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Sample records for burn scar contracture

  1. Management of difficult pediatric facial burns: reconstruction of burn-related lower eyelid ectropion and perioral contractures.

    PubMed

    Egeland, Brent; More, Sunita; Buchman, Steven R; Cederna, Paul S

    2008-07-01

    Despite significant burn treatment advances, modern multidisciplinary care, and improved survival after burns, facial burn scars remain clinically challenging. Achieving a successful reconstruction requires a comprehensive approach, entailing many advanced techniques with an emphasis on preserving function and balancing intricate aesthetic requirements. Pediatric facial burns present the same reconstructive challenges seen in adults, with additional developmental and psychologic concerns. In this paper, we describe the basic principals of facial burn care in the pediatric burn population, with a specific focus on lower-eyelid burn ectropion and oral commissure burn scar contracture leading to microstomia. Several cases are demonstrated. PMID:18650718

  2. Surgical management of burn flexion and extension contractures of the toes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jessica B; Kung, Theodore A; Levi, Benjamin; Irwin, Todd; Kadakia, Anish; Cederna, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    Burn contracture of the toes is a devastating sequela of thermal injury to the foot. Without proper treatment of toe burn contractures, patients suffer from significant functional and social limitations, including difficulties with activities of daily living. The authors classify the severity of toe burn scar contractures (TBSCs) by considering important characteristics of the deformity and tailor definitive surgical treatment based on the individual needs of the patient's condition. A retrospective review was performed on 20 patients who underwent a total of 32 reconstructive operations involving 275 TBSC procedures from 2000 to 2010. Multiple clinical, functional, and anatomic criteria were used to describe each patient's contracture as mild, moderate, or severe. Mild TBSC involved scarring of the superficial tissues only with no functional impairment; these were treated with scar release or local tissue rearrangement. Moderate TBSC involved soft tissue shortages requiring skin grafts and occasional closed joint capsulotomy. Severe TBSC caused the greatest impairment in function and involved burn injury to deeper structures. For these difficult contractures, a patient-specific technique was paramount to optimal reconstruction. There were six, three, and 11 patients with mild, moderate, and severe TBSC, respectively. The mean number of primary procedures per toe increased with increasing burn complexity from 1.1 procedures for mild, 1.5 for moderate, and 1.8 for severe groups, with severe TBSC undergoing more primary procedures overall (13.7 in severe vs 2.8 in mild TBSC). Complication rates per toe were highest for severe TBSC (59.0%). Only severe TBSC received secondary operations, and overall contracture recurrence was 35%. An individualized surgical approach based on TBSC severity is recommended for addressing burn contracture of the toes. Careful analysis of the clinical, functional, and anatomic characteristics of the burned foot determines the severity of each toe contracture and dictates the interventions necessary for reconstruction. PMID:24390110

  3. Postburn neck anterior contracture treatment in children with scar-fascial local trapezoid flaps: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M; Grishkevich, Max; Menzul, Vasiliy

    2015-01-01

    One of the dramatic consequences of burns is scar contracture and deformities of the neck. Cervical contracture in children is especially dangerous, leading to face disfigurement and kyphosis; therefore, early reconstruction is indicated. Despite the existence of many various surgical techniques, the successful neck contracture treatment in pediatric patients remains a challenge for surgeons. Eleven children (aged 5 to 14 years) with postburn neck anterior contractures were studied to develop a new approach for reconstruction that would employ the use of local scar-fascial flaps. The new approach and technique for postburn pediatric contracture treatment was developed which is especially effective in the treatment of children who cannot undergo complex and long surgical procedures that are aimed at both contracture elimination and neck skin restoration. The technique consists of two trapezoid scar-fascial flaps mobilization which includes all the anterior neck surfaces and consists of scars, fat layer, platysma, and deep cervical fascia. Counter transposition of flaps with tension elongated neck anterior surface was 100 to 200%. The contracture was fully eliminated, and neck contours, mentocervical angle, and head movement were restored. In case of severe contracture, residual wound in submandibular region and above clavicles were skin-grafted. The full range of head motion (functional results) was achieved in all the 11 patients. The flaps continued to grow and the skin grafts shrinkage was moderate. Local trapeze-flap plasty allows neck contracture elimination in children in the cases when a more complex technique is impossible or undesirable to use. Early surgical intervention prevents secondary complications, allotting enough time for patients to mature and be ready for more complex procedures. PMID:25522154

  4. Management of neck contractures by single-stage dermal substitutes and skin grafting in extensive burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Kook; Kym, Dohern

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Severe neck contracture is a problem that must be resolved by priority. We consider the best contracture treatment to be the full-thickness skin graft. However, clinicians often encounter patients, especially extensive burn patients, who have insufficient donor sites for the full-thickness skin graft. We treated extensive burn patients with neck scar contractures with a split-thickness skin graft (STSG) combined with dermal substitutes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of neck contracture treatment in extensive burn patients performing STSG with dermal substitutes as adjuvant treatment. Methods We analyzed the retrospective clinical and photographic records of 28 patients with severe neck contracture who were admitted to Hallym University Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul, Korea, from January 2012 to December 2012. We performed STSG in combination with dermal substitutes to minimize the degree of contracture. Results The overall take rate of skin to dermal substitutes was 95.9%, and no grafts failed to affect recontracture except in one patient with a partial loss of artificial dermis who underwent a follow-up skin graft without any problems. Excellent/good outcomes were shown in 27 out of 28 patients. Conclusion In extensive burn patients, skin grafting in combination with dermal substitutes can be an alternative to STSG alone for contracture release. PMID:25368851

  5. Airway management in patients with burn contractures of the neck.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Smita; Mullick, Parul

    2015-12-01

    Airway management of patients with burn contracture of the neck (PBC neck) is a challenge to the anesthesiologist. Patient evaluation includes history, physical and airway examination. A safe approach in the airway management of a patient with moderate to severe PBC neck is to secure the airway with the patient awake. The anesthesiologist should have a pre-planned strategy for intubation of the difficult airway. The choices advocated for airway management of such patients include awake fiberoptic-guided intubation, use of intubating laryngeal mask airway, intubation without neuromuscular blocking agents, intubation with neuromuscular blocking agents after testing the ability to ventilate by mask, pre-induction neck scar release under local anesthesia and ketamine or sedation followed by direct laryngoscopy and intubation and video-laryngoscope guided intubation, amongst others. Preparation of the patient includes an explanation of the proposed procedure, sedation, administration of antisialogogues and regional anesthesia of the airway. The various options for intubation of patients with PBC neck, intraoperative concerns and safe extubation are described. Back-up plans, airway rescue strategies and a review of literature on this subject are presented. PMID:25868969

  6. Management of complex pediatric burn scars in a humanitarian collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Bassetto, F.; Staffieri, A.; Reho, F.; Facchin, F.; Shehata, J.; Maged, D.; Tiengo, C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burn scars still represent a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Their management requires a specific expertise and set up involving the possibility of long term rehabilitation and follow up. Cases encountered in humanitarian missions present additional issues. Often the local environment is not suitable for an appropriate treatment plan, requiring the case to be transferred to a foreign country for surgical care as part of an integrated international and multidisciplinary management. We present the case of a three year-old patient injured in a bomb explosion during the Arab Spring and suffering from severe scar contracture limiting thoracic and upper limb movement. After initial consultation at distance, transfer to our country was organized and an intensive surgical and rehabilitative program was carried out over three months. After five months, the patient returned to his home country where a supportive network had been set up for continued rehabilitation, ensuring follow up for over a year and ultimate success.

  7. Linear Hand Burn Contracture Release under Local Anesthesia without Tourniquet.

    PubMed

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O H; Koswara, Astrid F

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to present a case of hand burn linear contracture release performed under local anesthesia. It also introduces the one-per-mil tumescent solution consisted of 0.2% lidocaine and 1:1.000.000 epinephrine as a local anesthesia formula, which has the potential of providing adequate anesthesia as well as hemostatic effect during surgery of the hand without tourniquet. The surgery was performed on a 19 year-old male patient with multiple thumb and fingers flexion linear contracture for 105 minutes without any obstacle. The patient did not complain any pain and discomfort during the procedure; while bloodless operative field was successfully achieved. At four-month follow up, the patient could fully extend his thumb, middle and ring finger, while the index was limited by 10° at the DIP joint. Overall, the patient was satisfied with the outcome. PMID:26388018

  8. A novel immune competent murine hypertrophic scar contracture model: A tool to elucidate disease mechanism and develop new therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Magdy; Bond, Jennifer; Bergeron, Andrew; Miller, Kyle J; Ehanire, Tosan; Quiles, Carlos; Lorden, Elizabeth R; Medina, Manuel A; Fisher, Mark; Klitzman, Bruce; Selim, M Angelica; Leong, Kam W; Levinson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) contraction following burn injury causes contractures. Contractures are painful and disfiguring. Current therapies are marginally effective. To study pathogenesis and develop new therapies, a murine model is needed. We have created a validated immune-competent murine HSc model. A third-degree burn was created on dorsum of C57BL/6 mice. Three days postburn, tissue was excised and grafted with ear skin. Graft contraction was analyzed and tissue harvested on different time points. Outcomes were compared with human condition to validate the model. To confirm graft survival, green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice were used, and histologic analysis was performed to differentiate between ear and back skin. Role of panniculus carnosus in contraction was analyzed. Cellularity was assessed with 4?,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Collagen maturation was assessed with Picro-sirius red. Mast cells were stained with Toluidine blue. Macrophages were detected with F4/80 immune. Vascularity was assessed with CD31 immune. RNA for contractile proteins was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Elastic moduli of skin and scar tissue were analyzed using a microstrain analyzer. Grafts contracted to ?45% of their original size by day 14 and maintained their size. Grafting of GFP mouse skin onto wild-type mice, and analysis of dermal thickness and hair follicle density, confirmed graft survival. Interestingly, hair follicles disappeared after grafting and regenerated in ear skin configuration by day 30. Radiological analysis revealed that panniculus carnosus doesn't contribute to contraction. Microscopic analyses showed that grafts show increase in cellularity. Granulation tissue formed after day 3. Collagen analysis revealed increases in collagen maturation over time. CD31 stain revealed increased vascularity. Macrophages and mast cells were increased. qRT-PCR showed up-regulation of transforming growth factor beta, alpha smooth muscle actin, and rho-associated protein kinase 2 in HSc. Tensile testing revealed that human skin and scar tissues are tougher than mouse skin and scar tissues. PMID:25327261

  9. Burn Scar Near the Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) image pair shows 'before and after' views of the area around the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Washington. On June 27, 2000, a fire in the dry sagebrush was sparked by an automobile crash. The flames were fanned by hot summer winds. By the day after the accident, about 100,000 acres had burned, and the fire's spread forced the closure of highways and loss of homes. These images were obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Compare the area just above and to the right of the line of cumulus clouds in the May 15 image with the same area imaged on August 3. The darkened burn scar measures approximately 35 kilometers across. The Columbia River is seen wending its way around Hanford. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/JPL, MISR Science Team

  10. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  11. A simple and effective procedure for treating burn contractures: releasing incision and quadra Z technique.

    PubMed

    Sen, Cenk; Karacalar, Ahmet; Agir, Hakan; Dinar, Serkan; Isil, Eda; Iscen, Deniz

    2007-03-01

    Burn contractures particularly involving the joints are challenging problems which might cause severe functional impairments. Many surgical techniques have been described for use, however, an ideal method yet to be found. Releasing incision is the most common and effective way to release the wide and severe contractures but it has some drawbacks. We propose a releasing incision technique combined with four Z plasty incisions to overcome the disadvantages of traditional releasing incision technique. We successfully used our releasing incision and quadra Z technique on seven consecutive patients with burn contractures between 2003 and 2005. We modified the classical releasing incision technique by adding four Z plasties; two of them with a common base on each corner of the incision line. In this technique, limitation of the webbing following the incision is made possible by the transposed flaps and unnecessary lateral extension of the incision and the defect was avoided, i.e. maximum release gain with minimal defect was provided. Satisfactory results were achieved in seven patients treated with this technique due to significant burn contractures between 2003 and 2005 with no significant complication. We propose this technique is suitable in all patients with severe burn contractures who require releasing incision and grafting. PMID:17118561

  12. Hypertrophic scar contracture is mediated by the TRPC3 mechanical force transducer via NFkB activation

    PubMed Central

    Ishise, Hisako; Larson, Barrett; Hirata, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Nishimoto, Soh; Kubo, Tateki; Matsuda, Ken; Kanazawa, Shigeyuki; Sotsuka, Yohei; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Kakibuchi, Masao; Kawai, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing process is a complex and highly orchestrated process that ultimately results in the formation of scar tissue. Hypertrophic scar contracture is considered to be a pathologic and exaggerated wound healing response that is known to be triggered by repetitive mechanical forces. We now show that Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) C3 regulates the expression of fibronectin, a key regulatory molecule involved in the wound healing process, in response to mechanical strain via the NFkB pathway. TRPC3 is highly expressed in human hypertrophic scar tissue and mechanical stimuli are known to upregulate TRPC3 expression in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. TRPC3 overexpressing fibroblasts subjected to repetitive stretching forces showed robust expression levels of fibronectin. Furthermore, mechanical stretching of TRPC3 overexpressing fibroblasts induced the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF?B), a regulator fibronectin expression, which was able to be attenuated by pharmacologic blockade of either TRPC3 or NF?B. Finally, transplantation of TRPC3 overexpressing fibroblasts into mice promoted wound contraction and increased fibronectin levels in vivo. These observations demonstrate that mechanical stretching drives fibronectin expression via the TRPC3-NFkB axis, leading to intractable wound contracture. This model explains how mechanical strain on cutaneous wounds might contribute to pathologic scarring. PMID:26108359

  13. Hypertrophic scar contracture is mediated by the TRPC3 mechanical force transducer via NFkB activation.

    PubMed

    Ishise, Hisako; Larson, Barrett; Hirata, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Nishimoto, Soh; Kubo, Tateki; Matsuda, Ken; Kanazawa, Shigeyuki; Sotsuka, Yohei; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Kakibuchi, Masao; Kawai, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing process is a complex and highly orchestrated process that ultimately results in the formation of scar tissue. Hypertrophic scar contracture is considered to be a pathologic and exaggerated wound healing response that is known to be triggered by repetitive mechanical forces. We now show that Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) C3 regulates the expression of fibronectin, a key regulatory molecule involved in the wound healing process, in response to mechanical strain via the NFkB pathway. TRPC3 is highly expressed in human hypertrophic scar tissue and mechanical stimuli are known to upregulate TRPC3 expression in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. TRPC3 overexpressing fibroblasts subjected to repetitive stretching forces showed robust expression levels of fibronectin. Furthermore, mechanical stretching of TRPC3 overexpressing fibroblasts induced the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF?B), a regulator fibronectin expression, which was able to be attenuated by pharmacologic blockade of either TRPC3 or NF?B. Finally, transplantation of TRPC3 overexpressing fibroblasts into mice promoted wound contraction and increased fibronectin levels in vivo. These observations demonstrate that mechanical stretching drives fibronectin expression via the TRPC3-NFkB axis, leading to intractable wound contracture. This model explains how mechanical strain on cutaneous wounds might contribute to pathologic scarring. PMID:26108359

  14. Postburn Neck Lateral Contracture Anatomy and Treatment: A New Approach.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M; Grishkevich, Max

    2015-01-01

    Lateral contracture of the neck is a rare and insufficiently researched burn consequent. Contracture restricts head motion, can cause a secondary face deformity, presents severe cosmetic defects, and, therefore, requires surgical reconstruction. Literature does not sufficiently address the issue; therefore, anatomy not researched and treatment techniques not developed. The anatomy of postburn lateral cervical flexion contracture was studied in 21 operated patients. Using obtained data, new approaches were investigated, which were directed toward maximal efficacy of the local tissues use. Follow-up results were observed from 6 months to 9 years. Lateral cervical contractures were divided into two types based on their anatomy: edge and medial. Edge contractures were caused by burns and scars located on the posterior neck surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold in central lateral zone. In the fold, only one (posterior) sheet is scars that cause the contracture. Medial contractures were caused by scars located on the lateral cervical surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold in which both sheets were scars. In both types, contracture was caused by scar sheet surface deficiency in length, which has a trapezoid form (contracture cause). In all cases, there was surface surplus in the fold's sheets allowed contracture release with local tissue. The technique that allows the maximum local tissue use and ensures full contracture elimination is the trapeze-flap plasty. Two anatomic types of lateral cervical scar contractures were identified: edge and medial. An anatomically justified efficacy reconstructive technique for both types is trapeze-flap plasty. PMID:25501780

  15. Free thin anterolateral thigh flap for post-burn neck contractures - a functional and aesthetic solution

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, A.; Raghavendra, S.; Jeelani Naiyer, M.G.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dutta, G.; Bain, J.; Asha, J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neck contractures after burn injuries produce restrictions in motion and unacceptable aesthetic outcomes. Although different methods of reconstruction have been used in the treatment of this ailment, a limited and unsatisfactory outcome often results. Free thin anterolateral flaps have been found to be a good single stage option for reconstruction of post-burn contractures of the neck. In our study, 11 patients with post flame burn contractures of the neck underwent surgical release and coverage by a free thin anterolateral thigh flap. Patients were followed up for an average of five years and various aspects of functional and aesthetic rehabilitation were assessed. Our findings revealed that the free thin anterolateral flaps covered the defects over anterior and lateral aspects of the neck with good colour match and contour. Furthermore, none of the flaps had any significant early or delayed complications. Two cases had to be reoperated for partial loss of flaps and all patients were satisfied with functional and aesthetic outcomes. We therefore consider free thin anterolateral thigh flaps to provide a good single stage reconstruction for post-burn cervical contractures with good functional and aesthetic outcomes. PMID:26336369

  16. Free thin anterolateral thigh flap for post-burn neck contractures - a functional and aesthetic solution.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, A; Raghavendra, S; Jeelani Naiyer, M G; Bhattacharya, D; Dutta, G; Bain, J; Asha, J

    2014-12-31

    Neck contractures after burn injuries produce restrictions in motion and unacceptable aesthetic outcomes. Although different methods of reconstruction have been used in the treatment of this ailment, a limited and unsatisfactory outcome often results. Free thin anterolateral flaps have been found to be a good single stage option for reconstruction of post-burn contractures of the neck. In our study, 11 patients with post flame burn contractures of the neck underwent surgical release and coverage by a free thin anterolateral thigh flap. Patients were followed up for an average of five years and various aspects of functional and aesthetic rehabilitation were assessed. Our findings revealed that the free thin anterolateral flaps covered the defects over anterior and lateral aspects of the neck with good colour match and contour. Furthermore, none of the flaps had any significant early or delayed complications. Two cases had to be reoperated for partial loss of flaps and all patients were satisfied with functional and aesthetic outcomes. We therefore consider free thin anterolateral thigh flaps to provide a good single stage reconstruction for post-burn cervical contractures with good functional and aesthetic outcomes. PMID:26336369

  17. Drought and Burn Scars in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    More than 2 million acres were consumed by hundreds of fires between December 2002 and February 2003 in southeastern Australia's national parks, forests, foothills and city suburbs. These images were acquired on February 14, 2002 (left) and February 17, 2003 (right) by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite. The year 2002 was one of Australia's hottest and driest on record, and the acreage burnt during the summer 2002-2003 fire season in Victoria, the Australian Capital Territory and southern New South Wales, is the largest since 1938-1939, when more than 3 million acres were scorched.

    The extent of the burnt area and the dry conditions as of February 2003 are indicated by these contrasting false-color views. Both image panels display data from the near-infrared, red and blue spectral bands of MISR's downward-viewing (nadir) camera, as red, green and blue, respectively. This display technique causes healthy vegetation to appear red and burnt areas to show as dark brown. The data displayed from the two dates were processed identically to preserve relative brightness variations. Vegetation changes related to the dry conditions (not related to the brown burn scars) are also indicated in the February 2003 panel, where many previously red areas exhibit instead the pale yellow-brown of the underlying soils and geology. Significant reduction in the surface area of several large and important water bodies are also apparent. The diminished extent of Lake Hume (along the left-hand edge) in the later date provides a good example.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 14999 and 16858. The panels cover an area of about 208 kilometers x 286 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 118 to 121 within World Reference System-2 path 91.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory,Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  18. Bipedicled “Superthin” Free Perforator Flaps for Facial Burn Scar Reconstruction: Expanded Scope of Superthin Flaps: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Van Anh, Tran; Tien, Nguyen Gia; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Superthin flap” is a distinctively thin flap that is thinned primarily to the point that the subdermal vascular network can be seen through a minimal fat layer. Reconstruction of severely disfigured neck and face can be performed using the occipito-cervico-dorsal superthin flap that is harvested from the dorsal region and supercharged by the circumflex scapular vessels. We used bipedicled superthin free perforator flaps to reconstruct scar contractures on half of the face, whole face, or the whole chin-neck area in 17 postburn patients. Methods: This case series report includes all 17 cases. Flaps in the dorsal area were designed. In all cases, one pedicle consisted of the circumflex scapular vessels. In 11, 5, and 1 flaps, the second pedicle consisted of contralateral posterior intercostal perforators (type 1), ipsilateral posterior intercostal perforators (type 2), and ipsilateral circumflex scapular vessels (type 3), respectively. Four patients underwent whole-face reconstruction after acid burn with type 1 or type 3 perforator. The recipient vessels were the superficial temporal vessels and contralateral or ipsilateral facial vessels. Intraoperatively, all adipose tissue in the flap, including between the 2 pedicles, was thinned by scissors before the pedicles were detached from the donor sites. Maximum flap size was 35?×?15?cm. Donor sites were covered by a split full-thickness skin graft. Flap survival and functional and cosmetic results were assessed retrospectively. Results: Fifteen of the 17 flaps survived completely. Two developed partial necrosis due to perforator thrombosis. Some patients developed hypertrophic scars around the flap, but these improved naturally over time. All patients were satisfied with both the cosmetic and functional outcomes of the reconstruction. Conclusion: Bipedicled superthin free perforator flaps may be an excellent choice for reconstruction of severe neck scar contracture. This report expands the scope of previously used “superthin flaps.” PMID:26495206

  19. Is 20 years of immobilization, not sufficient to render metacarpophalangeal joints completely useless?--Correction of a 20-year old post-burn palmar contracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saraiya, H

    2001-03-01

    This report presents a case of post-burn palmar contracture with flexion contracture of thumb of 20-year duration. The contracture was released and the raw area was covered with split thickness skin graft. Only one 'K' wire in soft tissue was needed to keep all the fingers straight and immobilized, suggestive of intermetacarpal ligamentous contracture. A static night splint was given to maintain the correction. Complete range of movement was achieved in a month with the combination of dynamic splinting and physiotherapy. It was interesting to note that even 20 years of contracted position did not render the metacarpophalangeal joints completely stiff and useless. Probable reasons are discussed. PMID:11226662

  20. Paediatric post-burn scar management in the UK: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Liuzzi, Francesca; Chadwick, Sarah; Shah, Mamta

    2015-03-01

    Thermal injuries affect 250,000 people annually in the United Kingdom. As burn survival improves, good scar management is paramount to help individuals living with the resultant scars lead a life without restrictions. Post-burn hypertrophic scars can limit growth in children, interfere with function and cause psychological problems. In the current literature there is great variation in post-burn scar management across the world and in the evidence available for the efficacy of these management modalities. The aim of this study was to investigate the variances if any, in the management of post-burn scarring in children across the UK. A telephone survey of UK paediatric burn services was conducted to obtain information on post-burn scar management and advice given to patients/carers. Of the 19 burn services that participated, all advised moisturising of scars but with variable emphasis on massaging. Silicones and pressure therapy were used by 18 services but commencement of use varied from soon after healing to onset of hypertrophic scarring. Laser therapy, ultrasound therapy and steroid therapy were used sporadically. This study highlights the common modalities of post-burn scar management in children across the UK. However, there is marked variation in timing and selection of the commonly used modalities. Although this study did not investigate the outcomes of scar management, it clearly identifies the need for a well-designed multi-centred study to establish evidence-based best practice in the management of post-burn scarring in children as these modalities are time consuming and not without potential complications. Evidence based practice could potentially lead to significant financial savings to the health service. PMID:25468478

  1. Study of Burn Scar Extraction Automatically Based on Level Set Method using Remote Sensing Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Dai, Qin; Liu, JianBo; Liu, ShiBin; Yang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Burn scar extraction using remote sensing data is an efficient way to precisely evaluate burn area and measure vegetation recovery. Traditional burn scar extraction methodologies have no well effect on burn scar image with blurred and irregular edges. To address these issues, this paper proposes an automatic method to extract burn scar based on Level Set Method (LSM). This method utilizes the advantages of the different features in remote sensing images, as well as considers the practical needs of extracting the burn scar rapidly and automatically. This approach integrates Change Vector Analysis (CVA), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) to obtain difference image and modifies conventional Level Set Method Chan-Vese (C-V) model with a new initial curve which results from a binary image applying K-means method on fitting errors of two near-infrared band images. Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 8 OLI data sets are used to validate the proposed method. Comparison with conventional C-V model, OSTU algorithm, Fuzzy C-mean (FCM) algorithm are made to show that the proposed approach can extract the outline curve of fire burn scar effectively and exactly. The method has higher extraction accuracy and less algorithm complexity than that of the conventional C-V model. PMID:24503563

  2. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 ? and TNF-?) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-I?B, p-NF?B, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1? and TNF-?, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  3. Evidence based management for paediatric burn: new approaches and improved scar outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kishikova, Lyudmila; Smith, Matthew D; Cubison, Tania C S

    2014-12-01

    Little evidence has been produced on the best practice for managing paediatric burns. We set out to develop a formal approach based on the finding that hypertrophic scarring is related to healing-time, with durations under 21 days associated with improved scar outcome. Incorporating new advances in burn care, we compared outcomes under the new approach to a cohort treated previously. Our study was a retrospective cross-sectional case note study, with demographic, treatment and outcome information collected. The management and outcome of each case was assessed and compared against another paediatric burns cohort from 2006. 181 burns presenting across a six month period were analysed (2010 cohort) and compared to 337 children from a previous cohort from 2006. Comparison of patients between cohorts showed an overall shift towards shorter healing-times in the 2010 cohort. A lower overall rate of hypertrophic scarring was seen in the 2010 cohort, and for corresponding healing-times after injury, hypertrophic scarring rates were halved in comparison to the 2006 cohort. We demonstrate that the use of a structured approach for paediatric burns has improved outcomes with regards to healing-time and hypertrophic scarring rate. This approach allows maximisation of healing potential and implements aggressive prophylactic measures. PMID:24630818

  4. Wildfires, smoke, and burn scars, near Yakutsk, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is hidden beneath a veil of smoke from multiple wildfires burning around the city of Yakutsk, Russia. Fires have been burning in the region off and on since late May 2002, and may be agricultural in cause. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on July 23, 2002. In the false=-color image, vegetation is bright green, smoke is blueish-white, and burned areas are reddish-brown. In both images, fire detections are marked with red outlines. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  5. The role of the TGF-? family in wound healing, burns and scarring: a review.

    PubMed

    Penn, Jack W; Grobbelaar, Adriaan O; Rolfe, Kerstin J

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated worldwide that over 6 million people per annum experience a burn injury. Despite advances in management and improved survival rates, the incidence of hypertrophic scarring remains high. These scars are particularly common after burns and are often raised, red, hard and may cause abnormal sensations. Such pathological scarring can lead to severe functional impairment, psychological morbidity, and costly long term healthcare. Wound healing is an inherent process which restores the integrity of the skin after injury and although scarring is a frequent by-product, the scarless wound healing observed in early human gestational fetuses suggests that it is not an essential component of the response. This has lead to a large body of research attempting to understand the mechanisms behind scarring and in turn prevent it. One of the main focuses of recent research has been the role played by the growth factor TGF-? in the process of both wound healing and scar formation. The three isoforms (TGF-?1, TGF-?2 and TGF-?3) appear to have overlapping functions and predominantly mediate their effects through the intracellular SMAD pathway. Initial research suggested that TGF-?1 was responsible for the fibrotic scarring response whereas the scarless wound healing seen in fetal wounds was due to increased levels of TGF-?3. However, the reality appears to be far more complex and it is unlikely that simply altering the ratio of TGF-? isoforms will lead to scarless wound healing. Other aspects of the TGF-? system that appear promising include the downstream mediator CTGF, the proteoglycan decorin and the binding protein p311. Other putative mechanisms which may underlie the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scars include excessive inflammation, excessive angiogenesis, altered levels of matrix metalloproteinases, growth factors, and delayed apoptosis of fibrotic myofibroblasts either due to p53 genetic alterations or tensile forces across the wound. If an effective treatment for hypertrophic scars following burns injury is to be developed then further work must be carried out to understand the basic mechanisms of pathological scarring. PMID:22928164

  6. Burn scar of the Rodeo-Chediski Complex Fire, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Rodeo Fire in east-central Arizona is burning within the Fort Apache Indian Reservation about 100 miles east-northeast of Phoenix (seen southwest of the fire as a large area of grayish pixels surrounded by scattered spots of dark green vegetation). The fire was about 48,000 acres as of June 20, 2002, and was 0 percent contained. These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite was captured on June 19, 2002. In the false-color image the vegetation is green, and burned areas are red.

