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Sample records for burn scar contracture

  1. Post-burn scars and scar contractures

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Arun; Shrivastava, Prabhat

    2010-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity from burns have diminished tremendously over the last six to seven decades. However, these do not truly reflect whether the victim could go back to society as a useful person or not and lead a normal life because of the inevitable post-burn scars, contractures and other deformities which collectively have aesthetic and functional considerations. This article gives an overview of the post-burn scars and scar contractures, especially their prevention, minimisation and principles of management. PMID:21321660

  2. The Lateral Position Improved Airway Patency in Anesthetized Patient With Burn-Induced Cervico-Mento-Sternal Scar Contracture

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Young-Chang P.; Kawanishi, Jun; Sakakima, Yoshikazu; Ohmoto, Koichi; Ito, Akihiro; Maruyama, Yuki; Ikemoto, Tatsunori

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman with burn-induced cervico-mento-sternal scar contracture was scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. During inhalational induction of sevoflurane, her airway patency deteriorated. The right lateral position and assist ventilation using a breathing bag dramatically improved her airway patency. PMID:27252906

  3. Initial Release of Severe Post-Burn Contracture Scar of the Neck for Intubation Under Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zacko, S.M.; Al-Kazzaz, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background. Severe anterior post-burn contracture (PBC) of the neck poses the anaesthesiologist some difficult problems and results in difficult intubation when extension of the atlanto-occipital joint is impaired. Such patients must therefore have the PBC scar released before other procedures are performed, in order to ensure airway control. Objectives. To show our experience with quick surgical neck release of patients with severe anterior PBC of the neck to facilitate direct laryngoscopy and orotracheal intubation (OTI). Material and methods. A prospective study of patients with severe anterior PBC of the neck was carried out from January 2003 to December 2007 in the Burns Unit of Mosul Teaching Hospital in Mosul, Iraq. The patients were given ketamine, after which a release incision was made over the anterior PBC of the neck scar. OTI was then performed successfully. Results. Twelve patients with severe neck PBC (3 males, 9 females; age range, 7-37 yr; mean age, 20 yr) all had successful OTI after PBC release under intravenous ketamine. None showed any complications attributed to the anaesthesia. PMID:21991181

  4. California Burn Scars

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Burn Scars Across Southern California     ... California between October 21 and November 18, 2003. Burn scars and vegetation changes wrought by the fires are illustrated in these ... Nov 18, 2003 Images:  California Burn Scars location:  United States region:  ...

  5. First web space post-burn contracture types: contracture elimination methods.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M

    2011-03-01

    First web space adduction contractures are a common consequence of hand burns. Many reconstructive techniques are used and investigation for more effective methods continues. Effective hand reconstruction usually considers anatomy as its foundation. Based on the experience of over 500 web space contracture elimination cases, three anatomical types of thumb adduction contractures were identified: edge, medial and total. Edge contractures (80% of all thumb adduction contractures) are caused by a fold in which only one sheet is scarred, either the palmar or dorsal surface. The contraction is caused by a trapeze-shaped length deficiency of the scar sheet, which has a surface surplus in width. Reconstruction consists of surface deficiency compensation with trapezoid flap prepared from the non-scarred side and skin-fat tissues of the web space. In most cases, the small scar-fat trapezoid flaps should be prepared from the non-scarred side to cover the donor wounds on both sides of the main flap. Medial contractures (10% of thumb adduction contractures) are caused by the fold, both sheets of which are scarred and have trapeze-shaped surface deficiency in length and surplus in width. Both fold sheets are converted into one or several pairs of trapezoid scar-fat flaps by radial incisions. The oppositely located flaps are transposed towards each other. As a result of the counter flaps transposition, the contracture is eliminated; the web space's shape and depth are restored by the use of flaps alone or in combination with skin grafting. The trapeze-flap plasty is very simple and effective with the length gain of up to 100-200%. Neither flap loss nor re-contracture occurs. Total contractures (about 10% of all) have no fold. Reconstruction consists of the creation of the central zone of the first web space depth with the rectangular subdermal pedicle flap; the wounds on both sides of the flap are skin grafted. The flap sustains normal web depth and prevents the contracture

  6. The cost of post-burn scarring.

    PubMed

    Mirastschijski, U; Sander, J T; Zier, U; Rennekampff, H O; Weyand, B; Vogt, P M

    2015-09-30

    Deep burns lead to scarring and contractures for which there is little or no published data on treatment costs. The purpose of this study was to fill this gap by analysing treatment costs for burn sequelae. To do this, German-DRG for in-patient treatment was collected from the Burn Centre Lower Saxony. DRG-related T95.-coding served as a tool for burn-associated sequelae. Data on scar occurrence, plastic-reconstructive surgery and sick leave were collected by a questionnaire. The findings showed that 44.6% patients reported post-burn scarring and 31% needed surgical intervention. The expected risk for readmission was significantly higher (p=0.0002) with scars compared to without. Significantly higher costs for pressure garments were noted for scarred patients (p=0.04). No differences were found for ointments, silicone dressings or pain medication. Treatment costs for patients with scars were 5.6 times higher compared with no scar assessed by G-DRG. No differences were stated subsuming multiple readmissions for post-burn treatment per individual. Significantly higher costs (p=0.03) were noted for patients with burn sequelae other than scars with regard to individual readmissions. It has been revealed that treatment of scars causes higher costs than for other burn sequelae because of multiple surgical interventions. To reduce post-burn scarring and costs, specialized burn centres provide optimal and state-of-the-art treatment. As well as this, more emphasis should be laid on promoting research for the development of novel anti-scarring therapies. PMID:27279810

  7. Post Burn Contracture Neck: Clinical Profile and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Sanket S.; Patil, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Morbidity related to hypertrophic scars and contractures which are well known sequel after burns remains high and in fact has increased as more severely burned patients are surviving. This study was undertaken in order to assess the varied clinical presentation, precipitating factors, preventive measures, treatment modalities of neck contractures and evaluate the results after surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: This hospital based study was conducted on patients admitted in our institution with proven cases of Post burn neck contracture from 1st August 2009 to 31st July 2011. Twenty two patients of post burn neck contracture who underwent operative treatment were included. Observation: 10 of 22 cases were in the middle age group i.e. between 21-30 years. There were 5 males and 17 females. Accidental flame burn was the commonest aetiology. Fourteen patients were treated within 1 year of burns for functional disability. Excisional release was performed in 13 and incisional release in 9 of our patients. Resurfacing with STSG (split thickness skin graft) was carried out in 19 cases and a local or regional flap with or without a graft in 3 patients. Hypertrophy and recontracture were the commonest late complications and occurred in 3 cases. Good to fair results were obtained in 19 patients Conclusion: Local flaps have many advantages and are to be used whenever possible. It is preferable to place the grafts if used in the area surrounding the neck (donor site of flap) or at least in the non-visible area of the neck (submental area). When a combination of flap & graft is used, it’s preferable to place the flap in a horizontal intersecting fashion in between the two patches of the graft. A follow up program for reasonable period is highly desired. PMID:25478392

  8. Longitudinal burn scar quantification.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; de Oliveira, Ana; LaSalle, Leo; Perrault, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative studies of the clinical recovery of burn scars are currently lacking. Previous reports validate the objective, precise, diagnostic capabilities of high-frequency ultrasound to measure thickness, the Cutometer(®) to measure pliability and the Mexameter(®) to measure erythema and pigmentation of scars. Thus, we prospectively quantified clinical characteristics of patient-matched, after burn hypertrophic scar (HSc), donor site scar (D) and normal skin (N) using these instruments. One investigator measured 3 sites (HSc, D, N) in 46 burn survivors at 3, 6, and 12 months after-burn. A mixed model regression analysis, adjusting p-values for multiplicity of testing, was used to compare means among sites and time points. Participants were 41.2±13.5 years old, 87% males, predominantly Caucasian, with an average of 19.5% body surface area burned. HSc thickness decreased significantly between 3 and 6, 6 and 12, and 3 and 12 months (all p<0.0001), but remained thicker than D and N skin (all p<0.0001). Pliability differed significantly between HSc, D and N sites at all time points (all p<0.0001), with HSc and D increasing between 3 and 12 months (p<0.05) but not reaching normal. HSc and D sites were significantly more erythematous than normal skin (p<0.05) at 3 and 6 months but D sites approached normal by 12 months. The only time points at which pigmentation significantly differed were the HSc and D sites at 6 months. Thickness, pliability, erythema and pigmentation of N skin remained similar over the 12 months. We found that post-burn HSc thickness, pliability and erythema differed significantly from D and N skin at 3, 6, and 12 months and does not return to normal by 12 months after-injury; however, significant improvements towards normal can be expected. Donor sites are redder than normal skin at 3 and 6 months but can be expected to return to normal by 12 months. Although the color of HSc and D sites change markedly with time these color changes are

  9. [To improve the effect of reconstruction of scar contracture deformity on face and neck].

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Yan, X

    2016-08-20

    This article briefly summarizes the methods for repair of scar contracture deformity on face and neck in recent years, including new technologies in this field. We can choose non-surgical treatment or surgical treatment to achieve the purpose of repair and reconstruction of scar contracture deformity on face and neck after considering the factors of function and appearance. PMID:27562153

  10. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients. PMID:23456048

  11. Keloid scarring, but not Dupuytren’s contracture, is associated with unexplained carotid atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Sankalp; Nimigan, Andre; Hackam, Daniel G.; O’Gorman, David B.; Gan, Bing Siang; Spence, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis, a response to injury, may be thought of as scarring in the artery wall. TGF-β and associated signaling molecules have been implicated in the pathophysiology of keloid scarring, Dupuytren’s Contracture and atherosclerotic plaques in independent studies. Purpose To test the hypothesis that excess cutaneous scarring and Dupuytren’s contractures predispose independently to carotid atherosclerosis. Methods Among 1,747 patients with plaque measurements and complete data for multivariable regression analysis, 57 Caucasian patients had Dupuytren’s contractures and 12 had keloid scars. Carotid total plaque area (TPA) was measured by 2-Dimensional ultrasound. Results In linear multivariable regression analysis with coronary risk factors, keloid scars were associated with TPA (P= 0.018), but Dupuytren’s contractures were not. Patients with keloid scarring were younger (P<0.0001), and more likely to be diabetic (P<0.0001) Conclusions Keloid scarring is a clinical clue to excess atherosclerosis not explained by traditional risk factors. Such patients may benefit from therapy directed at targets related to signalling molecules common to both the process of keloid scarring and atherosclerosis. These findings suggest previously unexplored possibilities for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. The differences between Dupuytren’s and keloid scars that may identify such targets are discussed. PMID:19331810

  12. Anterior tibial artery perforator plus flaps for reconstruction of post-burn flexion contractures of the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, S.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Saha, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background. Post-burn flexion contractures of the knee may arise even with adequate treatment of the burn injury. After release of the contracture, most of these defects require flap coverage. Here we describe the application of the perforator plus flap concept in the management of these contractures. Method. Between December 2010 and December 2011 five female and two male patients with knee contractures were operated on using a perforator plus flap from the anterior tibia artery perforator. In one patient both sides were operated on and the rest had unilateral surgeries. All patients had mature scars and the aetiology was thermal burn injury. All these contractures were categorized as Category 4 and Level 3 by the ICIDH guidelines with an average contracture angle of 87.5 degrees. The flap was raised after release of the defect and a Doppler study located the perforator below the fibular head. The base of the flap was kept intact at all times. The flap was then transposed towards the defect and inset in a tensionless manner. Results. All flaps survived well with marginal necrosis in only one flap, providing stable coverage to the knee joint. The average residual contracture was around 10 degrees and the average range of flexion was 10-120 degrees. Conclusion. The perforator plus flap can be an excellent choice in defects over the posterior aspect of the knee where important neurovascular structures and tendons are exposed. Level of evidence: Level IV. PMID:23233827

  13. [Evaluation of Cepan Cream after 15 years of treatment of burn scars].

    PubMed

    Stozkowska, Wiesława

    2002-01-01

    Cepan Cream is used for the topical treatment of scars and keloids resulting from burns, post-operative scars, and contractures. Cepan Cream makes scars more elastic, softer and paler. Plant extracts, heparin and allantoin in Cepan act on the biochemical processes in the developing connective tissue, preventing the formation of hyperplastic scars. These active ingredients enhance swelling, softening and loosening of connective tissue. It exerts softening and smoothing action on indurated and hyperplastic scar tissue, improving collagen structure. It promotes tissue regeneration and reduces exuberant granulation. Cepan is well tolerated. PMID:12731382

  14. Linear Hand Burn Contracture Release under Local Anesthesia without Tourniquet.

    PubMed

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O H; Koswara, Astrid F

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to present a case of hand burn linear contracture release performed under local anesthesia. It also introduces the one-per-mil tumescent solution consisted of 0.2% lidocaine and 1:1.000.000 epinephrine as a local anesthesia formula, which has the potential of providing adequate anesthesia as well as hemostatic effect during surgery of the hand without tourniquet. The surgery was performed on a 19 year-old male patient with multiple thumb and fingers flexion linear contracture for 105 minutes without any obstacle. The patient did not complain any pain and discomfort during the procedure; while bloodless operative field was successfully achieved. At four-month follow up, the patient could fully extend his thumb, middle and ring finger, while the index was limited by 10° at the DIP joint. Overall, the patient was satisfied with the outcome. PMID:26388018

  15. An idiosyncratic history of burn scars.

    PubMed

    Petro, Jane A

    2015-03-01

    The history of burn scars can best be found in military medical history. The care of wounded soldiers documented in the Illiad reflected the trauma of the weapons of war, arrow, spear, sword, and ax. The introduction of gunpowder in the 14th century, increasingly sophisticated explosives, and in modern times, petroleum-driven vehicles, including airplanes, created a new subset of wounds requiring attention and post-survival scars challenging the quality of survival. This article selects from among a myriad of examples of modern military treatments as they relate to those survivors. Larrey, with Napolean's Grand Army, Sir Harold Gilles during and following World War I, and the Boston area preparation and response to the Cocoanut Grove Fire in 1942 are the principle topics examined. Recent modern interventions, related to the survival of horrific blast and burn injuries, with modern wound care and scar manipulation techniques provide context to the current ability to modify healing and scars. PMID:25922950

  16. A novel immune competent murine hypertrophic scar contracture model: a tool to elucidate disease mechanism and develop new therapies.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Magdy; Bond, Jennifer; Bergeron, Andrew; Miller, Kyle J; Ehanire, Tosan; Quiles, Carlos; Lorden, Elizabeth R; Medina, Manuel A; Fisher, Mark; Klitzman, Bruce; Selim, M Angelica; Leong, Kam W; Levinson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) contraction following burn injury causes contractures. Contractures are painful and disfiguring. Current therapies are marginally effective. To study pathogenesis and develop new therapies, a murine model is needed. We have created a validated immune-competent murine HSc model. A third-degree burn was created on dorsum of C57BL/6 mice. Three days postburn, tissue was excised and grafted with ear skin. Graft contraction was analyzed and tissue harvested on different time points. Outcomes were compared with human condition to validate the model. To confirm graft survival, green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice were used, and histologic analysis was performed to differentiate between ear and back skin. Role of panniculus carnosus in contraction was analyzed. Cellularity was assessed with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Collagen maturation was assessed with Picro-sirius red. Mast cells were stained with Toluidine blue. Macrophages were detected with F4/80 immune. Vascularity was assessed with CD31 immune. RNA for contractile proteins was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Elastic moduli of skin and scar tissue were analyzed using a microstrain analyzer. Grafts contracted to ∼45% of their original size by day 14 and maintained their size. Grafting of GFP mouse skin onto wild-type mice, and analysis of dermal thickness and hair follicle density, confirmed graft survival. Interestingly, hair follicles disappeared after grafting and regenerated in ear skin configuration by day 30. Radiological analysis revealed that panniculus carnosus doesn't contribute to contraction. Microscopic analyses showed that grafts show increase in cellularity. Granulation tissue formed after day 3. Collagen analysis revealed increases in collagen maturation over time. CD31 stain revealed increased vascularity. Macrophages and mast cells were increased. qRT-PCR showed up-regulation of transforming growth factor beta, alpha smooth muscle

  17. Use of preputial skin for coverage of post-burn contractures of fingers in children

    PubMed Central

    Zaroo, Mohammed I.; Sheikh, Bashir A.; Wani, Adil H.; Darzi, Mohammad A.; Mir, Mohsin; Dar, Hameedullah; Baba Peerzada, U. F.; Zargar, Haroon R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Hand burns are common injuries. Children frequently sustain burn injuries, especially to their hands. Contractures are a common sequel of severe burns around joints. The prepuce, or foreskin, has been used as a skin graft for a number of indications. We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of utilising the preputial skin for the management of post-burn contractures of fingers in uncircumcised male children. Materials and Methods: Preputial skin was used for the coverage of released contractures of fingers in 12 patients aged 2-6 years. The aetiology of burns was “Kangri” burn in eight patients and scalding in four patients. Six patients had contracture in two fingers, four patients in one finger, and two patients had contractures in three fingers. Results: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents. Conclusions: Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity. PMID:21713163

  18. Burn Scar Near the Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) image pair shows 'before and after' views of the area around the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Washington. On June 27, 2000, a fire in the dry sagebrush was sparked by an automobile crash. The flames were fanned by hot summer winds. By the day after the accident, about 100,000 acres had burned, and the fire's spread forced the closure of highways and loss of homes. These images were obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Compare the area just above and to the right of the line of cumulus clouds in the May 15 image with the same area imaged on August 3. The darkened burn scar measures approximately 35 kilometers across. The Columbia River is seen wending its way around Hanford. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/JPL, MISR Science Team

  19. The Use of CO2 Fractional Photothermolysis for the Treatment of Burn Scars.

    PubMed

    Levi, Benjamin; Ibrahim, Amir; Mathews, Katie; Wojcik, Brandon; Gomez, Jason; Fagan, Shawn; Austen, William Gerald; Goverman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    A recent advancement in the treatment of burn scars has been the use of the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to perform fractional photothermolysis. In this analysis, we describe our results and patient-reported outcomes with the use of fractional CO2 laser for the treatment of burn-related scarring. We performed a retrospective study of all patients who underwent CO2 laser procedures for treatment of symptomatic burn scars and skin grafts at one accredited regional burn center. Burn injury and laser treatment demographics, as well as complications, are reported. A questionnaire was administered to all patients and included patient-reported outcome measures aimed at understanding the patient experience and their subjective response to treatment. A total of 387 CO2 laser procedures were performed on 131 patients for the treatment of symptomatic burn scars and skin grafts between October 1, 2011, and May 1, 2014 (average, 2.95 procedures/patient; range, 1-11). Average time between injury and first laser was 597.35 days (range, 60-13,475). Average time between laser treatments (when multiple) was 117.73 days (range, 22-514). There were no infections requiring treatment with oral antibiotics. Overall patient satisfaction with laser therapy was 96.7%. Patients reported reductions in neuropathic pain, tightness (contracture), and pruritus (54.0, 50.6, and 49.0%, respectively). Fractional photothermolysis utilizing the CO2 laser is a safe and effective modality for the treatment of symptomatic burn scars, donor sites, and skin grafts. Patient satisfaction with this procedure is high, and complications are low. Significant improvements in scar appearance, pliability, tightness, neuropathic pain, and pruritus were commonly reported. PMID:26536539

  20. Anesthetic management of post-burn contracture chest with microstomia: Regional nerve blocks to aid in intubation

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyam, Kalavala Lakshminarayana

    2015-01-01

    This case report exemplifies the anesthetic technique of blocking bilateral infraorbital and mental nerves for release of contractures of mouth. A 30 year old female patient of post-acid burn contractures of chest wall and mouth was scheduled for contracture release and skin grafting. Airway assessment revealed severe restriction of mouth opening with limited restriction of neck movements. Contracture release of mouth conducted by blocking bilateral infraorbital and mental nerves, which facilitated intubation easily. This case report highlights the practical advantage of nerve blocks for release of contracture mouth, in case of anticipated difficult airway, over other conventional methods. PMID:25948913

  1. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  2. The menace of post-burn contractures: a developing country’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Saaiq, M.; Zaib, S.; Ahmad, S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A study was carried out regarding 213 patients of either gender and all ages who presented with post-burn contractures. The commonest site of contracture was the neck. 92 patients (43.19%) had received their initial burn injury management in general surgery units in tertiary care hospitals compared to 43 patients (20.18%) in district headquarter hospitals. Only 26 patients (12.20%) were managed in plastic surgery/burn wards, and 52 patients (24.41%) received no regular treatment from any hospital. The majority of patients (n=197) had a history of conservative management, with only 16 patients (7.51%) having a split thickness skin graft for part of their initial burns. None of the patients had the appropriate anti-deformity splintage in the affected parts or any physiotherapy during the acute phase of their burns. PMID:23466805

  3. Expansion abdominoplasty for a pregnant woman with severe abdominal wall contracture due to a major burn during childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kohsuke; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Numajiri, Toshiaki; Nishino, Kenichi

    2013-06-01

    Normal abdominal expansion that occurs as a result of hormonal actions during pregnancy may be prevented by the presence of excessive scar tissue in individuals who have received severe burns. In these instances, the lack of abdominal expansion may cause maternal pain and put the infant at risk. A 23-year-old pregnant woman presented with severe abdominal wall contracture due to a major burn sustained during childhood. At 20 weeks of pregnancy, expansion abdominoplasty, consisting of zigzag incisions in the fascia to release the contracture and a split-thickness skin graft, was performed. The patient gave birth, via a planned cesarean operation at 36 weeks of pregnancy, to a baby girl in good condition; the postpartum course was uneventful. PMID:23673563

  4. Biology and principles of scar management and burn reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tredget, Edward E; Levi, Benjamin; Donelan, Matthias B

    2014-08-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is extremely common and is the source of most morbidity related to burns. The biology of hypertrophic healing is complex and poorly understood. Multiple host and injury factors contribute, but protracted healing of partial thickness injury is a common theme. Hypertrophic scarring and heterotopic ossification may share some basic causes involving marrow-derived cells. Several traditional clinical interventions exist to modify hypertrophic scar. All have limited efficacy. Laser interventions for scar modification show promise, but as yet do not provide a definitive solution. Their efficacy is only seen when used as part of a multimodality scar management program. PMID:25085089

  5. Current concepts related to hypertrophic scarring in burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ryan S; Borovikova, Anna A; King, Kassandra; Banyard, Derek A; Lalezari, Shadi; Toranto, Jason D; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Wirth, Garrett A; Evans, Gregory R D; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-05-01

    Scarring following burn injury and its accompanying aesthetic and functional sequelae still pose major challenges. Hypertrophic scarring (HTS) can greatly impact patients' quality of life related to appearance, pain, pruritus and even loss of function of the injured body region. The identification of molecular events occurring in the evolution of the burn scar has increased our knowledge; however, this information has not yet translated into effective treatment modalities. Although many of the pathophysiologic pathways that bring about exaggerated scarring have been identified, certain nuances in burn scar formation are starting to be recognized. These include the effects of neurogenic inflammation, mechanotransduction, and the unique interactions of burn wound fluid with fat tissue in the deeper dermal layers, all of which may influence scarring outcome. Tension on the healing scar, pruritus, and pain all induce signaling pathways that ultimately result in increased collagen formation and myofibroblast phenotypic changes. Exposure of the fat domes in the deep dermis is associated with increased HTS, possibly on the basis of altered interaction of adipose-derived stem cells and the deep burn exudate. These pathophysiologic patterns related to stem cell-cytokine interactions, mechanotransduction, and neurogenic inflammation can provide new avenues of exploration for possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:27027596

  6. Drought and Burn Scars in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    More than 2 million acres were consumed by hundreds of fires between December 2002 and February 2003 in southeastern Australia's national parks, forests, foothills and city suburbs. These images were acquired on February 14, 2002 (left) and February 17, 2003 (right) by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite. The year 2002 was one of Australia's hottest and driest on record, and the acreage burnt during the summer 2002-2003 fire season in Victoria, the Australian Capital Territory and southern New South Wales, is the largest since 1938-1939, when more than 3 million acres were scorched.

