones indicative of high tidal current energy. Wind-wave-driven longshore and tidal currents along a macrotidal coastline were funneled northeast-southwest by Precambrian topographic relief of up to 65 m. This relief is now expressed as the Thousand Islands of New York and Canada. The conformably overlying Theresa Formation preserves a shoaling-upward sequence of mixed clastic-carbonate facies. Shallow subtidal and peritidal facies contain a mixed Skolithos-Cruziana Ichnofacies in sharply alternating lithofacies consisting of gray, intensely bioturbated, poorly sorted calcareous sandstone, and meter-thick, white cross-bedded sandstone. The parallelism between ichnofacies and lithofacies indicates that environmental energy level and persistence rather than water depth controlled trace fossil distribution. Bioturbated sandstones contain a Cruziana ichnofacies of abundant deposit feeders including: Fustiglyphus , Gyrochorte , Neonereites uniserialis , Phycodes flabellum, Planolites beverlyensis, Rosselia socialis, and Teichichnus. Suspension feeders are represented by D. habichi, D. parallelum, Skolithos, Monocraterion, and possibly Palaeophycus tubularis. Scavenging or deposit-feeding arthropods are represented by rare Cruziana furrows. Cross-bedded sandstones contain a Skolithos Ichnofacies of shallow Skolithos and Monocraterion burrows, and an undescribed large epistratal eurypterid( ) trail.

  4. Cambrian calcareous algae and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchinina, Veronica A.; Terleev, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Individual calcareous algae were known in Riphean. Their mass distribution is connected to the beginning of Cambrian. Despite of a long history of study, the nature of this group long time remained not clear. The new unique finds of algae from East Sayan region have shown, that primary carbonate thallus disappeared in the process of fossilization, and after it the calcareous cover formed by association of bacteria and cyanobacteria only.

  5. A refined genetic model for the Laisvall and Vassbo Mississippi Valley-type sandstone-hosted deposits, Sweden: constraints from paragenetic studies, organic geochemistry, and S, C, N, and Sr isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintilan, Nicolas J.; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Samankassou, Elias; Kouzmanov, Kalin; Chiaradia, Massimo; Stephens, Michael B.; Fontboté, Lluís

    2016-06-01

    The current study has aimed to refine the previously proposed two-fluid mixing model for the Laisvall (sphalerite Rb-Sr age of 467 ± 5 Ma) and Vassbo Mississippi Valley-type deposits hosted in Ediacaran to Cambrian sandstone, Sweden. Premineralization cements include authigenic monazite, fluorapatite, and anatase in the Upper Sandstone at Laisvall, reflecting anoxic conditions during sandstone burial influenced by the euxinic character of the overlying carbonaceous middle Cambrian to Lower Ordovician Alum Shale Formation ( δ 13Corg = -33.0 to -29.5 ‰, δ 15Norg = 1.5 to 3.3 ‰, 0.33 to 3.03 wt% C, 0.02 to 0.08 wt% N). The available porosity for epigenetic mineralization, including that produced by subsequent partial dissolution of pre-Pb-Zn sulfide calcite and barite cements, was much higher in calcite- and barite-cemented sandstone paleoaquifers (29 % by QEMSCAN mapping) than in those mainly cemented by quartz (8 %). A major change in the Laisvall plumbing system is recognized by the transition from barite cementation to Pb-Zn sulfide precipitation in sandstone. Ba-bearing, reduced, and neutral fluids had a long premineralization residence time (highly radiogenic 87S/86Sr ratios of 0.718 to 0.723) in basement structures. As a result of an early Caledonian arc-continent collision and the development of a foreland basin, fluids migrated toward the craton and expelled Ba-bearing fluids from their host structures into overlying sandstone where they deposited barite upon mixing with a sulfate pool ( δ 34Sbarite = 14 to 33 ‰). Subsequently, slightly acidic brines initially residing in pre-Ediacaran rift sediments in the foredeep of the early Caledonian foreland basin migrated through the same plumbing system and acquired metals on the way. The bulk of Pb-Zn mineralization formed at temperatures between 120 and 180 °C by mixing of these brines with a pool of H2S ( δ 34S = 24 to 29 ‰) produced via thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) with oxidation of

  6. A refined genetic model for the Laisvall and Vassbo Mississippi Valley-type sandstone-hosted deposits, Sweden: constraints from paragenetic studies, organic geochemistry, and S, C, N, and Sr isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintilan, Nicolas J.; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Samankassou, Elias; Kouzmanov, Kalin; Chiaradia, Massimo; Stephens, Michael B.; Fontboté, Lluís

    2015-12-01

    The current study has aimed to refine the previously proposed two-fluid mixing model for the Laisvall (sphalerite Rb-Sr age of 467 ± 5 Ma) and Vassbo Mississippi Valley-type deposits hosted in Ediacaran to Cambrian sandstone, Sweden. Premineralization cements include authigenic monazite, fluorapatite, and anatase in the Upper Sandstone at Laisvall, reflecting anoxic conditions during sandstone burial influenced by the euxinic character of the overlying carbonaceous middle Cambrian to Lower Ordovician Alum Shale Formation (δ 13Corg = -33.0 to -29.5 ‰, δ 15Norg = 1.5 to 3.3 ‰, 0.33 to 3.03 wt% C, 0.02 to 0.08 wt% N). The available porosity for epigenetic mineralization, including that produced by subsequent partial dissolution of pre-Pb-Zn sulfide calcite and barite cements, was much higher in calcite- and barite-cemented sandstone paleoaquifers (29 % by QEMSCAN mapping) than in those mainly cemented by quartz (8 %). A major change in the Laisvall plumbing system is recognized by the transition from barite cementation to Pb-Zn sulfide precipitation in sandstone. Ba-bearing, reduced, and neutral fluids had a long premineralization residence time (highly radiogenic 87S/86Sr ratios of 0.718 to 0.723) in basement structures. As a result of an early Caledonian arc-continent collision and the development of a foreland basin, fluids migrated toward the craton and expelled Ba-bearing fluids from their host structures into overlying sandstone where they deposited barite upon mixing with a sulfate pool (δ 34Sbarite = 14 to 33 ‰). Subsequently, slightly acidic brines initially residing in pre-Ediacaran rift sediments in the foredeep of the early Caledonian foreland basin migrated through the same plumbing system and acquired metals on the way. The bulk of Pb-Zn mineralization formed at temperatures between 120 and 180 °C by mixing of these brines with a pool of H2S (δ 34S = 24 to 29 ‰) produced via thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) with oxidation of

  7. Fe-oxide grain coatings support bacterial Fe-reducing metabolisms in 1.7−2.0 km-deep subsurface quartz arenite sandstone reservoirs of the Illinois Basin (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yiran; Sanford, Robert A.; Locke, Randall A.; Cann, Isaac K.; Mackie, Roderick I.; Fouke, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    The Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone, deeply buried within the Illinois Basin of the midcontinent of North America, contains quartz sand grains ubiquitously encrusted with iron-oxide cements and dissolved ferrous iron in pore-water. Although microbial iron reduction has previously been documented in the deep terrestrial subsurface, the potential for diagenetic mineral cementation to drive microbial activity has not been well studied. In this study, two subsurface formation water samples were collected at 1.72 and 2.02 km, respectively, from the Mt. Simon Sandstone in Decatur, Illinois. Low-diversity microbial communities were detected from both horizons and were dominated by Halanaerobiales of Phylum Firmicutes. Iron-reducing enrichment cultures fed with ferric citrate were successfully established using the formation water. Phylogenetic classification identified the enriched species to be related to Vulcanibacillus from the 1.72 km depth sample, while Orenia dominated the communities at 2.02 km of burial depth. Species-specific quantitative analyses of the enriched organisms in the microbial communities suggest that they are indigenous to the Mt. Simon Sandstone. Optimal iron reduction by the 1.72 km enrichment culture occurred at a temperature of 40°C (range 20–60°C) and a salinity of 25 parts per thousand (range 25–75 ppt). This culture also mediated fermentation and nitrate reduction. In contrast, the 2.02 km enrichment culture exclusively utilized hydrogen and pyruvate as the electron donors for iron reduction, tolerated a wider range of salinities (25–200 ppt), and exhibited only minimal nitrate- and sulfate-reduction. In addition, the 2.02 km depth community actively reduces the more crystalline ferric iron minerals goethite and hematite. The results suggest evolutionary adaptation of the autochthonous microbial communities to the Mt. Simon Sandstone and carries potentially important implications for future utilization of this reservoir for CO2

  8. Ouachita trough: Part of a Cambrian failed rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Donald R.

    1985-11-01

    Pre-flysch (Cambrian-Mississippian) strata of the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma include two main sandstone lithofacies: (1) a craton-derived lithofacies made up largely of mature medium- to coarse-grained quartzose and carbonate detritus and, in some units, sediment eroded from exposed basement rocks and (2) an orogen-derived facies made up mainly of fine-grained quartzose sedimentary and metasedimentary debris and possibly, in lower units, a volcaniclastic component. Paleocurrent and distribution patterns indicate that detritus of facies I in the Benton uplift was derived from north and detritus of facies II throughout the Ouachitas was derived from south and east of the depositional basin. Overall sedimentological results suggest that the Ouachita trough was a relatively narrow, two-sided basin throughout most and probably all of its existence and never formed the southern margin of the North American craton. Regional comparisons suggest that it was one of several basins, including the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen, Reelfoot Rift, Illinois Basin, and Rome trough, that formed as a Cambrian failed rift system 150 to 250 m.y. after initial rifting along the Appalachian margin of the North American craton.

  9. Diagenesis of the Almond sandstone in the Washakie Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Peigui; Liu, Jie; Surdam, C.R. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    The marginal marine and nonmarine Almond sandstones are mostly sublitharenite, litharenite, and lithic arkose. The sandstones are fine-to very-fine-grained, and are well-sorted. The framework composition, authigenic minerals, and porosity and permeability distributions in the Almond sandstones are different below and above 8,000 feet, resulting in a variation in hydrocarbon reservoir types. The shallow conventional reservoirs are permeable, producing both liquid oil and gas, whereas the deep gas-bearing sandstones are very tight and overpressured. Porosity of the shallow Almond sandstones have been significantly enhanced by dissolution of the feldspar grains and lithic fragments. Quartz overgrowth cement and authigenic clay rims have occluded most of the intergranular pores, as well as the previously leached pores. The Almond sandstones have been buried deeper than their present depths. The sandstones in each part of the Washakie Basin have experienced different uplift and subsidence. Reconstruction of the burial history and diagenetic modeling are essential steps for understanding the diagenetic evolution of the Almond sandstones.

  10. The base of the Cambrian in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdzuy, K.; Geyer, G.

    The paper summarizes problems of datings of Latest Precambrian to Early Cambrian rocks of Morocco. The known palaeontological data are reviewed briefly. Characteristics and correlatability of the earliest trilobites of Morocco are discussed. Additional remarks concern the appearance of hard part animals at the beginning of the Cambrian.

  11. Diagenetic control of reservoir quality of Araba and Naqua diagenetic quartzarenites (Cambrian), Gebel Araba-Qabeliat, Southwest Sinai, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, A. ); Mcbride, E.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Sandstones of the marine Lower Cambrian Araba Formation and the overlying fluvial Upper Cambrian( ) Naqus Formation in Gebel Araba-Qabeliat, southwest Sinai (the eastern side of the Gulf of Suez) were studied to evaluate the major factors controlling potential hydrocarbon reservoir quality. The formations have a composite thickness of 873 m and overlie Precambrian granite and metamorphic rocks and underlie Cretaceous marine strata. The framework composition of both sandstones is almost entirely quartz with trace amounts of muscovite, K-feldspar, and heavy minerals. Up to 21.5% oversize pores, some filled with younger cements, attest to extensive dissolution loss of detrital grains, chiefly feldspar. Because the final mineralogical maturation of these quartzarenites was through diagenesis, they are diagenetic quartzarenites. Following deposition, the introduction of thin coatings of infiltered clay was followed by the precipitation of 6.3% unhomogeneously distributed quartz cement. Some outcrop samples contain pore-occluding gypsum cement or mixtures of gypsum and halite cement. Sr{sup 87}/Sr{sup 86} ratios of seven samples of gypsum cement have values (0.7077 to 0.7083) that are equal to Miocene and slightly younger seawater. These Cambrian sandstones have excellent reservoir potential (mean thin section porosity = 25.7%) because they contained few ductile grains to enhance compaction, and they developed significant amounts of secondary pores by both dissolution of calcite cement and unstable detrital grains. Kaolinite and dickite are potential problems for hydrocarbon production in some beds.

  12. Sedimentology of an early Cambrian tide-dominated embayment: Quyuk formation, Victoria Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbano, Andrew M.; Pratt, Brian R.; Hadlari, Thomas; Dewing, Keith

    2015-05-01

    The early Cambrian (series 2, stage 4) Quyuk formation is exposed in the Minto Inlier of western Victoria Island, Canadian Arctic Islands, and forms the base of the Phanerozoic succession. Coeval with other sandstones of this age in Laurentia, it was deposited in a shallow-marine embayment on a passive margin during the initial phase of the early Paleozoic transgression. Four facies associations are recognized: (1) offshore muds consisting dominantly of dark gray laminated mudstone with discontinuous laminae of medium- to coarse sand; (2) offshore sand dune fields characterized by laterally continuous, planar cross-stratified beds up to 1.4 m thick of medium- to coarse-grained sandstone; (3) distal nearshore consisting dominantly of fine- to medium-grained bioturbated sandstone and fine- to medium-grained sandstone interbedded with laminated mudstone; and (4) proximal nearshore characterized by laterally continuous fine- to medium-grained bioturbated sandstone and medium-grained oolitic ironstone. Large scale dunes of facies association 2 record areas where tidal currents were amplified and had available sediment supply in contrast to facies association 1, which was sediment starved. Dunes are, for the most part, non-bioturbated or contain just a few individual burrows belonging to Skolithos. In nearshore settings, bioturbation in the form of a typical early Cambrian suite of shallow-subtidal ichnofossils predominated, representing a low-diversity Cruziana ichnofacies. Oolitic ironstone horizons in the proximal nearshore mark periods of low sedimentation rates when iron became concentrated and calcite was the primary cementing agent. The coastline is envisaged as a complex of bays and lagoons.

  13. Geochemistry and origin of oil from Cambrian and Ordovician reservoirs in eastern and central Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, R.T. ); Burruss, R.C.; Hatch, J.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Oil from stratigraphic traps along the Middle Ordovician Knox unconformity in Ohio was analyzed to determine its geochemical characteristics, source, and migration history. The following stratigraphic units were samples: Upper Cambrian( ) Rose Run Sandstone, sample number (n) = 7; Upper Cambrian Knox Dolomite, n = 6; Upper Cambrian Krysik sandstone, n = 1; and Middle Ordovician Black River Limestone, n = 1. These Ohio oils are geochemically similar to oils in North America that are correlated with Ordovician source rocks. Seventy-one core samples from Ohio and West Virginia were analyzed by Rock-Eval for total organic carbon (TOC) and pyrolysis products and by solvent extraction to evaluate the source of the Ohio oils. Three potential source-rock intervals were tested: (1) Middle and Upper Cambrian strata in the Rome trough, (2) the Middle Ordovician Wells Creek Formation and the equivalent part of the Beekmantown Group, and (3) the Middle and Upper Ordovician Antes Shale. The thermal maturity of many samples was too high to give T{sub max} values and to yield adequate solvent extracts for detailed characterization. The Antes Shale samples have moderate TOC values ({bar x} = 1.2, n = 12) and Rock-Eval production indices between 0.3 and 0.5 ({bar x} = 0.4) calculated from nine samples with TOC greater than 0.5. These geochemical characteristics, a stratigraphic position about 1,000 ft above the Knox unconformity, and a maximum burial depth of about 10,000 ft along the Ohio-West Virginia border suggests that the Antes Shale is the probable source rock for the Ohio oils.

  14. Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.C.; Drahovzal, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    A recent gas discovery in the Rome Trough suggests the need to re-evaluate the deep Cambrian potential of eastern Kentucky. A new phase of Cambrian exploration began in mid-1994 with a new pool discovery by the Carson Associates No. 1 Kazee well in Elliott County, Ky. This well blew out and initially flowed 11 MMcfd of gas from the upper Conasauga Group/Rome Formation at 6,258 to 6,270 feet. After this discovery, a second exploratory well (the Blue Ridge No. 1Greene) was drilled on a separate structure in Elliott County in late 1995. The Blue Ridge well was temporarily abandoned, but had shows of gas and condensate. In early 1996, Carson Associates offset their initial discovery well with the No. 33 Lawson Heirs well. This activity follows a frustrating exploration history in the Rome Trough that is marked by numerous gas and oil shows, but rare commercial production. Only three single-well pools have produced commercial gas from the trough, including the recent Kazee well. Stratigraphic units below the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group in the Rome Trough are dramatically thicker than their equivalents on the shelf to the north. The interval in the trough is thought to include rocks as old as Early Cambrian, consisting of a basal sandstone, equivalents of the Shady/Tomstown Dolomite, the Rome Formation, and the Conasauga Formation. Sandstones and fractured shales have been responsible for most of the production to date, but dolostone intervals may also have potential. Limited seismic data indicate possible fan-delta and basin-floor fan deposits that may have reservoir potential.

  15. Prelude to the Cambrian Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, James W.

    The Prelude began with the origin of Metazoa, perhaps between 720 and 660 million years ago (mya), and ended with the geologically abrupt appearance of crown bilaterian phyla that began between 530 and 520 mya. The origin and early evolution of phyla cannot be tracked by fossils during this interval, but molecular phylogenetics permits reconstruction of their branching topology, whereas molecular developmental evidence supports hypotheses for the evolution of the metzoan genome during the rise of complex bodyplans. A flexible architecture of genetic regulation was in place even before the appearance of crown sponges, permitting increases in gene expression events as bodyplan complexity rose. Neoproterozoic bilaterians were chiefly small-bodied but likely diverse, whereas in the earliest Cambrian, between 543 and approximately 530-520 mya, bodies that were complex by marine invertebrate standards evolved in association with body-size increases.

  16. Phosphate Biomineralization of Cambrian Microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.; Hoover, Richard B.; Westall, Frances

    1998-01-01

    As part of a long term study of biological markers (biomarkers), we are documenting a variety of features which reflect the previous presence of living organisms. As we study meteorites and samples returned from Mars, our main clue to recognizing possible microbial material may be the presence of biomarkers rather than the organisms themselves. One class of biomarkers consists of biominerals which have either been precipitated directly by microorganisms, or whose precipitation has been influenced by the organisms. Such microbe-mediated mineral formation may include important clues to the size, shape, and environment of the microorganisms. The process of fossilization or mineralization can cause major changes in morphologies and textures of the original organisms. The study of fossilized terrestrial organisms can help provide insight into the interpretation of mineral biomarkers. This paper describes the results of investigations of microfossils in Cambrian phosphate-rich rocks (phosphorites) that were found in Khubsugul, Northern Mongolia.

  17. Exceptionally Preserved Jellyfishes from the Middle Cambrian

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Paulyn; Halgedahl, Susan L.; Hendricks, Jonathan R.; Jarrard, Richard D.; Marques, Antonio C.; Collins, Allen G.; Lieberman, Bruce S.

    2007-01-01

    Cnidarians represent an early diverging animal group and thus insight into their origin and diversification is key to understanding metazoan evolution. Further, cnidarian jellyfish comprise an important component of modern marine planktonic ecosystems. Here we report on exceptionally preserved cnidarian jellyfish fossils from the Middle Cambrian (∼505 million years old) Marjum Formation of Utah. These are the first described Cambrian jellyfish fossils to display exquisite preservation of soft part anatomy including detailed features of structures interpreted as trailing tentacles and subumbrellar and exumbrellar surfaces. If the interpretation of these preserved characters is correct, their presence is diagnostic of modern jellyfish taxa. These new discoveries may provide insight into the scope of cnidarian diversity shortly after the Cambrian radiation, and would reinforce the notion that important taxonomic components of the modern planktonic realm were in place by the Cambrian period. PMID:17971881

  18. Exceptionally preserved jellyfishes from the Middle Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Paulyn; Halgedahl, Susan L; Hendricks, Jonathan R; Jarrard, Richard D; Marques, Antonio C; Collins, Allen G; Lieberman, Bruce S

    2007-01-01

    Cnidarians represent an early diverging animal group and thus insight into their origin and diversification is key to understanding metazoan evolution. Further, cnidarian jellyfish comprise an important component of modern marine planktonic ecosystems. Here we report on exceptionally preserved cnidarian jellyfish fossils from the Middle Cambrian (approximately 505 million years old) Marjum Formation of Utah. These are the first described Cambrian jellyfish fossils to display exquisite preservation of soft part anatomy including detailed features of structures interpreted as trailing tentacles and subumbrellar and exumbrellar surfaces. If the interpretation of these preserved characters is correct, their presence is diagnostic of modern jellyfish taxa. These new discoveries may provide insight into the scope of cnidarian diversity shortly after the Cambrian radiation, and would reinforce the notion that important taxonomic components of the modern planktonic realm were in place by the Cambrian period. PMID:17971881

  19. Paleomagnetism of the Cambrian Sediments in Bornholm (Denmark) and Southern Sweden and Implications for Paleogeography of Baltica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, M.; Abrahamsen, N.

    2001-12-01

    In Bornholm the Phanerozoic sedimentary succession overlying Precambrian basement starts with the Lower Cambrian (ca. 545 Ma) Nekso Sandstone Fm (NSF) that, in the earlier paleomagnetic analyses, have yielded characteristic magnetization (ChRM) similar to the Permian direction for Baltica. Here, we present paleomagnetic results from other Lower Cambrian formations in Bornholm (Balka Sandstone, Broens Odde siltstone) and in southern Sweden (Hardebega, Mickwitzia and Lingula Sandstones). Lithologically, most of these formations are very similar to the NSF and they are all considered stratigraphically younger. The intention was to check, whether a Permian paleomagnetic overprint occured on a regional scale and could it be attributed to secondary magnetic phases originating from fluids, which possibly traveled laterally along the contact between the basement and the Lower Cambrian sediments. In this report we show results of this regional test, followed by a comprehensive re-analysis of our Nekso data, including new results obtained after supplementary sampling and new petrologic information, which appeared recently. We have found that the NSF possessed a unique ChRM. The well-grouped and stable characteristic magnetization of the Nekso Sandstone contrasts with fairly chaotic, soft and badly preserved magnetization of the Balka, the Hardeberga, the Mickwitzia and the Lingulid sandstones of Bornholm and southern Sweden. A regional geological context, including the inferred diagenetic evolution of Lower Cambrian sediments, points to a syndepositional/early diagenetic origin of the characteristic remanence of the Nekso Sandstone, revealing a stable remanence applicable for plate tectonic interpretations. Similarity of the characteristic remanence of the NSF to the Permian direction for Baltica has been confirmed, but it is supposed to be casual, because of lack of any sign of a regional Permian remagnetization within the other Cambrian deposits of Southern Scandinavia

  20. Stochastic reconstruction of sandstones

    PubMed

    Manwart; Torquato; Hilfer

    2000-07-01

    A simulated annealing algorithm is employed to generate a stochastic model for a Berea sandstone and a Fontainebleau sandstone, with each a prescribed two-point probability function, lineal-path function, and "pore size" distribution function, respectively. We find that the temperature decrease of the annealing has to be rather quick to yield isotropic and percolating configurations. A comparison of simple morphological quantities indicates good agreement between the reconstructions and the original sandstones. Also, the mean survival time of a random walker in the pore space is reproduced with good accuracy. However, a more detailed investigation by means of local porosity theory shows that there may be significant differences of the geometrical connectivity between the reconstructed and the experimental samples. PMID:11088546

  1. Cambrian-lower Middle Ordovician passive carbonate margin, southern Appalachians: Chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, J. Fred; Repetski, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The southern Appalachian part of the Cambrian–Ordovician passive margin succession of the great American carbonate bank extends from the Lower Cambrian to the lower Middle Ordovician, is as much as 3.5 km (2.2 mi) thick, and has long-term subsidence rates exceeding 5 cm (2 in.)/k.y. Subsiding depocenters separated by arches controlled sediment thickness. The succession consists of five supersequences, each of which contains several third-order sequences, and numerous meter-scale parasequences. Siliciclastic-prone supersequence 1 (Lower Cambrian Chilhowee Group fluvial rift clastics grading up into shelf siliciclastics) underlies the passive margin carbonates. Supersequence 2 consists of the Lower Cambrian Shady Dolomite–Rome-Waynesboro Formations. This is a shallowing-upward ramp succession of thinly bedded to nodular lime mudstones up into carbonate mud-mound facies, overlain by lowstand quartzose carbonates, and then a rimmed shelf succession capped by highly cyclic regressive carbonates and red beds (Rome-Waynesboro Formations). Foreslope facies include megabreccias, grainstone, and thin-bedded carbonate turbidites and deep-water rhythmites. Supersequence 3 rests on a major unconformity and consists of a Middle Cambrian differentiated rimmed shelf carbonate with highly cyclic facies (Elbrook Formation) extending in from the rim and passing via an oolitic ramp into a large structurally controlled intrashelf basin (Conasauga Shale). Filling of the intrashelf basin caused widespread deposition of thin quartz sandstones at the base of supersequence 4, overlain by widespread cyclic carbonates (Upper Cambrian lower Knox Group Copper Ridge Dolomite in the south; Conococheague Formation in the north). Supersequence 5 (Lower Ordovician upper Knox in the south; Lower to Middle Ordovician Beekmantown Group in the north) has a basal quartz sandstone-prone unit, overlain by cyclic ramp carbonates, that grade downdip into thrombolite grainstone and then storm

  2. An Early Cambrian tunicate from China.

    PubMed

    Shu, D G; Chen, L; Han, J; Zhang, X L

    2001-05-24

    Like the Burgess Shales of Canada, the Chengjiang Lagerstätte from the Lower Cambrian of China is renowned for the detailed preservation as fossils of delicate, soft-bodied creatures, providing an insight into the Cambrian explosion. The fossils of possible hemichordate chordates and vertebrates have attracted particular attention. Tunicates, or urochordates, comprise the most basal chordate clade, and details of their evolution could be important in understanding the sequence of character acquisition that led to the emergence of chordates and vertebrates. However, definitive fossils of tunicates from the Cambrian are scarce or debatable. Here we report a probable tunicate Cheungkongella ancestralis from the Chengjiang fauna. It resembles the extant ascidian tunicate genus Styela whose morphology could be useful in understanding the origin of the vertebrates. PMID:11373678

  3. Hydrogeology of the Potsdam Sandstone in northern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Franzi, David A.; Romanowicz, Edwin A.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2010-01-01

    The Potsdam Sandstone of Cambrian age forms a transboundary aquifer that extends across northern New York and into southern Quebec. The Potsdam Sandstone is a gently dipping sequence of arkose, subarkose, and orthoquartzite that unconformably overlies Precambrian metamorphic bedrock. The Potsdam irregularly grades upward over a thickness of 450 m from a heterogeneous feldspathic and argillaceous rock to a homogeneous, quartz-rich and matrix-poor rock. The hydrogeological framework of the Potsdam Sandstone was investigated through an analysis of records from 1,500 wells and geophysical logs from 40 wells, and through compilation of GIS coverages of bedrock and surficial geology, examination of bedrock cores, and construction of hydrogeological sections. The upper several metres of the sandstone typically is weathered and fractured and, where saturated, readily transmits groundwater. Bedding-related fractures in the sandstone commonly form sub-horizontal flow zones of relatively high transmissivity. The vertical distribution of sub-horizontal flow zones is variable; spacings of less than 10 m are common. Transmissivity of individual flow zones may be more than 100 m2/d but typically is less than 10 m2/d. High angle fractures, including joints and faults, locally provide vertical hydraulic connection between flow zones. Hydraulic head gradients in the aquifer commonly are downward; a laterally extensive series of sub-horizontal flow zones serve as drains for the groundwater flow system. Vertical hydraulic head differences between shallow and deep flow zones range from 1 m to more than 20 m. The maximum head differences are in recharge areas upgradient from the area where the Chateauguay and Chazy Rivers, and their tributaries, have cut into till and bedrock. Till overlies the sandstone in much of the study area; its thickness is generally greatest in the western part, where it may exceed 50 m. A discontinuous belt of bedrock pavements stripped of glacial drift extends

  4. Collective behavior in an early Cambrian arthropod.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xian-Guang; Siveter, Derek J; Aldridge, Richard J; Siveter, David J

    2008-10-10

    Examples that indicate collective behavior in the fossil record are rare. A group association of specimens that belong to a previously unknown arthropod from the Chengjiang Lagerstätte, China, provides evidence that such behavior was present in the early Cambrian (about 525 million years ago), coincident with the earliest extensive diversification of the Metazoa, the so-called Cambrian explosion event. The chainlike form of these specimens is unique for any arthropod, fossil or living, and most likely represents behavior associated with migration. PMID:18845748

  5. Burial dolomitization of Lower Cambrian platform margin, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, R.J.; Read, J.F.

    1989-03-01

    Shady Dolomite platform carbonates (Lower Cambrian) record several episodes of dolomite replacement and cementation during deep burial. Rare relict nonluminescent dolomite cores (zone 1) were replaced and overgrown by dark orange-red cathodoluminescent (CL) dolomite (zone 2A), the dominant replacement phase. Zone 2A dolomite was corroded, fractured, brecciated, and overgrown by Mississippi-Valley-type or lead-zinc minerals. Dark orange-red CL saddle dolomite (zone 2B) precipitated after mineralization and was fractured, corroded, and overgrown by bright orange-red CL saddle dolomite (zone 3). Cementation by later dark orange-red CL saddle dolomite (zone 4) was followed by quartz, calcite, and dedolomite. Only late-stage dolomite (zones 3 and 4) and calcite cement have elevated /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values (0.7103-0.7111) relative to marine carbonate and earlier dolomites (0.7090-0.7097), recording influx of radiogenic strontium-enriched fluids during late Paleozoic thrusting. Although the replacement dolomites are buried, it is unclear whether they replaced limestone or an unstable near-surface precursor dolomite. If a precursor dolomite were present, it was completely overprinted during burial diagenesis, preserving no trace of its initial composition.