  7. Reconstructive Surgery of Extensive Face and Neck Burn Scars Using Tissue Expanders

    PubMed Central

    Ashab Yamin, Mohammad Reza; Mozafari, Naser; Mozafari, Mohadase; Razi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neck reconstruction is considered as one of the most important surgeries in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. The present study aimed to assess the results of reconstructive surgery of extensive face and neck burning scars using tissue expanders. METHODS This descriptive prospective study was conducted on 36 patients with extensive burning scars on the neck and face. Operation for tissue expander insertion was performed and tissue distension started two or three weeks later, depending on the patients’ incisions. After sufficient time for tissue expansion, while removing the expander and excision of the lesion, the expanded flap was used to cover the lesion. Overall, 43 cosmetic surgeries were done. RESULTS Rectangular expanders were employed in most patients (73.81%) and were located in the neck in most of them (60.78%). Complications were detected in five patients (13.89%), with exposure of the prosthesis being the most common one. Scar tissues at the reconstruction site and the flap donor site were acceptable in 94.44% and 98.18% of the cases, respectively. Overall, most of the patients (77.78%) were satisfied with the operation results.  CONCLUSION Using tissue expanders in tissue reconstruction of extensive neck and facial burning scars results in highly desirable outcomes. PMID:25606476

  8. 77 FR 66419 - Eligibility of Disabled Veterans and Members of the Armed Forces With Severe Burn Injuries for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... causes contractures and limits motion of one or more extremities or the trunk and precludes effective... normal range of motion and influences not only the underlying joint but also the adjacent joints. Burn... more scarring with contracture limiting motion and, therefore, be more disabling than a...

  9. Using MODIS imagery to assign dates to maps of burn scars in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DaCamara, C. C.; Libonati, R.; Barros, A.; Gaspar, G.; Calado, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    In the European context, Portugal presents the highest number of fire occurrences and has the largest area affected by wildfires. Like other southern regions of Europe, Portugal has experienced a dramatic increase in fire incidence during the last few decades that has been attributed to modifications in land-use as well as to climatic changes and associated occurrence of weather extremes. Wildfire activity also presents a large inter-annual variability that has been related to changes in the frequency of occurrence of atmospheric conditions favorable to the onset and spreading of large-fires. Since 1990, the Portuguese Authority for Forests (AFN) has been producing yearly maps of fire perimeters under a protocol with the Department of Forest Engineering of the Institute of Agronomy (DEF/ISA). The AFN fire atlas uses end of fire season Landsat TM/ETM imagery to map all fire perimeters with area larger than 5ha. Because it relies on end-of-season imagery, the atlas provides a spatial snapshot of the yearly area burned, and dates of burn for individual events cannot be estimated. Such information is nevertheless crucial to understand the fire regime and fire seasonality and to disentangle the complex interactions among fire, land cover and meteorology. The aim of the present work is to develop an automated procedure that allows using time series of moderate resolution imagery, such as the one provided by the MODIS instrument on-board TERRA and AQUA, to assign dates of burning to scars larger than 500 ha in the Landsat based fire atlas. The procedure relies on the so-called (V,W) burned index that uses daily reflectance obtained from the 1km MODIS Level 1B calibrated radiance from bands 2 (NIR) and 20 (MIR). The algorithm detects persistent changes in the (V,W) burned index time series, within each Landsat burned scar. The day of maximum change is then identified by means of a discrimination index, together with thresholds from the (V,W) time series. A spatial filter is finally applied to remove the outliers. An assessment of the temporal accuracy of the algorithm was conducted for the year 2005. For this year, Landsat based fire scars larger than 500ha have an associated detection date, based on field information provided by the AFN. The detection date is here assumed as ignition date of each scar. It is also assumed that each scar corresponds to a single fire event. Using 78 fire scars, we computed the time difference, in days, between the detection date and the date of burn, estimated by the algorithm. Our results show that 70% of all scars were correctly dated by the algorithm with differences to the AFN detection date up to three days. These correspond to 83% of the overall burned area used in the accuracy assessment.

  10. Increased expression of three types of transient receptor potential channels (TRPA1, TRPV4 and TRPV3) in burn scars with post-burn pruritus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoon Seok; Cho, Soo Ick; Choi, Min Gyu; Choi, Young Hee; Kwak, In Suk; Park, Chun Wook; Kim, Hye One

    2015-01-01

    Post-burn pruritus is a common distressing consequence of burn wounds. Empirical treatment often fails to have a satisfactory outcome on post-burn pruritus, as the mechanism of post-burn pruritus has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the manifestation of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in post-burn pruritus. Fifty-one burn patients with (n=33) or without (n=18) pruritus were investigated, including skin biopsies. Not unexpectedly, the scarred body area was larger in the former group. In immunohistochemistry, TPRV3 was significantly elevated in the epidermis of burn scars with pruritus. Furthermore, real time- PCR showed that mRNA of TRPA1 and TRPV4 was increased in itching burn scars. Staining for substance P and CGRP did not differ between the 2 grouped, but the former neuropeptide was increased in burn scars. These results may help determine a specific therapeutic approach for post-burn pruritus. PMID:24695993

  11. Interrater and intrarater reliability of the Semmes Weinstein aesthesiometer to assess touch pressure threshold in burn scars.

    PubMed

    Meirte, J; Moortgat, P; Truijen, S; Maertens, K; Lafaire, C; De Cuyper, L; Hubens, G; Van Daele, U

    2015-09-01

    Burn scars are frequently accompanied with sensory deficits often remaining present months or even years after injury. Clinimetric properties of assessment tools remain understudied within burn literature. Tactile sense of touch can be examined with the touch pressure threshold (TPT) method using the Semmes Weinstein monofilament test (SWMT). There is in recent research no consensus on the exact measurement procedure when using the SWMT. The aim of this paper was to determine the interrater and intrarater reliability of TPT within burn scars and healthy controls using the 'ascending descending' measurement procedure. We used the newly developed guidelines for reporting reliability and agreement studies (GRRAS) as a basis to report this reliability study. In total 36 individuals were tested; a healthy control group and a scar group. The interrater reliability was excellent in the scar group (ICC=0.908/SEM=0.21) and fair to good in the control group (ICC=0.731/SEM=0.12). In the scar group intrarater ICC value was excellent (ICC=0.822/SEM=0.33). Within the control group also an excellent intrarater reliability (ICC=0.807/SEM=0.27) was found. In conclusion this study shows that the SWMT with the 'ascending descending' measurement procedure is a feasible and reliable objective measure to evaluate TPT in (older) upper extremities burn scars as well as in healthy skin. PMID:25703663

  12. Improving scar quality: a prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Ioannovich, John; Al-Amm, Christian A; El-Musa, Kusai A; Dham, Ruwayda

    2002-01-01

    Following traumatic or surgical injury to the skin, wounds do not heal by tissue regeneration but rather by scar formation. Though healing is definitely a welcomed event, the resultant scar, very often, is not aesthetically pleasing, and not infrequently, may be pathologic causing serious deformities and contractures. Management of problematic scars continues to be a frustrating endeavor with less than optimal results. Prophylactic methods of wound management to minimize serious scarring are being developed. In a previously published study, we have demonstrated improved healing of split thickness skin graft donor sites following treatment with Moist Exposed Burn Ointment (MEBO, Julphar Gulf Pharmaceutical Industries, Ras Al-Khaimah, UAE). At present, we are reporting the results of a comparative clinical prospective study evaluating scar quality following primary healing of elective surgical and traumatic facial wounds with prophylactic MEBO application, topical antibiotic ointment application, and no topical therapy at all. Scars were evaluated according to the Visual Analogue Scale for scar assessment. Statistical analysis of scar assessment scores demonstrated marked prevention of unfavorable scars with improved cosmetic results following MEBO prophylactic therapy. PMID:12621572

  13. Predicting severity of pathological scarring due to burn injuries: a clinical decision making tool using Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Berchialla, Paola; Gangemi, Ezio Nicola; Foltran, Francesca; Haxhiaj, Arber; Buja, Alessandra; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Stella, Maurizio; Gregori, Dario

    2014-06-01

    It is important for clinicians to understand which are the clinical signs, the patient characteristics and the procedures that are related with the occurrence of hypertrophic burn scars in order to carry out a possible prognostic assessment. Providing clinicians with an easy-to- use tool for predicting the risk of pathological scars. A total of 703 patients with 2440 anatomical burn sites who were admitted to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Burn Center of the Traumatological Hospital in Torino between January 1994 and May 2006 were included in the analysis. A Bayesian network (BN) model was implemented. The probability of developing a hypertrophic scar was evaluated on a number of scenarios. The error rate of the BN model was assessed internally and it was equal to 24·83%. While classical statistical method as logistic models can infer only which variables are related to the final outcome, the BN approach displays a set of relationships between the final outcome (scar type) and the explanatory covariates (patient's age and gender, burn surface area, full-thickness burn surface area, burn anatomical area and wound-healing time; burn treatment options such as advanced dressings, type of surgical approach, number of surgical procedures, type of skin graft, excision and coverage timing). A web-based interface to handle the BN model was developed on the website www.pubchild.org (burns header). Clinicians who registered at the website could submit their data in order to get from the BN model the predicted probability of observing a pathological scar type. PMID:22958613

  14. Neglected post burns contracture of hand in children: Analysis of contributory socio-cultural factors and the impact of neglect on outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Jindal, Nipun; Kamboj, Kulbhushan

    2014-01-01

    Background No study has ever evaluated the causes and effect of neglect on the outcome of post burns contractures of hand in children. Methods 66 hands in 61 children (mean age 12.22 years) with a mean neglect of 11.6 years (range 5–17 years) were assessed for the causes of neglect and the outcome of surgery. Average follow up was 6.6 years. The results were assessed in two groups of 5–10 years neglect as group I and >10 years neglect as group II. Results In a total number of 134 contracted rays in 66 hands, the surgical procedures included local Z/V-Y flap (51 rays), cross finger flap (48 rays), full thickness graft (35 rays). Additional external fixator with a distracter was used in 3 patients treated at a delay of 14, 16 and 17 years. 50 (81.96%) patients belonged to rural and slum areas. The reasons for delayed treatment included poverty – 33 patients, lack of awareness of surgical treatment – 16 patients; and indifference of parents – 12 patients. 44 (72.13%) children were illiterates. With treatment the average DASH score improved from 65.10 to 36.90 (p < .000) and from 68.14 to 45.93 (p < .000) in group I and II respectively. The results were significantly superior in group I (p < .000). Conclusion The main factors for neglect in treatment of post burns contracture include poverty, lack of awareness and illiteracy. All the patients showed significant improvement in function after the surgery. Contractures with higher neglect had significantly inferior outcome. PMID:25983501

  15. Management of Hypertrophic Burn Scar: A Comparison between the Efficacy of Exercise-Physiotherapy and Pressure Garment-Silicone on Hypertrophic Scar

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Hamid; Mobayen, Mohammadreza; Alijanpour, Aboulhasan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Our study aims to investigate the effectiveness of other treatment methods for burn related scarring and to determine the possibility of their routine administration in similar clinical settings. Methods Through a prospective study, 66 patients were enrolled to receive either the conventional pressure garment therapy (PGT) and Silicone (control group) or exercise and physiotherapy (case group). Patients were visited regularly to be examined for the status of their scars’ regression, limbs’ dysfunction, and joint motion. Then, these two groups were compared to determine the efficacy of exercise and physiotherapy as an alternative to the conventional treatment with PGT. Results After about 20 months follow-up, decreased articular range of motion (ROM) was: 16 (51.5%) cases compared to 5 (15%) of controls had mild, 11 (35.5%) of the cases compared to 13 (39.5%) of the controls had moderate; and 4 (13%) of the cases compared to 15 (45.5%) of the controls had severe decreased ROM which revealed statistically significant difference (P<0.01). At the same time, Vancouver Scar Scale score was: 15 (48%) of the cases and 6 (18%) of the controls had mild Scar Scale, 12 (39%) of the cases and 14 (42.5%) of the controls had moderate score and 4 (3%) of the cases and 13 (39.5%) of the controls had severe score which revealed a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion Our study showed that physical therapy andexercise are more effective than PGT, in management of burn hypertrophic scar, hence could be an alternative in cases that conventional therapy cannot be used for any reason. PMID:23785579

  16. Pirfenidone Nanoparticles Improve Corneal Wound Healing and Prevent Scarring Following Alkali Burn

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sushovan; Guha, Rajdeep; Trivedi, Ruchit; Kompella, Uday B.; Konar, Aditya; Hazra, Sarbani

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of pirfenidone nanoparticles on corneal re-epithelialization and scarring, major clinical challenges after alkali burn. Methods Effect of pirfenidone on collagen I and ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) synthesis by TGF? induced primary corneal fibroblast cells was evaluated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Pirfenidone loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles were prepared, characterized and their cellular entry was examined in primary corneal fibroblast cells by fluorescence microscopy. Alkali burn was induced in one eye of Sprague Dawley rats followed by daily topical treatment with free pirfenidone, pirfenidone nanoparticles or vehicle. Corneal re-epithelialization was assessed daily by flourescein dye test; absence of stained area indicated complete re-epithelialization and the time for complete re-epithelialization was determined. Corneal haze was assessed daily for 7 days under slit lamp microscope and graded using a standard method. After 7 days, collagen I deposition in the superficial layer of cornea was examined by immunohistochemistry. Results Pirfenidone prevented (P<0.05) increase in TGF ? induced collagen I and ?-SMA synthesis by corneal fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner. Pirfenidone could be loaded successfully within PLGA nanoparticles, which entered the corneal fibroblasts within 5 minutes. Pirfenidone nanoparticles but not free pirfenidone significantly (P<0.05) reduced collagen I level, corneal haze and the time for corneal re-epithelialization following alkali burn. Conclusion Pirfenidone decreases collagen synthesis and prevents myofibroblast formation. Pirfenidone nanoparticles improve corneal wound healing and prevent fibrosis. Pirfenidone nanoparticles are of potential value in treating corneal chemical burns and other corneal fibrotic diseases. PMID:23940587

  17. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3.8]). That subgroup exhibited significant differences in sensory thresholds when compared to the 18 responders (VAS from 7 [3] to 3 [1]). First, responders' thresholds for A-delta and C fibers in the PPBS area were significantly lower than those in the pain-free area before treatment but corrected after acupuncture (from respectively 60 [30] and 63 [10]% to 91 [11] and 106 [36]%). That might account for a nociceptive hypersensitivity in the PPBS that corrected after treatment. On the contrary, in non-responders nociceptive thresholds were similar in both the PPBS and the pain-free areas before treatment and did not change after EA. However, absolute values for thresholds in the pain-free areas where significantly lower for non-responders than for responders. The fact that non-responders had significant pain scores while presenting with lowered nociceptive thresholds even in the pain-free areas might evoke the possibility of a generalized supra-spinal hyperalgesia. The fact that acupuncture did not correct the pain nor the nociceptive thresholds in this subgroup requires further investigation. We also observed a statistically and clinically relevant reduction in VAS for pruritus for all patients - even those from the subgroup of non-responders to pain - that is worth to be mentioned and requires further studies to be confirmed. This observational study is the first that confirms the effects of acupuncture on analgesia and nociceptive thresholds in the clinical setting of burn pain only for patients presenting with a burn-localized but not a generalized hyperalgesia. PMID:26188894

  18. The use of pressure and silicone in hypertrophic scar management in burns patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Harte, Daniel; Gordon, Jude; Shaw, Maxine; Stinson, May; Porter-Armstrong, Alison

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study investigates whether pressure and silicone therapy used simultaneously are more effective in treating multiple characteristics of hypertrophic scars than pressure alone. A pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted. Twenty-two participants with hypertrophic burn scars were randomized to receive Jobskin pressure garments and Mepiform silicone sheeting or Jobskin pressure garments alone. The Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was used to measure multiple scar characteristics at baseline, week 12, and week 24. No statistically significant difference was found in the rate of change of the VSS scores between the pressure therapy (PT) group and the pressure therapy and silicone group at week 12 or week 24; however, the mean scores of both groups reduced over 24 weeks. There were no statistically significant changes in the VSS subscores (scar height, vascularity, pliability, and pigmentation) from baseline to week 12 or week 24. A statistically significant relationship was observed between the VSS score and TBSA burned (<30%) in the PT group at baseline (P<.05), over 12 weeks (P<.05), and over 24 weeks (P<.05). Given the limitations of this study, especially the small sample size, further research is necessary before any firm conclusions can be drawn on this therapy approach. However, this pilot study has discussed the recurring issues in the research regarding these controversial treatments and has yielded potential for further investigation in a fully powered randomized controlled trial. PMID:19506491

  19. Derivation of Burn Scar Depths with Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) in Indonesian Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhorn, U.; Siegert, F.

    2009-04-01

    Tropical deforestation and forest degradation contribute to about 20% of the global greenhouse gas emissions and Indonesia is a leading emitter. Forests are certainly critical; but the peat soils beneath can store 30 times more carbon than the trees above. Indonesia has the fourth-largest area of peatland in the world, ranging from 30 to 45 million ha, which is approximately 10 - 12% of the global peatland resource. Fire has a long tradition in Indonesian land clearing, where almost all fires are related to human activities. The 1997 - 1998 fires throughout Indonesia caused significant haze and smoke-related health problems across Southeast Asia. Strong and weak El Niño events in 1998 and 2002 accelerated burning as soil was parched. Green house gas emissions from the fires were the source of 60% of all anomalies globally for 1997 - 2000, particularly from drained peatlands. In 2007/08 we participated in a study conducted by the World Wildlife Fund which focused on Sumatra's 8.3 million ha province of Riau, along the island's northeastern coastline. In this study CO2 emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, peat decomposition and burning over 17 years from 1990 - 2007 were estimated. Fire hotspot data for the years 1997 - 2000 from the NOAA AVHRR and MODIS sensors was used to identify burned peatland. Based on soil water availability the depths of peat burns were estimated. El Nino years with a water table of lower than 1.5 m propel intense burning so that a peat burn depth of 0.50 m was assumed, while normally only a peat burn depth of 0.15 m. Total emissions for the 1990 - 2007 period were estimated at 3.66 Gt CO2, composed of 1.17 Gt CO2 from deforestation, 0.32 Gt CO2 from forest degradation, 0.78 Gt CO2 from peat decomposition, and 1.39 Gt CO2 from peat burning. Average annual CO2 emissions were 0.22 Gt, equal to 58% of Australia's total CO2 annual emissions (including emissions/removals from LULUCF, in 2005); between 1990 and 2007, Riau produced more CO2 per year than the fourth-largest industrial nation, Germany, saved to achieve its Kyoto target. Since 1990, emissions from peat burning and peat decomposition have exceeded that of above ground biomass deforestation. These numbers show how important it is to have more accurate estimations for peat burn depth in the future. Until now few field measurements were made, which would require to know the fire affected area in advance or ignite peatland on purpose. Furthermore fire scars are quickly covered by regenerating vegetation. Another problem is the lack of a method without actually having to go into the field (e.g. through remote sensing techniques), due to the fact that many of the fire locations are remote and very difficult to access. We investigated if airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR), an active laser pulse technology by which the height of objects can be precisely measured, can be used to determine the amount of peat burned during a fire event. From a LIDAR data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after severe fires resulting from the 2006 El Niño drought, we calculated that the average depth of a burn scar was 0.30 ± 0.15 m .This was achieved through the construction of digital terrain models (DTMs) by interpolating the LIDAR ground return signals in burnt and adjacent unburned peatland. These calculated depths were compared to in situ measurements, which came to similar results. We believe that the method presented here to estimate burnt peat depth has the potential to considerably improve the accuracy of regional and global carbon emission models but would also be helpful for monitoring projects under the Kyoto Protocol like the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) or the proposed Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing in Non-hypertrophic Traumatic and Burn Scars

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractional photothermolysis is one of the most effective treatment options used to resurface scars of different aetiologies. Aim: To assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing treatment in the management of non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients affected by non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars were treated with four sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing treatment at 6-weekly intervals. Patients were photographed at each visit and finally, 3 months after the end of treatment schedule. Response to treatment was assessed clinically as well as by comparing the initial photograph of the patient with the one taken at the last follow-up visit 3-months after the final treatment session. Changes in skin texture, surface irregularity and pigmentation were assessed on a quartile grading scale and scored individually from 0 to 4. A mean of the three individual scores was calculated and the response was labelled as ‘excellent’ if the mean score achieved was >2. A score of 1-2 was labeled as good response while a score below 1 was labeled as ‘poor’ response. The subjective satisfaction of each patient with the treatment offered was also assessed at the last follow-up visit. Results: The commonest site of scarring treated was the face followed by hands. Response to treatment was rated as excellent in 60% (15/25) patients while 24% (6/25) and 16% (4/25) patients were labeled as good and poor responders, respectively. Skin texture showed better response than other variables with average score of 2.44. Linear post-traumatic scars were seen to respond less than other morphological types. Majority of the patients (19 out of 25) were highly satisfied with the treatment offered. No long-term adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Fractional photothermolysis with a fractional CO2 laser gives excellent results in patients with post-burn scars with minimal adverse effects. Limitations: Lack of a control group and small sample size are limitations of this study.

  1. A comparative analysis of a fixed thresholding vs. a classification tree approach for operational burn scar detection and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoes, C. C.; Poilvé, H.; Florsch, G.; Keramitsoglou, I.; Paralikidis, S.

    2009-10-01

    The scope of this paper is to demonstrate, evaluate and compare two burn scar mapping (BSM) approaches developed and applied operationally in the framework of the RISK-EOS service element project within the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) program funded by ESA ( http://www.risk-eos.com). The first method is the BSM_NOA, a fixed thresholding method using a set of specifically designed and combined image enhancements, whilst the second one is the BSM_ITF, a decision tree classification approach based on a wide range of biophysical parameters. The two methods were deployed and compared in the framework of operational mapping conditions set by RISK-EOS standards, based either on sets of uni- or multi-temporal satellite images acquired by Landsat 5 TM and SPOT 4 HRV. The evaluation of the performance of the two methods showed that either in uni- or multi-temporal acquisition mode, the two methods reach high detection capability rates ranging from 80% to 91%. At the same time, the minimum burnt area detected was of 0.9-1.0 ha, despite the coarser spatial resolution of Landsat 5 TM sensor. Among the advantages of the satellite-based approaches compared to conventional burn scar mapping, are cost-efficiency, repeatability, flexibility, and high spatial and thematic accuracy from local to country level. Following the catastrophic fire season of 2007, burn scar maps were generated using BSM_NOA for the entirety of Greece and BSM_ITF for south France in the framework of the RISK-EOS/GMES Services Element project.

  2. Postburn edge shoulder adduction contracture: anatomy and elimination with trapeze-flap plasty--a new approach.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M

    2012-01-01

    Postburn scar shoulder adduction contracture is the most common among big joints' contractures. As the contracture impedes all upper limb function, surgical reconstruction is indicated as early as the contracture is formed. Many flaps and techniques have been suggested, yet the problem is not resolved completely. Three hundred forty-six edge scar shoulder adduction contractures were eliminated personally in 277 patients. Contracture anatomy was studied before and during surgery. Effectiveness of the existing and newly developed techniques was evaluated. Edge shoulder scar adduction contracture is caused by scars located on anterior and/or posterior shoulder joint surface and is characterized by the presence of the fold along the axillary fossa edge. Crest of the fold is the edge of scars. The fold's lateral sheet is scars (causes contracture); medial sheet and axillary fossa skin stay uninjured. Lateral scar sheets have surface deficit in length; the deficit spreads from the fold's crest to the shoulder joint rotation axis and has a trapezoid form. The conclusion was made that the adequate technique should consist of sheet surface deficit compensation with the flap of the same (trapezoid) shape. The medial fold sheet and axillary fossa served as an excellent donor site for the flap. Depending on contracture severity, several variants of the trapeze-flap plasty were developed: trapeze-flaps alone or in combination with skin grafts. In all cases, contractures were eliminated completely with trapeze-flap plasty without serious complications. No flap loss and contracture recurrence took place. The proposed techniques are based on the anatomy of the contracture. They are easy to plan and perform, allow complete restoration of the upper limb's function, and improve shoulder joint region appearance in general. The author believes that the trapeze-flap plasty procedure is a preferred technique for adult and pediatric patients with edge scar shoulder adduction contracture. PMID:22210077

  3. Silk fibroin/gelatin electrospun nanofibrous dressing functionalized with astragaloside IV induces healing and anti-scar effects on burn wound.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ying-Hui; Peng, Li-Hua; Liu, Xin; Chen, Xi; Xiong, Jie; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-02-20

    Functional wound dressing has provided new challenges for researchers who focus on burn to improve skin graft quality, reduce scarring, and develop a pluristratified dermal or epidermal construct of a burn wound. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a silk fibroin/gelatin (SF/GT) electrospun nanofibrous dressing loaded with astragaloside IV (AS) on deep partial-thickness burn wound. AS-loaded SF/GT-blended nanofibrous dressing was prepared by electrospinning nanotechnology. The optimal ratio (25:75) of silk fibroin to gelatin was further optimized by evaluating ATR-FTIR characteristics, mechanical properties, porosity, swelling rate, degradation, and release profile of the AS-loaded SF/GT nanofibrous dressing. In contrast to the blank control, the AS-loaded SF/GT nanofibrous dressing promoted cell adhesion and proliferation with good biocompatibility in vitro (p<0.01). This dressing also accelerated wound healing and inhibited scar formation in vivo by stimulating wound closure (p<0.05), increasing angiogenesis, regulating newly formed types of collagen, and improving collagen organization. These results showed that SF/GT nanofibrous dressing is a promising topical drug delivery system. Furthermore, AS-functionalized SF/GT nanofibrous dressing is an excellent topical therapeutic that could be applied to promote healing and elicit anti-scar effects on partial-thickness burn wound. PMID:25556053

  4. A fully automatic processing chain to produce Burn Scar Mapping products, using the full Landsat archive over Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoes, Charalampos; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Herekakis, Themistoklis; Michail, Dimitrios; Ieronymidi, Emmanuela

    2013-04-01

    Remote sensing tools for the accurate, robust and timely assessment of the damages inflicted by forest wildfires provide information that is of paramount importance to public environmental agencies and related stakeholders before, during and after the crisis. The Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing of the National Observatory of Athens (IAASARS/NOA) has developed a fully automatic single and/or multi date processing chain that takes as input archived Landsat 4, 5 or 7 raw images and produces precise diachronic burnt area polygons and damage assessments over the Greek territory. The methodology consists of three fully automatic stages: 1) the pre-processing stage where the metadata of the raw images are extracted, followed by the application of the LEDAPS software platform for calibration and mask production and the Automated Precise Orthorectification Package, developed by NASA, for image geo-registration and orthorectification, 2) the core-BSM (Burn Scar Mapping) processing stage which incorporates a published classification algorithm based on a series of physical indexes, the application of two filters for noise removal using graph-based techniques and the grouping of pixels classified as burnt to form the appropriate pixels clusters before proceeding to conversion from raster to vector, and 3) the post-processing stage where the products are thematically refined and enriched using auxiliary GIS layers (underlying land cover/use, administrative boundaries, etc.) and human logic/evidence to suppress false alarms and omission errors. The established processing chain has been successfully applied to the entire archive of Landsat imagery over Greece spanning from 1984 to 2012, which has been collected and managed in IAASARS/NOA. The number of full Landsat frames that were subject of process in the framework of the study was 415. These burn scar mapping products are generated for the first time to such a temporal and spatial extent and are ideal to use in further environmental time series analyzes, production of statistical indexes (frequency, geographical distribution and number of fires per prefecture) and applications, including change detection and climate change models, urban planning, correlation with manmade activities, etc.

  5. Volkmann ischemic contracture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... But because it is stiff, the joint remains bent and stuck. This condition is called a contracture. ... limited loss of feeling Moderate -- all fingers are bent (flexed) and the thumb is stuck in the ...

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. XX, NO. XX, JULY 2004 1 A Modeling Approach for Burn Scar Assessment

    E-print Network

    Goldgof, Dmitry

    need for a quantitative and objective scar rating method based on the biophysical properties of skin of scars using the finite element model and regularization method. A set of natural point features]. These rating methods suffer from their subjective nature and low consistency among rates. There is a strong

  7. Management of an unusual extreme extension contracture of the wrist: role of a custom-designed exercise program in achieving a good range of movement and prevention of recontraction.

    PubMed

    Saraiya, Hemant

    2003-01-01

    An extreme extension contracture of wrist with dorsal contracture of fingers 15 years after burn injury is described. Shortening of extensor tendons, secondary lengthening of flexor tendons, contracted wrist joint capsule, unusual dislocation of carpals, dorsal dislocation of metacarpophalangeal joints of fingers, and provision of sufficient amount of good-quality skin were some of the issues that had to be addressed in treatment. The contracture was released, the carpals and metacarpophalangeal joint dislocations were corrected and fixed with K wires, and the resulting defect was covered with a sheet split-thickness skin graft. An exercise program was designed that consisted of isotonic, isokinetic, and isometric resistance exercises and passive, active, and active-assistive range of motion exercises. These exercises were pursued with the intention of increasing dynamic strength, endurance, and overall functional recovery of the flexor muscles by exploiting the immature nature of early scar tissue. The resultant enhanced flexor muscle power from exercises along with the dynamic splint helped in lengthening of extensor tendons, wrist joint capsule, and split-thickness skin graft. It also helped in resisting the recontracting tendency, with further recovery of good range of wrist and fingers movements, obviating the need of tendon-lengthening surgery and flap coverage. One and half years of follow up didn't show any sign of recontracture, and the patient was able to perform his routine activities. Postburn wrist contractures of such magnitude have been seldom described. Emphasis is put on simple contracture release and a postoperative exercise program. PMID:14610422

  8. Acne Scars

    MedlinePLUS

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Acne scars Overview Acne scar treatment: This woman's dermatologist ... At 3 months (right), she has noticeable improvement. Acne scars: Overview If acne scars bother you, safe ...