    The extent of the burnt area and the dry conditions as of February 2003 are indicated by these contrasting false-color views. Both image panels display data from the near-infrared, red and blue spectral bands of MISR's downward-viewing (nadir) camera, as red, green and blue, respectively. This display technique causes healthy vegetation to appear red and burnt areas to show as dark brown. The data displayed from the two dates were processed identically to preserve relative brightness variations. Vegetation changes related to the dry conditions (not related to the brown burn scars) are also indicated in the February 2003 panel, where many previously red areas exhibit instead the pale yellow-brown of the underlying soils and geology. Significant reduction in the surface area of several large and important water bodies are also apparent. The diminished extent of Lake Hume (along the left-hand edge) in the later date provides a good example.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 14999 and 16858. The panels cover an area of about 208 kilometers x 286 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 118 to

  7. Remote sensing and hydrological modeling of burn scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mary Ellen

    This study examined the potential usefulness of combining remote sensing data with hydrologic models and mapping tools available from Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to evaluate the effects of wildfire. Four subprojects addressed this issue: (1) validation of burn scar maps derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) with the National Fire Occurrence Database; (2) testing the potential of thermal MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data for near-real time burn scar and fire severity mapping; (3) evaluation of Landsat derived burn severity maps within WEPP through the Geo-spatial interface for the Water Erosion Prediction Project (GeoWEPP), and (4) predicting potential post-fire erosion for western U.S. forests utilizing existing datasets and models. Wildfire poses incredibly complex management problems in all of its stages. Today's land managers have the option of trying to mitigate the effects of a severe fire before it occurs by fuel management practices. This process is expensive especially considering the uncertainty of when and where the next fire in a given region will occur. When a wildfire does occur, deciding when to let it burn and when to suppress it may lead to controversial decisions. In addition to the threat to life and property from the fire itself, smoke emissions from large fires can cause air quality problems in distant airsheds. Even after the fire is extinguished, erosion and water quality problems may pose difficult management questions. Contributions stemming from these studies include improved burn scar maps for studying historical fire extent and demonstration of the feasibility of using thermal satellite data to predict burn scar extent when clouds and smoke obscure visible bands. The incorporation of Landsat derived burn severity maps was shown to improve post-fire erosion modeling results. Finally the potential post-fire burn severity and erosion risk maps generated for western US forests

  8. Disfiguring burn scars and adolescent self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Robert, R; Meyer, W; Bishop, S; Rosenberg, L; Murphy, L; Blakeney, P

    1999-11-01

    Although children with burn scars are reported to have positive self-concepts, social and sexual maturation can be expected to stimulate anxiety, depression and diminished self-esteem in adolescents with disfiguring scars. This study examines complex self-regard of adolescents with burn scars. The following were hypothesized: (1) adolescents with disfiguring burn scars would view themselves as less competent than unburned normative samples; (2) subjects' perceived competence would be incongruent with the importance ascribed to the domains of physical appearance and athletic competence and (3) depression/anxiety would correlate negatively with perceived competence. Subjects were 14 adolescents: 6 male and 8 female, 13-20 years old, at least 2 years post-burn injury (TBSA = 39% +/- 23%). All had scars in at least 2 of the following areas: head/face, neck, chest, hands, genitals. Each subject was administered the Harter Self Perception Profile, a standardized measure of self-competence and value in 8 domains plus a general competence measure. The subjects were also assessed for anxiety/depression by the Child Behavioral Checklist. Overall, adolescents in this sample exhibited a similar or higher degree of self-worth as compared to their peers. However, the athletic competence and physical appearance sub-domains of self-worth for the burn survivors were significantly lower as compared to the normative group. Half of the participants rated the importance of physical appearance to be higher than their level of personal competence in this area, making for distressing emotions. Mood was similar to the normative group and mood correlated significantly with self-worth. PMID:10563682

  9. Release of the postburn contractures on the lower abdomen and inguinal regions using modified abdominoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ergün, Selma Sönmez

    2012-01-01

    To return the patient to normal function while maximizing aesthetic appearance is the most important issue in burn management. Although many techniques such as pressure garments and silicone dressings are used in the initial scar management to optimize final appearance, avoiding residual scarring is impossible after extensive burns. The changes in appearance and limitations imposed by the burn scar contribute to a negative body image. Burn patients frequently require numerous procedures over many years to achieve optimum function, but aesthetic needs are often overlooked in these patients. By assessing such patients with regard to their body image and aesthetic needs, patients who will benefit from a combined aesthetic procedure with burn contracture release are easily identified. The author presents a female patient who underwent modified abdominoplasty for releasing burn scar contractures, providing the dual benefit of improved body contour and burn scar release. PMID:22113321

  10. Marjolin's ulcers in the post-burned lesions and scars.

    PubMed

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ashraf, Bushra

    2014-10-16

    Marjolin's ulcer (MU) represents malignant degeneration that typically ensues over a period of time in the post-burned lesions and scars or any other chronic wound. This review highlights various facets of the presentation and management of MUs that originate from post-burned lesions. The incidence of MUs in such lesions is reported to be 0.77%-2%. This malignancy characteristically develops in the areas of full thickness skin burns that had been allowed for weeks to months to heal spontaneously by secondary intention, or burn wounds which never healed completely over years and the unstable post-burned scars. In the majority of cases, the MU is a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The MUs contribute to an overall 2% of all SCCs and 0.03% of all basal cell carcinomas of the skin. Clinically MUs present in two major morphologic forms. The commoner form is the flat, indurated, ulcerative variety while the less common form is the exophytic papillary variety. Lower limbs represent the most frequently affected body parts. Surgical resection of the primary tumor with 2-4 cm horizontal clearance margin, nodal clearance and radiotherapy constitute the cornerstones of effective oncologic management. Despite best efforts, the overall mortality is reported to be 21%. PMID:25325060

  11. Chromatic analysis of burn scar based on ANN by using photoelectrical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Baikun; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong; Zhang, Mingjian; Wang, Qifang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a novel method for the chromatic analysis of burn scar is proposed. The aim of the algorithm is to evaluate the curative effect and set up the treatment plan pertinently, because the scar color is an impersonal parameter reflects the degree of scar hypertrophy. The method is based on artificial neural network (ANN) by using photoelectrical technique, and composed of three main parts: firstly capture the digital color images of the burn scar using CCD camera, then change the RGB color data of the burn scar into that of HSB color space and emend it using ANN, lastly judge the degree of burn scar hypertrophy by chromatic analysis using ANN again. The experimental results were good conformed to the degrees of scar hypertrophy given by clinical evaluations. It suggests that the chromatic analysis technique of the burn scar is valuable for further study and apply to the clinical engineering.

  12. Bipedicled “Superthin” Free Perforator Flaps for Facial Burn Scar Reconstruction: Expanded Scope of Superthin Flaps: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Van Anh, Tran; Tien, Nguyen Gia; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Superthin flap” is a distinctively thin flap that is thinned primarily to the point that the subdermal vascular network can be seen through a minimal fat layer. Reconstruction of severely disfigured neck and face can be performed using the occipito-cervico-dorsal superthin flap that is harvested from the dorsal region and supercharged by the circumflex scapular vessels. We used bipedicled superthin free perforator flaps to reconstruct scar contractures on half of the face, whole face, or the whole chin-neck area in 17 postburn patients. Methods: This case series report includes all 17 cases. Flaps in the dorsal area were designed. In all cases, one pedicle consisted of the circumflex scapular vessels. In 11, 5, and 1 flaps, the second pedicle consisted of contralateral posterior intercostal perforators (type 1), ipsilateral posterior intercostal perforators (type 2), and ipsilateral circumflex scapular vessels (type 3), respectively. Four patients underwent whole-face reconstruction after acid burn with type 1 or type 3 perforator. The recipient vessels were the superficial temporal vessels and contralateral or ipsilateral facial vessels. Intraoperatively, all adipose tissue in the flap, including between the 2 pedicles, was thinned by scissors before the pedicles were detached from the donor sites. Maximum flap size was 35 × 15 cm. Donor sites were covered by a split full-thickness skin graft. Flap survival and functional and cosmetic results were assessed retrospectively. Results: Fifteen of the 17 flaps survived completely. Two developed partial necrosis due to perforator thrombosis. Some patients developed hypertrophic scars around the flap, but these improved naturally over time. All patients were satisfied with both the cosmetic and functional outcomes of the reconstruction. Conclusion: Bipedicled superthin free perforator flaps may be an excellent choice for reconstruction of severe neck scar contracture. This report expands the scope

  13. A pregnant patient with fetal distress with severe post burn contracture of anterior trunk and perineum: A surgeon's nightmare!

    PubMed Central

    Vathulya, Madhubari; Joshi, Meenakshi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A case report of a pregnant lady in the third trimester, presenting in the emergency with absent fetal movements is being described. A multi-speciality expertise was involved and a full term female baby was delivered. Presentation: The patient presented in a Government hospital, Dehradun, India. At the time of presentation the fetal heart sounds were absent and subsequently the severe post-burn deformity involving the anterior trunk, perineum and thighs were discovered. Management: Immediately a multi-speciality approach involving the plastic, obstetrics and pediatrics field were called for and an emergency caesarean with simultaneous contracture release with split skin grafts were performed after optimizing the patient for surgery. Conclusion: This is one of the first case reports reporting this rare combination of post burn contracture of trunk and perineum with fetal distress requiring emergency caesarean section along with release of abdominal and perineal post-burn contracture. This case interestingly reinforces that in such complicated cases a systematic and a combined multi-speciality approach still holds the key to patient's treatment even in district hospitals. PMID:25593442

  14. A Modeling Approach for Burn Scar Assessment Using Natural Features and Elastic Property

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Zhang, Y; Goldgof, D B; Sarkar, S

    2004-04-02

    A modeling approach is presented for quantitative burn scar assessment. Emphases are given to: (1) constructing a finite element model from natural image features with an adaptive mesh, and (2) quantifying the Young's modulus of scars using the finite element model and the regularization method. A set of natural point features is extracted from the images of burn patients. A Delaunay triangle mesh is then generated that adapts to the point features. A 3D finite element model is built on top of the mesh with the aid of range images providing the depth information. The Young's modulus of scars is quantified with a simplified regularization functional, assuming that the knowledge of scar's geometry is available. The consistency between the Relative Elasticity Index and the physician's rating based on the Vancouver Scale (a relative scale used to rate burn scars) indicates that the proposed modeling approach has high potentials for image-based quantitative burn scar assessment.

  15. Study of burn scar extraction automatically based on level set method using remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Dai, Qin; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, ShiBin; Yang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Burn scar extraction using remote sensing data is an efficient way to precisely evaluate burn area and measure vegetation recovery. Traditional burn scar extraction methodologies have no well effect on burn scar image with blurred and irregular edges. To address these issues, this paper proposes an automatic method to extract burn scar based on Level Set Method (LSM). This method utilizes the advantages of the different features in remote sensing images, as well as considers the practical needs of extracting the burn scar rapidly and automatically. This approach integrates Change Vector Analysis (CVA), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) to obtain difference image and modifies conventional Level Set Method Chan-Vese (C-V) model with a new initial curve which results from a binary image applying K-means method on fitting errors of two near-infrared band images. Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 8 OLI data sets are used to validate the proposed method. Comparison with conventional C-V model, OSTU algorithm, Fuzzy C-mean (FCM) algorithm are made to show that the proposed approach can extract the outline curve of fire burn scar effectively and exactly. The method has higher extraction accuracy and less algorithm complexity than that of the conventional C-V model. PMID:24503563

  16. The evidence for natural therapeutics as potential anti-scarring agents in burn-related scarring.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Branford, O A; Rolfe, K J

    2016-01-01

    Though survival rate following severe thermal injuries has improved, the incidence and treatment of scarring have not improved at the same speed. This review discusses the formation of scars and in particular the formation of hypertrophic scars. Further, though there is as yet no gold standard treatment for the prevention or treatment of scarring, a brief overview is included. A number of natural therapeutics have shown beneficial effects both in vivo and in vitro with the potential of becoming clinical therapeutics in the future. These natural therapeutics include both plant-based products such as resveratrol, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate as examples and includes the non-plant-based therapeutic honey. The review also includes potential mechanism of action for the therapeutics, any recorded adverse events and current administration of the therapeutics used. This review discusses a number of potential 'treatments' that may reduce or even prevent scarring particularly hypertrophic scarring, which is associated with thermal injuries without compromising wound repair. PMID:27574685

  17. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  18. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  19. Recurrence rates of burn contracture ankle equinus and other foot deformities in children treated with Ilizarov fixation.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Kelly D; Maxwell, Seth C; Calhoun, Jason H

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine recurrence rates of pediatric foot and ankle burn deformities treated with the Ilizarov method. A total of 19 patients with 29 foot and ankle deformities were studied. The most common deformity treated was equinus (23). Rocker-bottom and cavus foot deformities were each treated three times. The average age of the patient at the time of the burn injury was 3.2 years, and the average age at the time of fixation was 9.4 years. Equinus contractures averaged -34 degrees (34 degrees of plantarflexion) before surgery and +7 degrees (7 degrees of dorsiflexion) after treatment with the Ilizarov fixator. The recurrence rate for all 29 ankles and feet was 69% (20/29). The recurrence rate for equinus contractures was 74% (17/23). The average time to recurrence was 17.3 months. Only short-term follow-up was available on four of the six feet and ankles that did not recur. Deformity correction in burned feet and ankles is difficult to obtain by any means. The authors recommend using the Ilizarov method to obtain correction of moderate to severe foot and ankle deformities in pediatric burn patients, but the correction obtained is not stable and deformity will likely recur. Parents and patients should anticipate adjunctive nonoperative and operative procedures to keep their feet plantigrade as they grow. In young children, the possibility of having additional surgeries, including repeat Ilizarov procedures, should be discussed. Even older children should expect additional surgeries to prevent recurrent deformities. PMID:15958908

  20. Effect of intense pulsed light on immature burn scars: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Arindam; Dewangan, Yatindra Kumar; Bain, Jayanta; Rakshit, Pritha; Dhruw, Krishnanand; Basu, Sandip Kanti; Saha, Jayanta Kumar; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: As intense pulsed light (IPL) is widely used to treat cutaneous vascular malformations and also used as non-ablative skin rejunuvation to remodel the skin collagen. A study has been undertaken to gauze the effect of IPL on immature burn scars with regard to vascularity, pliability and height. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014, among patients with immature burn scars that healed conservatively within 2 months. Photographic evidence of appearance of scars and grading and rating was done with Vancouver Scar Scale parameters. Ratings were done for both case and control scar after the completion of four IPL treatment sessions and were compared. Results: Out of the 19 cases, vascularity, pliability and height improved significantly (P < 0.05) in 13, 14 and 11 scars respectively following IPL treatment. Conclusions: Intense pulsed light was well-tolerated by patients, caused good improvement in terms of vascularity, pliability, and height of immature burn scar. PMID:25593424

  1. Release of severe post-burn contracture of the first web space using the reverse posterior interosseous flap: Our experience with 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Kai, Shi; Zhao, Jingchun; Jin, Zhenghua; Wu, Weiwei; Yang, Ming; Wang, Yan; Xie, Chunhui; Yu, Jiaao

    2013-09-01

    We retrospectively assessed outcomes after treating severe contractures of the first web space from burns with the reverse posterior interosseous flaps (RPIF). Twelve consecutive patients (ages 18-58 years) with burns from 10% to 70% (mean, 30.1%) total body surface area and severe contractures of the first web space of the hand (initial thumb to index angles from 10° to 35° [mean, 23°]) underwent contracture release using the RPIF. Seventeen RPIFs were used, with sizes from 9cm×6cm to 14cm×10cm (mean area, 83.6cm(2)). The patients were followed for 5-26 months. All flaps survived completely, rapidly adapted to the recipient beds, and achieved good color and texture harmony. No early complications occurred. Fifteen donor sites were closed with skin grafts. Two donor sites were closed by direct suture. No paralysis of the posterior interosseous nerve was observed in these cases. At last follow-up the mean thumb to index angle was 78°, increasing the web length 260%. All patients regained fundamental hand functions. The RPIF is reliable and safe for releasing severe contractures of the first web space of the hand after burn, with distinct advantages over currently used alternative methods. PMID:23523223

  2. Wildfires, smoke, and burn scars, near Yakutsk, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is hidden beneath a veil of smoke from multiple wildfires burning around the city of Yakutsk, Russia. Fires have been burning in the region off and on since late May 2002, and may be agricultural in cause. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on July 23, 2002. In the false=-color image, vegetation is bright green, smoke is blueish-white, and burned areas are reddish-brown. In both images, fire detections are marked with red outlines. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  3. The effects of conservative treatments on burn scars: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Anthonissen, Mieke; Daly, Daniel; Janssens, Thaïs; Van den Kerckhove, Eric

    2016-05-01

    A variety of conservative treatments for burn scars are available, but there is no clear consensus on the evidence. The purpose of this study was to summarize the available literature on the effects of conservative treatments of burn scars in adults. RCTs and CCTs were sought in three databases, reference lists of retrieved articles and relevant reviews. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network scoring system was used to assess the quality of the selected studies. Information on the study characteristics, results and interventions was extracted. Twenty-two articles were included into the review and categorized in six topics: 5 on massage therapy, 4 on pressure therapy, 6 on silicone gel application, 3 on combined therapy of pressure and silicone, 3 on hydration and 1 on ultrasound. Pressure and silicone therapy are evidence-based conservative treatments of hypertrophic scar formation after a burn producing clinically relevant improvement of scar thickness, redness and pliability. Massage therapy could have a positive result on scar pliability, pain and pruritus, but with less supporting evidence. The use of moisturizers and lotions could have an effect on itching, but the findings are contradictory. Of all other non-invasive treatments such as splinting, casting, physical activity, exercise and mobilizations no RCTs or CCTs were found. PMID:26777448

  4. Contracture deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Brain and nervous system disorders, such as cerebral palsy or stroke Inherited disorders (such as muscular dystrophy ) ... 2011:chap 26. Read More Becker muscular dystrophy Cerebral palsy Duchenne muscular dystrophy Dupuytren contracture Volkmann ischemic contracture ...

  5. Palm oil thorn-induced squamous cell carcinoma with underlying burns scar.

    PubMed

    Qi Qi, Choo; Ajit Singh, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    Marjolin's ulcers are malignancies that arise from previously traumatised, chronically inflamed or scarred skin. We present a case with childhood burns, who had repeated irritation of his forearm skin with palm oil thorns that eventually led to malignant change. PMID:22865804

  6. ICG angiography predicts burn scarring within 48 h of injury in a porcine vertical progression burn model.

    PubMed

    Fourman, Mitchell S; McKenna, Peter; Phillips, Brett T; Crawford, Laurie; Romanelli, Filippo; Lin, Fubao; McClain, Steve A; Khan, Sami U; Dagum, Alexander B; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-08-01

    The current standard of care in determining the need to excise and graft a burn remains with the burn surgeon, whose clinical judgment is often variable. Prior work suggests that minimally invasive perfusion technologies are useful in burn prognostication. Here we test the predictive capabilities of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and indocyanine green dye (ICG) angiography in the prediction of burn scarring 28 days after injury using a previously validated porcine burn model that shows vertical progression injury. Twelve female Yorkshire swine were burned using a 2.5 × 2.5 cm metal bar at variable temperature and application times to create distinct burn depths. Six animals (48 injuries total) each were analyzed with LDI or ICG angiography at 1, 24, 48, and 72 h following injury. A linear regression was then performed correlating perfusion measurements against wound contraction at 28 days after injury. ICG angiography showed a peak linear correlate (r(2)) of .63 (95% CI .34 to .92) at 48 h after burn. This was significantly different from the LDI linear regression (p < .05), which was measured at r(2) of .20 (95% CI .02 to .39). ICG angiography linear regression was superior to LDI at all timepoints. Findings suggest that ICG angiography may have significant potential in the prediction of long-term burn outcomes. PMID:25499407

  7. Long-term scar quality in burns with three distinct healing potentials: A multicenter prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Goei, Harold; van der Vlies, Cornelis H; Hop, M Jenda; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K; Middelkoop, Esther; van Baar, Margriet E

    2016-07-01

    The laser Doppler imager is used in cases of indeterminate burn depth to accurately predict wound healing time at an early stage. The laser Doppler imager classifies burns into three estimated healing potentials as follows: high, <14 days; intermediate, 14-21 days; and low, >21 days. At this time, the relationship between these healing potentials and long-term scar quality is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the long-term scar quality of burns with three distinct healing potentials. The secondary objectives were to compare treatment strategies in intermediate wounds, to study the effect of the timing of surgery on low healing potential wounds and to identify predictors of reduced scar quality. Hence, in a prospective cohort study, scar quality was determined in patients whose burns were assessed with laser Doppler imaging. Scar Quality was assessed with objective and subjective measurement tools, including overall scar quality (Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale) as a primary outcome and color and elasticity parameters. A total of 141 patients (>19 months postburn) with 216 scars were included. Wounds with high and intermediate healing potential did not significantly differ regarding scar quality. Wounds with a low healing potential had a significantly lower scar quality. Analysis of 76 surgically treated low healing potential wounds showed no significant differences in the primary outcome regarding the timing of surgery (≤14 days vs. >14). Predictors of reduced long-term scar quality were darker skin type and multiple surgeries. In conclusion, scar quality was strongly related to the healing potential category. Scar quality was very similar in high and intermediate healing potential wounds. No positive effects were found on scar quality or on healing time in surgically treated wounds with intermediate healing potential, advocating a conservative approach. Further studies should focus on the optimal timing of surgery in low healing

  8. Application of acellular dermis and autograft on burns and scars.

    PubMed

    Ramos Duron, L E; Martínez Pardo, M E; Olivera Zavaleta, V; Silva Diaz, T; Reyes Frías, M L; Luna Zaragoza, D

    1999-01-01

    The cases of two patients with burns treated with dermis allograft and of one patient for lip reconstructive aesthetic filling treated with less than one mm3 of radiosterilised acellular dermis are presented. This paper emphasizes the treatment with radiosterilised dermal grafts with a permanent character so far. Hospitals, therefore, can satisfy the demand for this kind of tissue in the case of disaster and patients with serious injuries. In the cases cited, histocompatibility analysis was not required, thus having the advantage of long-time storage of the radiosterilised dermis used on these patients. Neither inflammatory reaction nor acute phase re-absorption were observed. Moreover, shrink (contract) healing was diminished. After two years, the results are still satisfactory. PMID:10853787

  9. Using MODIS imagery to assign dates to maps of burn scars in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DaCamara, C. C.; Libonati, R.; Barros, A.; Gaspar, G.; Calado, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    In the European context, Portugal presents the highest number of fire occurrences and has the largest area affected by wildfires. Like other southern regions of Europe, Portugal has experienced a dramatic increase in fire incidence during the last few decades that has been attributed to modifications in land-use as well as to climatic changes and associated occurrence of weather extremes. Wildfire activity also presents a large inter-annual variability that has been related to changes in the frequency of occurrence of atmospheric conditions favorable to the onset and spreading of large-fires. Since 1990, the Portuguese Authority for Forests (AFN) has been producing yearly maps of fire perimeters under a protocol with the Department of Forest Engineering of the Institute of Agronomy (DEF/ISA). The AFN fire atlas uses end of fire season Landsat TM/ETM imagery to map all fire perimeters with area larger than 5ha. Because it relies on end-of-season imagery, the atlas provides a spatial snapshot of the yearly area burned, and dates of burn for individual events cannot be estimated. Such information is nevertheless crucial to understand the fire regime and fire seasonality and to disentangle the complex interactions among fire, land cover and meteorology. The aim of the present work is to develop an automated procedure that allows using time series of moderate resolution imagery, such as the one provided by the MODIS instrument on-board TERRA and AQUA, to assign dates of burning to scars larger than 500 ha in the Landsat based fire atlas. The procedure relies on the so-called (V,W) burned index that uses daily reflectance obtained from the 1km MODIS Level 1B calibrated radiance from bands 2 (NIR) and 20 (MIR). The algorithm detects persistent changes in the (V,W) burned index time series, within each Landsat burned scar. The day of maximum change is then identified by means of a discrimination index, together with thresholds from the (V,W) time series. A spatial filter

  10. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on scar pain in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Soo; Joo, So Young; Cui, Huisong; Cho, Sung-Rae; Yim, Haejun; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been used to reduce pain in patients with various musculoskeletal diseases and wounds. We investigated the effect of ESWT on scar pain after complete wound epithelialization in burn patients. Methods: A prospective, single-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted from February 2014 to 2015. Forty patients with burn scar pain despite standard therapy (medication, physical therapy, and burn rehabilitation massage therapy) were randomized into ESWT or control (sham ESWT) groups. ESWT was administered at 100 impulses/cm2 (0.05–0.15 mJ/mm2) once per week for 3 weeks. The treatment effects were assessed using the numerical rating scale (NRS), pain threshold, Nirschl pain phase system, and Roles and Maudsley scores. Results: The characteristics of patients between the 2 study groups were balanced (P >0.05) for age, sex, and total burn surface area (%). In both groups, the NRS, pain threshold (Ib/cm2), and Nirschl pain phase system values significantly improved (P <0.05) after 3 sessions of ESWT or sham therapy, and there were significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of these 3 variables (P <0.001, P <0.001, P = 0.013, respectively). The Roles and Maudsley scores significantly improved; among 20 patients, 17 reported a score of poor (85%) and 3 reported fair (15%) before ESWT, whereas 3 reported poor (15%), 8 reported fair (40%), 5 reported good (25%), and 4 reported excellent (20%) after ESWT (P = 0.004). The scores did not improve in the control group (P = 0.128). Conclusion: ESWT significantly reduced scar pain in burn patients after wound recovery. PMID:27512886

  11. Healing the Burn: Advances in Burn Treatment Technology Aim to Save Lives, Lessen Pain and Scarring.

    PubMed

    Allen, Summer E

    2016-01-01

    When brothers Jamie and Glen Selby, aged 5 and 7, arrived at the Shriners Burns Institute in Denver, Colorado, in July 1983, more than 97% of their skin had been destroyed by a fire they had accidentally started while playing in an abandoned house. The boys were so badly burned that their outlook was grim-a 6-year-old friend who was also in the fire died from his injuries?but Jamie and Glen were lucky. Not only did they survive, but they were also some of the first patients to benefit from a new burn treatment nicknamed test-tube skin. PMID:27414631

  12. Neglected post burns contracture of hand in children: Analysis of contributory socio-cultural factors and the impact of neglect on outcome☆

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Jindal, Nipun; Kamboj, Kulbhushan

    2014-01-01

    Background No study has ever evaluated the causes and effect of neglect on the outcome of post burns contractures of hand in children. Methods 66 hands in 61 children (mean age 12.22 years) with a mean neglect of 11.6 years (range 5–17 years) were assessed for the causes of neglect and the outcome of surgery. Average follow up was 6.6 years. The results were assessed in two groups of 5–10 years neglect as group I and >10 years neglect as group II. Results In a total number of 134 contracted rays in 66 hands, the surgical procedures included local Z/V-Y flap (51 rays), cross finger flap (48 rays), full thickness graft (35 rays). Additional external fixator with a distracter was used in 3 patients treated at a delay of 14, 16 and 17 years. 50 (81.96%) patients belonged to rural and slum areas. The reasons for delayed treatment included poverty – 33 patients, lack of awareness of surgical treatment – 16 patients; and indifference of parents – 12 patients. 44 (72.13%) children were illiterates. With treatment the average DASH score improved from 65.10 to 36.90 (p < .000) and from 68.14 to 45.93 (p < .000) in group I and II respectively. The results were significantly superior in group I (p < .000). Conclusion The main factors for neglect in treatment of post burns contracture include poverty, lack of awareness and illiteracy. All the patients showed significant improvement in function after the surgery. Contractures with higher neglect had significantly inferior outcome. PMID:25983501

  13. Predicting severity of pathological scarring due to burn injuries: a clinical decision making tool using Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Berchialla, Paola; Gangemi, Ezio Nicola; Foltran, Francesca; Haxhiaj, Arber; Buja, Alessandra; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Stella, Maurizio; Gregori, Dario

    2014-06-01

    It is important for clinicians to understand which are the clinical signs, the patient characteristics and the procedures that are related with the occurrence of hypertrophic burn scars in order to carry out a possible prognostic assessment. Providing clinicians with an easy-to- use tool for predicting the risk of pathological scars. A total of 703 patients with 2440 anatomical burn sites who were admitted to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Burn Center of the Traumatological Hospital in Torino between January 1994 and May 2006 were included in the analysis. A Bayesian network (BN) model was implemented. The probability of developing a hypertrophic scar was evaluated on a number of scenarios. The error rate of the BN model was assessed internally and it was equal to 24·83%. While classical statistical method as logistic models can infer only which variables are related to the final outcome, the BN approach displays a set of relationships between the final outcome (scar type) and the explanatory covariates (patient's age and gender, burn surface area, full-thickness burn surface area, burn anatomical area and wound-healing time; burn treatment options such as advanced dressings, type of surgical approach, number of surgical procedures, type of skin graft, excision and coverage timing). A web-based interface to handle the BN model was developed on the website www.pubchild.org (burns header). Clinicians who registered at the website could submit their data in order to get from the BN model the predicted probability of observing a pathological scar type. PMID:22958613

  14. Assessment of human burn scars with optical coherence tomography by imaging the attenuation coefficient of tissue after vascular masking.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peijun; McLaughlin, Robert A; Liew, Yih Miin; Munro, Peter R T; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D

    2014-02-01

    The formation of burn-scar tissue in human skin profoundly alters, among other things, the structure of the dermis. We present a method to characterize dermal scar tissue by the measurement of the near-infrared attenuation coefficient using optical coherence tomography (OCT). To generate accurate en face parametric images of attenuation, we found it critical to first identify (using speckle decorrelation) and mask the tissue vasculature from the three-dimensional OCT data. The resulting attenuation coefficients in the vasculature-masked regions of the dermis of human burn-scar patients are lower in hypertrophic (3.8±0.4  mm(-1)) and normotrophic (4.2±0.9  mm(-1)) scars than in contralateral or adjacent normal skin (6.3±0.5  mm(-1)). Our results suggest that the attenuation coefficient of vasculature-masked tissue could be used as an objective means to assess human burn scars. PMID:24192908

  15. Mechanical evaluation of the resistance and elastance of post-burn scars after topical treatment with tretinoin

    PubMed Central

    Dematte, Maria Fernanda; Gemperli, Rolf; Salles, Alessandra Grassi; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Lanças, Tatiana; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: After burn injuries, scarred skin lacks elasticity, especially in hypertrophic scars. Topical treatment with tretinoin can improve the appearance and quality of the skin (i.e., texture, distensibility, color, and hydration). The objective of this prospective study was to examine the effects of treatment with 0.05% tretinoin for one year on the biomechanical behavior and histological changes undergone by facial skin with post-burn scarring. Setting: Tertiary, Institutional. METHOD: Fifteen female patients who had suffered partial thickness burns with more than two years of evolution were selected. Skin biopsies were obtained initially and after one year of treatment. The resistance and elastance of these skin biopsies were measured using a mechanical oscillation analysis system. The density of collagen fibers, elastic fibers, and versican were determined using immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: Tretinoin treatment significantly lowered skin resistance and elastance, which is a result that indicates higher distensibility of the skin. However, tretinoin treatment did not significantly affect the density of collagen fibers, elastic fibers, or versican. CONCLUSION: Topical tretinoin treatment alters the mechanical behavior of post-burn scarred skin by improving its distensibility and thus leads to improved quality of life for patients. PMID:22086527

  16. Nanolayered siRNA delivery platforms for local silencing of CTGF reduce cutaneous scar contraction in third-degree burns.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Steven A; Golberg, Alexander; Sharkh, Malak Abu; Khan, Saiqa; Almquist, Benjamin D; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin L; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-07-01

    Wound healing is an incredibly complex biological process that often results in thickened collagen-enriched healed tissue called scar. Cutaneous scars lack many functional structures of the skin such as hair follicles, sweat glands, and papillae. The absence of these structures contributes to a number of the long-term morbidities of wound healing, including loss of function for tissues, increased risk of re-injury, and aesthetic complications. Scar formation is a pervasive factor in our daily lives; however, in the case of serious traumatic injury, scars can create long-lasting complications due to contraction and poor tissue remodeling. Within this report we target the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a key mediator of TGFβ pro-fibrotic response in cutaneous wound healing, with controlled local delivery of RNA interference. Through this work we describe both a thorough in vitro analysis of nanolayer coated sutures for the controlled delivery of siRNA and its application to improve scar outcomes in a third-degree burn induced scar model in rats. We demonstrate that the knockdown of CTGF significantly altered the local expression of αSMA, TIMP1, and Col1a1, which are known to play roles in scar formation. The knockdown of CTGF within the healing burn wounds resulted in improved tissue remodeling, reduced scar contraction, and the regeneration of papillary structures within the healing tissue. This work adds support to a number of previous reports that indicate CTGF as a potential therapeutic target for fibrosis. Additionally, we believe that the controlled local delivery of siRNA from ultrathin polymer coatings described within this work is a promising approach in RNA interference that could be applied in developing improved cancer therapies, regenerative medicine, and fundamental scientific research. PMID:27108403

  17. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3

  18. [Ultrasound imaging of Dupuytren's contracture].