  6. Diversity partitioning during the Cambrian radiation.

    PubMed

    Na, Lin; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-04-14

    The fossil record offers unique insights into the environmental and geographic partitioning of biodiversity during global diversifications. We explored biodiversity patterns during the Cambrian radiation, the most dramatic radiation in Earth history. We assessed how the overall increase in global diversity was partitioned between within-community (alpha) and between-community (beta) components and how beta diversity was partitioned among environments and geographic regions. Changes in gamma diversity in the Cambrian were chiefly driven by changes in beta diversity. The combined trajectories of alpha and beta diversity during the initial diversification suggest low competition and high predation within communities. Beta diversity has similar trajectories both among environments and geographic regions, but turnover between adjacent paleocontinents was probably the main driver of diversification. Our study elucidates that global biodiversity during the Cambrian radiation was driven by niche contraction at local scales and vicariance at continental scales. The latter supports previous arguments for the importance of plate tectonics in the Cambrian radiation, namely the breakup of Pannotia. PMID:25825755

  7. Diversity partitioning during the Cambrian radiation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Lin; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record offers unique insights into the environmental and geographic partitioning of biodiversity during global diversifications. We explored biodiversity patterns during the Cambrian radiation, the most dramatic radiation in Earth history. We assessed how the overall increase in global diversity was partitioned between within-community (alpha) and between-community (beta) components and how beta diversity was partitioned among environments and geographic regions. Changes in gamma diversity in the Cambrian were chiefly driven by changes in beta diversity. The combined trajectories of alpha and beta diversity during the initial diversification suggest low competition and high predation within communities. Beta diversity has similar trajectories both among environments and geographic regions, but turnover between adjacent paleocontinents was probably the main driver of diversification. Our study elucidates that global biodiversity during the Cambrian radiation was driven by niche contraction at local scales and vicariance at continental scales. The latter supports previous arguments for the importance of plate tectonics in the Cambrian radiation, namely the breakup of Pannotia. PMID:25825755

  8. Further Evidence for Unusual Geomagnetic Field Behavior Around the Precambrian-Cambrian Boundary from new Siberian paleomagnetic and magnetostratigraphic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V.; Rud'ko, S.; Shatsillo, A.; Gallet, Y.; Kouznetsov, N.

    2015-12-01

    Since paleomagnetic studies have focused on Late Precambrian-Early Paleozoic geodynamics of the Siberian platform, apparently irreconcilable paleomagnetic poles have been obtained. We will first report on recent paleomagnetic results dated to the Late Ediacaran-Nemakit Daldynian (latemost Precambrian-Lowermost Cambrian) and Tommotian-Atdabanian (Lower Cambrian) periods obtained from the southwestern and southeastern margins of the Siberian platform. Whereas the poles of the older time interval lie close to Madagascar, Tommotian-Atdabanian poles are lying to the south of Australia, as other Cambrian poles previously obtained by Khramov and co-authors. Such a large angular difference in pole position could be explained either by True Polar Wander or by the occurrence of abnormal geomagnetic field behavior around the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary. Furthermore, a 60-m thick sequence of red siltstones and sandstones of the Ediacaran Lopata Formation, that crops out along the Teya river in the Yenisey Ridge region (Western margin of the Siberian platform), was sampled for magnetostratigraphy. Rock magnetic analyses and thermal demagnetization reveal a magnetization dominantly carried by hematite, with the coexistence of antiparallel components of magnetization in some samples. The magnetization isolated over the highest unblocking temperatures is regarded as the characteristic component. It defines numerous magnetic polarity intervals with antipodal directions. According to reasonable sedimentation rates expected for the lithology of the Lopata Formation, this high number of magnetozones most probably indicates the occurrence of an extremely high magnetic reversal frequency during at least a part of the Ediacaran. This result confirms other magnetostratigraphic data previously obtained in North-Western Russia and Urals. Altogether, the paleomagnetic and magnetostratigraphic results provide evidence supporting the unusual geomagnetic field behavior around the Precambrian-Cambrian

  9. Evaluating the relationship between the carbon and sulfur cycles in the later Cambrian ocean: An example from the Port au Port Group, western Newfoundland, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtgen, Matthew T.; Pruss, Sara B.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2009-05-01

    We present a high-resolution δ34S (sulfate and pyrite) and δ13C carbonate record from the Middle-Upper Cambrian Port au Port Group, a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic succession exposed in western Newfoundland, Canada. The results illustrate systematic δ34S sulfate shifts of > 15‰ over relatively short stratigraphic intervals (10 m, likely < 1 m.y.), low average Δ 34S sulfate-pyrite (ca. 23‰) and a generally positive coupling between changes in δ13C carbonate and δ34S sulfate. Together, these results indicate that Middle to Late Cambrian sulfate concentrations were low and that the sulfate reservoir was more sensitive to change than it was in either terminal Neoproterozoic or Cenozoic oceans. However, a simple carbon (C) and sulfur (S) isotope box model of the Late Cambrian ocean illustrates that low sulfate concentrations alone fail to account for the > 15‰ δ34S sulfate shifts recognized in Port au Port strata. Such large shifts can be generated only if fluctuating oceanic redox is invoked; marine anoxia forces reduced C/S burial and elevated Δ 34S, driving larger δ34S changes per mole of organic carbon buried. The conclusion that later Cambrian oceans featured both low sulfate levels and widespread subsurface anoxia supports hypotheses that link fluctuating marine redox conditions in the delayed recovery of skeletal animals and metazoan reefs from late Early Cambrian extinction.

  10. A new formal perspective on 'Cambrian explosions'.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2014-01-01

    The 'Cambrian explosion' 500 Myr ago saw a relatively sudden proliferation of organism Bauplan and ecosystem niche structure that continues to haunt evolutionary biology. Here, adapting standard methods from information theory and statistical mechanics, we model the phenomenon as a noise-driven phase transition, in the context of deep-time relaxation of current path-dependent evolutionary constraints. The result is analogous to recent suggestions that multiple 'explosions' of increasing complexity in the genetic code were driven by rising intensities of available metabolic free energy. In the absence of severe path-dependent lock-in, 'Cambrian explosions' are standard features of blind evolutionary process, representing outliers in the ongoing routine of evolutionary punctuated equilibrium. PMID:24439546

  11. Tubicolous enteropneusts from the Cambrian period.

    PubMed

    Caron, Jean-Bernard; Morris, Simon Conway; Cameron, Christopher B

    2013-03-28

    Hemichordates are a marine group that, apart from one monospecific pelagic larval form, are represented by the vermiform enteropneusts and minute colonial tube-dwelling pterobranchs. Together with echinoderms, they comprise the clade Ambulacraria. Despite their restricted diversity, hemichordates provide important insights into early deuterostome evolution, notably because of their pharyngeal gill slits. Hemichordate phylogeny has long remained problematic, not least because the nature of any transitional form that might serve to link the anatomically disparate enteropneusts and pterobranchs is conjectural. Hence, inter-relationships have also remained controversial. For example, pterobranchs have sometimes been compared to ancestral echinoderms. Molecular data identify enteropneusts as paraphyletic, and harrimaniids as the sister group of pterobranchs. Recent molecular phylogenies suggest that enteropneusts are probably basal within hemichordates, contrary to previous views, but otherwise provide little guidance as to the nature of the primitive hemichordate. In addition, the hemichordate fossil record is almost entirely restricted to peridermal skeletons of pterobranchs, notably graptolites. Owing to their low preservational potentials, fossil enteropneusts are exceedingly rare, and throw no light on either hemichordate phylogeny or the proposed harrimaniid-pterobranch transition. Here we describe an enteropneust, Spartobranchus tenuis (Walcott, 1911), from the Middle Cambrian-period (Series 3, Stage 5) Burgess Shale. It is remarkably similar to the extant harrimaniids, but differs from all known enteropneusts in that it is associated with a fibrous tube that is sometimes branched. We suggest that this is the precursor of the pterobranch periderm, and supports the hypothesis that pterobranchs are miniaturized and derived from an enteropneust-like worm. It also shows that the periderm was acquired before size reduction and acquisition of feeding tentacles, and

  12. Proposed reassessment of the Cambrian GSSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Loren E.; Peng, Shanchi; Zhu, Maoyan; Xiao, Shuhai; Ahlberg, Per

    2014-10-01

    Since the time of its ratification in 1992, the Cambrian GSSP, 2.3 m above the base of Member 2A (Quaco Road Member) of the Chapel Island Formation, Fortune Head section, Newfoundland, Canada, has been challenged as posing an ambiguous correlation level. Difficulties have been encountered in precisely correlating the horizon coinciding with the GSSP to strata on most paleocontinents, but especially to Siberia and South China (Gondwana). The GSSP point, which was intended to coincide with the base of the Treptichnus pedum (formerly Phycodes pedum or Trichophycus pedum) Ichnozone at the FAD of the trace fossil T. pedum, occurs above the first appearance of the trace in the stratotype section. Trace fossils of other forms in the stratotype provide a means of bracketing the position of the GSSP, but are imprecise guides for correlation globally. Other chronostratigraphic guides are unavailable at the stratotype because of a dominance of coarse siliciclastic lithologies and metamorphic overprint. To facilitate global correlation of the Cambrian base and ensure nomenclatural stability to the extent possible, discussion of the merits and perceived weaknesses of the Cambrian GSSP is sought. Possible solutions to the problems surrounding the current GSSP definition are addressed in hopes that the global scientific community will actively participate in developing a well-reasoned, practical solution that will stand the test of time.

  13. Did gamma ray burst induce Cambrian explosion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Ruffini, R.

    2015-06-01

    One longstanding mystery in bio-evolution since Darwin's time is the origin of the Cambrian explosion that happened around 540 million years ago (Mya), where an extremely rapid increase of species occurred. Here we suggest that a nearby GRB event 500 parsecs away, which should occur about once per 5 Gy, might have triggered the Cambrian explosion. Due to a relatively lower cross section and the conservation of photon number in Compton scattering, a substantial fraction of the GRB photons can reach the sea level and would induce DNA mutations in organisms protected by a shallow layer of water or soil, thus expediting the bio-diversification. This possibility of inducing genetic mutations is unique among all candidate sources for major incidents in the history of bio-evolution. A possible evidence would be the anomalous abundance of certain nuclear isotopes with long half-lives transmuted by the GRB photons in geological records from the Cambrian period. Our notion also imposes constraints on the evolution of exoplanet organisms and the migration of panspermia.

  14. Sedimentation and tectonic implications of Cambrian-Ordovician clastics, Renville county, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Mescher, P.K.; Pol, J.C.

    1985-02-01

    Cambrian-Ordovician clastics of the Deadwood Formation were studied in detail from Newporte field in Renville County, North Dakota. This small Cambrian-Ordovician oil pool was extensively cored, often to the Precambrian basement, allowing close examination of clastic deposition influenced by local basement tectonics. In Renville County, the basal unit consists of a well-rounded, fine to medium-grained glauconitic quartz sandstone. Paleohighs appear to have had a pronounced effect on Deadwood sedimentation. Sands, from quiet water settings, show poor to moderate sorting, are commonly finely laminated, and/or show traces of minor small-scale cross-bedding. In places, bedding planes are highly disrupted, suggesting intervals of intense bioturbation (Skolithos). Sands associated with paleohighs are clean, well sorted, and commonly friable. Their association with basement structure is suggestive of beach-barrier-bar sequences related to irregularly upthrown basement blocks. In one example, this clean basal sand is associated with an upthrown basement block and is sharply truncated by the pre-Winnipeg (early Ordovician) unconformity. The first unit above the basal sandstone in structurally lower wells is an anomalous conglomerate unit. Large angular basement clasts up to cobble size were viewed in core. This unit grades upward into a fine sand sequence and distally grades into a marine sand. It terminates abruptly in upthrown wells and indicates rapid fault movement and offset during middle Deadwood deposition, with development of localized fanglomerate sequences associated with fault scarps. Immediately capping this sequence is a dark-gray marine shale that thins depositionally toward paleohighs.

  15. Ichnofossils and their significance in the Cambrian successions of the Parahio Valley in the Spiti Basin, Tethys Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcha, S. K.; Pandey, Shivani

    2011-11-01

    The Spiti Basin exposes well preserved Cambrian successions in the Tethys Himalaya. The present ichnofossil assemblage is reported from the Debsakhad Member of the Kunzum La Formation. The ichnofossils includes the ichnogenera Bergaueria, Chondrites, Cruziana, Didymaulichnus, Dimorphichnus, Diplichnites, Helminthorhaphe, Merostomichnites, ?Monocraterion, Monomorphichnus, Nereites, Palaeopascichnus, Palaeophycus, Phycodes, Planolites, Rusophycus, Skolithos, Scolicia, Treptichnus, etc. along with annelid worm, burrow and scratch marks. These ichnogenera can be assigned to cubichnial, repichnial, pascichnial to fodinichnial behaviors. The ichnofossils reported from this section provide evidence regarding the developmental patterns during the early phase of life. In absence of trilobites, the present assemblage of ichnofossils is very significant in assigning the age of the Debsakhad Member. The abundance of ichnofossils in sandstone, siltstone and in shale beds indicate that the ichnocenosis is dominated by a high behavioral diversity ranging from the suspension to deposit feeders. Three lithofacies were observed in this section, they show a vertical disposition, which further reflects general upward coarsening trend. Ichnofossils are mostly produced by arthropods along with crustacean, polychaetes and polyphyletic vermiforms. Due to the paucity of body fossil, as well as microbiota in the lowermost beds of the Debsakhad Member, the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary could not be demarcated. However, the presence of Treptichnus and Phycodes can be considered as a horizon marker for the beginning of Lower Cambrian in this section.

  16. Paleoenvironmental constraints provided by paleowave reconstructions: Early Cambrian Chilhowee Group drift-stage sedimentation in the central Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, E.L.; Eriksson, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Early Cambrian Chilhowee Group in Virginia records the transition from the rift- to drift-stage of the Early Iapetus Ocean and forms the foundation for development of the overlying Cambrian-Ordovician carbonates. Calculation of wave parameters from vortex ripples of different scales provides insights into paleoenvironmental conditions existing along the trailing margin during development of the Chilhowee Group. Vortex ripples are recognized on the basis of their ripple symmetry index and ripple index and possess a linear relationship between ripple wave length and wave-orbital diameter. Applying linear wave theory to these bedforms permits reconstruction of maximum wave period, height, wavelength, as well as open ocean fetch and maximum wave depth (Clifton and Dingler, 1984). A coarse-grained sandstone facies contains two-dimensional, symmetrical, megaripples with an average wavelength of 60 cm. Fine-grained sandstone facies possesses two-dimensional, symmetrical, ripples with an average wavelength of 6.0 cm. Calculated wave parameters show that these two facies formed under distinctly different wave conditions. Small-scale symmetrical ripples were generated by waves with maximum wave periods of 2-3 seconds in maximum water depths of 5-9 m. Calculated wave fetches for the megaripples represent the minimum size of the basin. Greater period waves may have been present along the trailing Chilhowee margin but are not recorded as symmetrical bedforms in the shallower-water facies. These calculations permit zonation of shelf sediments on the basis of either wave period or maximum after depth.

  17. Subsurface study of Lower Ordovician Prairie du Chien group and underlying Cambrian formations and their relation to pre-Glenwood unconformity in southern peninsula of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, C.T. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    Prior to discovery of commercial gas in Lower Ordovician Prairie du Chien sandstones at Falmouth field, Missaukee County, in April 1981, only 119 wells had reached underlying Cambrian rocks in Michigan's Southern Peninsula. The resulting deep basin drilling activity to January 1, 1987, has resulted in 17 Prairie du Chien gas discoveries in the north-central part of the Michigan basin and an additional 46 Cambrian penetrations. This study also utilized 235 Prairie du Chien partial penetrations. It is now possible to correlate with relative certainty the standard Cambrian formations of the subsurface of southern Michigan to wells within and on the other margins of the basin. These, in ascending order, are Mount Simon, Eau Claire, Dresbach, Franconia, and Trempealeau. Because of the previous lack of control, these units were commonly misidentified in northern wells in previous studies. The present study largely corroborates previous recent work. Four ascending formations of the Prairie du Chien Group were also correlated throughout the basin: Umlor, Foster, Bruggers, and Goodwell (newly proposed). Two type wells demonstrate the character of the Goodwell Formation. The Bruggers Sandstones has been further divided into four informal zones, based on extending correlations of thin, silty dolomite marker beds on gamma-ray logs from the Goodwell and Woodville fields area, Newaygo County. Gas is produced from these Brugger zones. Twelve detailed stratigraphic cross sections (using 183 wells) and a pre-Glenwood paleogeologic map demonstrate marked basin-wide pre-Middle Ordovician erosional truncation.

  18. Paleomagnetic results from the Cambrian and Ordovician sediments of Bornholm (Denmark) and Southern Sweden and paleogeographical implications for Baltica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Marek; Abrahamsen, Niels

    2003-11-01

    If apparent polar wander paths (APWP) cross, the question arises how to prove the older magnetization to be primary and not just a younger overprint. This problem is typically met in areas affected by percolating mineralizing fluids and/or heating due to a younger regional igneous activity. The Permian magnetic overprint is the classical example. Earlier paleomagnetic studies over the Lowermost Cambrian Nekso Sandstone Fm (NSF) of Bornholm (Denmark) yielded a characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) similar to the Permian directions for Baltica. Since a possible reason could be a chemical overprint, we checked whether this phenomenon did take place on a regional scale. Some samples therefore were collected from other Lower Cambrian clastics of Bornholm and Southern Scandinavia. In result we show that the well-grouped and stable ChRM of the NSF contrasts with fairly chaotic, soft, and badly preserved magnetizations of the Balka, Hardeberga, Mickwitzia, and Lingulid sandstones of Bornholm and Southern Sweden, thus not indicating widespread paleomagnetic overprint. We demonstrate that the ChRM of the NSF is most probably of syndepositional/early diagenetic origin and its similarity to the Permian direction for Baltica is only casual. We propose a normal polarity and a near-equatorial position on the Southern Hemisphere for Baltica in the early Cambrian time, as well as a more complicated trend of the APWP for this paleocontinent than envisaged by other authors. Paleomagnetic results from the Arenigian limestones of the Laesaa Formation (Bornholm) that yield excellently defined but most probably only secondary components are also presented.

  19. High continental weathering rate during Early Cambrian: Evidence from Os isotopic composition of Early Cambrian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S.-Y.; Yang, J.-H.; Ling, H.-F.; Feng, H.-Z.; Chen, Y.-Q.; Chen, J.-H.

    2003-04-01

    The paleo-ocean environmental change during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition is a key issue related to the causes for an explosive radiation of different metazoan phyla during Early Cambrian. The chemical and isotopic compositions of marine sediments and chemical precipitates such as carbonates, phosphorites, siliceous rocks, and black shales record the changing composition and physical conditions of the seawater in which these rocks accumulated. Organic carbon-rich black shales from marine environments are commonly enriched in a number of trace elements such as Ni, Mo, V, Co, Cr, Au, U, As, Pb, Zn, Cu, Re, and platinum-group-elements (PGE). Recent researches have demonstrated that Re-Os isotopes and PGE contents in black shales are useful proxies for seawater chemistry. It is believed that Re and Os in orgainc-carbon rich black shales are mostly hydrogeneous in origin which were largely sequestered from seawater at the time of deposition. In South China, the Lower Cambrian black shale sequence of the Niutitang Formation (and lateral equivalents) exists broadly several thousands kilometers. The lowermost sequence of this formation contain a thin sulfide ore horizon with an apparently unique and extreme case of metal enrichments such as Mo, Ni, Se, Re, Os, As, Hg, Sb, Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd. In this study, we conducted a preliminary investigation of Re-Os isotopes and Plantium Group Element (PGE) distribution patterns of the balck shales and intercalated Ni-Mo polymetallic sulfide bed from Guizhou and Hunan Provinces. The high rOs(t) values of the black shales indicate that the Early Cambrian ocean in Yangtze Platform had a highly radiogenic Os, possibly as a result of high continental weathering rate at that time. The Ni-Mo polymetallic sulfide ores within the black shales have lower rOs(t) values than the black shales, and they show similar REE and PGE patterns as the hydrothermal siliceous rocks within the Lower Cambrian strata, which suggest that the Ni

  20. Log interpretation of shaly sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The determination of water saturation from electrical resistivity measurements to evaluate the potential of reservoirs is a fundamental tool of the oil industry. Shaly sandstones are difficult to evaluate because clays are conductive and they lower the resistivity of the rock. A review of shaly-sandstone research concerning ''volume-of-shale'' equations reveals three theoretical categories: (1) laminated clay equations, (2) dispersed clay equations, and (3) equations that assume that the effect of the clays on the conductivity measurement is directly related to water saturation. A new model for predicting the relative amounts of laminated and dispersed shales and accounting for their effects according to their abundance can be used for any sandstone, clean or shaly. Equations representing each of the three theoretical categories and the new equation were tested on cored Wilcox sandstones from two wells. Cores were analyzed to determine the volume and distribution of clays and to correlate porosity with the well logs.

  1. Silcrete in the uppermost Cambrian and Lower Ordovician of the Wisconsin arch and Michigan basin - Implications for subaerial exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Silcrete within uppermost Cambrian strata and the Lower Ordovician Prairie du Chien Group delineates the basinward extent of subaerial exposure during three relative sea-level lowstands that exposed portions of the Wisconsin arch and Michigan basin before, during, and after Prairie du Chien deposition. Shallow-water Prairie du Chien carbonates and Cambrian sandstones were deposited in tropical, epeiric seas during relative sea-level highstands. Fabrics identical to Cenozoic silcretes consist of cryptocrystalline microquartz (chert), microquartz ({lt}0.02 mm), megaquartz ({lt}0.02 mm), and length-slow and length-fast chalcedony. Silicified crusts of oolitic grainstones and/or anhydrite nodule typically coat uppermost Cambrian and Prairie du Chien unconformities. Silicification associated with intra- and post-Prairie du Chien unconformities is generally restricted to within 5 m of the overlying unconformity. Highly permeable lithologies, such as oolitic grainstones, boundstones, and paleokarst breccias, were preferentially silicified during intra- and post-Prairie du Chien exposure. Reworked silcrete clasts typically overlie unconformities. Silcrete is a practical exposure indicator as it is easily identified in outcrop and well cuttings. Silcrete within uppermost Cambrian strata is generally restricted to the Wisconsin arch axis, but occurs as far east as western Michigan. Silcrete below the intra-Prairie du Chien unconformity indicates subaerial exposure of the entire arch and basin. In contrast, silcrete below the post-Prairie du Chien, pre-St. Peter unconformity indicates that exposure was restricted to the Wisconsin arch and western margin of the Michigan basin in eastern Wisconsin.

  2. Trilobite biogeography and Cambrian tectonic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrett, Clive; Richardson, Robert

    1980-03-01

    The biogeographic patterns of Cambrian trilobites are almost impossible to explain on an Early Palaeozoic Pangaea but may be explained by relative movements of several continental blocks separated by wide ocean basins. Realms, regions, provinces and sub-provinces are recognised by progressively agglomerating 450 faunal lists, based on 1371 genera, distributed through eleven time segments. The agglomerating method proposed, is a simple one that may be performed by hand or computer and provides Medial Cambrian results similar to those of Jell (1974) who used principal components and cluster analyses. Simplified results are obtained when time segments are combined or when only the largest list from each 10° (lat. × long.) tessera is used or when only illustrated papers are used or when only lists containing ⩾ 3, 5 or 10 genera are used. The program was also run with all of the presumably planktonic miomerids removed resulting in smaller, better defined provinces with few links between tectonic blocks. The number of polymerid-only realms is three in Albertella Zone times, four in Glossopleura Zone and Eluinia/Conaspis Zone times and five in all other time segments. The average five realms recognised tend to be restricted to one (or rarely two) of the major tectonic blocks: America (excluding Boston and maritime Canada), Europe (including Morocco), Siberia, China and Australia. The existence of the American realm in Argentina through most of the Cambrian and the unlikelihood of a dismembered Gondwanaland necessitates using the latitudinal control hypothesis of Palmer (1972). This hypothesis places the European realm in high palaeolatitudes, the American realm in low palaeolatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere, the Australian realm in low palaeolatitudes in the Northern Hemisphere and the Siberian realm in temperate palaeolatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. When the miomerids are included, connections between the peripheral ocean-facing regions of one tectonic block

  3. An Early Cambrian stem polychaete with pygidial cirri.

    PubMed

    Vinther, Jakob; Eibye-Jacobsen, Danny; Harper, David A T

    2011-12-23

    The oldest annelid fossils are polychaetes from the Cambrian Period. They are representatives of the annelid stem group and thus vital in any discussion of how we polarize the evolution of the crown group. Here, we describe a fossil polychaete from the Early Cambrian Sirius Passet fauna, Pygocirrus butyricampum gen. et sp. nov., with structures identified as pygidial cirri, which are recorded for the first time from Cambrian annelids. The body is slender and has biramous parapodia with chaetae organized in laterally oriented bundles. The presence of pygidial cirri is one of the characters that hitherto has defined the annelid crown group, which diversified during the Cambrian-Ordovician transition. The newly described fossil shows that this character had already developed within the total group by the Early Cambrian. PMID:21733871

  4. Cambrian-Ordovician Knox production in Ohio: Three case studies of structural-stratigraphic traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, R.A.; Wicks, J.; Thomas, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The Knox Dolomite (Cambrian-Ordovician) in Ohio consists of a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sequence deposited in a tidal-flat to shallow-marine environment along a broad continental shelf. Knox hydrocarbon production occurs in porous sandstone and dolomite reservoirs in the Copper Ridge dolomite, Rose Run sandstone, and Beekmantown dolomite. In Ohio, historical Knox exploration and development have been focused on paleogeomorphic traps within the prolific Morrow Consolidated field, and more recently, within and adjacent to the Rose Run subcrop. Although these paleogeomorphic traps have yielded significant Knox production, structural and stratigraphic traps are being largely ignored. Three Knox-producing pools demonstrate structural and stratigraphic traps: the Birmingham-Erie pool in southern Erie and southwestern Lorain counties, the South Canaan pool in northern Wayne County, and the East Randolph pool in south-central Portage County. Enhanced porosity and permeability from fractures, as evident in the East Randolph pool, are also an underexplored mechanism for Knox hydrocarbon accumulation. An estimated 800 bcf of gas from undiscovered Knox resources makes the Knox one of the most attractive plays in the Appalachian basin.

  5. Cambrian-Ordovician (500 Ma) alkalic plutonism in southwestern New Mexico: U-Th-Pb isotopic data from the Florida Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, K.V.; Clemons, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A major alkalic igneous suite in the Florida Mountains of southwestern New Mexico has been dated by the U-Th-Pb method on zircon as latest Cambrian to earliest Ordovician. The results firmly document the presence of lower Paleozoic alkalic plutons in southwestern New Mexico. Implications of these data include: 1) a diamictite that nonconformably overlies the plutonic complex is not Late Proterozoic as suggested by previous workers on the basis of correlation with similar deposits in the Cordillera; 2) the Bliss Sandstone, thought to be Late Cambrian in the Florida Mountains area, is clearly in depositional contact with the alkalic plutonic complex and must be younger than 503??10 Ma; and 3) the alkalic plutonism, a type commonly associated with extensional tectonics, may have considerable significance in deciphering the poorly understood early Paleozoic tectonics in this region. -from Authors

  6. Cambrian bivalved arthropod reveals origin of arthrodization

    PubMed Central

    Legg, David A.; Sutton, Mark D.; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Extant arthropods are diverse and ubiquitous, forming a major constituent of most modern ecosystems. Evidence from early Palaeozoic Konservat Lagerstätten indicates that this has been the case since the Cambrian. Despite this, the details of arthropod origins remain obscure, although most hypotheses regard the first arthropods as benthic predators or scavengers such as the fuxianhuiids or megacheirans (‘great-appendage’ arthropods). Here, we describe a new arthropod from the Tulip Beds locality of the Burgess Shale Formation (Cambrian, series 3, stage 5) that possesses a weakly sclerotized thorax with filamentous appendages, encased in a bivalved carapace, and a strongly sclerotized, elongate abdomen and telson. A cladistic analysis resolved this taxon as the basal-most member of a paraphyletic grade of nekto-benthic forms with bivalved carapaces. This grade occurs at the base of Arthropoda (panarthropods with arthropodized trunk limbs) and suggests that arthrodization (sclerotization and jointing of the exoskeleton) evolved to facilitate swimming. Predatory and fully benthic habits evolved later in the euarthropod stem-lineage and are plesiomorphically retained in pycnogonids (sea spiders) and euchelicerates (horseshoe crabs and arachnids). PMID:23055069

  7. Segmentation, metamerism and the Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Couso, Juan Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Data on the molecular and genetic basis of animal development, and on genome sequences, have been challenging our established assumptions about animal evolution for the last decade. Recent such data in animals of particular phylogenetic importance beg us to take another look at whether similarities in developmental and genetic mechanisms in current animals are the product of a common inheritance (homology) or convergent evolution (analogy). The evolution of segmentation, in particular whether segmentation and metameric bodies have arisen just once or several times in evolution, is a prime concern. Segmentation and metamerism are striking developmental and body organisations that exist, in varying degrees, in many complex animals, but the traditional view holds that this is the result of convergent evolution. Here, I review recent palenotological and developmental information and conclude that a metameric body plan is not only a likely ancestral character of bilaterian animals, but also a possible trigger for the Cambrian explosion in body morphology and complexity. This conclusion is supported by the phylogenetic distribution and prevalence of metameric phyla in the Cambrian, and the similarity of the genomes and segmentation mechanisms across current bilaterian phyla. PMID:19247939

  8. Cambrian bivalved arthropod reveals origin of arthrodization.

    PubMed

    Legg, David A; Sutton, Mark D; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Extant arthropods are diverse and ubiquitous, forming a major constituent of most modern ecosystems. Evidence from early Palaeozoic Konservat Lagerstätten indicates that this has been the case since the Cambrian. Despite this, the details of arthropod origins remain obscure, although most hypotheses regard the first arthropods as benthic predators or scavengers such as the fuxianhuiids or megacheirans ('great-appendage' arthropods). Here, we describe a new arthropod from the Tulip Beds locality of the Burgess Shale Formation (Cambrian, series 3, stage 5) that possesses a weakly sclerotized thorax with filamentous appendages, encased in a bivalved carapace, and a strongly sclerotized, elongate abdomen and telson. A cladistic analysis resolved this taxon as the basal-most member of a paraphyletic grade of nekto-benthic forms with bivalved carapaces. This grade occurs at the base of Arthropoda (panarthropods with arthropodized trunk limbs) and suggests that arthrodization (sclerotization and jointing of the exoskeleton) evolved to facilitate swimming. Predatory and fully benthic habits evolved later in the euarthropod stem-lineage and are plesiomorphically retained in pycnogonids (sea spiders) and euchelicerates (horseshoe crabs and arachnids). PMID:23055069

  9. Petrography, diagenesis and reservoir characteristics of the Pre-Cenomanian sandstone, Sheikh Attia area, East Central Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassab, Mohamed A.; Hassanain, Ibrahim M.; Salem, Alaa M.