  9. Race and Melanocortin 1 Receptor Polymorphism R163Q Are Associated with Post-Burn Hypertrophic Scarring: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sood, Ravi F; Hocking, Anne M; Muffley, Lara A; Ga, Maricar; Honari, Shari; Reiner, Alexander P; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Gibran, Nicole S

    2015-10-01

    The genetic determinants of post-burn hypertrophic scarring (HTS) are unknown, and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) loss-of-function leads to fibrogenesis in experimental models. To examine the associations between self-identified race and MC1R single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with severity of post-burn HTS, we conducted a prospective cohort study of burned adults admitted to our institution over 7 years. Subjects were evaluated using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS), asked to rate their itching, and genotyped for 8 MC1R SNPs. Testing for association with severe HTS (VSS>7) and itch severity (0-10) was based on multivariate regression with adjustment for known risk factors. Of 425 subjects analyzed, 77% identified as White. The prevalence of severe HTS (VSS>7) was 49%, and the mean itch score was 3.9. In multivariate analysis, Asian (prevalence ratio (PR) 1.54; 95% CI: 1.13-2.10), Black/African American (PR 1.86; 95% CI: 1.42-2.45), and Native American (PR 1.87; 95% CI: 1.48-2.35) race were independently associated with severe HTS. MC1R SNP R163Q was also significantly (P<0.001) associated with severe HTS. Asian race (linear regression coefficient 1.32; 95% CI: 0.23-2.40) but not MC1R SNP genotype was associated with increased itch score. We conclude that MC1R genotype may influence post-burn scarring. PMID:26030184

  10. [The treatment of a post-burn deformity and contracture of the neck, using extended flaps with axial type of blood supply].

    PubMed

    Zhernov, A A; Zhernov, An A

    2012-03-01

    Experience of treatment of 24 patients, suffering neck deformity and contracture, using stretched flaps with axial type of blood circulation, was summarized. In total 43 expanders were implanted. The cutaneo-fascial flaps stretching was performed in the neck and thorax. In all the flaps a nutrition artery was included. The neck-brachial flaps, including supraclavicular artery, were applied in 25 (58.1%) patients, the neck-thoracic flaps, using superficial neck artery--in 12 (27.91%), the occipital-neck flaps on a musculocutaneous perforating vessels of occipital artery--in 6 (13.95%). The methods of the expander implantation, the stretching, transposition regimes of plastic material and its fixation were elaborated. The donor sites were closed using stretched tissues, left in place after formation of flaps. Flaps were fixed, using mechanical method of the tissues connection with duplicature formation from deepidermized portion of cicatrix or with polypropylene mesh, which played a role of a dense framework. Then a strong connective tissue bolt was formed, securely fixing transposedstretched tissues. While application of a complex-component vascularized flaps a suppuration have occurred in 3 (6.97%), partial necrosis--in 2 (4.64%) observations. Inclusion of nutritive vessels permit to form large size flaps with a small risk of necrosis occurrence. The stretched perforant flaps application permits to achieve positive result in 95.3% of observations--in immediate and in 81.82%--in far remote period. PMID:22702123

  11. Joint Contracture Orthosis (JCO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunsford, Thomas R.; Parsons, Ken; Krouskop, Thomas; McGee, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an advanced orthosis which is effective in reducing upper and lower limb contractures in significantly less time than currently required with conventional methods. The team that developed the JCO consisted of an engineer, orthotist, therapist, and physician.

  12. Isolated Chemical Burns to the Genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Razek, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Perineal or genital burns are mostly part of large body surface injuries, and isolated burns to the genitalia are not common. Nevertheless, they are of major concern to the patient and clinician. Highly concentrated solutions of sulphuric acid are available to unclog drains. We have noted a substantial number of both accidental and intentional cutaneous burns caused by these agents and we therefore conducted a study on the incidence and treatment of isolated chemical burns in the genitalia. The study was performed in the Burns Unit, King Saud Hospital, Al-Qassim, Kingdom Saudi Arabia, from April 2001 to December 2004. During this period we received 12 patients with isolated chemical burns in the genitalia, representing 3.4% of all cases of burns treated between 2001 and 2004 (350 patients with different causes and variable percentages of burns). Of these 12 patients, 11 were males and one female. The patients' ages ranged from 9 to 75 yr. The mean burn size was 2% of the total body surface area. The cause of the burn injury was sulphuric acid, which is famous in this area for water closet cleaning. Eight patients (66.7%) required skin grafting, one healed with minimal scarring, and three (25%) healed with minimal contractures treated with multiple Z-plasty. We concluded that conservative management of perineal and genital chemical burns was recommended until the demarcation zone became clear. Split-thickness skin grafts were durable, safe, and technically easy, with satisfactory cosmetic and functional results. PMID:21991041

  13. Study on Surgical Management of Post Burn Hand Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Firdos; Jash, Prabir Kumar; Gupta, Madhumita; Suba, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Context Functionality of the hands is the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors. If contractures or scarring affect the dominant hand, as they do on most occasions, the vocation and there by the economic status of the patient suffer. Aim The aim of this study is to evaluate the different surgical procedures for resurfacing after release of post-burn hand contractures in terms of functional recovery and aesthetic outcome. Settings and Design It’s a prospective, non-randomised study of 50 patients admitted and undergoing surgical reconstructive procedures for post burn hand contractures in our plastic surgery department. Materials and Methods Resurfacing procedures were done according to type of contracture with individualisation for each case. All cases were followed up with physiotherapy and splinting advices. Functional and aesthetic outcome and recurrence of contracture for each procedure was noted at 6 months. Results Forty seven percent of the cases were reconstructed with skin grafting, 30% cases with Z plasties and 23% with flap coverage. Split thickness skin grafts (STSG) and full thickness graft (FTSG) reconstructed cases had good recovery of joint mobility in 43% and 75% of cases respectively. Reconstructive procedures were aesthetically acceptable to the patients in 63%, 75% and 94% of STSG, FTSG and Z plasty cases respectively. Recurrence was seen in 17% of STSG done cases. Conclusion Most of the cases can be resurfaced with skin grafting and few cases have clear indication for flap coverage which needs to be planned and executed cautiously. Z plasties with proper planning gives maximum length gain with no donor morbidity as other procedures. Postoperative physiotherapy and splinting is must for better outcome in all cases. PMID:26435994

  14. Avoiding unfavorable results in postburn contracture hand

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sameek

    2013-01-01

    Deformities of the hands are a fairly common sequel of burn especially in the developing world. This is because of high incidence of burns, limited access to standard treatment and rehabilitation. The best outcome of a burnt hand is when deformities are prevented from developing. A good functional result is possible when due consideration is paid to hands during resuscitation, excisional surgery, reconstructive surgery and physiotherapy. The post-burns deformities of hand develop due direct thermal damage or secondary to intrinsic minus position due to oedema or vascular insufficiency. During the acute phase the concerns are, maintenance circulation minimize oedema prevent unphysiological positioning and wound closure with autogenous tissue as soon as possible. The rehabilitation program during the acute phase starts from day one and goes on till the hand has healed and has regained full range of motion. Full blown hand contractures are challenging to correct and become more difficult as time passes. Long-standing cases often land up with attenuation of extensor apparatus leading to swan neck and boutonniere deformity, muscle shortening and bony ankylosis. The major and most common pitfall after contracture release is relapse. The treatment protocol of contracture is solely directed towards countering this tendency. This article aims to guide a surgeon in obtaining optimal hand function and avoid pit falls at different stages of management of hand burns. The reasons of an unfavourable outcome of a burnt hand are possible lack of optimal care in the acute phase, while planning and performing reconstructive procedure and during aftercare and rehabilitation. PMID:24501479

  15. Burns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > Burns Fact Sheet Burns Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is a burn? A burn is tissue damage caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight or nuclear radiation. The most common burns are ...

  16. Honey Dressing Versus Silver Sulfadiazene Dressing for Wound Healing in Burn Patients: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi Singh; Singh, Onkar; Bhagel, Praveen Singh; Moses, Sonia; Shukla, Sumit; Mathur, Raj Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of honey dressing and silver sulfadiazene (SSD) dressing on wound healing in burn patients. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 108 patients (14–68 years of age), with first and second degree burns of less than 50% of the total body surface area admitted to our institution, over a period of 5 years (2004–2008). Fifty-one patients were treated with honey dressings and 57 with SSD. Time elapsed since burn, site, percentage, degree and depth of burns, results of culture sensitivity at various time intervals, duration of healing, formation of post-treatment hypertrophic scar, and/or contracture were recorded and analyzed. Results: The average duration of healing was 18.16 and 32.68 days for the honey and SSD group, respectively. Wounds of all patients reporting within 1 h of burns became sterile with the honey dressing in less than 7 days while there was none with SSD. All wounds treated with honey became sterile within 21 days while for SSD-treated wounds, this figure was 36.5%. A complete outcome was seen in 81% of all patients in the “honey group” while in only 37% patients in the “SSD group.” Conclusion: Honey dressings make the wounds sterile in less time, enhance healing, and have a better outcome in terms of hypertropic scars and postburn contractures, as compared to SSD dressings. PMID:22279383

  17. Emerging Therapies for Scar Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Block, Lisa; Gosain, Ankush; King, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: There are ?12 million traumatic lacerations treated in the United States emergency rooms each year, 250 million surgical incisions created worldwide every year, and 11 million burns severe enough to warrant medical treatment worldwide. In the United States, over $20 billion dollars per year are spent on the treatment and management of scars. Recent Advances: Investigations into the management of scar therapies over the last decade have advanced our understanding related to the care of cutaneous scars. Scar treatment methods are presented including topical, intralesional, and mechanical therapies in addition to cryotherapy, radiotherapy, and laser therapy. Critical Issues: Current treatment options for scars have significant limitations. This review presents the current and emerging therapies available for scar management and the scientific evidence for scar management is discussed. Future Directions: Based upon our new understanding of scar formation, innovative scar therapies are being developed. Additional research on the basic science of scar formation will lead to additional advances and novel therapies for the treatment of cutaneous scars. PMID:26487979

  18. Outcome of Split Thickness Skin Grafting and Multiple Z-Plasties in Postburn Contractures of Groin and Perineum: A 15-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sajad, Wani; Hamid, Raashid

    2014-01-01

    Background. Groin and perineal burn contracture is a rare postburn sequel. Such postburn contractures causes distressing symptoms to the patients and in the management of these contractures, both functional and cosmetic appearance should be the primary concern. Aims. To study the outcome of surgical treatment (STSG and multiple Z-plasties) in postburn contractures of groin and perineum. Material and Methods. We conducted a study of 49 patients, with postburn groin and perineal contractures. Release of contracture with split thickness skin grafting (STSG) was done in 44 (89.79%) patients and release of contracture and closure by multiple Z-plasties was done in 5 (10.21%) patients. Results. Satisfactory functional and cosmetic outcome was seen in 44 (89.79%) patients. Minor secondary contractures of the graft were seen in 3 (6.81%) patients who were managed by physiotherapy and partial recurrence of the contracture in 4 (8.16%) patients required secondary surgery. Conclusion. We conclude that postburn contractures of the groin and perineum can be successfully treated with release of contracture followed by STSG with satisfactory functional and cosmetic results. Long term measures like regular physiotherapy, use of pressure garments, and messaging with emollient creams should not be neglected and should be instituted postoperatively to prevent secondary contractures of the graft and recurrence of the contracture. PMID:24967100

  19. Flooding after fire: Impacts of the 2013 Colorado Front Range floods on the High Park Fire burn scar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, S. K.; Schmeer, S.; MacDonald, L. H.; Brogan, D. J.; Nelson, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    In June 2012, the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO burned 350 km2 of steep forested terrain, leading to elevated runoff and erosion in watersheds draining the burned area. Under the auspices of a NSF RAPID grant we began monitoring precipitation, hillslope-scale sediment production, stream stage, and channel geomorphic change in Skin Gulch and Hill Gulch, two 15 km2 watersheds within the High Park Fire. Short-duration summer thunderstorms are typically the dominant cause of post-fire runoff and erosion in the central and southern Rocky Mountains, but in September 2013 an extreme, long duration storm dropped more than 200 mm of rain in 48 hours. This storm provided a unique opportunity to compare the hydrologic and geomorphic effects of smaller summer thunderstorms to those of the long duration, high magnitude September event. Mean June-August 2013 precipitation in these watersheds was 125 mm, less than half the total for the September 2013 event, but this summer precipitation led to a mean sediment yield of 8 Mg ha-1, about double the mean sediment yield of the much larger September storm. Hillslope sediment production was highest during summer storms that were shorter duration but had higher 5-15 minute precipitation intensities than the September storm. These localized summer 2013 storms led to flashy pulses of flow in the channel network that caused relatively small amounts of channel aggradation or incision. In contrast, the September 2013 event produced sustained high flows that led to substantial geomorphic change throughout the channel network, with more than 2 m of aggradation at the outlet of Skin Gulch. These results indicate that the high intensity summer thunderstorms were most effective at mobilizing sediment from hillslopes, but the more spatially uniform rainfall during the September event produced much more dramatic downstream channel geomorphic change.

  20. Burns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... doing so puts you in danger as well. Chemical and Electrical Burns For chemical and electrical burns, call 911 or your local ... the power source has been turned off. For chemical burns: Dry chemicals should be brushed off the ...

  1. Acne Scars

    MedlinePLUS

    ... guides Media Media resources Media contacts Public service advertisements Stats and facts Gold Triangle Awards Stories and ... that your skin is inflamed. Inflammation reduces the effectiveness of treatment for acne scars. To obtain the ...

  2. Burns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to least common are: Fire/flame Scalding from steam or hot liquids Touching hot objects Electrical burns ... burn your airways if you breathe in smoke, steam, superheated air, or chemical fumes in poorly ventilated ...

  3. Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn J

    2015-12-01

    Scar tissue is associated with physical wounds and their mending, but it is also descriptive in portraying the emotional scarring that occurs following adversity, resulting in potential psychological morbidity. Provided the adversity is not severe, such challenges to adaptability may provoke Andrew Solomon's process of forging meaning and building identity. Perceiving an emotional constitution as analogous to the immune system provides a metaphor for appreciating the benefits of emotional challenges, which may provoke greater emotional resilience or posttraumatic growth. PMID:26631526

  4. Microsurgery in the burn population – a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, A.E.; Skoracki, R.; Goverman, J.G.; Sarhane, K.A.; Parham, C.S.; Abu-Sittah, G.; kaddoura, I.; Atiyeh, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The management of patients suffering from burn injury poses unique challenges for the reconstructive surgeon, both in the acute and delayed settings. Once resuscitative measures are optimized and hemodynamic stability is achieved, early burn debridement and coverage is performed. Traditionally, this consists of excision of devitalized tissue and subsequent coverage using split thickness skin grafts. However, in certain instances, and depending on the extent and nature of the burn injury, skin grafting (or even local tissue rearrangement) may not be a reasonable option. in these cases, free tissue transfer may provide a viable reconstructive alternative. While free flap reconstruction is rare in burn surgery, particularly in the acute setting, burn injuries that expose vital structures, such as tendon, nerve, bone, or deep vessels, require robust flap coverage. in the delayed setting, unsightly scar formation and contracture often occurs secondary to skin graft coverage. These significant patient morbidities are often amenable to free tissue transfer as well. This review article discusses the indications, applications, and problems with free flap surgery for burn injuries in both the acute and delayed setting, and summarizes the available literature on microsurgical free tissue transfer for burn management. PMID:26668561

  5. Chemical Burn Injury in Kumasi: The Trend and Complications following and Their Management

    PubMed Central

    Akpaloo, Joseph; Chirurgie, Facharzt; Aboah, Ken; Klutsey, Ellen; Hoyte-Williams, Paa Ekow; Farhat, Boutros; Turkson, Edmund; Yorke, Joseph; Chirurgie, Facharzt; Ametih, Richard; Hussey, Romeo

    2015-01-01

    Background: A chemical burn refers to irritation and destruction of human tissue caused by exposure to a chemical, usually by direct contact with the chemical or its fumes. The study investigated the trend and complications following chemical burns and their management. Methods: The study involved a retrospective review of Burns Registry at the Burns Intensive Care Unit of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital on patients who were admitted for burns from May 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. Results: Chemical burns admissions accounted for 3.5% (n = 17) out of the total 487 burns cases, consisting of 12 males (70.6%) and 5 females (29.4%). Mean total burns surface area was 21.9%; mean length of stay in Burns Intensive Care Unit was 9.5 days. The etiological agents for the chemical burns included the following: hot caustic soda 1 (5.9%); acid 9 (53.9%)—the most common; hot ethanol 3 (17.6%); and other chemicals such as other bases, oxidizers, solvents, etc. accounted for 4 (23.5%) etiological agents. Outcome included 11 discharges (64.7%), 6 transferred out to other wards (35.3%), and 0 deaths (0.0%). The complications included severe scar contractures in 5 patients (29.4%), loss of vision: partial/total = 2 (11.8%), gross keloidal/hypertrophic scars = 10 (58.8%). Conclusions: Chemical burns are severe and often cause severe debilitating sequelae including partial/total loss of vision. But the current study showed that only a small population (3.5%) were affected by chemical burns and no death was recorded; society has to be continually conscious of chemicals, especially caustic agents, and hence take the necessary precautions so as to prevent these avoidable complications. PMID:26579354

  6. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scars are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  7. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  8. Idiopathic osteoarthritis and contracture: causal implications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, P; Alexander, C; Stewart, J; Lynskey, N

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To use the known association of idiopathic osteoarthritis with contracture as a means of searching for its cause. There are currently two theories concerning this association, one assuming that the contracture is a consequence of the osteoarthritis and the other that it precedes and causes the osteoarthritis. This study tested both theories. Methods: Flexion ranges in the 12 finger joints were obtained by goniometric measurement in two samples of normal female subjects, one group with a mean age of 22 years (25 subjects) and one with a mean age of 45 years (50 subjects). The results were compared with the known regional prevalence of osteoarthritis in the finger joints of women. Results: The older group showed evidence of reduced flexion range consistent with development of contracture in the extensor mechanism of the fingers. The distribution of the contracture showed a strong negative correlation with the regional prevalence of osteoarthritis. Conclusions: An early dorsal contracture develops in the fingers of normal subjects, but it is neither a consequence of nor the cause of digital osteoarthritis. The most parsimonious explanation for the association is that both contracture and idiopathic osteoarthritis are independent consequences of failure to use the full movement range. If this hypothesis is correct, the disease could be preventable. PMID:15647431

  9. Therapeutic Improvement of Scarring: Mechanisms of Scarless and Scar-Forming Healing and Approaches to the Discovery of New Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Occleston, Nick L.; Metcalfe, Anthony D.; Boanas, Adam; Burgoyne, Nicholas J.; Nield, Kerry; O'Kane, Sharon; Ferguson, Mark W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Scarring in the skin after trauma, surgery, burn or sports injury is a major medical problem, often resulting in loss of function, restriction of tissue movement and adverse psychological effects. Whilst various studies have utilised a range of model systems that have increased our understanding of the pathways and processes underlying scar formation, they have typically not translated to the development of effective therapeutic approaches for scar management. Existing treatments are unreliable and unpredictable and there are no prescription drugs for the prevention or treatment of dermal scarring. As a consequence, scar improvement still remains an area of clear medical need. Here we describe the basic science of scar-free and scar-forming healing, the utility of pre-clinical model systems, their translation to humans, and our pioneering approach to the discovery and development of therapeutic approaches for the prophylactic improvement of scarring in man PMID:20811598

  10. Epidemiology and Outcome of Chemical Burn Patients Admitted in Burn Unit of JNMC Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India: A 5-year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md Sohaib; Ahmad, Imran; Khurram, M. Fahud; Kanungo, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the epidemiology, clinical variable of chemical burns, and their outcomes to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all the patients with chemical burns admitted at author's center between November 2008 and December 2013. All the patients were evaluated in terms of age, sex, total body surface area, etiology, treatment given, morbidity, mortality, final outcome, and then educated regarding specific preventive measures. Results: A total of 96 patients (2.4% of total burn admissions) (42 males and 54 females) were admitted to our hospital with chemical burn injuries. Most of the patients were in the age group of 16–30 years. Incidence in females was slightly higher than in males. Acid was found to be the most common cause of injury. We found 55% patients admitted had <10% total body surface area (TBSA) involvement, 35% had burns involving between 11 and 20% TBSA, and 4% had burns involving 21–30% TBSA, and 6% had burns in >30% TBSA. Morbidity was noticed in the form of skin defect in 80% of cases, soft tissue defect with exposed tendon, bone, or vessels in 16% of cases, and 4% of patients developed contracture and hypertrophic scar. Eighty-six percent of patients required operative intervention. A total of three deaths (3%) were recorded. Conclusion: It was found that chemical burns, though not very common, are deeper burns and can be accidental or non-accidental, and the high-risk age group is 16–25 years. Chemical burns are largely preventable and if properly managed have a good outcome. PMID:25810999

  11. Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita: Multiple Congenital Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Ornek, Nurettin Irem; Caglar, Cagkan

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a syndrome characterized by nonprogressive multiple congenital joint contractures. The etiology of disease is multifactorial; it is most commonly suspected from absent fetal movements and genetic defects. AMC affects mainly limbs; also it might present with other organs involvement. It is crucial that the diagnosis of AMC should be kept in mind by musculoskeletal physicians in newborns with multiple joint contractures and patients must begin rehabilitation in early stage after accurate diagnosis in terms of functional independence. We present the diagnosis, types, clinical features, and treatment approaches of this disease in our case with literature reviews.

  12. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > Teens > Body > Skin Stuff > ... Scars Mild vs. Severe Scarring Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  13. Models of Abnormal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Bommie F.; Lee, Jun Yong; Jung, Sung-No

    2013-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are thick, raised dermal scars, caused by derailing of the normal scarring process. Extensive research on such abnormal scarring has been done; however, these being refractory disorders specific to humans, it has been difficult to establish a universal animal model. A wide variety of animal models have been used. These include the athymic mouse, rats, rabbits, and pigs. Although these models have provided valuable insight into abnormal scarring, there is currently still no ideal model. This paper reviews the models that have been developed. PMID:24078916

  14. Co-Graft of Acellular Dermal Matrix and Autogenous Microskin in a Child with Extensive Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.L.; Xia, Z.F.; Fang, L.S.; Wang, Y.J.; Wang, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 6-yr-old boy was the victim of a burns accident in a public bathhouse. The burns involved the face, neck, upper and lower extremities, anterior and posterior trunk, and both buttocks, covering 72% of the total body surface area (TBSA). The lesions in the lower extremities and parts of the right upper extremity were deep partial-thickness, comprising 40% TBSA. On day 5 post-burn, the lesions in both lower extremities were excised to the extent of the fascia under general anaesthesia. Meshed J1 Jayya Acellular Dermis®, a kind of acellular allodermal (ADM) matrix, was then placed on the left knee joint. The right knee joint served as control. The wounds in both lower extremities were then overlaid with microskin autografting. At 19 days post-application, the lesions in both lower extremities had almost completely resurfaced. Follow-up at six months revealed well-healed and stable skin of acellular ADM and microskin autografts on the left knee. However, the skin of the right knee was unstable and there was a chronic residual ulcer. Both legs showed some significant hypertrophic scars. The left knee joint (acellular ADM grafted site) showed mild contractures, while the right knee joint developed a significant contracture. The "skin" of the co-graft covered site appeared thicker and more elastic. The movement range of the left knee joint was much larger than that of the right knee joint. These results suggest that co-graft of acellular dermal matrix and autogenous microskin may be an effective way to repair this functional site in children with extensive burns and to improve the functional and cosmetic results. PMID:21991120

  15. Acne Scars: Treatment and Outcome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatments A - D Acne scars Treatment and outcome Acne scars: Treatment and outcome Safe and effective treatment ... be best for you. How do dermatologists treat acne scars? If you and your dermatologist believe that ...

  16. Capsular Contracture after Breast Augmentation: An Update for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Headon, Hannah; Kasem, Adbul; Mokbel, Kefah

    2015-09-01

    Capsular contracture is the most common complication following implant based breast surgery and is one of the most common reasons for reoperation. Therefore, it is important to try and understand why this happens, and what can be done to reduce its incidence. A literature search using the MEDLINE database was conducted including search terms 'capsular contracture breast augmentation', 'capsular contracture pathogenesis', 'capsular contracture incidence', and 'capsular contracture management', which yielded 82 results which met inclusion criteria. Capsular contracture is caused by an excessive fibrotic reaction to a foreign body (the implant) and has an overall incidence of 10.6%. Risk factors that were identified included the use of smooth (vs. textured) implants, a subglandular (vs. submuscular) placement, use of a silicone (vs. saline) filled implant and previous radiotherapy to the breast. The standard management of capsular contracture is surgical via a capsulectomy or capsulotomy. Medical treatment using the off-label leukotriene receptor antagonist Zafirlukast has been reported to reduce severity and help prevent capsular contracture from forming, as has the use of acellular dermal matrices, botox and neopocket formation. However, nearly all therapeutic approaches are associated with a significant rate of recurrence. Capsular contracture is a multifactorial fibrotic process the precise cause of which is still unknown. The incidence of contracture developing is lower with the use of textured implants, submuscular placement and the use of polyurethane coated implants. Symptomatic capsular contracture is usually managed surgically, however recent research has focussed on preventing capsular contracture from occurring, or treating it with autologous fat transfer. PMID:26430623

  17. Capsular Contracture after Breast Augmentation: An Update for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Headon, Hannah; Kasem, Adbul

    2015-01-01

    Capsular contracture is the most common complication following implant based breast surgery and is one of the most common reasons for reoperation. Therefore, it is important to try and understand why this happens, and what can be done to reduce its incidence. A literature search using the MEDLINE database was conducted including search terms 'capsular contracture breast augmentation', 'capsular contracture pathogenesis', 'capsular contracture incidence', and 'capsular contracture management', which yielded 82 results which met inclusion criteria. Capsular contracture is caused by an excessive fibrotic reaction to a foreign body (the implant) and has an overall incidence of 10.6%. Risk factors that were identified included the use of smooth (vs. textured) implants, a subglandular (vs. submuscular) placement, use of a silicone (vs. saline) filled implant and previous radiotherapy to the breast. The standard management of capsular contracture is surgical via a capsulectomy or capsulotomy. Medical treatment using the off-label leukotriene receptor antagonist Zafirlukast has been reported to reduce severity and help prevent capsular contracture from forming, as has the use of acellular dermal matrices, botox and neopocket formation. However, nearly all therapeutic approaches are associated with a significant rate of recurrence. Capsular contracture is a multifactorial fibrotic process the precise cause of which is still unknown. The incidence of contracture developing is lower with the use of textured implants, submuscular placement and the use of polyurethane coated implants. Symptomatic capsular contracture is usually managed surgically, however recent research has focussed on preventing capsular contracture from occurring, or treating it with autologous fat transfer. PMID:26430623

  18. Atrophic Acne Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Graber, Emmy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scarring is an unfortunate and frequent complication of acne, resulting in significant psychological distress for patients. Fortunately, numerous treatment options exist for acne scarring. Objectives: To extensively review the literature on treatment options for atrophic acne scarring. Materials and methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted on the following topics: dermabrasion, subcision, punch techniques, chemical peels, tissue augmentation, and lasers. Results: The literature supports the use of various treatment modalities; superior results may be achieved when multiple modalities are combined for a multi-step approach to scarring. Conclusion: The safety and efficacy of various treatment devices for acne scarring is well established, but there is a paucity of split-face trials comparing modalities. PMID:25610524

  19. Functional and mechanistic investigation of Shikonin in scarring.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Fan, Chen; Dong, Ying; Lynam, Emily; Leavesley, David I; Li, Kun; Su, Yonghua; Yang, Yinxue; Upton, Zee

    2015-02-25

    Scarring is a significant medical burden; financially to the health care system and physically and psychologically for patients. Importantly, there have been numerous case reports describing the occurrence of cancer in burn scars. Currently available therapies are not satisfactory due to their undesirable side-effects, complex delivery routes, requirements for long-term use and/or expense. Radix Arnebiae (Zi Cao), a perennial herb, has been clinically applied to treat burns and manage scars for thousands of years in Asia. Shikonin, an active component extracted from Radix Arnebiae, has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Apoptosis is an essential process during scar tissue remodelling. It was therefore hypothesized that Shikonin may induce apoptosis in scar-associated cells. This investigation presents the first detailed in vitro study examining the functional responses of scar-associated cells to Shikonin, and investigates the mechanisms underlying these responses. The data obtained suggests that Shikonin inhibits cell viability and proliferation and reduces detectable collagen in scar-derived fibroblasts. Further investigation revealed that Shikonin induces apoptosis in scar fibroblasts by differentially regulating the expression of caspase 3, Bcl-2, phospho-Erk1/2 and phospho-p38. In addition, Shikonin down-regulates the expression of collagen I, collagen III and alpha-smooth muscle actin genes hence attenuating collagen synthesis in scar-derived fibroblasts. In summary, it is demonstrated that Shikonin induces apoptosis and decreases collagen production in scar-associated fibroblasts and may therefore hold potential as a novel scar remediation therapy. PMID:25591861

  20. A polarized multispectral imaging system for quantitative assessment of hypertrophic scars

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are a pathologic reaction of the skin and soft tissue to burn or other traumatic injury. Scar tissue can cause patients serious functional and cosmetic issues. Scar management strategies, specifically scar assessment techniques, are vital to improve clinical outcome. To date, no entirely objective method for scar assessment has been embraced by the medical community. In this study, we introduce for the first time, a novel polarized multispectral imaging system combining out-of-plane Stokes polarimetry and Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI). This imaging system enables us to assess the pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, water, and melanin) and structural features (cellularity and roughness) of HTS. To apply the proposed technique in an in vivo experiment, dermal wounds were created in a porcine model and allowed to form into scars. The developed scars were then measured at various time points using the imaging system. Results showed a good agreement with clinical Vancouver Scar Scale assessment and histological examinations. PMID:25360354

  1. Primary scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Stamatios, Gregoriou; Ioannides, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Scarring alopecia or cicatricial alopecia results from follicular damage that is sufficient to cause the destruction and replacement of pilosebaceous structures by scar tissue. Primary scarring alopecias represent a group of disorders that primarily affect the hair follicles, as opposed to secondary scarring alopecias, which affect the dermis and secondarily cause follicular destruction. Inflammation may predominantly involve lymphocytes or neutrophils. Cicatricial alopecias that mainly involve lymphocytic inflammation include discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia, central centrifugal alopecia, and pseudopelade (Brocq). Cicatricial alopecias that are due to predominantly neutrophilic inflammation include folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Folliculitis keloidalis is a cicatricial alopecia with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. PMID:26370646

  2. Caesarean scar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Yves; Kerremans, Mieke; Op de Beeck, Bart; Colpaert, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    Faced with difficulty discriminating between placenta and myometrium in a patient with three previous caesarean sections, MRI provided definitive diagnosis of caesarean scar pregnancy, allowing for a save and uneventful planned surgical procedure. PMID:22778462

  3. Posterior capsular contracture of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Bach, H Gregory; Goldberg, Benjamin A

    2006-05-01

    Posterior capsular contracture is a common cause of shoulder pain in which the patient presents with restricted internal rotation and reproduction of pain. Increased anterosuperior translation of the humeral head occurs with forward flexion and can mimic the pain reported with impingement syndrome; however, the patient with impingement syndrome presents with normal range of motion. Initial management of posterior capsular contracture should be nonsurgical, emphasizing range-of-motion stretching with the goal of restoring normal motion. For patients who fail nonsurgical management, arthroscopic posterior capsule release can result in improved motion and pain relief. In the throwing athlete, repetitive forces on the posteroinferior capsule may cause posteroinferior capsular hypertrophy and limited internal rotation. This may be the initial pathologic event in the so-called dead arm syndrome, leading to a superior labrum anteroposterior lesion and, possibly, rotator cuff tear. Management involves regaining internal rotation such that the loss of internal rotation is not greater than the increase in external rotation. In the athlete who fails nonsurgical management, a selective posteroinferior capsulotomy can improve motion, reduce pain, and prevent further shoulder injury. PMID:16675620

  4. [Use of the Volkov-Oganesjan distraction-reposition apparatus in treatment of flexion contractures of the interphalangeal joints].