    PubMed

    Créteur, V; Madani, A; Gosset, N

    2010-06-01

    Dupuytren's contracture is characterized by two underlying lesions, nodules and cords. These involve the palmar fascia at the distal palmar crease, especially at the level of the third and fourth rays with progressive disabling finger contracture. The superficial palmar aponeurosis appears as a thin echogenic lamellar structure overlying the flexor tendons. The demonstration of hypoechoic bands adhering to the marging of the flexor tendons and deep surface of the dermis appears to be pathognomonic of the disease. Compared to tendons, early nodules are hypoechoic and typically hypervascular whereas older nodules are iso- to hyperechoic, without hypervascular Doppler signal. Ultrasound can sometimes demonstrate arterial encasement by fibrous or scarring tissue. Ultrasound therefore is very useful for the differential diagnosis of pathologies involving the palmar surface of the hand, for the early detection of Dupuytren's contracture, and for the detection of complication, especially vascular. These data may have an impact on management. PMID:20808269

  19. Derivation of Burn Scar Depths with Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) in Indonesian Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhorn, U.; Siegert, F.

    2009-04-01

    more CO2 per year than the fourth-largest industrial nation, Germany, saved to achieve its Kyoto target. Since 1990, emissions from peat burning and peat decomposition have exceeded that of above ground biomass deforestation. These numbers show how important it is to have more accurate estimations for peat burn depth in the future. Until now few field measurements were made, which would require to know the fire affected area in advance or ignite peatland on purpose. Furthermore fire scars are quickly covered by regenerating vegetation. Another problem is the lack of a method without actually having to go into the field (e.g. through remote sensing techniques), due to the fact that many of the fire locations are remote and very difficult to access. We investigated if airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR), an active laser pulse technology by which the height of objects can be precisely measured, can be used to determine the amount of peat burned during a fire event. From a LIDAR data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after severe fires resulting from the 2006 El Niño drought, we calculated that the average depth of a burn scar was 0.30 ± 0.15 m .This was achieved through the construction of digital terrain models (DTMs) by interpolating the LIDAR ground return signals in burnt and adjacent unburned peatland. These calculated depths were compared to in situ measurements, which came to similar results. We believe that the method presented here to estimate burnt peat depth has the potential to considerably improve the accuracy of regional and global carbon emission models but would also be helpful for monitoring projects under the Kyoto Protocol like the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) or the proposed Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism.

  20. Management of post burn hand deformities

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Bajantri, Babu; Bharathi, R. Ravindra

    2010-01-01

    The hand is ranked among the three most frequent sites of burns scar contracture deformity. One of the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors is the functionality of the hands. Burns deformities, although largely preventable, nevertheless do occur when appropriate treatment is not provided in the acute situation or when they are part of a major burns. Reconstructive procedures can greatly improve the function of the hands. Appropriate choice of procedures and timing of surgery followed by supervised physiotherapy can be a boon for a burns survivor. PMID:21321661

  1. Acute assessment and management of burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Purdue, Gary F; Arnoldo, Brett D; Hunt, John L

    2011-05-01

    Burns are ubiquitous injuries in modern society, with virtually all adults having sustained a burn at some point in their lives. The skin is the largest organ of the body, basically functioning to protect self from non-self. Burn injury to the skin is painful, resource-intensive, and often associated with scarring, contracture formation, and long-term disability. Larger burns are associated with morbidity and mortality disproportionate to their initial appearance. Electrical and chemical burns are less common injuries but are often associated with significant morbidity. PMID:21624716

  2. Derivation of burn scar depths and estimation of carbon emissions with LIDAR in Indonesian peatlands.

    PubMed

    Ballhorn, Uwe; Siegert, Florian; Mason, Mike; Limin, Suwido

    2009-12-15

    During the 1997/98 El Niño-induced drought peatland fires in Indonesia may have released 13-40% of the mean annual global carbon emissions from fossil fuels. One major unknown in current peatland emission estimations is how much peat is combusted by fire. Using a light detection and ranging data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after the severe peatland fires of 2006, we determined an average burn scar depth of 0.33 +/- 0.18 m. Based on this result and the burned area determined from satellite imagery, we estimate that within the 2.79 million hectare study area 49.15 +/- 26.81 megatons of carbon were released during the 2006 El Niño episode. This represents 10-33% of all carbon emissions from transport for the European Community in the year 2006. These emissions, originating from a comparatively small area (approximately 13% of the Indonesian peatland area), underline the importance of peat fires in the context of green house gas emissions and global warming. In the past decade severe peat fires occurred during El Niño-induced droughts in 1997, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2009. Currently, this important source of carbon emissions is not included in IPCC carbon accounting or in regional and global carbon emission models. Precise spatial measurements of peat combusted and potential avoided emissions in tropical peat swamp forests will also be required for future emission trading schemes in the framework of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in developing countries. PMID:19940252

  3. Derivation of burn scar depths and estimation of carbon emissions with LIDAR in Indonesian peatlands

    PubMed Central

    Ballhorn, Uwe; Siegert, Florian; Mason, Mike; Limin, Suwido

    2009-01-01

    During the 1997/98 El Niño-induced drought peatland fires in Indonesia may have released 13–40% of the mean annual global carbon emissions from fossil fuels. One major unknown in current peatland emission estimations is how much peat is combusted by fire. Using a light detection and ranging data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after the severe peatland fires of 2006, we determined an average burn scar depth of 0.33 ± 0.18 m. Based on this result and the burned area determined from satellite imagery, we estimate that within the 2.79 million hectare study area 49.15 ± 26.81 megatons of carbon were released during the 2006 El Niño episode. This represents 10–33% of all carbon emissions from transport for the European Community in the year 2006. These emissions, originating from a comparatively small area (approximately 13% of the Indonesian peatland area), underline the importance of peat fires in the context of green house gas emissions and global warming. In the past decade severe peat fires occurred during El Niño-induced droughts in 1997, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2009. Currently, this important source of carbon emissions is not included in IPCC carbon accounting or in regional and global carbon emission models. Precise spatial measurements of peat combusted and potential avoided emissions in tropical peat swamp forests will also be required for future emission trading schemes in the framework of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in developing countries. PMID:19940252

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing in Non-hypertrophic Traumatic and Burn Scars

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractional photothermolysis is one of the most effective treatment options used to resurface scars of different aetiologies. Aim: To assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing treatment in the management of non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients affected by non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars were treated with four sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing treatment at 6-weekly intervals. Patients were photographed at each visit and finally, 3 months after the end of treatment schedule. Response to treatment was assessed clinically as well as by comparing the initial photograph of the patient with the one taken at the last follow-up visit 3-months after the final treatment session. Changes in skin texture, surface irregularity and pigmentation were assessed on a quartile grading scale and scored individually from 0 to 4. A mean of the three individual scores was calculated and the response was labelled as ‘excellent’ if the mean score achieved was >2. A score of 1-2 was labeled as good response while a score below 1 was labeled as ‘poor’ response. The subjective satisfaction of each patient with the treatment offered was also assessed at the last follow-up visit. Results: The commonest site of scarring treated was the face followed by hands. Response to treatment was rated as excellent in 60% (15/25) patients while 24% (6/25) and 16% (4/25) patients were labeled as good and poor responders, respectively. Skin texture showed better response than other variables with average score of 2.44. Linear post-traumatic scars were seen to respond less than other morphological types. Majority of the patients (19 out of 25) were highly satisfied with the treatment offered. No long-term adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Fractional photothermolysis with a fractional CO2 laser gives excellent results in patients with post-burn scars with minimal adverse

  5. Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 expression is enhanced in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts from burned children

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C; He, Jing; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) plays a key role in hypertrophic scar formation. A lot of studies have shown that TGF-β1 stimulates fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, inhibits matrix degradation and eventually leads to scar formation. Smad proteins are important intracellular mediators of TGF-β1 signaling, and Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2), an ubiquitin ligase for Smads, plays critical roles in the regulation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling. It was reported that Smurf2 was abnormally expressed during the process of liver fibrosis and lung fibrosis. Hypertrophic scarring is a fibroproliferative disorder of the dermis that occurs following wounding. However, little is known about the expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scarring. We hypothesized that TGF-β1 signaling cannot be disrupted after wound epithelialization probably due to abnormal expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. In the present study, we found that hypertrophic scar fibroblasts exhibited increased Smurf2 protein and mRNA levels compared with normal fibroblasts, and the expression of Smurf2 gradually increased in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts after TGF-β1 stimulation. Furthermore, we transfected Smurf2 siRNA into hypertrophic scar fibroblasts, and we found that silencing the expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts dramatically reduced TGF-β1 production, inhibited TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression and inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen I synthesis. Our results suggest that the enhanced expression of Smurf2 is involved in the progression of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:21920670

  6. Missense Variant in MAPK Inactivator PTPN5 Is Associated with Decreased Severity of Post-Burn Hypertrophic Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Ravi F.; Arbabi, Saman; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic scarring (HTS) is hypothesized to have a genetic mechanism, yet its genetic determinants are largely unknown. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are important mediators of inflammatory signaling, and experimental evidence implicates MAPKs in HTS formation. We hypothesized that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MAPK-pathway genes would be associated with severity of post-burn HTS. Methods We analyzed data from a prospective-cohort genome-wide association study of post-burn HTS. We included subjects with deep-partial-thickness burns admitted to our center who provided blood for genotyping and had at least one Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) assessment. After adjusting for HTS risk factors and population stratification, we tested MAPK-pathway gene SNPs for association with the four VSS variables in a joint regression model. In addition to individual-SNP analysis, we performed gene-based association testing. Results Our study population consisted of 538 adults (median age 40 years) who were predominantly White (76%) males (71%) admitted to our center from 2007–2014 with small-to-moderate-sized burns (median burn size 6% total body surface area). Of 2,146 SNPs tested, a rare missense variant in the PTPN5 gene (rs56234898; minor allele frequency 1.5%) was significantly associated with decreased severity of post-burn HTS (P = 1.3×10−6). In gene-based analysis, PTPN5 (P = 1.2×10−5) showed a significant association and BDNF (P = 9.5×10−4) a borderline-significant association with HTS severity. Conclusions We report PTPN5 as a novel genetic locus associated with HTS severity. PTPN5 is a MAPK inhibitor expressed in neurons, suggesting a potential role for neurotrophic factors and neuroinflammatory signaling in HTS pathophysiology. PMID:26872063

  7. Volkmann ischemic contracture

    MedlinePlus

    Volkmann contracture is a deformity of the hand, fingers, and wrist caused by injury to the muscles ... injured. This leads to contracture deformities of the fingers, hand, and wrist. There are three levels of ...

  8. Pediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Kung, Theodore A; Gosain, Arun K

    2008-07-01

    Despite major advances in the area of burn management, burn injury continues to be a leading cause of pediatric mortality and morbidity. Facial burns in particular are devastating to the affected child and result in numerous physical and psychosocial sequelae. Although many of the principles of adult burn management can be applied to a pediatric patient with facial burns, the surgeon must be cognizant of several important differences. Facial burns and subsequent scar formation can drastically affect the growth potential of a child's face. Structures such as the nose and teeth may become deformed due to abnormal external forces caused by contractures. Serious complications such as occlusion amblyopia and microstomia must be anticipated and urgently addressed to avert permanent consequences, whereas other reconstructive procedures can be delayed until scar maturation occurs. Furthermore, because young children are actively developing the concept of self, severe facial burns can alter a child's sense of identity and place the child at high risk for future emotional and psychologic disturbances. Surgical reconstruction of burn wounds should proceed only after thorough planning and may involve a variety of skin graft, flap, and tissue expansion techniques. The most favorable outcome is achieved when facial resurfacing is performed with respect to the aesthetic units of the face. Children with facial burns remain a considerable challenge to their caregivers, and these patients require long-term care by a multidisciplinary team of physicians and therapists to optimize functional, cosmetic, and psychosocial outcomes. PMID:18650717

  9. [I Am an Occupational Therapist. I Will Accompany You Through the Process of Burn Rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Sung

    2016-02-01

    Burn injuries nearly always occur by accident. Burn injuries that cover large areas of the body typically cause hypertrophic scarring and joint contractures that affect the ability of the burn patient to handle normal activities of daily living. Occupational therapists begin the related interventions as early as possible, and patients require rehabilitation continuously until scar maturation. The present article provides an overview of the approach that occupational therapists should take in treating burn patients. Key elements of this approach include creating a burn rehabilitation program and helping patients achieve independence in their activities of daily living by applying individual assistive devices. The goal of this program is to allow burn patients to return to the workplace and to a normal life. We hope that this article makes more specialists aware of the proper approach to occupational therapy for burn patients and reduces the incidence of post-burn-injury sequelae. PMID:26813062

  10. The Effects of Topical Agent (Kelo-Cote or Contractubex) Massage on the Thickness of Post-Burn Scar Tissue Formed in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Won Jin; Suh, Bum Sin; Kim, Hyeon A; Heo, Woo Hoe; Choi, Gum Ha; Lee, Seo Ul

    2013-01-01

    Background We conducted an experimental study to compare the effect of massage using topical agents (Kelo-cote or Contractubex) on scar formation by massaging the healed burn wound on the dorsal area of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Methods Four areas of second degree contact burn were made on the dorsal area of each of 15 SD rats, using a soldering iron 15 mm in diameter. After gross epithelialization in the defect, 15 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: the Kelo-cote group, Contractubex group, Vaseline group, and control group. Rats in three of the groups (all but the Control group) were massaged twice per day for 5 minutes each day, while those in the Control group were left unattended. For histologic analysis, we performed a biopsy and evaluated the thickness of scar tissue. Results In the Kelo-cote and Contractubex groups, scar tissue thicknesses showed a significant decrease, compared with the Vaseline and control groups. However, no significant differences were observed between the Kelo-cote and Contractubex groups. In the Vaseline group, scar tissue thicknesses showed a significant decrease, compared with the control groups. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that massage using a topical agent is helpful in the prevention of scar formation and that massage only with lubricant (no use of a topical agent) also has a considerable effect, although not as much as the use of a topical agent. Thus, we recommend massage with a topical agent on the post-burn scar as an effective method for decreasing the scar thickness. PMID:24286041

  11. A histological study on the effect of pressure therapy on the activities of myofibroblasts and keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar tissues after burn.

    PubMed

    Li-Tsang, Cecilia W P; Feng, Beibei; Huang, Lin; Liu, Xusheng; Shu, Bin; Chan, Yvonne T Y; Cheung, Kwok-Kuen

    2015-08-01

    Although pressure therapy (PT) has been widely used as the first-line treatment for hypertrophic scars (HS), the histopathological changes involved have seldom been studied. This study aimed to examine the longitudinal effect of PT on the histopathological changes in HS. Ten scar samples were selected from six patients with HS after burn and they were given a standardized PT intervention for 3 months while 16 scar samples were obtained on those without PT. The scar biopsies were collected pre-treatment, 1 and 3 months post-intervention for both clinical and histopathological examinations. Clinical assessments demonstrated significant improvement in the thickness and redness of the scars after PT. Histological examination revealed that cell density in the dermal layer was markedly reduced in the 3-months post-pressurized scar tissues, while the arrangement of the collagen fiber was changed from nodular to wave-like pattern. The α-smooth muscle actin immunoreactivity was significantly decreased after 1-month pressure treatment. There was a significant reduction of myofibroblasts population and a concomitant increase in the apoptotic index in the dermal layer in the 3-months' post-pressurized scars. A significant negative correlation was found between the myofibroblasts population and the apoptotic index. The keratinocyte proliferation was found inhibited after PT. Results demonstrated that PT appeared to promote HS maturation by inhibiting the keratinocyte proliferation and suppressing myofibroblasts population, the latter possibly via apoptosis. PMID:25681960

  12. Rehabilitation of the burn patient

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of burn treatment. It is not something which takes place following healing of skin grafts or discharge from hospital; instead it is a process that starts from day one of admission and continues for months and sometimes years after the initial event. Burns rehabilitation is not something which is completed by one or two individuals but should be a team approach, incorporating the patient and when appropriate, their family. The term ‘Burns Rehabilitation’ incorporates the physical, psychological and social aspects of care and it is common for burn patients to experience difficulties in one or all of these areas following a burn injury. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. The aims of burn rehabilitation are to minimise the adverse effects caused by the injury in terms of maintaining range of movement, minimising contracture development and impact of scarring, maximising functional ability, maximising psychological wellbeing, maximising social integration PMID:21321643

  13. Contractures and muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Walters, R Jon

    2016-08-01

    Contractures are one of a handful of signs in muscle disease, besides weakness and its distribution, whose presence can help guide us diagnostically, a welcome star on the horizon. Contractures are associated with several myopathies, some with important cardiac manifestations, and consequently are important to recognise; their presence may also provide us with a potential satisfying 'penny dropping' diagnostic moment. PMID:26867558

  14. A fully automatic processing chain to produce Burn Scar Mapping products, using the full Landsat archive over Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoes, Charalampos; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Herekakis, Themistoklis; Michail, Dimitrios; Ieronymidi, Emmanuela

    2013-04-01

    Remote sensing tools for the accurate, robust and timely assessment of the damages inflicted by forest wildfires provide information that is of paramount importance to public environmental agencies and related stakeholders before, during and after the crisis. The Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing of the National Observatory of Athens (IAASARS/NOA) has developed a fully automatic single and/or multi date processing chain that takes as input archived Landsat 4, 5 or 7 raw images and produces precise diachronic burnt area polygons and damage assessments over the Greek territory. The methodology consists of three fully automatic stages: 1) the pre-processing stage where the metadata of the raw images are extracted, followed by the application of the LEDAPS software platform for calibration and mask production and the Automated Precise Orthorectification Package, developed by NASA, for image geo-registration and orthorectification, 2) the core-BSM (Burn Scar Mapping) processing stage which incorporates a published classification algorithm based on a series of physical indexes, the application of two filters for noise removal using graph-based techniques and the grouping of pixels classified as burnt to form the appropriate pixels clusters before proceeding to conversion from raster to vector, and 3) the post-processing stage where the products are thematically refined and enriched using auxiliary GIS layers (underlying land cover/use, administrative boundaries, etc.) and human logic/evidence to suppress false alarms and omission errors. The established processing chain has been successfully applied to the entire archive of Landsat imagery over Greece spanning from 1984 to 2012, which has been collected and managed in IAASARS/NOA. The number of full Landsat frames that were subject of process in the framework of the study was 415. These burn scar mapping products are generated for the first time to such a temporal and spatial

  15. Silk fibroin/gelatin electrospun nanofibrous dressing functionalized with astragaloside IV induces healing and anti-scar effects on burn wound.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ying-Hui; Peng, Li-Hua; Liu, Xin; Chen, Xi; Xiong, Jie; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-02-20

    Functional wound dressing has provided new challenges for researchers who focus on burn to improve skin graft quality, reduce scarring, and develop a pluristratified dermal or epidermal construct of a burn wound. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a silk fibroin/gelatin (SF/GT) electrospun nanofibrous dressing loaded with astragaloside IV (AS) on deep partial-thickness burn wound. AS-loaded SF/GT-blended nanofibrous dressing was prepared by electrospinning nanotechnology. The optimal ratio (25:75) of silk fibroin to gelatin was further optimized by evaluating ATR-FTIR characteristics, mechanical properties, porosity, swelling rate, degradation, and release profile of the AS-loaded SF/GT nanofibrous dressing. In contrast to the blank control, the AS-loaded SF/GT nanofibrous dressing promoted cell adhesion and proliferation with good biocompatibility in vitro (p<0.01). This dressing also accelerated wound healing and inhibited scar formation in vivo by stimulating wound closure (p<0.05), increasing angiogenesis, regulating newly formed types of collagen, and improving collagen organization. These results showed that SF/GT nanofibrous dressing is a promising topical drug delivery system. Furthermore, AS-functionalized SF/GT nanofibrous dressing is an excellent topical therapeutic that could be applied to promote healing and elicit anti-scar effects on partial-thickness burn wound. PMID:25556053

  16. Race and melanocortin 1 receptor polymorphism R163Q are associated with post-burn hypertrophic scarring: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Ravi F.; Hocking, Anne M.; Muffley, Lara A.; Ga, Maricar; Honari, Shari; Reiner, Alexander P.; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic determinants of post-burn hypertrophic scarring (HTS) are unknown, and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) loss-of-function leads to fibrogenesis in experimental models. To examine the associations between self-identified race and MC1R single- nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with severity of post-burn HTS, we conducted a prospective cohort study of burned adults admitted to our institution over 7 years. Subjects were evaluated using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS), asked to rate their itching, and genotyped for 8 MC1R SNPs. Testing for association with severe HTS (VSS>7) and itch severity (0-10) was based on multivariate regression with adjustment for known risk factors. Of 425 subjects analyzed, 77% identified as White. The prevalence of severe HTS (VSS>7) was 49%, and the mean itch score was 3.9. In multivariate analysis, Asian (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.54; 95% CI: 1.13-2.10), Black/African American (PR 1.86; 95% CI: 1.42-2.45), and Native American (PR 1.87; 95% CI: 1.48-2.35) race were independently associated with severe HTS. MC1R SNP R163Q was also significantly (P<0.001) associated with severe HTS. Asian race (linear regression coefficient 1.32; 95% CI: 0.23-2.40) but not MC1R SNP genotype was associated with increased itch score. We conclude that MC1R genotype may influence post-burn scarring. PMID:26030184

  17. The molecular basis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are caused by dermal injuries such as trauma and burns to the deep dermis, which are red, raised, itchy and painful. They can cause cosmetic disfigurement or contractures if craniofacial areas or mobile region of the skin are affected. Abnormal wound healing with more extracellular matrix deposition than degradation will result in HTS formation. This review will introduce the physiology of wound healing, dermal HTS formation, treatment and difference with keloids in the skin, and it also review the current advance of molecular basis of HTS including the involvement of cytokines, growth factors, and macrophages via chemokine pathway, to bring insights for future prevention and treatment of HTS. PMID:27574672

  18. [The treatment of a post-burn deformity and contracture of the neck, using extended flaps with axial type of blood supply].

    PubMed

    Zhernov, A A; Zhernov, An A

    2012-03-01

    Experience of treatment of 24 patients, suffering neck deformity and contracture, using stretched flaps with axial type of blood circulation, was summarized. In total 43 expanders were implanted. The cutaneo-fascial flaps stretching was performed in the neck and thorax. In all the flaps a nutrition artery was included. The neck-brachial flaps, including supraclavicular artery, were applied in 25 (58.1%) patients, the neck-thoracic flaps, using superficial neck artery--in 12 (27.91%), the occipital-neck flaps on a musculocutaneous perforating vessels of occipital artery--in 6 (13.95%). The methods of the expander implantation, the stretching, transposition regimes of plastic material and its fixation were elaborated. The donor sites were closed using stretched tissues, left in place after formation of flaps. Flaps were fixed, using mechanical method of the tissues connection with duplicature formation from deepidermized portion of cicatrix or with polypropylene mesh, which played a role of a dense framework. Then a strong connective tissue bolt was formed, securely fixing transposedstretched tissues. While application of a complex-component vascularized flaps a suppuration have occurred in 3 (6.97%), partial necrosis--in 2 (4.64%) observations. Inclusion of nutritive vessels permit to form large size flaps with a small risk of necrosis occurrence. The stretched perforant flaps application permits to achieve positive result in 95.3% of observations--in immediate and in 81.82%--in far remote period. PMID:22702123

  19. Race and Melanocortin 1 Receptor Polymorphism R163Q Are Associated with Post-Burn Hypertrophic Scarring: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sood, Ravi F; Hocking, Anne M; Muffley, Lara A; Ga, Maricar; Honari, Shari; Reiner, Alexander P; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Gibran, Nicole S

    2015-10-01

    The genetic determinants of post-burn hypertrophic scarring (HTS) are unknown, and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) loss-of-function leads to fibrogenesis in experimental models. To examine the associations between self-identified race and MC1R single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with severity of post-burn HTS, we conducted a prospective cohort study of burned adults admitted to our institution over 7 years. Subjects were evaluated using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS), asked to rate their itching, and genotyped for 8 MC1R SNPs. Testing for association with severe HTS (VSS>7) and itch severity (0-10) was based on multivariate regression with adjustment for known risk factors. Of 425 subjects analyzed, 77% identified as White. The prevalence of severe HTS (VSS>7) was 49%, and the mean itch score was 3.9. In multivariate analysis, Asian (prevalence ratio (PR) 1.54; 95% CI: 1.13-2.10), Black/African American (PR 1.86; 95% CI: 1.42-2.45), and Native American (PR 1.87; 95% CI: 1.48-2.35) race were independently associated with severe HTS. MC1R SNP R163Q was also significantly (P<0.001) associated with severe HTS. Asian race (linear regression coefficient 1.32; 95% CI: 0.23-2.40) but not MC1R SNP genotype was associated with increased itch score. We conclude that MC1R genotype may influence post-burn scarring. PMID:26030184

  20. Topical treatments for hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zurada, Joanna M; Kriegel, David; Davis, Ira C

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic scars represent an abnormal, exaggerated healing response after skin injury. In addition to cosmetic concern, scars may cause pain, pruritus, contractures, and other functional impairments. Therapeutic modalities include topical medications, intralesional corticosteroids, laser therapy, and cryosurgery. Topical therapies, in particular, have become increasingly popular because of their ease of use, comfort, noninvasiveness, and relatively low cost. This review will discuss the properties and effectiveness of these agents, including pressure therapy, silicone gel sheeting and ointment, polyurethane dressing, onion extract, imiquimod 5% cream, and vitamins A and E in the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scars. PMID:17097399

  1. Volkmann ischemic contracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... contracture occurs when there is a lack of blood flow (ischemia) to the forearm. This usually occurs when there is increased pressure due to swelling, a condition called compartment syndrome . Injury to the arm, including a crush injury or fracture, can lead ...