    2014-08-01

    The diagenetic influence on reservoir characteristics was investigated for the Pre-Cenomanian (Early Paleozoic and Early Cretaceous) sandstone sequence in the Sheikh Attia area, East Central Sinai. This sequence can be distinguished into four formations: Sarabit El-Khadim Formation (Cambrian) at the base, Abu Hamata Formation (Cambro-Ordovician), Adedia Formation (Ordovician-Silurian) and Malha Formation (Early Cretaceous) on the top. The sandstones of Pre-Cenomanian sequence in the Sheikh Attia area are dominantly quartz arenites and subarkoses, where the quartz grains constitute about 82.3-98.4% of the framework composition with an average value of approximately 94% of the framework composition. Feldspars range in abundance from 0% to14.2%, with an average value of about 3% of the framework composition. The rock fragments constitute up to 9.8% of volume percent of framework grains, with an average of about 2.7%. Diagenetic events identified in these sandstones include compaction, cementation by calcite, quartz, clay minerals and iron oxides, dissolution and alteration of unstable clastic grains, and tectonically induced grain fracturing. Unstable clastic grains like feldspars suffered considerable alteration to kaolinite. The Pre-Cenomanian (Early Paleozoic and Early Cretaceous) sandstones possess good reservoir characteristics because they retain sufficient porosity and permeability in some intervals. These sandstones are characterized by porosity ranges between 3.80% and 27.60%, and have a permeability range from k ⩽ 0.03 mD, for tight sandstones to k ⩾ 50 mD, for the more permeable parts. The Pre-Cenomanian sandstones can be classified into four petrophysical flow units (megaport, macroport, mesoport and microport) with varying reservoir performances and are distinguished by comparable ranges of R35. Petrographic observations showed that the Early Paleozoic sandstones are texturally immature owing to the abundance of angular grains, non-uniformity of grain

  10. Early Cambrian palaeogeography and the probable Iberia Siberia connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, Alexander P.

    2002-07-01

    The end of the Proterozoic-beginning of the Cambrian is marked by some of the most dramatic events in the history of Earth. The fall of the Ediacaran biota, followed by the Cambrian Explosion of skeletonised bilaterians, a pronounced shift in oceanic and atmospheric chemistry and rapid climatic change from 'snowball earth' to 'greenhouse' conditions all happened within a rather geologically short period of time. These events took place against a background of the rearrangement of the prevailing supercontinent; some authors view this as a sequence of individual supercontinents such as Mesoproterozoic Midgardia, Neoproterozoic Rodinia and Early Cambrian Pannotia. Assembled in the Mesoproterozoic, this supercontinent appears to have existed through the Neoproterozoic into the Early Cambrian with periodic changes in configuration. The final rearrangement took place during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition with the Cadomian and related phases of the Pan-African orogeny. The distribution of Early Cambrian molluscs and other small shelly fossils (SSF) across all continents indicates a close geographic proximity of all major cratonic basins that is consistent with the continued existence of the supercontinent at that time. Subsequently, Rodinia experienced breakup that led to the amalgamation of Gondwana, separation of Laurentia, Baltica, Siberia and some small terranes and the emergence of oceanic basins between them. Spreading oceanic basins caused a gradual geographic isolation of the faunal assemblages that were united during the Vendian-Early Cambrian.

  11. Tectonic linkage between the Korean Peninsula and mainland Asia in the Cambrian: Insights from U-Pb dating of detrital zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeong Soo; Hwang, Mi-Kyeong; Ree, Jin-Han; Yi, Keewook

    2013-04-01

    The establishment of robust Paleozoic tectonic links between parts of the Korean Peninsula and cratonic blocks within China remains uncertain, despite their important implications for the overall tectonic evolution of East Asia. Here we provide new SHRIMP U-Pb detrital zircon geochronological constraints on correlations between sedimentary rocks of the Taebaeksan Basin (Cambrian-Ordovician) of South Korea and possible source rocks in the North and South China cratons. The detrital grain compositions and whole-rock rare earth element (REE) compositions of sandstones from the Cambrian formations in western (Sambangsan) and eastern (Myeonsan) parts of the Taebaeksan Basin suggest that the sedimentary provenance of these two formations is either a recycled orogen or a magmatic arc. The magmatic (eastern part) versus metamorphic (western part) origins inferred for the youngest populations (ca. 0.5-0.6 Ga) of detrital zircon grains from the Cambrian formations collectively indicate that rapid uplift and erosion of the source rocks for the formations took place soon after the associated magmatic and metamorphic events. Thus, we propose that the paleo-sedimentary environments in which these two formations were deposited may have been retroarc basins with the detrital zircons originating from magmatic arcs. The Early Cambrian formation in the eastern Taebaeksan Basin contains populations of detrital zircon grains that show prominent age peaks at ca. 2.0 Ga and ca. 1.8 Ga, and a distinct lack of Meso- to Neoproterozoic ages, whereas the Middle Cambrian formation in the western Taebaeksan Basin exhibits age peaks at ca. 1.0 Ga and ca. 0.7 Ga. These age spectra imply that the western Taebaeksan area at the margin of the North China Block may once have been near Gondwana, whereas the eastern Taebaeksan area may have been situated at the margin of the North China Block more distant from Gondwana.

  12. Siderite (FeCO3)—the Hidden (but Primary) Player in Iron Diagenesis of Non-Marine Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, D.; Kettler, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Siderite precipitates in reducing pore waters in which iron reduction exceeds sulfate reduction. Abundant siderite should be expected in non-marine strata in which a reductant was present. The Triassic Shinarump Member (Chinle Fm) and Cretaceous Dakota Fm are fluvial and contain siderite in outcrops of floodplain mudstones. Siderite is present in cores of Dakota channel sandstones. Rinded and jointed iron-oxide concretions, Wonderstone patterns, and rhombic, iron-oxide pseudomorphs are present in outcrops of these sandstones. Vascular plants growing on floodplains provided the reductant. Similar concretions, patterns, and pseudomorphs are present in outcropping eolian cross-strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone and in fluvial sandstone of the Cambrian Umm Ishrin Fm. Bleached sandstones indicate reductant was present in both units during late diagenesis. Because Jurassic deserts and Cambrian river systems lacked vascular plants, extra-formational methane was the likely reductant. We interpret the various iron-oxide-cemented phenomena of the Shinarump, Dakota, Navajo, and Umm Ishrin as products of siderite oxidation that accompanied exhumation. In the Navajo, large concretions are enclosed in thick sheaths of iron-oxide cement. Through-going horizontal and vertical joints cut sheaths. Outside concretion sheaths, joints are unassociated with iron-oxide cements, but inside the sheaths, thick cement zones are present on both sides of (still-open) joints. Joints were conduits for oxidizing water entering the concretions. Redox gradients formed on both sides of joints and iron oxide accumulated as Fe+2 diffused from dissolving siderite toward joints and O2 diffused away from joints. Horizontal joints formed <100 m from the land surface. Iron-oxide accumulations on the horizontal joints and on the vertical joints that abut them (see figure) are evidence that siderite oxidation is ongoing and linked to exhumation.

  13. Electromagnetic modeling of buried objects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.F.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, radar cross section (RCS) models of buried dipoles, surface steel pipe, and buried steel pipes are discussed. In all these models, the ground is assumed to be a uniform half space. The calculated results for the buried dipoles and the surface steel pipe compare favorably with those measured in the 1993 Yuma ground penetration radar (GPR) experiment. For the buried dipoles, a first-order RCS model is developed. In this model, a solution for an infinitely long conducting cylinder, together with a mirror image approximation (which accounts for the coupling between the dipole and the ground-air interface) is used to calculate the dipole RCS. This RCS model of the buried dipoles explains the observed loss of dipole RCS. For the surface steel pipe, a geometrical optics model, which includes the multipath interaction, is developed. This model explains the observed multipath gain/loss. For the buried steel pipes, a zero order physical optics model is developed. Also discussed is desert radar clutter statistics as a function of depression angle. Preliminary analysis, based on samples of Yuma desert surface profiles, indicates that simple rough-surface models cannot explain the observed average backscatter from desert clutter.

  14. New uppermost Cambrian U-Pb date from Avalonian Wales and age of the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidek, K.; Landing, E.; Bowring, S.A.; Westrop, S.R.; Rushton, A.W.A.; Fortey, R.A.; Adrain, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    A crystal-rich volcaniclastic sandatone in the lower Peltura scarabaeoides Zone at Ogof-odi near Criccieth, North Wales, yields a U-Pb zircon age of 491 ?? 1 Ma. This late Late Cambrian date indicates a remarkably young age for the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary whose age must be less than 491 Ma. Hence the revised duration of the post-Placentian (trilobite-bearing) Cambrian indicates that local trilobite zonations allow a biostratigraphic resolution comparble to that provided by Ordovician graptolites and Mesozoic ammonites.

  15. Hydrogeology of a Transboundary Sandstone Aquifer, Quebec - New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastev, M.; Lamontagne, C.; Morin, R.; Williams, J.; Lavigne, M.; Croteau, A.; Tremblay, T.; Godin, R.; Dagenais, M.; Rouleau, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Potsdam sandstone aquifer of Cambrian age straddles southern Quebec and northern New York in a region known for its abundant and good quality groundwater, a resource that recently has been coveted by several bottling companies. The potential conflicts and concerns of the mainly rural and groundwater dependent population about the possible overuse of this resource has led the Quebec Ministry of Environment, Geological Survey of Canada and the U. S. Geological Survey to jointly carry out a transboundary hydrogeological study of the Potsdam sandstone aquifer. The Potsdam sandstone aquifer consists of a lower unit of arkose and conglomerate and an upper unit of well-cemented quartz arenite. The thickness of the regional aquifer ranges from nil at the base of Adirondacks to more than 500 m near the St. Lawrence River. Glacial till, littoral sand and gravel, and marine silt and clay discontinuously overlie the aquifer. The aquifer's water budget is characterized by low rates of surface runoff and high rates of infiltration and sub-surface runoff. Major recharge areas are present at higher altitudes near and to the south of the border. Strong downward hydraulic gradients in these areas result in cascading water and water-level depths of more than 30 m in deep wells. Bedding in the Potsdam sandstone is gently dipping with fractures along sub-horizontal bedding planes forming major flow conduits. Bedrock folds and faults, mainly developed by east-west compression during the Appalachian orogenies, locally complicates aquifer geometry and groundwater flow. Hydraulic tests (pump, slug, flowmeter and straddle packer) indicate similar horizontal transmissivities in the lower and upper aquifer units. However, differences in lithology and structure of the aquifer units impose some apparent differences in hydraulic properties and groundwater flow patterns. In the lower unit, regional flow appears to be sustained by a limited number of laterally extensive bedding-plane fractures

  16. An Early Cambrian stem polychaete with pygidial cirri

    PubMed Central

    Vinther, Jakob; Eibye-Jacobsen, Danny; Harper, David A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The oldest annelid fossils are polychaetes from the Cambrian Period. They are representatives of the annelid stem group and thus vital in any discussion of how we polarize the evolution of the crown group. Here, we describe a fossil polychaete from the Early Cambrian Sirius Passet fauna, Pygocirrus butyricampum gen. et sp. nov., with structures identified as pygidial cirri, which are recorded for the first time from Cambrian annelids. The body is slender and has biramous parapodia with chaetae organized in laterally oriented bundles. The presence of pygidial cirri is one of the characters that hitherto has defined the annelid crown group, which diversified during the Cambrian–Ordovician transition. The newly described fossil shows that this character had already developed within the total group by the Early Cambrian. PMID:21733871

  17. Early Cambrian magmatism in the northeastern Siberian Craton (Olenek Uplift)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. I.; Kochnev, B. B.; Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Egorov, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Vendian-Lower Cambrian tectonomagmatic activation took place in the northeastern Siberian Craton, within the Olenek Uplift and in the Kharaulakh segment of the Verkhoyansk fold-and-thrust belt (the lower reaches of the Lena River). The Early Paleozoic volcanic activity in the Olenek Uplift is expressed in the form of basitic diatremes, small basaltic covers, and doleritic dikes and sills intruding and covering the Upper Vendian carbonate deposits. The material specificity of the Lower Cambrian basites and their mantle sources, jointly with the Vendian-Cambrian sedimentation history, gives reason to consider the Lower Cambrian riftogenesis and the associated magmatism as a consequence of the plume-lithosphere interaction in the northeastern Siberian Craton.

  18. Complexity and diversity of eyes in Early Cambrian ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fangchen; Bottjer, David J.; Hu, Shixue; Yin, Zongjun; Zhu, Maoyan

    2013-01-01

    Here we report exceptionally preserved non-biomineralized compound eyes of a non-trilobite arthropod Cindarella eucalla from the lower Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte, China. The specimen represents the oldest microanatomical evidence confirming the occurrence of highly developed vision in the early Cambrian, over 2,000 ommatidia in each eye. Moreover, a quantitative analysis of the distribution of eyes related to life habit, feeding types, and phyla respectively, from the Chengjiang biota indicates that specimens with eyes mostly belong to the arthropods, and they usually were actively mobile epifaunal and nektonic forms as hunters or scavengers. Arthropods took the lead in evolution of ‘good vision' and domination in Cambrian communities, which supports the hypothesis that the origin and evolution of ‘good vision' was a key trait that promoted preferential diversification and formed the foundation of modern benthic ecosystems in the early Cambrian ocean. PMID:24067397

  19. Reconstruction of early Cambrian ocean chemistry from Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hanjie; Fan, Haifeng; Zhang, Yuxu; Cloquet, Christophe; Carignan, Jean

    2015-09-01

    The Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition was a key time interval in the history of the Earth, especially for variations in oceanic and atmospheric chemical composition. However, two conflicting views exist concerning the nature of ocean chemistry across the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary. Abundant geochemical evidence suggests that oceanic basins were fully oxygenated by the late Ediacaran, while other studies provide seemingly conflicting evidence for anoxic deep waters, with ferruginous conditions [Fe(II)-enriched] persisting into the Cambrian. Here, two early Cambrian sedimentary platform and shelf-slope sections in South China were investigated to trace early Cambrian ocean chemistry from Mo isotopes. The results reveal that early Cambrian sediments deposited under oxic to anoxic/euxinic conditions have δ98/95Mo values ranging from -0.28‰ to 2.29‰, which suggests that early Cambrian seawater may have had δ98/95Mo values of at least 2.29‰, similar to modern oceans. The heaviest and relatively homogeneous δ98/95Mo values were recorded in siltstone samples formed under completely oxic conditions, which is considered that Mn oxide-free shuttling was responsible for such heavy δ98/95Mo value. Further, combined with Fe species data and the accumulation extent of Mo and U, the variation of δ98/95Mo values in the two studied sections demonstrate a redox-stratified ocean with completely oxic shallow water and predominantly anoxic (even euxinic) deeper water having developed early on, which eventually became completely oxygenated. This suggests that oceanic circulation at the time became reorganized, and such changes in oceanic chemistry may have been responsible for triggering the "Cambrian Explosion" of biological diversity.

  20. Tectonic Events May Have Triggered the Cambrian Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-11-01

    Major geological changes causing sea level rise at the start of the Cambrian period (540-490 million years ago) could have kick-started the Cambrian Explosion—a geological time period when most major phyla of life suddenly appeared in the fossil record. A paper published in the November issue of Geology (doi:10.1130/G35886.1) proposes a new geological mechanism for this event.

  1. New insights into the provenance of Saudi Arabian Palaeozoic sandstones from heavy mineral analysis and single-grain geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassis, Alexander; Hinderer, Matthias; Meinhold, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Saudi Arabian Palaeozoic siliciclastics cover a stratigraphic range from the Cambrian to the Permian. They crop out along the eastern margin of the Arabian Shield and are comprised of highly mature sandstones. Their heavy mineral assemblage reflects their mineralogical maturity and is dominated by the ultra-stable phases zircon, tourmaline and rutile. Less stable accessories are apatite, staurolite and garnet. Standard heavy mineral analysis of samples from two study areas in central/northern (Tabuk area) and southern (Wajid area) Saudi Arabia reveals distinct changes in provenance. Cambrian-Ordovician sandstones are first-cycle sediments, probably sourced from the 'Pan-African' basement. The overlying Hirnantian glaciogenic deposits consist of recycled Cambrian-Ordovician material. Devonian-Permian sandstones show a significant influx of fresh basement material, as attested by an increase of meta-stable heavy minerals. Single-grain geochemical analysis of rutile and garnet has proven to be a powerful supplementary technique. Rutile varietal studies reveal distinct differences in host rock lithologies between the two study areas: the Tabuk area contains predominantly felsic rutiles, whereas the Wajid area has more mafic input. Zr-in-rutile thermometry identified granulite-facies detritus in the lower Palaeozoic of the Tabuk area and has the potential to further define source areas. The distribution patterns of garnet host rock lithologies are remarkably similar in both study areas. They are dominated by amphibolite-facies metasediments and intermediate to felsic igneous rocks. Garnets derived from granulite-facies metasediments, which are scarce in the Arabian-Nubian Shield, also occur. Possible source rocks for high-grade garnets can be found in Yemen or farther south in the Mozambique Belt.

  2. Operation Sandstone: 1948. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhouse, L.H.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

    1983-12-19

    SANDSTONE was a three-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during the spring of 1948 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  3. A New Classification of Sandstone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Roger Clay; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Introduced is a sandstone classification scheme intended for use with thin-sections and hand specimens. Detailed is a step-by-step classification scheme. A graphic presentation of the scheme is presented. This method is compared with other existing schemes. (CW)

  4. Primitive soft-bodied cephalopods from the Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Smith, Martin R; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2010-05-27

    The exquisite preservation of soft-bodied animals in Burgess Shale-type deposits provides important clues into the early evolution of body plans that emerged during the Cambrian explosion. Until now, such deposits have remained silent regarding the early evolution of extant molluscan lineages-in particular the cephalopods. Nautiloids, traditionally considered basal within the cephalopods, are generally depicted as evolving from a creeping Cambrian ancestor whose dorsal shell afforded protection and buoyancy. Although nautiloid-like shells occur from the Late Cambrian onwards, the fossil record provides little constraint on this model, or indeed on the early evolution of cephalopods. Here, we reinterpret the problematic Middle Cambrian animal Nectocaris pteryx as a primitive (that is, stem-group), non-mineralized cephalopod, based on new material from the Burgess Shale. Together with Nectocaris, the problematic Lower Cambrian taxa Petalilium and (probably) Vetustovermis form a distinctive clade, Nectocarididae, characterized by an open axial cavity with paired gills, wide lateral fins, a single pair of long, prehensile tentacles, a pair of non-faceted eyes on short stalks, and a large, flexible anterior funnel. This clade extends the cephalopods' fossil record by over 30 million years, and indicates that primitive cephalopods lacked a mineralized shell, were hyperbenthic, and were presumably carnivorous. The presence of a funnel suggests that jet propulsion evolved in cephalopods before the acquisition of a shell. The explosive diversification of mineralized cephalopods in the Ordovician may have an understated Cambrian 'fuse'. PMID:20505727

  5. Evolution of Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate shelf, United States Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections and isopach maps (palinspastic) of the Cambrian-Ordovician continental shelf, US Appalachians, show that thickness and facies trends are controlled by the Adirondack, New Jersey, and Virginia highs and depocenters in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and by the Rome trough. Carbonate sedimentation was initiated with drowning of Early Cambrian clastics, deposition of carbonate ramp and rimmed shelf facies followed by drowning, then regional regression and deposition of Early to Middle Cambrian red beds and platform margin rimmed shelf facies. During subsequent regional transgression, the Conasauga intrashelf shale basin formed, bounded toward the shelf edge and along depositional strike by Middle to Upper Cambrian oolitic ramp facies and cyclic peritidal carbonates. Intrashelf basin filling and regional regression caused progradation of Late Cambrian cyclic carbonates and clastics across the shelf. By this time, the margin had a relief of 2.5 km. During the Early Ordovician, incipient drowning of the shelf formed subtidal carbonates and bioherms that passed up into cyclic carbonate as sea level oscillations decreased in magnitude. Numerous unconformities interrupt this sequence in the northern Appalachians. The earlier high relief rimmed shelf was converted into a ramp, owing to uplift in the basin, heralding approaching collision. Subsidence rates on the margin were low (4 cm/1000 yr) and typical of a mature passive margin. Shelf sedimentation in the southern Appalachians ceased with arc-continent collision and development of the Knox unconformity, which dies out into the Pennsylvania depocenter. Major exploration targets are in the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician Knox Group.

  6. Buried-hill discoveries in Damintan depression of North China basin

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoguang, T.; Zuan, H.

    1988-01-01

    The Damintan fault depression is about 20 km west of Shenyang, Liaoning Province, North China, and is a small Tertiary continental depression, covering only about 800 km/sup 2/. In the depression, the Tertiary system unconformably overlies upper-middle Proterozoic sedimentary rocks and Archean metamorphic rocks. The Tertiary system is up to 6,600 m in thickness. Source rocks are in the third and fourth members of the Eocens Shahejie Formation. Buried-hill traps were formed in Proterozoic carbonates and metamorphic rocks of the Archean. Fault block, stratigraphic, and lithologic traps also occur in sandstones of the Shahejie Formation, especially in those of the third member. Several buried-hill-drape traps occur in the depression. The various types of oil pole in each buried-hill-drape trap constitute a complex hydrocarbon accumulation zone. A series of oil fields have been found in the depression. The crude oil is characterized by high wax content and high pour point.

  7. Geochemical Insights Into Paleobiological Patterns of the Middle-Upper Cambrian Port au Port Group, Western Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruss, S. B.; Hurtgen, M.; Knoll, A. H.

    2008-12-01

    The Cambro-Ordovician interval is marked by significant changes in the marine realm, both biological and geochemical. The first mineralized skeletons appear near the Proterozoic-Cambrian boundary, but the major radiation of carbonate skeletonized crown group taxa occurred ~40 million years later in the Ordovician. Recent work on the carbonate-clastic Middle and Upper Cambrian Port au Port Group exposed in western Newfoundland has focused on quantifying skeletal abundances and analyzing δ13Ccarbonate and δ34S(sulfate and pyrite) to determine how environmental fluctuations may be tied to the abundance of skeletal organisms during the Cambro-Ordovician interval. The geochemical data show systematic shifts in δ34Ssulfate of >15‰ over relatively short stratigraphic distances (10 m, likely <1 Myr), low average Î"34Ssulfate-pyrite (ca. 23‰) and a general positive coupling between δ13Ccarbonate and δ34Ssulfate. In combination, these results indicate that Middle to Late Cambrian sulfate concentrations were low and that the sulfate reservoir was more sensitive to isotopic variability than it was in either terminal Neoproterozoic or Cenozoic oceans. However, a simple C and S isotope box model of the Late Cambrian ocean illustrates that low sulfate concentrations alone fail to account for the >15‰ δ34Ssulfate shifts recognized in Port au Port strata. These large δ34S shifts can be generated only if fluctuating oceanic redox is invoked, whereby marine anoxia forces reduced C/S and elevated Î"34S, driving larger δ34S changes per mole of OC buried. These geochemical data have been generated in concert with quantification of fossil skeletal abundances from the same Cambro-Ordovician sections of western Newfoundland. In general, skeletal abundance is low during the Middle and Late Cambrian and shows a small increase in the first half of the Early Ordovician. The major radiation of carbonate skeletal organisms occurs in the second half of the Early

  8. First results of U-Pb dating of detrital zircons from the Upper Ordovician sandstones of the Bashkir uplift (Southern Urals)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, N. B.; Belousova, E. A.; Degtyarev, K. E.; Pyzhova, E. S.; Maslov, A. V.; Gorozhanin, V. M.; Gorozhanina, E. N.; Romanyuk, T. V.

    2016-04-01

    The first results of U-Pb dating of detrital zircons from Upper Ordovician sandstones of the Bashkir uplift in the Southern Urals and U-Pb isotopic ages available for detrital zircons from six stratigraphic levels of the Riphean-Paleozoic section of this region are discussed. It is established that the long (approximately 1.5 Ga) depositional history of sedimentary sequences of the Bashkir uplift includes a peculiar period lasting from the Late Vendian to the Emsian Age of the Early Devonian (0.55-0.41 Ga). This period is characterized by the following features: (1) prevalence of material from eroded Mesoproterozoic and Early Neoproterozoic crystalline complexes among clastics with ages atypical of the Volga-Urals segment of the East European Platform basement; (2) similarity of age spectra obtained for detrital zircons from different rocks of the period: Upper Vendian-Lower Cambrian lithic sandstones and Middle Ordovician substantially quartzose sandstones.

  9. Ultrasonic isolation of buried pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinov, Eli; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Cawley, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Long-range guided wave testing (GWT) is used routinely for the monitoring and detection of corrosion defects in above ground pipelines. The GWT test range in buried, coated pipelines is greatly reduced compared to above ground configurations due to energy leakage into the embedding soil. In this paper, the effect of pipe coatings on the guided wave attenuation is investigated with the aim of increasing test ranges for buried pipelines. The attenuation of the T(0,1) and L(0,2) guided wave modes is measured using a full-scale experimental apparatus in a fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated 8 in. pipe, buried in loose and compacted sand. Tests are performed over a frequency range typically used in GWT of 10-35 kHz and compared with model predictions. It is shown that the application of a low impedance coating between the FBE layer and the sand effectively decouples the influence of the sand on the ultrasound leakage from the buried pipe. Ultrasonic isolation of a buried pipe is demonstrated by coating the pipe with a Polyethylene (PE)-foam layer that has a smaller impedance than both the pipe and sand, and has the ability to withstand the overburden load from the sand. The measured attenuation in the buried PE-foam-FBE-coated pipe is found to be substantially reduced, in the range of 0.3-1.2 dB m-1 for loose and compacted sand conditions, compared to measured attenuation of 1.7-4.7 dB m-1 in the buried FBE-coated pipe without the PE-foam. The acoustic properties of the PE-foam are measured independently using ultrasonic interferometry and incorporated into model predictions of guided wave propagation in buried coated pipe. Good agreement is found between the experimental measurements and model predictions. The attenuation exhibits periodic peaks in the frequency domain corresponding to the through-thickness resonance frequencies of the coating layer. The large reduction in guided wave attenuation for PE-coated pipes would lead to greatly increased GWT test ranges; such

  10. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  11. Thin film buried anode battery

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Liu, Ping

    2009-12-15

    A reverse configuration, lithium thin film battery (300) having a buried lithium anode layer (305) and process for making the same. The present invention is formed from a precursor composite structure (200) made by depositing electrolyte layer (204) onto substrate (201), followed by sequential depositions of cathode layer (203) and current collector (202) on the electrolyte layer. The precursor is subjected to an activation step, wherein a buried lithium anode layer (305) is formed via electroplating a lithium anode layer at the interface of substrate (201) and electrolyte film (204). The electroplating is accomplished by applying a current between anode current collector (201) and cathode current collector (202).

  12. A New Stalked Filter-Feeder from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Lorna J.; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Burgess Shale-type deposits provide invaluable insights into the early evolution of body plans and the ecological structure of Cambrian communities, but a number of species, continue to defy phylogenetic interpretations. Here we extend this list to include a new soft-bodied animal, Siphusauctum gregarium n. gen. and n. sp., from the Tulip Beds (Campsite Cliff Shale Member, Burgess Shale Formation) of Mount Stephen (Yoho National Park, British Columbia). With 1,133 specimens collected, S. gregarium is clearly the most abundant animal from this locality. This stalked animal (reaching at least 20 cm in length), has a large ovoid calyx connected to a narrow bilayered stem and a small flattened or bulb-like holdfast. The calyx is enclosed by a flexible sheath with six small openings at the base, and a central terminal anus near the top encircled by indistinct openings. A prominent organ, represented by six radially symmetrical segments with comb-like elements, surrounds an internal body cavity with a large stomach, conical median gut and straight intestine. Siphusauctum gregarium was probably an active filter-feeder, with water passing through the calyx openings, capturing food particles with its comb-like elements. It often occurs in large assemblages on single bedding planes suggesting a gregarious lifestyle, with the animal living in high tier clusters. These were probably buried en masse more or less in-situ by rapid mud flow events. Siphusauctum gregarium resembles Dinomischus, another Cambrian enigmatic stalked animal. Principal points of comparison include a long stem with a calyx containing a visceral mass and bract-like elements, and a similar lifestyle albeit occupying different tiering levels. The presence in both animals of a digestive tract with a potential stomach and anus suggest a grade of organization within bilaterians, but relationships with extant phyla are not straightforward. Thus, the broader affinities of S. gregarium remain largely unconstrained

  13. Giant submarine landslide grooves in the Neoproterozoic/Lower Cambrian Phe Formation, northwest Himalaya: Mechanisms of formation and palaeogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, E.; Schlaf, J.; Grasemann, B.; Argles, T.