    PubMed

    Richtr, M; Rysavý, M

    1991-03-01

    In the submitted paper the authors present their experience with the treatment of flexion contractures by a Volkov-Oganesjan distraction reposition apparatus. The principle of treatment is continuous distension of shortened ligaments. The Volkov-Oganesjan apparatus makes systematic rehabilitation of the joint possible during gradual reposition of the contracture and at the same time prevents damage of the articular cartilage. The group comprised six patients who were treated and followed up. In four a post-traumatic condition was involved, once burns caused by electric current, and in one patient reoperation of a flexion contracture was involved. The mean grade of fixation of the PP joint before operation was 70 degrees. On average correction to 22 degrees was achieved. The mean period of treatment with the apparatus was 21 days. The therapeutic results was evaluated at least three months after removal of the apparatus. In all patients it proved possible to influence the flexion contracture by the method of an external fixation device. No complications of treatment were observed. The method and effect of therapy are consistent with the conclusions of work in vitro concerned with the role of traction in the shaping of ligaments. PMID:1872116

  5. Nonsurgical scar management of the face: does early versus late intervention affect outcome?

    PubMed

    Parry, Ingrid; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina; Greenhalgh, David

    2013-01-01

    Special emphasis is placed on the clinical management of facial scarring because of the profound physical and psychological impact of facial burns. Noninvasive methods of facial scar management include pressure therapy, silicone, massage, and facial exercises. Early implementation of these scar management techniques after a burn injury is typically accepted as standard burn rehabilitation practice, however, little data exist to support this practice. This study evaluated the timing of common noninvasive scar management interventions after facial skin grafting in children and the impact on outcome, as measured by scar assessment and need for facial reconstructive surgery. A retrospective review of 138 patients who underwent excision and grafting of the face and subsequent noninvasive scar management during a 10-year time frame was conducted. Regression analyses were used to show that earlier application of silicone was significantly related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale scores, specifically in the subscales of vascularity and pigmentation. Early use of pressure therapy and implementation of facial exercises were also related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale vascularity scores. No relationship was found between timing of the interventions and facial reconstructive outcome. Early use of silicone, pressure therapy, and exercise may improve scar outcome and accelerate time to scar maturity. PMID:23816994

  6. The scar mechanism revisited

    E-print Network

    F. Borondo; D. A. Wisniacki; E. G. Vergini; R. M. Benito

    2007-12-20

    Unstable periodic orbits are known to originate scars on some eigenfunctions of classically chaotic systems through recurrences causing that some part of an initial distribution of quantum probability in its vicinity returns periodically close to the initial point. In the energy domain, these recurrences are seen to accumulate quantum density along the orbit by a constructive interference mechanism when the appropriate quantization (on the action of the scarring orbit) is fulfilled. Other quantized phase space circuits, such as those defined by homoclinic tori, are also important in the coherent transport of quantum density in chaotic systems. The relationship of this secondary quantum transport mechanism with the standard mechanism for scarring is here discussed and analyzed.

  7. Dynamic Distraction External Fixation for Contracture of the Metacarpophalangeal Joint.

    PubMed

    Seigerman, Daniel A; Tan, Virak

    2015-12-01

    Metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint contractures are common after traumatic injury, and can be difficult to manage. After surgical capsulectomy, it remains challenging to maintain motion that was obtained at the time of surgery. Our group uses a novel, prefabricated digital external fixator to provide both distraction, and motion therapy across the MP joint after surgical treatment of MP contracture. The purpose of this technique is to demonstrate the effectiveness of an adjunctive dynamic distraction external fixator for the maintenance of joint motion after surgical treatment of MP contractures of the border digits. PMID:26280472

  8. Acne Scars: Tips for Preventing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatments A - D Acne scars Tips for preventing Acne scars: Tips for preventing Gentle skin care can ... acne clears. Dermatologists recommend the following: Treat the acne The fewer breakouts you have, the less likely ...

  9. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  10. Caesarean scar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ash, A; Smith, A; Maxwell, D

    2007-03-01

    Caesarean scar pregnancy is one of the rarest forms of ectopic pregnancy. Little is known about its incidence and natural history. With increasing incidence of caesarean section worldwide, more and more cases are diagnosed and reported. Transvaginal ultrasound and colour flow Doppler provides a high diagnostic accuracy with very few false positives. A delay in diagnosis and/or treatment can lead to uterine rupture, major haemorrhage, hysterectomy and serious maternal morbidity. Early diagnosis can offer treatment options of avoiding uterine rupture and haemorrhage, thus preserving the uterus and future fertility. Management plan should be individually tailored. Available data suggest that termination of pregnancy is the treatment of choice in the first trimester soon after the diagnosis. Expectant treatment has a poor prognosis because of risk of rupture. There are no reliable scientific data on the risk of recurrence of the condition in future pregnancy, role of the interval between the previous caesarean delivery and occurrence of caesarean scar pregnancy, and effect of caesarean wound closure technique on caesarean scar pregnancy. In this article, we aim to find the demography, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, most appropriate methods of diagnosis and management, with their implications in clinical practice for this condition. PMID:17313383

  11. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation. PMID:25922301

  12. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: An Emerging Treatment Modality for Retracting Scars of the Hands.

    PubMed

    Saggini, Raoul; Saggini, Andrea; Spagnoli, Anna Maria; Dodaj, Ira; Cigna, Emanuele; Maruccia, Michele; Soda, Giuseppe; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged and abnormal scarring after trauma, burns and surgical procedures often results in a pathologic scar. We evaluated the efficacy of unfocused shock wave treatment, alone or in combination with manual therapy, on retracting scars on the hands. Scar appearance was assessed by means of the modified Vancouver Scar Scale; functional hand mobility was evaluated using a range-of-motion scale, whereas a visual analogue score was implemented for detecting any improvements in referred pain. Additionally, biopsy specimens were collected for clinico-pathologic correlation. For each active treatment group, statistically significant improvements in modified Vancouver Scar Scale were recorded as early as five treatment sessions and confirmed 2 wk after the last treatment session. Analogous results were observed when assessing pain and range of movement. Histopathological examination revealed significant increases in dermal fibroblasts in each active treatment group, as well as in neoangiogenetic response and type-I collagen concentration. PMID:26454624

  13. Halothane cooling contractures of skinned mammalian muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sudo, R T; Zapata-Sudo, G; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1990-11-01

    The effects of halothane or cooling on Ca2(+)-activated tensions and on the uptake and release of Ca2+ by the sarcoplasmic reticulum were investigated in chemically skinned fibers of the extensor digitorum longus muscle of adult rabbits. At 22 degrees C, halothane (greater than 0.46 mM) induced Ca2+ release from the SR of Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers that resulted in transient tensions. Higher concentrations of halothane (greater than 4.65 mM) reduced the steady-state accumulation of Ca2+ in the SR at 22 degrees C. Cooling (to less than 10 degrees C) elicited transient contractures (cooling-induced contractures [CC]) in Ca2(+)-loaded skinned fibers, despite the fact that the tensions elicited by adding Ca2+ to the bath were depressed at these low temperatures. The skinned fibers did not develop CCs at 12-16 degrees C. Halothane cooling contractures could be elicited at these temperatures by exposing the fibers to halothane concentrations that failed to elicit Ca2+ release at 22 degrees C. The halothane cooling contractures were blocked by procaine but not by lidocaine. It was concluded that these contractures resulted from a synergistic interaction between halothane and cooling that stimulates Ca2+ release from, and reduces Ca2+ uptake by, the sarcoplasmic reticulum. PMID:2240685

  14. SCAR-B MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-01-10

    ... properties. Study the impact of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosol on the atmosphere and climate by measuring the properties of urban and industrial pollution dominated by sulfate particles. Project ...

  15. MiR-138/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? signaling regulates human hypertrophic scar fibroblast proliferation and movement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying-ying; Fan, Peng-ju; Lei, Shao-rong; Qi, Min; Yang, Xing-hua

    2015-05-01

    Excessive scars affect a patient's quality of life, both physically and psychologically, by causing pruritus, pain and contractures. Because there is a poor understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of hypertrophic scar formation, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory. In this study, we found that miR-138 was downregulated and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR?) was inversely upregulated in hypertrophic scar tissues compared to in paired normal skin tissues. Using a dual-luciferase assay, we validated that miR138 directly targets PPAR? and regulates its expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. In gain-and-loss experiments, we found that miR-138/PPAR? signaling regulated human hypertrophic scar fibroblast proliferation and movement, and affected scarring-related protein expression, which suggests that miR-138/PPAR? signaling is important for hypertrophic scarring. Thus, our study provides evidence to help determine whether miR-138/PPAR? signaling may be a potential target for hypertrophic scarring management. PMID:25752881

  16. Dune Avalanche Scars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  17. Mapping Fire Scars in the Brazilian Cerrado Using AVHRR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Brass, J. A.; Rezendez, A.; Alexander, S.; Guild, L. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian cerrado, or savanna, spans an area of 1,800,000 square kilometers on the great plateau of Central Brazil. Large fires covering hundreds of square kilometers, frequently occur in wildland areas of the cerrado, dominated by grasslands or grasslands mixed with shrubs and small trees, and also within area in the cerrado used for agricultural purposes, particularly for grazing. Smaller fires, typically extending over arm of a few square kilometers or less, are associated with the clewing of crops, such as dry land rice. A method for mapping fire scars and differentiating them from extensive areas of bare sod with AVHRR bands 1 (.55 -.68 micrometer) and 3 (3.5 - 3.9 micrometers) and measures of performance based on comparison with maps of fires with Landsat imagery will be presented. Methods of estimating total area burned from the AVHRR fire scar map will be discussed and related to land use and scar size.

  18. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News 4/3/2014 The Burning Truth 12/19/2013 Osteopathic Training Statement 7/2/2013 The Truth About Tanning 4/24/2013 Sun Safety IQ Online Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  19. The surgical treatment of Dupuytren's contracture: a synthesis of techniques.

    PubMed

    Skoff, Hillel D

    2004-02-01

    Dupuytren's disease is an affliction of the palmar fascia. Selective fasciectomy is recommended once contracture has occurred. Alternatives for wound closure include tissue rearrangement, the open palm technique, and full-thickness skin grafting. In this prospective study, a new "synthesis" technique was used to treat a cohort of patients with advanced Dupuytren's disease. The results were then compared with those of a second cohort of patients who underwent the open palm technique. Thirty consecutive patients were selected. Ten patients (nine men and one woman; average age, 67 years) underwent the open palm technique, and 20 patients (18 men and two women; average age, 70 years) underwent the synthesis method. Follow-up was 3.5 years for the open palm group and 2.7 years for the synthesis group. All patients in both groups improved with respect to motion, function, appearance, and satisfaction. Objectively, for the open palm technique, metacarpophalangeal joint contracture decreased from 50 degrees to 0 degrees, and proximal interphalangeal joint contracture decreased from 40 degrees to 6 degrees. Using the synthesis method, metacarpophalangeal joint contracture decreased from 57 degrees to 0 degrees, and proximal interphalangeal joint contracture decreased from 58 degrees to 10 degrees. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Test scores decreased from 37 to 30 in both groups. There were no significant differences between groups in these parameters. The two significant intergroup differences were healing time (40 days for the open palm technique versus 28 days for the synthesis method) and recurrence rate (50 percent for open palm versus 0 percent for synthesis). The synthesis technique combines with success the best features of current methods for the surgical treatment of advanced Dupuytren's disease. PMID:14758215

  20. [Scalp burns due to hair bleach].

    PubMed

    Wagenblast, Lene

    2011-02-28

    We present two cases of scalp burn or possible chemical reaction due to use of hair highlight products. One case was treated with serial excision of the scarred bald area after the burn, and the other case was treated with implantation of expanders and subsequent excision of the bald area. PMID:21362396

  1. Student Attitudes toward Children and Adolescents with Severe Burns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holaday, Margot; McPhearson, Ruth

    1996-01-01

    Color photographs of burned and nonburned children were used to study the attitudes of 218 practice teachers, nursing students, and counselors-in-training. Findings revealed that children with severe burns and facial scarring were regarded less favorably. Stresses that professionals should be well-trained and empathic in order to assist burned

  2. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  3. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  4. Dermatan sulfate remodeling associated with advanced Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Ko?ma, Ewa M; G?owacki, Andrzej; Olczyk, Krystyna; Ciecierska, Magdalena

    2007-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate (DS) widespread as a component of extracellular matrix proteoglycans, is characterized by great bio-reactivity and remarkable structural heterogeneity due to distinct degrees of sulfation and glucuronosyl epimerization and different polymerization degrees. However, DS metabolism under various biological conditions is poorly known. Dupuytren's contracture is a benign fibromatosis leading to complex remodeling of the palmar fascia structure and properties. However, it remains unclear whether the disease affects the structure of DS, which is the major tissue glycosaminoglycan. Thus the aim of the study was to examine the structure of the total DS in Dupuytren's fascia. DS chains were extracted from 5 samples of normal fascia and 7 specimens of Dupuytren's tissue by papain digestion followed by fractionation with cetylpyridinium chloride. Then, DS structure analysis was performed comprising the evaluation of its molecular masses and sensitivity to hyaluronidase and chondroitinase B. Dupuytren's contracture is associated with significant remodeling of DS chain structure revealed by (1) a distinct profile of chain molecular masses characterized by the appearance of long size components as well as the increase in the content of small size chains; (2) a different glucuronosyl epimerization pattern connected with the enhanced content of glucuronate disaccharide blocks; (3) chain oversulfation. These structural alterations in total DS may modify the GAG interactions especially affecting collagen fibrillogenesis and growth factor availability. Thus, Dupuytren's contracture associated DS remodeling may promote the phenomena typical for advanced disease: apoptosis and reduction in cell number as well as the appearance of dense pseudotendinous collagen matrix. PMID:18066404

  5. Generation and characterization of a novel shoulder contracture mouse model.

    PubMed

    Oki, Satoshi; Shirasawa, Hideyuki; Yoda, Masaki; Matsumura, Noboru; Tohmonda, Takahide; Yuasa, Kazuki; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Horiuchi, Keisuke

    2015-11-01

    Frozen shoulder is a relatively common disorder that leads to severe pain and stiffness in the shoulder joint. Although this disorder is self-limiting in nature, the symptoms often persist for years, resulting in severe disability. Recent studies using human specimens and animal models have shown distinct changes in the gene expression patterns in frozen shoulder tissue, indicating that novel therapeutic intervention could be achieved by controlling the genes that are potentially involved in the development of frozen shoulder. To achieve this goal, it is imperative to develop a reliable animal joint contracture model in which gene expression can be manipulated by gene targeting and transgenic technologies. Here, we describe a novel shoulder contracture mouse model. We found that this model mimics the clinical presentation of human frozen shoulder and recapitulates the changes in the gene expression pattern and the histology of frozen shoulder and joint contracture in humans and other larger animal models. The model is highly reproducible, without any major complications. Therefore, the present model may serve as a useful tool for investigating frozen shoulder etiology and for identifying its potential target genes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1732-1738, 2015. PMID:26014262

  6. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with overcorrected strabismus (and several patients with undercorrection after extraocular muscle resection) underwent exploration of previously operated muscles, with the intention of advancing their tendons to prevent the need for surgery on additional muscles. Unexpectedly, it was found that, in many cases, an elongated scar segment of variable length was interposed between the muscle and its insertion site on the sclera. Laboratory investigations were carried out to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s) and to create an animal model of the disorder. METHODS: Lengthened scars were repaired on 198 muscles during 134 procedures performed on 123 patients. The scars consisted of amorphous connective tissue interposed between the globe and normal tendon. Repair was accomplished by excision of the scar and reattachment of the muscle to sclera, using absorbable sutures in 64 cases and nonabsorbable sutures in 70 cases. Histopathologic examination was performed on 82 clinical specimens, and tissue culture studies were performed on 7 specimens. To develop an animal model, 10 New Zealand white rabbits underwent bilateral superior rectus resection. Half of the eyes received sub-Tenon's injections of collagenase over the operative site during weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6 postoperatively; the other half received saline solution injections on the same schedule. At 10 weeks, half the sites were studied histologically, and the other half underwent collagen creep analysis. In a second study, the use of absorbable versus nonabsorbable sutures was compared in the rabbit model. RESULTS: In the clinical cases, the mean length of the elongated scar segments was 4.2 mm. A total of 105 of the 134 repair procedures were judged successful. Thirty-one procedures resulted in recurrence of the original overcorrection; 7 of these had documented restretches. Factors that distinguished patients with stretched scars from patients with classic slipped muscles included minimal or no limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52 FIGURE 53 FIGURE 54 FIGURE 55 FIGURE 58 FIGURE 59 FIGURE 60 FIGURE 61 FIGURE 62 FIGURE 63

  7. MISR Views a Fire-Scarred Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This MISR image pair shows 'before and after' views of the area around the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Washington. On June 27, 2000, a fire in the dry sagebrush was sparked by an automobile crash. The flames were fanned by hot summer winds. By the day after the accident, about 100,000 acres had burned, and the fire's spread forced the closure of highways and loss of homes.

    These images, from Terra orbits 2176 and 3341, were obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Compare the area just above and to the right of the line of cumulus clouds in the May 15 image with the same area imaged on August 3. The darkened burn scar measures approximately 35 kilometers across. The Columbia River is seen wending its way around the area, and the Snake River branches off to the right.

    According to Idaho's National Interagency Fire Center, the US has been experiencing the worst fire season since 1996.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  8. Biologicals and Fetal Cell Therapy for Wound and Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2011-01-01

    Few biopharmaceutical preparations developed from biologicals are available for tissue regeneration and scar management. When developing biological treatments with cellular therapy, selection of cell types and establishment of consistent cell banks are crucial steps in whole-cell bioprocessing. Various cell types have been used in treatment of wounds to reduce scar to date including autolog and allogenic skin cells, platelets, placenta, and amniotic extracts. Experience with fetal cells show that they may provide an interesting cell choice due to facility of outscaling and known properties for wound healing without scar. Differential gene profiling has helped to point to potential indicators of repair which include cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, cytokines, growth factors, and development. Safety has been evidenced in Phase I and II clinical fetal cell use for burn and wound treatments with different cell delivery systems. We present herein that fetal cells present technical and therapeutic advantages compared to other cell types for effective cell-based therapy for wound and scar management. PMID:22363853

  9. Fire scars and ancient sand dunes in southern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The rectangular green areas in this view of southern Australia are protected areas of natural forest (national parks and biospheric reserves), and the lighter surrounding colors (tan-brown) are agricultural croplands occupying land which once must have looked as green as the nature reserves but are now cleared of forest. The major green patch has been recently burned, as shown by the irregular pattern of a large, multiple burn scar. The pattern of the fire scar indicates that the fires were driven by winds blowing from left to right. Close examination of the view shows that the forests are rooted in a soil made up of a widespread sheet of ancient dune sand. The dunes can be seen best within the area of the large fire scar where the characteristic wavy, scalloped pattern of crescent dunes can be detected. The crescents indicate that the sand was heaped up by winds blowing from right to left in this view, in the opposite direction to the winds which fanned the fires. A few straight dunes

  10. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:24347858

  11. Burning Issue: Handling Household Burns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hot objects or liquid, fire, friction, the sun, electricity, or certain chemicals. Each year, about a half- ... infant or elderly. the burn was caused by electricity, which can lead to “invisible” burns. Burns Burns ...

  12. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following...

  13. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following...

  14. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following...

  15. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following...

  16. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following...

  17. Management Strategies for Post-Prostatectomy Bladder Neck Contractures.

    PubMed

    Kovell, Robert Caleb; Terlecki, Ryan Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Patients who develop bladder neck contracture (BNC) after surgical treatment for prostate cancer often present with progressive lower urinary tract symptoms. Multiple risk factors contribute to BNC development including patient-related factors and technical considerations at the time of surgery. Initial management begins with endoscopic therapies, including dilation, transurethral incision (TUIBNC), and injection of adjunctive agents. When BNC remains refractory to these therapies, surgical reconstruction of the vesicourethral anastomosis or urinary diversion can be considered in select cases. This review presents an outline of the management of BNC after radical prostatectomy (RP), highlighting the recent literature related to the subject. PMID:26224157

  18. Microstructural and molecular considerations in the treatment of scars with ablative fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Cerrene N; Ozog, David

    2015-03-01

    Fractional ablative lasers have recently proven to be an effective modality for improving the clinical appearance and minimizing the morbidity associated with restrictivetype scars. Their tolerable safety profile on nonfacial sites and darker Fitzpatrick skin types provides an advantage over its fully ablative counterpart in treating facial rhytides, photodamaged skin, and acne scars. However, despite its increasing usage in clinical practice, the mechanism behind the observed clinical benefit remains complex and has yet to be fully elucidated. This paper reviews the work on the histological mechanism of action of ablative fractional lasers, and the molecular changes that occur posttreatment on restrictive scars, with an emphasis on mature burn and postsurgical scars. As the majority of research has been on the carbon dioxide laser, a natural focus on this wavelength is presented. PMID:25922951

  19. Scar Wars: Preferences in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Siun; Murphy, Stephen; Kelly, Jack L; Morrison, Colin M

    2015-01-01

    Background The uptake of breast reconstruction is ever increasing with procedures ranging from implant-based reconstructions to complex free tissue transfer. Little emphasis is placed on scarring when counseling patients yet they remain a significant source of morbidity and litigation. The aim of this study was to examine the scarring preferences of men and women in breast oncoplastic and reconstructive surgery. Methods Five hundred men and women were asked to fill out a four-page questionnaire in two large Irish centres. They were asked about their opinions on scarring post breast surgery and were also asked to rank the common scarring patterns in wide local excisions, oncoplastic procedures, breast reconstructions as well as donor sites. Results Fifty-eight percent of those surveyed did not feel scars were important post breast cancer surgery. 61% said that their partners' opinion of scars were important. The most preferred wide local excision scar was the lower lateral quadrant scar whilst the scars from the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap were most favoured. The superior gluteal artery perforator flap had the most preferred donor site while surprisingly, the DIEP had the least favourite donor site. Conclusions Scars are often overlooked when planning breast surgery yet the extent and position of the scar needs to be outlined to patients and it should play an important role in selecting a breast reconstruction option. This study highlights the need for further evaluation of patients' opinions regarding scar patterns. PMID:26430631

  20. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on...

  1. Congenital Heart Disease in Adolescents With Gluteal Muscle Contracture

    PubMed Central

    You, Tian; Zhang, Xin-tao; Zha, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), presented with hip abduction and external rotation when crouching, is common in several ethnicities, particularly in Chinese. It remains unclear that the reasons why these children are weak and have no choice to accept repeated intramuscular injection. Here, we found some unique cases which may be useful to explain this question. We describe a series of special GMC patients, who are accompanied with congenital heart disease (CHD). These cases were first observed in preoperative examinations of a patient with atrial septal defect (ASD), which was proved by chest X-ray and cardiac ultrasound. From then on, we gradually identified additional 3 GMC patients with CHD. The original patient with ASD was sent to cardiosurgery department to repair atrial septal first and received arthroscopic surgery later. While the other 3 were cured postoperative of ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of fallot (TOF), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), respectively, and had surgery directly. The study gives us 3 proposals: (1) as to CHD children, it is essential to decrease the use of intramuscular injection, (2) paying more attention to cardiac examination especially cardiac ultrasound in perioperative period, and (3) taking 3D-CT to reconstruct gluteal muscles for observing contracture bands clearly in preoperation. However, more larger series of patients are called for to confirm these findings. PMID:25654394

  2. The Mast Cell Stabilizer Ketotifen Fumarate Lessens Contracture Severity and Myofibroblast Hyperplasia: A Study of a Rabbit Model of Posttraumatic Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Monument, Michael J.; Hart, David A.; Befus, A. Dean; Salo, Paul T.; Zhang, Mei; Hildebrand, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The propensity of the elbow to become stiff after trauma is widely appreciated and in this setting, the joint capsule is commonly recognized as the major motion-limiting anatomical structure. Affected joint capsules become fibrotic, characterized by myofibroblast hyperplasia and excessive collagen deposition. Mast cell hyperplasia is common within fibrotic tissue and mast cells are known to synthesize many profibrotic mediators. We have hypothesized that mast cell inhibition after skeletal injury will lessen the degree of contracture severity and will reduce myofibroblast hyperplasia within the joint capsule. Methods Posttraumatic contractures of the knee were created using a combination of intra-articular injury coupled to internal immobilization in skeletally mature, New Zealand white rabbits. Four groups of animals were studied: a non-operative control group (CON), an operative contracture group (ORC) and two-operative groups treated with a mast cell stabilizer, Ketotifen fumarate at doses of 0.5mg/kg (KF0.5) and 1.0mg/kg (KF1.0) twice daily, respectively. After 8 weeks of immobilization, flexion contractures were measured biomechanically and the posterior joint capsule was harvested for quantification of myofibroblast and mast cell numbers. Results Flexion contractures developed in the ORC group (58 ± 14°) and the severity of contracture was significantly reduced in both groups treated with Ketotifen (KF0.5: 42 ± 17° and KF1.0: 45 ± 10°, p<0.02). Joint capsule myofibroblast and mast cell numbers were significantly increased within the operative contracture group (p<0.001). In both surgical groups treated with Ketotifen, myofibroblast and mast cell numbers were significantly reduced (p<0.001). Conclusions The use of a mast cell stabilizer, Ketotifen was effective in reducing the biomechanical and cellular manifestations of joint capsule fibrosis in a rabbit model of posttraumatic joint contracture. This is suggestive that an inflammatory pathway, mediated by mast cell activation is involved in the induction of joint capsule fibrosis after traumatic injury. Clinical Relevance These results suggest mast cell activation is an important event in the genesis of posttraumatic joint contractures. Further work is needed to determine if mast cell inhibition has a role in the prevention of posttraumatic joint contractures in humans. PMID:20516323

  3. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  4. Scarring in open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Wisniacki, Diego; Carlo, Gabriel G

    2008-04-01

    We study scarring phenomena in open quantum systems. We show numerical evidence that individual resonance eigenstates of an open quantum system present localization around unstable short periodic orbits in a similar way as their closed counterparts. The structure of eigenfunctions around these classical objects is not destroyed by the opening. This is exposed in a paradigmatic system of quantum chaos, the cat map. PMID:18517679

  5. Biomass Burning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-07-27

    Projects:  Biomass Burning Definition/Description:  Biomass Burning: This data set represents the geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ...