  2. Joint Contracture Orthosis (JCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunsford, Thomas R.; Parsons, Ken; Krouskop, Thomas; McGee, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an advanced orthosis which is effective in reducing upper and lower limb contractures in significantly less time than currently required with conventional methods. The team that developed the JCO consisted of an engineer, orthotist, therapist, and physician.

  3. OUTCOME OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND SPLINTING IN HAND BURNS INJURY. OUR LAST FOUR YEARS’ EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Rrecaj, Shkurta; Hysenaj, Hajrie; Martinaj, Merita; Murtezani, Ardiana; Ibrahimi-Kacuri, Dafina; Haxhiu, Bekim; Buja, Zene

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Burn injuries in hands are much more complex and the appearance of contractures is a common complication. Hand burn injuries often result in limited functionality, flexion and extension of fingers and present a major hindrance in rehabilitation. The aim of physical therapy and splinting after hand burn injury is to maintain mobility, prevent the development of the contracture and to promote the functionality of hand and good cosmetic results. The purpose of this study is to presents our experience of 38 children with hand burn injuries, admitted and treated at the Department of Plastic Surgery, UCCK-Pristina, Kosovo, during the years 2012-2015. Methods: Physical therapy is focused on active/passive range of motion in affected joints, management of cicatrix, strengthening exercise, coordination and use of splints for correction contractures. Patients were evaluated in three, six months and the definitive evaluation is done after 9 months of physical therapy and splinting. Results: We have improvement in range of motion (ROM), functionality, coordination, muscle force, decrease of keloids scars. Conclusion: This study shows the importance of physical therapy and splinting, achieving good results in preventing contracture, improving range of motion, muscle force and good cosmetic results. PMID:26889095

  4. Forty-Year Follow-up of Full-Thickness Skin Graft After Thermal Burn Injury to the Volar Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kasdan, Morton L.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hands are commonly affected in severe thermal burn injuries. Resulting contractures lead to significant loss of function. Burn contracture release and skin grafting are necessary to restore hand function. We report a case in which surgical reconstruction of a volar hand burn was performed with full-thickness skin grafting. The patient had a 40-year follow-up to assess the function and cosmesis of the repaired hand. Methods: We report a case in which a 15-month-old boy presented after receiving third-degree burns to the left volar hand, including the flexural aspects of the index, long, and ring fingers by placing it on a hot kitchen stove burner. The patient subsequently underwent scar contracture release and full-thickness skin grafting. Results: Eleven years after reconstruction, further contractures developed associated with the patient's growth, which were reconstructed with repeat full-thickness skin graft from the inguinal region. No recurrence was witnessed afterward and 40 years after initial injury, the patient maintains full activities of daily living and use of his hand in his occupation. Conclusions: There is debate regarding the superiority of split-thickness versus full-thickness grafts during reconstruction. Our case strengthens the argument for durability of a full-thickness skin graft following thermal burn injury. PMID:27555888

  5. Assessing the Potential Impact of the 2015-2016 El Niño on the California Rim Fire Burn Scar Through Debris Flow Hazard Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larcom, S.; Grigsby, S.; Ustin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires are a perennial issue for California, and the current record-breaking drought is exacerbating the potential problems for the state. Fires leave behind burn scars characterized by diminished vegetative cover and abundant bare soil, and these areas are especially susceptible to storm events that pose an elevated risk of debris flows and sediment-rich sheet wash. This study focused on the 2013 Rim Fire that devastated significant portions of Stanislaus National Forest and Yosemite National Park, and utilized readily available NASA JPL SRTM elevation data and AVIRIS spectral imaging data to construct a debris flow hazard map that assesses mass wasting risk for the Rim Fire burn scar. This study consisted entirely of remotely sensed data, which was processed in software programs such as ENVI, GRASS GIS, ArcMap, and Google Earth. Parameters that were taken into consideration when constructing this map include hill slope (greater than 30 percent rise), burn severity (assessed by calculating NDVI), and erodibility of the soil (by comparing spectral reflectance of AVIRIS images with the reference spectra of illite). By calculating percent of total burn area, 6% was classified as low risk, 55% as medium risk, and 39% as high risk. In addition, this study assessed the importance of the 2015-2016 El Niño, which is projected to be one of the strongest on record, by studying historic rainfall records and storm events of past El Niño's. Hydrological and infrastructural problems that could be caused by short-term convective or long-term synoptic storms and subsequent debris flows were explored as well.

  6. In-vivo cutaneous burn characterization and scar assay with multi-functional optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bumju; Yoon, Yeorum; Le, Viet-Hoan; Yoon, Calvin J.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-03-01

    Research about the cutaneous burn was separated by assessment of burn depth and development of wound healing therapy. Various in vivo optical techniques were used to determined burn depth and observe the wound healing process. In this paper, we report the usage of multimodal optical coherence tomography system, which containing angiographic and polarization sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) with conventional OCT system, at burn studies. Burn was induced at 4 different degrees by control the attachment time of 75 Celsius degree heated brass rod at dorsal skin of the rat. For the burn depth assessment, we imaged the different burn degrees area. Changes of polarization sensitive signal were providing burn depth information. To see the wound healing process, each wound area imaged at long period. Conventional OCT shows the structural information about the tissue, like layer and hair follicle. Angiographic OCT provides vascular distribution and diameter of blood vessel information and PS-OCT shows birefringence tissue information. Based on the multimodal OCT data, burn depth assessment were well matched with burn induced time and wound healing process was consistent with previous wound healing report. Therefore, the multimodal OCT holds potential for burn study.

  7. Myofibroblastic differentiation in atypical fibroxanthomas occurring on sun-exposed skin and in a burn scar: an ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ayako; Yamada, Nanako; Yoshida, Yuichi; Morino, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2011-08-01

    Herein, we report the investigation of two cases of atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX). One AFX developed within actinically damaged skin, as is typical, while the other developed within a burn scar within non-sun-exposed skin. The two tumors showed almost identical histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features. The tumors were composed of pleomorphic spindled, epithelioid, multinucleated and bizarre cells with enlarged atypical nuclei. Most tumor cells expressed vimentin and about 50% expressed CD10. Some tumor cells also expressed α-smooth muscle actin and CD68. However, there was no expression of cytokeratins, p63, S-100 protein, melan-A, HMB 45, desmin, epithelial membrane antigen or CD34. Ultrastructurally, the tumor cells contained myofilaments with dense patches but lacked plasmalemmal caveolae and basal lamina. The most prominent finding was the identification of fibronexus junctions. In addition, there were tumor cells containing numerous lysosomal granules. In conclusion, we clearly showed myofibroblastic differentiation in AFX by electron microscopy. We report also a case of AFX directly developing within a burn scar in the absence of actinic damage. PMID:21623865

  8. Acne Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... scars. Cryosurgery : This treatment freezes the scar tissue. Freezing the tissue causes it to die and gradually ... et al . “Which Type of Atrophic Acne Scar (Ice-pick, Boxcar, or Rolling) Responds to Nonablative Fractional ...

  9. Scarring, stem cells, scaffolds and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Markeson, Daniel; Pleat, Jonathon M; Sharpe, Justin R; Harris, Adrian L; Seifalian, Alexander M; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin loss, which can be extensive in the case of large burns, continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. This is due to an on-going inability to produce a suitable tissue engineered substrate that can satisfactorily replicate the epidermal and dermal in vivo niches to fulfil both aesthetic and functional demands. The current gold standard treatment of autologous skin grafting is inadequate because of poor textural durability, scarring and associated contracture, and because of a paucity of donor sites in larger burns. Tissue engineering has seen exponential growth in recent years with a number of 'off-the-shelf' dermal and epidermal substitutes now available. Each has its own limitations. In this review, we examine normal wound repair in relation to stem/progenitor cells that are intimately involved in this process within the dermal niche. Endothelial precursors, in particular, are examined closely and their phenotype, morphology and enrichment from multiple sources are described in an attempt to provide some clarity regarding the controversy surrounding their classification and role in vasculogenesis. We also review the role of the next generation of cellularized scaffolds and smart biomaterials that attempt to improve the revascularisation of artificial grafts, the rate of wound healing and the final cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:24668923

  10. Cost-Efficacy of Cultured Epidermal Autografts in Massive Pediatric Burns

    PubMed Central

    Barret, Juan P.; Wolf, Steven E.; Desai, Manubhai H.; Herndon, David N.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of cultured epidermal autografts (CEA) for closure of burn wounds in pediatric burn patients with full-thickness burns of more than 90% total body surface area. Summary Background Data Paucity of donor sites in massive burns makes the use of expanded skin of paramount importance. CEA techniques have been used in burned patients with differing and controversial results. The true impact and the efficacy of such techniques in massive burns remain uncertain. Methods Patients with full-thickness burns of more than 90% body surface area treated between May 1988 and May 1998 were studied. Patients grafted with CEA were compared with patients grafted with conventional meshed autografts. Rates of death and complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), hospital cost, acute readmissions for reconstruction, and quality of scars were studied as outcome measures. Results Patients treated with CEA had a better quality of burn scars but incurred a longer LOS and higher hospital costs. Both groups had comparable readmissions for open wounds, but patients treated with CEA required more reconstructive procedures during the first 2 years after the injury. The incidence of sepsis and pneumonia in both groups was comparable. Conclusions Conventional meshed autografts are superior to CEA for containing hospital cost, diminishing LOS, and decreasing the number of readmissions for reconstruction of contractures. However, the use of CEA provides better scar quality such that perhaps future research should focus on bioengineered dermal templates to promote take and diminish long-term fragility. PMID:10816630

  11. Validation of a vertical progression porcine burn model.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Hirth, Douglas; McClain, Steve A; Crawford, Laurie; Lin, Fubao; Clark, Richard A F

    2011-01-01

    A major potential goal of burn therapy is to limit progression of partial- to full-thickness burns. To better test therapies, the authors developed and validated a vertical progression porcine burn model in which partial-thickness burns treated with an occlusive dressing convert to full-thickness burns that heal with scarring and wound contraction. Forty contact burns were created on the backs and flanks of two young swine using a 150 g aluminum bar preheated to 70°C, 80°C, or 90°C for 20 or 30 seconds. The necrotic epidermis was removed and the burns were covered with a polyurethane occlusive dressing. Burns were photographed at 1, 24, and 48 hours as well as at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days postinjury. Full-thickness biopsies were obtained at 1, 4, 24, and 48 hours as well as at 7 and 28 days. The primary outcomes were presence of deep contracted scars and wound area 28 days after injury. Secondary outcomes were depth of injury, reepithelialization, and depth of scars. Data were compared across burn conditions using analysis of variance and χ(2) tests. Eight replicate burns were created with the aluminum bar using the following temperature/contact-time combinations: 70/20, 70/30, 80/20, 80/30, and 90/20. The percentage of burns healing with contracted scars were 70/20, 0%; 70/30, 25%; 80/20, 50%; 80/30, 75%; and 90/20, 100% (P = .05). Wound areas at 28 days by injury conditions were 70/20, 8.1 cm(2); 70/30, 7.8 cm(2); 80/20, 6.6 cm(2); 80/30, 4.9 cm(2); and 90/20, 4.8 cm(2) (P = .007). Depth of injury judged by depth of endothelial damage for the 80/20 and 80/30 burns at 1 hour was 36% and 60% of the dermal thickness, respectively. The depth of injury to the endothelial cells 1 hour after injury was inversely correlated with the degree of scar area (Pearson's correlation r = -.71, P < .001). Exposure of porcine skin to an aluminum bar preheated to 80°C for 20 or 30 seconds results initially in a partial-thickness burn that when treated with an occlusive dressing

  12. Dupuytren's Contracture: Fibroblast Contraction?

    PubMed Central

    Gabbiani, Giulio; Majno, Guido

    1972-01-01

    In 6 cases of Dupuytren's disease and 1 of Ledderhose's disease, the nodules of the palmar and plantar aponeurosis were examined by light and electron microscopy. The cells composing these nodules, presumably fibroblasts, showed three significant ultrastructural features: (1) a fibrillar system similar to that of smooth muscle cells; (2) nuclear deformations such as are found in contracted cells, the severest being recognizable by light microscopy (cross-banded nuclei); (3) cell-to-cell and cell-to-stroma attachments. Based on these data and on recent information about the biology of the fibroblasts, it is suggested that these cells are fibroblasts that have modulated into contractile cells (myofibroblasts), and that their contraction plays a role in the pathogenesis of the contracture observed clinically. ImagesFig 10Fig 5Fig 11Fig 6 and 7Fig 8Fig 1Fig 2Fig 9Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:5009249

  13. Bladder neck contracture

    PubMed Central

    Simhan, Jay; Ramirez, Daniel; Morey, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-described complication of the surgical treatment of benign and malignant prostate conditions. Nevertheless, etiologies of BNC development are highly dependent on the primary treatment modality undertaken with BNC also occurring after pelvic radiation. The treatment options for BNC can range from simple, office-based dilation procedures to more invasive, complex abdomino-perineal reconstructive surgery. Although numerous strategies have been described, a patient-specific approach is usually necessary in the management of these complex patients. In this review, we highlight various therapeutic maneuvers described for the management of BNC and further delineate a tailored approach utilized at our institution in these complicated patients. PMID:26816768

  14. [Dermatological laser- and light treatments of scars].

    PubMed

    Karmisholt, Katrine; Borch, Jakob E; Omland, Silje Haukali; Hædersdal, Merete

    2016-08-01

    Many patients struggle with tender, rigid and erythematous scars. Various modalities are used to treat cutaneous scars and in recent years, laser treatments are emerging as promising procedures. This article describes laser systems used for scar treatment according to scar type, evaluates the highest available level of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and introduces a guideline for laser treatment of scars. Twelve RCTs documented effect on acne, burn and surgical scars. It is recommended that laser- and light-based treatments are considered according to the scar type. PMID:27507028

  15. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... doing so puts you in danger as well. Chemical and Electrical Burns For chemical and electrical burns, call 911 or your local ... the power source has been turned off. For chemical burns: Dry chemicals should be brushed off the ...

  16. Scar revision

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mohit; Wakure, Abhijeet

    2013-01-01

    Most surgical patients end up with a scar and most of these would want at least some improvement in the appearance of the scar. Using sound techniques for wound closure surgeons can, to a certain extent, prevent suboptimal scars. This article reviews the principles of prevention and treatment of suboptimal scars. Surgical techniques of scar revision, i.e., Z plasty, W plasty, and geometrical broken line closure are described. Post-operative care and other adjuvant therapies of scars are described. A short description of dermabrasion and lasers for management of scars is given. It is hoped that this review helps the surgeon to formulate a comprehensive plan for management of scars of these patients. PMID:24516292

  17. Scarring alopecia.

    PubMed

    Newton, R C; Hebert, A A; Freese, T W; Solomon, A R

    1987-07-01

    The scarring alopecias are a diverse group of diseases characterized by the combination of follicular destruction and dermal scarring. In this article we divide scarring alopecias into three broad categories, pediatric diseases, perifollicular lymphocytic diseases, and folliculopustular diseases, and discuss selected entities from each category. PMID:3301117

  18. Emerging Therapies for Scar Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Block, Lisa; Gosain, Ankush; King, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: There are ∼12 million traumatic lacerations treated in the United States emergency rooms each year, 250 million surgical incisions created worldwide every year, and 11 million burns severe enough to warrant medical treatment worldwide. In the United States, over $20 billion dollars per year are spent on the treatment and management of scars. Recent Advances: Investigations into the management of scar therapies over the last decade have advanced our understanding related to the care of cutaneous scars. Scar treatment methods are presented including topical, intralesional, and mechanical therapies in addition to cryotherapy, radiotherapy, and laser therapy. Critical Issues: Current treatment options for scars have significant limitations. This review presents the current and emerging therapies available for scar management and the scientific evidence for scar management is discussed. Future Directions: Based upon our new understanding of scar formation, innovative scar therapies are being developed. Additional research on the basic science of scar formation will lead to additional advances and novel therapies for the treatment of cutaneous scars. PMID:26487979

  19. Changes in the expression of epidermal differentiation markers at sites where cultured epithelial autografts were transplanted onto wounds from burn scar excision.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Kuniko; Amano, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Toshio; Inomata, Shinji; Tsunenaga, Makoto; Kumagai, Norio; Matsuzaki, Kyoichi

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the recovery process during which grafted cultured epithelium formed normal epidermis. The subjects were 18 patients whose burn scars were excised at a depth not exposing the fat layer and who subsequently received cultured epithelial autografts. A total of 24 samples were obtained from the grafted sites: 6 samples within 6 weeks (stage 1), 5 samples after 6 weeks and within 6 months (stage 2), 6 samples after 6 months and within 18 months (stage 3) and 7 samples beyond 18 months (stage 4) after transplantation. These samples were stained for monoclonal antibodies against filaggrin, transglutaminase (TG), cytokeratin 6 and involucrin. Their expressions were examined in the epidermis. The expression patterns were classified using a six-grade scale. The grades of filaggrin and TG were significantly higher at stage 3 and 4 compared with stage 1. There was a marginally significant increase in the grade of cytokeratin 6 at stage 3 and it was significantly higher at stage 4 compared with stage 1. These results showed that wound healing continued at a molecular level until the end of stage 3. The recovery of involucrin was delayed compared with that of other markers. TG and involucrin are thought to be regulated independently at the grafted sites. PMID:25040836

  20. Dynamics associated with total aboveground biomass, C, nutrient pools, and biomass burning of primary forest and pasture in Rondo‸nia, Brazil during SCAR-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, Liane S.; Kauffman, J. Boone; Ellingson, Lisa J.; Cummings, Dian L.; Castro, Elmar A.; Babbitt, Ron E.; Ward, Darold E.

    1998-12-01

    Burning of slashed tropical forests and pastures is among the most significant global sources of atmospheric emissions, yet the composition of the fuels and fires that creates these emissions is not well characterized. As part of the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment, we measured total aboveground biomass (TAGB) as well as carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur pools in one cattle pasture and two slashed primary forests in Rondônia, Brazil. These pools were measured before and immediately after fires. From these data, we calculated the quantities of biomass and elements lost to the atmosphere during biomass burning. Prefire biomass in the pasture was 66 Mg ha-1; fire consumed 31% of this mass. Woody debris from the forest that occupied this site 12 years previously comprised 81% of the pasture prefire TAGB. Elemental inputs into the atmosphere (site losses) from the pasture fire were 9 Mg C ha-1, 88 kg N ha-1, and 5 kg S ha-1. Combining previous studies with this one, we calculate that the mean TAGB of Amazonian pastures is 74 Mg ha-1 with a mean combustion factor of 46%. Mean nutrient losses from pasture fires in Amazonia are 14 Mg C ha-1, 199 kg N ha-1, and 16 kg S ha-1. The TAGB of the two slashed primary forests before fire was 355 and 399 Mg ha-1 and following fire was 188 and 185 Mg ha-1 (i.e., a combustion factor of 47 and 54%), respectively. Combining this study with other studies of Amazon slashed primary forests, we calculate that the mean TAGB is 349 Mg ha-1 and the mean combustion factor is 48%. Total elemental losses arising from the primary forest slash fires in this study were notably higher than losses from the pasture site: 79 and 102 Mg C ha-1; 1019 and 1196 kg N ha-1; and 87 and 96 kg S ha-1. From this study combined with previous research in Rondônia and Pará, we calculate that mean nutrient losses from primary forest slash fires are 88 Mg C ha-1, 1181 kg N ha-1, and 107 kg S ha-1. As rates of deforestation are remaining high in

  1. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... are burns treated? In many cases, topical antibiotics (skin creams or ointments) are used to prevent infection. For third-degree burns and some second-degree ones, immediate blood transfusion and/or extra fluids ... is skin grafting? There are two types of skin grafts. ...

  2. [Burns].

    PubMed

    Arai, Takao

    2016-02-01

    Burns extending deep into the skin and those affecting a wide surface area trigger various responses in the body and pose a serious threat to life. Therefore, the degree of severity needs to be determined accurately, and appropriate transfusion and local management should be provided accordingly. Systematic and meticulous management that considers not just the risk of death but also functional prognosis is essential from the early stage of burn injuries. Such management requires comprehensive care by a medical team concerning infections, nutrition and rehabilitation. This article outlines the current status of intensive care for severe burns. PMID:26915244

  3. Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn J

    2015-12-01

    Scar tissue is associated with physical wounds and their mending, but it is also descriptive in portraying the emotional scarring that occurs following adversity, resulting in potential psychological morbidity. Provided the adversity is not severe, such challenges to adaptability may provoke Andrew Solomon's process of forging meaning and building identity. Perceiving an emotional constitution as analogous to the immune system provides a metaphor for appreciating the benefits of emotional challenges, which may provoke greater emotional resilience or posttraumatic growth. PMID:26631526

  4. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation. Scalds from hot liquids and ... to infections because they damage your skin's protective barrier. Treatment for burns depends on the cause of ...

  5. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Surgery . 18th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 22. Holmes JH, Heimbach DM. Burns. In: Brunicardi FC, Andersen DK, Billiar TR, et al, eds. Schwartz's Principles of Surgery . 9th ed. New ...

  6. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged. PMID:26036205

  7. Scar Management in the Pediatric and Adolescent Populations.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Totri, Christine R; Donelan, Matthias B; Shumaker, Peter R

    2016-02-01

    For most children and adolescents who have developed symptomatic scars, cosmetic concerns are only a portion of the motivation that drives them and their caregivers to obtain treatment. In addition to the potential for cosmetic disfigurement, scars may be associated with a number of physical comorbidities including hypertrichosis, dyshidrosis, tenderness/pain, pruritus, dysesthesias, and functional impairments such as contractures, all of which may be compounded by psychosocial factors. Although a plethora of options for treating scars exists, specific management guidelines for the pediatric and adolescent populations do not, and evidence must be extrapolated from adult studies. New modalities such as the scar team approach, autologous fat transfer, and ablative fractional laser resurfacing suggest a promising future for children who suffer symptomatically from their scars. In this state-of-the-art review, we summarize cutting-edge scar treatment strategies as they relate to the pediatric and adolescent populations. PMID:26743819

  8. Fetal Bovine Collagen Matrix in the Treatment of a Full Thickness Burn Wound: A Case Report With Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Amy L.; Bennett, Danielle K.; Spreen, Elizabeth B.; Adhvaryu, Dhaval V.; Littleton, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin wounds commonly associated with large burns continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. The current treatment for large TBSA burns is split thickness autologous skin grafting; however, this treatment often results in poor textural durability, hypertrophic scarring, and fibrotic contractures. In this case report, we describe our experience and long-term follow-up results after the application of fetal bovine collagen (FBC) matrix (PriMatrix, TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA) to burn wounds clinically assessed as full thickness that healed without the need for subsequent skin grafting. The patient presented with 25% TBSA burns and was debrided and covered with FBC on postburn day 7. By postoperative day 12, the patient had large areas of reepithelialization distributed throughout the wound bed. By postoperative day 26, the patient had significantly more areas of wound closure and was discharged. Reepithelialization and repigmentation continued, and long-term follow-up after 26 months demonstrated complete reepithelialization and nearly complete repigmentation, without the appearance of contractures or hypertrophic scarring. This case report highlights the use of FBC as a scaffold capable of dermal regeneration and spontaneous reepithelialization with an excellent long-term functional and cosmetic outcome. PMID:25494213

  9. Fetal Bovine Collagen Matrix in the Treatment of a Full Thickness Burn Wound: A Case Report With Long-Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Strong, Amy L; Bennett, Danielle K; Spreen, Elizabeth B; Adhvaryu, Dhaval V; Littleton, Jeffrey C; Mencer, Ernest J

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin wounds commonly associated with large burns continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. The current treatment for large TBSA burns is split thickness autologous skin grafting; however, this treatment often results in poor textural durability, hypertrophic scarring, and fibrotic contractures. In this case report, we describe our experience and long-term follow-up results after the application of fetal bovine collagen (FBC) matrix (PriMatrix, TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA) to burn wounds clinically assessed as full thickness that healed without the need for subsequent skin grafting. The patient presented with 25% TBSA burns and was debrided and covered with FBC on postburn day 7. By postoperative day 12, the patient had large areas of reepithelialization distributed throughout the wound bed. By postoperative day 26, the patient had significantly more areas of wound closure and was discharged. Reepithelialization and repigmentation continued, and long-term follow-up after 26 months demonstrated complete reepithelialization and nearly complete repigmentation, without the appearance of contractures or hypertrophic scarring. This case report highlights the use of FBC as a scaffold capable of dermal regeneration and spontaneous reepithelialization with an excellent long-term functional and cosmetic outcome. PMID:25494213

  10. Chemical Burn Injury in Kumasi: The Trend and Complications following and Their Management

    PubMed Central

    Akpaloo, Joseph; Chirurgie, Facharzt; Aboah, Ken; Klutsey, Ellen; Hoyte-Williams, Paa Ekow; Farhat, Boutros; Turkson, Edmund; Yorke, Joseph; Chirurgie, Facharzt; Ametih, Richard; Hussey, Romeo