    2008-04-01

    Giant groove casts have been found in the upper Proterozoic to Lower Cambrian Phe Formation (Haimanta Group), a siliciclastic sandstone/shale succession in the Tethyan Zone of the Higher Himalaya tectonic unit. The grooves are among the largest linear erosion structures related to submarine mass-movements observed in the geologic record. They are up to 4 m wide, about 0.2 m deep and can be traced for more than 35 m without changing their character. The grooves are straight, subparallel to cross-cutting striations with shallow semi-circular cross-sections and well-defined superimposed minor ridges and grooves. Groove casts exist on the soles of several sandstone beds within a 73 m thick logged section, commonly associated with flute casts. Their characteristics were compared with several other types of ancient and modern submarine linear erosion structures. A sand-rich, non-channelized basin floor depositional environment is inferred from the lithofacies, the combination of sedimentary structures, the lack of coarse-grained pebbly facies, the lateral continuity of beds, and the lack of channel structures. The grooves probably formed by laminar debris flows/concentrated density flows dragging blocks of already lithified sediment across the basin floor. When the bedding is structurally rotated back to horizontal, the groove casts show consistent North-South oriented palaeocurrent trends, with South-directed palaeocurrent directions indicated by flute casts. These palaeocurrent orientations contrast with previous palaeogeographic reconstructions of this area, which propose sediment delivery from the South. We therefore suggest a new "double provenance" model for the spatial relationship of late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian strata of the Himalaya, in which Lesser and Tethyan Himalayan age-equivalent sediment was deposited in a connected basin, where the former received detritus from the South, and the latter from a hitherto unknown source in the North. One possible

  14. A Cambrian origin for vertebrate rods

    PubMed Central

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Grillner, Sten; Cangiano, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates acquired dim-light vision when an ancestral cone evolved into the rod photoreceptor at an unknown stage preceding the last common ancestor of extant jawed vertebrates (∼420 million years ago Ma). The jawless lampreys provide a unique opportunity to constrain the timing of this advance, as their line diverged ∼505 Ma and later displayed high-morphological stability. We recorded with patch electrodes the inner segment photovoltages and with suction electrodes the outer segment photocurrents of Lampetra fluviatilis retinal photoreceptors. Several key functional features of jawed vertebrate rods are present in their phylogenetically homologous photoreceptors in lamprey: crucially, the efficient amplification of the effect of single photons, measured by multiple parameters, and the flow of rod signals into cones. These results make convergent evolution in the jawless and jawed vertebrate lines unlikely and indicate an early origin of rods, implying strong selective pressure toward dim-light vision in Cambrian ecosystems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07166.001 PMID:26095697

  15. Explaining the Cambrian "Explosion" of Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Charles R.

    2006-05-01

    The Cambrian "explosion" is a unique episode in Earth history, when essentially all the animal phyla first appear in the fossil record. A variety of environmental, developmental (genetic), and ecological explanations for this complex and somewhat protracted event are reviewed, with a focus on how well each explains the observed increases in disparity and diversity, the time of onset of the radiation, its duration, and its uniqueness. The increase in disparity (the origin of the phyla) and diversity are best understood as being the result of the interplay of the combinatorial bilaterian developmental system and the increase in the number of needs the first bilaterians had to meet as complex ecological interactions developed. The time of onset is constrained by the evolution of the environment, whereas its duration appears to be controlled primarily by rates of developmental innovation. The uniqueness of the event is either due to ensuing developmental limitation, to ecological saturation, or simply to the exhaustion of ecologically viable morphologies that could be produced by the nascent bilaterian developmental system.

  16. Quantitative analysis of sandstone porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, R.E. Jr.; Carpenter, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of changes in porosity associated with sandstone diagenesis was accomplished with digital back-scattered electron image analysis techniques. The volume percent (vol. %) of macroporosity, quartz, clay minerals, feldspar, and other constituents combined with stereological parameters, such as the size and shape of the analyzed features, permitted the determination of cement volumes, the ratio of primary to secondary porosity, and the relative abundance of detrital and authigenic clay minerals. The analyses were produced with a JEOL 733 Superprobe and a TRACOR/NORTHERN 5700 Image Analyzer System. The results provided a numerical evaluation of sedimentological facies controls and diagenetic effects on the permeabilities of potential reservoirs. In a typical application, subtle differences in the diagnetic development of porosity were detected in Wilcox sandstones from central Louisiana. Mechanical compaction of these shoreface sandstones has reduced the porosity to approximately 20%. In most samples with permeabilities greater than 10 md, the measured ratio of macroporosity to microporosity associated with pore-filling kaolinite was 3:1. In other sandstones with lower permeabilities, the measured ratio was higher, but the volume of pore-filling clay was essentially the same. An analysis of the frequency distribution of pore diameters and shapes revealed that the latter samples contained 2-3 vol% of grain-dissolution or moldic porosity. Fluid entry to these large pores was restricted and the clays produced from the grain dissolution products reduced the observed permeability. The image analysis technique provided valuable data for the distinction of productive and nonproductive intervals in this reservoir.

  17. The Buried Town of Beaver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jostad, Karen

    Local history as source material for environmental education is uniquely portrayed in this resource kit. Utilizing a Winona County Historical Society publication, "The Beaver Story" and accompanied by a teacher's guide, "The Buried Town of Beaver," and other teaching aids, a case study of the area can be developed. Based on the reminiscences of…

  18. A suspension-feeding anomalocarid from the Early Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Vinther, Jakob; Stein, Martin; Longrich, Nicholas R; Harper, David A T

    2014-03-27

    Large, actively swimming suspension feeders evolved several times in Earth's history, arising independently from groups as diverse as sharks, rays and stem teleost fishes, and in mysticete whales. However, animals occupying this niche have not been identified from the early Palaeozoic era. Anomalocarids, a group of stem arthropods that were the largest nektonic animals of the Cambrian and Ordovician periods, are generally thought to have been apex predators. Here we describe new material from Tamisiocaris borealis, an anomalocarid from the Early Cambrian (Series 2) Sirius Passet Fauna of North Greenland, and propose that its frontal appendage is specialized for suspension feeding. The appendage bears long, slender and equally spaced ventral spines furnished with dense rows of long and fine auxiliary spines. This suggests that T. borealis was a microphagous suspension feeder, using its appendages for sweep-net capture of food items down to 0.5 mm, within the size range of mesozooplankton such as copepods. Our observations demonstrate that large, nektonic suspension feeders first evolved during the Cambrian explosion, as part of an adaptive radiation of anomalocarids. The presence of nektonic suspension feeders in the Early Cambrian, together with evidence for a diverse pelagic community containing phytoplankton and mesozooplankton, indicate the existence of a complex pelagic ecosystem supported by high primary productivity and nutrient flux. Cambrian pelagic ecosystems seem to have been more modern than previously believed. PMID:24670770

  19. Rates of phenotypic and genomic evolution during the Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y; Soubrier, Julien; Edgecombe, Gregory D

    2013-10-01

    The near-simultaneous appearance of most modern animal body plans (phyla) ~530 million years ago during the Cambrian explosion is strong evidence for a brief interval of rapid phenotypic and genetic innovation, yet the exact speed and nature of this grand adaptive radiation remain debated. Crucially, rates of morphological evolution in the past (i.e., in ancestral lineages) can be inferred from phenotypic differences among living organisms-just as molecular evolutionary rates in ancestral lineages can be inferred from genetic divergences. We here employed Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic clock methods on an extensive anatomical and genomic data set for arthropods, the most diverse phylum in the Cambrian and today. Assuming an Ediacaran origin for arthropods, phenotypic evolution was ~4 times faster, and molecular evolution ~5.5 times faster, during the Cambrian explosion compared to all subsequent parts of the Phanerozoic. These rapid evolutionary rates are robust to assumptions about the precise age of arthropods. Surprisingly, these fast early rates do not change substantially even if the radiation of arthropods is compressed entirely into the Cambrian (~542 mega-annum [Ma]) or telescoped into the Cryogenian (~650 Ma). The fastest inferred rates are still consistent with evolution by natural selection and with data from living organisms, potentially resolving "Darwin's dilemma." However, evolution during the Cambrian explosion was unusual (compared to the subsequent Phanerozoic) in that fast rates were present across many lineages. PMID:24035543

  20. Evolution of Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate shelf, US Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Newly compiled cross sections and isopach maps of the Cambro-Ordovician continental shelf, U.S. Appalachians shows that thickness and facies trends are controlled by the Adirondack, New Jersey and Virginia and Alabama arches, and depocenters in Tennessee, Pennsylvania and the Rome Trough. Carbonate sedimentation was initiated with drowning of Early Cambrian clastics, deposition of carbonate ramp facies followed by drowning, regional regression and deposition of Early to Middle Cambrian red beds and platform margin rimmed shelf lime sands and reefs. During subsequent regional transgression the Conasauga intrashelf shale basin formed, bounded toward the shelf edge and along depositional strike by Middle to Upper Cambrian oolitic ramp facies and cyclic peritidal carbonates. During Middle Cambrian rifting, the Rome Trough was filled by thick clastics and carbonates. Intrashelf basin filling and regional regression caused progradation of Late Cambrian cyclic carbonates and clastics across the shelf. By this time, the margin had a relief of 2.5 kms. During the Early Ordovician, incipient drowning of the shelf formed subtidal carbonates and bioherms that passed up into cyclic carbonates which grade seaward into lime sands and reefs. Numerous unconformities interrupt this sequence in the Northern Appalachians. Early dolomitization patterns were controlled by regional highs. Subsidence rates on the margin were low (4 cm/1000 yrs) and typical of a mature passive margin. Shelf sedimentation in the Southern Appalachians ceased with arc-continent collision and development of the Knox unconformity, which dies out into the Pennsylvania depocenter.

  1. Petrogenetic and tectonic significance of xenocrystic Precambrian zircon in Lower Cambrian tonalite, eastern Klamath Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, E.T. )

    1990-11-01

    U-Pb analyses of zircon from a Lower Cambrian tonalite in the Yreka terrane, Klamath Mountains, California, reveal an inherited Precambrian zircon component within rocks that have generally been believed to be part of the ophiolitic Trinity complex. The isotopic data indicate that Lower Cambrian plutonic rocks in the eastern Klamath Mountains are probably not ophiolitic in origin. These Lower Cambrian rocks may be either tectonic blocks within a lower Paleozoic accretionary complex or part of a disrupted Lower Cambrian volcanoplutonic terrane.

  2. Petrogenetic and tectonic significance of xenocrystic Precambrian zircon in Lower Cambrian tonalite, eastern Klamath Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, E. T.

    1990-11-01

    U-Pb analyses of zircon from a Lower Cambrian tonalite in the Yreka terrane, Klamath Mountains, California, reveal an inherited Precambrian zircon component within rocks that have generally been believed to be part of the "ophiolitic" Trinity complex. The isotopic data indicate that Lower Cambrian plutonic rocks in the eastern Klamath Mountains are probably not ophiolitic in origin. These Lower Cambrian rocks may be either tectonic blocks within a lower Paleozoic accretionary complex or part of a disrupted Lower Cambrian volcanoplutonic terrane.

  3. Magmatism in a Cambrian Laurentian Plate Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. C.

    2008-12-01

    Evidences of the Cambrian Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen extend over 1000km from about Dallas out to the Uncompahgre Plateau in SW Colorado. The signature of this originally extensional feature can be traced geophysically, and in some places at the present surface, petrologically and temporally, by the presence of mafic rock. It appears to have been the intracontinental third arm of a plume-generated? triple junction which helped to dismember the southern part of Laurentia on the final break-up of a Neoproterozoic supercontinent. Other parts of Laurentia rifted away and are now found in the Precordillera of Argentina. Rift magmatism appears to have been concentrated nearer the plate edge during the breakup. Perhaps as much as 40,000 km3 of mostly subaerial silicic volcanics and shallow-seated granites overlay and filled the top of the rift in the area of SW Oklahoma. The rift fill below the silicic rocks is large, layered mafic complexes and smaller, layered, hydrous gabbros, the whole set appearing as a shallow AMCG complex. Unusually, direct rift sediments are not obvious. Furthermore, silicic and mafic rocks have identical Nd signatures. Finally, about 20 Ma after rifting ceased and later into the Paleozoic during sea incursion, overlying sediments are thickened 4X compared to equivalent units 100's of kms to the rift sides. This rift appears distinct from most modern rifts. Conclusions are 1) This was a hot, narrow rift; 2) Basaltic magmatism , not sedimentation, filled the rift; 3) Magmatic intensity varied along the rift strike; 4) Silicic rocks were generated mostly directly from new mantle-derived basalt liquids through fractionation, not melting of older crustal rocks; 5) Laurentian lithosphere was weak allowing centering of the Early/Middle Paleozoic large "Oklahoma" basin (pre-Anadarko) over the rift.

  4. A vanished history of skeletonization in Cambrian comb jellies

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Qiang; Xiao, Shuhai; Han, Jian; Sun, Ge; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Zhifei; Shu, Degan

    2015-01-01

    Ctenophores are traditionally regarded as “lower” metazoans, sharing with cnidarians a diploblastic grade of organization. Unlike cnidarians, where skeletonization (biomineralization and sclerotization) evolved repeatedly among ecologically important taxa (for example, scleractinians and octocorals), living ctenophores are characteristically soft-bodied animals. We report six sclerotized and armored ctenophores from the early Cambrian period. They have diagnostic ctenophore features (for example, an octamerous symmetry, oral-aboral axis, aboral sense organ, and octaradially arranged ctene rows). Unlike most modern counterparts, however, they lack tentacles, have a sclerotized framework, and have eight pairs of ctene rows. They are resolved as a monophyletic group (Scleroctenophora new class) within the ctenophores. This clade reveals a cryptic history and sheds new light on the early evolution of this basal animal phylum. Skeletonization also occurs in some other Cambrian animal groups whose extant members are exclusively soft-bodied, suggesting the ecological importance of skeletonization in the Cambrian explosion. PMID:26601209

  5. A vanished history of skeletonization in Cambrian comb jellies.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qiang; Xiao, Shuhai; Han, Jian; Sun, Ge; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Zhifei; Shu, Degan

    2015-07-01

    Ctenophores are traditionally regarded as "lower" metazoans, sharing with cnidarians a diploblastic grade of organization. Unlike cnidarians, where skeletonization (biomineralization and sclerotization) evolved repeatedly among ecologically important taxa (for example, scleractinians and octocorals), living ctenophores are characteristically soft-bodied animals. We report six sclerotized and armored ctenophores from the early Cambrian period. They have diagnostic ctenophore features (for example, an octamerous symmetry, oral-aboral axis, aboral sense organ, and octaradially arranged ctene rows). Unlike most modern counterparts, however, they lack tentacles, have a sclerotized framework, and have eight pairs of ctene rows. They are resolved as a monophyletic group (Scleroctenophora new class) within the ctenophores. This clade reveals a cryptic history and sheds new light on the early evolution of this basal animal phylum. Skeletonization also occurs in some other Cambrian animal groups whose extant members are exclusively soft-bodied, suggesting the ecological importance of skeletonization in the Cambrian explosion. PMID:26601209

  6. Proterozoic and early Cambrian protists: evidence for accelerating evolutionary tempo.

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, A H

    1994-01-01

    In rocks of late Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic age (ca. 1700-1000 million years ago), probable eukaryotic microfossils are widespread and well preserved, but assemblage and global diversities are low and turnover is slow. Near the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic boundary (1000 million years ago), red, green, and chromophytic algae diversified; molecular phylogenies suggest that this was part of a broader radiation of "higher" eukaryotic phyla. Observed diversity levels for protistan microfossils increased significantly at this time, as did turnover rates. Coincident with the Cambrian radiation of marine invertebrates, protistan microfossils again doubled in diversity and rates of turnover increased by an order of magnitude. Evidently, the Cambrian diversification of animals strongly influenced evolutionary rates, within clades already present in marine communities, implying an important role for ecology in fueling a Cambrian explosion that extends across kingdoms. Images PMID:8041692

  7. Cambrian explosion triggered by geosphere-biosphere feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bloh, Werner; Bounama, Christine; Franck, Siegfried

    2003-09-01

    A new hypothesis for the cause of the Cambrian explosion is presented. For that the evolution of the planet Earth is described by the co-evolution of the geosphere-biosphere system. Here we specify our previously published Earth system model for the long-term carbon cycle by introducing three different types of biosphere: procaryotes, eucaryotes, and complex multicellular life. They are characterized by different global temperature tolerance windows. The biotic enhancement of silicate weathering by complex multicellular life adds an additional feedback to the system and triggers the Cambrian explosion. The Cambrian explosion is characterized by a sudden increase of biomass and a rapid cooling, which amplified the spread of complex multicellular life. Cooling events in the Neoproterozoic, however, could force a premature appearance of complex multicellular life.

  8. Darwin's dilemma: the realities of the Cambrian ‘explosion’

    PubMed Central

    Conway Morris, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The Cambrian ‘explosion’ is widely regarded as one of the fulcrum points in the history of life, yet its origins and causes remain deeply controversial. New data from the fossil record, especially of Burgess Shale-type Lagerstätten, indicate, however, that the assembly of bodyplans is not only largely a Cambrian phenomenon, but can already be documented in fair detail. This speaks against a much more ancient origin of the metazoans, and current work is doing much to reconcile the apparent discrepancies between the fossil record, including the Ediacaran assemblages of latest Neoproterozoic age and molecular ‘clocks’. Hypotheses to explain the Cambrian ‘explosion’ continue to be generated, but the recurrent confusion of cause and effect suggests that the wrong sort of question is being asked. Here I propose that despite its step-like function this evolutionary event is the inevitable consequence of Earth and biospheric change. PMID:16754615

  9. Proterozoic and early Cambrian protists: evidence for accelerating evolutionary tempo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    In rocks of late Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic age (ca. 1700-1000 million years ago), probable eukaryotic microfossils are widespread and well preserved, but assemblage and global diversities are low and turnover is slow. Near the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic boundary (1000 million years ago), red, green, and chromophytic algae diversified; molecular phylogenies suggest that this was part of a broader radiation of "higher" eukaryotic phyla. Observed diversity levels for protistan microfossils increased significantly at this time, as did turnover rates. Coincident with the Cambrian radiation of marine invertebrates, protistan microfossils again doubled in diversity and rates of turnover increased by an order of magnitude. Evidently, the Cambrian diversification of animals strongly influenced evolutionary rates, within clades already present in marine communities, implying an important role for ecology in fueling a Cambrian explosion that extends across kingdoms.

  10. 47 CFR 32.2423 - Buried cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buried cable. 32.2423 Section 32.2423... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2423 Buried cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of buried cable as well as the cost of other material...

  11. 47 CFR 32.2423 - Buried cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buried cable. 32.2423 Section 32.2423... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2423 Buried cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of buried cable as well as the cost of other material...

  12. Black shale source rocks and oil generation in the Cambrian and Ordovician of the central Appalachian Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, R.T.; Burruss, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Nearly 600 million bbl of oil (MMBO) and 1 to 1.5 trillion ft3 (tcf) of gas have been produced from Cambrian and Ordovician reservoirs (carbonate and sandstone) in the Ohio part of the Appalachian basin and on adjoining arches in Ohio, Indiana, and Ontario, Canada. Most of the oil and gas is concentrated in the giant Lima-Indiana field on the Findlay and Kankakee arches and in small fields distributed along the Knox unconformity. Based on new geochemical analyses of oils, potential source rocks, bitumen extracts, and previously published geochemical data, we conclude that the oils in both groups of fields originated from Middle and Upper Ordovician blcak shale (Utica and Antes shales) in the Appalachian basin. Moroever, we suggest that approximately 300 MMBO and many trillions of cubic feet of gas in the Lower Silurian Clinton sands of eastern Ohio originated in the same source rocks. Oils from the Cambrian and Ordovician reservoirs have similar saturated hydrocarbon compositions, biomarker distributions, and carbon isotope signatures. Regional variations in the oils are attributed to differences in thermal maturation rather than to differences in source. Total organic carbon content, genetic potential, regional extent, and bitument extract geochemistry identify the balck shale of the Utica and Antes shales as the most plausible source of the oils. Other Cambrian and Ordovician shale and carbonate units, such as the Wells Creek formation, which rests on the Knox unconformity, and the Rome Formation and Conasauga Group in the Rome trough, are considered to be only local petroleum sources. Tmax, CAI, and pyrolysis yields from drill-hole cuttings and core indicate that the Utica Shale in eastern and central Ohio is mature with respect to oil generation. Burial, thermal, and hydrocarbon-generation history models suggest that much of the oil was generated from the Utica-Antes source in the late Paleozoic during the Alleghanian orogeny. A pervasive fracture network

  13. Geology and log responses of the Rose Run sandstone in Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, C.C.

    1996-09-01

    Approximately 75 wells have penetrated the Cambrian Rose Run sandstone in Randolph Township, Portage County, Ohio, about half of which should produce well beyond economic payout. Only one deep test (to the Rose Run or deeper) was drilled in this Township prior to 1990. Two separate and distinct Rose Run producing fields exist in the Township; the western field is predominately gas-productive and the east is predominantly oil-productive. Both fields are on the north side of the Akron-Suffield Fault Zone, which is part of a regional cross-strike structural discontinuity extending from the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area northwestward to Lake Erie. This feature exhibits control over Berea, Oriskany, Newburg, Clinton, and Rose Run production.

  14. A well-preserved Cambrian impact exposed in Central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, Maurits; Ekvall, Johan; Hagenfeldt, Stefan E.; Säwe, Brigitta; Sturkell, Erik F. F.

    1991-02-01

    The Lockne impact crater south of Östersund formed in the early Middle Cambrian with a diameter of 7 km. It is identified by its rim wall of crushed Precambrian basement granite, by fragments of impact melt, and by grains of shocked quartz. The exceptional preservation, in particular of the rim wall, is due to a complicated geological history, the first stage of which consisted of burial by marine sediments. This stage lasted until the Middle Ordovician, or over 50 million years. An early Caradoc lowering of the sea-level may have induced debris flows that stripped the rim wall of much of its sedimentary cover. Because normal marine sedimentation recommenced soon after this event, the structure was not seriously damaged, as it was buried again. The Caledonian orogeny emplaced an overthrust nappe as ultimate protection, which was removed by a recent erosion episode from all but the center of the structure. Structures formed by the impact of extraterrestrial bodies are very rare throughout much of Europe, because such structures are neither well preserved nor displayed in young mountain belts or sedimentary basins. However, northern Europe has several ascertained structures of this kind ( Svensson & Wickman, 1965; Svensson, 1968; Bruun & Dahlman, 1982; Kala et al., 1984; Flodén et al., 1986; Wickman, 1988). Unfortunately, the hitherto known structures are either poorly preserved or hidden by younger deposits. We are reporting the discovery of a well-preserved exposed and accessible impact structure that has escaped the notice of geologists although important features of it have been described and puzzled over by generations of researchers ( Wiman, 1900; Hadding, 1927; Thorslund, 1940; Lindström et al., 1983). The structure is located in the Lockne area to the south of Östersund in central Sweden. It has a diameter of 7 km and its center is near Tramsta on the northwest shore of Lake Locknesjön (Fig. 1). Its middle is covered by folded Lower to Middle Ordovician

  15. Electromagnetic scattering from buried objects

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Sorensen, K.W.

    1994-10-01

    Radar imaging and detection of objects buried in soil has potentially important applications in the areas of nonproliferation of weapons, environmental monitoring, hazardous-waste site location and assessment, and even archeology. In order to understand and exploit this potential, it is first necessary to understand how the soil responds to an electromagnetic wave, and how targets buried within the soil scatter the electromagnetic wave. We examine the response of the soil to a short pulse, and illustrate the roll of the complex dielectric permittivity of the soil in determining radar range resolution. This leads to a concept of an optimum frequency and bandwidth for imaging in a particular soil. We then propose a new definition for radar cross section which is consistent with the modified radar equation for use with buried targets. This radar cross section plays the same roll in the modified radar equation as the traditional radar cross section does in the free-space radar equation, and is directly comparable to it. The radar cross section of several canonical objects in lossy media is derived, and examples are given for several object/soil combinations.

  16. Dr. Cooper Curtice - Unknown worker in interpreting the Cambrian of Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yochelson, E.L.; Osborne, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Cooper Curtice was an assistant to C. D. Walcott from 1883-1886. In 1885, he spent four months, mostly in Alabama, measuring sections of Paleozoic rocks and searching for fossils, mainly in the Cambrian. In 1888, Walcott concurred with foreign authorities that the rocks called Middle Cambrian in North America were Early Cambrian in age and vice versa, requiring a new interpretation of Cambrian strata. Curtice returned to Alabama for geologic investigations in 1892, and again briefly with Walcott in 1895. Since that time Cambrian stratigraphy in the southeastern United States has remained virtually unchanged.

  17. Diagenetic influences on reservoir characteristics of Terry sandstone, Spindle field, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, P.D.; Tieh, T.T.

    1989-03-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Terry sandstones of Spindle field, Weld County, Colorado, were deposited as offshore bars in a shallow-marine environment. The Terry Sandstone Member of the Pierre Shale is presently buried at depths of 4500-5000 ft (1375-1525 m). The Terry sandstone reservoir was diagenetically created by selective dissolution of calcite cement and detrital material in downdip sands. Hydrocarbon entrapment occurred as a diagenetic/stratigraphic trap through preservation of cement updip and by shale boundaries laterally and vertically. The arkosic litharenites of the Terry sandstone have experienced four major stages of diagenesis: (1) early compaction and calcite cementation, (2) cement and grain dissolution and renewed compaction, (3) chlorite authigenesis, and (4) late illite and smectite authigenesis. In the study area, samples which have experienced dissolution of calcite exhibit porosities of up to 20%. However, permeabilities are low (0.1-11.0 md) due to the presence of pore-lining chlorite and the development of a pseudomatrix related to postdissolution compaction of glauconite pellets. The authigenic chlorite and glauconite pseudomatrix reduced porosity and blocked pore throats. Semilogarithmic plots indicate a logarithmic decrease in permeability with increased chlorite and glauconite content. Terry sandstone reservoir quality has been strongly modified by the diagenetic processes of cementation and compaction. These diagenetic processes resulted in the destruction of primary porosity, the formation of secondary porosity, and the subsequent partial occlusion of secondary porosity. Variations in reservoir properties and production potential within the sandstones can be ascribed to both primary lithologic contrasts and subsequent diagenetic modifications.

  18. Origin of dolomites in the Lower Cambrian Xiaoerbulak Formation in the Tarim Basin, NW China: Implications for porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Jiang, Zaixing; Hu, Wenxuan; You, Xuelian; Hao, Guoli; Zhang, Juntao; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Dolomites occur pervasively in the Cambrian strata in the Tarim Basin, NW China. Although the Cambrian strata have been deeply buried and affected by multiple phases of dolomitization, some intervals in the upper part of the Lower Cambrian Xiaoerbulak Formation developed high porosity. The goal of this study is to understand the origin of different types of dolomites and the formation mechanism of the porosity in the Xiaoerbulak Formation. The geochemistry of matrix dolomites suggests that they formed from middle rare earth element (MREE)-enriched anoxic pore fluids, close to or within the zone of iron reduction. The similar REE + Y patterns and overlapping δ13C values between pore-filling and matrix dolomites indicate that the fluids that were responsible for the precipitation of pore-filling dolomite apparently inherited the signatures of the formation waters that were stored in the host strata. Low δ18O values coupled with high Ba, Zn, and rare earth element (REE) content of pore-filling dolomites indicate that pore-filling dolomites were formed at elevated temperatures. The precipitation of authigenic quartz and saddle dolomites and high Mn content in pore-filling dolomites indicate that hydrothermal fluids that mostly originated from Cambrian basinal clastic units or basement rocks were involved. The mixture of formation water and external hydrothermal fluids is the most likely explanation for the formation of significant porosity and precipitation of pore-filling dolomites at depth. Breccia dolomite, zebra dolomite, and saddle dolomite occur mostly in areas that are close to faults, which suggests that hydrothermal fluids passed through strike-slip faults in this area when these faults were activated. The development of permeable layers in the upper part of the Xiaoerbulak Formation overlain by impermeable layers of the Wusongger Formation suggests a possible potential diagenetic trap. When the faults were activated, high-pressure and high

  19. Proterozoic structure, cambrian rifting, and younger faulting as revealed by a regional seismic reflection network in the Southern Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, C.J.; Drahovzal, J.A.; Sargent, M.L.; McBride, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Four high-quality seismic reflection profiles through the southern Illinois Basin, totaling 245 km in length, provide an excellent regional subsurface stratigraphic and structural framework for evaluation of seismic risk, hydrocarbon occurrence, and other regional geologic studies. These data provide extensive subsurface information on the geometry of the intersection of the Cambrian Reelfoot and Rough Creek rifts, on extensive Proterozoic reflection sequences, and on structures (including the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex and Hicks Dome) that underlie a transitional area between the well-defined New Madrid seismic zone (to the southwest) and a more diffuse area of seismicity in the southern Illinois Basin. Our principal interpretations from these data are listed here in order of geologic age, from oldest to youngest: 1. Prominent Proterozoic layering, possibly equivalent to Proterozoic (???1 Ga) Middle Run Formation clastic strata and underlying (1.3-1.5 Ga) volcanic rocks of the East Continent rift basin, has been strongly deformed, probably as part of the Grenville foreland fold and thrust belt. 2. A well-defined angular unconformity is seen in many places between Proterozoic and Cambrian strata; a post-Grenville Proterozoic sequence is also apparent locally, directly beneath the base of the Cambrian. 3. We infer a major reversal in Cambrian rift polarity (accommodation zone) in the Rough Creek Graben in western Kentucky. 4. Seismic facies analysis suggests the presence of basin-floor fan complexes at and near the base of the Cambrian interval and within parts of a Proterozoic post-Grenville sequence in several parts of the Rough Creek Graben. 5. There is an abrupt pinchout of the Mount Simon Sandstone against crystalline basement beneath the Dale Dome (near the Texaco no. 1 Cuppy well, Hamilton County) in southeastern Illinois, and a more gradual Mount Simon pinchout to the southeast. 6. Where crossed by the seismic reflection line in southeast Illinois, some

  20. Reconstructing the Avalon continent: Marginal to inner platform transition in the Cambrian of southern New Brunswick

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landing, E.

    1996-01-01

    A west to east, marginal to inner Avalonian platform transition, comparable to that in southeast Newfoundland and southern Britain, is present in the Cambrian of southern New Brunswick. The Saint John - Caton's Island - Hanford Brook area lay on the marginal platform, and its thick, uppermost Precambrian - lower Lower Cambrian is unconformably overlain by trilobite-bearing, upper Lower Cambrian. An inner platform remnant is preserved in the Cradle Brook outlier 60 km northeast of Saint John. In contrast to the marginal platform sequences, the Cradle Brook outlier has a very thin lower Lower Cambrian and has middle Lower Cambrian strata (Bonavista Group) not present on the marginal platform. The Cradle Brook Lower Cambrian closely resembles inner platform successions in eastern Massachusetts and Trinity and Placentia bays, southeast Newfoundland. A limestone with Camenella baltica Zone fossils on Cradle Brook seems to be the peritidal limestone cap of the subtrilobitic Lower Cambrian known in Avalonian North America (Fosters Point Formation) and England (Home Farm Member).