  6. Bilateral carpal contracture in a neonatal addax (Addax nasomaculatus).

    PubMed

    Watson, Megan K; Langan, Jennifer; Adkesson, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    A neonate male addax calf displayed an inability to extend its forelimbs bilaterally (range of motion restricted to 45 degrees-50 degrees on full extension) with resultant inability to stand. Based on examination and radiographs, the congenital defect was attributed to contracted soft tissue structures (joint capsule and/or intercarpal ligaments). Splinting, support of the limbs, and physical therapy resulted in moderate improvement of the angle of contraction (full flexion to approximately 120 degrees on extension at day 10). The animal was able to walk with splints but died at 10 days from acute head trauma, presumably related to a traumatic fall caused by challenges with ambulation. Postmortem examination confirmed soft-tissue contracture of the forelimbs. Malposition of the calf in utero was considered a possible cause of the defect. PMID:24063116

  7. A Case of Multiple Spontaneous Keloid Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jfri, Abdulhadi; Rajeh, Nawal; Karkashan, Eman

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scars result from an abnormal healing response to cutaneous injury or inflammation that extends beyond the borders of the original wound. Spontaneous keloid scars forming in the absence of any previous trauma or surgical procedure are rare. Certain syndromes have been associated with this phenomenon, and few reports have discussed the evidence of single spontaneous keloid scar, which raises the question whether they are really spontaneous. Here, we present a 27-year-old mentally retarded single female with orbital hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, repaired cleft lip and high-arched palate who presented with progressive multiple spontaneous keloid scars in different parts of her body which were confirmed histologically by the presence of typical keloidal collagen. This report supports the fact that keloid scars can appear spontaneously and are possibly linked to a genetic factor. Furthermore, it describes a new presentation of spontaneous keloid scars in the form of multiple large lesions in different sites of the body. PMID:26351423

  8. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  9. A comparative study to evaluate the effect of honey dressing and silver sulfadiazene dressing on wound healing in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Baghel, P. S.; Shukla, S.; Mathur, R. K.; Randa, R.

    2009-01-01

    To compare the effect of honey dressing and silver-sulfadiazene (SSD) dressing on wound healing in burn patients. Patients (n=78) of both sexes, with age group between 10 and 50 years and with first and second degree of burn of less than 50% of TBSA (Total body surface area) were included in the study, over a period of 2 years (2006-08). After stabilization, patients were randomly attributed into two groups: ‘honey group’ and ‘SSD group’. Time elapsed since burn was recorded. After washing with normal saline, undiluted pure honey was applied over the wounds of patients in the honey group (n=37) and SSD cream over the wounds of patients in SSD group (n=41), everyday. Wound was dressed with sterile gauze, cotton pads and bandaged. Status of the wound was assessed every third and seventh day and on the day of completion of study. Patients were followed up every fortnight till epithelialization. The bacteriological examination of the wound was done every seventh day. The mean age for case (honey group) and control (SSD group) was 34.5 years and 28.5 years, respectively. Wound swab culture was positive in 29 out of 36 patients who came within 8 hours of burn and in all patients who came after 24 hours. The average duration of healing in patients treated with honey and SSD dressing at any time of admission was 18.16 and 32.68 days, respectively. Wound of all those patients (100%) who reported within 1 hour became sterile with honey dressing in less than 7 days while none with SSD. All of the wounds became sterile in less than 21 days with honey, while tthis was so in only 36.5% with SSD treated wounds. The honey group included 33 patients reported within 24 hour of injury, and 26 out of them had complete outcome at 2 months of follow-up, while numbers for the SSD group were 32 and 12. Complete outcome for any admission point of time after 2 months was noted in 81% and 37% of patients in the honey group and the SSD group. Honey dressing improves wound healing, makes the wound sterile in lesser time, has a better outcome in terms of prevention of hypertrophic scarring and post-burn contractures, and decreases the need of debridement irrespective of time of admission, when compared to SSD dressing. PMID:20368852

  10. Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Anna Y; Butler, Daniel P; Cussons, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Background Insufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria. Methods Patients (250) were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma), underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic) and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database. Results Telephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions). Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016) and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05), particularly in the elective group where males (36.17%) were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04%) (P<0.01). Conclusions Successful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision. PMID:26618120

  11. Scars

    MedlinePLUS

    ... subspecialty, ASDS member dermatologists perform medically necessary and cosmetic procedures to improve the health, function and beauty ... to frown lines… Performing more than 5 million cosmetic procedures each year, ASDS member dermatologists offer many ...

  12. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  13. Effective treatments of atrophic acne scars.

    PubMed

    Gozali, Maya Valeska; Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-05-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient's scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  14. Management of Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, A.S.; Mesták, J.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Scar management for the prevention of excessive scar formation has always been important but never so important as it is today. Optimal management continues to be an enigma for surgeons, and the best modality of treatment has been debated for many years. However, most studies have unfortunately been either retrospective or case report descriptions. Advances in scar management have been hampered by confusing or ambiguous terminology. There is no consensus on what amount of post-traumatic skin scar formation is "normal" and what should be considered "hypertrophic". In the World Health Organization's ICD-9, there is no diagnostic code for hypertrophic scar - only keloid is listed. Yet the medical and scientific literature distinguishes them as different conditions. This confusion results in inappropriate management of scar formation, and occasionally contributes to decision making related to elective or cosmetic surgery. Our experience suggests that there is no single treatment for scars that is adequate and that clinical judgement is very important when considering treatment and balancing the potential benefits of the various treatments available. The goal of treating scars is to restore functionality, provide relief of symptoms, enhance cosmetics, and prevent recurrence. This article is based on our scientific and clinical experiences and focuses on over-the-counter options to manage keloid and hypertrophic scars. PMID:21991008

  15. [Use of a distraction apparatus in the treatment of flexion contractures in the interphalangeal joints].

    PubMed

    Richtr, M; Rysavý, M

    1992-04-01

    The use of a Volkov-Oganesjan distraction reposition apparatus in the treatment of flexion contractures of interphalangeal joints gives very satisfactory results. As compared with formerly used methods of conservative treatment, the apparatus makes reposition of the contractures possible, by its design it protects articular cartilages against damage by pressure and makes continuous rehabilitation of the joint possible throughout the period when the apparatus is used. PMID:1594996

  16. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. © 2015 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 5:1877-1909, 2015. PMID:26426470

  17. Mechanoregulation of the Myofibroblast in Wound Contraction, Scarring, and Fibrosis: Opportunities for New Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Van De Water, Livingston; Varney, Scott; Tomasek, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Myofibroblasts are responsible for wound closure that occurs in healed acute wounds. However, their actions can result in disfiguring scar contractures, compromised organ function, and a tumor promoting stroma. Understanding the mechanisms regulating their contractile machinery, gene expression, and lifespan is essential to develop new therapies to control their function. Recent Advances Mechanical stress and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-?1) regulate myofibroblast differentiation from mesenchymal progenitors. As these precursor cells differentiate, they assemble a contractile apparatus to generate the force used to contract wounds. The mechanisms by which mechanical stress promote expression of contractile genes through the TGF-?1 and serum response factor pathways and offer therapeutic targets to limit myofibroblast function are being elucidated. Critical Issues Emerging evidence suggests that the integration of mechanical cues with intracellular signaling pathways is critical to myofibroblast function via its effects on gene expression, cellular contraction, and paracrine signaling with neighboring cells. In addition, while apoptosis is clearly one pathway that can limit myofibroblast lifespan, recent data suggest that pathogenic myofibroblasts can become senescent and adopt a more beneficial phenotype, or may revert to a quiescent state, thereby limiting their function. Future Directions Given the important role that myofibroblasts play in pathologies as disparate as cutaneous scarring, organ fibrosis, and tumor progression, knowledge gained in the areas of intracellular signaling networks, mechanical signal transduction, extracellular matrix biology, and cell fate will support efforts to develop new therapies with a wide impact. PMID:24527336

  18. Prevention and treatment of excessive dermal scarring.

    PubMed Central

    Roseborough, Ingrid E.; Grevious, Mark A.; Lee, Raphael C.

    2004-01-01

    Today, wound management to avoid excessive scar formation is increasingly important, especially in populations with Fitzpatrick 3 or higher skin pigmentation. Medical science and industrial development are devoting more effort toward understanding and offering better therapy to control scars. However, advances in scar management have been hampered by the confusing or ambiguous terminology. There is no consensus on what amount of post-traumatic skin scar formation is "normal" and what should be considered "hypertrophic". In the World Health Organization's ICD-9, there is no diagnostic code for hypertrophic scar--only keloid is listed. Yet, the medical and scientific literature distinguishes them as different conditions. Our experience suggests that the diagnosis of keloid disease is greatly over-rendered. For black patients, an elevated scar seems, by default, diagnosed as keloid by most. This confusion results in inappropriate management of scar formation, and occasionally contributes to decision making related to elective or cosmetic surgery. Given that patients are expecting better outcomes from wound care today than in the past, this review article attempts to capture the essential biological factors related to wound scar production and discusses treatment options and indications used by the authors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:14746360

  19. Effect of stretch on improvement of muscular contractures in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ishikura, Hideki; Ono, Takeya; Oki, Sadaaki; Saito, Yasukazu; Umei, Namiko; Tsumiyama, Wakako; Tasaka, Atsushi; Aihara, Kazuki; Sato, Yuta; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate how a stretching torque affects muscular contractures. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 48 male Wistar rats. [Methods] Subjects were divided into 4 groups as follows: Group 1 was the control; Group 2 had muscles in continuous fixation; Group 3 had muscles stretched in the direction of dorsiflexion by a spring balancer set at a torque of 0.3N for a period of 30 minutes after continuous fixation; and Group 4 had muscles stretched in the direction of dorsiflexion by a spring balancer set at a torque of 3.0N for a period of 30 minutes after continuous fixation. Joint fixation periods were for 2 and 4-weeks. Ankle joint range of motion and soleus flexibility were analyzed. [Results] For the 2-week joint fixation, soleus flexibility in Group 4 showed an increase compared with that of Group 3. For both fixation periods, range of motion in Group 4 showed an increase compared with that of Group 3. [Conclusion] For both fixation periods, stretching improved joint range of motion. In the 2-week joint fixation, soleus flexibility improved. However, soleus flexibility did not improve in the 4-week joint fixation. PMID:26504301

  20. Burn Institute

    MedlinePLUS

    ... save a close friend from a fiery plane crash. He spent nearly two months in the UCSD ... Burn Prevention Research and Treatment Burn Survivor Support Community Services Donate Now! Recent Photos Choose Language For ...

  1. Controlled Burn

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    GULF OF MEXICO — Dark clouds of smoke and fire emerge as oil burns during a controlled burn in the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. Coast Guard working in partnership with BP PLC, local residents, and other Federal agencies conducted the controlled burn to aid in preventing the spread of oil following...

  2. Treatment of Hypertrophic Scar in Human with Autologous Transplantation of Cultured Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts along with Fibrin Glue

    PubMed Central

    Taghiabadi, Ehsan; Mohammadi, Parvaneh; Aghdami, Nasser; Falah, Nasrin; Orouji, Zahra; Nazari, Abdoreza; Shafieyan, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypertrophic scar involves excessive amounts of collagen in dermal layer and may be painful. Nowadays, we can’t be sure about effectiveness of procedure for hypertrophic scar management. The application of stem cells with natural scaffold has been the best option for treatment of burn wounds and skin defect, in recent decades. Fibrin glue (FG) was among the first of the natural biomaterials applied to enhance skin deformity in burn patients. This study aimed to identify an efficient, minimally invasive and economical transplantation procedure using novel FG from human cord blood for treatment of hypertrophic scar and regulation collagen synthesis. Materials and Methods In this case series study, eight patients were selected with hypertrophic scar due to full-thickness burns. Human keratinocytes and fibroblasts derived from adult skin donors were isolated and cultured. They were tested for the expression of cytokeratin 14 and vimentin using immunocytochemistry. FG was prepared from pooled cord blood. Hypertrophic scars were extensively excised then grafted by simply placing the sheet of FG containing autologous fibroblast and keratinocytes. Histological analyses were performed using Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson’s Trichrome (MT) staining of the biopsies after 8 weeks. Results Cultured keratinocytes showed a high level of cytokeratin 14 expression and also fibroblasts showed a high level of vimentin. Histological analyses of skin biopsies after 8 weeks of transplantation revealed re-epithelialization with reduction of hypertrophic scars in 2 patients. Conclusion These results suggest may be the use of FG from cord blood, which is not more efficient than previous biological transporters and increasing hypertrophic scar relapse, but could lead to decrease pain rate. PMID:25870834

  3. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity analyses of key model parameters caused estimates of global burned area increases from small fires to vary between 24% and 54%. Biomass burning carbon emissions increased by 35% at a global scale when small fires were included in GFED3, from 1.9 Pg C/yr to 2.5 Pg C/yr. The contribution of tropical forest fires to year-to-year variability in carbon fluxes increased because small fires amplified emissions from Central America, South America and Southeast Asia-regions where drought stress and burned area varied considerably from year to year in response to El Nino-Southern Oscillation and other climate modes.

  4. Scald Burns From Hair Braiding.

    PubMed

    Meizoso, Jonathan P; Ramaley, Stephen R; Ray, Juliet J; Allen, Casey J; Guarch, Gerardo A; Varas, Robin; Teisch, Laura F; Pizano, Louis R; Schulman, Carl I; Namias, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Only one previous case report has described scald burns secondary to hair braiding in pediatric patients. The present case study is the largest to date of scald burns as a result of hair braiding in children and adults. Charts of all 1609 female patients seen at a single burn center from 2008 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with scald burns attributed to hair braiding. Demographics, injury severity, injury patterns, and complications were analyzed. Twenty-six patients (1.6%) had scald burns secondary to hair braiding with median TBSA 3%. Eighty-five percent of patients were pediatric with median age 8 years. Injury patterns were as follows: back (62%), shoulder (31%), chest (15%), buttocks (15%), abdomen (12%), arms (12%), neck (12%), and legs (4%). No patients required operative intervention. Three patients were admitted to the hospital. Two patients required time off from school for 6 and 10 days post burn for recovery. Complications included functional limitations (n = 2), hypertrophic scarring (n = 1), cellulitis requiring antibiotics (n = 1), and anxiety requiring medical/psychological therapy (n = 2). This peculiar mechanism of injury not only carries inherent morbidity that includes the risks of functional limitations, infection, and psychological repercussions but also increases usage of resources through hospital admissions and multiple clinic visits. Further work in the form of targeted outreach programs is necessary to educate the community regarding this preventable mechanism of injury. PMID:26594857

  5. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  6. Postburn galactorrhea with refractory hypertrophic scars: role of obesity under scrutiny.

    PubMed

    Saraiya, Hemant

    2003-01-01

    Postburn galactorrhea, although relatively uncommon, is a complex problem to treat. Three of 25 female premenopausal patients who were admitted during the years 1995 to 2001 with more than 40% TBSA burns developed this problem. All three patients were obese according to body mass index and other clinical criteria. It was observed that the additional disturbance of equilibrium of hypothalamus because of burn injury, which is already disturbed as per se in obese patients, precipitates sustained release of prolactin, leading to galactorrhea. Hyperinsulinemia because of obesity and associated reactive metabolic response of burn trauma contribute to the stimulation of prolactin secretion and sustained hyperprolactinemia. Interestingly, our patients who developed postburn galactorrhea also developed refractory hypertrophic scars not readily amenable to preventive and conservative therapeutic treatment methods. The responsible factor for its development can be a rise in prolactin levels with interplay of other hormones, such as melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), from the anterior pituitary. Repeated serum prolactin measurements and early control of rising levels during the burn treatment, particularly in obese patients, are recommended. Early and vigorous measures to prevent scar hypertrophy also are advocated. In our study, we failed to correlate chest wall burns with galactorrhea. PMID:14610425

  7. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  8. The Incidence of Burns Among Sex-Trafficking Victims in India

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nadia; Sinha, Indranil; Husain, Fatima; Shah, Ajul; Patel, Anup

    2014-01-01

    Sex trafficking remains a flagrant violation of human rights, creating many public health concerns. During the initiation period, these victims experience acts of violence including gang rapes, subjecting them to traumatic injuries that include burns. Furthermore, lack of access to health care, particularly surgical, keeps them from receiving treatment for these functionally debilitating contractures caused by burns. This piece provides an overview of burns among sex-trafficked victims in India and the efforts by Cents of Relief to address the associated surgical burden of disease. PMID:25191142

  9. Cesarean scar endometrioma: Case series

    PubMed Central

    Çöl, Cavit; Yilmaz, Edip Erdal

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate endometrioma located at cesarean scatrix. METHODS: Medical data of 6 patients who presented to our institution with abdominal wall endometrioma were evaluated retrospectively and reviewed literature in this case series. The diagnostic approaches and treatment is discussed. RESULTS: All patients had a painful mass located at abdominal scars with history of cesarean section. The ages ranged from 31 to 34 and Doppler ultrasonography (US) detected hypoechoic mass with a mean diameter of 30 mm. Initial diagnosis was endometrioma in 4 and incisional hernia in 2 of 6 patients. Treatment was achieved with surgical excision in 5 patients, and one is followed by hormone suppression therapy with gonadotropin. CONCLUSION: Malignant or benign tumors of abdominal wall and incisional hernias should be kept in mind for diagnosis of endometrioma. Imaging methods like doppler US, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging should be used for differential diagnosis. Definitive diagnosis can only be made histopathologically. The treatment should be complete surgical excision and take care against intraoperative auto-inoculation of endometrial tissue in order to prevent recurrences. PMID:24868512

  10. Proceedings of the SCAR Conference, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) team analyzed six major topics: (1) aerodynamics, (2) stability and control, (3) propulsion, (4) environmental factor, (5) airframe structures and materials, and (6) design integration.

  11. Answers to Common Questions about Scars

    MedlinePLUS

    ... off the skin and fairly stiff to the touch. Reaching a peak after several months, the scar ... have received your message and will be in touch as soon as possible. Cleft Connection Miracle Flights ...

  12. SCAR-A Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-19

    ... and Information Smoke/Sulfates, Clouds and Radiation - America (SCAR-A) data include physical and chemical components of ... Search and Order:  ASDC Order Tool Parameters:  Infrared Radiance Visible Radiance Order Data:  ...

  13. Outcomes of outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew; Coffee, Tammy; Adenuga, Paul; Yowler, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    The literature surrounding pediatric burns has focused on inpatient management. The goal of this study is to characterize the population of burned children treated as outpatients and assess outcomes validating this method of burn care. A retrospective review of 953 patients treated the burn clinic and burn unit of a tertiary care center. Patient age, burn etiology, burn characteristics, burn mechanism, and referral pattern were recorded. The type of wound care and incidence of outcomes including subsequent hospital admission, infection, scarring, and surgery served as the primary outcome data. Eight hundred and thirty children were treated as outpatients with a mean time of 1.8 days for the evaluation of burn injury in our clinic. Scalds accounted for 53% of the burn mechanism, with burns to the hand/wrist being the most frequent area involved. The mean percentage of TBSA was 1.4% for the outpatient cohort and 8% for the inpatient cohort. Burns in the outpatient cohort healed with a mean time of 13.4 days. In the outpatient cohort, nine (1%) patients had subsequent admissions and three (0.4%) patients had concern for infection. Eight patients from the outpatient cohort were treated with excision and grafting. The vast majority of pediatric burns are small, although they may often involve more critical areas such as the face and hand. Outpatient wound care is an effective treatment strategy which results in low rates of complications and should become the standard of care for children with appropriate burn size and home support. PMID:25055004

  14. Frequency of placenta previa in previously scarred and non scarred uterus

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Tayyaba; Waheed, Fatima; Mahmood, Zahid; Saba, Kanwal; Mahmood, Hamis; Bukhari, Mulazim Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of placenta Previa in patients coming to a tertiary care unit with previously scarred and non-scarred uterus. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried on 114 cases who underwent caesarean sections (37 cases out of 645 cases with non scarred uterus and 77 cases from 721 cases with scarred uterus) in the department of obstetrics and gynecology Lady Willingdon Hospital from January 2008– December 2011. Results: Most patients (47.36%) were between 26-30 years age group, presented with gestational age between 36-40 weeks (70.17%), were mostly G2-4, while frequency of placenta Previa in non-scarred uterus was 32.45% (37 cases), and frequency in previously scarred uterus was 67.54% (77 cases). Major degree Previa was found in 88 cases (77.19%). There were 5.70% cases of placenta Previa from non-scarred uteruses and 10.67% cases of placenta Previa (10.67%) from already scarred uteruses. Stratification revealed a higher trend of the morbidity with the increase in number of previous caesarean sections. Conclusion: A significantly higher frequency of placenta Previa was found among patients coming to a tertiary care hospital with previously scarred uterus. PMID:26101491

  15. Optical Scar in a chaotic fibre

    E-print Network

    Doya, V; Michel, C; Mortessagne, F; Doya, Val\\'{e}rie; Legrand, Olivier; Michel, Claire; Mortessagne, Fabrice

    2006-01-01

    We propose to use a multimode optical fiber with a D-shaped cross section as a privileged system to image wavefunctions of a chaotic system. Scar modes are in particular the sub ject of our investigations. We study their imprints on the statistics of intensity and we show how the introduction of a localized gain region in the fiber is used to perform a selective excitation of scar modes.

  16. Optical Scar in a chaotic fibre

    E-print Network

    Valérie Doya; Olivier Legrand; Claire Michel; Fabrice Mortessagne

    2007-01-26

    We propose to use a multimode optical fiber with a D-shaped cross section as a privileged system to image wavefunctions of a chaotic system. Scar modes are in particular the sub ject of our investigations. We study their imprints on the statistics of intensity and we show how the introduction of a localized gain region in the fiber is used to perform a selective excitation of scar modes.

  17. Modulation of wound contracture alpha-smooth muscle actin and multispecific vitronectin receptor integrin alphavbeta3 in the rabbit's experimental model.

    PubMed

    El Kahi, Cynthia G; Atiyeh, Bishara S; Abdallah Hajj Hussein, Inaya; Jurjus, Rosalyne; Dibo, Saad A; Jurjus, Alice; Jurjus, Abdo

    2009-06-01

    The myofibroblast, a major component of granulation tissue, is a key cell during wound healing, tissue repair and connective tissue remodelling. Persistence of myofibroblasts within a fibrotic lesion leads to excessive scarring impairing function and aesthetics. Various wound-healing cytokines can be modulated by topical application of active agents to promote optimal wound healing and improve scar quality. Thus, the myofibroblast may represent an important target for wound-healing modulation to improve the evolution of conditions such as hypertrophic scars. The purpose of this work is to study the modulation of myofibroblasts and integrin alphavbeta3 in a full thickness wound performed on rabbits treated with different topical agents using: (1) saline, (2) Tegaderm occlusive dressing (3) silver sulfadiazine and (4) moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO). The reepithelialisation was 4 days faster in the MEBO group compared with the other therapies with less oedema formation, delayed contraction, less inflammatory cells and the lowest transepidermal water loss (TEWL) resulting in a soft scar. Although alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) was the highest around day 12 in the MEBO group, wound contraction and myofibroblast's activity were the least for the same period probably because of a downregulation of the integrin alphavbeta3. It seems that the effect of MEBO could be more pronounced on force transmission rather then on force generation. Greater insight into the pathology of scars may translate into non surgical treatments in the future and further work in myofibroblast biology will eventually result in efficient pharmacological tools, improving the evolution of healing and scar formation. PMID:19538194

  18. A randomized comparative study of two methods for controlling Tendo Achilles contracture in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hyde, S A; Fl?ytrup, I; Glent, S; Kroksmark, A K; Salling, B; Steffensen, B F; Werlauff, U; Erlandsen, M

    2000-06-01

    A 30-month prospective randomized study of 27 Scandinavian boys with confirmed diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy was done to compare the effect of passive stretching combined with the use of night splints (group A) or passive stretching (group B) on the evolution of Tendo Achilles contractures. Assessments were based on the methodology of Scott et al. (Muscle Nerve 1982;5:291-301)Analysis of the pattern and mechanism of dropout was done to eliminate bias between the two groups. Logistic regression showed that Tendo Achilles contracture was the most important variable (P=0.0020) for dropout. Methods of statistical analysis for longitudinal data avoiding induced serial correlations were used in the analysis. The expected annual change in Tendo Achilles contracture was found to be 23% less in group A than in group B after equalization for total muscle strength (%MRC). PMID:10838252

  19. Collagenase treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture using a modified injection method

    PubMed Central

    Nordenskjöld, Jesper; Lauritzson, Anna; Ahlgren, Eva; Waldau, Johanna; Waldén, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture (DC) with collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) consists of injection followed by finger manipulation. We used a modified method, injecting a higher dose than recommended on the label into several parts of the cord, which allows treatment of multiple joint contractures in 1 session and may increase efficacy. We studied the occurrence of skin tears and short-term outcome with this procedure. Patients and methods We studied 164 consecutive hands with DC, palpable cord, and extension deficit of ? 20º in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and/or proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (mean patient age 70 years, 82% men). A hand surgeon injected all the content of 1 CCH vial (approximately 0.80 mg) into multiple spots in the cord and performed finger extension under local anesthesia after 1 or 2 days. A nurse recorded skin tears on a diagram and conducted a standard telephone follow-up within 4 weeks. A hand therapist measured joint contracture before injection and at a median of 23 (IQR: 7–34) days after finger extension. Results A skin tear occurred in 66 hands (40%). The largest diameter of the tear was ? 5 mm in 30 hands and > 10 mm in 14 hands. Hands with skin tear had greater mean pretreatment MCP extension deficit than those without tear: 59º (SD 26) as opposed to 32º (SD 23). Skin tear occurred in 21 of 24 hands with MCP contracture of ? 75º. All tears healed with open-wound treatment. No infections occurred. Mean improvement in total (MCP + PIP) extension deficit was 55º (SD 28). Interpretation Skin tears occurred in 40% of hands treated with collagenase injections, but only a fifth of them were larger than 1 cm. Tears were more likely in hands with severe MCP joint contracture. All tears healed without complications. Short-term contracture reduction was good. PMID:25695745

  20. Characterization of hyaluronan and TSG-6 in skin scarring: differential distribution in keloid scars, normal scars and unscarred skin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, KT; McGrouther, DA; Day, AJ; Milner, CM; Bayat, A

    2011-01-01

    Background Hyaluronan (HA) is a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) with increased synthesis during tissue repair. Tumour necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) is known to catalyze the covalent transfer of heavy chains (HC1 and HC2) from inter-?-inhibitor (I?I) onto HA, and resultant HC•HA complexes have been implicated in physiological and pathological processes related to remodelling and inflammation. Objective The aims of this study were to determine the expression of HA, TSG-6 and the I?I polypeptides in unscarred skin, normal scars and keloid scars. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of unscarred skin, normal scars and keloid scars were prepared from patient samples collected during scar revision surgery. Haematoxylin and eosin, as well as immunofluorescent staining for HA, TSG-6 and the three polypeptide chains of I?I (i.e. HC1, HC2 and bikunin) were performed. Results All skin types stained positive for TSG-6, HC1, HC2 and bikunin, associated with keratinocytes, fibroblasts and skin appendages all in close proximity to HA. Keloid lesions showed altered HA organization patterns compared with unscarred skin and normal scars. TSG-6 staining was significantly more intense in the epidermis compared with the dermis of all sample types. There was a significant reduction in TSG-6 levels within keloid lesions compared with the dermis of unscarred skin (P = 0.017). Conclusion TSG-6 is expressed in unscarred skin, where its close association with HA and I?I could give rise to TSG-6-mediated HC•HA formation within this tissue. A reduction in the beneficial effects of TSG-6, caused by diminished protein levels in keloid lesions, could contribute to this abnormal scarring process. PMID:20642475

  1. Improved scar quality following primary and secondary healing of cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Amm, Christian A; El Musa, Kusai A

    2003-01-01

    Poor wound healing remains a critical problem in our daily practice of surgery, exerting a heavy toll on our patients as well as on the health care system. In susceptible individuals, scars can become raised, reddish, and rigid, may cause itching and pain, and might even lead to serious cosmetic and functional problems. Hypertrophic scars do not occur spontaneously in animals, which explains the lack of experimental models for the study of pathologic scar modulation. We present the results of three clinical comparative prospective studies that we have conducted. In the first study, secondary healing and cosmetic appearance following healing of partial thickness skin graft donor sites under dry (semi-open Sofra-Tulle dressing) and moist (moist exposed burn ointment, MEBO) was assessed. In the second study, healing of the donor sites was evaluated following treatment with Tegaderm or MEBO, two different types of moisture-retentive dressings. In the third study, 3 comparable groups of primarily healed wounds were evaluated. One group was treated by topical antibiotic ointment, the second group was treated by Moist Exposed Burn Ointment (MEBO), and the third group did not receive any topical treatment. In the second study, secondary healing of partial thickness skin graft donor sites was evaluated following treatment with Tegaderm or MEBO, two different types of moisture-retentive dressings. In the second and third studies, healed wounds were evaluated with the quantitative scale for scar assessment described by Beausang et al. Statistical analysis revealed that for both types of wound healing, scar quality was significantly superior in those wounds treated with MEBO. PMID:14648065

  2. Management of acid burns: experience from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore Kumar; Olga, Loren; Peck, Michael; Morselli, Paolo G; Salek, A J M

    2015-05-01

    Acid burn injuries in Bangladesh primarily occur as a result of intentional attacks although there are incidences of accidental acid burns in industry, on the street, and at home. A total of 126 patients with acid burns, 95 from attacks and 31 from accidents, were studied from July 2004 to December 2012. A diagnosis of acid burn was made from history, physical examination and in some cases from chemical analysis of the patients' clothing. Alkali burns were excluded from the study. In the burn unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital, we applied a slightly different protocol for management of acid burns, beginning with plain water irrigation of the wound, which effectively reduced burn depth and the requirement of surgical treatment. Application of hydrocolloid dressing for 48-72 h helped with the assessment of depth and the course of treatment. Early excision and grafting gives good results but resultant acid trickling creates a marble cake-like appearance of the wound separated by the vital skin. Excision with a scalpel and direct stitching of the wounds are often a good option. Observation of patients on follow-up revealed that wounds showed a tendency for hypertrophy. Application of pressure garments and other scar treatments were given in all cases unless the burn was highly superficial. PMID:25440856

  3. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the biological characteristics of human skin fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongming; Hu, Chao; Li, Fengyu; Liang, Liming; Liu, Lingying

    2013-06-01

    Burn injury-mediated destruction of the skin barrier normally induces microbial invasion, in turn leading to the development of systemic infection and occasional septic shock by the release of endotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the biological characteristics of normal skin fibroblasts and to elucidate the influence of LPS in the initial stage of skin wound healing. Twenty patients with hypertrophic scar in proliferative stage were selected randomly and primary cultures were established from fibroblasts derived from their hypertrophic scar tissue and normal skin. Normal skin fibroblasts of passage 3 were stimulated with different concentrations of LPS. LPS stimulated the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts within a certain extent of concentrations (0.005-0.5 ?g/mL) (P < 0.05), whereas at a concentration of 1 ?g/mL inhibited the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Collagen synthesis by normal skin fibroblasts after LPS stimulation mimicked those derived from hypertrophic scar tissue. LPS of 0.1 ?g/mL had significant effect on normal skin fibroblasts-continuous passage of these fibroblasts resulted in ultrastructural pattern similar to fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar tissue, and the findings was substantiated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry detection of proliferation cell nuclear antigen, type I procollagen and ?-smooth muscle actin. Our results suggest that LPS might convert normal skin fibroblasts to hypertrophic scar tissue fibroblasts and participate in the formation of hypertrophic scar; hence, appropriate concentration of LPS may have no effect or be beneficial to skin wound healing, whereas excessive concentration of LPS may delay the time of wound healing. PMID:23653386

  4. Lightning burns.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Cochran, Amalia L; Mehta, Sagar T; Morris, Stephen E; McDevitt, Marion C

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a lightning-strike victim. This case illustrates the importance of in-field care, appropriate referral to a burn center, and the tendency of lightning burns to progress to full-thickness injury. PMID:23799482

  5. Observations of atmospheric methane and carbon monoxide in Brazil: SCAR-B mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvala, Plinio C.; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.