    2015-01-01

    Background: A chemical burn refers to irritation and destruction of human tissue caused by exposure to a chemical, usually by direct contact with the chemical or its fumes. The study investigated the trend and complications following chemical burns and their management. Methods: The study involved a retrospective review of Burns Registry at the Burns Intensive Care Unit of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital on patients who were admitted for burns from May 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. Results: Chemical burns admissions accounted for 3.5% (n = 17) out of the total 487 burns cases, consisting of 12 males (70.6%) and 5 females (29.4%). Mean total burns surface area was 21.9%; mean length of stay in Burns Intensive Care Unit was 9.5 days. The etiological agents for the chemical burns included the following: hot caustic soda 1 (5.9%); acid 9 (53.9%)—the most common; hot ethanol 3 (17.6%); and other chemicals such as other bases, oxidizers, solvents, etc. accounted for 4 (23.5%) etiological agents. Outcome included 11 discharges (64.7%), 6 transferred out to other wards (35.3%), and 0 deaths (0.0%). The complications included severe scar contractures in 5 patients (29.4%), loss of vision: partial/total = 2 (11.8%), gross keloidal/hypertrophic scars = 10 (58.8%). Conclusions: Chemical burns are severe and often cause severe debilitating sequelae including partial/total loss of vision. But the current study showed that only a small population (3.5%) were affected by chemical burns and no death was recorded; society has to be continually conscious of chemicals, especially caustic agents, and hence take the necessary precautions so as to prevent these avoidable complications. PMID:26579354

  11. Contemporary management of dupuytren contracture.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Marco; Stern, Peter J; Benhaim, Prosper; Hurst, Lawrence C

    2014-01-01

    Dupuytren contracture is a condition that affects the palmar fascia. It most commonly affects men of northern European ancestry and initially presents at middle age. The diseased fascia may form cords that extend into the digits, resulting in limited motion and function. Treatment is aimed at either releasing or removing the diseased cord so that the finger can extend fully. Common interventions include surgery, needle aponeurotomy, and collagenase injection. Surgery remains the gold standard in treatment and most commonly includes a limited fasciectomy. Although often successful, surgery carries inherent risks and may involve a lengthy recovery with extensive therapy. Needle aponeurotomy and collagenase injections are office-based alternatives that aim to weaken the cord and release the contracture. Needle aponeurotomy involves repeated needling along the cord in intervals and collagenase injections to dissolve a portion of the cord. Despite being less invasive, problems such as nerve and/or tendon injury, skin tears, and autoimmune reactions have been reported. Regardless of treatment, recurrence remains a concern. PMID:24720301

  12. Burns functional disabilities among burn survivors: a study in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Agbenorku, Pius

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the types of functional disabilities in adult and paediatric burns survivors, with specific emphasis on potential risk and socio-economic factors of burn disabilities present in Ghana. Patients and Methods: The descriptive study was carried out in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana from May 2011 to April 2012. Burn survivors who came for follow-up visits after been discharged home and had functional disability were the participants of the study. They were physically examined and interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire after their informed consent/or that of their parents (in the cases of paediatrics burns survivors) was sought. Results: A total of 70 participants consented for the study. Their ages ranged from 8/12 – 78 years, with a mean age of 12±1.7 years. Majority (60.0%, N=42) of the participants had third degree burns. The nature of disabilities of participants were mostly scar contractures (42.9%, N=30) of which 36.7% (N=11) had impeded arm elevation; 23.3% (N=7) could not fold the palm or move the digits. From the multiple regression analysis risk factors for burn victim to have disability were paediatric age (OR=11.1, P=0.043), third degree of burn (OR=6.2, P=0.001) and anatomical part affected (OR=18.3, P=0.031). Socio-economic factors that affected burn disability victims were nuclear family compensation (OR=4.2, P=0.021), community mockery/stigmatization (OR=0.1, P=0.052) and caretakers time and finance (OR=5.2, P=0.033). Conclusion: The commonest functional disabilities recorded were scar contractions of the axilla region which had impeded the ability of the patients to lift the arm. Risk factors for burns disability included childhood age, third degree of burn incurred and anatomical part affected. Social factors influencing the lives of burn survivors with disability were good family and negative community interactions. Significant economical factors recorded were caretakers’ time and financial constrains. PMID

  13. Management of Radiation-induced Severe Anophthalmic Socket Contracture in Patients with Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Qasiem J.; Gombos, Dan S.; Williams, Michelle D.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Beadle, Beth M.; Canseco, Elvia; Esmaeli, Bita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose High-dose radiotherapy can cause contracture of the anophthalmic socket, but the incidence of this complication in patients with enucleation for uveal melanoma has not previously been reported. We reviewed the surgical management and outcomes in terms of successful prosthesis wear in patients with severe contracture of the anophthalmic socket treated with high-dose radiotherapy for high-risk uveal melanoma and estimated the relative risk of this complication. Methods The medical records of all consecutive patients enrolled in a prospective uveal-melanoma tissue-banking protocol at our institution who underwent enucleation between January 2003 and December 2010 were reviewed. Patients who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy of the enucleated socket were further studied. Results Of the 68 patients enrolled in the prospective tissue banking protocol, 12 had high-risk histologic features (e.g., extrascleral spread or vortex vein invasion) and were treated with 60 Gy of external-beam radiotherapy after enucleation. Five of these patients (41.7%) experienced severe socket contracture precluding prosthesis wear. The median time to onset of contracture following completion of radiotherapy was 20 months. Three patients underwent surgery, which entailed scar tissue release, oral mucous membrane grafting, and socket reconstruction; 2 patients declined surgery. All 3 patients who had surgery experienced significant improvement of socket contracture that enabled patients to wear a prosthesis again. Conclusion High-dose radiotherapy after enucleation in patients with uveal melanoma caused severe socket contracture and inability to wear a prosthesis in approximately 40% of patients. Surgical repair of the contracted socket using oral mucous membrane grafting can allow resumption of prosthesis wear. PMID:22581085

  14. Long-term follow-up of the impacts on obstetric complications of trunk burn injuries sustained during childhood.

    PubMed

    Duke, Janine; Wood, Fiona; Semmens, James; Edgar, Dale W; Rea, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Limited data are available to assess the long-term effects of burns to the trunk sustained during early childhood on subsequent pregnancies. This population-based retrospective longitudinal study uses linked Western Australia hospital morbidity and midwives notification data for the period 1983-2008. During the study period, 824 girls younger than 15 years with non-erythema burns (partial thickness, full thickness, or unspecified burn depth) to the trunk were hospitalized in Western Australia. During the follow-up, 134 subjects with burns to the trunk during childhood were identified as having later pregnancies. The mean age at admission for burn injury was 5.7 ± 4.0 years, and the majority of burns were caused by scalds (51.5%) and flame (37.3%). For these subjects (N = 134), there were a total of 213 subsequent pregnancies. All pregnancies resulted in full-term live births. There were 142 (64.3%) vaginal deliveries, 26 (12.2%) breech or instrument, and 45 (21.2%) deliveries were by cesarean section. No admissions for scar conditions or revisions of burn scar or contracture were identified during any pregnancy (first to fourth) for subjects with burns to the trunk. Mode of delivery was not statistically significantly different from that experienced by subjects with burns sustained during childhood to other anatomical sites. For subjects in this study with less severe burns to the trunk, no specific detrimental impacts during pregnancy or delivery or to the fetus were identified. Further surveillance is required to gauge an accurate assessment of complications associated with severe trunk burns sustained during childhood. PMID:22269824

  15. [2-stage operative treatment of Dupuytren contracture].

    PubMed

    Nagay, B

    1985-05-01

    The incidence of Sudeck-like complications after surgery for Dupuytren's contracture is discussed. In a series of 209 operations for Dupuytren's contracture some complications were observed in 26 cases. In 12 patients these complications could not be precisely explained. In the author's opinion they may illustrate the creation of a nerve-irritating source within the operative field. In order to avoid these complications a two-stage operation was proposed, especially for severe contractures in elderly patients. A preliminary fasciotomy relieves most of symptoms of the disease and may also serve as a so-called tissue test for eventual more radical procedures. The observation of 42 patients with severe contractures so treated confirms the usefulness of the method. PMID:4007639

  16. Idiopathic osteoarthritis and contracture: causal implications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, P; Alexander, C; Stewart, J; Lynskey, N

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To use the known association of idiopathic osteoarthritis with contracture as a means of searching for its cause. There are currently two theories concerning this association, one assuming that the contracture is a consequence of the osteoarthritis and the other that it precedes and causes the osteoarthritis. This study tested both theories. Methods: Flexion ranges in the 12 finger joints were obtained by goniometric measurement in two samples of normal female subjects, one group with a mean age of 22 years (25 subjects) and one with a mean age of 45 years (50 subjects). The results were compared with the known regional prevalence of osteoarthritis in the finger joints of women. Results: The older group showed evidence of reduced flexion range consistent with development of contracture in the extensor mechanism of the fingers. The distribution of the contracture showed a strong negative correlation with the regional prevalence of osteoarthritis. Conclusions: An early dorsal contracture develops in the fingers of normal subjects, but it is neither a consequence of nor the cause of digital osteoarthritis. The most parsimonious explanation for the association is that both contracture and idiopathic osteoarthritis are independent consequences of failure to use the full movement range. If this hypothesis is correct, the disease could be preventable. PMID:15647431

  17. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scars are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  18. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  19. Treatment of nasal burns: analysis of 150 cases

    PubMed Central

    Prousskaia, E.; El-Muttardi, N.; Philp, B.; Dziewulski, P.; Shelley, O.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nasal burns present a challenge for the plastic surgeon in terms of immediate management, choice of primary treatment and secondary reconstruction with the goals of good aesthetic and functional outcome. We present a retrospective analysis of the management of 150 patients with nasal burns treated in our center between July 2005 and July 2011. We rationalized our conservative and all surgical treatments of this subset of burns patients and organized them in a simple and structured way. The reconstructive options for most complex full thickness nasal injury is determined by the integrity of adjacent facial tissues which would always be preferred when available. Microsurgical free tissue transfer is dependent upon the fitness of the patient and the availability of unburned skin at the donor site. Secondary nasal reconstruction is based on an assessment of the residual functional and cosmetic problems. Airways narrowing from scar contracture or loss of support are managed using standard plastic surgical and rhinoplasty principles. Cosmetic refinements range from flap debulking to the importation of new tissue on to the nose. Our experience with this challenging group of patients has led us to develop a simple treatment algorithm for the management of nasal burns. PMID:27252610

  20. Solanidine and tomatidine trigger scar pruritus.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pedro E; Rioja, Luis F

    2016-05-01

    Scar pruritus is frequently encountered in clinical practice (particularly in burn patients) owing to its poorly known pathogenesis and difficult treatment. In previous work, we demonstrated the usefulness of a diet excluding edible solanaceae (viz., potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) in patients with antihistamine-resistant scar pruritus. We hypothesized that alkaloids in solanaceae (particularly their secondary metabolites or aglycones) might be the actual pruritogens. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted a single-blind prospective study on patients responding favourably to a solanaceae-free diet whose scar pruritus could be ascribed to one of the four foods. The study involved applying the aglycones solanidine and tomatidine to each scar and checking whether, and which, had a pruritogenic effect. A total of 18 patients (90%) responded by developing pruritus; also, the triggering aglycone coincided with that prevailing in the pruritogenic food. We concluded that solanaceae aglycones are directly involved in the pathogenesis of scar pruritus. PMID:26777454

  1. Epidemiology and Outcome of Chemical Burn Patients Admitted in Burn Unit of JNMC Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India: A 5-year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md Sohaib; Ahmad, Imran; Khurram, M. Fahud; Kanungo, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the epidemiology, clinical variable of chemical burns, and their outcomes to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all the patients with chemical burns admitted at author's center between November 2008 and December 2013. All the patients were evaluated in terms of age, sex, total body surface area, etiology, treatment given, morbidity, mortality, final outcome, and then educated regarding specific preventive measures. Results: A total of 96 patients (2.4% of total burn admissions) (42 males and 54 females) were admitted to our hospital with chemical burn injuries. Most of the patients were in the age group of 16–30 years. Incidence in females was slightly higher than in males. Acid was found to be the most common cause of injury. We found 55% patients admitted had <10% total body surface area (TBSA) involvement, 35% had burns involving between 11 and 20% TBSA, and 4% had burns involving 21–30% TBSA, and 6% had burns in >30% TBSA. Morbidity was noticed in the form of skin defect in 80% of cases, soft tissue defect with exposed tendon, bone, or vessels in 16% of cases, and 4% of patients developed contracture and hypertrophic scar. Eighty-six percent of patients required operative intervention. A total of three deaths (3%) were recorded. Conclusion: It was found that chemical burns, though not very common, are deeper burns and can be accidental or non-accidental, and the high-risk age group is 16–25 years. Chemical burns are largely preventable and if properly managed have a good outcome. PMID:25810999

  2. Hypertrophic Scarring and Keloids: Pathomechanisms and Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G; Korting, Hans C; Pavicic, Tatiana; Ruzicka, Thomas; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-01-01

    Excessive scars form as a result of aberrations of physiologic wound healing and may arise following any insult to the deep dermis. By causing pain, pruritus and contractures, excessive scarring significantly affects the patient’s quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Multiple studies on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation have been conducted for decades and have led to a plethora of therapeutic strategies to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation. However, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory, most likely owing to poor understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying keloid and hypertrophic scar formation and discuss established treatments and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20927486

  3. Treatment of acne scarring.

    PubMed

    Alam, M; Dover, J S

    Acne scarring is common but surprisingly difficult to treat. Scars can involve textural change in the superficial and deep dermis, and can also be associated with erythema, and less often, pigmentary change. In general, treatment of acne scarring is a multistep procedure. First, examination of the patient is necessary to classify the subtypes of scarring that are present. Then, the patient's primary concerns are elicited, and the patient is offered a menu of procedures that may address the various components of the scarring process. It is important to emphasize to the patient that acne scarring can be improved but never entirely reversed. PMID:17180246

  4. Morphological and immunochemical differences between keloid and hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, H. P.; Desmoulière, A.; Diegelmann, R. F.; Cohen, I. K.; Compton, C. C.; Garner, W. L.; Kapanci, Y.; Gabbiani, G.

    1994-01-01

    There are two types of excessive scarring, keloid and hypertrophic scar. Contrary to hypertrophic scars, keloids do not regress with time, are difficult to revise surgically, and do not provoke scar contractures. These two lesions require different therapeutic approaches but are often confused because of an apparent lack of morphological differences. We have investigated the collagen organization and the possible presence of alpha-smooth muscle (SM) actin-expressing myofibroblasts in these conditions. Keloids contain large, thick collagen fibers composed of numerous fibrils closely packed together. In contrast hypertrophic scars exhibit modular structures in which fibroblastic cells, small vessels, and fine, randomly organized collagen fibers are present. We confirm that such nodular structures are always present in hypertrophic scar and rarely in keloid. Furthermore, only nodules of hypertrophic scars contain alpha-SM actin-expressing myofibroblasts. Electron microscopic examination supports the above-mentioned differences in collagen organization and in fibroblastic features and shows the presence of an amorphous extracellular material surrounding fibroblastic cells in keloid. The presence in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts of alpha-SM actin, the actin isoform typical of vascular SM cells, may represent an important element in the pathogenesis of contraction. Interestingly, when placed in culture fibroblasts from hypertrophic scars and keloid express similar amounts of alpha-SM actin, suggesting that local microenvironmental factors influence in vivo the expression of this protein. Thus several morphological and immunohistochemical differences exist between hypertrophic scar and keloid that are useful for the biological and pathological characterization of the two lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8030742

  5. Scar revision - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... entire body, and acts as a protective barrier. Scar tissue forms as skin heals after an injury ( ... heredity; and skin characteristics including color (pigmentation). No scar can be removed completely. The degree of improvement ...

  6. Relativistic Quantum Scars

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K.; Goodnick, Stephen M.; Akis, Richard

    2009-07-31

    The concentrations of wave functions about classical periodic orbits, or quantum scars, are a fundamental phenomenon in physics. An open question is whether scarring can occur in relativistic quantum systems. To address this question, we investigate confinements made of graphene whose classical dynamics are chaotic and find unequivocal evidence of relativistic quantum scars. The scarred states can lead to strong conductance fluctuations in the corresponding open quantum dots via the mechanism of resonant transmission.

  7. [Recommendations for the prevention and therapy of hypertrophic scars and keloids].

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, G G; Kunte, C

    2011-05-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids form due to aberrations in the physiologic wound healing cascade characterized by greater and more sustained ECM deposition. Both entities are frequently associated with pain, pruritus and contractures, and are thus significantly affecting the patient's quality of life. Genetic susceptibility, specific anatomic locations, prolonged inflammation and delayed epithelialization significantly contribute to excessive scar formation. However, despite intensive scientific work in this field the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction remain poorly understood and most therapeutic approaches are clinically unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, based on a rising number of clinical studies next to well-known therapeutic concepts including cryotherapy and intralesional triamcinolone, recent techniques extend the spectrum for treating excessive scars. Nonetheless, prevention of pathologic scarring is undoubtedly more effective than to later attempts to treat it. PMID:21468729

  8. Multidisciplinary, multimodal approach for a child with a traumatic facial scar.

    PubMed

    Admani, Shehla; Gertner, Jeffrey W; Grosman, Amanda; Shumaker, Peter R; Uebelhoer, Nathan S; Krakowski, Andrew C

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of disfiguring and disabling scars remains a field of active study, reinvigorated with recent advances in techniques and technologies. A variety of approaches can be utilized depending on scar characteristics, location, degree of tissue loss, and associated contractures. Just as traumatic scars can be complex and heterogeneous, the corresponding paradigm for treatment must also be flexible and multimodal for optimal improvement. This report describes a 3-year-old girl with a "mixed" (atrophic/hypertrophic), violaceous, contracted facial scar from a dog bite. It was treated with a novel approach utilizing a multidisciplinary pediatric scar team to combine autologous fat grafting, ablative fractional laser resurfacing, pulsed-dye laser, and laser-assisted delivery of a corticosteroid as concurrent, multimodal therapy to optimize the outcome. PMID:25922954

  9. Capsular Contracture after Breast Augmentation: An Update for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Headon, Hannah; Kasem, Adbul

    2015-01-01

    Capsular contracture is the most common complication following implant based breast surgery and is one of the most common reasons for reoperation. Therefore, it is important to try and understand why this happens, and what can be done to reduce its incidence. A literature search using the MEDLINE database was conducted including search terms 'capsular contracture breast augmentation', 'capsular contracture pathogenesis', 'capsular contracture incidence', and 'capsular contracture management', which yielded 82 results which met inclusion criteria. Capsular contracture is caused by an excessive fibrotic reaction to a foreign body (the implant) and has an overall incidence of 10.6%. Risk factors that were identified included the use of smooth (vs. textured) implants, a subglandular (vs. submuscular) placement, use of a silicone (vs. saline) filled implant and previous radiotherapy to the breast. The standard management of capsular contracture is surgical via a capsulectomy or capsulotomy. Medical treatment using the off-label leukotriene receptor antagonist Zafirlukast has been reported to reduce severity and help prevent capsular contracture from forming, as has the use of acellular dermal matrices, botox and neopocket formation. However, nearly all therapeutic approaches are associated with a significant rate of recurrence. Capsular contracture is a multifactorial fibrotic process the precise cause of which is still unknown. The incidence of contracture developing is lower with the use of textured implants, submuscular placement and the use of polyurethane coated implants. Symptomatic capsular contracture is usually managed surgically, however recent research has focussed on preventing capsular contracture from occurring, or treating it with autologous fat transfer. PMID:26430623

  10. Dupuytren's Contracture Cosegregation with Limb-Girdle Muscle Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lace, Baiba; Inashkina, Inna; Micule, Ieva; Vasiljeva, Inta; Naudina, Maruta Solvita; Jankevics, Eriks

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) is a heterogeneous group of muscular dystrophies that mostly affect the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscle groups. We report here a case of neuromuscular disease associated with Dupuytren's contracture, which has never been described before as cosegregating with an autosomal dominant type of inheritance. Dupuytren's contracture is a common disease, especially in Northern Europe. Comorbid conditions associated with Dupuytren's contracture are repetitive trauma to the hands, diabetes, and seizures, but it has never before been associated with neuromuscular disease. We hypothesize that patients may harbor mutations in genes with functions related to neuromuscular disease and Dupuytren's contracture development. PMID:24024053

  11. Laser Scar Management Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ohshiro, Toshio; Sasaki, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Scars are common and cause functional problems and psychological morbidity. Recent advances in optical technologies have produced various laser systems capable of revising the appearance of scars from various etiologies to optimize their appearance. Methods: Laser treatment can commence as early as the time of the initial injury and as late as several years after the injury. Several optical technologies are currently available and combined laser/light treatments are required for treatment of scars. Since 2006, we have set up a scar management department in our clinic and more than 2000 patients have been treated by our combined laser irradiation techniques. Herein, we review several available light technologies for treatment of surgical, traumatic, and inflammatory scars, and discuss our combined laser treatment of scars, based upon our clinical experience. Results and Conclusions: Because scars have a variety of potential aetiologies and take a number of forms, no single approach can consistenty provide good scar treatment and management. The combination of laser and devices is essential, the choice of wavelength and approach being dictated by each patient as an individual. PMID:24511202

  12. Myofibroblast Upregulators are Elevated in Joint Capsules in Posttraumatic Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Kevin A.; Zhang, Mei; Hart, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized specific growth factors are increased in the elbow capsules of patients with post traumatic elbow contractures. A model of surgically induced joint contracture in rabbit knees was developed to study the growth factor expression in joint contractures. This study demonstrates this model mimics the human condition and analyzes how the growth factor levels decrease with time in rabbit knees with contractures. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure mRNA levels of transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, ED-A of fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin normalized to a housekeeping gene, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. In the joint capsules of patients with elbow contractures, mRNA levels were increased for transforming growth factor- β1, connective tissue growth factor, and α-smooth muscle actin. In the joint capsules of rabbit knees with contractures, mRNA levels were increased for transforming growth factor- β1, connective tissue growth factor, ED-A of fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin. The mRNA levels for transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and α-smooth muscle actin decreased with time in rabbit knees. The elevated levels of these myofibroblast up-regulators and fibrogenic growth factors could explain the previously reported increase in myofibroblasts and collagen mRNA levels. The rabbit knee model correlated well with the human post traumatic elbow contractures. PMID:17195814

  13. Arthroscopic capsular release of flexion contractures (arthrofibrosis) of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Jones, G S; Savoie, F H

    1993-01-01

    Twelve patients with flexion contractures of the elbow were managed by arthroscopic release of the proximal capsule and debridement of the olecranon fossa. Postoperatively the mean flexion contracture improved from 38 to 3 degrees with supination improving from 45 to 84 degrees and pronation improving from 80 to 88 degrees. All patients reported a decrease in pain level as well as improvement in motion. There was one severe complication in this series, in which a patient sustained a permanent posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Arthroscopic limited capsular release appears to be satisfactory management modality for flexion contracture of the elbow. PMID:8323612

  14. SCAR-B AERONET

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-19

    ... SCAR-B Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Field Campaigns Radiation Budget Aerosols ... Parameters:  Aerosol Optical Depth Precipitable Water Vapor Solar Irradiance Order Data:  ASDC Order ...

  15. Scar revision - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a year after a wound has healed. A keloid is an abnormal scar that is thicker, different ... creates a thick, puckered effect simulating a tumor. Keloids are removed at the point where it meets ...

  16. Keloid scar (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Keloids are an overgrowth of scar tissue at the site of a healed skin injury. They often create a thick, puckered effect simulating a tumor. Keloids may be reduced in size by freezing (cryotherapy), ...