  1. Evidence of multi-stage faulting by clay mineral analysis: Example in a normal fault zone affecting arkosic sandstones (Annot sandstones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatier, Martine D.; Cavailhes, Thibault; Charpentier, Delphine; Lerat, Jérémy; Sizun, Jean Pierre; Labaume, Pierre; Gout, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Fault affecting silicoclastic sediments are commonly enriched in clay minerals. Clays are sensitive to fluid-rock interactions and deformation mechanisms; in this paper, they are used as proxy for fault activity and behavior. The present study focuses on clay mineral assemblages from the Point Vert normal fault zone located in the Annot sandstones, a Priabonian-Rupelian turbidite succession of the Alpine foredeep in SE France. In this area, the Annot sandstones were buried around 6-8 km below the front of Alpine nappes soon after their deposition and exhumed during the middle-late Miocene. The fault affects arkosic sandstone beds alternating with pelitic layers, and displays throw of about thirty meters. The fault core zone comprises intensely foliated sandstones bounding a corridor of gouge about 20 cm thick. The foliated sandstones display clay concentration along S-C structures characterized by dissolution of K-feldspar and their replacement by mica, associated with quartz pressure solution, intense microfracturation and quartz vein precipitation. The gouge is formed by a clayey matrix containing fragments of foliated sandstones and pelites. However, a detailed petrographical investigation suggests complex polyphase deformation processes. Optical and SEM observations show that the clay minerals fraction of all studied rocks (pelites and sandstones from the damage and core zones of the fault) is dominated by white micas and chlorite. These minerals have two different origins: detrital and newly-formed. Detrital micas are identified by their larger shape and their chemical composition with a lower Fe-Mg content than the newly-formed white micas. In the foliated sandstones, newly-formed white micas are concentrated along S-C structures or replace K-feldspar. Both types of newly formed micas display the same chemical composition confirmed microstructural observations suggesting that they formed in the same conditions. They have the following structural formulas: Na0

  2. An Early Cambrian problematic fossil: Vetustovermis and its possible affinities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-yuan; Huang, Di-ying; Bottjer, David J

    2005-01-01

    The Early Cambrian problematic fossil Vetustovermis (Glaessner 1979 Alcheringa 3, 21–31) was described as an annelid or arthropod. Anatomical analysis of 17 new specimens from the Lower Cambrian Maotianshan Shale at Anning, Kunming (South China) does not support its affinities with annelids or arthropods. Anatomical features instead resemble other animal groups including modern flatworms, nemertines and molluscs. The presence of a pelagic slug-like form and ventral foot, as well as a head with eyes and tentacles indicates a possible affinity with molluscs, but these characters are not present only in molluscs; some of them are shared with other animal groups, including flatworms and nemertines. For example, a ventral foot-like structure is found in nemertines, ‘turbellarians’, and some polychaete groups. The well differentiated head is seen in separate bilaterian groups, but among molluscs it did not occur before the evolutionary level of the Conchifera. Unlike the ctenia-gills in molluscs, the gills in Vetustovermis are bar-like. All the characters displayed in this 525 million-year old soft-bodied animal fail to demonstrate clear affinity with molluscs or any other known extant or extinct animal groups, but argue for representing an independently evolved animal group, which flourished in Early Cambrian and possibly in Middle Cambrian time. PMID:16191609

  3. Fossils, molecules and embryos: new perspectives on the Cambrian explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, J. W.; Jablonski, D.; Erwin, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    The Cambrian explosion is named for the geologically sudden appearance of numerous metazoan body plans (many of living phyla) between about 530 and 520 million years ago, only 1.7% of the duration of the fossil record of animals. Earlier indications of metazoans are found in the Neoproterozic; minute trails suggesting bilaterian activity date from about 600 million years ago. Larger and more elaborate fossil burrows appear near 543 million years ago, the beginning of the Cambrian Period. Evidence of metazoan activity in both trace and body fossils then increased during the 13 million years leading to the explosion. All living phyla may have originated by the end of the explosion. Molecular divergences among lineages leading to phyla record speciation events that have been earlier than the origins of the new body plans, which can arise many tens of millions of years after an initial branching. Various attempts to date those branchings by using molecular clocks have disagreed widely. While the timing of the evolution of the developmental systems of living metazoan body plans is still uncertain, the distribution of Hox and other developmental control genes among metazoans indicates that an extensive patterning system was in place prior to the Cambrian. However, it is likely that much genomic repatterning occurred during the Early Cambrian, involving both key control genes and regulators within their downstream cascades, as novel body plans evolved.

  4. Oceanic anoxia at the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroto; Watanabe, Yoshio

    2001-11-01

    The Precambrian-Cambrian (PC-C) boundary separates fossils representing two discrete evolutionary phases: the Neoproterozoic soft-bodied Ediacarian biotas and Cambrian small shelly faunas. The biological discontinuity is suspected to have been a result of mass extinction; however, recent discoveries of the Ediacarian biotas in Cambrian sediments have led to an understanding that the faunal change was gradual through the PC-C transition. Th/U ratios, which are high in oxidizing conditions and low in reducing conditions, show a considerable positive correlation with δ13C values at all studied sites of the PC-C boundary. This correlation indicates that reported δ13C variation across the PC-C boundary from numerous localities corresponds to redox variation in the depositional environment. The negative δ13C anomaly that occurs worldwide at the PC-C boundary, therefore, corresponds to the widespread development of an oxygen-deficient shallow marine environment. This finding suggests that widespread oceanic oxygen deficiency, which has been interpreted to reflect Phanerozoic mass extinction events, also occurred immediately before the Cambrian explosion.

  5. College Cambrian College Board of Governors Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Paula; Lafrance, Glenys

    Intended as a resource manual for new and continuing governing board members of College Cambrian College (CCC) in Ontario, Canada, this five-part guide includes information on board member orientation; the Ontario College System (OCS); the history, mission and operations of CCC; activities, responsibilities, and tenure of board members; and…

  6. Ediacaran matground ecology persisted into the earliest Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Buatois, Luis A; Narbonne, Guy M; Mángano, M Gabriela; Carmona, Noelia B; Myrow, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the Cambrian was a time of marked biological and sedimentary changes, including the replacement of Proterozoic-style microbial matgrounds by Phanerozoic-style bioturbated mixgrounds. Here we show that Ediacaran-style matground-based ecology persisted into the earliest Cambrian. Our study in the type section of the basal Cambrian in Fortune Head, Newfoundland, Canada reveals widespread microbially induced sedimentary structures and typical Ediacaran-type matground ichnofossils. Ediacara-type body fossils are present immediately below the top of the Ediacaran but are strikingly absent from the overlying Cambrian succession, despite optimal conditions for their preservation, and instead the microbial surfaces are marked by the appearance of the first abundant arthropod scratch marks in Earth evolution. These features imply that the disappearance of the Ediacara biota represents an abrupt evolutionary event that corresponded with the appearance of novel bilaterian clades, rather than a fading away owing to the gradual elimination of conditions appropriate for Ediacaran preservation. PMID:24675373

  7. Successful Integration of Seismic Reflection Data for Evaluating the Sequestration Potential of the Cambrian and Ordovician Strata of the Illinois Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leetaru, H. E.; Couëslan, M.; Brown, A. L.; Finley, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata form the most important carbon sink available for the sequestration of CO2 in the heavily industrialized Midwest of the United States. In the Illinois Basin, the three most significant suitable for sequestration are the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone, the Cambrian carbonate intervals in the Knox Group, and the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of these formations was based on data collected from the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin -- Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois. All three formations have significant potential. The Knox formation is composed of interconnected solution cavities that make CO2 plume prediction difficult. The St. Peter Sandstone is a potential sink but, at 52 m (170 feet) thick, it has less storage capacity than the Mt. Simon Sandstone. The Mt. Simon Sandstone is over 487 m (1600 feet thick) in the Decatur area with average porosities of 22% and permeabilities of 200 mD. However, individual intervals can have porosities as high as 28% and permeabilities of over a Darcy. Few wells have been drilled through these Cambro-Ordovician saline reservoirs because there are no recoverable hydrocarbons; therefore, seismic reflection data integrated with regional geologic models are absolutely necessary for evaluating potential sites and characterizing reservoirs with only one or two wells. Regional seismic profiles across the Illinois Basin were used to define areas of high and low risk for sequestration. Areas have been designated as high risk if the Mt. Simon Formation is thin or non-existent as a result of Precambrian topography or if it is a structurally complex area with extensive faulting. Seismic and regional well data suggested that the saline formation at Decatur, Illinois is an excellent sink for CO2. Seismic acquisition at the Illinois Basin -- Decatur Project has been challenging given that the site is located in close proximity

  8. Blast wave from buried charges

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Behrens, K.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-08-01

    While much airblast data are available for height-of-burst (HOB) effects, systematic airblast data for depth-of-burst (DOB) effects are more limited. It is logical to ask whether the spherical 0.5-g Nitropenta charges that, proved to be successful for HOB tests at EMI are also suitable for experiments with buried charges in the laboratory scale; preliminary studies indicated in the alternative. Of special interest is the airblast environment generated by detonations just above or below the around surface. This paper presents a brief summary of the test results.

  9. First U-Pb detrital zircon ages from Numidian sandstones in Southern Apennines (Italy): Evidences of African provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornelli, Annamaria; Micheletti, Francesca; Langone, Antonio; Perrone, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    Two samples of quartz-rich sandstones collected in the Numidian Flysch of Southern Apennines (Italy) have been studied to highlight the provenance of detritus using radiometric dating by LA-ICP-MS of detrital zircons and to compare the obtained ages with those of the Betic and Maghrebian Chains. The provenance of quartzose detritus from European or African Plates is still debated in these Chains, accordingly the ages of the detrital zircons can contribute significantly to discriminate the origin of the quartzose supply. The U-Pb zircon ages (n = 47) vary from 3047 ± 13 Ma (Mesoarchean) to 516 ± 19 Ma (Cambrian). The predominance of Paleo-Proteozoic ages (2500-1600 Ma) and the lack of Hercynian and Alpine ones suggest a provenance of the Numidian supply from North-African cratonic areas during the early-middle Langhian, when the Numidian successions of Southern Apennines were deposited. In addition, a cluster of ages at 773 ± 24 Ma and 668 ± 12 Ma in one sample and at 664 ± 17 Ma in the other sample, calculated on zircon domains with magmatic zoning, testify to an important contribution from Neo-proterozoic "granitic" rocks widely outcropping in the North-African Craton. The age data on detrital zircons from Numidian sandstones in Southern Apennines overlap those found in the Numidian sandstones widespread in the Betic Cordillera and in the Maghrebian Chain from south Spain to Sicily. This suggests that the entire depositional zone in which Numidian Flysch deposited, was fed from a southerly source represented by the African Craton where Archean, Proterozoic and Cambrian rocks widely crop out from the Atlantic coast to the Hoggar and Tibesti Massifs. Finally, it must be outlined that a Meso-Archean zircon age (3047 Ma) has been found in the Numidian Flysch of the Southern Apennines whereas in the Numidian Flysch of the Maghrebian Chain, zircons older than Paleo-proterozoic (1840 Ma) have not yet been found.

  10. Hydraulic relationships between buried valley sediments of the glacial drift and adjacent bedrock formations in northeastern Ohio, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyoum, Wondwosen Mekonnen; Eckstein, Yoram

    2014-08-01

    Buried valleys are ancient river or stream valleys that predate the recent glaciation and since have been filled with glacial till and/or outwash. Outwash deposits are known to store and transmit large amounts of groundwater. In addition to their intrinsic hydraulic properties, their productivity depends on their hydraulic relationships with the adjacent bedrock formations. These relationships are examined using a steady-state three-dimensional groundwater flow model through a section of a buried valley in northeastern Ohio, USA. The flow domain was divided into five hydrostratigraphic units: low-conductivity (K) till, high-K outwash, and three bedrock units (Pottsville Formation, Cuyahoga Group and Berea Sandstone). The model input was prepared using the data from well logs and drilling reports of residential water wells. The model was calibrated using observed heads with mean residual head error of 0.3 m. The calibrated model was used to quantify flux between the buried valley and bedrock formations. Mass balance was calculated to within an error of 2-3 %. Mass balance of the buried valley layer indicates that it receives 1.6 Mm3/year (≈40 % of the total inflow) from the adjacent bedrock aquifers: Pottsville Formation contributes 0.96 Mm3/year (60 %) while the Berea Sandstone 0.64 Mm3/year (40 %).

  11. Nonlinear vibrations of buried landmines.

    PubMed

    Donskoy, Dimitri; Reznik, Alexander; Zagrai, Andrei; Ekimov, Alexander

    2005-02-01

    The seismo-acoustic method is one of the most promising emerging techniques for the detection of landmines. Numerous field tests have demonstrated that buried landmines manifest themselves at the surface through linear and nonlinear responses to acoustic/seismic excitation. The present paper describes modeling of the nonlinear response in the framework of the mass-spring model of the soil-mine system. The perturbation method used in the model allows for the derivation of an analytical solution describing both quadratic and cubic acoustic interactions at the soil-mine interface. This solution has been compared with actual field measurements to obtain nonlinear parameters of the buried mines. These parameters have been analyzed with respect to mine types and burial depths. It was found that the cubic nonlinearity could be a significant contributor to the nonlinear response. This effect has led to the development of a new intermodulation detection algorithm based on dual-frequency excitation. Both quadratic and intermodulation nonlinear algorithms were evaluated at the U.S. Army outdoor testing facilities. The algorithms appear to complement each other in improving the overall detection performance. PMID:15759689

  12. Chemical detection of buried landmines

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Webb, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    Of all the buried landmine identification technologies currently available, sensing the chemical signature from the explosive components found in landmines is the only technique that can classify non-explosive objects from the real threat. In the last two decades, advances in chemical detection methods has brought chemical sensing technology to the foreground as an emerging technological solution. In addition, advances have been made in the understanding of the fundamental transport processes that allow the chemical signature to migrate from the buried source to the ground surface. A systematic evaluation of the transport of the chemical signature from inside the mine into the soil environment, and through the soil to the ground surface is being explored to determine the constraints on the use of chemical sensing technology. This effort reports on the results of simulation modeling using a one-dimensional screening model to evaluate the impacts on the transport of the chemical signature by variation of some of the principal soil transport parameters.

  13. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1991-12-01

    This document presents the plan of activities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program which supports the environmental restoration (ER) objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Discussed in this plan are the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, and the process for implementing and managing BWID. BWID is hosted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), but involves participants from throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, universities, and the international community. These participants will support, demonstrate, and evaluate a suite of advanced technologies representing a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for applicability and maturity, selecting appropriate technologies for demonstration, field demonstrating, evaluation of results and transferring technologies to environmental restoration programs are also presented. This document further describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to BWID. It addresses the management processes, operating procedures, programmatic and technical objectives, and schedules. Key functions in support of each demonstration such as regulatory coordination, safety analyses, risk evaluations, facility requirements, and data management are presented.

  14. The Lower Cretaceous Chouf Sandstone of Lebanon: Tracking Caledonian tectonism in a Tethyan sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, Chloé; Schneider, David A.; Grasemann, Bernhard; Nader, Fadi H.; Tari, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    The Chouf Sandstone is a clastic rock sequence within the Cretaceous succession of Lebanon. Generally, the formation consists of shales, sandstones and shallow water, low-energy limestones with local volcanic horizons and lignites. The typical Chouf Sandstone is dominated by monocrystalline quartz (85-95%) indicating well-sorted sandstone deposited in fluvial to deltaic/littoral environments. The thickness of the Chouf Sandstone is variable, ranging from just a few meters to almost 700 m thick showing prominent lateral facies changes locally. Isopach maps of the Chouf Sandstone reveal systematic variations which could be interpreted as the result of deposition in extensional half-grabens at the margin of a large basin. The overlying Lower Cretaceous neritic carbonate formations do not record any major thickness variations and therefore the Chouf Sandstone may be interpreted as a Lower Cretaceous syn-rift clastic sequence. LA-ICPMS U-Pb geochronology was conducted on detrital zircons from the Chouf Sandstone sampled along the Qartaba Anticline (Mount Lebanon). With the exception of a few Archean outliers, the resulted ages fell into three broad populations: i) a small Paleoproterozoic population, ii) a Grenvillian population, and iii) a Pan-African population (575-650 Ma). One single zircon is slightly younger then the Pan-African population, yielding a 206Pb/238U age of 491 ± 5 Ma. Zircon (U-Th)/He dating on the same samples records cooling through a nominal closure temperature of 180°C and yields Late Ordovician to Early Silurian ages (440-465 Ma), regressed from triplicates of zircon from seven samples across the anticline. Typically, the youngest detrital age that is obtained by U-Pb geochronology, represents a maximum estimate for the depositional age. However, in our study the ca. 490 Ma zircon U-Pb age is interpreted as the age of primary deposition in an Early Paleozoic basin. Combined with the zircon (U-Th)/He cooling ages, our data may suggest the

  15. Sedimentology, Geochemistry, and Geophysics of the Cambrian Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creveling, Jessica Renee

    Within this dissertation, I document how—and hypothesize why—the quirks and qualities of the Cambrian Period demarcate this interval as fundamentally different from the preceding Proterozoic Eon and succeeding periods of the Phanerozoic Eon. To begin, I focus on the anomalous marine deposition of the mineral apatite. Sedimentary sequestration of phosphorus modulates the capacity for marine primary productivity and, thus, the redox state of the Earth system. Moreover, sedimentary apatite minerals may entomb and replicate skeletal and soft-tissue organisms, creating key aspects of the fossil record from which paleontologists deduce the trajectory of animal evolution. I ask what geochemical redox regime promoted the delivery of phosphorus to Cambrian seafloors and conclude that, for the case of the Thorntonia Limestone, apatite nucleation occurred under anoxic, ferruginous subsurface water masses. Moreover, I infer that phosphorus bound to iron minerals precipitated from the water column and organic-bound phosphorus were both important sources of phosphorus to the seafloor. Petrographic observations allow me to reconstruct the early diagenetic pathways that decoupled phosphorus from these delivery shuttles and promoted the precipitation of apatite within the skeletons of small animals. Together, mechanistic understandings of phosphorus delivery to, and retention within, seafloor sediment allow us to constrain hypotheses for the fleeting occurrence of widespread apatite deposition and exquisite fossil preservation within Cambrian sedimentary successions. Next, I describe and quantify the nature of carbonate production on a marine platform deposited at the hypothesized peak of Cambrian skeletal carbonate production. I find that fossils represent conspicuous, but volumetrically subordinate components of early Cambrian carbonate reef ecosystems and that despite the evolution of mineralized skeletons, Cambrian carbonate platforms appear similar to their Neoproterozoic

  16. Compilation and Network Analyses of Cambrian Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Jennifer A; Williams, Richard J; Martinez, Neo D; Wood, Rachel A; Erwin, Douglas H

    2008-01-01

    A rich body of empirically grounded theory has developed about food webs—the networks of feeding relationships among species within habitats. However, detailed food-web data and analyses are lacking for ancient ecosystems, largely because of the low resolution of taxa coupled with uncertain and incomplete information about feeding interactions. These impediments appear insurmountable for most fossil assemblages; however, a few assemblages with excellent soft-body preservation across trophic levels are candidates for food-web data compilation and topological analysis. Here we present plausible, detailed food webs for the Chengjiang and Burgess Shale assemblages from the Cambrian Period. Analyses of degree distributions and other structural network properties, including sensitivity analyses of the effects of uncertainty associated with Cambrian diet designations, suggest that these early Paleozoic communities share remarkably similar topology with modern food webs. Observed regularities reflect a systematic dependence of structure on the numbers of taxa and links in a web. Most aspects of Cambrian food-web structure are well-characterized by a simple “niche model,” which was developed for modern food webs and takes into account this scale dependence. However, a few aspects of topology differ between the ancient and recent webs: longer path lengths between species and more species in feeding loops in the earlier Chengjiang web, and higher variability in the number of links per species for both Cambrian webs. Our results are relatively insensitive to the exclusion of low-certainty or random links. The many similarities between Cambrian and recent food webs point toward surprisingly strong and enduring constraints on the organization of complex feeding interactions among metazoan species. The few differences could reflect a transition to more strongly integrated and constrained trophic organization within ecosystems following the rapid diversification of species

  17. Compilation and network analyses of cambrian food webs.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Jennifer A; Williams, Richard J; Martinez, Neo D; Wood, Rachel A; Erwin, Douglas H

    2008-04-29

    A rich body of empirically grounded theory has developed about food webs--the networks of feeding relationships among species within habitats. However, detailed food-web data and analyses are lacking for ancient ecosystems, largely because of the low resolution of taxa coupled with uncertain and incomplete information about feeding interactions. These impediments appear insurmountable for most fossil assemblages; however, a few assemblages with excellent soft-body preservation across trophic levels are candidates for food-web data compilation and topological analysis. Here we present plausible, detailed food webs for the Chengjiang and Burgess Shale assemblages from the Cambrian Period. Analyses of degree distributions and other structural network properties, including sensitivity analyses of the effects of uncertainty associated with Cambrian diet designations, suggest that these early Paleozoic communities share remarkably similar topology with modern food webs. Observed regularities reflect a systematic dependence of structure on the numbers of taxa and links in a web. Most aspects of Cambrian food-web structure are well-characterized by a simple "niche model," which was developed for modern food webs and takes into account this scale dependence. However, a few aspects of topology differ between the ancient and recent webs: longer path lengths between species and more species in feeding loops in the earlier Chengjiang web, and higher variability in the number of links per species for both Cambrian webs. Our results are relatively insensitive to the exclusion of low-certainty or random links. The many similarities between Cambrian and recent food webs point toward surprisingly strong and enduring constraints on the organization of complex feeding interactions among metazoan species. The few differences could reflect a transition to more strongly integrated and constrained trophic organization within ecosystems following the rapid diversification of species, body

  18. Tropical shoreline ice in the late Cambrian: Implications for earth's climate between the Cambrian Explosion and the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Anthony C.; MacKey, T.J.; Cowan, Clinton A.; Fox, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Middle to late Cambrian time (ca. 513 to 488 Ma) is characterized by an unstable plateau in biodiversity, when depauperate shelf faunas suffered repeated extinctions. This poorly understood interval separates the Cambrian Explosion from the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event and is generally regarded as a time of sustained greenhouse conditions. We present evidence that suggests a drastically different climate during this enigmatic interval: Features indicative of meteoric ice are well preserved in late Cambrian equatorial beach deposits that correspond to one of the shelf extinction events. Thus, the middle to late Cambrian Earth was at least episodically cold and might best be considered a muted analogue to the environmental extremes that characterized the Proterozoic, even though cooling in the two periods may have occurred in response to different triggers. Such later Cambrian conditions may have significantly impacted evolution preceding the Ordovician radiation.

  19. The geological significance of the boundary between the Fort Sill and Signal Mountain Formations in the lower Arbuckle Group (Cambrian)

    SciTech Connect

    Hosey, R.; Donovan, R.N. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    During the upper Cambrian, a transgression inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen enveloping a landscape that consisted of hills of Cambrian-aged rhyolite up to 350 m in height. Initial deposits on this topography--the Reagan Formation--consist of siliciclastics that were deposited as alluvium and succeeding tidally-influenced marine sandstones and shales. The siliciclastics grains are made up of local rhyolite, quartz and authigenic glauconite. The overlying Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition of carbonated detritus in the form of tidally-influenced pelmatozoan grainstones. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. The contact between the Fort Sill and the overlying thinly-bedded dark grey bioclastic limestones of the Signal Mountain Formation is one of the most distinctive horizons in the Arbuckle Group. The contact evidently marks a substantial change in depositional environment. In detail the contact is sharp and shows evidence of minor erosion, although no karsting has been detected. The authors suggest that the contact surface records a regression, perhaps associated with dolomitization and followed by some erosion. A regression is also indicated by the local occurrence of a laminated tidal flat unit with traces of evaporites that outcrops in the far west of the Slick Hills immediately below the formation contact. They suggest that the Signal Mountains as a transgressive unit, incorporating siliciclastics transported into the area during the regression. It has been suggested that the unconformity reflects localized tectonism associated with the evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. On the other hand the surface may correlate with a craton--wide Sauxian' hiatus.

  20. Cambrian extensional tectonics and magmatism within the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, D. A.; Gilbert, M. C.

    1990-03-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen is partially constrained by the petrological consequences of a bimodal igneous suite associated with the Cambrian rift. Mineralogical and compositional layers and erosional surfaces are recognized as initially subplanar, subhorizontal markers. The progressive rotation of these horizons can be explained by uniform-sense normal faulting. Magmatism, confined to the aulacogen trend, elevated the thermal gradient producing a crustal strength-anisotropy. This ensured the localization of the extension throughout the Cambrian rifting event. The presence of a substantial volume of mafic igneous rocks within the crust along the aulacogen's trend suggests that crustal attenuation was compensated for by the addition of mantle derived material during extension.

  1. Oxygen, ecology, and the Cambrian radiation of animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Erik A.; Frieder, Christina A.; Raman, Akkur V.; Girguis, Peter R.; Levin, Lisa A.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2013-08-01

    The Proterozoic-Cambrian transition records the appearance of essentially all animal body plans (phyla), yet to date no single hypothesis adequately explains both the timing of the event and the evident increase in diversity and disparity. Ecological triggers focused on escalatory predator-prey "arms races" can explain the evolutionary pattern but not its timing, whereas environmental triggers, particularly ocean/atmosphere oxygenation, do the reverse. Using modern oxygen minimum zones as an analog for Proterozoic oceans, we explore the effect of low oxygen levels on the feeding ecology of polychaetes, the dominant macrofaunal animals in deep-sea sediments. Here we show that low oxygen is clearly linked to low proportions of carnivores in a community and low diversity of carnivorous taxa, whereas higher oxygen levels support more complex food webs. The recognition of a physiological control on carnivory therefore links environmental triggers and ecological drivers, providing an integrated explanation for both the pattern and timing of Cambrian animal radiation.

  2. New and extraordinary Early Cambrian sponge spicule assemblage from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi-Guang; Pratt, Brian R.

    1994-01-01

    The fossil record of siliceous sponges, compared with that of other skeleton- secreting Metazoa, is poorly known, based as it is on disarticulated spicules and sporadically preserved body fossils. Abundant spicules recovered from Lower Cambrian strata in Shaanxi, China, essentially double the known morphological diversity of siliceous sponges for that interval of geologic time. These fossils, along with a comparable coeval fauna from South Australia, have a remarkably modern aspect, thereby demonstrating that the principal siliceous sponge groups and styles of body architecture were established quickly in the earliest Phanerozoic as part of the Cambrian "explosion" and that they inhabited a variety of low-energy, relatively deep water settings. The similarity of spicule shape and variation to that of younger assemblages reflects a conservative architecture for the siliceous sponges.

  3. An early Cambrian agglutinated tubular lophophorate with brachiopod characters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z.-F.; Li, G.-X.; Holmer, L. E.; Brock, G. A.; Balthasar, U.; Skovsted, C. B.; Fu, D.-J.; Zhang, X.-L.; Wang, H.-Z.; Butler, A.; Zhang, Z.-L.; Cao, C.-Q.; Han, J.; Liu, J.-N.; Shu, D.-G.

    2014-01-01

    The morphological disparity of lophotrochozoan phyla makes it difficult to predict the morphology of the last common ancestor. Only fossils of stem groups can help discover the morphological transitions that occurred along the roots of these phyla. Here, we describe a tubular fossil Yuganotheca elegans gen. et sp. nov. from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Chengjiang Lagerstätte (Yunnan, China) that exhibits an unusual combination of phoronid, brachiopod and tommotiid (Cambrian problematica) characters, notably a pair of agglutinated valves, enclosing a horseshoe-shaped lophophore, supported by a lower bipartite tubular attachment structure with a long pedicle with coelomic space. The terminal bulb of the pedicle provided anchorage in soft sediment. The discovery has important implications for the early evolution of lophotrochozoans, suggesting rooting of brachiopods into the sessile lophotrochozoans and the origination of their bivalved bauplan preceding the biomineralization of shell valves in crown brachiopods. PMID:24828016

  4. Mining metrics for buried treasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkowski, D. A.; Helliwell, T. M.

    2006-06-01

    The same but different: That might describe two metrics. On the surface CLASSI may show two metrics are locally equivalent, but buried beneath may be a wealth of further structure. This was beautifully described in a paper by Malcolm MacCallum in 1998. Here I will illustrate the effect with two flat metrics — one describing ordinary Minkowski spacetime and the other describing a threeparameter family of Gal'tsov-Letelier-Tod spacetimes. I will dig out the beautiful hidden classical singularity structure of the latter (a structure first noticed by Tod in 1994) and then show how quantum considerations can illuminate the riches. I will then discuss how quantum structure can help us understand classical singularities and metric parameters in a variety of exact solutions mined from the Exact Solutions book.

  5. Upper Cambrian chitons (Mollusca, polyplacophora) from Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pojeta, J., Jr.; Vendrasco, M.J.; Darrough, G.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous new specimens reveal a greater presence of chitons in Upper Cambrian rocks than previously suspected. Evidence is presented showing that the chiton esthete sensory system is present in all chiton species in this study at the very beginning of the known polyplacophoran fossil record. The stratigraphic occurrences and paleobiogeography of Late Cambrian chitons are documented. The 14 previously-named families of Cambrian and Ordovician chitons are reviewed and analyzed. Aulochitonidae n. fam. is defined, based on Aulochiton n. gen.; A. sannerae n. sp. is also defined. The long misunderstood family Preacanthochitonidae and its type genus Preacanthochiton Bergenhayn, 1960, are placed in synonymy with Mattheviidae and Chelodes Davidson & King, 1874, respectively; Eochelodes Marek, 1962, also is placed in synonymy with Chelodes, and Elongata Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, is placed in synonymy with Hemithecella Ulrich & Bridge, 1941. At the species level, H. elongata Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, and Elongata perplexa Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, are placed in synonymy with H. eminensis Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995. The Ordovician species H. abrupta Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995, is transferred to the genus Chelodes as C. abrupta (Stinchcomb & Darrough, 1995). The Ordovician species Preacanthochiton baueri Hoare & Pojeta, 2006, is transferred to the genus Helminthochiton as H. ? baueri (Hoare & Pojeta, 2006). The Ordovician species H. marginatus Hoare & Pojeta, 2006, is transferred to the genus Litochiton as L. marginatus (Hoare & Pojeta, 2006). Matthevia walcotti Runnegar, Pojeta, Taylor, & Collins, 1979, is treated as a synonym of Hemithecella expansa Ulrich & Bridge, 1941. In addition, other multivalved Cambrian mollusks are discussed; within this group, Dycheiidae n. fam. is defined, as well as Paradycheia dorisae n. gen. and n. sp. Cladistic analysis indicates a close relationship among the genera here assigned to the Mattheviidae, and between Echinochiton Pojeta

  6. Early Cambrian Pentamerous Cubozoan Embryos from South China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jian; Kubota, Shin; Li, Guoxiang; Yao, Xiaoyong; Yang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Degan; Li, Yong; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Sasaki, Osamu; Komiya, Tsuyoshi; Yan, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Background Extant cubozoans are voracious predators characterized by their square shape, four evenly spaced outstretched tentacles and well-developed eyes. A few cubozoan fossils are known from the Middle Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah and the well-known Carboniferous Mazon Creek Formation of Illinois. Undisputed cubozoan fossils were previously unknown from the early Cambrian; by that time probably all representatives of the living marine phyla, especially those of basal animals, should have evolved. Methods Microscopic fossils were recovered from a phosphatic limestone in the Lower Cambrian Kuanchuanpu Formation of South China using traditional acetic-acid maceration. Seven of the pre-hatched pentamerous cubozoan embryos, each of which bears five pairs of subumbrellar tentacle buds, were analyzed in detail through computed microtomography (Micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) without coating. Results The figured microscopic fossils are unequivocal pre-hatching embryos based on their spherical fertilization envelope and the enclosed soft-tissue that has preserved key anatomical features arranged in perfect pentaradial symmetry, allowing detailed comparison with modern cnidarians, especially medusozoans. A combination of features, such as the claustrum, gonad-lamella, suspensorium and velarium suspended by the frenula, occur exclusively in the gastrovascular system of extant cubozoans, indicating a cubozoan affinity for these fossils. Additionally, the interior anatomy of these embryonic cubozoan fossils unprecedentedly exhibits the development of many new septum-derived lamellae and well-partitioned gastric pockets unknown in living cubozoans, implying that ancestral cubozoans had already evolved highly specialized structures displaying unexpected complexity at the dawn of the Cambrian. The well-developed endodermic lamellae and gastric pockets developed in the late embryonic stages of these cubozoan fossils are comparable with extant pelagic

  7. 7 CFR 1755.505 - Buried services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Buried services. 1755.505 Section 1755.505 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.505 Buried services. (a)...