    1998-12-01

    Methane (CH4) concentrations have been measured in the lower atmosphere in Brazil on board a Brazilian research aircraft. Air samples were obtained at different heights by grab sampling, and taken for analysis by flame ionization detector (FID) gas chromatography at INPE (the Brazilian Institute for Space Research). The sampling region is the cerrado area of central Brazil, around the cities of Brasilia, Cuiaba, Alta Floresta, and Porto Nacional. Instead of concentrating on plume characteristics, an effort was made to describe the average mixed atmosphere, keeping a distance from direct burning sources. The measurements of atmospheric CH4 during the dry season have shown larger mixing ratios compared to the wet season. This finding has consistently been observed for different dry seasons, but especially for the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation: Brazil (SCAR-B) field mission. For comparison, measurements near the ground in a region not directly affected by biomass burning (Natal, Brazil) show concentrations that are 39 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) less than the biomass burning results, which is 4 times the size of the seasonal amplitude at oceanic stations within about 10° of the equator, thus making the biomass burning values comparable to those observed at northern hemisphere midlatitudes. The vertical distribution for these regions seems to be well mixed, showing differences of about 40 ppbv between the different sampling areas of the SCAR-B experiment. The CH4 mixing ratio was in general well correlated with the CO mixing ratio.

  6. Evaluating evidence for atrophic scarring treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    McGrouther, Duncan; Chakrabarty, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction Atrophic scars cause significant patient morbidity. Whilst there is evidence to guide treatment, there does not appear to be a systematic review to analyse the efficacy of treatment options. Objectives To retrieve all evidence relating to atrophic scar treatment and evaluate using the Clinical Evidence GRADE score in order to allow clinicians to make evidence-based treatment choices. Method Searches were performed in Medline, EMBASE, CINHL and Cochrane to identify all English studies published evaluating treatment of atrophic scars on adults excluding journal letters. Each study was allocated a GRADE score based on type of study, quality, dose response, consistency of results and significance of results. The end score allowed categorisation of evidence into high, moderate, low or very low quality. Results A total of 41 studies were retrieved from searches including randomised controlled trials, observational studies, retrospective analyses and case reports of which 7% were allocated a high-quality score, 10% a moderate score, 7% a low score and 75% a very low score. Treatment modalities included ablative laser therapy, non-ablative laser therapy, autologous fat transfer, dermabrasion, chemical peels, injectables, subcision, tretinoin iontophoresis and combination therapy. Conclusion There is a paucity of good-quality clinical evidence evaluating treatment modalities for atrophic scarring. Evidence supports efficacy of laser, surgery and peel therapy. Further biomolecular research is required to identify targeted treatment options and more randomised controlled trials would make the evidence base for atrophic scar treatment more robust. PMID:25352991

  7. Understanding the Etiology and Prevention of Capsular Contracture: Translating Science into Practice.

    PubMed

    Chong, Simon J; Deva, Anand K

    2015-10-01

    Capsular contracture remains a common and preventable complication of implanted breast prostheses. As our understanding of the pathophysiology continues to develop, it is prudent to reexamine existing beliefs in a contemporary context. This article presents a current summary of clinical and laboratory evidence, expressed as an interaction between potentiating and suppressing factors, and how this understanding can be applied to practice. PMID:26408434

  8. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography evaluation after autologous fat grafting in scar revision

    PubMed Central

    BOLLERO, D.; POZZA, S.; GANGEMI, E.N.; DE MARCHI, A.; GANEM, J.; EL KHATIB, A.M.; FALETTI, C.; STELLA, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Fat transfer is commonly used to fill loss of volume in depressed scars caused by trauma, deep burns or surgery. The aim of the study is to investigate the degree of fat graft take through evaluation of the microcirculation of grafted autologous adipose tissue using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. Patients and method From 2010 to 2012 at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Traumatological Center in Turin, a study population was selected from patients with surgical indications for autologous fat transfer for scar correction. For each surgical procedure patients underwent a clinical and sonographic evaluation before and after intervention (at 1 month and 3 months). Results Out of a total of 28 interventions, 24 showed a good result; defined as improvement of the scar, and confirmed by the presence of vascularization in the transplanted tissue. In 4 cases, there was a lack of blood supply at the first evaluation but an initial good clinical scar correction. The absence of blood vessels was confirmed at 3 months accompanied by complete resorption of the transferred fat with a failure of good clinical outcome. Conclusion Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was able to evaluate the microvasculature of adipose tissue after fat transfer. Due to this characteristic, it allows to monitor and predict the take of adipose tissue and provide realistic and early information on the clinical outcome of fat transfer. PMID:25644727

  9. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  10. Early second trimester uterine scar rupture

    PubMed Central

    Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; G, Shyamala

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous uterine scar rupture can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar rupture in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19?weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar rupture, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine rupture should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine rupture in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with rupture uterus. PMID:24326433

  11. New insights on keloids, hypertrophic scars, and striae.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the literature regarding treatments for keloid disease, hypertrophic scars, and striae distensae in dark pigmented skin. Striae, keloid, and hypertrophic scarring present a challenging problem for both the clinician and patient. No single therapy is advocated for hypertrophic scars, keloid scars, or striae distensae. New therapies have shown promise in the treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scars, and in patients with dark pigmented skin. This article provides guidance on the assessment and determination of patients' suitability for certain treatment options, as well as advice on the follow-up of patients affected with problematic scarring and striae. PMID:24680006

  12. Reduced satellite cell population may lead to contractures in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, LUCAS R; CHAMBERS, HENRY G; LIEBER, RICHARD L

    2014-01-01

    AIM Satellite cells are the stem cells residing in muscle responsible for skeletal muscle growth and repair. Skeletal muscle in cerebral palsy (CP) has impaired longitudinal growth that results in muscle contractures. We hypothesized that the satellite cell population would be reduced in contractured muscle. METHOD We compared the satellite cell populations in hamstring muscles from participants with CP contracture (n=8; six males, two females; age range 6–15y; Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels II–V; 4 with hemiplegia, 4 with diplegia) and from typically developing participants (n=8; six males, two females, age range 15–18y). Muscle biopsies were extracted from the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles and mononuclear cells were isolated. Cell surface markers were stained with fluorescently conjugated antibodies to label satellite cells (neural cell adhesion molecule) and inflammatory and endothelial cells (CD34 and CD4 respectively). Cells were analyzed using flow cytometry to determine cell populations. RESULTS After gating for intact cells a mean of 12.8% (SD 2.8%) were determined to be satellite cells in typically developing children, but only 5.3% (SD 2.3%;p<0.05) in children with CP. Hematopoietic and endothelial cell types were equivalent in typically developing children and children with CP (p>0.05) suggesting the isolation procedure was valid. INTERPRETATION A reduced satellite cell population may account for the decreased longitudinal growth of muscles in CP that develop into fixed contractures or the decreased ability to strengthen muscle in CP. This suggests a unique musculoskeletal disease mechanism and provides a potential therapeutic target for debilitating muscle contractures. PMID:23210987

  13. Functional Regeneration Beyond the Glial Scar

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, Jared M.; DePaul, Marc A.; Filous, Angela R.; Lang, Brad T.; Tran, Amanda; Silver, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes react to CNS injury by building a dense wall of filamentous processes around the lesion. Stromal cells quickly take up residence in the lesion core and synthesize connective tissue elements that contribute to fibrosis. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells proliferate within the lesion and help to entrap dystrophic axon tips. Here we review evidence that this aggregate scar acts as the major barrier to regeneration of axons after injury. We also consider several exciting new interventions that allow axons to regenerate beyond the glial scar, and discuss the implications of this work for the future of regeneration biology. PMID:24424280

  14. Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Pinto, Joseph P.

    1993-01-01

    Biomass burning may be the overwhelming regional or continental-scale source of methane (CH4) as in tropical Africa and a significant global source of CH4. Our best estimate of present methane emissions from biomass burning is about 51.9 Tg/yr, or 10% of the annual methane emissions to the atmosphere. Increased frequency of fires that may result as the Earth warms up may result in increases in this source of atmospheric methane.

  15. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... burn may peel off after 1 or 2 days. Second-degree burns are thicker burns, are very painful and ... degree burns usually heal in 3 to 6 days. Second-degree burns usually heal in 2 to 3 weeks. ...

  16. Correlations between morphological appearance and psychosocial difficulties in patients with extensive burns who received allotransplant.

    PubMed

    Calot?, D R; Ni?escu, C; Marinescu, S; Cristescu, Carmen; Boiangiu, Ileana; Florescu, I P; Lasc?r, I

    2012-01-01

    Extensive burns are devastating traumatic events, with significant potential for development of complex psychosocial problems. The aim of the study was to identify and quantify these difficulties among extensive burns patients. This study was conducted at Clinical Emergency Hospital for Plastic, Reconstructive and Burns Surgery and "Bagdasar-Arseni" Emergency Hospital, in Bucharest, on 43 extensive burn patients. For each patient we developed a statistic sheet with demographic data and medical information. For data collection, subjects completed the following instruments: Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) and Satisfaction With Appearance Scale (SWAP). The impact variables evaluated in this study were demographic characteristic of patients, burn injury characteristics, abnormal scarring and visible scars, body image dissatisfaction and depression symptoms. Although performed on a small sample, the results of this pilot study could be a valuable starting point for future larger studies, to achieve more generalizable results on extensive burns survivor's quality of life. PMID:23188428

  17. Proper Wound Care: How to Minimize a Scar

    MedlinePLUS

    ... wound care: Minimize a scar Proper wound care: How to minimize a scar Whenever your skin is injured – ... injury requires stitches, follow your doctor’s advice on how to care for the wound and when to get ...

  18. A nude mouse model of hypertrophic scar shows morphologic and histologic characteristics of human hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Momtazi, Moein; Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Anderson, Colin C; Honardoust, Dariush; Goekjian, Serge; Tredget, Edward E

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) is a fibroproliferative disorder that occurs following deep dermal injury. Lack of a relevant animal model is one barrier toward better understanding its pathophysiology. Our objective is to demonstrate that grafting split-thickness human skin onto nude mice results in survival of engrafted human skin and murine scars that are morphologically, histologically, and immunohistochemically consistent with human HSc. Twenty nude mice were xenografted with split-thickness human skin. Animals were euthanized at 30, 60, 120, and 180 days postoperatively. Eighteen controls were autografted with full-thickness nude mouse skin and euthanized at 30 and 60 days postoperatively. Scar biopsies were harvested at each time point. Blinded scar assessment was performed using a modified Manchester Scar Scale. Histologic analysis included hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue, and picrosirius red staining. Immunohistochemistry included anti-human human leukocyte antigen-ABC, ?-smooth muscle actin, decorin, and biglycan staining. Xenografted mice developed red, shiny, elevated scars similar to human HSc and supported by blinded scar assessment. Autograft controls appeared morphologically and histologically similar to normal skin. Xenografts survived up to 180 days and showed increased thickness, loss of hair follicles, adnexal structures and rete pegs, hypercellularity, whorled collagen fibers parallel to the surface, myofibroblasts, decreased decorin and increased biglycan expression, and increased mast cell density. Grafting split-thickness human skin onto nude mice results in persistent scars that show morphologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical consistency with human HSc. Therefore, this model provides a promising technique to study HSc formation and to test novel treatment options. PMID:23126488

  19. The Use of Silicone Adhesives for Scar Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Finnegan, Simon; Murray, Kathyryn; Kelly, Sean; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: This article discusses the history and developments of silicone gel sheeting (SGS) scar therapy. Furthermore, we review a breadth of literature to gain an insight into how and why topical silicone gels remain the favored treatment of medical experts in scar management. We also analyze an ever increasing number of alternative therapies claiming to provide enhanced scar reduction performance. Recent Advances: Topical silicone gel treatments seem to remain the first point of clinical recommendation in scar management. SGS has been used in scar therapy for over 30 years, during which its efficacy has been the subject of numerous clinical evaluations. Critical Issues: While the exact mechanisms by which SGS improves hypertrophic scars, keloid development and recovery are yet to be fully agreed upon, its ability to do so remains largely undisputed at present. However, there still is ongoing deliberation over the exact mechanism of action of silicone in improving a scar. At present it is likely that through occlusion of the scar site and hydration of the wound bed, the overactivity of scar-related cells is suppressed, and their activity normalized. Future Direction: The clinical support of topical silicone gel products, relative to all alternative scar therapies, is considered the internationally recommended first-line form of scar management, and favored by consensus among healthcare professionals. However, there still remains the need for further clinical evidence and a better understanding of the mechanism behind the benefit of silicone gel for use in the prevention of abnormal scarring. PMID:26155385

  20. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  1. Treatment of localized post-traumatic neuropathic pain in scars with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Illanes, Gerardo; Calderón, Wilfredo; Roa, Ricardo; Piñeros, José Luis; Dote, Jacqueline; Medina, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster (LMP) for treating painful scars resulting from burns or skin degloving. Patients and methods This was a prospective, observational case series study in individuals with painful scars <70 cm2 in area, caused by burns or skin degloving. The study included a structured questionnaire incorporating demographic variables, pain evaluation using the numeric rating scale (NRS), the DN4 questionnaire, and measurement of the painful surface area. Patients with open wounds in the painful skin or with severe psychiatric disease were excluded. Results Twenty-one men and eight women were studied, aged (mean + standard deviation) 41.4 ± 11.0 years, with painful scars located in the upper extremity (n = 9), lower extremity (n = 19), or trunk (n = 1). Eleven patients (37.9%) had an associated peripheral nerve lesion. The scars were caused by burns (n = 13), degloving (n = 7), and/or orthopedic surgery (n = 9). The duration of pain before starting treatment with lidocaine plaster was 9.7 ± 10.0 (median 6) months. The initial NRS was 6.66 ± 1.84 points, average painful area 23.0 ± 18.6 (median 15) cm2, and DN4 score 4.7 ± 2.3 points. The duration of treatment with LMP was 13.9 ± 10.2 (median 11) weeks. After treatment, the NRS was reduced by 58.2% ± 27.8% to 2.72 ± 1.65. The average painful area was reduced by 72.4% ± 24.7% to 6.5 ± 8.6 (median 5) cm2. Nineteen patients (69%) showed functional improvement following treatment. Conclusion LMP was useful for treating painful scars with a neuropathic component, producing meaningful reductions in the intensity of pain and painful surface area. This is the first time that a decrease in the painful area has been demonstrated in neuropathic pain using topical therapy, and may reflect the disease-modifying potential of LMP. PMID:22915873

  2. Tissue expansion for burn sequelae: Jeitawe Burn Center, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Ghanime, G; Rizkallah, N; Said, J M

    2011-06-30

    Burn sequelae used to be treated with skin grafts and local or distant flaps with a high morbidity on the donor site. The purpose of treatment today by skin expansion is to achieve aesthetic amelioration, as the advantage of this technique is that it becomes possible to obtain local flaps with the same characteristics of colour, texture, hair, and sensitivity as normal skin. This is a review of 14 cases of burn patients treated between 2006 and 2010 at our burn centre at Jeitawe Hospital, Lebanon. The patients' ages ranged from 6 to 50 yr. The regions expanded were the scalp, forehead, neck, trunk, and the upper and lower limbs. The implants were positioned on the fascial layer; antibiotics and drainage were routinely used. The inflation of the expander began two weeks after surgery and continued for an average time of three months. Complications were rare. Results were good with an improvement of scars and minimal morbidity. Fifty per cent of our patients underwent another expansion. PMID:22262964

  3. Scars, Marks and Tattoos (SMT):Scars, Marks and Tattoos (SMT): Automatic Matching & RetrievalAutomatic Matching & Retrieval

    E-print Network

    Scars, Marks and Tattoos (SMT):Scars, Marks and Tattoos (SMT): Automatic Matching & Retrieval Palmprint DNA Footprint TyreprintBite Mark Tattoo Face #12;· Skin imprints: ­ can be used to identify suspects/victims Scars Marks Tattoos · 2003 online Harris poll: ­16% of adults have at least one tattoo

  4. [Assessment of functional activity of phagocytic system in patients suffered from Dupuytren's contracture with hepatic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Iskra, N I; Shatrova, K M; Hur"iev, S O; Kuz'min, V Iu; Roshchin, H H; Pleskach, O Ia

    2013-06-01

    Dupuytren's contracture--a pathology that should not be seen as an isolated lesion tendon-aponeurotic structures of the palmar surface of the hand, but as a disease that requires careful research and a comprehensive, differentiated approach to treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate the functional activity of the phagocytic system of Dupuytren's contracture patients with chronic hepatitis and liver fibrosis in liquidators of the CHNPP accident consequences. The resulting study 188 patients aged 45-65 years showed the correlation of the data of the functional activity of phagocytic system with degree of liver fibrosis, thus objectively assess the patient's condition and make the appropriate correction in the diagnostic criteria as well as in medical and rehabilitative programs. PMID:25095677

  5. [Pathogenetic aspects of complex treatment of Dupuytren's contracture in patients with chronic hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Iskra, N I; Hur'iev, S O; Kuz'min, V Iu; Kukuruz, Ia S

    2011-03-01

    The results of Dupuytren's contracture treatment in patients, suffering chronic hepatitis with the hand deformity grade II and III, in the injured persons and liquidators of the Chernobyl disaster consequences, conducted in 2000-2010 yrs., were adduced. Beginning from the third week, when an active movements had emerged, the patients were treated locally, including lidase and solution, which consisted of dimexid, isotonic saline and furazolidon. PMID:21695974

  6. Roles of TGF-?/Smad signaling pathway in pathogenesis and development of gluteal muscle contracture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xintao; Ma, Yukun; You, Tian; Tian, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Honglei; Zhu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the study Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) is a chronic fibrotic disease of gluteal muscles which is characterized by excessive deposition of collagen in the extracellular matrix. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-?s have been shown to play an important role in the progression of GMC. However, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. We sought to explore the expression of TGF-?/Smad pathway proteins and their downstream targets in gluteal muscle contracture disease. Materials and methods The expression levels of collagens type I/III, TGF-?1, Smad2/3/4/7 and PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) in gluteal muscle contraction (GMC) patients were measured using immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot assays. Results The expressions of collagens type I/III and TGF-?1 were significantly increased in the contraction band compared with unaffected muscle. In addition, R-Smad phosphorylation and Smad4 protein expression in the contraction band were also elevated, while the expression of Smad7 was significantly decreased in the fibrotic muscle of the GMC patients compared to the unaffected adjacent muscle. The protein and mRNA levels of PAI-1 were also remarkably increased in the contraction band compared with adjacent muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated that the expression levels of TGF-?1 and PAI-1 were higher in contraction band than those in the adjacent muscle. Conclusion Our data confirm the stimulating effects of the TGF-?/Smad pathway in gluteal muscle contracture disease and reveal the internal changes of TGF-?/Smad pathway proteins and their corresponding targets in gluteal muscle contracture patients. PMID:25207745

  7. Burning Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2006-01-01

    Former Baltimore cop and teacher Ed Burns isn't a masochist. The writer-producer for "The Wire," a critically applauded HBO series about life and death on the streets of Baltimore, is just feverishly trying to save public schools. He thinks American education is hopelessly screwed up, but that it's also the country's only hope. So it makes sense…

  8. Eliciting health state utilities for Dupuytren’s contracture using a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose An internet-based discrete choice experiment (DCE) was conducted to elicit preferences for a wide range of Dupuytren’s contracture (DC)-related health states. An algorithm was subsequently developed to convert these preferences into health state utilities that can be used to assess DC’s impact on quality of life and the value of its treatments. Methods Health state preferences for varying levels of DC hand severity were elicited via an internet survey from a sample of the UK adult population. Severity levels were defined using a combination of contractures (0, 45, or 90 degrees) in 8 proximal interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers. Right-handed, left-handed, and ambidextrous respondents indicated which hand was preferable in each of the 10 randomly-selected hand-pairings comparing different DC severity levels. For consistency across comparisons, anatomically precise digital hand drawings were used. To anchor preferences onto the traditional 0–1 utility scale used in health economic evaluations, unaffected hands were assigned a utility of 1.0 whereas the utility for a maximally affected hand (i.e., all 8 joints set at 90 degrees of contracture) was derived by asking respondents to indicate what combination of attributes and levels of the EQ-5D-5L profile most accurately reflects the impact of living with such hand. Conditional logistic models were used to estimate indirect utilities, then rescaled to the anchor points on the EQ-5D-5L. Results Estimated utilities based on the responses of 1,745 qualified respondents were 0.49, 0.57, and 0.63 for completely affected dominant hands, non-dominant hands, or ambidextrous hands, respectively. Utility for a dominant hand with 90-degree contracture in t h e metacarpophalangeal joints of the ring and little fingers was estimated to be 0.89. Separately, reducing the contracture of metacarpophalangeal joint for a little finger from 50 to 12 degrees would improve utility by 0.02. Interpretation DC is associated with substantial utility decre- ments. The algorithms presented herein provide a robust and flexible framework to assess utility for varying degrees of DC severity. PMID:24286567

  9. The efficacy of Aloe vera, tea tree oil and saliva as first aid treatment for partial thickness burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Cuttle, Leila; Kempf, Margit; Kravchuk, Olena; George, Narelle; Liu, Pei-Yun; Chang, Hong-En; Mill, Julie; Wang, Xue-Qing; Kimble, Roy M

    2008-12-01

    Many alternative therapies are used as first aid treatment for burns, despite limited evidence supporting their use. In this study, Aloe vera, saliva and a tea tree oil impregnated dressing (Burnaid) were applied as first aid to a porcine deep dermal contact burn, compared to a control of nothing. After burn creation, the treatments were applied for 20 min and the wounds observed at weekly dressing changes for 6 weeks. Results showed that the alternative treatments did significantly decrease subdermal temperature within the skin during the treatment period. However, they did not decrease the microflora or improve re-epithelialisation, scar strength, scar depth or cosmetic appearance of the scar and cannot be recommended for the first aid treatment of partial thickness burns. PMID:18603378

  10. Preclinical Study of Novel Gene Silencer Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamide Targeting Human TGF-?1 Promoter for Hypertrophic Scars in a Common Marmoset Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Jun; Fukuda, Noboru; Inoue, Takashi; Nakai, Shigeki; Saito, Kosuke; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Nagase, Hiroki; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Soma, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a preclinical study of a pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide that targets the human transforming growth factor (hTGF)-?1 gene as a novel transcriptional gene silencer in a common marmoset primate model. We designed and then synthesized PI polyamides to target the hTGF-?1 promoter. We examined effects of seven PI polyamides (GB1101-1107) on the expression of hTGF-?1 mRNA stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human vascular smooth muscle cells. GB1101, GB1105 and GB1106 significantly inhibited hTGF-?1 mRNA expression. We examined GB1101 as a PI polyamide to hTGF-?1 for hypertrophic scars in marmosets in vivo. Injection of GB1101 completely inhibited hypertrophic scar formation at 35 days post-incision and inhibited cellular infiltration, TGF-?1 and vimentin staining, and epidermal thickness. Mismatch polyamide did not affect hypertrophic scarring or histological changes. Epidermis was significantly thinner with GB1101 than with water and mismatch PI polyamides. We developed the PI polyamides for practical ointment medicines for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. FITC-labeled GB1101 with solbase most efficiently distributed in the nuclei of epidermal keratinocytes, completely suppressed hypertropic scarring at 42 days after incision, and considerably inhibited epidermal thickness and vimentin-positive fibroblasts. PI polyamides targeting hTGF-?1 promoter with solbase ointment will be practical medicines for treating hypertrophic scars after surgical operations and skin burns. PMID:25938472

  11. The Impact of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Volcanoes Upon the Earth's Radiative Energy Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for detecting aerosols from biomass burning and dust is developed. The radiative forcing of aerosols is estimated over four major ecosystems in South America. A new smoke and fire detection scheme is developed for biomass burning aerosols over South America. Surface shortware irradiance calculations are developed in the presence of biomass burning aerosols during the SCAR-B experiment. This new approach utilizes ground based, aircraft, and satellite measurements.

  12. Analysis of state of vehicular scars on Arctic Tundra, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathram, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Identification on ERTS images of severe vehicular scars in the northern Alaska tundra suggests that, if such scars are of an intensity or have spread to a dimension such that they can be resolved by ERTS sensors (20 meters), they can be identified and their state monitored by the use of ERTS images. Field review of the state of vehicular scars in the Umiat area indicates that all are revegetating at varying rates and are approaching a stable state.

  13. Scarring due to an enuresis blanket.

    PubMed

    Diez, F; Berger, T G

    1988-02-01

    A 7-year-old boy was examined for cutaneous lesions that were localized to the side of the body on which he slept and occurred on skin in direct contact with an enuresis blanket. The painless skin lesions were similar to the punched-out skin ulcers and atrophic scars reported in the British literature as buzzer ulcers. Exposure of the child's skin to electrical current may have produced the lesions, which ceased to appear when use of the enuresis blanket was discontinued. PMID:3380764

  14. Scarred resonances and steady probability distribution in a chaotic microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo-Young; Rim, Sunghwan; Kim, Chil-Min; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Kwon, Tae-Yoon

    2005-12-15

    We investigate scarred resonances of a stadium-shaped chaotic microcavity. It is shown that two components with different chirality of the scarring pattern are slightly rotated in opposite ways from the underlying unstable periodic orbit, when the incident angles of the scarring pattern are close to the critical angle for total internal reflection. In addition, the correspondence of emission pattern with the scarring pattern disappears when the incident angles are much larger than the critical angle. The steady probability distribution gives a consistent explanation about these interesting phenomena and makes it possible to expect the emission pattern in the latter case.