  17. Primary scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Stamatios, Gregoriou; Ioannides, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Scarring alopecia or cicatricial alopecia results from follicular damage that is sufficient to cause the destruction and replacement of pilosebaceous structures by scar tissue. Primary scarring alopecias represent a group of disorders that primarily affect the hair follicles, as opposed to secondary scarring alopecias, which affect the dermis and secondarily cause follicular destruction. Inflammation may predominantly involve lymphocytes or neutrophils. Cicatricial alopecias that mainly involve lymphocytic inflammation include discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia, central centrifugal alopecia, and pseudopelade (Brocq). Cicatricial alopecias that are due to predominantly neutrophilic inflammation include folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Folliculitis keloidalis is a cicatricial alopecia with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. PMID:26370646

  18. Nonsurgical scar management of the face: does early versus late intervention affect outcome?

    PubMed

    Parry, Ingrid; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina; Greenhalgh, David

    2013-01-01

    Special emphasis is placed on the clinical management of facial scarring because of the profound physical and psychological impact of facial burns. Noninvasive methods of facial scar management include pressure therapy, silicone, massage, and facial exercises. Early implementation of these scar management techniques after a burn injury is typically accepted as standard burn rehabilitation practice, however, little data exist to support this practice. This study evaluated the timing of common noninvasive scar management interventions after facial skin grafting in children and the impact on outcome, as measured by scar assessment and need for facial reconstructive surgery. A retrospective review of 138 patients who underwent excision and grafting of the face and subsequent noninvasive scar management during a 10-year time frame was conducted. Regression analyses were used to show that earlier application of silicone was significantly related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale scores, specifically in the subscales of vascularity and pigmentation. Early use of pressure therapy and implementation of facial exercises were also related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale vascularity scores. No relationship was found between timing of the interventions and facial reconstructive outcome. Early use of silicone, pressure therapy, and exercise may improve scar outcome and accelerate time to scar maturity. PMID:23816994

  19. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly due to a novel splice site mutation in the FBN2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Mehar, Virendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Kumar, Ravindra; Yadav, Summi; Singh, Kuldeep; Callewaert, Bert; Pathan, Shahnawaz; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by crumpled ears, congenital contractures, arachnodactyly and scoliosis. Only few cases have been described to date. Here we report a newborn with congenital contractures, crumpled ears and scoliosis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel fibrillin-2 mutation at the donor splice site of intron 28. We discuss the differential diagnosis of neonates with congenital contractures and review the current knowledge on congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

  20. Prevention of Thumb Web Space Contracture With Multiplanar External Fixation.

    PubMed

    Harper, Carl M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    Thumb web space contracture following hand trauma can be disabling with numerous reconstructive procedures existing to correct the resultant deformity. Following marked soft tissue injury to the hand we utilized the Stryker Hoffmann II Micro External Fixator System to link the first and second metacarpals by a multiplanar system using 1.6 or 2.0 mm self-drilling half-pins and 3 mm carbon fiber connecting rods. This facilitated placement of the thumb in maximal palmar abduction as well as allowed adjustment of thumb position throughout the postoperative period. This technique was performed on 5 patients. Two patients were treated with a first web space external fixator for table saw injuries to the radial aspect of the hand. An additional 2 patients were treated with a first web space external fixator following metacarpophalangeal joint capsular release in the setting of thermal burns. A fifth patient underwent second ray amputation, trapeziectomy and trapezoidectomy for squamous cell carcinoma with subsequent stabilization with the external fixator. The external fixator was left in place until soft tissues were healed (average 5.5 wk). The patients were allowed to mobilize their hand in as much as the external fixator allowed, and no device-associated complications were noted. Thumb web space was preserved with passive and supple thumb circumduction and web space abduction/adduction in all patients at an average follow-up of 5 months. The average Quick Dash Score was 35±5 and the average Modern Activity Subjective Survey of 2007 was 30±8. PMID:27203276

  1. Capsular Contracture In Silicone Breast Implants: Insights From Rat Models.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Vilberto J; D'Acampora, Armando; Neves, Fernanda S; Mendes, Paulo R; Vasconcellos, Zulmar A DE; Neves, Rodrigo D'Eça; Figueiredo, Claudia P

    2016-09-01

    Breast augmentation with silicone implants is one of the most common procedures performed by plastic surgeons around the world. Capsular contracture is a frequent complication in breast augmentation and reconstructive surgery, that requires invasive intervention. The inflammatory response to implanted mammary prostheses appears to be directly associated to capsular contracture. This review discusses the evidences from rat models studies, on the role of inflammation and fibrosis in capsular contraction and its relation to silicone breast implants surface. PMID:27627068

  2. Burns and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group. PMID:9212488

  3. Pediatric cutaneous bleach burns.

    PubMed

    Lang, Cathleen; Cox, Matthew

    2013-07-01

    Bleach is a common household product which can cause caustic injuries. Its effects on mucosal tissues and the eye have been well-described in the literature. However, there is little information published regarding the appearance and effect of bleach on a child's skin. We report three children who sustained chemical burns after contact with bleach. All three children sustained accidental bleach burns while at home, and each child had a distinct brown discoloration to the skin from the injury. All three children had treatment and follow-up for their burns. Two of the children sustained more severe burns, which were extensive and required more time to heal. There was also long-term scarring associated with the severe burns. Like most burns, pain control is required until the injury heals. PMID:23545350

  4. Posttraumatic elbow contractures: targeting neuroinflammatory fibrogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Monument, Michael J; Hart, David A; Salo, Paul T; Befus, A Dean; Hildebrand, Kevin A

    2013-11-01

    Posttraumatic elbow stiffness remains a common and challenging clinical problem. In the setting of a congruent articular surface, the joint capsule is regarded as the major motion-limiting anatomic structure. The affected joint capsule is characterized by irreversible biomechanical and biochemical fibrogenic changes strikingly similar to those observed in many other fibroproliferative human conditions. Studies in humans and preclinical animal models are providing emergent evidence that neuroinflammatory mechanisms are critical upstream events in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic connective tissue fibrogenesis. Maladaptive recruitment and activation of mast cell infiltrates coupled with the aberrant expression of growth factors such as transforming growth factor-beta, nerve growth factor, and neuropeptides such as substance P are common observations in posttraumatic joint contractures and many other fibroproliferative disorders. Blockade of these factors is providing promising evidence that if treatment is timed correctly, the fibrogenic process can be interrupted or impeded. This review serves to highlight opportunities derived from these recent discoveries across many aberrant fibrogenic disorders as we strive to develop novel, targeted antifibrotic prevention and treatment strategies for posttraumatic elbow stiffness. PMID:24005582

  5. Incomplete Cesarean Scar Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Siahbazi, Shiva; Akhbari, Farnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine rupture at the site of a previous cesarean scar is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of pregnancy, which is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation A 30-year old woman at 24th week of gestation and complaint of pain, contractions and spotting was admitted in Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran. She had a past medical history of an EP and a cesarean section delivery, respectively 4 and 2 years before hospitalization. Herniation of an amniotic membrane into the maternal bladder was found on ultrasound examination. Conclusion Risk factors of cesarean scar rupture should be considered in women undergoing subsequent pregnancies as they need extra care. Ultrasonography can be used to evaluate women with previous cesarean section to assess the risks of scar rupture during subsequent pregnancies. PMID:23926561

  6. A Review of Scar Scales and Scar Measuring Devices

    PubMed Central

    Fearmonti, Regina; Bond, Jennifer; Erdmann, Detlev; Levinson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Pathologic scarring affects millions of people worldwide. Quantitative and qualitative measurement modalities are needed to effectively evaluate and monitor treatments. Methods: This article reviews the literature on available tools and existent assessment scales used to subjectively and objectively characterize scar. Results: We describe the attributes and deficiencies of each tool and scale and highlight areas where further development is critical. Conclusion: An optimal, universal scar scoring system is needed in order to better characterize, understand and treat pathologic scarring. PMID:20596233

  7. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminarse las marcas de acne? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  8. Anatomopathological findings in scars: comparative study between different specimens.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Andrada Despina; Bedereag, Ştefan Iulian; NiŢescu, Cristian; Florescu, Ioan Petre

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the remarkable progress science and medicine have experienced, many facts concerning healing processes and pathological scars are still unknown or incompletely explained. This paper is part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis) concerning new approaches in the prevention and treatment of pathological post-burn scars. We present and analyze the cases of some patients who developed abnormal scars in order to understand and point out the characteristics, that different types of pathological scars have in common and how we can differentiate them. Knowing what issue to address is the key to any successful therapy. Thus, the information we obtained will help us in applying more appropriate and efficient methods of treatment and in our further research: comparing the efficiency of newer therapies to that of older ones. PMID:25826518

  9. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Farina Júnior, Jayme Adriano

    2014-08-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  10. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  11. Activated keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed Central

    Machesney, M.; Tidman, N.; Waseem, A.; Kirby, L.; Leigh, I.

    1998-01-01

    The etiology of hypertrophic scarring, a pathological end point of wound healing, is unknown. The scars most commonly occur when epithelialization has been delayed during, for example, the healing of deep dermal burn wounds. Hypertrophic scars are conventionally described as a dermal pathology in which the epidermis has only a passive role. In this study, the expression of keratin intermediate filament proteins and filaggrin has been investigated in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars and site-matched controls from the same patients. Hypertrophic scar epidermis was found to express the hyperproliferative keratins K6 and K16 in interfollicular epidermis in association with K17 and precocious expression of filaggrin. K16 mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization using a highly specific cRNA probe. In contrast to the immunohistochemical location of K16 protein, the K16 mRNA was found to be expressed in the basal cell layer of normal skin. In hypertrophic scars the mRNA distribution corroborated the abnormal K16 protein distribution. These results suggest the keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar epidermis have entered an alternative differentiation pathway and are expressing an activated phenotype. Activated keratinocytes are a feature of the early stages of wound healing producing growth factors that influence fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and the inflammatory response. We propose that cellular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scarring are more complex than isolated dermal phenomena. The persistence of activated keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar epidermis implicates abnormal epidermal-mesenchymal interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9588880

  12. [Cesarean scar pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Matyszkiewicz, Anna; Jach, Robert; Nocuń, Agnieszka; Posadzka, Ewa; Huras, Hubert; Pityński, Kazimierz; Wolski, Hubert; Basta, Paweł

    2015-10-01

    Pregnancy in the uterine scare after previous caesarean section is the rarest type of ectopic pregnancy Due to the possibility of life-threatening complications, cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) needs rapid and proper diagnosis and management. Hereby we present 3 cases of women with CSP, diagnosed and treated at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of Jagiellonian University Medical College, in Krakow, in 2013, as well as literature review. PMID:26677591

  13. SCAR-B MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-01-10

    ... properties. Study the impact of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosol on the atmosphere and climate by measuring the properties of urban and industrial pollution dominated by sulfate particles. Project ...

  14. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation. PMID:25922301

  15. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Maureen A; Laverty, Peter H; Soiderer, Emily E

    2005-03-01

    Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes. PMID:15884646

  16. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes. PMID:15884646

  17. The successful treatment of pain associated with scar tissue using acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    In this case report, a 48-year-old female who had suffered severe scar pain for 3 months was treated with acupuncture using the Wei Ci technique (surrounding the dragon). Scar tissue usually forms after deep trauma, such as piercings, burns, and surgery, to the dermis. In Chinese Medicine, scar tissue causes local Qi and blood stagnation which lead to pain. The Wei Ci technique (surrounding the dragon) and distal points Hegu-LI-4, Taichong-LIV-3, Zusanli-ST-36 were used. The patient received a total of eight treatments in 5 weeks. The scar pain decreased from 7 to 1 or 2 on a Likert scale of 0-10, with 0 being no pain and 10 being the worst pain. Acupuncture may have a good short-term pain-relieving effect on scar pain but its long-term scar-pain-relieving effects are still unclear. PMID:25441952

  18. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Bulushi, Taimoor

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management. PMID:26909210

  19. Dune Avalanche Scars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  20. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (< or =0.3). The Cutometer reading of elasticity provided acceptable reliability (>0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way. PMID:18388576

  1. [Scalp burns due to hair bleach].

    PubMed

    Wagenblast, Lene

    2011-02-28

    We present two cases of scalp burn or possible chemical reaction due to use of hair highlight products. One case was treated with serial excision of the scarred bald area after the burn, and the other case was treated with implantation of expanders and subsequent excision of the bald area. PMID:21362396

  2. Mapping Fire Scars in the Brazilian Cerrado Using AVHRR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Brass, J. A.; Rezendez, A.; Alexander, S.; Guild, L. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian cerrado, or savanna, spans an area of 1,800,000 square kilometers on the great plateau of Central Brazil. Large fires covering hundreds of square kilometers, frequently occur in wildland areas of the cerrado, dominated by grasslands or grasslands mixed with shrubs and small trees, and also within area in the cerrado used for agricultural purposes, particularly for grazing. Smaller fires, typically extending over arm of a few square kilometers or less, are associated with the clewing of crops, such as dry land rice. A method for mapping fire scars and differentiating them from extensive areas of bare sod with AVHRR bands 1 (.55 -.68 micrometer) and 3 (3.5 - 3.9 micrometers) and measures of performance based on comparison with maps of fires with Landsat imagery will be presented. Methods of estimating total area burned from the AVHRR fire scar map will be discussed and related to land use and scar size.

  3. Laser treatment of hypertrophic scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrjakova, Olga B.; Gulev, Valerii S.

    2001-10-01

    For prophylaxis and treatment, the pulsed solid state neodymium yttrium-aluminum garnet laser was used. It has been shown that this kind of radiation inhibits the proliferative process and prevents the scar hyperfibrotization. In this paper author's reports about the development of the method for improving the scar quality using Nd:YAG laser are presented.

  4. A new bromelain-based enzyme for the release of Dupuytren’s contracture

    PubMed Central

    Rinott, M.; Wolovelsky, A.; Rosenberg, L.; Shoham, Y.; Rozen, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Injectable Bromelain Solution (IBS) is a modified investigational derivate of the medical grade bromelain-debriding pharmaceutical agent (NexoBrid) studied and approved for a rapid (four-hour single application), eschar-specific, deep burn debridement. We conducted an ex vivo study to determine the ability of IBS to dissolve-disrupt (enzymatic fasciotomy) Dupuytren’s cords. Materials and Methods Specially prepared medical grade IBS was injected into fresh Dupuytren’s cords excised from patients undergoing surgical fasciectomy. These cords were tested by tension-loading them to failure with the Zwick 1445 (Zwick GmbH & Co. KG, Ulm, Germany) tension testing system. Results We completed a pilot concept-validation study that proved the efficacy of IBS to induce enzymatic fasciotomy in ten cords compared with control in ten cords. We then completed a dosing study with an additional 71 cords injected with IBS in descending doses from 150 mg/cc to 0.8 mg/cc. The dosing study demonstrated that the minimal effective dose of 0.5 cc of 6.25 mg/cc to 5 mg/cc could achieve cord rupture in more than 80% of cases. Conclusions These preliminary results indicate that IBS may be effective in enzymatic fasciotomy in Dupuytren’s contracture. Cite this article: Dr G. Rubin. A new bromelain-based enzyme for the release of Dupuytren’s contracture: Dupuytren’s enzymatic bromelain-based release. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:175–177. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.BJR-2016-0072. PMID:27174554

  5. Cutaneous Scarring: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Richard; Urso-Baiarda, Fulvio; Linge, Claire; Grobbelaar, Adriaan

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring can cause patients symptoms ranging from the psychological to physical pain. Although the process of normal scarring is well described the ultimate cause of pathological scarring remains unknown. Similarly, exactly how early gestation fetuses can heal scarlessly remains unsolved. These questions are crucial in the search for a preventative or curative antiscarring agent. Such a discovery would be of enormous medical and commercial importance, not least because it may have application in other tissues. In the clinical context the assessment of scars is becoming more sophisticated and new physical, medical and surgical therapies are being introduced. This review aims to summarise some of the recent developments in scarring research for non-specialists and specialists alike. PMID:20585482

  6. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  7. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  8. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  9. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  10. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  11. Gradual closed correction of equinus contracture using the Ilizarov apparatus.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Sakurakichi, Keisuke; Uehara, Kenji; Yamashiro, Teruhisa; Tomita, Katsuro

    2003-01-01

    We treated 16 patients with equinus contracture using the Ilizarov method without open soft tissue release. No hinge was used in seven patients; instead, their ankle joint was used as the hinge (natural hinge; unconstrained construct). In the remaining nine patients, medial and lateral hinges connecting the tibial and foot rings were placed at the center of the talar dome (rotating hinge; constrained construction). We assessed the results in terms of the extent of dorsiflexion, its improvement, and complications. There was little difference between the results in the natural hinge group and the rotating hinge group. The natural hinge system is therefore the method of choice for treating equinus contracture because it is less invasive and simpler. However, particular care is needed during correction to avoid complications such as anterior subluxation of the talus and joint space narrowing. When complications do occur, intervention should be immediate. PMID:14648268

  12. Reconstruction following head and neck burns.

    PubMed

    Neale, H W; Billmire, D A; Carey, J P

    1986-01-01

    Burn reconstruction of the head and neck must first start with special care to this anatomic area in the early acute phase, with appropriate early débridement and coverage with sheet grafts of medium thickness into unit facial orientation. Postoperative garment and mask splinting, will help lessen the hypertrophic scar formation that frequently follows facial burns and skin coverage. Carefully planned reconstruction of these areas is indicated, with priority given first to the neck, then to the periorbital area, and then to perioral areas. Principles of scalp, ear, nasal, and cheek reconstruction following burns of the face are carefully outlined. The unit concept of burn scar resurfacing of the face has been the mainstay of our treatment. We have emphasized skin coverage of the face from similar donor site areas. The emotional and psychological effects of facial scarring secondary to severe burns are crippling to patients. Although numerous reconstructive surgical procedures may lessen the deformity, ultimately burn patients realize that their burn scars are permanent and no surgeon can give them back their original facial appearance. These patients need strong and continued support and reassurance from their physicians and nursing professional staff to maintain their self-identity and confidence. PMID:3514059

  13. [Reconstructions after periorbital burn injuries].

    PubMed

    Klett, A; Rebane, R

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays burn patients who also have periocular symptoms are usually treated by reconstructive surgeons and the role of the ophthalmic surgeon has decreased.Although periocular complications occur in a minority of burned patients, they pose a greater challenge in surgical and non-surgical treatment. Chemical, electrical and thermal burns can lead to disfiguring scar formations and delayed treatment can lead to devastating ocular complications. Achieving a successful reconstruction requires a comprehensive approach, entailing many advanced techniques with an emphasis on preserving function and balancing intricate aesthetic requirements. The theory is illustrated in this article with clinical examples. PMID:23345146

  14. An automated image processing method to quantify collagen fibre organization within cutaneous scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Kyle P; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett; Austen, William G; Sheridan, Robert L; Mihm, Martin C; Yarmush, Martin L; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Standard approaches to evaluate scar formation within histological sections rely on qualitative evaluations and scoring, which limits our understanding of the remodelling process. We have recently developed an image analysis technique for the rapid quantification of fibre alignment at each pixel location. The goal of this study was to evaluate its application for quantitatively mapping scar formation in histological sections of cutaneous burns. To this end, we utilized directional statistics to define maps of fibre density and directional variance from Masson's trichrome-stained sections for quantifying changes in collagen organization during scar remodelling. Significant increases in collagen fibre density are detectable soon after burn injury in a rat model. Decreased fibre directional variance in the scar was also detectable between 3 weeks and 6 months after injury, indicating increasing fibre alignment. This automated analysis of fibre organization can provide objective surrogate endpoints for evaluating cutaneous wound repair and regeneration. PMID:25256009

  15. Postinfective skin contracture: a rare cause of fifth metatarsophalangeal joint subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jatin; Mehtani, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Dislocation or subluxation of the metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP) is common and usually follows a traumatic event. Non-traumatic causes usually include inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis), connective tissue disorders, crowded shoewear or flexor digitorum longus tendon contracture. We present a very unusual case of subluxation of the fifth MTP joint following a postboil skin contracture. The case was treated with the release of contracture by Z-plasty. It resulted in concentric reduction of the joint and normal skin healing. PMID:25199201

  16. Post-traumatic flexion contractures of the elbow: Operative treatment via the limited lateral approach

    PubMed Central

    Brinsden, Mark D; Carr, Andrew J; Rees, Jonathan L

    2008-01-01

    Varying surgical techniques, patient groups and results have been described regards the surgical treatment of post traumatic flexion contracture of the elbow. We present our experience using the limited lateral approach on patients with carefully defined contracture types. Surgical release of post-traumatic flexion contracture of the elbow was performed in 23 patients via a limited lateral approach. All patients had an established flexion contracture with significant functional deficit. Contracture types were classified as either extrinsic if the contracture was not associated with damage to the joint surface or as intrinsic if it was. Overall, the mean pre-operative deformity was 55 degrees (95%CI 48 – 61) which was corrected at the time of surgery to 17 degrees (95%CI 12 – 22). At short-term follow-up (7.5 months) the mean residual deformity was 25 degrees (95%CI 19 – 30) and at medium-term follow-up (43 months) it was 32 degrees (95%CI 25 – 39). This deformity correction was significant (p < 0.01). One patient suffered a post-operative complication with transient dysaesthesia in the distribution of the ulnar nerve, which had resolved at six weeks. Sixteen patients had an extrinsic contracture and seven an intrinsic. Although all patients were satisfied with the results of their surgery, patients with an extrinsic contracture had significantly (p = 0.02) better results than those with an intrinsic contracture. (28 degrees compared to 48 degrees at medium term follow up). Surgical release of post-traumatic flexion contracture of the elbow via a limited lateral approach is a safe technique, which reliably improves extension especially for extrinsic contractures. In this series all patients with an extrinsic contracture regained a functional range of movement and were satisfied with their surgery. PMID:18783605

  17. Post-Radical-Prostatectomy Urinary Incontinence: The Management of Concomitant Bladder Neck Contracture

    PubMed Central

    King, Thomas; Almallah, Y. Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Urinary incontinence postradical prostatectomy is a common problem which adversely affects quality of life. Concomitant bladder neck contracture in the setting of postprostatectomy incontinence represents a challenging clinical problem. Postprostatectomy bladder neck contracture is frequently recurrent and makes surgical management of incontinence difficult. The aetiology of bladder neck contracture and what constitutes the optimum management strategy are controversial. Here we review the literature and also present our approach. PMID:22611382

  18. Postinfective skin contracture: a rare cause of fifth metatarsophalangeal joint subluxation.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jatin; Mehtani, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Dislocation or subluxation of the metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP) is common and usually follows a traumatic event. Non-traumatic causes usually include inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis), connective tissue disorders, crowded shoewear or flexor digitorum longus tendon contracture. We present a very unusual case of subluxation of the fifth MTP joint following a postboil skin contracture. The case was treated with the release of contracture by Z-plasty. It resulted in concentric reduction of the joint and normal skin healing. PMID:25199201

  19. [The scars of Andy Warhol].

    PubMed

    Scholz, A

    1996-02-01

    The biographical and artistic documents describing to the attempted assassination of the artist Andy Warhol are reviewed. The visible scars are interpreted as symbols of the damaged integrity of the skin. PMID:8868460

  20. Burning Issue: Handling Household Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... hot objects or liquid, fire, friction, the sun, electricity, or certain chemicals. Each year, about a half- ... infant or elderly. the burn was caused by electricity, which can lead to “invisible” burns. Burns Burns ...

  1. [Functional reconstruction of multiple severe deformities after extensive deep burn].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi; Jia, Chi-yu; Hu, Da-hai; Zhu, Xiong-xiang; Han, Jun-tao; Yao, Qing-jun; Xu, Ming-da

    2008-10-01

    To explore new measures for functional reconstruction of multiple severe deformities as a result of extensive deep burn (total burn surface area > or = 90% TBSA, including deep burn > or = 70%TBSA) in late stage. Twelve severe burn patients with above-mentioned deformities were hospitalized in our ward during 1960--2005, the scars resulted from burns were distributed from head to foot with 173 deformities, including 27 scar ulcers. All patients lacked of self-care ability, among them some could not stand. Due to inadequate skin source, deformities were corrected by skin from matured scars expanded with subcutaneous balloon at late postburn stage. Following our former clinical experience, anatomic investigation and experimental research, we chose the following methods to correct deformities and restore functions: application of split-thickness scar skin after expansion (88 wounds); use of scar skin flap/scar-Achilles tendon flaps (59 wounds); combination of thin split-thickness skin grafts from scar and allogeneic acellular dermal matrix (composite skin, 40 wounds). All grafts survived, the appearance and function were improved obviously without complications. Follow-up 1-40 years, all patients could take care themselves with satisfactory function and appearance, and among them 8 patients returned to work (one had worked for 40 years), 2 patients married and had children. The above-mentioned measures are safe, reliable and effective for functional reconstruction of deformities. PMID:19103016

  2. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  3. MISR Views a Fire-Scarred Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This MISR image pair shows 'before and after' views of the area around the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Washington. On June 27, 2000, a fire in the dry sagebrush was sparked by an automobile crash. The flames were fanned by hot summer winds. By the day after the accident, about 100,000 acres had burned, and the fire's spread forced the closure of highways and loss of homes.

    These images, from Terra orbits 2176 and 3341, were obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Compare the area just above and to the right of the line of cumulus clouds in the May 15 image with the same area imaged on August 3. The darkened burn scar measures approximately 35 kilometers across. The Columbia River is seen wending its way around the area, and the Snake River branches off to the right.

    According to Idaho's National Interagency Fire Center, the US has been experiencing the worst fire season since 1996.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  4. Rhinoplasty with Cartilage and Alloplastic Materials, Nasal SMAS Management in Asian Rhinoplasty, Contracture Classification, and Secondary Rhinoplasty with Contracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Kyu; Kania, Katarzyna; Nguyen, Anh H

    2015-11-01

    Rhinoplasty for Asians is quite different from that of Westerners. Most Asians desire a raised nasal bridge with a projected nasal tip, similar to that of Westerners. Nevertheless, most Asian nasal bones, and upper and lower lateral cartilages are inadequately developed. This largely necessitates the use of a nasal alloplastic material such as a silicone implant, most frequently utilized in nasal cosmetic surgery for Asians. Shaping of the silicone implant is rather easy and its removal is also simple, in the case of a complication or undesired result. The disadvantage of a nasal silicone implant, like that of silicone implants of the breast, is the fibrous capsular formation, which may lead to capsular contracture. The frequently employed types of nasal silicone implant include (1) the boat type in which the silicone implant descends down to the nasal tip, (2) the L-shape in which the silicone implant further extends to the anterior nasal spine (ANS) after passing the tip, and (3) the three-quarter type for which the silicone implant extends down to the upper lateral cartilage. In conjunction with the silicone implant, the cartilages of the ear and the nasal septum are commonly used to create or lengthen tip projection. Asians generally have cartilage with inadequate anatomical development. Instead, they often have an anatomically thick fibrous fatty layer including underdeveloped superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS). Patients with a thick fibrous tissue layer have a bulbous tip. This nasal tip is the area where severe capsular contracture occurs after insertion of a silicone implant. It is imperative that the surgeon properly understands the nasal anatomical characteristics of Asians, and selects an appropriate implant together with a suitable donor cartilage to attain a safe and aesthetically pleasing nose. The same principle should apply to reoperation cases; the fibrofatty layer of SMAS along with the capsular contracture must be removed or released to

  5. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with overcorrected strabismus (and several patients with undercorrection after extraocular muscle resection) underwent exploration of previously operated muscles, with the intention of advancing their tendons to prevent the need for surgery on additional muscles. Unexpectedly, it was found that, in many cases, an elongated scar segment of variable length was interposed between the muscle and its insertion site on the sclera. Laboratory investigations were carried out to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s) and to create an animal model of the disorder. METHODS: Lengthened scars were repaired on 198 muscles during 134 procedures performed on 123 patients. The scars consisted of amorphous connective tissue interposed between the globe and normal tendon. Repair was accomplished by excision of the scar and reattachment of the muscle to sclera, using absorbable sutures in 64 cases and nonabsorbable sutures in 70 cases. Histopathologic examination was performed on 82 clinical specimens, and tissue culture studies were performed on 7 specimens. To develop an animal model, 10 New Zealand white rabbits underwent bilateral superior rectus resection. Half of the eyes received sub-Tenon's injections of collagenase over the operative site during weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6 postoperatively; the other half received saline solution injections on the same schedule. At 10 weeks, half the sites were studied histologically, and the other half underwent collagen creep analysis. In a second study, the use of absorbable versus nonabsorbable sutures was compared in the rabbit model. RESULTS: In the clinical cases, the mean length of the elongated scar segments was 4.2 mm. A total of 105 of the 134 repair procedures were judged successful. Thirty-one procedures resulted in recurrence of the original overcorrection; 7 of these had documented restretches. Factors that distinguished patients with stretched scars from patients with classic slipped muscles included minimal or no

  6. New minimally invasive option for the treatment of gluteal muscle contracture.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bin; Zhou, Panyu; Xia, Yan; Chen, Youyan; Yu, Jun; Xu, Shuogui

    2012-12-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture is a clinical syndrome that involves contracture and distortion of the gluteal muscles and fascia fibers due to multiple causes. Physical examination demonstrates a characteristic gait due to hip adduction and internal thigh rotation. This study introduces a new minimally invasive method for surgical release of gluteal muscle contracture. Patients with gluteal muscle contracture were assigned to 4 categories: type A, contracture occurred mainly in the iliotibial tract; type B, contracture occurred in the Iliotibial tract and gluteus maximus; type C1, movement of the contraction band was palpable and a snapping sound was audible during squatting; and type C2, movement of the contraction band was not palpable or almost absent and a snapping sound was audible during squatting. This classification method allowed prediction of the anatomic location of these pathological contractures and determination of the type of surgery required. Four critical points were used to define the operative field and served as points to mark a surgical incision smaller than 4 mm. The contracture was easily released in this carefully marked operative field without causing significant neurovascular damage. Over a period of 5 years, between March 2003 and June 2008, the authors treated 1059 patients with this method and achieved excellent outcomes. Most patients were fully active within 12 weeks, with the assistance of an early postoperative rehabilitation program. The most significant complication was a postoperative periarticular hematoma, which occurred in 3 patients within 10 days postoperatively and required surgical ligation of the bleeding vessel. PMID:23218623

  7. Biologicals and Fetal Cell Therapy for Wound and Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2011-01-01

    Few biopharmaceutical preparations developed from biologicals are available for tissue regeneration and scar management. When developing biological treatments with cellular therapy, selection of cell types and establishment of consistent cell banks are crucial steps in whole-cell bioprocessing. Various cell types have been used in treatment of wounds to reduce scar to date including autolog and allogenic skin cells, platelets, placenta, and amniotic extracts. Experience with fetal cells show that they may provide an interesting cell choice due to facility of outscaling and known properties for wound healing without scar. Differential gene profiling has helped to point to potential indicators of repair which include cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, cytokines, growth factors, and development. Safety has been evidenced in Phase I and II clinical fetal cell use for burn and wound treatments with different cell delivery systems. We present herein that fetal cells present technical and therapeutic advantages compared to other cell types for effective cell-based therapy for wound and scar management. PMID:22363853

  8. Fire scars and ancient sand dunes in southern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The rectangular green areas in this view of southern Australia are protected areas of natural forest (national parks and biospheric reserves), and the lighter surrounding colors (tan-brown) are agricultural croplands occupying land which once must have looked as green as the nature reserves but are now cleared of forest. The major green patch has been recently burned, as shown by the irregular pattern of a large, multiple burn scar. The pattern of the fire scar indicates that the fires were driven by winds blowing from left to right. Close examination of the view shows that the forests are rooted in a soil made up of a widespread sheet of ancient dune sand. The dunes can be seen best within the area of the large fire scar where the characteristic wavy, scalloped pattern of crescent dunes can be detected. The crescents indicate that the sand was heaped up by winds blowing from right to left in this view, in the opposite direction to the winds which fanned the fires. A few straight dunes

  9. Biomass Burning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-07-27

    Projects:  Biomass Burning Definition/Description:  Biomass Burning: This data set represents the geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ...