  8. 7 CFR 1755.505 - Buried services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Buried services. 1755.505 Section 1755.505 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.505 Buried services. (a)...

  9. Tiny Sea Anemone from the Lower Cambrian of China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jian; Kubota, Shin; Uchida, Hiro-omi; Stanley, George D.; Yao, Xiaoyong; Shu, Degan; Li, Yong; Yasui, Kinya

    2010-01-01

    Background Abundant fossils from the Ediacaran and Cambrian showing cnidarian grade grossly suggest that cnidarian diversification occurred earlier than that of other eumetazoans. However, fossils of possible soft-bodied polyps are scanty and modern corals are dated back only to the Middle Triassic, although molecular phylogenetic results support the idea that anthozoans represent the first major branch of the Cnidaria. Because of difficulties in taxonomic assignments owing to imperfect preservation of fossil cnidarian candidates, little is known about forms ancestral to those of living groups. Methods and Findings We have analyzed the soft-bodied polypoid microfossils Eolympia pediculata gen. et sp. nov. from the lowest Cambrian Kuanchuanpu Formation in southern China by scanning electron microscopy and computer-aided microtomography after isolating fossils from sedimentary rocks by acetic acid maceration. The fossils, about a half mm in body size, are preserved with 18 mesenteries including directives bilaterally arranged, 18 tentacles and a stalk-like pedicle. The pedicle suggests a sexual life cycle, while asexual reproduction by transverse fission also is inferred by circumferential grooves on the body column. Conclusions The features found in the present fossils fall within the morphological spectrum of modern Hexacorallia excluding Ceriantharia, and thus Eolympia pediculata could be a stem member for this group. The fossils also demonstrate that basic features characterizing modern hexacorallians such as bilateral symmetry and the reproductive system have deep roots in the Early Cambrian. PMID:20967244

  10. Armored kinorhynch-like scalidophoran animals from the early Cambrian

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaqiao; Xiao, Shuhai; Liu, Yunhuan; Yuan, Xunlai; Wan, Bin; Muscente, A. D.; Shao, Tiequan; Gong, Hao; Cao, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of the Scalidophora (Kinorhyncha, Loricifera, Priapulida) and Nematoida (Nematoda, Nematomorpha), together constituting the monophyletic Cycloneuralia that is the sister group of the Panarthropoda. Kinorhynchs are unique among living cycloneuralians in having a segmented body with repeated cuticular plates, longitudinal muscles, dorsoventral muscles, and ganglia. Molecular clock estimates suggest that kinorhynchs may have diverged in the Ediacaran Period. Remarkably, no kinorhynch fossils have been discovered, in sharp contrast to priapulids and loriciferans that are represented by numerous Cambrian fossils. Here we describe several early Cambrian (~535 million years old) kinorhynch-like fossils, including the new species Eokinorhynchus rarus and two unnamed but related forms. E. rarus has characteristic scalidophoran features, including an introvert with pentaradially arranged hollow scalids. Its trunk bears at least 20 annuli each consisting of numerous small rectangular plates, and is armored with five pairs of large and bilaterally placed sclerites. Its trunk annuli are reminiscent of the epidermis segments of kinorhynchs. A phylogenetic analysis resolves E. rarus as a stem-group kinorhynch. Thus, the fossil record confirms that all three scalidophoran phyla diverged no later than the Cambrian Period. PMID:26610151

  11. Armored kinorhynch-like scalidophoran animals from the early Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaqiao; Xiao, Shuhai; Liu, Yunhuan; Yuan, Xunlai; Wan, Bin; Muscente, A D; Shao, Tiequan; Gong, Hao; Cao, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of the Scalidophora (Kinorhyncha, Loricifera, Priapulida) and Nematoida (Nematoda, Nematomorpha), together constituting the monophyletic Cycloneuralia that is the sister group of the Panarthropoda. Kinorhynchs are unique among living cycloneuralians in having a segmented body with repeated cuticular plates, longitudinal muscles, dorsoventral muscles, and ganglia. Molecular clock estimates suggest that kinorhynchs may have diverged in the Ediacaran Period. Remarkably, no kinorhynch fossils have been discovered, in sharp contrast to priapulids and loriciferans that are represented by numerous Cambrian fossils. Here we describe several early Cambrian (~535 million years old) kinorhynch-like fossils, including the new species Eokinorhynchus rarus and two unnamed but related forms. E. rarus has characteristic scalidophoran features, including an introvert with pentaradially arranged hollow scalids. Its trunk bears at least 20 annuli each consisting of numerous small rectangular plates, and is armored with five pairs of large and bilaterally placed sclerites. Its trunk annuli are reminiscent of the epidermis segments of kinorhynchs. A phylogenetic analysis resolves E. rarus as a stem-group kinorhynch. Thus, the fossil record confirms that all three scalidophoran phyla diverged no later than the Cambrian Period. PMID:26610151

  12. At the origin of animals: the revolutionary cambrian fossil record.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E

    2013-09-01

    The certain fossil record of animals begins around 540 million years ago, close to the base of the Cambrian Period. A series of extraordinary discoveries starting over 100 years ago with Walcott's discovery of the Burgess Shale has accelerated in the last thirty years or so with the description of exceptionally-preserved Cambrian fossils from around the world. Such deposits of "Burgess Shale Type" have been recently complemented by other types of exceptional preservation. Together with a remarkable growth in knowledge about the environments that these early animals lived in, these discoveries have long exerted a fascination and strong influence on views on the origins of animals, and indeed, the nature of evolution itself. Attention is now shifting to the period of time just before animals become common, at the base of the Cambrian and in the preceding Ediacaran Period. Remarkable though the Burgess Shale deposits have been, a substantial gap still exists in our knowledge of the earliest animals. Nevertheless, the fossils from this most remarkable period of evolutionary history continue to exert a strong influence on many aspects of animal evolution, not least recent theories about developmental evolution. PMID:24396267

  13. Lower Cambrian biogeography and the prehistory of early animals

    SciTech Connect

    Signor, P.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Biogeographic distributions of animals reflect the complex interplay of biological and physical processes acting over geological time. In particular, plate tectonics and the evolution of lineages within clades play fundamental roles in determining faunal distributions. Ranges expand through vicariant events or dispersal and contract through local and regional extinctions. Vicariance promotes the evolutionary divergence of closely related lineages. Viewed as historical phenomena, biogeographic distributions can be employed to infer prior tectonic and evolutionary events. For example, the existence of modern marine faunal provinces reflects the interaction of evolution and plate tectonics. The Proterozoic history of skeletogenous organisms (and their ancestors) is a contentious subject, with many authors arguing that skeletogenous clades have no significant prehistory before their appearance in the fossil record. The existence of trilobite provinces dominated by different suborders, for example, suggests the trilobites evolved and dispersed, or were separated by plate movement, and then evolved independently for an extended period prior to their appearance in the fossil record. Similar arguments can be applied to other groups. The paleobiogeographic distribution of organisms also provides useful insights into late Proterozoic and Early Cambrian paleogeography. The provincial distribution of Early Cambrian taxa suggests that the putative Proterozoic supercontinent, if it existed, began to separate well before the Early Cambrian. Separate provinces would not have evolved had the various plates remained united. Therefore, the dawn of the Phanerozoic could not have coincided with the breakup of the Proterozoic supercontinent.

  14. At the Origin of Animals: The Revolutionary Cambrian Fossil Record

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Graham E

    2013-01-01

    The certain fossil record of animals begins around 540 million years ago, close to the base of the Cambrian Period. A series of extraordinary discoveries starting over 100 years ago with Walcott’s discovery of the Burgess Shale has accelerated in the last thirty years or so with the description of exceptionally-preserved Cambrian fossils from around the world. Such deposits of “Burgess Shale Type” have been recently complemented by other types of exceptional preservation. Together with a remarkable growth in knowledge about the environments that these early animals lived in, these discoveries have long exerted a fascination and strong influence on views on the origins of animals, and indeed, the nature of evolution itself. Attention is now shifting to the period of time just before animals become common, at the base of the Cambrian and in the preceding Ediacaran Period. Remarkable though the Burgess Shale deposits have been, a substantial gap still exists in our knowledge of the earliest animals. Nevertheless, the fossils from this most remarkable period of evolutionary history continue to exert a strong influence on many aspects of animal evolution, not least recent theories about developmental evolution. PMID:24396267

  15. Cambrian rocks of the Pioche mining district, Nevada, with a section on Pioche shale faunules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merriam, Charles Warren; Palmer, Allison R.

    1964-01-01

    The Pioche mining district in the Ely Range, southeastern Nevada, is one of several districts in the Great Basin where Cambrian rocks are hosts of important ore deposits. Cambrian strata underlying the Ely Range are intruded by porphyritic granite and other dikes. Tertiary volcanic rocks and Pliocene fresh-water clastic deposits of the Panaca Formation occupy adjacent valleys and extend over the Cambrian strata on the south and east.

  16. Reservoir uncertainty, Precambrian topography, and carbon sequestration in the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leetaru, H.E.; McBride, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Sequestration sites are evaluated by studying the local geological structure and confirming the presence of both a reservoir facies and an impermeable seal not breached by significant faulting. The Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone is a blanket sandstone that underlies large parts of Midwest United States and is this region's most significant carbon sequestration reservoir. An assessment of the geological structure of any Mt. Simon sequestration site must also include knowledge of the paleotopography prior to deposition. Understanding Precambrian paleotopography is critical in estimating reservoir thickness and quality. Regional outcrop and borehole mapping of the Mt. Simon in conjunction with mapping seismic reflection data can facilitate the prediction of basement highs. Any potential site must, at the minimum, have seismic reflection data, calibrated with drill-hole information, to evaluate the presence of Precambrian topography and alleviate some of the uncertainty surrounding the thickness or possible absence of the Mt. Simon at a particular sequestration site. The Mt. Simon is thought to commonly overlie Precambrian basement granitic or rhyolitic rocks. In places, at least about 549 m (1800 ft) of topographic relief on the top of the basement surface prior to Mt. Simon deposition was observed. The Mt. Simon reservoir sandstone is thin or not present where basement is topographically high, whereas the low areas can have thick Mt. Simon. The paleotopography on the basement and its correlation to Mt. Simon thickness have been observed at both outcrops and in the subsurface from the states of Illinois, Ohio, Wisconsin, and Missouri. ?? 2009. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  17. Porosity prediction in sandstones using erosional unconformities

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1989-03-01

    Erosional unconformities of subaerial origin are created by tectonic uplifts and eustatic sea level fall. Most erosional unconformities developed on sandstones are planes of increased porosity because uplifted sandstones are exposed to undersaturated CO/sub 2/-charged meteoric waters that result in dissolution of unstable framework grains and cements. The chemical weathering of sandstones is intensified in humid regions by the heavy rainfall, soil zones, lush vegetation, and accompanying voluminous production of organic and inorganic acids. Erosional unconformities are considered hydrologically open systems because of abundant supply of fresh meteoric water and relatively unrestricted transport of dissolved constituents away from the site of dissolution, causing a net gain in porosity near unconformities. Thus, porosity in sandstones tends to increase toward overlying unconformities. Such porosity trends have been observed in hydrocarbon-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Alaska, Algeria, Australia, China, Libya, Netherlands, Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Texas. A common attribute of these reservoirs is that they were all subaerially exposed under heavy rainfall conditions. An empirical model has been developed for the Triassic and Jurassic sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian North Sea on the basis of the observed relationship that shows an increase in porosity in these reservoirs with increasing proximity to the overlying base of Cretaceous unconformity. An important practical attribute of this model is that it allows for the prediction of porosity in the neighboring undrilled areas by recognizing the base of Cretaceous unconformity in seismic reflection profiles and by constructing subcrop maps.

  18. Provenance of Norphlet sandstone, northern Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.P.; Ward, W.C.; Kuglar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet sandstone of the northern Gulf Coast is predominantly subarkose, with some arkose in the eastern area and sublitharenite and quartzarenite in the western area. Despite great depths of burial and despite feldspar and rock-fragment constituents, diagenesis has not appreciably altered the composition of Norphlet sandstone. Therefore, reconstruction of original composition of Norphlet sandstone presented little difficulty. Variation in detrital modes of the Norphlet suggests compositionally distinct source terranes. Samples from Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi reflect the influence of metamorphic and plutonic rocks of the Appalachian Piedmont Province and of Triassic-Jurassic volcanic rocks. Sandstones in east Texas, northern Louisiana, and southern Arkansas were derived from sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks of the Ouachita system. The Arbuckle Mountains and Llano uplift may have supplied trace amounts of quartzo-feldspathic and volcanic-rock fragments to the extreme western part of the study area. Norphlet sandstones represent a mixture of collision-orogen-derived sediment from the Appalachian and/or Ouachita system and continental-block-derived sediment from paleohighs and uplifts within the Gulf basin. However, Norphlet sandstones plot in the craton-interior and transitional-continental fields on Q-F-L and QM-F-Lt tectonic-provenance diagrams, because of mineralogically mature source rocks, elimination of unstable grains by abrasion and sorting during deposition, and/or sediment mixing from different source terranes.

  19. Depositional mechanisms and architecture of a pre-early Cambrian mixed sand mud deepwater ramp (Apiúna Unit, South Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilici, Giorgio

    2006-06-01

    The Apiúna Unit is located in the south of Brazil, in the State of Santa Catarina. It is a deepwater depositional system, which is part of the sedimentary fill of the Itajaí Basin, pre-early Cambrian in age, interpreted as a foredeep basin. We have described and interpreted the depositional mechanisms according to the terminology proposed by Mulder and Alexander [Mulder, T., Alexander, J., 2001. The Physical Character of Subaqueous Sedimentary Density Flows and their Deposits. Sedimentology 48 (2), 269-299] and have recognized seven architectural elements. The Apiúna Unit is interpreted as a mixed sand-mud deepwater ramp system. The slope deposits are characterized by laminated argillite with slumped beds. The proximal and medial ramp is characterized by channel-levee systems. The distal ramp shows sandstone sheet, which pass distally into interlayered sandstone/pelite. The sequence development of this ramp unit differs from other known ancient ramp systems. The Apiúna Unit shows at least five phases of sandy input, recording times of progradation or retrogradation of the ramp, interstratified with muddy deposits, related to sand-starved phases. In the upper part of the succession, the ramp building was interrupted and the sandy deposits are replaced by pelitic slope deposits. The depositional mechanisms have a direct relationship to the architectural elements and the regions of the depositional system. Settling, very low-density turbidity currents and slumps formed the slope deposits. Channel deposits are formed by debris flows, hyperconcentrated density flows and concentrated density flows, in that vertical sequence order. Levee deposits were made of surge-like turbidity flows. Proximal sandstone sheet deposits were formed by concentrated density flows. Distal sandstone sheet deposits are formed by concentrated density flows and surge-like turbidity flows. Surge-like turbidity flows and quasi-steady (?) turbidity flows formed the interchannel deposits.

  20. Antarctica, supercontinents and the palaeogeography of the Cambrian 'explosion'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalziel, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Laurentia is bordered by latest Precambrian-Cambrian rifted margins and must therefore have been located within a Precambrian supercontinent. Geochronologic and geochemical evidence indicates that it was attached to parts of the East Antarctic craton within the Rodinian supercontinent in the late Mesoproterozoic. The Mawson craton of Antarctica rifted from the proto-Pacific margin of Laurentia during the Neooproterozoic, colliding with the present 'southern cone' of Laurentia at ~600 Ma along the Shackleton Range suture zone as Gondwana and Laurentia amalgamated to form the ephemeral Pannotia supercontinental assembly at the end of the Precambrian. The abrupt appearance of almost all animal phyla in the fossil record is often colloquially referred to as the Cambrian 'explosion' of life on Earth. It is also named 'Darwin's dilemma,' as he appreciated that this seemingly mysterious event posed a major problem for his theory of evolution by natural selection. It coincided with a time of major marine transgression over all the continents. Although the metazoan 'explosion' is now seen as more protracted than formerly recognized, it is still regarded one of the most critical events in the history of the biosphere. One of the most striking aspects of the earliest Cambrian fossils is geographic differentiation. In particular, the first benthic trilobite faunas on Laurentia, ancestral North America, and the newly amalgamated southern supercontinent of Gondwana are distinctly different. This has led to the suggestion of an unknown vicariant event intervening between an ancestral trilobite clade and higher members that are represented in the fossil record, possibly one related to the breakup of a supercontinent. Igneous rocks along the Panthalassic margin of Gondwana, including South America, southernmost Africa and the Ellsworth-Whitmore crustal block of Antarctica, and along the proto-Appalachian margin of Laurentia indicate that final separation of Laurentia from

  1. Relationship between the Neoproterozoic snowball Earth and Cambrian explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, S.; Yoshihara, A.; Isozaki, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Origin of snowball Earth has been debated in terms of greenhouse gas (e.g., Hoffman and Schrag), obliqueness of Earth's rotation axis (Williams, 1975), true polar wander (Evans, 2003), Galactic cosmic ray radiation (Shaviv and Veizer, 2003; Svensmark, 2006), or weakened geomagnetism (Maruyama and Yoshihara, 2003). A major difficulty for the greenhouse gas hypothesis is the on-off switch causing decrease and increase of appropriate amounts of CO2 by plume- and plate tectonics, and also in available amount of CO2 in atmosphere to be consistent with the observations. In contrast, the cosmic ray radiation models due to the star burst peaked at 2.5- 2.1 Ga and 1.4-0.8 Ga can explain on-off switch more easily than the greenhouse gas model. Cosmic ray radiations, however, must be modified by the geomagnetic intensity, fluctuating 150"% to < 10"% of the present-day level through geologic time. Our compilation suggests the idea of extensive glaciation appeared when the intensity decreased below 50% of the present-day value, as typically seen in the Neoproterozoic time. This proposes the idea of extensive cloudiness by increased cosmic rays in the Neoproterozoic to cause the snowball Earth. Time difference between the Neoproterozoic snowball Earth and Cambrian explosion is as large as 250 millions years, and this refuses their direct close-relationship. Role of frequent mass extinctions, i.e., 8 times during 100 m.y. from 585 Ma to 488 Ma, during the Ediacaran and Cambrian, has been proposed (Zhu et al., 2007). This frequency is one order of magnitude higher compared to that in the post-Ordovician time. Yet, the Cambrian explosion cannot be explained by mass extinction which replaced the vacant niches shortly after the mass extinction and never created a new animal with a new body plan. A new model proposed herein is derived from weakened geomagnetism and resultant extensive cosmic radiation to alter gene and genome for a long period over advancement of low magnetic

  2. U-Pb single-grain dating of detrital zircon in the Cambrian of central Poland: implications for Gondwana versus Baltica provenance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde-Vaquero, P.; Dörr, W.; Belka, Z.; Franke, W.; Wiszniewska, J.; Schastok, J.

    2000-12-01

    A provenance study of detrital zircon has been carried out in Middle Cambrian sandstones from the Lysogory Unit (Holy Cross Mountains) and the East European Platform (EEP, Baltica) to investigate the docking of terranes along the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) during the Paleozoic. Paleontological evidence suggests that the Lysogory Massif is a peri-Gondwanan-derived terrane which did not reach the Baltic realm before Ordovician times. For a comparison with the adjacent sequence in the EEP, across the TESZ, we have analyzed samples from borehole Okuniew IG-1 (15 km east of Warsaw), which contains Baltic faunas. The age spectrum of the detritus in the Cambrian of the Lysogory Massif (19 analyses) reflects input of sources with ca. 600 Ma, ca. 1.8-2.0 Ga, and >2.5 Ga zircon ages. In the EEP (Okniew borehole; 19 analyses), the U-Pb data demonstrate input from sources with ca. 530-700 Ma, 1.0-1.2 Ga, 1.5 Ga, ca. 1.8-2.0 Ga, 2.2 Ga, and >2.5 Ga zircon ages. Additionally, in this borehole the crystalline basement has been dated at 1800±6 Ma. These new data show that Late Neoproterozoic zircon ages are not restricted to peri-Gondwanan sources and that provenance studies across the TESZ are more complex than expected.

  3. Lithostratigraphy and hydrocarbon potential of the Cambrian (pre-Knox) interval in the Conoco No. 1 Turner well, Rough Creek Graben, western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.C.

    1995-09-01

    In 1992 an important deep exploratory well was drilled in the Rough Creek Graben of western Kentucky. The Conoco No. 1 Turner well, in McLean County, reached a total depth of 14,202 feet in Precambrian granite. The objective of this well was to test potential gas reservoirs in Cambrian-age pre-Knox Group carbonates and synrift sandstones. The well encountered no commercial hydrocarbons, but provided new data on the evolution and hydrocarbon potential of the Rough Creek Graben. Encouraged by the Turner well, Conoco has drilled two additional wells in the graben. The Turner well penetrated over 4,000 feet of pre-Knox sedimentary rocks. The clastic rocks lack porosity in the Turner well (because of calcite and quartz cements), but may have reservoir potential in other parts of the basin. The oolitic dolostones contain dolomite cement, and also have no effective porosity. However, bitumen staining is present in the dolostones, indicating that oil moved through the interval. The Conoco Turner well has proven that substaintial thickness of synrift clastics and post-rift dolostones occur in the Rough Creek Graben, and that facies distribution is strongly tectonically controlled. Bitumen staining indicates that hydrocarbons were migrating in the basin, but prediction of effective porosity remains a problem in the search for Cambrian reservoirs in the Rough Creek Graben.

  4. The Vendian-Cambrian δ 13C record, North Iran: evidence for overturning of the ocean before the Cambrian Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroto; Matsumoto, Ryo; Kakuwa, Yoshitaka; Hamdi, Bahaeddin; Zibaseresht, Hamid

    Continuous fossilliferous successions across the Precambrian/Cambrian (PC/C) boundary in the Elburz Mountains of Northern Iran show a remarkable negative δ 13C excursion just below the PC/C boundary. High concentrations of manganese, phosphorus, barium, and high abundances of fossil phytoplankton, and black shale coincide with the excursion. Worldwide stratigraphic correlation shows that the isotopic anomaly is a global event. The initial Metazoan diversification, coupled with 13C enrichment, occurs stratigraphically just above the excursion. We propose the following scenario for oceanic environmental changes before the Cambrian Faunal Explosion based on new data from Iran: A global warm climate following the last Precambrian glaciation resulted in a generally stagnant oceanic condition, so that surface water was oxic; deep water was dysoxic, depleted in 13C, and enriched in nutrients. Massive upwelling of deep water (vertical advection of nutrients and 13C-depleted CO 2) caused enhanced phytoplankton productivity and a sharp drop in δ 13C in shallow water carbonate and organic carbon. We conclude that latest Cryptozoic overturning of ocean stratification preceded the Cambrian Explosion.

  5. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  6. Microstructure of deformed graywacke sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Dengler, L.A.

    1980-03-05

    Microsctures in low-permeability graywacke sandstones were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM specimens were prepared by ion-bombardment of thick polished samples. The undeformed rock contains grains in a matrix composed primarily of authigenic chlorite and kaolinite. Chlorite platelets are randomly arranged in face-to-edge relation to one another. Kaolinite occurs as pseudohexagonal crystals stacked face-to-face in pore filling books. Uniaxial-stress experiments covered a range of confining pressures from .1 to 600 MPa. Below 50 MPa confining pressure, intergranular fracturing occurs within the fault zone and near the sample's cylindrical surface. Between 100 and 300 MPa confining pressure, fault zones contain highly fractured grains, gauge and slickensides on grain surfaces. At 600 MPa, the sample contains a diffuse shear zone of highly fractured grains and no well-defined fault. In all samples, the distribution of microcracks is heterogeneous. Different clay minerals exhibit different modes of deformation. Chlorite structure responds to applied stress by compaction, reducing both pore size and volume. Chlorite platelets are plastically deformed in even the least strained samples. Kaolinite does not deform plastically in any of the samples examined. Deformation of kaolinite is restricted to toppling of the book structure. Dilatant crack growth was studied in two samples unloaded prior to failure. Uniaxially-strained samples deform primarily along grain boundaries, producing intergranular cracks and realignment of chlorite platelets. Intragranular crack density is linearly related to axial-strain, although grains are less fractured than in uniaxially-stressed samples tested at equivalent mean pressures. Cracks are rarely longer than a grain diameter. Nuclear-explosively deformed samples were recovered after the Rio Blanco gas stimulation experiment. (JGB)

  7. Diagenesis and reservoir potential of volcanogenic sandstones - Cretaceous of the Surat Basin, Queensland, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Hawlader, H.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The sandstones of the Lower Cretaceous succession of the Surat basin are characterized by abundant volcanogenic detritus in the form of rock-fragments and feldspars derived from an andesitic magmatic arc coincident with the present Great Barrier Reef in offshore Queensland. These compositionally immature sandstones are not regarded as favorable exploration targets because of their labile nature, their shallow burial depths, and hence the low thermal maturity of the intercalated mudrocks that might have constituted hydrocarbon source rocks. However, petrographic and petrophysical examinations show that significant primary and early diagenetic secondary dissolution porosity and permeability exist in some of these stratigraphic units that under certain circumstances could be the host for hydrocarbons and may become the future exploration targets. Flushing by CO{sub 2}-charged meteoric water after the inception of the Great Artesian basin (of which the Surat basin is a component) in the Tertiary is likely to have been the principal agent of secondary porosity development in these sandstones. Additionally, products of microbial degradation of organic matter (in the intercalated mudstones) and/or maturation products from the deeply buried part of the basin might have assisted in the dissolution of framework grains and previously deposited cement.

  8. Probing the Buried Magnetic Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqing; Zhou, Qionghua; Chen, Qian; Niu, Daxin; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yongbing; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jinlan; van der Laan, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Understanding magnetism in ferromagnetic metal/semiconductor (FM/SC) heterostructures is important to the development of the new-generation spin field-effect transistor. Here, we report an element-specific X-ray magnetic circular dichroism study of the interfacial magnetic moments for two FM/SC model systems, namely, Co/GaAs and Ni/GaAs, which was enabled using a specially designed FM1/FM2/SC superstructure. We observed a robust room temperature magnetization of the interfacial Co, while that of the interfacial Ni was strongly diminished down to 5 K because of hybridization of the Ni d(eg) and GaAs sp(3) states. The validity of the selected method was confirmed by first-principles calculations, showing only small deviations (<0.02 and <0.07 μB/atom for Co/GaAs and Ni/GaAs, respectively) compared to the real FM/SC interfaces. Our work proved that the electronic structure and magnetic ground state of the interfacial FM2 is not altered when the topmost FM2 is replaced by FM1 and that this model is applicable generally for probing the buried magnetic interfaces in the advanced spintronic materials.. PMID:26887429

  9. Mapping Buried Hydrogen-Bonding Networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John C; Goronzy, Dominic P; Dragomiretskiy, Konstantin; Zosso, Dominique; Gilles, Jérôme; Osher, Stanley J; Bertozzi, Andrea L; Weiss, Paul S

    2016-05-24

    We map buried hydrogen-bonding networks within self-assembled monolayers of 3-mercapto-N-nonylpropionamide on Au{111}. The contributing interactions include the buried S-Au bonds at the substrate surface and the buried plane of linear networks of hydrogen bonds. Both are simultaneously mapped with submolecular resolution, in addition to the exposed interface, to determine the orientations of molecular segments and directional bonding. Two-dimensional mode-decomposition techniques are used to elucidate the directionality of these networks. We find that amide-based hydrogen bonds cross molecular domain boundaries and areas of local disorder. PMID:27096290

  10. Surface energy characterization of sandstone rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsalan, Naveed; Palayangoda, Sujeewa S.; Burnett, Daniel J.; Buiting, Johannes J.; Nguyen, Quoc P.

    2013-08-01

    The fundamental forces of adhesion are responsible for the spreading of fluids such as crude oil/brine on the reservoir rock surface. These physico-chemical interactions determine the surface energetics of a reservoir and thus their wetting phenomena. Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC) is introduced to characterize the surface energy of sandstones (Ottawa sand and Berea sandstone). The surface chemistry of the sandstone rocks is further elucidated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The behavior of the polar and non-polar interaction forces was investigated at varying water coverage and at different temperatures. The results indicated that in general as the water coverage increased, the Lifshitz-van der Waals component of surface energy decreased to nearly that of the bulk water, while the acid-base component also showed a decreasing trend. The Lifshitz-van der Waals component of surface energy always decreased with increase in temperature, while the acid-base properties showed contrasting trends in line with changes in surface chemistry of the sandstones, due to the change in temperature. Finally, the wetting properties arising in reservoir sandstones were related to the surface chemistry of the reservoir fluids and their interactions with the reservoir rock surface.