  15. The role of scar origin in shaping men's body image.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Anne; Mayer-Eckhard, Lennart; White, Andrew J; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-03-01

    Men generally have a more positive body image than women. However, the extent to which scars negatively influence men's body image is uncertain. The aim of the current study was to assess body image in men with and without scars while taking scar origin into account (nonsuicidal self-harming injuries [NSSI] vs. accidents or surgery). One hundred and nine men (n = 19 with NSSI) and 185 women (n = 96 with NSSI) filled in multidimensional body image questionnaires. Results indicate that on most clinical subscales women had a significantly more negative body image compared with men. However, within a subsample whose scars resulted from NSSI, gender differences vanished. Among men, scar origin was significantly associated with negative body image after partialling out scar characteristics, age, and borderline symptomatology. The visibility of scars was not associated with more severe body image disturbances. The results of our study indicate that self-inflicted scars adversely affect body image. Although women generally reported having a more negative body image, disturbances in body image should not be neglected among men, especially in those who have self-inflicted scars. PMID:24785425

  16. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  17. ?Cat FACE? SCAR ON LONGLEAF PINE TREE, OVERHILLS HISTORIC ENTRANCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ?Cat FACE? SCAR ON LONGLEAF PINE TREE, OVERHILLS HISTORIC ENTRANCE ROAD, FACING NORTHEAST - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  18. Breast conservation therapy without capsular contracture in young augmented women using interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe a breast-conserving technique using interstitial brachytherapy after lumpectomy and axillary nodal sampling in selected women who are diagnosed with breast cancer in the presence of augmentation mammoplasty. Material and methods Over the past 20 years, we have developed and improved a technique of “pinch view” image-guided catheter insertion that avoids implant puncture. Selection criteria include: 1) women of any age with either subpectoral or retroglandular, augmentation implants (silicone or saline) who were diagnosed with stages Tis, T1, T2, N0, or N1 breast cancer; 2) any pathologic subtype of malignant breast cancer was accepted; 3) microscopic tumor extent ? 3 cm; 4) axillary node negative or metastasis to 1 to 3 nodes without extracapsular extension; and 5) surgical margins clear by the NSABP “no ink on tumor” definition. More than 250 women have been successfully treated. Patients were treated with high dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 or 32 Gy in 8 twice daily fractions. The target volume was the surgical cavity edge with 1.5 to 2 cm margin using 3-D treatment planning systems. Results The implant technique as currently employed is described. There have been no implant ruptures, and the Planning Treatment Volume (PTV-eval) exhibited at least 90% coverage by the 90% isodose line in the vast majority of cases. Dose Homogeneity Index exceeded 70% in most cases. The maximum skin dose was below the prescription dose in every case. Other than some patients with pre-existing capsular contracture, less than 5% experience new capsular contracture after interstitial brachytherapy. Conclusions A technique of reliable and reproducible accelerated partial breast irradiation is described that minimizes the risk of capsular contracture by avoiding circumferential dose to the foreign body in the breast. PMID:25097566

  19. Saturday night burns: an increasing problem?

    PubMed Central

    Bollero, D.; Malvasio, V.; Gangemi, E.N.; Giunta, G.; Collard, B.; Stella, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In Italy the economic crisis has caused changes in behavior in daily as well as leisure activities. For instance, night clubs have changed both their scenography and what they can offer. From simply providing a place to dance, they can now offer more complex scenography with spectacular fireworks and lit cocktails. While this can be amazing for all of us it can also be another cause of burn injuries. We conducted a retrospective study of all burns patients admitted to the Accident and Emergency Department at CTO Hospital in Turin from 2009 to 2013, after a night clubbing. A total of five patients were identified with an average age of 20 years old: four were burned by flaming cocktails and one was burned by a firework. Two received outpatient treatment, while orotracheal intubation and admission were needed for three, and two required surgical debridement and resurfacing with split skin graft. All patients had permanent sequelae caused by pathologic scarring and/or dyschromia. Our findings show that the risk of burn injuries is higher at weekends, mainly in summer, if all correct safety procedures are not followed. Meanwhile it is important to highlight that the promotion of inappropriate behavior at night clubs during firework displays and the passing of flaming cocktails should be avoided. PMID:26668565

  20. Saturday night burns: an increasing problem?

    PubMed

    Bollero, D; Malvasio, V; Gangemi, E N; Giunta, G; Collard, B; Stella, M

    2015-03-31

    In Italy the economic crisis has caused changes in behavior in daily as well as leisure activities. For instance, night clubs have changed both their scenography and what they can offer. From simply providing a place to dance, they can now offer more complex scenography with spectacular fireworks and lit cocktails. While this can be amazing for all of us it can also be another cause of burn injuries. We conducted a retrospective study of all burns patients admitted to the Accident and Emergency Department at CTO Hospital in Turin from 2009 to 2013, after a night clubbing. A total of five patients were identified with an average age of 20 years old: four were burned by flaming cocktails and one was burned by a firework. Two received outpatient treatment, while orotracheal intubation and admission were needed for three, and two required surgical debridement and resurfacing with split skin graft. All patients had permanent sequelae caused by pathologic scarring and/or dyschromia. Our findings show that the risk of burn injuries is higher at weekends, mainly in summer, if all correct safety procedures are not followed. Meanwhile it is important to highlight that the promotion of inappropriate behavior at night clubs during firework displays and the passing of flaming cocktails should be avoided. PMID:26668565

  1. Burning plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

  2. Surgical Correction of Rigid Equinovarus Contracture Utilizing Extensive Soft Tissue Release.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Christopher L; Shane, Amber M; Zappasodi, Francesca; Payne, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Although deforming contractures of the lower extremities after acute cerebrovascular events are well documented in the literature, there is limited literature regarding specific surgical considerations for the correction of these deformities, which are nonosseus in nature. The equinovarus foot, regardless of its origin, is a challenging pathologic condition for the foot and ankle surgeon. It is critical to have a firm understanding of the cause and symptoms behind an equinovarus deformity before treatment. The clinical presentation is discussed with special attention to deformities in adults with rigid equinovarus deformities after cerebrovascular-related accidents or peripheral ischemic events. PMID:26590731

  3. Management outcome and associated factors in burn injuries with and without facial involvement in a Nigerian population.

    PubMed

    Fatusi, Olawunmi A; Fatusi, Adesegun O; Olabanji, J Kayode; Alatise, Olusegun I

    2006-01-01

    There is a high potential for the occurrence of burns in Nigeria, yet very little is known about factors that are associated with management outcomes (death/survivorship) in burns affecting facial or other body areas among Nigerian populations. This study aimed at determining patterns of occurrences of burn injuries with and without facial involvement and the factors that are associated with mortality. A standardized data-collection instrument was designed and used to extract relevant information about burn patients that were seen at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, between 1998 and 2003. During the study period, fuel-related flames constituted the leading type of agent in both facial (71.1%) and nonfacial involved burns (65.3%). There was no significant difference in the incidence of contracture and inhalation injury between burns with facial involvement and burns without facial involvement, but cases of facial involvement have significantly lower incidences of wound infections. No significant difference was seen in the incidence of mortality between burns with facial involvement (31.6 %) and burns without facial involvement (30.7%). Significant bivariate correlates for mortality were age, flame as the agent of burns, depth of the burns and wound infections. Two correlates remained significant in the multivariate analysis (binary logistic regression): BSA involved and wound infection. PMID:17091085

  4. Vicious Cycle of Multiple Invasive Treatments in a Hemophilic Inhibitor Positive Child with Resistant Knee Flexion Contracture, A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Badiei, Zahra; Zandinezhad, Mohammad E

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled recurrent hemarthrosis can end to contracture, deformity, pain, joint destruction and gait disorders which are disabling. We are going to report a challenge, a unilateral knee flexion contracture in a child with severe hemophilia A and inhibitor who underwent different treatment options with unsatisfactory improvement of knee range of motion. Mismanaging postoperatively, patient and parents irresponsibility in managing self-care, lack of access and affordability to treatment and unavailability of proper treatment can be the reasons of recurrence in addition to the tough nature of a patient with inhibitor. PMID:25207302

  5. Safety and tolerability of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum and fasciectomy for Dupuytren’s contracture

    PubMed Central

    Wilbrand, S.; Gerber, R. A.; Chapman, D.; Szczypa, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    Safety was evaluated for collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) based on 11 clinical trials (N = 1082) and compared with fasciectomy data in a structured literature review of 48 European studies (N = 7727) for treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture. Incidence of adverse events was numerically lower with CCH vs. equivalent complications from fasciectomy (median [range] incidence), including nerve injury (0% vs. 3.8% [0%?50+%]), neurapraxia (4.4% vs. 9.4% [0%?51.3%]), complex regional pain syndrome (0.1% vs. 4.5% [1.3%?18.5%]) and arterial injury (0% vs. 5.5% [0.8%?16.5%]). Tendon injury (0.3% vs. 0.1% [0%?0.2%]), skin injury (16.2% vs. 2.8% [0%?25.9%]) and haematoma (77.7% vs. 2.0% [0%?25%]) occurred at a numerically higher incidence with CCH than surgery. Adverse events in CCH trials not reported after fasciectomy included peripheral oedema; extremity pain; injection site pain, haemorrhage and swelling; tenderness; pruritus and lymphadenopathy. CCH-related adverse events were reported as predominantly injection-related and transient. These results may support clinical decision-making for treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture. PMID:24698851

  6. Scarred eigenstates for quantum cat maps of minimal Frdric Faure

    E-print Network

    Scarred eigenstates for quantum cat maps of minimal periods Frédéric Faure #3; Stéphane of eigenfunctions of the #16;quantum Arnold's cat map#17; that, in the semiclassical limit, show a strong scarring Introduction One of the main problems in quantum chaos is the understanding of the semiclassical behaviour

  7. SCAR-B fires in the tropics: Properties and remote sensing from EOS-MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Kleidman, Richard G.; King, Michael D.

    1998-12-01

    Two moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are planned for launch in 1999 and 2000 on the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 and EOS PM-1 satellites. The MODIS instrument will sense fires with designated 3.9 and 11 ?m channels that saturate at high temperatures (450 and 400 K, respectively). MODIS data will be used to detect fires, to estimate the rate of emission of radiative energy from the fire, and to estimate the fraction of biomass burned in the smoldering phase. The rate of emission of radiative energy is a measure of the rate of combustion of biomass in the fires. In the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment the NASA ER-2 aircraft flew the MODIS airborne simulator (MAS) to measure the fire thermal and mid-IR signature with a 50 m spatial resolution. These data are used to observe the thermal properties and sizes of fires in the cerrado grassland and Amazon forests of Brazil and to simulate the performance of the MODIS 1 km resolution fire observations. Although some fires saturated the MAS 3.9 ?m channel, all the fires were well within the MODIS instrument saturation levels. Analysis of MAS data over different ecosystems, shows that the fire size varied from single MAS pixels (50×50 m) to over 1 km2. The 1×1 km resolution MODIS instrument can observe only 30-40% of these fires, but the observed fires are responsible for 80 to nearly 100% of the emitted radiative energy and therefore for 80 to 100% of the rate of biomass burning in the region. The rate of emission of radiative energy from the fires correlated very well with the formation of fire burn scars (correlation coefficient = 0.97). This new remotely sensed quantity should be useful in regional estimates of biomass consumption.

  8. Two pregnancy cases of uterine scar dehiscence after laparoscopic myomectomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Soo-Youn; Yoo, Hee-Jun; Kang, Byung-Hun; Ko, Young-Bok; Lee, Ki-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Uterine scar dehiscence following laparoscopic myomectomy rarely occurs but can compromise both maternal and fetal well-being in subsequent pregnancy. We here present two cases of pregnancy complicated by preterm birth that resulted from uterine scar dehiscence following laparoscopic myomectomy. First case was a nulligravida who had scar dehiscence at 26 weeks of gestation after having a laparoscopic myomectomy 3 months prior to conception. Two weeks later, we observed her fetal leg protruding through the defect. The other case was a primigravida with a history of prior cesarean delivery, whose sonography revealed myomectomy scar dehiscence at 31 weeks of gestation. Within a few hours after observing, the patient complained of abdominal pain that was aggravating as fetal leg protruded through the defect. In both cases, babies were born by emergency cesarean section. Conservative management can be one of treatment options for myomectomy scar dehiscence in preterm pregnancy. However, clinicians should always be aware of the possibility of obstetric emergencies.

  9. BKL maps, Poincaré sections, and quantum scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2013-11-01

    Cosmological billiards arise as a map of the solution to the Einstein equations, when the most general symmetry of the metric tensor is implemented, under the Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz (BKL) paradigm, for which points are spatially decoupled in the asymptotical limit close to the cosmological singularity. Cosmological billiards in 4=3+1 dimensions for the case of pure gravity are analyzed for those features, for which the content of Weyl reflections in the BKL maps requires the definition of a three-dimensional restricted phase space. The role of Poincaré sections in these processes is outlined. The quantum regime is investigated within this framework: as a result, one-epoch BKL eras are found to be the most probable configuration at which the wave functions have to be evaluated; furthermore, BKL eras containing n?1 epochs are shown to be a less probable configuration for the wave functions. This description of the dynamics allows one to gain information about the connections between the statistical characterization of the maps which imply the different symmetry-quotienting mechanisms and the characterization of the semiclassical limit of the wave functions, for which evidence is produced for the phenomenon of “scars,” here for the first time outlined for the wave function of the universe in cosmological billiards, analyzed for the lowest silver ratios, and compared with the implications of a Farey map. The connections between the classical BKL probabilties and the quanum BKL probabilities for the “scarred” wave functions of the universe are provided and compared within different expansions according to different limits of the BKL statistics

  10. Inclusion of Scar/WAVE3 in a similar complex to Scar/WAVE1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Stovold, Craig F; Millard, Thomas H; Machesky, Laura M

    2005-01-01

    Background The Scar/WAVE family of proteins mediates signals to actin assembly by direct activation of the Arp2/3 complex. These proteins have been characterised as major regulators of lamellipodia formation downstream of Rac activation and as members of large protein complexes. Results We have investigated the interactions of the three human Scar/WAVE isoforms with several previously described binding partners for Scar/WAVE 1 or 2. We find that all three Scar/WAVE isoforms behave similarly and are likely to participate in the same kinds of protein complexes that regulate actin assembly. Conclusion Differences between Scar/WAVE proteins are therefore likely to be at the level of tissue distribution or subtle differences in the affinity for specific binding partners. PMID:15752430

  11. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  12. MRI evaluation of RF ablation scarring for atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Yuri; Nazafat, Reza; Wylie, John V.; Linguraru, Marius G.; Josephson, Mark E.; Howe, Robert D.; Manning, Warren J.; Peters, Dana C.

    2007-03-01

    This study presents a multi-modality image registration method that evaluates left atrial scarring after radiofrequency (RF) ablation for pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. Our group has recently developed a delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) method with the potential to visualize and monitor non-invasively post-ablation scarring in the left atrium and the PV ostia. We wished to compare the 3D configuration of scarring in the DE-MRI image and the ablation points recorded by electroanatomical mapping (EAM) system, hypothesizing that scarring detected by DE-MRI overlaps with ablation points recorded by the EAM system used in the procedure. Methods and Results: Three data sets, DE-MRI images and pulmonary vein MR angiography (PV-MRA) images, and EAM data (CARTO-XP, Biosense-Webster, Inc., Diamond Bar, CA) from a patient who underwent PV ablation, were used for the multi-modal image registration. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed 38 days after the ablation procedure. PV-MRA and DE-MRI were fused by intensity-based rigid registration. Scar tissue was extracted from the DE-MRI images using multiple threshold values. EAM data was further fused with segmented PV-MRA by the iterative closest point algorithm (ICP). After registration, the distance from PV-MRA to the scar was 2.6 +/- 2.1 mm, and from ablation points to the surface of the scar was 2.5 +/- 2.3 mm. The fused image demonstrates the 3D relationship between the PV ostia, the scar and the EAM recording of ablation points. Conclusion: Multimodal data fusion indicated that the scar tissue lesion after PV isolation showed good overlap with the ablation points.

  13. Control of scar formation in experimentally induced epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, T J; Morrell, F

    1986-12-01

    Penfield proposed that the meningocerebral scar that forms following trauma to the brain plays an important role in the development of posttraumatic epilepsy. Although the epileptogenic scar has come to be widely accepted as a cause of epilepsy, there is no direct evidence that scar formation contributes to epileptogenesis. This current study showed that procedures that control the development of collagen in a fibroblastic scar may modify the development of epilepsy. Epilepsy induced in the guinea pig by injection of metallic aluminum powder into the cerebral cortex was used as a model of posttraumatic epilepsy. Following application of aluminum and implantation of epidural electrodes, animals received either daily injections of prednisolone or an ascorbic acid-deficient diet to block scar formation. Control animals also had an injection of aluminum, but afterward received saline injections or a normal diet. Control animals developed epileptic spikes and often exhibited focal seizures. All manifestations of epileptogenesis were markedly reduced in animals treated with prednisolone or the ascorbic acid-deficient diet. The reduction in epileptiform activity corresponded to reduced collagenous scar formation in the treated animals. Although effective when given prophylactically, prednisolone did not inhibit the activity of an already established epileptic focus whether induced by aluminum or by amygdala kindling, nor did it block pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. The finding that epileptogenesis is blocked by two procedures that inhibit scar formation but show no evidence of a direct anticonvulsant effect, suggests that scar formation is a significant factor in epileptogenesis induced by metallic aluminum. The collagenous component appears to be more significant than the glial component of the scar. PMID:3780905

  14. Nonlinear optics for the study of human scar tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, D. P.; Vieira-Damiani, G.; Adam, R. L.; Cesar, C. L.; Metze, Konradin

    2012-03-01

    Collagen fibers are an essential component of the dynamic process of scarring, which accompanies various diseases. Scar tissue may reveal different morphologic expressions, such as hypertrophic scars or keloids. Collagen fibers can be visualized by fluorescent light when stained with eosin. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) creates a non linear signal that occurs only in molecules without inversion symmetry and is particularly strong in the collagen fibers arranged in triple helices. The aim of this study was to describe the methodology for the analysis of the density and texture of collagen in keloids, hypertrophic scars and conventional scars. Samples were examined in the National Institute of Science and Technology on Photonics Applied to Cell Biology (INFABIC) at the State University of Campinas. The images were acquired in a multiphoton microscopy LSM 780-NLO Zeiss 40X. Both signals, two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) and SHG, were excited by a Mai-Tai Ti:Sapphire laser at 940 nm. We used a LP490/SP485 NDD filter for SHG, and a BP565-610 NDD filter for fluorescence In each case, ten images were acquired serially (512×512 ?m) in Z-stack and joined together to one patchwork-image . Image analysis was performed by a gliding-box-system with in-house made software. Keloids, hypertrophic scars and normal scar tissue show different collagen architecture. Inside an individual case differences of the scar process may be found between central and peripheral parts. In summary, the use of nonlinear optics is a helpful tool for the study of scars tissue.

  15. Special problems in burns.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Robert L; Greenhalgh, David

    2014-08-01

    Burn units provide a unique set of resources to patients with complex wounds, sepsis, and organ failures. This resource set is useful in a number of traumatic, infectious, and medical conditions as well. Further, many burn patients have sustained simultaneous non-burn trauma which will be managed in burn programs. PMID:25085088

  16. The Use of Stem Cells in Burn Wound Healing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghieh, Fadi; Jurjus, Rosalyn; Ibrahim, Amir; Geagea, Alice Gerges; Daouk, Hisham; El Baba, Bassel; Chams, Sana; Matar, Michel; Zein, Wadih; Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-01-01

    Burn wound healing involves a series of complex processes which are subject to intensive investigations to improve the outcomes, in particular, the healing time and the quality of the scar. Burn injuries, especially severe ones, are proving to have devastating effects on the affected patients. Stem cells have been recently applied in the field to promote superior healing of the wounds. Not only have stem cells been shown to promote better and faster healing of the burn wounds, but also they have decreased the inflammation levels with less scar progression and fibrosis. This review aims to highlight the beneficial therapeutic effect of stem cells in burn wound healing and to discuss the involved pathways and signaling molecules. The review covers various types of burn wound healing like skin and corneal burns, along with the alternative recent therapies being studied in the field of burn wound healing. The current reflection of the attitudes of people regarding the use of stem cells in burn wound healing is also stated. PMID:26236731

  17. [Differential approach to the use of drug ultraphonophoresis for scars].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, M Iu; Zenger, V G; Iusova, Zh Iu

    2002-01-01

    A differential approach to administration of drug ultraphonophoresis (gel contractubex, collitin, elastolitin) in scarry deformations is proposed. The analysis of 82 treatment outcomes has shown that early after trauma (on day 6-12) it is more beneficial to use ultraphonophoresis (UPP) of heparin-containing compounds improving blood rheology, e.g. lidase. This prevents development of pathological scars. Later, when the scar tissues has already formed, more effective is UPP of enzyme medicines with fibrinolytic properties (collitin, elastolitin). Differentiated choice of UPP in scar therapy reduces the time of rehabilitation considerably. PMID:12132225

  18. Abdominal scar endometriosis after Caesarean section: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ruchi; Kumar, Mohan; Matah, Manjari

    2011-01-01

    Scar endometriosis is an uncommon entity. It is often misdiagnosed leading to unnecessary referrals. Gynaecologists and general surgeons must be aware of this entity to avoid discomfort to the patient due to delay in diagnosis. We are presenting a case of scar endometriosis which was misdiagnosed initially. Detailed history of cyclic pain and swelling was the key point for the final diagnosis of scar endometriosis. Medical therapy was ineffective. Surgical excision of mass was the treatment for endometriotic lesion. This article is an attempt to create awareness of this condition among gynaecologists and general surgeons. PMID:23393503

  19. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly complicated with aortic dilatation and dissection: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Norifumi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Daishi; Inuzuka, Ryo; Taniguchi, Yuki; Imai, Yasushi; Hirata, Yasunobu; Komuro, Issei

    2015-10-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is a connective tissue disease caused by mutations of the FBN2, which encodes fibrillin-2. CCA patients have a marfanoid habitus; however, aortic dilatation and/or dissection as observed in Marfan syndrome have been rarely documented. Here, we report on a Japanese familial case of CCA resulting from a FBN2 splicing mutation (IVS32+5g?a), which leads to exon 32 being skipped, and the patients developed aortic dilatation and type A dissection. Although CCA patients have been believed to have favorable prognoses, repetitive aortic imaging studies must be performed in some patients to detect possible aortic disease early, and genetic testing of FBN2 might be useful to identify such high-risk patients. PMID:25975422

  20. Outcome of post-infectious renal scarring.

    PubMed

    Tullus, Kjell

    2015-09-01

    In this issue of Pediatric Nephrology, Gebäck et al. from Gothenburg, Sweden, show that after a mean follow-up after childhood urinary tract infection of 41 years, kidney function decreases from a mean of 93 ml/min/1.73m(2) to 81 ml/min/1.73m(2). This was found in women with severe bilateral renal scarring. They had experienced their UTI during childhood in the 1950s and 1960s and had been drawn from a population-based cohort of more than 1,000 children. A previous paper on this same group of women had shown a higher systolic blood pressure of 3 mmHg during the day and 5 mmHg during the night compared with a control group. This contrasted with a follow-up study published earlier by the same group on two different cohorts in which no impairment of kidney function or increase in hypertension could be found. The present follow-up time was 13 years longer than that of any previous studies. Data on the long-term outcome of children who have had one or several urine infections is very important, as the fear of long-term complications has been driving the extensive investigations to which these children have traditionally been subjected. Further population-based follow-up data can help us to outline modern guidance on imaging after UTI. PMID:26037738

  1. Sonographic diagnosis of cesarean scar pregnancy at 16 weeks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alison; Ash, Alok; Maxwell, Darryl

    2007-05-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy is rare. However, there has been a rapid increase in the reporting of such cases in recent years. Most of the cases reported in the literature were diagnosed early in the first trimester. Possible management options proposed are pertinent to an early diagnosis. We present a case of a cesarean scar pregnancy diagnosed at 16 weeks that posed a dilemma with regard to management. The patient subsequently suffered a ruptured uterus, which was preserved at surgery. PMID:17366559

  2. Heparin Reduced Mortality and Sepsis in Severely Burned Children

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, G.J.; Bonilla, A.M.; Saliba, M.J

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objectives. In El Salvador, before 1999, morbidity and mortality in severely burned children were high. In 1998, all children with burns of 40% or larger size died and sepsis was found. With heparin use in 1999, some similarly burned children survived, and sepsis, pain, procedures, and scars were noted to be less. This retrospective study presents the details. Methods. A study was conducted at the National Children's Hospital in El Salvador of all children with burns over 20% size treated in 1998, when no heparin was used, and in 1999, when heparin was added to burns treatment, using an ethics committee approved protocol in use in twelve other countries. Sodium aqueous heparin solution USP from an intestinal source was infused intravenously and applied topically onto burn surfaces and within blisters for the first 1-3 days post-burn. Then heparin, in diminishing doses, was continued only topically until healing. The treatments in 1998 and 1999 were otherwise the same, except that fewer procedures were needed in 1999. Results. There were no significant differences in gender, age, weight, burn aetiology, or burn size between the burned children in 1998 and those in 1999. Burn pain was relieved and pain medicine was not needed in children treated with heparin in 1999. In 1998, one child survived who had a 35% size burn, and the eight children died who had burns of 40% and over. The survival rate was one out of nine (11%). The average burn size was 51.7%. With heparin use in 1999, six of the ten children survived burns of 50.7% average size. The increase in survival with heparin from 11% to 60% and, therefore, the decrease in mortality from 89% to 40% were significant (p < 0.04). Clinical symptoms and positive blood cultures documented bacterial sepsis in the nine children in 1998. In 1999, the blood cultures for sepsis were positive in the four children who died and negative in the six who survived. The nine versus four differences in the incidence of sepsis between 1998 and 1999 was significant (p < 0.008). The survivors had notably smooth skin. Conclusions. The use of heparin in this study relieved burn pain, significantly reduced mortality and sepsis with fewer procedures, and discernibly improved cosmetic results. PMID:21991064

  3. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: Update and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chenyu; Murphy, George F.; Akaishi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The development of cutaneous pathological scars, namely, hypertrophic scars (HSs) and keloids, involves complex pathways, and the exact mechanisms by which they are initiated, evolved, and regulated remain to be fully elucidated. The generally held concepts that keloids and HSs represent “aberrant wound healing” or that they are “characterized by hyalinized collagen bundles” have done little to promote their accurate clinicopathological classification or to stimulate research into the specific causes of these scars and effective preventative therapies. To overcome this barrier, we review here the most recent findings regarding the pathology and pathogenesis of keloids and HSs. The aberrations of HSs and keloids in terms of the inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling phases of the wound healing process are described. In particular, the significant roles that the extracellular matrix and the epidermal and dermal layers of skin play in scar pathogenesis are examined. Finally, the current hypotheses of pathological scar etiology that should be tested by basic and clinical investigators are detailed. Therapies that have been found to be effective are described, including several that evolved directly from the aforementioned etiology hypotheses. A better understanding of pathological scar etiology and manifestations will improve the clinical and histopathological classification and treatment of these important lesions. PMID:25289219

  4. Short and long-term cosmesis of cervical thyroidectomy scars.

    PubMed

    Dordea, M; Aspinall, S R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiple surgical approaches to the thyroid gland have been described via cervical or extracervical routes. Improved cosmesis, patient satisfaction, reduced pain (procedure dependent) and early discharge have all been reported for minimally invasive approaches with similar safety profiles and long-term outcomes to conventional surgery. This review summarises the current evidence base for improved cosmesis with minimally invasive cervical approaches to the thyroid gland compared with conventional surgery. Methods A systematic review was undertaken. The MEDLINE(®), Embase™ and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles. Results A total of 57 papers thyroid papers were identified. Of those, 20 reported some form of cosmetic outcome assessment. There were 6 randomised controlled trials with 412 patients (evidence level 2B), 7 cohort studies with 3,073 patients (level 3B) and 7 non-comparative case series with 1,575 patients (level 4). There was significant heterogeneity between studies in terms of wound closure technique, timing of scar assessment and scar assessment scales (validated and non-validated). Most studies performed early scar assessments, some using non-validated scar assessment tools. Conclusions Assessment of cosmesis is complex and requires rigorous methodology. Evidence from healing/remodelling studies suggests scar maturation is a long-term process. This calls into question the value of early scar assessment. Current evidence does not support minimally invasive surgical approaches to the thyroid gland if improved long-term cosmesis is the goal. PMID:26688393

  5. [Estimating Biomass Burned Areas from Multispectral Dataset Detected by Multiple-Satellite].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Chen, Liang-fu; Li, Shen-shen; Tao, Jin-hua; Su, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning makes up an important part of both trace gases and particulate matter emissions, which can efficiently degrade air quality and reduce visibility, destabilize the global climate system at regional to global scales. Burned area is one of the primary parameters necessary to estimate emissions, and considered to be the largest source of error in the emission inventory. Satellite-based fire observations can offer a reliable source of fire occurrence data on regional and global scales, a variety of sensors have been used to detect and map fires in two general approaches: burn scar mapping and active fire detection. However, both of the two approaches have limitations. In this article, we explore the relationship between hotspot data and burned area for the Southeastern United States, where a significant amount of biomass burnings from both prescribed and wild fire took place. MODIS (Moderate resolution imaging spectrometer) data, which has high temporal-resolution, can be used to monitor ground biomass. burning in time and provided hot spot data in this study. However, pixel size of MODIS hot spot can't stand for the real ground burned area. Through analysis of the variation of vegetation band reflectance between pre- and post-burn, we extracted the burned area from Landsat-5 TM (Thematic Mapper) images by using the differential normalized burn ratio (dNBR) which is based on TM band4 (0.84 ?m) and TM band 7(2.22 ?m) data. We combined MODIS fire hot spot data and Landsat-5 TM burned scars data to build the burned area estimation model, results showed that the linear correlation coefficient is 0.63 and the relationships vary as a function of vegetation cover. Based on the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), we built burned area estimation model over different vegetation cover, and got effective burned area per fire pixel, values for forest, grassland, shrub, cropland and wetland are 0.69, 1.27, 0.86, 0.72 and 0.94 km2 respectively. We validated the burned area estimates by using the ground survey data from National interagency Fire Center (NIFC), our results are more close to the ground survey data than burned area from Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) and MODIS burned area product (MCD45), which omitted many small prescribed fires. We concluded that our model can provide more accurate burned area parameters for developing fire emission inventory, and be better for estimating emissions from biomass burning. PMID:26117890

  6. Shikonin reduces TGF-?1-induced collagen production and contraction in hypertrophic scar-derived human skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    FAN, CHEN; DONG, YING; XIE, YAN; SU, YONGHUA; ZHANG, XUFANG; LEAVESLEY, DAVID; UPTON, ZEE

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring/hypertrophic scars (HS) is a highly prevalent condition following burns and trauma wounds. Numerous studies have demonstrated that transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) plays an essential role in the wound healing process by regulating cell differentiation, collagen production and extracellular matrix degradation. The increased expression of TGF-?1 is believed to result in the formation of HS. Shikonin (SHI), an active component extracted from the Chinese herb, Radix Arnebiae, has previously been found to downregulate the expression of TGF-?1 in keratinocyte/fibroblast co-culture conditioned medium. In view of this, in this study, we aimed to further investigate the effects of SHI on TGF-?1-stimulated hypertrophic scar-derived human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) and examined the underlying mechanisms. Cell viability and proliferation were measured using alamarBlue and CyQUANT assays. The total amount of collagen and cell contraction were examined using Sirius red staining and the cell contraction assay kit. Gene expression and signalling pathway activation were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Our results revealed that SHI reduced TGF-?1-induced collagen production through the ERK/Smad signalling pathway and attenuated TGF-?1-induced cell contraction by downregulating ?-smooth muscle actin (?SMA) expression in the HSFs. The data from this study provide evidence supporting the potential use of SHI as a novel treatment for HS. PMID:26239419

  7. Biomechanical characterization and clinical implications of artificially induced toe-walking: differences between pure soleus, pure gastrocnemius and combination of soleus and gastrocnemius contractures.