  10. Modified Dovetail-Plasty in Scar Revision

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Suk Joon; Yang, Jihoon; Kim, Seon Gyu; Jung, Sung Won; Koh, Sung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Scar revision is one of the fundamental techniques in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Local flaps, such as a Z-plasty, W-plasty, or geometric broken-line closure, have been used for scar revision. Camouflaging a scar during scar revision for marginal scars from skin grafts and flaps, trapdoor scars, and linear scars is difficult. We describe our experience with the use of modified dovetail-plasty for scar revision in these difficult areas. Our study group consisted of 28 cases among 22 patients (9 males and 13 females) with a mean age of 33.6 years (range, 6–61 years). The conspicuous scars were located on the face (50%) and extremities (50%). The authors designed Y-shaped incision lines to relax the skin tension lines on one side of the excision line and trapezoid incision lines on the other side. There were 16 follow-up operations performed over 6 months after the initial operation among a total of 22 patients. There were scar depressions (2 patients) and a hypertrophic scar (1 patient) at the interval area between the dovetail flaps. A diffuse hypertrophic scar occurred in 1 patient with a dorsal foot scar. The overall success rates of the procedure as assessed by the surgeons were as follows: excellent (75%), good (12.4%), fair (6.3%), and poor (6.3%). This new local flap can achieve an inconspicuous scar using a blurred scar line and reducing tension. The authors recommend a modified dovetail-plasty for the revision of trapdoor scars and scars under excessive tension. PMID:24577307

  11. The Mast Cell Stabilizer Ketotifen Fumarate Lessens Contracture Severity and Myofibroblast Hyperplasia: A Study of a Rabbit Model of Posttraumatic Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Monument, Michael J.; Hart, David A.; Befus, A. Dean; Salo, Paul T.; Zhang, Mei; Hildebrand, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The propensity of the elbow to become stiff after trauma is widely appreciated and in this setting, the joint capsule is commonly recognized as the major motion-limiting anatomical structure. Affected joint capsules become fibrotic, characterized by myofibroblast hyperplasia and excessive collagen deposition. Mast cell hyperplasia is common within fibrotic tissue and mast cells are known to synthesize many profibrotic mediators. We have hypothesized that mast cell inhibition after skeletal injury will lessen the degree of contracture severity and will reduce myofibroblast hyperplasia within the joint capsule. Methods Posttraumatic contractures of the knee were created using a combination of intra-articular injury coupled to internal immobilization in skeletally mature, New Zealand white rabbits. Four groups of animals were studied: a non-operative control group (CON), an operative contracture group (ORC) and two-operative groups treated with a mast cell stabilizer, Ketotifen fumarate at doses of 0.5mg/kg (KF0.5) and 1.0mg/kg (KF1.0) twice daily, respectively. After 8 weeks of immobilization, flexion contractures were measured biomechanically and the posterior joint capsule was harvested for quantification of myofibroblast and mast cell numbers. Results Flexion contractures developed in the ORC group (58 ± 14°) and the severity of contracture was significantly reduced in both groups treated with Ketotifen (KF0.5: 42 ± 17° and KF1.0: 45 ± 10°, p<0.02). Joint capsule myofibroblast and mast cell numbers were significantly increased within the operative contracture group (p<0.001). In both surgical groups treated with Ketotifen, myofibroblast and mast cell numbers were significantly reduced (p<0.001). Conclusions The use of a mast cell stabilizer, Ketotifen was effective in reducing the biomechanical and cellular manifestations of joint capsule fibrosis in a rabbit model of posttraumatic joint contracture. This is suggestive that an inflammatory pathway

  12. Answers to Common Questions about Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donation Volunteer Efforts Answers to Common Questions About Scars skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Information for Parents & Individuals Answers to Common Questions About Scars To download the PDF version of this factsheet, ...

  13. Microstructural and molecular considerations in the treatment of scars with ablative fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Cerrene N; Ozog, David

    2015-03-01

    Fractional ablative lasers have recently proven to be an effective modality for improving the clinical appearance and minimizing the morbidity associated with restrictivetype scars. Their tolerable safety profile on nonfacial sites and darker Fitzpatrick skin types provides an advantage over its fully ablative counterpart in treating facial rhytides, photodamaged skin, and acne scars. However, despite its increasing usage in clinical practice, the mechanism behind the observed clinical benefit remains complex and has yet to be fully elucidated. This paper reviews the work on the histological mechanism of action of ablative fractional lasers, and the molecular changes that occur posttreatment on restrictive scars, with an emphasis on mature burn and postsurgical scars. As the majority of research has been on the carbon dioxide laser, a natural focus on this wavelength is presented. PMID:25922951

  14. Burns: Treatment and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Burns can cause extensive and devastating injuries of the head and neck. Prevention of the initial injury must always be a priority, but once an injury has occurred, then prevention of progression of the damage together with survival of the patient must be the immediate goals. The acute care will have a major influence on the subsequent scarring, reconstructive need, and long-term outcome. In the majority of cases, the reconstruction will involve restoration of form and function to the soft tissues, and the methods used will depend very much on the extent of scarring locally and elsewhere in the body. In nearly all cases, a significant improvement in functional and aesthetic outcomes can be achieved, which, in conjunction with intensive psychosocial rehabilitation, can lead to high-quality patient outcomes. With the prospect of facial transplantation being a clinical reality, the reconstructive spectrum has opened up even further, and, with appropriate reconstruction and support, no patient should be left economically deprived or socially isolated after a burn injury. PMID:22550448

  15. Bilateral carpal contracture in a neonatal addax (Addax nasomaculatus).

    PubMed

    Watson, Megan K; Langan, Jennifer; Adkesson, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    A neonate male addax calf displayed an inability to extend its forelimbs bilaterally (range of motion restricted to 45 degrees-50 degrees on full extension) with resultant inability to stand. Based on examination and radiographs, the congenital defect was attributed to contracted soft tissue structures (joint capsule and/or intercarpal ligaments). Splinting, support of the limbs, and physical therapy resulted in moderate improvement of the angle of contraction (full flexion to approximately 120 degrees on extension at day 10). The animal was able to walk with splints but died at 10 days from acute head trauma, presumably related to a traumatic fall caused by challenges with ambulation. Postmortem examination confirmed soft-tissue contracture of the forelimbs. Malposition of the calf in utero was considered a possible cause of the defect. PMID:24063116

  16. Epidemiology. The incidence and management of joint contracture in India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A K; Mokashi, M G

    1987-06-01

    An epidemiologic study in India showed that 50% of the severely disabled (1.8% of the total population) had locomotor disorders. There is a considerable difference in the incidence of disability and disease in rural and urban populations. The deformities from poliomyelitis are encountered predominantly in the rural areas (53.5%). The incidence in urban areas is only 1%. After poliomyelitis, the pathomechanics of deformity are prominent in the lower limbs. In a developing country, the management of contractures differs considerably from treatment in economically advanced nations. The use of postural exercises with body weight is well illustrated by certain Yoga postures such as paschimottansana or ushtrasana and is a prescribed treatment. PMID:3581587

  17. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome: further delineation and genetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Vuopala, K; Herva, R

    1994-01-01

    In a national morphology based study of lethal arthrogryposis between 1979 and 1992, 40 fetuses and infants with lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS, McKusick 253310) were found in Finland. The incidence of LCCS in Finland was 1:19,000 births. There were 20 affected males and 20 affected females in 26 families. In 16 cases the pregnancy was terminated after the prenatal diagnosis of total akinesia and fetal hydrops on ultrasound. There were 19 stillborn infants and five were born showing signs of life, but died within one hour. The segregation analyses yielded 0.45 affected by the "singles" method and 0.34 by the "sib" method. The birthplaces of the grandparents were located in the sparsely populated north east of Finland. This finding supports the existence of an autosomal recessive LCCS gene in Finland, particularly in the north eastern part. Images PMID:7966188

  18. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    PubMed

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy. PMID:26177134

  19. Optical coherence tomography for longitudinal monitoring of vasculature in scars treated with laser fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peijun; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Harms, Karl-Anton; Murray, Alexandra; Rea, Suzanne; Kennedy, Brendan F; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D; McLaughlin, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the first in vivo longitudinal assessment of scar vasculature in ablative fractional laser treatment using optical coherence tomography (OCT). A method based on OCT speckle decorrelation was developed to visualize and quantify the scar vasculature over the treatment period. Through reliable co-location of the imaging field of view across multiple imaging sessions, and compensation for motion artifact, the study was able to track the same scar tissue over a period of several months, and quantify changes in the vasculature area density. The results show incidences of occlusion of individual vessels 3 days after the first treatment. The subsequent responses ˜20 weeks after the initial treatment show differences between immature and mature scars. Image analysis showed a distinct decrease (25 ± 13%, mean ± standard deviation) and increase (19 ± 5%) of vasculature area density for the immature and mature scars, respectively. This study establishes the feasibility of OCT imaging for quantitative longitudinal monitoring of vasculature in scar treatment. En face optical coherence tomography vasculature images pre-treatment (top) and ˜20 weeks after the first laser treatment (bottom) of a mature burn scar. Arrows mark the same vessel pattern. PMID:26260918

  20. Noninflammatory Joint Contractures Arising from Immobility: Animal Models to Future Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kayleigh; Trudel, Guy; Laneuville, Odette

    2015-01-01

    Joint contractures, defined as the limitation in the passive range of motion of a mobile joint, can be classified as noninflammatory diseases of the musculoskeletal system. The pathophysiology is not well understood; limited information is available on causal factors, progression, the pathophysiology involved, and prediction of response to treatment. The clinical heterogeneity of joint contractures combined with the heterogeneous contribution of joint connective tissues to joint mobility presents challenges to the study of joint contractures. Furthermore, contractures are often a symptom of a wide variety of heterogeneous disorders that are in many cases multifactorial. Extended immobility has been identified as a causal factor and evidence is provided from both experimental and epidemiology studies. Of interest is the involvement of the joint capsule in the pathophysiology of joint contractures and lack of response to remobilization. While molecular pathways involved in the development of joint contractures are being investigated, current treatments focus on physiotherapy, which is ineffective on irreversible contractures. Future treatments may include early diagnosis and prevention. PMID:26247029

  1. Scar Wars: Preferences in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Siun; Murphy, Stephen; Kelly, Jack L; Morrison, Colin M

    2015-01-01

    Background The uptake of breast reconstruction is ever increasing with procedures ranging from implant-based reconstructions to complex free tissue transfer. Little emphasis is placed on scarring when counseling patients yet they remain a significant source of morbidity and litigation. The aim of this study was to examine the scarring preferences of men and women in breast oncoplastic and reconstructive surgery. Methods Five hundred men and women were asked to fill out a four-page questionnaire in two large Irish centres. They were asked about their opinions on scarring post breast surgery and were also asked to rank the common scarring patterns in wide local excisions, oncoplastic procedures, breast reconstructions as well as donor sites. Results Fifty-eight percent of those surveyed did not feel scars were important post breast cancer surgery. 61% said that their partners' opinion of scars were important. The most preferred wide local excision scar was the lower lateral quadrant scar whilst the scars from the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap were most favoured. The superior gluteal artery perforator flap had the most preferred donor site while surprisingly, the DIEP had the least favourite donor site. Conclusions Scars are often overlooked when planning breast surgery yet the extent and position of the scar needs to be outlined to patients and it should play an important role in selecting a breast reconstruction option. This study highlights the need for further evaluation of patients' opinions regarding scar patterns. PMID:26430631

  2. Stimulated infrared thermography applied to differentiate scar tissue from peri-scar tissue: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Riquet, Damien; Houel, Nicolas; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Every human injury leads to a scar formation. The healing process leads to the formation of new tissue: the scar, which is different from the original tissue. This process is influenced by mechanical strength and the local vasculature is modified. The purpose of this study is to show that there are various temperatures between the scar and the peri-scar area associated with the healing process that can be estimated using the thermal infrared camera. In the study, 12 scars were stimulated by cold. Several changes of temperature were observed between scar and peri-scar area for 10 min. Scars appeared significantly colder with a Wilcoxon test (p = 0.01). Results showed that stimulated infrared thermography can be used to monitor the temperature difference between the scar and peri-scar tissue. PMID:27270169

  3. The Relationship of Bacterial Biofilms and Capsular Contracture in Breast Implants.

    PubMed

    Ajdic, Dragana; Zoghbi, Yasmina; Gerth, David; Panthaki, Zubin J; Thaller, Seth

    2016-03-01

    Capsular contracture is a common sequelae of implant-based breast augmentation. Despite its prevalence, the etiology of capsular contracture remains controversial. Numerous studies have identified microbial biofilms on various implantable materials, including breast implants. Furthermore, biofilms have been implicated in subclinical infections associated with other surgical implants. In this review, we discuss microbial biofilms as a potential etiology of capsular contracture. The review also outlines the key diagnostic modalities available to identify the possible infectious agents found in biofilm, as well as available preventative and treatment measures. PMID:26843099

  4. Argon laser treatment of urethral stricture and vesical neck contracture.

    PubMed

    Adkins, W C

    1988-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the argon laser wavelength allow a precise incision with excellent hemostasis and negligible heating of adjacent tissues resulting in less scarring. These qualities are used to advantage in the treatment of strictures. The argon laser was used to perform 13 internal urethrotomies and ten vesical neck incisions. The operative method used is similar to optical internal urethrotomy. The argon probe incises hemostatically, reducing the need for extensive fulguration of tissues at the operative site and thereby reducing the tendency for more scar tissue to form and compromise the operation. The same hemostasis reduces the need for postoperative indwelling urethral catheterization. Utility of the argon device in most instances allows treatment to be conducted on an outpatient basis without general anesthesia and without use of postoperative urethral catheters, yielding an effective, cost-saving therapy. PMID:3210887

  5. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-10-01

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. PMID:26426470

  6. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  7. Possibilities of scar treatment after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Maragakis, M; Willital, G H; Michel, G; Görtelmeyer, R

    1995-01-01

    During a ten year observation period it was found that scar formation after thoracic surgery is influenced by various factors: metabolism, operative technique and factors of a general nature. On the basis of these findings, a study was carried out to investigate the effect of the scar-specific Contractubex gel (Merz+Co., D-Frankfurt/Main), containing 10% onion extract, 50 U sodium heparin per g of gel and 1% allantoin, in the treatment of children who underwent thoracic surgery and to evaluate its effect on scar development. Before and during the six-month treatment period, both macromorphology and scar colour were assessed; furthermore, a global evaluation of the therapeutic result was made. Additionally, the scars were characterized after a six-month treatment-free follow-up period. The results of 38 Contractubex-treated and 27 untreated patients were compared. In the treated scars, the global evaluation of the therapeutic result was better than in the untreated scars. In the Contractubex group, the rating was "good" and "very good" in 84% of cases, as compared to 59% of the untreated cases. In the treated group, the increase in scar size was markedly lower than in the untreated patients. The treated scars showed a tendency towards quicker paling than the untreated scars. In the treated group, the conversion of primary physiological scars to unphysiological scars (hypertrophic or keloidal scars) was less frequent than in the untreated group. The tolerability of the product was very good in 37 of the 38 treated patients, and good in one patient. All scar-specific effects of Contractubex continued to persist after the end of treatment. PMID:8846750

  8. Grass-skirt burns in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Barss, P; Wallace, K

    1983-04-01

    A retrospective survey of burn cases admitted to Alotau Hospital, Papua New Guinea, over a four-year period showed that 48% were due to grass-skirt burns. Most of these occurred in young girls and usually caused full-thickness burns of the buttocks and thigh. The commonest long-term complications were contractures of the hips and knees. The next most common cause of burns was a fall into a fire during an epileptic fit (24%). None of the patients were on anticonvulsants. The population needs to be informed of the dangers of leaving children near open fires, of the value of bundling up children whose grass-skirts catch fire to smother the flames, of the importance of anticonvulsants to chronic epileptics, and of the advantages of seeking medical treatment when burns occur. PMID:6132083

  9. Dupuytren's disease or Cooper's contracture?: Kenneth Fitzpatrick Russell Memorial Lecture.

    PubMed

    Thurston, Alan

    2003-07-01

    In his position as curator of the Cowlishaw collection of historical medical books in the Library of the College, Kenneth Russell prepared the definitive catalogue of the collection. This catalogue is comprehensive and for almost all entries there is an annotation that demonstrates his meticulous attention to detail and the love of the book collection that he managed to secure for the College. It is from this catalogue that I have chosen two books in particular that bring together two great surgeons of the turn of the 19th century. Although he was a pupil of the great John Hunter, the young Astley Cooper possessed good manners and a gift of oratory of which the Scot, his teacher, was devoid. After his apprenticeship with Henry Cline senior, Cooper came to share the podium with Cline at Guy's and St Thomas' hospitals and the two dominated surgical teaching in London for some 22 years, until Cline's retirement in 1811. It was the latter who was first to recognize the true nature of the condition now known as Dupuytren's disease. Later, in 1822, Cooper wrote a detailed description of the contracture of the palmar aponeurosis and recommended fasciotomy as being curative. His book A Treatise on Dislocations and Fractures of the Joints, which contains this description of Dupuytren's contracture, is held in the Cowlishaw Collection. On the other side of the English Channel, M. le Baron Dupuytren repeatedly misquoted Cooper and stated that Cooper believed that the disease was incurable. In his famous lecture given to the staff of the Hôtel Dieu in Paris on 5th December 1931, he admitted to having seen 30 or 40 cases over 20 years of practice. It seems likely that he was not aware of the true cause of the condition before 1831 when he treated his first case. This lecture, along with others, are recorded in his Leçons Orales de Clinique Chirurgicale, a copy of which is also to be found in the Cowlishaw Collection. PMID:12864830

  10. Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchoff, V. W. J. H.; Artaxo, P.; Remer, L. A.; Holben, B. N.; King, M. D.; Ward, D. E.; Prins, E. M.; Longo, K. M.; Mattos, L. F.; Nobre, C. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Ji, Q.; Thompson, A. M.; Gleason, J. F.; Christopher, S. A.; Tsay, S.-C.

    1998-01-01

    The Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) field project took place in the Brazilian Amazon and cerrado regions in August-September 1995 as a collaboration between Brazilian and American scientists. SCAR-B, a comprehensive experiment to study biomass burning, emphasized measurements of surface biomass, fires, smoke aerosol and trace gases, clouds, and radiation. their climatic effects, and remote sensing from aircraft and satellites. It included aircraft and ground-based in situ measurements of smoke emission factors and the compositions, sizes, and optical properties of the smoke particles; studies of the formation of ozone; the transport and evolution of smoke; and smoke interactions with water vapor and clouds. This overview paper introduces SCAR-B and summarizes some of the main results obtained so far. (1) Fires: measurements of the size distribution of fires, using the 50 m resolution MODIS Airborne Simulator, show that most of the fires are small (e.g. 0.005 square km), but the satellite sensors (e.g., AVHRR and MODIS with I km resolution) can detect fires in Brazil which are responsible for 60-85% of the burned biomass: (2) Aerosol: smoke particles emitted from fires increase their radius by as much as 60%, during their first three days in the atmosphere due to condensation and coagulation, reaching a mass median radius of 0.13-0.17 microns: (3) Radiative forcing: estimates of the globally averaged direct radiative forcing due to smoke worldwide, based on the properties of smoke measured in SCAR-B (-O.l to -0.3 W m(exp -2)), are smaller than previously modeled due to a lower single-scattering albedo (0.8 to 0.9), smaller scattering efficiency (3 square meters g(exp -2) at 550 nm), and low humidification factor; and (4) Effect on clouds: a good relationship was found between cloud condensation nuclei and smoke volume concentrations, thus an increase in the smoke emission is expected to affect cloud properties. In SCAR-B, new techniques were developed

  11. Pulmonary scar carcinoma. A clinicopathologic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bakris, G.L.; Mulopulos, G.P.; Korchik, R.; Ezdinli, E.Z.; Ro, J.; Yoon, B.H.

    1983-08-01

    To delineate differences between scar and non-scar pulmonary carcinoma, the charts, autopsy protocols and chest roentgenograms of 80 male patients (autopsied) between 1975 and 1980, were reviewed. Nineteen patients (24%) had documented scar carcinomas. The comparison revealed scar carcinomas to possess certain distinctive features: A higher histologic distribution of adenocarcinoma (58% versus 15% in non-scars) and the frequent presentation (53%) with only nonpulmonary symptoms and signs related to metastasis. In scar carcinomas both bronchoscopy and sputum cytology were ineffective as initial diagnostic tools since chest findings were absent or minimal. Chest x-ray was negative in 9 of the 19 patients with scar cancer and remained negative until death in seven. In 10 of 19 instances, pulmonary scar carcinomas presented with only nonpulmonary symptoms and showed a tendency to metastasize while clinically undetectable. The differences noted between scar and non-scar carcinomas of the lung appear to depend on the peripheral location of these tumors and not on the adenocarcinoma histology.

  12. Dupuytren’s Contracture in Alabama HFE Hemochromatosis Probands

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Barton, J. Clayborn

    2012-01-01

    Background Dupuytren’s contracture (DC) and HFE hemochromatosis occur in some of the same at-risk populations and present with similar comorbid conditions. Methods We estimated DC prevalence in two cohorts of white Alabama hemochromatosis probands (294 C282Y homozygotes, 67 C282Y/H63D compound heterozygotes) in a retrospective study. We performed logistic regressions on DC using the following independent variables: age, body mass index, heavy ethanol consumption, serum ferritin, elevated serum AST/ALT, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and diabetes. Results One man and two women with C282Y homozygosity had DC (prevalence 1.02%; 95% CI 0.35%–2.96%). A man with C282Y/H63D had DC (prevalence 1.49%; 95% CI 0.26%–7.98%). DC occurred as an autosomal dominant trait in his kinship. In regression analyses, no single variable predicted DC. We observed no new DC cases after the diagnosis of hemochromatosis (mean follow-up 12.9 ± 7.5 years (1 SD), and 9.0 ± 5.1 years, respectively). Conclusions Our prevalence estimates of DC in white Alabama hemochromatosis probands are similar to those found in the white US population cohorts. DC risk was unrelated to the variables we studied. PMID:22952417

  13. Identification and function analysis of contrary genes in Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xianglu; Tian, Feng; Tian, Lijie

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the expression of genes involved in Dupuytren's contracture (DC), using bioinformatic methods. The profile of GSE21221 was downloaded from the gene expression ominibus, which included six samples, derived from fibroblasts and six healthy control samples, derived from carpal-tunnel fibroblasts. A Distributed Intrusion Detection System was used in order to identify differentially expressed genes. The term contrary genes is proposed. Contrary genes were the genes that exhibited opposite expression patterns in the positive and negative groups, and likely exhibited opposite functions. These were identified using Coexpress software. Gene ontology (GO) function analysis was conducted for the contrary genes. A network of GO terms was constructed using the reduce and visualize gene ontology database. Significantly expressed genes (801) and contrary genes (98) were screened. A significant association was observed between Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and ten genes in the positive gene set. Positive regulation of transcription and the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-inducing kinase activity exhibited the highest degree values in the network of GO terms. In the present study, the expression of genes involved in the development of DC was analyzed, and the concept of contrary genes proposed. The genes identified in the present study are involved in the positive regulation of transcription and activation of NF-κB-inducing kinase activity. The contrary genes and GO terms identified in the present study may potentially be used for DC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25760233

  14. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group). These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments). Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02), hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that a collagen

  15. Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  16. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  17. A Case of Multiple Spontaneous Keloid Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jfri, Abdulhadi; Rajeh, Nawal; Karkashan, Eman

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scars result from an abnormal healing response to cutaneous injury or inflammation that extends beyond the borders of the original wound. Spontaneous keloid scars forming in the absence of any previous trauma or surgical procedure are rare. Certain syndromes have been associated with this phenomenon, and few reports have discussed the evidence of single spontaneous keloid scar, which raises the question whether they are really spontaneous. Here, we present a 27-year-old mentally retarded single female with orbital hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, repaired cleft lip and high-arched palate who presented with progressive multiple spontaneous keloid scars in different parts of her body which were confirmed histologically by the presence of typical keloidal collagen. This report supports the fact that keloid scars can appear spontaneously and are possibly linked to a genetic factor. Furthermore, it describes a new presentation of spontaneous keloid scars in the form of multiple large lesions in different sites of the body. PMID:26351423

  18. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  19. Global burned area and biomass burning emissions from small fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; van der Werf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  20. [Surgical controversy. Limiting postoperative scarring].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2005-06-01

    Postoperative follow-up of glaucoma surgery must be rigorous and carried out over the long term. Data acquired on the make-up of the filtering bleb justifies using postoperative anti-inflammatory drugs, even if the eye is clinically quiet. When using antimetabolites, the risk factors for failure must be well known and either 5-fluorouracile or mitomycin should be chosen depending on the level of risk of scarring. Their use in needle revision must be adapted case by case. anti-TGF-beta-2 antibody, currently being investigated, may prove advantageous in the very near future. PMID:16208245

  1. Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Anna Y; Butler, Daniel P; Cussons, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Background Insufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria. Methods Patients (250) were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma), underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic) and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database. Results Telephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions). Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016) and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05), particularly in the elective group where males (36.17%) were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04%) (P<0.01). Conclusions Successful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision. PMID:26618120

  2. Scald Burns From Hair Braiding.

    PubMed

    Meizoso, Jonathan P; Ramaley, Stephen R; Ray, Juliet J; Allen, Casey J; Guarch, Gerardo A; Varas, Robin; Teisch, Laura F; Pizano, Louis R; Schulman, Carl I; Namias, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Only one previous case report has described scald burns secondary to hair braiding in pediatric patients. The present case study is the largest to date of scald burns as a result of hair braiding in children and adults. Charts of all 1609 female patients seen at a single burn center from 2008 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with scald burns attributed to hair braiding. Demographics, injury severity, injury patterns, and complications were analyzed. Twenty-six patients (1.6%) had scald burns secondary to hair braiding with median TBSA 3%. Eighty-five percent of patients were pediatric with median age 8 years. Injury patterns were as follows: back (62%), shoulder (31%), chest (15%), buttocks (15%), abdomen (12%), arms (12%), neck (12%), and legs (4%). No patients required operative intervention. Three patients were admitted to the hospital. Two patients required time off from school for 6 and 10 days post burn for recovery. Complications included functional limitations (n = 2), hypertrophic scarring (n = 1), cellulitis requiring antibiotics (n = 1), and anxiety requiring medical/psychological therapy (n = 2). This peculiar mechanism of injury not only carries inherent morbidity that includes the risks of functional limitations, infection, and psychological repercussions but also increases usage of resources through hospital admissions and multiple clinic visits. Further work in the form of targeted outreach programs is necessary to educate the community regarding this preventable mechanism of injury. PMID:26594857

  3. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  4. Restoration of the shape, location and skin of the severe burn-damaged breast.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M

    2009-11-01

    Thermal injuries to the anterior chest in pre-pubescent girls result in breast contracture. During puberty, the breast parenchyma develops and grows underneath the scars, resulting in being flattened and disfigured. The breast mound, as well as the nipple-areolar complex, is partially or completely levelled out and displaced. The contours are unclear and the inframammary fold is effaced. This feature of the most severe breast contracture still poses a challenge for most surgeons. This type of breast contracture can be successfully eliminated with the author-suggested, improved free-skin grafting technique. The scars are excised and the shifted area of parenchyma is mobilised symmetrically to the border of the undamaged breast. Then, the shape and positioning of the breast as well as the nipple-areolar complex are reconstructed with the help of circular suturing through the fat layer on two to three breast levels. The suture ends are led beyond the wound area and are affixed with certain tension contralateral to the breast displacement. The suture ends, being in state of tension, are tied into untied knots around bolsters and are retained in place for about 3 months. During this time, the form and the positioning of the breast can be corrected using the traction of the untied sutures; the skin transplants are stabilised, under which the scar tissue is formed. Skin transplant and the scar tissue hold the shape and positioning of the breast and the sutures can be removed at this stage. In this series, 11 patients were operated upon and 13 breasts were reconstructed. Good results were achieved in all cases: the breast's shape and skin was restored and the positioning was corrected. PMID:19409709

  5. A retrospective review of burn dressings on a porcine burn model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Kravchuk, Olena; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-08-01

    This is a study to compare wound healing among three types of dressings on a porcine model with deep-dermal-partial-thickness burns. The burns in this study were from eight animal trials conducted in the past for other purposes and only burns with a uniform pale appearance that had served as controls in original experiments were selected. In total, there were 57 burns in 33 pigs, using one of following three dressings: Acticoat (Silver) (3 trials), Jelonet (Gauze) (3 trials), and Solosite Gel/Jelonet (Gel/Gauze) (2 trials). The wound healing assessments included wound re-epithelialisation during a 6-week period, clinical and histological scar assessments at week 6 after burn. Of all wound healing/scar assessments, only re-epithelialisation showed statistical difference between dressings. Earlier re-epithelialisation was observed in Gel/Gauze dressings compared to Silver and/or Gauze dressings. However, this study revealed huge variation in wound healing outcome between 3 trials within both Silver and/or Gauze dressings, supported by significant differences on re-epithelialisation, clinical and histological scar measurements. In addition, it was found that larger animals healed better than smaller ones, based on weights from 21 pigs. Of all dressings, Silver delivers the best protection for wound colonization/infection. Wound colonization/infection was found to confine wound healing and lead to thinner RND in scars. From this study, we cannot find enough evidence to suggest the beneficial effect of one dressing(s) over others on burn wound healing outcome on a porcine model with small deep-dermal-partial-thickness burns with a relative small sample size. PMID:19864074

  6. Prevention and treatment of excessive dermal scarring.

    PubMed Central

    Roseborough, Ingrid E.; Grevious, Mark A.; Lee, Raphael C.