  11. New Perspectives on the Old Red Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miall, Andrew D.

    The Old Red Sandstone is amongst the most distinctive and well-known stratigraphic units in the British Isles. It is mainly of Devonian age; in fact, its lower boundary was used to define the base of the Devonian until relatively recently and it was called "Old" back in the nineteenth century to distinguish it from a superficially similar succession of Triassic age named the New Red Sandstone. The Old Red Sandstone has long been known to be a non-marine syntectonic to post-tectonic deposit associated with the Caledonian Orogeny One of the most famous outcrops of the red sandstone is at Siccar Point in northeast England at one of several outcrops named "Hutton's unconformity" where it lies, with marked angularity on Silurian lithic sandstones and shales. It was at these outcrops, toward the end of the eigthteenth century that James Hutton first came to understand the meaning of angular unconformities as structures representing vast amounts of missing time during which major upheavals of the Earth's crust occurred.

  12. Sm-Nd isotopic study of Precambrian/Cambrian sedimentary provenance in the Great Basin and implications for the tectonic evolution of the western US

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Nd isotopic compositions and Sm-Nd model ages were determined for 14 Precambrian to Cambrian clastic miogeoclinal and 2 Lower Paleozoic eugeoclinal metasedimentary rocks in the Great Basin to determine the sediment source regions and constrain the tectonic evolution of the western margin of the continental US Upper Precambrian (McCoy Creek Group-MCG) and Lower Cambrian miogeoclinal sandstones and shales have homogeneous 147SM/144Nd values (.110 to .119) but show a regional variation in measured element of/sub Nd/, from values of -18 and -26 (T/sub DM/=1.9 and 2.5Ga) in the Pilot and Ruby Ranges in N. Nevada, to values clustering at -11 and -18 (T/sub DM/=1.3 and 1.9Ga) in the Deep Creek and Schell Creek Ranges in the east-central Great Basin. The isotopic variations in the MCG correspond spatially to changes in the element of/sub ND/(0) and T/sub DM/ Precambrian basement adjacent to the miogeocline, suggesting that the MCG were derived from these crustal terranes and were deposited close to the paleocontinental margin of the western US. An element of/sub Nd/(0)=22.14 (T/sub DM/=2.1 Ga) for deeper water miogeoclinal sediment in the southern Great Basin (Wyman Fm-White Mountains, California) requires a source either in nearby T/sub DM/=2.2Ga crust in the S. Sierra Nevada (Bennett and DePaolo, 1984), or in T/sub DM/>2.0Ga crustal terranes to the north, with the sediment having been transported southward via Precambrian longshore currents. Feldspathic sandstone of the Cambrian Harmony Formation in north-central Nevada has element of/sub Nd/(0)=-25.22 (T/sub DM/=2.4Ga), consistent with a northerly source in Archean crust of present-day Idaho, while Ordovician shale of the Vinini Fm. in central Nevada has element of/sub Nd/(0)=-17.6, identical to values for the MCG exposed directly to the east.

  13. Recognition of Macluritella ( Gastropoda) from the Upper Cambrian of Missouri and Nevada ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yochelson, E.L.; Stinchcomb, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Open-coiled euomphalacean gastropods have been identified for the first time in the Upper Cambrian Eminence Dolomite of Missouri. These gastropods have a triangular whorl profile and are conspecific with Hyolithes walcotti described from the Upper Cambrian of Nevada. That species is questionably reassigned to the gastropod genus Macluritella, hitherto known only from the Lower Ordovician of Colorado. -Authors Ordovician Colorado

  14. Beyond the Burgess Shale: Cambrian microfossils track the rise and fall of hallucigeniid lobopodians.

    PubMed

    Caron, Jean-Bernard; Smith, Martin R; Harvey, Thomas H P

    2013-09-22

    Burgess Shale-type deposits are renowned for their exquisite preservation of soft-bodied organisms, representing a range of animal body plans that evolved during the Cambrian 'explosion'. However, the rarity of these fossil deposits makes it difficult to reconstruct the broader-scale distributions of their constituent organisms. By contrast, microscopic skeletal elements represent an extensive chronicle of early animal evolution--but are difficult to interpret in the absence of corresponding whole-body fossils. Here, we provide new observations on the dorsal spines of the Cambrian lobopodian (panarthropod) worm Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale (Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5). These exhibit a distinctive scaly microstructure and layered (cone-in-cone) construction that together identify a hitherto enigmatic suite of carbonaceous and phosphatic Cambrian microfossils--including material attributed to Mongolitubulus, Rushtonites and Rhombocorniculum--as spines of Hallucigenia-type lobopodians. Hallucigeniids are thus revealed as an important and widespread component of disparate Cambrian communities from late in the Terreneuvian (Cambrian Stage 2) through the 'middle' Cambrian (Series 3); their apparent decline in the latest Cambrian may be partly taphonomic. The cone-in-cone construction of hallucigeniid sclerites is shared with the sclerotized cuticular structures (jaws and claws) in modern onychophorans. More generally, our results emphasize the reciprocal importance and complementary roles of Burgess Shale-type fossils and isolated microfossils in documenting early animal evolution. PMID:23902914

  15. Beyond the Burgess Shale: Cambrian microfossils track the rise and fall of hallucigeniid lobopodians

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Jean-Bernard; Smith, Martin R.; Harvey, Thomas H. P.

    2013-01-01

    Burgess Shale-type deposits are renowned for their exquisite preservation of soft-bodied organisms, representing a range of animal body plans that evolved during the Cambrian ‘explosion’. However, the rarity of these fossil deposits makes it difficult to reconstruct the broader-scale distributions of their constituent organisms. By contrast, microscopic skeletal elements represent an extensive chronicle of early animal evolution—but are difficult to interpret in the absence of corresponding whole-body fossils. Here, we provide new observations on the dorsal spines of the Cambrian lobopodian (panarthropod) worm Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale (Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5). These exhibit a distinctive scaly microstructure and layered (cone-in-cone) construction that together identify a hitherto enigmatic suite of carbonaceous and phosphatic Cambrian microfossils—including material attributed to Mongolitubulus, Rushtonites and Rhombocorniculum—as spines of Hallucigenia-type lobopodians. Hallucigeniids are thus revealed as an important and widespread component of disparate Cambrian communities from late in the Terreneuvian (Cambrian Stage 2) through the ‘middle’ Cambrian (Series 3); their apparent decline in the latest Cambrian may be partly taphonomic. The cone-in-cone construction of hallucigeniid sclerites is shared with the sclerotized cuticular structures (jaws and claws) in modern onychophorans. More generally, our results emphasize the reciprocal importance and complementary roles of Burgess Shale-type fossils and isolated microfossils in documenting early animal evolution. PMID:23902914

  16. Implementation of the buried waste integrated demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, K.M.; Merrill, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development (OTD) has initiated the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) to resolve technological deficiencies associated with the remediation of radioactive and hazardous buried waste. The BWID mission is to identify, demonstrate, and transfer innovative technologies for the remediation of DOE buried waste. To accomplish the mission, BWID is using a systems approach which supports the development of a suite of advanced and innovative technologies for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. This systems approach includes technologies for theentire remediation cycle. Specifically, BWID sponsors technology development in the following technology categories: site and waste characterization, retrieval, preprocessing, ex situ treatment, packaging, transportation, storage, disposal, and post-disposal monitoring.

  17. Implementation of the buried waste integrated demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, K.M.; Merrill, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development (OTD) has initiated the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) to resolve technological deficiencies associated with the remediation of radioactive and hazardous buried waste. The BWID mission is to identify, demonstrate, and transfer innovative technologies for the remediation of DOE buried waste. To accomplish the mission, BWID is using a systems approach which supports the development of a suite of advanced and innovative technologies for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. This systems approach includes technologies for theentire remediation cycle. Specifically, BWID sponsors technology development in the following technology categories: site and waste characterization, retrieval, preprocessing, ex situ treatment, packaging, transportation, storage, disposal, and post-disposal monitoring.

  18. Did homeobox gene duplications contribute to the Cambrian explosion?

    PubMed

    Holland, Peter W H

    2015-01-01

    The Cambrian explosion describes an apparently rapid increase in the diversity of bilaterian animals around 540-515 million years ago. Bilaterian animals explore the world in three-dimensions deploying forward-facing sense organs, a brain, and an anterior mouth; they possess muscle blocks enabling efficient crawling and burrowing in sediments, and they typically have an efficient 'through-gut' with separate mouth and anus to process bulk food and eject waste, even when burrowing in sediment. A variety of ecological, environmental, genetic, and developmental factors have been proposed as possible triggers and correlates of the Cambrian explosion, and it is likely that a combination of factors were involved. Here, I focus on a set of developmental genetic changes and propose these are part of the mix of permissive factors. I describe how ANTP-class homeobox genes, which encode transcription factors involved in body patterning, increased in number in the bilaterian stem lineage and earlier. These gene duplications generated a large array of ANTP class genes, including three distinct gene clusters called NK, Hox, and ParaHox. Comparative data supports the idea that NK genes were deployed primarily to pattern the bilaterian mesoderm, Hox genes coded position along the central nervous system, and ParaHox genes most likely originally specified the mouth, midgut, and anus of the newly evolved through-gut. It is proposed that diversification of ANTP class genes played a role in the Cambrian explosion by contributing to the patterning systems used to build animal bodies capable of high-energy directed locomotion, including active burrowing. PMID:26605046

  19. Uranium in the Upper Cambrian black shale of Sweden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, Vincent Ellis

    1955-01-01

    The Peltura zone of the Upper Cambrian black shales of Sweden contains about 0.02 percent uranium. Maximum amounts are present in rocks deposited in an embayment in the sea and in rocks in or closely adjacent to that part of the vertical sequence that contains maximum amounts of distillable oil, total organic matter, pyrite, and a black highly uraniferous kerogen called "kolm". Available data suggest that the precipitation of uranium is favored by a low redox potential and that the uranium in the shale matrix may be in fine-grained kolm.

  20. Syn-rift unconformities punctuating the lower-middle Cambrian transition in the Atlas Rift, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvaro, J. Javier; Ezzouhairi, Hassan; Clausen, Sébastien; Ribeiro, M. Luisa; Solá, Rita

    2015-04-01

    The Cambrian Tamdroust and Bab n'Ali Volcanic Complexes represent two magmatic episodes developed in the latest Ediacaran-Cambrian Atlas Rift of Morocco. Their rifting pulses were accompanied by accumulation of volcanosedimentary edifices (dominated by effusive lava flows in the former and explosive acidic aprons in the latter) associated with active tilting and uplift. Sealing of their peneplaned horst-and-graben palaeotopographies led to the onset of distinct onlapping geometries and angular discordances capping eroded basements ranging from the Ediacaran Ouarzazate Supergroup to the Cambrian Asrir Formation. Previous interpretations of these discordances as pull-apart or compressive events are revised here and reinterpreted in an extensional (rifting) context associated with active volcanism. The record of erosive unconformities, stratigraphic gaps, condensed beds and onlapping patterns across the traditional "lower-middle Cambrian" (or Cambrian Series 2-3) transition of the Atlas Rift must be taken into consideration for global chronostratigraphic correlation based on their trilobite content.

  1. The Cambrian explosion triggered by critical turning point in genome size evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Dirson Jian; Zhang, Shengli

    2010-02-01

    The Cambrian explosion is a grand challenge to science today and involves multidisciplinary study. This event is generally believed as a result of genetic innovations, environmental factors and ecological interactions, even though there are many conflicts on nature and timing of metazoan origins. The crux of the matter is that an entire roadmap of the evolution is missing to discern the biological complexity transition and to evaluate the critical role of the Cambrian explosion in the overall evolutionary context. Here, we calculate the time of the Cambrian explosion by a "C-value clock"; our result quite fits the fossil records. We clarify that the intrinsic reason of genome evolution determined the Cambrian explosion. A general formula for evaluating genome size of different species has been found, by which the genome size evolution can be illustrated. The Cambrian explosion, as a major transition of biological complexity, essentially corresponds to a critical turning point in genome size evolution. PMID:20074549

  2. TNX Burying Ground: Environmental information document

    SciTech Connect

    Dunaway, J.K.W.; Johnson, W.F.; Kingley, L.E.; Simmons, R.V.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    The TNX Burying Ground, located within the TNX Area of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), was originally built to dispose of debris from an experimental evaporator explosion at TNX in 1953. This evaporator contained approximately 590 kg of uranyl nitrate. From 1980 to 1984, much of the waste material buried at TNX was excavated and sent to the SRP Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds for reburial. An estimated 27 kg of uranyl nitrate remains buried at TNX. The TNX Burying Ground consists of three sites known to contain waste and one site suspected of containing waste material. All four sites are located within the TNX security fenceline. Groundwater at the TNX Burying Ground was not evaluated because there are no groundwater monitoring wells installed in the immediate vicinity of this waste site. The closure options considered for the TNX Burying Ground are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated.

  3. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that offer promising solutions to the problems associated with the remediation of buried waste. BWID addresses the difficult remediation problems associated with DOE complex-wide buried waste, particularly transuranic (TRU) contaminated buried waste. BWID has implemented a systems approach to the development and demonstration of technologies that will characterize, retrieve, treat, and dispose of DOE buried wastes. This approach encompasses the entire remediation process from characterization to post-monitoring. The development and demonstration of the technology is predicated on how a technology fits into the total remediation process. To address all of these technological issues, BWID has enlisted scientific expertise of individuals and groups from within the DOE Complex, as well as experts from universities and private industry. The BWID mission is to support development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that, when integrated with commercially-available technologies, forms a comprehensive, remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste throughout the DOE Complex. BWID will evaluate and validate demonstrated technologies and transfer this information and equipment to private industry to support the Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), Office of Waste Management (WM), and Office of Facility Transition (FT) remediation planning and implementation activities.

  4. Seismic Response of Carbonate Cemented Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, T.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.

    2007-12-01

    This study focuses on how carbonate cementation precipitated at the key sequence stratigraphic surfaces impact the seismic impedance. Our goals are two-fold: (1) to identify the sedimentological variations within carbonate- cemented sandstones and (2) to quantify their effects on P-impedance. To accomplish this goal, we identify the relationship between carbonate cementation and key stratigraphic surfaces, such as, the incision surfaces and the flooding surfaces. Next, we use effective medium models to quantify the impact of sediment parameters on P- impedance. We find that the carbonate cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in nature, even within a depth interval of 60 meter in our study area offshore Equatorial Guinea, West Africa. Their grain-size, sorting, mineralogy, clay-content, amount of cement and degree of leaching vary considerably. We identify two distinct clusters of data in the P-impedance vs. porosity plane. The carbonate cemented sandstones from the base of incision are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance. On the contrary, data from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. The contact cement model fails to predict the trend shown by the later cluster of data. The predictions using the constant cement model with 1% constant carbonate cement, and the modified stiffsand model with 15% critical porosity agree reasonably well with the data. Furthermore, we find that the modified differential effective media model with 40% percolation porosity, and Berryman's self consistent model with 20% percolation porosity fit P- impedance vs. porosity trend of the carbonated cemented sandstones. In conclusion, the carbonate cements are different than the siliciclastic cements in terms of sedimentological parameters, and the commonly used rock physics model for quartz cemented sandstones are not always suitable to predict P-impedance vs. porosity trends for the

  5. Buried-hill discoveries in Damintan depression of north China basin

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoguang, Tong; Huang Zuan

    1988-02-01

    The Damintan fault depression is about 20 km west of Shenyang, Liaoning Province, North China, and is a small Tertiary continental depression, covering only about 800 km/sup 2/. In the depression, the Tertiary system unconformably overlies upper-middle Proterozoic sedimentary rocks and Archean metamorphic rocks. The Tertiary system is up to 6,600 m in thickness. Source rocks are in the third and fourth members of the Eocene Shahejie Formation. Buried-hill traps were formed in Proterozoic carbonates and metamorphic rocks of the Archean. Fault block, stratigraphic, and lithologic traps also occur in sandstones of the Shahejie Formation, especially in those of the third member. Several buried-hill-drape traps occur in the depression. The various types of oil pools in each buried-hill-drape trap constitute a complex hydrocarbon accumulation zone. A series of oil fields have been found in the depression. The crude oil is characterized by high wax content and high pour point. Hydrocarbon exploration began in 1971, but only a few small oil fields were found in the 1970s. Recently, by applying digital seismic techniques, the subsurface geological structure has been accurately mapped and new production technology has enabled the high-our-point oil to be produced. Thus, important achievements in hydrocarbon exploration were made during the 1980s.

  6. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  7. Delayed onset sandstone pneumoconiosis: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Symanski, H.

    1981-01-01

    An unusual case of silicosis is described in a worker who inhaled the dust of pure silica while working in a sandstone quarry. The exposure lasted only eight years. In 1980, 45 years after exposure ceased, severe clinical manifestations of silicosis appeared for the first time. The chest X-ray showed a pneumoconiosis A 2mn/A2 Mn Cor, em, hilus, based on the International Classification of Geneva, 1958. A diagnosis of sandstone pneumoconiosis was made. The case is one further example of late-occurring disease appearing after a latency of several decades.

  8. Towering sponges in an Early Cambrian Lagerstätte: Disparity between nonbilaterian and bilaterian epifaunal tierers at the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xunlai; Xiao, Shuhai; Parsley, Ronald L.; Zhou, Chuanming; Chen, Zhe; Hu, Jie

    2002-04-01

    Epifaunal, suspension-feeding bilaterian animals in the Cambrian lived close to the sediment-water interface, and hence their ecological tiering levels were low (<10 cm). Here we report an Early Cambrian (Diandongian or probably Tommotian-Atdabanian) Lagerstätte from the Hetang Formation in Anhui Province, south China. The Hetang biota is characterized by high-tiering (to 50 cm) sponges and small (<0.5 cm) bilaterians (including orthothecid hyoliths and bivalved arthropods). Nonbilaterian suspension feeders (sponges, cnidarians, and archaeocyathids) as high-tiering animals and bilaterian suspension feeders as low-tiering animals also characterize other Neoproterozoic-Cambrian assemblages, such as the Ediacaran, Chengjiang, Burgess Shale, and Sinsk biotas. These data are consistent with medium- to high-tiering levels in Neoproterozoic-Cambrian epifaunal communities, but suggest that nonbilaterians achieved such tiering levels long before bilaterian suspension feeders did so in the Early Ordovician. The disparity between bilaterian and nonbilaterian tierers during the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition and the delayed appearance of high-tiering bilaterians demand phylogenetic and ecological explanations. The Cambrian substrate revolution may have triggered a cascade of ecological evolution, including the rise of bilaterian animals in high-tiering levels during the Ordovician radiation of the Paleozoic fauna.

  9. Testing alternative tectonic models of Palaeotethys in the E Mediterranean region: new U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analyses of detrital zircons from Late Carboniferous and Late Triassic sandstones associated with the Anatolide and Tauride blocks (S Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaömer, Timur; Ayda Ustaömer, Petek; Robertson, Alastair; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Alternative tectonic models of Palaeotethys during Late Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic time infer: 1. southward subduction beneath the north margin of Gondwana; 2. northward subduction beneath the south margin of Eurasia, or 3. double subduction (northwards and southwards), at least during Late Carboniferous. U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analysis of detrital zircons, extracted from sandstones, can provide strong indications of age and identity of source terranes. Here, we consider the provenance of both Late Carboniferous and Late Triassic sandstones from both relatively allochthonous and relatively autochthonous units that are all spatially associated with the Anatolide and Tauride continental blocks. The relatively allochthonous units are sandstones (3 samples) from the Late Carboniferous Aladaǧ Nappe (Tauride; in the east), the Konya Complex (Anatolide; central area) and the Karaburun Mélange (Tauride-related; in the west). The relatively autochthonous units are Late Triassic sandstones (4 samples) from the Üzümdere Formation, the Kasımlar Formation (both western Taurides) and the Güvercinlik Formation (Karaburun Peninsula-Tauride related; far west). The Late Carboniferous sandstones from the three relatively allochthonous units are dominated by Precambrian zircon populations, the age distribution of which suggests derivation from two contrasting source regions: First, a NE African-type source (i.e. Saharan craton) for the sandstones of the Konya Mélange and the Aladaǧ Nappe because these sediments have prominent zircon populations dated at 0.5-0.7, 0.8 and 0.9-1.1 Ga. Palaeozoic zircons are minimal in the sandstones of the Aladaǧ Nappe and the Konya Complex (3 and 5% of the whole data, respectively) and are confined to Cambrian to Ordovician. Secondly, a contrasting NW African-type source is inferred for sandstone from the Karaburun Mélange because of the marked absence of Tonian-Stenian zircons and the predominance of ~2 Ga zircons over ~2.5 Ga zircons. In

  10. Development, triploblastism, physics of wetting and the Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    The Cambrian explosion is characterized by the sudden outburst of organized animal plans, which occurred circa 530 M years ago. Around that time, many forms of animal life appeared, including several which have since disappeared. There is no general consensus about "why" this happened, and why it had any form of suddenness. However, all organized animal plans share a common feature: they are triploblastic, i.e., composed of 3 layers of tissue, endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm. I show here that, within simple hypotheses, the formation of the mesoderm has intrinsically a physical exponential dynamics, leading rapidly to triploblastism, and eventually, to animal formation. A novel physico-mathematical framework including epithelium-mesenchyme transition, visco-elastic constitutive equations, and conservation laws, is presented which allows one to describe gastrulation as a self-wetting phenomenon of a soft solid onto itself. This phenomenon couples differentiation and migration during gastrulation, and leads in a closed form to an exponential scaling law for the formation of the mesoderm. Therefore, the Cambrian explosion might have started, actually, by a true viscoelastic "explosion": the exponential run-away of mesenchymal cells. PMID:23959076

  11. Preservational Pathways of Corresponding Brains of a Cambrian Euarthropod.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoya; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Hou, Xianguang; Goral, Tomasz; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2015-11-16

    The record of arthropod body fossils is traceable back to the "Cambrian explosion," marked by the appearance of most major animal phyla. Exceptional preservation provides crucial evidence for panarthropod early radiation. However, due to limited representation in the fossil record of internal anatomy, particularly the CNS, studies usually rely on exoskeletal and appendicular morphology. Recent studiesshow that despite extreme morphological disparities, euarthropod CNS evolution appears to have been remarkably conservative. This conclusion is supported by descriptions from Cambrian panarthropods of neural structures that contribute to understanding early evolution of nervous systems and resolving controversies about segmental homologies. However, the rarity of fossilized CNSs, even when exoskeletons and appendages show high levels of integrity, brought into question data reproducibility because all but one of the aforementioned studies were based on single specimens. Foremost among objections is the lack of taphonomic explanation for exceptional preservation of a tissue that some see as too prone to decay to be fossilized. Here we describe newly discovered specimens of the Chengjiang euarthropod Fuxianhuia protensa with fossilized brains revealing matching profiles, allowing rigorous testing of the reproducibility of cerebral structures. Their geochemical analyses provide crucial insights of taphonomic pathways for brain preservation, ranging from uniform carbon compressions to complete pyritization, revealing that neural tissue was initially preserved as carbonaceous film and subsequently pyritized. This mode of preservation is consistent with the taphonomic pathways of gross anatomy, indicating that no special mode is required for fossilization of labile neural tissue. PMID:26526373

  12. Oxygen, ecology, and the Cambrian radiation of animals

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Erik A.; Frieder, Christina A.; Raman, Akkur V.; Girguis, Peter R.; Levin, Lisa A.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    The Proterozoic-Cambrian transition records the appearance of essentially all animal body plans (phyla), yet to date no single hypothesis adequately explains both the timing of the event and the evident increase in diversity and disparity. Ecological triggers focused on escalatory predator–prey “arms races” can explain the evolutionary pattern but not its timing, whereas environmental triggers, particularly ocean/atmosphere oxygenation, do the reverse. Using modern oxygen minimum zones as an analog for Proterozoic oceans, we explore the effect of low oxygen levels on the feeding ecology of polychaetes, the dominant macrofaunal animals in deep-sea sediments. Here we show that low oxygen is clearly linked to low proportions of carnivores in a community and low diversity of carnivorous taxa, whereas higher oxygen levels support more complex food webs. The recognition of a physiological control on carnivory therefore links environmental triggers and ecological drivers, providing an integrated explanation for both the pattern and timing of Cambrian animal radiation. PMID:23898193

  13. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. Late Ediacaran-Cambrian structures and their reactivation during the Variscan and Alpine cycles in the Anti-Atlas (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulaimani, A.; Michard, A.; Ouanaimi, H.; Baidder, L.; Raddi, Y.; Saddiqi, O.; Rjimati, E. C.

    2014-10-01

    The post-Pan-African evolution of the northern border of the West African Craton is largely controlled by the remobilisation of Late Neoproterozoic basement faults. The Upper Ediacaran volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequences of the Ouarzazate Group show dramatic and rapid thickness changes, consistent with active extensional faulting associated with post-orogenic collapse and incipient continental rifting. The geometry and kinematics of these faults differ from west to east in the Anti-Atlas. N- to NE-trending faults dominate in western Anti-Atlas in response to E-W to NW-SE pure extension, while a transtensive opening regime characterize the central (Bou Azzer) and eastern (Saghro-Ougnate) Anti-Atlas. The marine incursion in the west-central Anti-Atlas during the late Ediacaran-Early Cambrian occurred without major geodynamical break between the continental Ouarzazate Group and marine sediments of the Adoudou Fm. Extensional tectonics went on during the Early Cambrian, being concentrated in the western and central parts of the belt. From Middle Cambrian to Lower Devonian and mainly due to thermal subsidence, the Anti-Atlas basement was buried under marine sediments with dominant south-derived detrital input. Basement faults control the distribution of subsiding versus shallow areas. During the Middle-Late Devonian, the dislocation of the Saharan platform occurred, mainly in the eastern Anti-Atlas where Precambrian faults were also remobilized during the Early Carboniferous. During the Variscan orogeny, the Paleozoic series of the Anti-Atlas basin were involved in folding tectonics, concomitant with the uplift of Proterozoic basement blocks bounded by inherited basement faults. The pre-existing rift-related faults were variably inverted across the Anti-Atlas. In the westernmost part of the belt, Variscan shortening induced positive inversions along the remobilized basement faults, but in some cases, some faults preserved an apparently normal throw. Some hidden

  15. Emplacement of sandstone intrusions during contractional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Giuseppe; Grippa, Antonio; Bureau, Denis; Alsop, G. Ian; Hurst, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Sandstone injections are created by the forceful emplacement of remobilized sand in response to increases in overpressure. However, the contribution provided by horizontal compressive stress to the build-up in overpressure, and the resulting emplacement of sand injection complexes, is still to be substantiated by robust field observations. An opportunity to address this issue occurs in Central California where a large volume of sandstone intrusions record regionally-persistent supra-lithostatic pore-pressure. Detailed fieldwork allows sandstone-filled thrusts to be recognized and, for the first time, permits us to demonstrate that some sandstone intrusions are linked to contractional deformation affecting the western border of the Great Valley Basin. Fluidized sand was extensively injected along thrust surfaces, and also fills local dilatant cavities linked to thrusting. The main aims of this paper are to provide detailed descriptions of the newly recognized syn-tectonic injections, and describe detailed cross-cutting relationships with earlier sandstone injection complexes in the study area. Finally, an evolutionary model consisting of three phases of sand injection is provided. In this model, sand injection is linked to contractional tectonic episodes affecting the western side of the Great Valley Basin during the Early-Middle Cenozoic. This study demonstrates that sand injections, driven by fluid overpressure, may inject along thrusts and folds and thereby overcome stresses associated with regional contractional deformation. It is shown that different generations of sand injection can develop in the same area under the control of different stress regimes, linked to the evolving mountain chain.

  16. Early palaeozoic palaeomagnetism in Australia I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia III. Middle to early-Late Cambrian results from the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klootwijk, C. T.

    1980-04-01

    I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia A total of 460 samples from six sequences spanning the Cambrian succession of the Flinders Ranges (Adelaide "Geosyncline", South Australia) has been analyzed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples showed a recent field component, generally constituting more than 50% of the initial intensity, which in most cases was removed by 200-400°C. Two characteristic magnetic components have been identified: (A) A secondary magnetic component of Cambro-Ordovician age (S-pole at 75.3°E 26.0°N, α95 = 7.4°, N = 5 localities) interpreted as having been induced by thermochemical activity during a period of enhanced heat flux prior to the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician diastrophistic phases of the Delamarian Orogeny. (B) A primary magnetic component, which indicates rapid polar motion during the Early Cambrian and a much reduced polar motion during the Middle Cambrian. Representative palaeomagnetic pole positions for the primary component are: (1) Basal Hawker Group (earliest Cambrian): S-pole at 2.3°E 26.7°S, d p = 8.1°, d m = 14.3°, N = 10 (sites). (2) Billy Creek Formation— Wirrealpa Limestone— Aroona Creek Limestone (late Early Cambrian to early Middle Cambrian): S-pole at 20.1°E 37.4°S, d p = 7.2°, dm = 14.4°, N = 11(sites). (3) Basal Lake Frame Group (Middle Cambrian): S-pole at 26.1°E 29.3°S, d p = 6.6°, d m = 13.1°, N =10 (sites). (4) Pantapinna Formation (late Middle Cambrian?): S-pole at 29.2°E 36.4°S, d p = 8.4°, dm = 16.7°, N = 4 (sites). Available data suggest that deposition of the Lake Frome Group beds probably did not continue into the Late Cambrian. II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia A total of 108 block samples from a late Early Cambrian red-bed sequence on Kangaroo Island (Adelaide "Geosyncline", South Australia) has been analysed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples contained a recent field component of

  17. Frost heave induced mechanics of buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Selvadurai, A.P.S.; Shinde, S.B.

    1993-12-01

    This paper examines the problem of the flexural interaction between a long-distance buried pipeline embedded in a soil medium that experiences differential frost heave. The modeling takes into consideration the interaction at a transition zone between a frozen region and a frost-susceptible region that experiences a time-dependent growth of a frost bulb around the buried pipeline. The heave that accompanies the development of a frost bulb induces the soil-pipeline interaction process. The analysis focuses on the development of a computational scheme that addresses the three-dimensional nature of the soil-pipeline interaction problem, the creep susceptibility of the frozen region, and a prescribed time- and stress-dependent heave in an evolving frost bulb zone. The numerical results presented in the paper illustrate the influence of the heave process and the creep behavior of the frozen soil on the displacements and stresses in the buried pipeline.

  18. Prioritization for rehabilitation of buried lifelines

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.R.L.; Ishibashi, I.; Li, H.

    1995-12-31

    Seismic rehabilitation or retrofit is a cost-effective way to prevent pipeline damage caused by future earthquakes. In general, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to rehabilitate all buried pipelines at the same time because of limited funds and time available. The purpose of this study is to establish a priority strategy for rehabilitation of buried pipelines considering several important factors such as pipeline damage probability, rehabilitation cost, rehabilitation rate (e.g. km/day), pipeline importance and total funds available.