    2004-01-01

    Today, wound management to avoid excessive scar formation is increasingly important, especially in populations with Fitzpatrick 3 or higher skin pigmentation. Medical science and industrial development are devoting more effort toward understanding and offering better therapy to control scars. However, advances in scar management have been hampered by the confusing or ambiguous terminology. There is no consensus on what amount of post-traumatic skin scar formation is "normal" and what should be considered "hypertrophic". In the World Health Organization's ICD-9, there is no diagnostic code for hypertrophic scar--only keloid is listed. Yet, the medical and scientific literature distinguishes them as different conditions. Our experience suggests that the diagnosis of keloid disease is greatly over-rendered. For black patients, an elevated scar seems, by default, diagnosed as keloid by most. This confusion results in inappropriate management of scar formation, and occasionally contributes to decision making related to elective or cosmetic surgery. Given that patients are expecting better outcomes from wound care today than in the past, this review article attempts to capture the essential biological factors related to wound scar production and discusses treatment options and indications used by the authors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:14746360

  7. Mechanoregulation of the Myofibroblast in Wound Contraction, Scarring, and Fibrosis: Opportunities for New Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Van De Water, Livingston; Varney, Scott; Tomasek, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Myofibroblasts are responsible for wound closure that occurs in healed acute wounds. However, their actions can result in disfiguring scar contractures, compromised organ function, and a tumor promoting stroma. Understanding the mechanisms regulating their contractile machinery, gene expression, and lifespan is essential to develop new therapies to control their function. Recent Advances Mechanical stress and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) regulate myofibroblast differentiation from mesenchymal progenitors. As these precursor cells differentiate, they assemble a contractile apparatus to generate the force used to contract wounds. The mechanisms by which mechanical stress promote expression of contractile genes through the TGF-β1 and serum response factor pathways and offer therapeutic targets to limit myofibroblast function are being elucidated. Critical Issues Emerging evidence suggests that the integration of mechanical cues with intracellular signaling pathways is critical to myofibroblast function via its effects on gene expression, cellular contraction, and paracrine signaling with neighboring cells. In addition, while apoptosis is clearly one pathway that can limit myofibroblast lifespan, recent data suggest that pathogenic myofibroblasts can become senescent and adopt a more beneficial phenotype, or may revert to a quiescent state, thereby limiting their function. Future Directions Given the important role that myofibroblasts play in pathologies as disparate as cutaneous scarring, organ fibrosis, and tumor progression, knowledge gained in the areas of intracellular signaling networks, mechanical signal transduction, extracellular matrix biology, and cell fate will support efforts to develop new therapies with a wide impact. PMID:24527336

  8. The incidence of burns among sex-trafficking victims in India.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nadia; Sinha, Indranil; Husain, Fatima; Shah, Ajul; Patel, Anup

    2014-09-01

    Sex trafficking remains a flagrant violation of human rights, creating many public health concerns. During the initiation period, these victims experience acts of violence including gang rapes, subjecting them to traumatic injuries that include burns. Furthermore, lack of access to health care, particularly surgical, keeps them from receiving treatment for these functionally debilitating contractures caused by burns. This piece provides an overview of burns among sex-trafficked victims in India and the efforts by Cents of Relief to address the associated surgical burden of disease. PMID:25191142

  9. The Incidence of Burns Among Sex-Trafficking Victims in India

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nadia; Sinha, Indranil; Husain, Fatima; Shah, Ajul; Patel, Anup

    2014-01-01

    Sex trafficking remains a flagrant violation of human rights, creating many public health concerns. During the initiation period, these victims experience acts of violence including gang rapes, subjecting them to traumatic injuries that include burns. Furthermore, lack of access to health care, particularly surgical, keeps them from receiving treatment for these functionally debilitating contractures caused by burns. This piece provides an overview of burns among sex-trafficked victims in India and the efforts by Cents of Relief to address the associated surgical burden of disease. PMID:25191142

  10. Collagenase treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture using a modified injection method

    PubMed Central

    Nordenskjöld, Jesper; Lauritzson, Anna; Ahlgren, Eva; Waldau, Johanna; Waldén, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture (DC) with collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) consists of injection followed by finger manipulation. We used a modified method, injecting a higher dose than recommended on the label into several parts of the cord, which allows treatment of multiple joint contractures in 1 session and may increase efficacy. We studied the occurrence of skin tears and short-term outcome with this procedure. Patients and methods We studied 164 consecutive hands with DC, palpable cord, and extension deficit of ≥ 20º in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and/or proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (mean patient age 70 years, 82% men). A hand surgeon injected all the content of 1 CCH vial (approximately 0.80 mg) into multiple spots in the cord and performed finger extension under local anesthesia after 1 or 2 days. A nurse recorded skin tears on a diagram and conducted a standard telephone follow-up within 4 weeks. A hand therapist measured joint contracture before injection and at a median of 23 (IQR: 7–34) days after finger extension. Results A skin tear occurred in 66 hands (40%). The largest diameter of the tear was ≤ 5 mm in 30 hands and > 10 mm in 14 hands. Hands with skin tear had greater mean pretreatment MCP extension deficit than those without tear: 59º (SD 26) as opposed to 32º (SD 23). Skin tear occurred in 21 of 24 hands with MCP contracture of ≥ 75º. All tears healed with open-wound treatment. No infections occurred. Mean improvement in total (MCP + PIP) extension deficit was 55º (SD 28). Interpretation Skin tears occurred in 40% of hands treated with collagenase injections, but only a fifth of them were larger than 1 cm. Tears were more likely in hands with severe MCP joint contracture. All tears healed without complications. Short-term contracture reduction was good. PMID:25695745

  11. Systemic depletion of macrophages in the subacute phase of wound healing reduces hypertrophic scar formation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Iwashina, Takashi; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic scars are caused by trauma or burn injuries to the deep dermis and can cause cosmetic disfigurement and psychological issues. Studies suggest that M2-like macrophages are pro-fibrotic and contribute to hypertrophic scar formation. A previous study from our lab showed that M2 macrophages were present in developing hypertrophic scar tissues in vivo at 3-4 weeks after wounding. In this study, the effect of systemic macrophage depletion on scar formation was explored at subacute phase of wound healing. Thirty-six athymic nude mice that received human skin transplants were randomly divided into macrophage depletion group and control group. The former received intraperitoneal injections of clodronate liposomes while the controls received sterile saline injections on day 7, 10, and 13 postgrafting. Wound area, scar thickness, collagen abundance and collagen bundle structure, mast cell infiltration, myofibroblast formation, M1, and M2 macrophages together with gene expression of M1 and M2 related factors in the grafted skin were investigated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks postgrafting. The transplanted human skin from the control group developed contracted, elevated, and thickened scars while the grafted skin from the depletion group healed with significant less contraction and elevation. Significant reductions in myofibroblast number, collagen synthesis, and hypertrophic fiber morphology as well as mast cell infiltration were observed in the depletion group compared to the control group. Macrophage depletion significantly reduced M1 and M2 macrophage number in the depletion group 2 weeks postgrafting as compared to the control group. These findings suggest that systemic macrophage depletion in subacute phase of wound healing reduces scar formation, which provides evidence for the pro-fibrotic role of macrophages in fibrosis of human skin as well as insight into the potential benefits of specifically depleting M2 macrophages in vivo. PMID:27169512

  12. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  13. Phase and Texture Characterizations of Scar Collagen Second-Harmonic Generation Images Varied with Scar Duration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guannan; Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-08-01

    This work developed a phase congruency algorithm combined with texture analysis to quantitatively characterize collagen morphology in second-harmonic generation (SHG) images from human scars. The extracted phase and texture parameters of the SHG images quantified collagen directionality, homogeneity, and coarseness in scars and varied with scar duration. Phase parameters showed an increasing tendency of the mean of phase congruency with scar duration, indicating that collagen fibers are better oriented over time. Texture parameters calculated from local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) and Haar wavelet transform, demonstrated that the LD-LBP variance decreased and the energy of all subimages increased with scar duration. It implied that collagen has a more regular pattern and becomes coarser with scar duration. In addition, the random forest regression was used to predict scar duration, demonstrating reliable performance of the extracted phase and texture parameters in characterizing collagen morphology in scar SHG images. Results indicate that the extracted parameters using the proposed method can be used as quantitative indicators to monitor scar progression with time and can help understand the mechanism of scar progression. PMID:26036282

  14. Analysis of Frequency of Use of Different Scar Assessment Scales Based on the Scar Condition and Treatment Method

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Seong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of scars in various conditions is essential, but no consensus had been reached on the scar assessment scale to select for a given condition. We reviewed papers to determine the scar assessment scale selected depending on the scar condition and treatment method. We searched PubMed for articles published since 2000 with the contents of the scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale with a Journal Citation Report impact factor >0.5. Among them, 96 articles that conducted a scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale were reviewed and analyzed. The scar assessment scales were identified and organized by various criteria. Among the types of scar assessment scales, the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was found to be the most frequently used scale. As for the assessment of newly developed operative scars, the POSAS was most used. Meanwhile, for categories depending on the treatment methods for preexisting scars, the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was used in 6 studies following a laser treatment, the POSAS was used in 7 studies following surgical treatment, and the POSAS was used in 7 studies following a conservative treatment. Within the 12 categories of scar status, the VSS showed the highest frequency in 6 categories and the POSAS showed the highest frequency in the other 6 categories. According to our reviews, the POSAS and VSS are the most frequently used scar assessment scales. In the future, an optimal, universal scar scoring system is needed in order to better evaluate and treat pathologic scarring. PMID:24665417

  15. Forest Fire Burned Biomass Estimation Using Satellite Images and Reference Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xianlin; Zu, Xiaofeng; Deng, Guang; Li, Zengyuan; Zhang, Zihui; Casanova, J. L. Sanz, Julia; Salvador, Pablo

    2014-11-01

    Vegetation biomass burning has been identified as a significant source of aerosols, carbon fluxes, and trace gases, which pollute the atmosphere and contribute to radiative forcing responsible for global climate change. To estimate the total biomass burned by forest fire using satellite images in Dragon 3, basing on the fuel load from reference data,the combustion factor getting from fieldwork at the sub-compartment level, and the results of burned scar mapping by using HJ-1A CCD and the monthly MODIS burned production datasets (MCD45A1), the biomass burned of the selected experiment area has been estimated by combining these data. The result showed that the accuracy of the biomass burned estimation mainly was affected by the accuracy of burned scar edge using the spatial resolution of satellite data.

  16. Scar State on Time-evolving Wavepacket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, Mitsuyoshi; Tsuyuki, Hiroyoshi; Kawamura, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Shoichi; Heller, Eric J.

    2015-09-01

    The scar-like enhancement is found in the accumulation of the time-evolving wavepacket in stadium billiard. It appears close to unstable periodic orbits, when the wavepackets are launched along the orbits. The enhancement is essentially due to the same mechanism of the well-known scar states in stationary eigenstates. The weighted spectral function reveals that the enhancement is the pileup of contributions from scar states on the same periodic orbit. The availavility of the weighted spectrum to the semiclassical approximation is also disscussed.

  17. Unexplained Facial Scar: Child Abuse or Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Shapouri, Javad; Masjedi, Mohsen; Saffaei, Ali; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Context: Child abuse is a serious problem, and its physical manifestations can be mimicked by certain diseases and conditions. These conditions can include genetic, congenital and other disorders that may result in poor weight gain, bone fractures or skin lesions that look like bruises or burns. Case Report: This paper reports the case of a seven-year-old girl with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), which was misdiagnosed as child abuse. This child was referred to us for treatment of an unexplained facial scar that was alleged to be the result of child abuse. Conclusion: When unusual skin presentations are observed, dermatologists should consider the possibility of child abuse to protect the child. Furthermore, they should be aware of the cutaneous abnormalities that mimic injuries associated with abuse to avoid the unnecessary reporting of child abuse. PMID:25535610

  18. Pressure therapy for hypertrophic scarrings: preliminary communication1

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J C; Druett, J E; Hodgson, B; Druett, Jane

    1980-01-01

    A six-point programme for the prevention and pressure therapy of hypertrophic scarring started in 1975 at Odstock Hospital. The work reported here includes a pressure calibration of batches of the material chosen for pressure bandaging; a pressure study of the bandages on volunteers' limbs; and the formation of a pressure therapy clinic. The clinic results were similar to those reported by Thomson (1974) and were considered sufficiently favourable to justify continuing the clinic and instituting a policy of close review and early therapy for all burns patients. The programme proved the accuracy of the pressure sensor and attempted to develop an objective method of recording progress. Arguments for pressure versus occlusion as the therapeutic agent are discussed and supported by a case report. It is suggested that a controlled trial of pressure therapy should be carried out. PMID:7241460

  19. Proceedings of the SCAR Conference, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) team analyzed six major topics: (1) aerodynamics, (2) stability and control, (3) propulsion, (4) environmental factor, (5) airframe structures and materials, and (6) design integration.

  20. SCAR-B UWC131A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-19

    ... SCAR-B Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Field Campaigns Radiation Budget Aerosols ... Droplet Concentration Effective Droplet Radius Liquid Water Content Nitrogen Oxides Ozone (O3) Particle Number Concentration ...

  1. The semiclassical limit of scar intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergini, Eduardo G.

    2015-04-01

    By using a simple statistical model we find the distribution of scar intensities surviving the semiclassical limit. The obtained distribution is verified in a wide energy range of the quantum Bunimovich stadium billiard.

  2. SCAR-A Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-19

    ... (SCAR-A) data include physical and chemical components of the Earth's surface, the atmosphere and the radiation field collected in the eastern part of the United States with an emphasis in air pollution. Discipline:  ...

  3. Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Pinto, Joseph P.

    1993-01-01

    Biomass burning may be the overwhelming regional or continental-scale source of methane (CH4) as in tropical Africa and a significant global source of CH4. Our best estimate of present methane emissions from biomass burning is about 51.9 Tg/yr, or 10% of the annual methane emissions to the atmosphere. Increased frequency of fires that may result as the Earth warms up may result in increases in this source of atmospheric methane.

  4. Idiopathic Bilateral Gluteus Maximus Contracture in Adolescent Female: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Abhishek; Shukla, Jiten

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Bilateral gluteus muscle contracture is a rare entity. “Idiopathic contracture of gluteus maximus” a term proposed by Gao is a rare condition. It present as typical complain of inability to squat with patient assuming a typical frog leg position. Case Report: We report a case of idiopathic gluteal muscle contracture in adolescent female presenting with inability to squat, sit cross legged and painless awkward gait. The patient could not sit comfortably except in a high chair position. No history of repeated intramuscular injections in the buttocks or signs suggestive of post-polio residual paralysis. All her investigations were within normal limit. Our patient belonged to type III according to GMC classification and underwent surgical release of fibrotic band of gluteal maximus muscle. Patient had remarkable recovery with patient able to squat and sit cross-legged within 4 weeks of surgery. Conclusion: Gluteal maximus contracture, though rare, present with characteristic clinical symptom and should not be missed. Our patient though presented late showed excellent result after surgical release. PMID:27298891

  5. Evaluating the accuracy of a MODIS direct broadcast algorithm for mapping burned areas over Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, A.; Hao, W. M.; Nordgren, B.; Corley, R.; Urbanski, S. P.; Ponomarev, E. I.

    2012-12-01

    Emission inventories for open area biomass burning rely on burned area estimates as a key component. We have developed an automated algorithm based on MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument data for estimating burned area from biomass fires. The algorithm is based on active fire detections, burn scars from MODIS calibrated radiances (MOD02HKM), and MODIS land cover classification (MOD12Q1). Our burned area product combines active fires and burn scar detections using spatio-temporal criteria, and has a resolution of 500 x 500 meters. The algorithm has been used for smoke emission estimates over the western United States. We will present the assessed accuracy of our algorithm in different regions of Russia with intense wildfire activity by comparing our results with the burned area product from the Sukachev Institute of Forest (SIF) of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, as well as burn scars extracted from Landsat imagery. Landsat burned area extraction was based on threshold classification using the Jenks Natural Breaks algorithm to the histogram for each singe scene Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) image. The final evaluation consisted of a grid-based approach, where the burned area in each 3 km x 3 km grid cell was calculated and compared with the other two sources. A comparison between our burned area estimates and those from SIF showed strong correlation (R2=0.978), although our estimate is approximately 40% lower than the SIF burned areas. The linear fit between the burned area from Landsat scenes and our MODIS algorithm over 18,754 grid cells resulted with a slope of 0.998 and R2=0.7, indicating that our algorithm is suitable for mapping burned areas for fires in boreal forests and other ecosystems. The results of our burned area algorithm will be used for estimating emissions of trace gasses and aerosol particles (including black carbon) from biomass burning in Northern Eurasia for the period of 2002-2011.

  6. Do postsurgical interventions optimize ultimate scar cosmesis.

    PubMed

    Viera, M H; Amini, S; Konda, S; Berman, B

    2009-06-01

    Keloids and other scars are different manifestations of the normal wound healing process. If located in visible areas, scars may have a psychological impact that could affect the quality of life of the scar-bearing population. Good preoperatory planning including hiding incisions in natural anatomical landmarks or placing them parallel to relaxed skin tension lines are among the techniques used to improve the cosmesis of scars. Once a prominent or noticeable scar has developed, multiple therapeutic modalities can be applied including surgical excision, although high recurrence rates precludes its use as monotherapy. Several advanced surgical correction techniques including Z-plasty and W-plasty may be useful in repositioning scars. Other modalities that have been reported to improve scar cosmesis include cryosurgery, radiotherapy, lasers, and skin substitute grafts. Adjuvant postsurgical treatment modalities have reduced dramatically the recurrence rates associated with the removal of the scar. In this review of the literature the authors discuss evidence based data related to the abovementioned modalities and other topical and intralesional therapies including occlusion, compression, silicone, corticosteroids, interferons, imiquimod, resiquimod, tacrolimus, 5-fluorouracil, retinoids, as well as the role of several over-the-counter agents such as onion extract, vitamin E and the combination of hydrocortisone, vitamin E and silicone. Finally, they address newer modalities including vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, transforming growth factor-3, interleukin-10, mannose-6-phosphate, UVA-1, narrowband UVB, intense pulsed light and photodynamic therapy. Ultimately, the decision of choosing the most appropriate postexcisional management treatment should be taken by physicians on a case-by-case basis in order to obtain the best cosmetically acceptable results. PMID:19528906

  7. Frequency of placenta previa in previously scarred and non scarred uterus

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Tayyaba; Waheed, Fatima; Mahmood, Zahid; Saba, Kanwal; Mahmood, Hamis; Bukhari, Mulazim Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of placenta Previa in patients coming to a tertiary care unit with previously scarred and non-scarred uterus. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried on 114 cases who underwent caesarean sections (37 cases out of 645 cases with non scarred uterus and 77 cases from 721 cases with scarred uterus) in the department of obstetrics and gynecology Lady Willingdon Hospital from January 2008– December 2011. Results: Most patients (47.36%) were between 26-30 years age group, presented with gestational age between 36-40 weeks (70.17%), were mostly G2-4, while frequency of placenta Previa in non-scarred uterus was 32.45% (37 cases), and frequency in previously scarred uterus was 67.54% (77 cases). Major degree Previa was found in 88 cases (77.19%). There were 5.70% cases of placenta Previa from non-scarred uteruses and 10.67% cases of placenta Previa (10.67%) from already scarred uteruses. Stratification revealed a higher trend of the morbidity with the increase in number of previous caesarean sections. Conclusion: A significantly higher frequency of placenta Previa was found among patients coming to a tertiary care hospital with previously scarred uterus. PMID:26101491

  8. Outcomes of a shoulder treatment flowchart in patients with axillary burns.

    PubMed

    Webb, Darren C; Byrne, Martin; Kolmus, Alison; Law, Henrietta Y; Holland, Anne E; Cleland, Heather

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a structured shoulder treatment flowchart on range of motion (ROM) and function of the upper limb in patients at high and low risk of contracture after an axillary burn injury. Consecutive patients with axillary burns were managed according to a structured pathway based on risk of contracture. Those patients with deep partial- or full-thickness burns to more than one area of the axilla or requiring more than one split skin graft were classified as high risk; these patients underwent a more aggressive approach to splinting and exercise. Measurements of shoulder ROM and functional ability (upper extremity functional index) were made at admission, hospital discharge, and at 12 weeks postdischarge. Twenty patients (19 men) with an average age of 39 years and a median TBSA of 20% were recruited. Median length of stay was 18 days. Ten patients were classified as high risk. Both low-risk and high-risk patients showed good range of movement outcomes at discharge and 12 weeks, with no significant differences between risk groups (abduction at 12 weeks, mean [SD]: 168° [22°] vs 166° [28°], P = .60; flexion at 12 weeks, mean [SD]: 172° [20°] vs 167° [31°], P = .60, respectively). There were no differences in functional outcomes at 12 weeks postdischarge. Use of a shoulder treatment pathway was associated with good shoulder ROM and functional capacity in patients at high and low risk of axillary contracture. PMID:21336045

  9. Treatment of severe burn with DermACELL®, an acellular dermal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Wang, Chih-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    For treatment of skin burn injuries, there exist several methods of treatment related to tissue regeneration, including the use of autograft skin and cryopreserved skin. However, each method has drawbacks. An alternative method for tissue regeneration is allograft acellular dermal matrix, with potential as a biocompatible scaffold for new tissue growth. One recently produced material of this type is DermACELL®, which was used in this case presentation for treating a scar resulting from second- and third-degree burns in a 33-year-old female patient. The patient presented with significant hypertrophic scarring from the elbow to the hand and with limited wrist and elbow motion. The scarring was removed, and the patient was treated with a 1:3 mesh of DermACELL. The wound was resurfaced with a split thickness skin graft, and postoperative care included application of pressure garment and silicone sheet, as well as range of motion exercise and massage. At 30 days after DermACELL application, the wound appeared well-healed with little scar formation. At 180 days post-application, the wound continued to appear healed well without significant scar formation. Additionally, the wound was supple, and the patient experienced significant improvement in range of motion. In the case presented, DermACELL appears to have been a successful method of treatment for scarring due to severe burns by preventing further scar formation and improving range of motion. PMID:23071908

  10. Facial scars after a road accident: combined treatment with PDL and Q-switched ND:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andrea; Trindade, Felicidade; Leite, Luiz

    2008-09-01

    We report the case of a woman who presented with several facial scars following a road accident. Treatment was carried out using combined laser treatment with pulsed dye laser (PDL) and the Q-switched neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser (QS Nd:YAG laser). No side effects or complications from treatment were noted or reported. The patient had very good cosmetic results with this combined technique. A variety of facial scars--erythematous, pigmented, atrophic and hypertrophic--may occur as a result of trauma, surgery, burns and skin disease. Surgery with other adjunctive methods including radiotherapy, intralesional steroids and pressure therapy has shown variable results. Laser treatment has been attempted for scar revision since the 1980s. The PDL is the optimal treatment for reducing scar bulk and symptoms. It also decreases the erythema and telangiectasia associated with scars, normalizes the skin surface texture and improves scar pliability. The QS Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is highly effective for traumatic tattoo removal, resulting in complete clearance in the majority of cases. PMID:18608707