  19. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration test objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.L.; Heard, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program (BWID) is to support the development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies form a comprehensive system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste throughout the US Department of Energy complex. To accomplish this mission of identifying technology solutions for remediation deficiencies, the Office of Technology Development initiated the BWID at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in fiscal year (FY) 1991. This document provides the test objectives against which the demonstrations will be tested during FY-93.

  20. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  1. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  2. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  3. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  4. Limited Panniculectomy for Adult Buried Penis Repair.

    PubMed

    Figler, Bradley D; Chery, Lisly; Friedrich, Jeffrey B; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B

    2015-11-01

    Patients with buried or hidden penis may be unable to carry out normal hygiene, void with a directable urine stream, or be sexually active as a result of the condition. Although these patients are nearly always obese, weight loss often does not reverse the problem, as the mons pannus may remain after weight loss. Furthermore, associated penile skin changes such as lichen sclerosus or stenosis of the penile shaft skin are often irreversible. Treatment includes removal of the diseased shaft skin surrounding the penis, in combination with a limited panniculectomy. The authors present their technique for this procedure in a typical patient with buried penis that prevented him from voiding effectively. PMID:26182174

  5. Embryos, polyps and medusae of the Early Cambrian scyphozoan Olivooides

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xi-Ping; Cunningham, John A.; Bengtson, Stefan; Thomas, Ceri-Wyn; Liu, Jianbo; Stampanoni, Marco; Donoghue, Philip C. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Early Cambrian organism Olivooides is known from both embryonic and post-embryonic stages and, consequently, it has the potential to yield vital insights into developmental evolution at the time that animal body plans were established. However, this potential can only be realized if the phylogenetic relationships of Olivooides can be constrained. The affinities of Olivooides have proved controversial because of the lack of knowledge of the internal anatomy and the limited range of developmental stages known. Here, we describe rare embryonic specimens in which internal anatomical features are preserved. We also present a fuller sequence of fossilized developmental stages of Olivooides, including associated specimens that we interpret as budding ephyrae (juvenile medusae), all of which display a clear pentaradial symmetry. Within the framework of a cnidarian interpretation, the new data serve to pinpoint the phylogenetic position of Olivooides to the scyphozoan stem group. Hypotheses about scalidophoran or echinoderm affinities of Olivooides can be rejected. PMID:23446532

  6. Embryos, polyps and medusae of the Early Cambrian scyphozoan Olivooides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xi-Ping; Cunningham, John A; Bengtson, Stefan; Thomas, Ceri-Wyn; Liu, Jianbo; Stampanoni, Marco; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2013-04-22

    The Early Cambrian organism Olivooides is known from both embryonic and post-embryonic stages and, consequently, it has the potential to yield vital insights into developmental evolution at the time that animal body plans were established. However, this potential can only be realized if the phylogenetic relationships of Olivooides can be constrained. The affinities of Olivooides have proved controversial because of the lack of knowledge of the internal anatomy and the limited range of developmental stages known. Here, we describe rare embryonic specimens in which internal anatomical features are preserved. We also present a fuller sequence of fossilized developmental stages of Olivooides, including associated specimens that we interpret as budding ephyrae (juvenile medusae), all of which display a clear pentaradial symmetry. Within the framework of a cnidarian interpretation, the new data serve to pinpoint the phylogenetic position of Olivooides to the scyphozoan stem group. Hypotheses about scalidophoran or echinoderm affinities of Olivooides can be rejected. PMID:23446532

  7. Early palaeozoic palaeomagnetism in Australia I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia III. Middle to early-Late Cambrian results from the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klootwijk, C. T.

    1980-04-01

    I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia A total of 460 samples from six sequences spanning the Cambrian succession of the Flinders Ranges (Adelaide "Geosyncline", South Australia) has been analyzed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples showed a recent field component, generally constituting more than 50% of the initial intensity, which in most cases was removed by 200-400°C. Two characteristic magnetic components have been identified: (A) A secondary magnetic component of Cambro-Ordovician age (S-pole at 75.3°E 26.0°N, α95 = 7.4°, N = 5 localities) interpreted as having been induced by thermochemical activity during a period of enhanced heat flux prior to the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician diastrophistic phases of the Delamarian Orogeny. (B) A primary magnetic component, which indicates rapid polar motion during the Early Cambrian and a much reduced polar motion during the Middle Cambrian. Representative palaeomagnetic pole positions for the primary component are: (1) Basal Hawker Group (earliest Cambrian): S-pole at 2.3°E 26.7°S, d p = 8.1°, d m = 14.3°, N = 10 (sites). (2) Billy Creek Formation— Wirrealpa Limestone— Aroona Creek Limestone (late Early Cambrian to early Middle Cambrian): S-pole at 20.1°E 37.4°S, d p = 7.2°, dm = 14.4°, N = 11(sites). (3) Basal Lake Frame Group (Middle Cambrian): S-pole at 26.1°E 29.3°S, d p = 6.6°, d m = 13.1°, N =10 (sites). (4) Pantapinna Formation (late Middle Cambrian?): S-pole at 29.2°E 36.4°S, d p = 8.4°, dm = 16.7°, N = 4 (sites). Available data suggest that deposition of the Lake Frome Group beds probably did not continue into the Late Cambrian. II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia A total of 108 block samples from a late Early Cambrian red-bed sequence on Kangaroo Island (Adelaide "Geosyncline", South Australia) has been analysed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples contained a recent field component of

  8. Pulse of atmospheric oxygen during the late Cambrian

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Matthew R.; Young, Seth A.; Kump, Lee R.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Runnegar, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A rise in atmospheric O2 has been linked to the Cambrian explosion of life. For the plankton and animal radiation that began some 40 million yr later and continued through much of the Ordovician (Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event), the search for an environmental trigger(s) has remained elusive. Here we present a carbon and sulfur isotope mass balance model for the latest Cambrian time interval spanning the globally recognized Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE) that indicates a major increase in atmospheric O2. We estimate that this organic carbon and pyrite burial event added approximately 19 × 1018 moles of O2 to the atmosphere (i.e., equal to change from an initial starting point for O2 between 10–18% to a peak of 20–28% O2) beginning at approximately 500 million years. We further report on new paired carbon isotope results from carbonate and organic matter through the SPICE in North America, Australia, and China that reveal an approximately 2‰ increase in biological fractionation, also consistent with a major increase in atmospheric O2. The SPICE is followed by an increase in plankton diversity that may relate to changes in macro- and micronutrient abundances in increasingly oxic marine environments, representing a critical initial step in the trophic chain. Ecologically diverse plankton groups could provide new food sources for an animal biota expanding into progressively more ventilated marine habitats during the Ordovician, ultimately establishing complex ecosystems that are a hallmark of the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event. PMID:21368152

  9. Pulse of atmospheric oxygen during the late Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Matthew R; Young, Seth A; Kump, Lee R; Gill, Benjamin C; Lyons, Timothy W; Runnegar, Bruce

    2011-03-01

    A rise in atmospheric O(2) has been linked to the Cambrian explosion of life. For the plankton and animal radiation that began some 40 million yr later and continued through much of the Ordovician (Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event), the search for an environmental trigger(s) has remained elusive. Here we present a carbon and sulfur isotope mass balance model for the latest Cambrian time interval spanning the globally recognized Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE) that indicates a major increase in atmospheric O(2). We estimate that this organic carbon and pyrite burial event added approximately 19 × 10(18) moles of O(2) to the atmosphere (i.e., equal to change from an initial starting point for O(2) between 10-18% to a peak of 20-28% O(2)) beginning at approximately 500 million years. We further report on new paired carbon isotope results from carbonate and organic matter through the SPICE in North America, Australia, and China that reveal an approximately 2‰ increase in biological fractionation, also consistent with a major increase in atmospheric O(2). The SPICE is followed by an increase in plankton diversity that may relate to changes in macro- and micronutrient abundances in increasingly oxic marine environments, representing a critical initial step in the trophic chain. Ecologically diverse plankton groups could provide new food sources for an animal biota expanding into progressively more ventilated marine habitats during the Ordovician, ultimately establishing complex ecosystems that are a hallmark of the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event. PMID:21368152

  10. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of brines from three oil- and gas-producing sandstones in eastern Ohio, with applications to the geochemical tracing of brine sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breen, K.J.; Angelo, Clifford G.; Masters, Robert W.; Sedam, Alan C.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic characteristics of selected inorganic constituents are reported for brines from the Berea Sandstone of Mississippian age, the Clinton sandstone, Albion Sandstone of Silurian age, and the Rose Run formation of Cambrian and Ordovician age in 24 counties in eastern Ohio. Ionic concentrations of dissolved constituents in brines from these formations generally fall in the following ranges (in millimoles per kilogram of brine): Na, Cl > 1,000; 100 < Ca, Mg < 1,000; 1 < K, Br, Sr, Li, Fe, SO4 < 100; Mn, Zn, Al, I, HCO3, SiO2 < 1. Mean ionic concentrations of Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, K, SO4 and Br, and mean values of density and dissolved solids are significantly different at the 95-percent confidence level in each formation. Only potassium has a unique concentration range in each formation. Selected concentration ratios are identified as potential indicators for geochemical tracing of brines having some history of dilution. The k:Na ratios work best for identifying the source formation of an unidentified brine. Isotopic characteristics of hydrogen and oxygen indicate a meteoric origin for the water matrix of the brines. Sulfur isotopes may have utility for differentiating brines from oxidizing ground water.

  11. Effects of reduction in porosity and permeability with depth on storage capacity and injectivity in deep saline aquifers: A case study from the Mount Simon Sandstone aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.; Barnes, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Upper Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is recognized as a deep saline reservoir that has significant potential for geological sequestration in the Midwestern region of the United States. Porosity and permeability values collected from core analyses in rocks from this formation and its lateral equivalents in Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio indicate a predictable relationship with depth owing to a reduction in the pore structure due to the effects of compaction and/or cementation, primarily as quartz overgrowths. The regional trend of decreasing porosity with depth is described by the equation: ??(d)=16.36??e-0.00039*d, where ?? is the porosity and d is the depth in m. The decrease of porosity with depth generally holds true on a basinwide scale. Bearing in mind local variations in lithologic and petrophysical character within the Mount Simon Sandstone, the source data that were used to predict porosity were utilized to estimate the pore volume available within the reservoir that could potentially serve as storage space for injected CO2. The potential storage capacity estimated for the Mount Simon Sandstone in the study area, using efficiency factors of 1%, 5%, 10%, and 15%, is 23,680, 118,418, 236,832, and 355,242 million metric tons of CO2, respectively. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. True triaxial testing of Castlegate sandstone.

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, M. D.; Holcomb, David Joseph; Issen, Kathleen A.

    2010-03-01

    Deformation bands in high porosity sandstone are an important geological feature for geologists and petroleum engineers; however, their formation is not fully understood. Axisymmetric compression, the common test for this material, is not sufficient to fully evaluate localization criteria. This study seeks to investigate the influence of the second principal stress on the failure and the formation of deformation bands in Castlegate sandstone. Experimental results from tests run in the axisymmetric compression stress state, as well as a stress state between axisymmetric compression and pure shear will be presented. Samples are tested using a custom triaxial testing rig at Sandia National Laboratories capable of applying stresses up to 400 MPa. Acoustic emissions are used to locate deformation bands should they not be visible on the specimen exterior. It is suspected that the second invariant of stress has a strong contribution to the failure mode and band formation. These results could have significant bearing on petroleum extraction as well as carbon dioxide sequestration.

  13. Preserving Native American petroglyphs on porous sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grisafe, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    A new method of chemical treatment is proposed to improve the durability of soft, porous sandstones onto which Native American petroglyphs have been carved. Cores of Dakota Sandstone from the Faris Cave site, located along the Smoky Hill River in Ellsworth County, Kansas, were treated with ethyl silicate dissolved in a lightweight ketone carrier, and some cores were subsequently treated with a combination of ethyl silicate and silane using the same solvent. Measurement of the resulting physical properties, when compared to untreated cores, indicate the treatments substantially increased the compressive strength and freeze-thaw resistance of the stone without discoloring the stone or completely sealing the pore system. The treatment increases the durability of the stone and provides a method for preserving the petroglyphs at the site. After treating test panels at the site, the petroglyphs were treated in like manner.

  14. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of /sup 3/H, /sup 95m/Tc, and /sup 85/Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for /sup 85/Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for /sup 85/Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta.

  15. Lower Cambrian fossil Volborthella: The whole truth or just a piece of the beast?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signor, Philip W.; Ryan, Dallas A.

    1993-09-01

    Early Cambrian faunas are rich in strange and distinctive fossils that are difficult to interpret or to classify. The small, conical fossils assigned to the extinct phylum Agmata, and the arguments surrounding their affinities and paleoecology, are a classic example of this problem. Volborthella are commonly found in Lower Cambrian strata of North America and in coeval units on the East European platform. These agglutinated fossils are traditionally interpreted as the complete skeleton of individual animals. However, a newly discovered fossil from the White-Inyo Mountains of eastern California demonstrates that Volborthella was a bilaterally symmetrical animal bearing multiple pairs of conical agglutinated sclerites. Volborthella, as traditionally defined, was one of many sclerites covering a relatively large metazoan, an Early Cambrian armored worm or mollusklike animal, and is the only known metazoan with a scleritome composed of agglutinated elements. This discovery ends more than a century of misinterpretation of this enigmatic Early Cambrian fossil.

  16. Isotopic fractionation of uranium in sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosholt, J.N.; Shields, W.R.; Garner, E.L.

    1963-01-01

    Relatively unoxidized black uranium ores from sandstone deposits in the western United States show deviations in the uranium-235 to uranium-234 ratio throughout a range from 40 percent excess uranium-234 to 40 percent deficient uranium-234 with respect to a reference uranium-235 to uranium-234 ratio. The deficient uranium-234 is leached preferentially to uranium-238 and the excess uranium-234 is believed to result from deposition of uranium-234 enriched in solutions from leached deposits.

  17. In situ vitrification on buried waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.O.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being evaluated as a remedial treatment technology for buried mixed and transuranic (TRU) wastes at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and can be related to buried wastes at other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. There are numerous locations around the DOE Complex where wastes were buried in the ground or stored for future burial. The Buried Waste Program (BWP) is conducting a comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the Department of Energy - Field Office Idaho (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an ISV scoping study on the treatability of the SDA mixed low-level and mixed TRU waste is being performed for applicability to remediation of the waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The ISV project being conducted at the INEL by EG G Idaho, Inc. consists of a treatability investigation to collect data to satisfy nine CERCLA criteria with regards to the SDA. This treatability investigation involves a series of experiments and related efforts to study the feasibility of ISV for remediation of mixed and TRU waste disposed of at the SDA.

  18. In situ vitrification on buried waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.O.

    1992-08-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being evaluated as a remedial treatment technology for buried mixed and transuranic (TRU) wastes at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and can be related to buried wastes at other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. There are numerous locations around the DOE Complex where wastes were buried in the ground or stored for future burial. The Buried Waste Program (BWP) is conducting a comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the Department of Energy - Field Office Idaho (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an ISV scoping study on the treatability of the SDA mixed low-level and mixed TRU waste is being performed for applicability to remediation of the waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The ISV project being conducted at the INEL by EG&G Idaho, Inc. consists of a treatability investigation to collect data to satisfy nine CERCLA criteria with regards to the SDA. This treatability investigation involves a series of experiments and related efforts to study the feasibility of ISV for remediation of mixed and TRU waste disposed of at the SDA.

  19. Detection of buried mines with seismic sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Thomas G.; Baker, Steven R.; Gaghan, Frederick E.; Fitzpatrick, Sean M.; Hall, Patrick W.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Guy, Jeremie

    2003-10-01

    Prior research on seismo-acoustic sonar for detection of buried targets [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 2333-2343 (1998)] has continued with examination of the target strengths of buried test targets as well as targets of interest, and has also examined detection and confirmatory classification of these, all using arrays of seismic sources and receivers as well as signal processing techniques to enhance target recognition. The target strengths of two test targets (one a steel gas bottle, the other an aluminum powder keg), buried in a sand beach, were examined as a function of internal mass load, to evaluate theory developed for seismic sonar target strength [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 2344-2353 (1998)]. The detection of buried naval and military targets of interest was achieved with an array of 7 shaker sources and 5, three-axis seismometers, at a range of 5 m. Vector polarization filtering was the main signal processing technique for detection. It capitalizes on the fact that the vertical and horizontal components in Rayleigh wave echoes are 90 deg out of phase, enabling complex variable processing to obtain the imaginary component of the signal power versus time, which is unique to Rayleigh waves. Gabor matrix processing of this signal component was the main technique used to determine whether the target was man-made or just a natural target in the environment. [Work sponsored by ONR.

  20. Seismic response of buried submarine pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.K.; Mashaly, E.A.

    1988-12-01

    Submarine pipelines are many a time buried into a jet-blasted channel in the seabed. Seismic response of such buried pipelines are investigated in this paper. The earthquake is considered as a partially correlated stationary random proceeds characterized by a power spectral density function (PSDF). The cross-spectral density function between two random inputs along the length of the pipe is defined with the help of the local earthquake PSDF, which is the same for all points, and a frequency-dependent, exponentially decaying function (with distance). A lumped-mass model with 2-D beam elements is used to write the equation of motion. Soil resistance to dynamic excitation along the pipe length is obtained in an approximate manner with the help of frequency-independent impedance functions derived from half-space analysis and Mindlin's static stresses within the soil due to point loads. The responses are obtained by a spectral analysis for horizontal ground motions in two principal directions, which are assumed to coincide with pipe axis and the perpendicular to it. Using the proposed method of analysis, a parametric study is conducted. The results of the study help in understanding the behavior of buried submarine pipelines under seismic forces and its differences from that of the buried pipelines on land.

  1. 47 CFR 32.2423 - Buried cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2423 Buried cable. (a... other associated material used in constructing a physical path for the transmission of... single or paired conductor cable, wire and other associated material used in constructing a physical...

  2. A review of the Late Cambrian (Furongian) palaeogeography in the western Mediterranean region, NW Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvaro, J. Javier; Ferretti, Annalisa; González-Gómez, Cristina; Serpagli, Enrico; Tortello, M. Franco; Vecoli, Marco; Vizcaïno, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    The Cambrian-Ordovician transition of the western Mediterranean region (NW Gondwana) is characterized by the record of major erosive unconformities with gaps that range from a chronostratigraphic stage to a series. The hiatii are diachronous and involved progressively younger strata along the Gondwanan margin, from SW (Morocco) to NE (Montagne Noire). They can be related to development of a multi-stage rifting (further North), currently connected to the opening of the Rheic Ocean, and concomitant erosion on southern rift shoulders. The platforms of this margin of Gondwana occupied temperate-water, mid latitudes and were dominated by siliciclastic sedimentation, while carbonate factories were only episodically active in the Montagne-Noire platform. The Upper Cambrian is devoid of significant gaps in the southern Montagne Noire and the Iberian Chains. There, the sedimentation took place in a transgressive-dominated depositional system, with common offshore deposits and clayey substrates, and was bracketed by two major regressive trends. The Late Cambrian is also associated with the record of volcanic activity ( e.g., in the Cantabrian and Ossa-Morena zones, and the northern Montagne Noire), and widespread development of a tectonic instability that led to the episodic establishment of palaeotopographies and record of slope-related facies associations. Several immigration events are recognized throughout the latest Middle Cambrian, Late Cambrian and Tremadocian. The trilobites show a stepwise replacement of Acado-Baltic-type families ( e.g., the conocoryphid-paradoxidid-solenopleurid assemblage) characterized by: (i) a late Languedocian (latest Middle Cambrian) co-occurrence of Middle Cambrian trilobite families with the first anomocarid, dorypygid and proasaphiscid invaders; (ii) a Late Cambrian immigration replacing previous faunas, composed of trilobites (aphelaspidids, catillicephalids, ceratopygids, damesellids, eulomids, idahoiids, linchakephalids, lisariids

  3. Ichnofossil from the Cambrian succession of Parahio Valley, Spiti Basin, India: Their stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Shivani; Parcha, Suraj Kumar

    2013-04-01

    The Spiti Basin exposes an excellent section of Neoproterozoic- Cretaceous rocks in the Tethyan Himalaya of Himachal Pradesh. The diverse assemblage of ichnofossils is present in the Cambrian succession of Parahio Valley in the Spiti Basin. In the present study nineteen ichnofossils are reported from the Cambrian succession of Parahio Valley. The ichnofossils includes Bergaueria, Chondrites, Cruziana, Didymaulichnus, Dimorphichnus, Diplichnites, Helminthorhaphe, Merostomichnites, ?Monocraterion, Monomorphichnus, Nereites, Palaeopascichnus, Palaeophycus, Phycodes, Planolites, Rusophycus, Skolithos, Scolicia, Treptichnus etc. along with annelid worm, burrow and scratch marks. The described ichnofossil assemblage indicates that the ichnocenosis is dominated by a high behavioral diversity ranging from suspension to deposit feeders. It seems that the ichnofauna present in the Cambrian succession of this section were mostly produced by trilobite and arthropods, whereas some of them were produced by crustacean, priapulid worm, polychaetes and polyphyletic vermiforms. The distribution pattern of ichnofossils shows increase in taxonomic and morphological diversity up in the section. It further indicates that the availability of nutrients significantly increased their abundance as well as spatial distribution during Cambrian. The presence of Chondrites, Treptichnus, and Phycodes at the basal part of the Cambrian indicates shallow to deep environment with anaerobic condition. Whereas, the complex forms like Rusophycus, Cruziana, Monomorphichnus and Nereites represent shelf to slope environment. The appearance of Skolithos in the upper part reflects well oxygenated high energy condition. The environmental changes in the Parahio Valley during Cambrian period was distinctly marked by an anaerobic to aerobic condition and by a faunal change from endobenthic, soft - bodied, deposit feeders to epibenthic grazers. The present ichnofossils indicates that these sediments were

  4. Early and middle(?) Cambrian metazoan and protistan fossils from West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culver, S.J.; Repetski, J.E.; Pojeta, J., Jr.; Hunt, D.

    1996-01-01

    Supposed Upper Proterozoic strata in the southwest Taoudeni Basin, Guinea and Senegal, and from the Mauritanide fold belt, Mauritania, have yielded mostly poorly preserved small skeletal fossils of metazoan and protistan origin. Problematic, but possible echinoderm material and spicules of the heteractinid sponge Eiffelia dominate the Taoudeni Basin assemblage. The age of the material is not certain but the paleontologic data suggest an Early Cambrian age for the stratigraphically lowest faunas, and a Middle Cambrian age is possible for the stratigraphically highest collections.

  5. Early Cambrian record of failed durophagy and shell repair in an epibenthic mollusc.

    PubMed

    Skovsted, Christian B; Brock, Glenn A; Lindström, Anna; Peel, John S; Paterson, John R; Fuller, Margaret K

    2007-06-22

    Predation is arguably one of the main driving forces of early metazoan evolution, yet the fossil record of predation during the Ediacaran-Early Cambrian transition is relatively poor. Here, we present direct evidence of failed durophagous (shell-breaking) predation and subsequent shell repair in the Early Cambrian (Botoman) epibenthic mollusc Marocella from the Mernmerna Formation and Oraparinna Shale in the Flinders Ranges, South Australia. This record pushes back the first appearance of durophagy on molluscs by approximately 40Myr. PMID:17412671

  6. Seawater fluid inclusions preserved within Cambrian-Ordovician marine cements indicate Cambrian-Ordovician seawater precipitated low-magnesium calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.J.; Goldstein, R.H. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The San Saba Member of the Wilberns Formation (Llano Uplift, Texas) contains a series of Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician hardgrounds. Bladed low-Mg calcite cements are truncated at hardground surfaces and overlain by shallow marine limestones, indicating a syndepositional shallow marine origin. Primary one-phase fluid inclusions within bladed cements have marine salinities, suggesting that these low-Mg calcite cements formed as a precipitate from Late Cambrian and Early Ordovician seawater and have not undergone recrystallization. Stable isotope analysis of the bladed cement yields delta O-18 values that cluster between [minus]5.6--[minus]6.0 ([per thousand] PDB) which is comparable to those previously reported for Early Ordovician marine calcite. The delta C-13 values are more positive than those reported for this time interval (0.6--1.3 [per thousand] PDB). Trace element analysis indicates that strontium content ranges from 200 to 2,200 ppm. Iron ranges from below detection by electron microprobe to 800 ppm. Mg is generally below detection, however, cements in one hardground display Mg contents that increase progressively toward pore centers. Trace element data lack covariance that would suggest recrystallization. In addition, closed system recrystallization cannot be supported here due to a lack of microdolomite inclusions. Stable isotope, trace element, and fluid inclusion data are consistent with submarine cementation at or below the sediment-water interface. These cements have not undergone significant recrystallization and preserve a primary low Mg calcite mineralogy. These data suggest that early Paleozoic seawater differed chemically from modern seawater. Moreover, preservation of ancient seawater, within fluid inclusions, may provide a direct means of determining those differences.

  7. Subcritical scattering from buried elastic shells.

    PubMed

    Lucifredi, Irena; Schmidt, Henrik

    2006-12-01

    Buried objects have been largely undetectable by traditional high-frequency sonars due to their insignificant bottom penetration. Further, even a high grazing angle sonar approach is vastly limited by the coverage rate dictated by the finite water depth, making the detection and classification of buried objects using low frequency, subcritical sonar an interesting alternative. On the other hand, such a concept would require classification clues different from the traditional high-resolution imaging and shadows to maintain low false alarm rates. A potential alternative, even for buried targets, is classification based on the acoustic signatures of man-made elastic targets. However, the elastic responses of buried and proud targets are significantly different. The objective of this work is to identify, analyze, and explain some of the effects of the sediment and the proximity of the seabed interface on the scattering of sound from completely and partially buried elastic shells. The analysis was performed using focused array processing of data from the GOATS98 experiment carried out jointly by MIT and SACLANTCEN, and a new hybrid modeling capability combining a virtual source-or wave-field superposition-approach with an exact spectral integral representation of the Green's functions for a stratified ocean waveguide, incorporating all multiple scattering between the object and the seabed. Among the principal results is the demonstration of the significant role of structural circumferential waves in converting incident, evanescent waves into backscattered body waves, emanating to the receivers at supercritical grazing angles, in effect making the target appear closer to the sonar than predicted by traditional ray theory. PMID:17225387

  8. Sensor feature fusion for detecting buried objects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Sherwood, R.J.; Hernandez, J.E.; Buhl, M.R.; Schaich, P.C.; Kane, R.J.; Barth, M.J.; DelGrande, N.K.

    1993-04-01

    Given multiple registered images of the earth`s surface from dual-band sensors, our system fuses information from the sensors to reduce the effects of clutter and improve the ability to detect buried or surface target sites. The sensor suite currently includes two sensors (5 micron and 10 micron wavelengths) and one ground penetrating radar (GPR) of the wide-band pulsed synthetic aperture type. We use a supervised teaming pattern recognition approach to detect metal and plastic land mines buried in soil. The overall process consists of four main parts: Preprocessing, feature extraction, feature selection, and classification. These parts are used in a two step process to classify a subimage. Thee first step, referred to as feature selection, determines the features of sub-images which result in the greatest separability among the classes. The second step, image labeling, uses the selected features and the decisions from a pattern classifier to label the regions in the image which are likely to correspond to buried mines. We extract features from the images, and use feature selection algorithms to select only the most important features according to their contribution to correct detections. This allows us to save computational complexity and determine which of the sensors add value to the detection system. The most important features from the various sensors are fused using supervised teaming pattern classifiers (including neural networks). We present results of experiments to detect buried land mines from real data, and evaluate the usefulness of fusing feature information from multiple sensor types, including dual-band infrared and ground penetrating radar. The novelty of the work lies mostly in the combination of the algorithms and their application to the very important and currently unsolved operational problem of detecting buried land mines from an airborne standoff platform.

  9. A Carboniferous non-onychophoran lobopodian reveals long-term survival of a Cambrian morphotype.

    PubMed

    Haug, Joachim T; Mayer, Georg; Haug, Carolin; Briggs, Derek E G

    2012-09-25

    Lobopodians, a nonmonophyletic assemblage of worm-shaped soft-bodied animals most closely related to arthropods, show two major morphotypes: long-legged and short-legged forms. The morphotype with stubby, conical legs has a long evolutionary history, from the early Cambrian through the Carboniferous, including the living onychophorans and tardigrades. Species with tubular lobopods exceeding the body diameter have been reported exclusively from the Cambrian; the three-dimensionally preserved Orstenotubulus evamuellerae from the uppermost middle Cambrian "Orsten" (Sweden) is the youngest long-legged lobopodian reported thus far. Here we describe a new long-legged lobopodian, Carbotubulus waloszeki gen. et sp. nov., from Mazon Creek, Illinois, USA (∼296 million years ago). This first post-Cambrian long-legged lobopodian extends the range of this morphotype by about 200 million years. The three-dimensionally preserved specimen differs significantly from the associated short-legged form Ilyodes inopinata, of which we also present new head details. The discovery of a Carboniferous long-legged lobopodian provides a more striking example of the long-term survival of Cambrian morphotypes than, for example, the occurrence of a Burgess Shale-type biota in the Ordovician of Morocco and dampens the effect of any major extinction of taxa at the end of the middle Cambrian. PMID:22885062

  10. Hydrogen sulphide release to surface waters at the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary.

    PubMed

    Wille, Martin; Nägler, Thomas F; Lehmann, Bernd; Schröder, Stefan; Kramers, Jan D

    2008-06-01

    Animal-like multicellular fossils appeared towards the end of the Precambrian, followed by a rapid increase in the abundance and diversity of fossils during the Early Cambrian period, an event also known as the 'Cambrian explosion'. Changes in the environmental conditions at the Precambrian/Cambrian transition (about 542 Myr ago) have been suggested as a possible explanation for this event, but are still a matter of debate. Here we report molybdenum isotope signatures of black shales from two stratigraphically correlated sample sets with a depositional age of around 542 Myr. We find a transient molybdenum isotope signal immediately after the Precambrian/Cambrian transition. Using a box model of the oceanic molybdenum cycle, we find that intense upwelling of hydrogen sulphide-rich deep ocean water best explains the observed Early Cambrian molybdenum isotope signal. Our findings suggest that the Early Cambrian animal radiation may have been triggered by a major change in ocean circulation, terminating a long period during which the Proterozoic ocean was stratified, with sulphidic deep water. PMID:18509331