    PubMed

    Matjaci?, Zlatko; Olensek, Andrej; Bajd, Tadej

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize biomechanically three different toe-walking gait patterns, artificially induced in six neurologically intact subjects and to compare them to selected cases of pathological toe-walking. The subjects, equipped with lightweight mechanical exoskeleton with elastic ropes attached to the left leg's heel on one end and on shank and thigh on the other end in a similar anatomical locations where soleus and gastrocnemius muscles attach to skeleton, walked at speed of approximately 1m/s along the walkway under four experimental conditions: normal walking (NW), soleus contracture emulation (SOL), gastrocnemius contracture emulation (GAS) and emulation of both soleus and gastrocnemius contractures (SOLGAS). Reflective markers and force platform data were collected and ankle, knee and hip joint angles, moments and powers were calculated using inverse dynamic model for both legs. Characteristic peaks of averaged kinematic and kinetic patterns were compared among all four experimental conditions in one-way ANOVA. In the left leg SOL contracture mainly influenced the ankle angle trajectory, while GAS and SOLGAS contractures influenced the ankle and knee angle trajectories. GAS and SOLGAS contractures significantly increased ankle moment during midstance as compared to SOL contracture and NW. All three toe-walking experimental conditions exhibited significant power absorption in the ankle during loading response, which was absent in the NW condition, while during preswing significant decrease in power absorption as compared to NW was seen. In the knee joint SOL contracture diminished, GAS contracture increased while SOLGAS contracture approximately halved knee extensor moment during midstance as compared to NW. All three toe-walking experimental conditions decreased hip range of motion, hip flexor moment and power requirements during stance phase. Main difference in the right leg kinematic and kinetic patterns was seen in the knee moment trajectory, where significant increase in the knee extensor moment took place in terminal stance for GAS and SOLGAS experimental conditions as compared to SOL and NW. The kinetic trajectories under SOL and GAS experimental conditions were qualitatively compared to two selected clinical cases showing considerable similarity. This implies that distinct differences in kinetics between SOL, GAS and SOLGAS experimental conditions, as described in this paper, may be clinically relevant in determining the relative contribution of soleus and gastrocnemius muscles contractures to toe-walking in particular pathological gait. PMID:16321627

  8. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  9. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  10. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  11. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  12. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  13. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  14. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  15. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  16. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  17. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411...open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a...of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning...

  18. Treatment of sandal burns of the feet in children in a moist environment.

    PubMed

    Shakirov, Babur M

    2014-05-01

    Burns to children's feet are often due to scalds, from hot tap water, as an infant's skin is thinner and hence more susceptible to a full-thickness injury. In Central Asia, and particularly in Uzbekistan, many episodes of burns take place at homes because of using sandal heaters. In the case of sandal burns of the foot, it usually is not only skin that is injured but also underlying tissues: subcutaneous fat, fasciae, muscles and even bones. Many controlled studies have confirmed that wounds heal more readily in a moist, physiological environment. After performing the toilet of burn wounds of the foot, we applied Dermazin cream on the affected areas and then the foot was placed onto a polyethylene packet of large size and fixed by a bandage. Measurement of wound water evaporation was performed every day post-burn. Surgery was usually performed 15-17 days after burn by applying a perforated skin graft or a 0.2-0.3-mm-thick non-perforated skin graft. The procedures helped to improve the general condition of patients, shortened their stay in hospital and also reduced expenses and lessened joint deformities and contracture deformities. PMID:24094987

  19. Burning and Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Jane

    1981-01-01

    Examines the extended metaphor of "burnout" as it applies to the teaching profession. Examines three ancient Celtic invocations for the better tending of fires, which reveal ways that teachers can burn with enthusiasm without burning out from apathy. (RL)

  20. American Burn Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and the ABA is unable to respond to requests regarding personal medical concerns related to burn injuries. Your physician is the best source for information related to initial treatment, ongoing care, and follow-up issues for burn ...

  1. Unroofed Midline Prostate Cyst Misled Into a Stricture With Obliterative Bladder Neck Contracture Following a Laser Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Richilda Red; Lee, Joo Yong; Choi, Young Deuk

    2013-01-01

    We report on a case of a 67-year-old man who presented with persistent lower urinary tract symptoms following a potassium titanyl phosphate laser photoselective vaporization of prostate. Upon further diagnostic examinations were performed, he was noted to have an obliterative bladder neck contracture with an incidental, misleading, and rare presence of an unroofed midline anterior prostatic cyst presenting as a stricture. As we were presented with this case, it was imperative to address these complications of bladder neck contracture and incompletely ablated prostatic cyst. This report brings to light underestimated complicating factors in the urinary tract, and the diagnostic and therapeutic interventions we had undertaken to rectify the identified complications and improve patien's quality of life. The patient underwent internal urethrotomy, resection of prostatic cyst wall and transurethral resection of the prostate directed to improve his quality of life and prevent urinary retention. PMID:23610710

  2. Study on changes in skin extensibility during the development of joint contracture due to joint immobilization in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka, Atsushi; Ono, Takeya; Oki, Sadaaki; Umei, Namiko; Ishikura, Hideki; Aihara, Kazuki; Sato, Yuta; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether skin extensibility decreases when a contracture develops as a result of joint immobilization. [Subjects] This study was conducted on six female Wistar rats. [Methods] The rats were divided into two experimental groups. In the immobilized group, the right ankle joints were immobilized in complete plantar flexion by plaster casts for two weeks. In the control group, the left ankle joints had no intervention. On the final day, skin extensibility was determined from a length-tension curve by collecting skin from the posterior aspect of the ankle joint and using a tensile strength tester. [Results] Compared with the control group, the immobilized group showed a significant decrease in skin extensibility. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that the extensibility of the skin itself decreases when joint contracture develops. PMID:26504268

  3. Double-muscle flap repair of the tethered tracheostomy scar.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Marguerite E; Hammond, Dennis C

    2002-09-01

    Whether for facial trauma, extensive cancer resection, or long-term pulmonary ventilation, the final result after prolonged placement of a tracheostomy is usually a widened, depressed scar that is adherent to the underlying trachea. This adherence creates an unsightly up-and-down movement to the scar with swallowing. This "tracheal tug" is distressful emotionally to many patients and may even be painful. Simple methods of repair do not separate the skin closure adequately from the trachea, leading to recurrence of the tracheal tug. Use of the surrounding strap muscles to cover the trachea in conjunction with allogeneic dura mater has been described as one method of repair. In an attempt to perform a repair without the need for an outside tissue source, the double-muscle flap technique was developed. During this procedure the retracted scar is released from the trachea, the strap muscles are used to cover the tracheal closure, and the medial edge of the platysma muscle on each side is dissected free and sutured together in the midline. This separates effectively the tracheal closure from the skin, allowing the trachea to move independently. The cutaneous scar is revised along skin tension lines to create a fine-line linear scar. This procedure has been used in 2 patients with tracheal tug after prolonged tracheostomy placement. In each patient, the tracheal tug was eliminated completely, and an imperceptible cutaneous scar was the only remaining evidence of what had been a long and arduous recovery for these patients. In each case, patient satisfaction was complete. The authors recommend this technique as a simple and effective method of closure for these troublesome scars. PMID:12351986

  4. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Yadav, Poonam; Welsh, James S.; Fahner, Tasha; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3-50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7-2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0-60.2 Gy at 2.0-2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7-1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  5. Learn Not To Burn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Nancy; Hendricks, Charlotte M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the "Learn Not to Burn Preschool Program," a low-cost fire safety awareness and burn prevention curriculum for young children. The program promotes eight burn prevention methods--including practicing an escape plan--using developmentally appropriate learning objectives to increase children's fire safety knowledge, skill, and…

  6. The reported effects of bullying on burn-surviving children.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, Ruth B; Foster, Kevin N; Bay, Curtis R; Floros, Jim; Rutter, Cindy; Bosch, Jim; Wadsworth, Michelle M; Caruso, Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    There is a trend of increasing childhood aggression in America, which has been tied to bullying. Although there is growing research concerning bullying in the general pediatric population, there are limited data on bullying and its effects on children with disfigurements and physical limitations. This study was conducted to assess burned children's experience with bullying. A pretest was administered regarding experience with bullying and teasing. A curriculum regarding bullying, which incorporated the Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone movie, was presented. After reviewing bullying depicted in the film and participating in a class regarding bullying, children were invited to complete a survey regarding their experience with bullying. A total of 61% of these children reported being bullied at school; 25% reported experiencing headaches or stomachaches due to bullying, and 12% reported staying home from school. Nearly 25% reported bullying as a big problem. Of those with visible scars (55%), a full 68% reported bullying as a problem, versus 54% with hidden scars (P < .05). However, those with visible scars were no more likely to tell an adult (54%) than those without (56%). Children were much more willing to disclose personal bullying experiences after participating in the class (57%) than before (45%) (P < .01). This study revealed that bullying impacts many burn-injured children and has negative effects on their physical and mental well-being. Many children (with visible or hidden scars) did not seek adult intervention for the problem. Participation in a bullying course appears to give children a forum that increases their willingness to disclose personal bullying experiences and can provide them with prevention information and a safe place to seek help. PMID:17438488

  7. The effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on breast implants: Unveiling biomaterial alterations with potential implications on capsular contracture.

    PubMed

    Ribuffo, Diego; Lo Torto, Federico; Giannitelli, Sara M; Urbini, Marco; Tortora, Luca; Mozetic, Pamela; Trombetta, Marcella; Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Cassese, Raffaele; Scuderi, Nicolò; Rainer, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with expanders and implants is recognized as an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Its main complication is represented by capsular contracture, which leads to poor expansion, breast deformation, and pain, often requiring additional surgery. In such a scenario, the debate continues as to whether the second stage of breast reconstruction should be performed before or after post-mastectomy radiation therapy, in light of potential alterations induced by irradiation to silicone biomaterial. This work provides a novel, multi-technique approach to unveil the role of radiotherapy in biomaterial alterations, with potential involvement in capsular contracture. Following irradiation, implant shells underwent mechanical, chemical, and microstructural evaluation by means of tensile testing, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), high resolution stylus profilometry, and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Our findings are consistent with radiation-induced modifications of silicone that, although not detectable at the microscale, can be evidenced by more sophisticated nanoscale surface analyses. In light of these results, biomaterial irradiation cannot be ruled out as one of the possible co-factors underlying capsular contracture. PMID:26354273

  8. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    PubMed Central

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Hee Choi, Seong; Bless, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method Twenty four 4-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to one of four experimental groups: Chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100 ng basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), chronic vocal fold scar treated with saline (sham treatment), and unscarred untreated control. Following tissue harvest, histological and immunohistochemical data were collected to confirm extracellular matrix alteration in the chronic scar group, and acoustic, aerodynamic and high speed digital imaging data were collected using an excised larynx setup in all groups. Phonation threshold pressure (Pth), glottal resistance (Rg), glottal efficiency (Eg), vibratory amplitude and vibratory area were employed as dependent variables. Results Chronically scarred vocal folds were characterized by elevated collagen I and III and reduced hyaluronic acid abundance. Phonation was achieved and data were collected from all control and bFGF treated larynges, however phonation was not achieved with 3 of 6 chronically scarred and 1 of 6 saline treated larynges. Compared to control, the chronic scar group was characterized by elevated Pth, reduced Eg, and intra-larynx vibratory amplitude and area asymmetry. The bFGF group was characterized by Pth below control group levels, Eg comparable to control, and vocal fold vibratory amplitude and area symmetry comparable to control. The sham group was characterized by Pth comparable to control, Eg superior to control, and vocal fold vibratory amplitude and area symmetry comparable to control. Conclusions The excised larynx model reported here demonstrated robust deterioration across phonatory indices under the scar condition and sensitivity to treatment induced change under the bFGF condition. The improvement observed under the sham condition may reflect unanticipated therapeutic benefit or artifact. This model holds promise as a tool for the functional characterization of biomechanical tissue changes resulting from vocal fold ECM injury, and the evaluation of experimental therapies. PMID:19641079

  9. Closure of supporting cell scar formations requires dynamic actin mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hordichok, Andrew J.; Steyger, Peter S.

    2007-01-01

    In many vertebrate inner ear sensory epithelia, dying sensory hair cells are extruded, and the apices of surrounding supporting cells converge to re-seal the epithelial barrier between the electrochemically-distinct endolymph and perilymph. These cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Dynamic microtubular mechanisms have been proposed for hair cell extrusion; while contractile actomyosin-based mechanisms are required for cellular extrusion and closure in epithelial monolayers. The hypothesis that cytoskeletal mechanisms are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation was tested using bullfrog saccules incubated with gentamicin (6 hours), and allowed to recover (18 hours). Explants were then fixed, labeled for actin and cytokeratins, and viewed with confocal microscopy. To block dynamic cytoskeletal processes, disruption agents for microtubules (colchicine, paclitaxel) myosin (Y-27632, ML-9) or actin (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A) were added during treatment and recovery. Microtubule disruption agents had no effect on hair cell extrusion or supporting cell scar formation. Myosin disruption agents appeared to slow down scar formation but not hair cell extrusion. Actin disruption agents blocked scar formation, and largely prevented hair cell extrusion. These data suggest that actin-based cytoskeletal processes are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation in bullfrog saccules. PMID:17716843

  10. Closure of supporting cell scar formations requires dynamic actin mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hordichok, Andrew J; Steyger, Peter S

    2007-10-01

    In many vertebrate inner ear sensory epithelia, dying sensory hair cells are extruded, and the apices of surrounding supporting cells converge to re-seal the epithelial barrier between the electrochemically-distinct endolymph and perilymph. These cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Dynamic microtubular mechanisms have been proposed for hair cell extrusion; while contractile actomyosin-based mechanisms are required for cellular extrusion and closure in epithelial monolayers. The hypothesis that cytoskeletal mechanisms are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation was tested using bullfrog saccules incubated with gentamicin (6h), and allowed to recover (18h). Explants were then fixed, labeled for actin and cytokeratins, and viewed with confocal microscopy. To block dynamic cytoskeletal processes, disruption agents for microtubules (colchicine, paclitaxel) myosin (Y-27632, ML-9) or actin (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A) were added during treatment and recovery. Microtubule disruption agents had no effect on hair cell extrusion or supporting cell scar formation. Myosin disruption agents appeared to slow down scar formation but not hair cell extrusion. Actin disruption agents blocked scar formation, and largely prevented hair cell extrusion. These data suggest that actin-based cytoskeletal processes are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation in bullfrog saccules. PMID:17716843

  11. ZBTB42 mutation defines a novel lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS6)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nisha; Smith, Laura L.; Faqeih, Eissa; Mohamed, Jawahir; Gupta, Vandana A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) is a lethal autosomal recessive form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). LCCS is genetically heterogeneous with mutations in five genes identified to date, all with a role in the innervation or contractile apparatus of skeletal muscles. In a consanguineous Saudi family with multiple stillbirths presenting with LCCS, we excluded linkage to all known LCCS loci and combined autozygome analysis and whole-exome sequencing to identify a novel homozygous variant in ZBTB42, which had been shown to be enriched in skeletal muscles, especially at the neuromuscular junction. Knockdown experiments of zbtb42 in zebrafish consistently resulted in grossly abnormal skeletal muscle development and myofibrillar disorganization at the microscopic level. This severe muscular phenotype is successfully rescued with overexpression of the human wild-type ZBTB42 gene, but not with the mutant form of ZBTB42 that models the human missense change. Our data assign a novel muscular developmental phenotype to ZBTB42 in vertebrates and establish a new LCCS6 type caused by ZBTB42 mutation. PMID:25055871

  12. High resolution muscle measurements provide insights into equinus contractures in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Margie A; Ward, Samuel R; Chambers, Henry G; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contractures that occur after upper motor neuron lesion are often surgically released or lengthened. However, surgical manipulation of muscle length changes a muscle's sarcomere length (Ls ), which can affect force production. To predict effects of surgery, both macro- (fascicle length (Lf )) and micro- (Ls ) level structural measurements are needed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify both Ls and Lf in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) as well as typically developing (TD) children. Soleus ultrasound images were obtained from children with CP and TD children. Lf was determined and, with the joint in the same position, CP biopsies were obtained and formalin fixed, and Ls was measured by laser diffraction. Since soleus Ls values were not measurable in TD children, TD Ls values were obtained using three independent methods. While average Lf did not differ between groups (CP=3.6±1.2?cm, TD=3.5±0.9?cm; p>0.6), Ls was dramatically longer in children with CP (4.07±0.45?µm vs. TD=2.17±0.24?µm; p<0.0001). While Lf values were similar between children with CP and TD children, this was due to highly stretched sarcomeres within the soleus muscle. Surgical manipulation of muscle-tendon unit length will thus alter muscle sarcomere length and change force generating capacity of the muscle. PMID:25242618

  13. Mutations in FAM111B Cause Hereditary Fibrosing Poikiloderma with Tendon Contracture, Myopathy, and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Sandra; Küry, Sébastien; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Houniet, Darren T.; Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P.; Bou-Hanna, Chantal; Bodak, Nathalie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; David, Albert; Faivre, Laurence; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Gherardi, Romain K.; Glen, Elise; Hamel, Antoine; Laboisse, Christian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Magot, Armelle; Munnich, Arnold; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Pillay, Komala; Rahman, Thahira; Redon, Richard; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Thauvin, Christel; Barbarot, Sébastien; Keavney, Bernard; Bézieau, Stéphane; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital poikiloderma is characterized by a combination of mottled pigmentation, telangiectasia, and epidermal atrophy in the first few months of life. We have previously described a South African European-descent family affected by a rare autosomal-dominant form of hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma accompanied by tendon contracture, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we report the identification of causative mutations in FAM111B by whole-exome sequencing. In total, three FAM111B missense mutations were identified in five kindreds of different ethnic backgrounds. The mutation segregated with the disease in one large pedigree, and mutations were de novo in two other pedigrees. All three mutations were absent from public databases and were not observed on Sanger sequencing of 388 ethnically matched control subjects. The three single-nucleotide mutations code for amino acid changes that are clustered within a putative trypsin-like cysteine/serine peptidase domain of FAM111B. These findings provide evidence of the involvement of FAM111B in congenital poikiloderma and multisystem fibrosis. PMID:24268661

  14. Capsular contracture by silicone breast implants: possible causes, biocompatibility, and prophylactic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Steiert, Andreas E; Boyce, Maria; Sorg, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The most common implanted material in the human body consists of silicone. Breast augmentation and breast reconstruction using silicone-based implants are procedures frequently performed by reconstructive and aesthetic surgeons. A main complication of this procedure continues to be the development of capsular contracture (CC), displaying the result of a fibrotic foreign body reaction after the implantation of silicone. For many years, experimental and clinical trials have attempted to analyze the problem of its etiology, treatment, and prophylaxis. Different theories of CC formation are known; however, the reason why different individuals develop CC in days or a month, or only after years, is unknown. Therefore, we hypothesize that CC formation, might primarily be induced by immunological mechanisms along with other reasons. This article attempts to review CC formation, with special attention paid to immunological and inflammatory reasons, as well as actual prophylactic strategies. In this context, the word “biocompatibility” has been frequently used to describe the overall biological innocuousness of silicone in the respective studies, although without clear-cut definitions of this important feature. We have therefore developed a new five-point scale with distinct key points of biocompatibility. Hence, this article might provide the basis for ongoing discussion in this field to reduce single-publication definitions as well as increase the understanding of biocompatibility. PMID:24324348

  15. Fire Scars Detection Using Full Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Yang; Hong, Wen

    2010-10-01

    In this paper a fire scars detection procedure based on Jong-Sen Lee's classification method which combines the Freeman-Durden 3 components decomposition and the Wishart classifier was applied. We applied Jong-Sen Lee's classification method to the PolSAR data being studied to get several clusters preserving scattering mechanisms. Then merged the clusters according to their scattering mechanism and scattering intensity into three final classes: fire scars, forests and others. To satisfy the basic condition of Freeman-Durden decomposition, reflection asymmetry compensation was applied. Fire scars detection results with and without reflection asymmetry compensation were compared. Better detection result was obtained after compensation, and the detection result was good compared with the SPOT5 reference image.

  16. The SCAR Astronomy & Astrophysics from Antarctica Scientific Research Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, John W. V.; Abe, Lyu; Andersen, Michael; Anderson, Philip; Burton, Michael; Cui, Xiangqun; Ichikawa, Takashi; Karle, Albrecht; Lloyd, James; Masi, Silvia; Steinbring, Eric; Travouillon, Tony; Tuthill, Peter; Zhou, HongYang

    2013-01-01

    SCAR, the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research, is, like the IAU, a committee of ICSU, the International Council for Science. For over 30 years, SCAR has provided scientific advice to the Antarctic Treaty System and made numerous recommendations on a variety of matters. In 2010, Astronomy and Astrophysics from Antarctica was recognized as one of SCAR's five Scientific Research Programs. Broadly stated, the objectives of Astronomy & Astrophysics from Antarctica are to coordinate astronomical activities in Antarctica in a way that ensures the best possible outcomes from international investment in Antarctic astronomy, and maximizes the opportunities for productive interaction with other disciplines. There are four Working Groups, dealing with site testing, Arctic astronomy, science goals, and major new facilities. Membership of the Working Groups is open to any professional working in astronomy or a related field.

  17. Arteriovenous malformation as a consequence of a scar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rygh, Astrid B; Greve, Ole J; Fjetland, Lars; Berland, Jannicke M; Eggebø, Torbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    A scar pregnancy is an ectopic pregnancy implanted in a previous lower segment cesarean scar, and the incidence of this complication may be expected to rise along with increasing cesarean section rates. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus may be congenital, associated with early pregnancy loss, trophoblastic disease, or surgical procedures. We describe a case of uterine arteriovenous malformation as a consequence of a scar pregnancy, complicated by recurrent, serious bleeding. The condition was diagnosed using three-dimensional ultrasound with color Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging and appears not to have been described before. Selective embolization was performed, but eventually surgical intervention with resection of the affected uterine segment was necessary, and the patient recovered. The diagnosis was confirmed by pathologic-anatomical diagnosis showing trophoblastic cells in the resected area. Because of collateral formation, non-surgical options may be limited and not successful. PMID:19452327

  18. A multidisciplinary approach to scars: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Zanier, Emiliano; Bordoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to carry out a narrative review regarding the approach to scars through complementary and alternative medicine focusing on osteopathy, naturopathy, and other minor methods and traditional rehabilitative medicines, such as physiotherapy and manual therapies. We analyzed the existing literature regarding the possible influences of techniques relaxing the diaphragm – both manual and psychophysical relaxing techniques – and the consequent local response to events leading to scar tissue healing. The objective of the study is to become a useful instrument of knowledge for those manual therapists and professionals who deal with patients affected by discontinuity of the skin surface due to trauma or surgery. This article also intends to stimulate research in order to find and propose new methods of scar treatment, taking into consideration the information gained so far from other complementary and alternative disciplines. PMID:26316774

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to scars: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Zanier, Emiliano; Bordoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to carry out a narrative review regarding the approach to scars through complementary and alternative medicine focusing on osteopathy, naturopathy, and other minor methods and traditional rehabilitative medicines, such as physiotherapy and manual therapies. We analyzed the existing literature regarding the possible influences of techniques relaxing the diaphragm - both manual and psychophysical relaxing techniques - and the consequent local response to events leading to scar tissue healing. The objective of the study is to become a useful instrument of knowledge for those manual therapists and professionals who deal with patients affected by discontinuity of the skin surface due to trauma or surgery. This article also intends to stimulate research in order to find and propose new methods of scar treatment, taking into consideration the information gained so far from other complementary and alternative disciplines. PMID:26316774

  20. Comparison of the Postoperative Incidence Rate of Capsular Contracture among Different Breast Implants: A Cumulative Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Zhou, Liang; Pan, Fuqiang; Gao, Yang; Yuan, Xi; Fan, Dongli

    2015-01-01

    Background A large number of clinical studies have reported that the different materials used in breast implants were a possible cause of the different incidence rates of capsular contracture observed in patients after implantation. However, this theory lacks comprehensive support from evidence-based medicine, and considerable controversy remains. Objectives In this study, a cumulative systematic review examined breast augmentation that used implants with textured or smooth surfaces to analyze the effects of these two types of implants on the occurrence of postoperative capsular contracture. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of literature databases, including PubMed and EMBASE, for clinical reports on the incidence of capsular contracture after the implantation of breast prostheses. We performed a cumulative meta-analysis on the incidence of capsular contracture in order from small to large sample sizes and conducted subgroup analyses according to the prosthetic material used, the implant pocket placement, the incision type and the duration of follow-up. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used as the final pooled statistics. Results This meta-analysis included 16 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and two retrospective studies. The cumulative comparison of textured and smooth breast implants showed statistical significance at 2.13 (95% CI, 1.18-3.86) when the fourth study was entered into the analysis. With the inclusion of more reports, the final results indicated that smooth breast implants were more likely to be associated with capsular contracture, with statistical significance at 3.10 (95% CI, 2.23-4.33). In the subgroup analyses, the subgroups based on implant materials included the silicone implant group and the saline implant group, with significant pooled statistical levels of 4.05 (95% CI, 1.97-8.31) and 3.12 (95% CI, 2.19-4.42), respectively. According to implant pocket placement, a subglandular group and a submuscular group were included in the analyses, and only the subglandular group had a statistically significant pooled result of 3.59 (95% CI, 2.43-5.30). Four subgroups were included in the analyses according to incision type: the inframammary incision group, the periareolar incision group, the transaxillary incision group and the mastectomy incision group. Among these groups, only the pooled results of the inframammary and mastectomy incision groups were statistically significant, at 2.82 (95% CI, 1.30-6.11) and 2.30 (95% CI, 1.17-4.50), respectively. Three follow-up duration subgroups were included in the analyses: the one-year group, the two- to three-year group and the ?five-year group. These subgroups had statistically significant results of 4.67 (95% CI, 2.35-9.28), 3.42 (95% CI, 2.26-5.16) and 2.71 (95% CI, 1.64-4.49), respectively. Conclusion In mammaplasty, the use of textured implants reduces the incidence of postoperative capsular contracture. Differences in implant pocket placement and incision type are also likely to affect the incidence of capsular contracture; however, this conclusion awaits further study. PMID:25680100

  1. Joint Capsule Mast Cells and Neuropeptides Are Increased within Four Weeks of Injury and Remain Elevated in Chronic Stages of Posttraumatic Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Kevin A.; Zhang, Mei; Hart, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to determine mast cell and neuropeptide nerve fiber numbers in joint capsules in posttraumatic contractures, as elevated numbers have been implicated in other fibrotic and contracture conditions. Twelve skeletally mature rabbits had intraarticular cortical windows removed from the medial and lateral femoral condyles and the knee joint immobilized. The contralateral unoperated limb served as a control. Equal numbers of rabbits were sacrificed 4 weeks after surgery or 40 weeks after the first surgery that included 32 weeks of remobilization. Six patients with chronic posttraumatic elbow joint contractures and six age-matched organ donor controls free of elbow contractures were also studied. Joint capsule myofibroblast, mast cell, and neuropeptide containing nerve fiber numbers were assessed with immunohistochemistry. The numbers of myofibroblasts, mast cells, and neuropeptide containing nerve fibers expressed as a percentage of total cells were significantly greater in the contracture capsules when compared to the control capsules at all time points (p < 0.0001). The range of percentages for the three components in the contracture capsules versus the controls were 41–48% versus 9–10%, 44–50% versus 11–13%, and 45–50% versus 10–12% for the acute and chronic stages of the rabbit model and the chronic stages in the human elbows, respectively. These data support the hypothesis that a myofibroblast–mast cell–neuropeptide fibrosis axis may underlie some of the pathologic changes in the joint capsule in posttraumatic contractures. Approaches designed to manipulate this axis, such as preventing degranulation of mast cells, warrant further investigation. PMID:18404724

  2. Developing and piloting a multifactorial intervention to address participation and quality of life in nursing home residents with joint contractures (JointConImprove): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin; Bartoszek, Gabriele; Beutner, Katrin; Klingshirn, Hanna; Saal, Susanne; Stephan, Anna-Janina; Strobl, Ralf; Grill, Eva; Meyer, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint contractures are common problems in frail older people in nursing homes. Irrespective of the exact extent of older individuals in geriatric care settings living with joint contractures, they appear to be a relevant problem. Also, the new emphasis on the syndrome of joint contractures, e. g. by the German statutory long term care insurance, led to an increase in assessment and documentation efforts and preventive interventions in clinical care. However, more attention should be paid to the actual situation of older individuals in nursing homes with prevalent joint contractures, particularly their experience of related activity limitations and participation restrictions. Thus, the aim of this study is 1) to develop a tailored intervention to improve functioning, and especially participation and quality of life in older residents with joint contractures in nursing homes and 2) to test the feasibility of the intervention accompanied by a rigorous process evaluation. Methods: The complex intervention, which will be developed in this project follows the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) framework and integrates the perspectives of all potentially relevant user groups, from the affected individuals to clinicians and researchers. The development process will comprise a systematic literature review, reanalysis of existing data and the integration of the knowledge of the affected individuals and experts. The developed intervention including a comprehensive process evaluation will be pilot tested with residents with joint contractures in three nursing homes. Discussion: The projected study will provide a tailored intervention to improve functioning, participation and quality of life in older residents with joint contractures in nursing homes. With this focus, the intervention will support patient relevant outcomes. The pilot study including process evaluation will offer a first opportunity to indicate the size of the intervention’s effect and prepare further studies. PMID:26195926

  3. Bizarre paediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Ho, W S; Ying, S Y; Wong, T W

    2000-08-01

    Child abuse and neglect account for a significant number of paediatric burn injuries. It is of great importance because of the high mortality, high frequency of repeated abuse, as well as the physical, psychological and social sequelae that it causes. Burn abuse is often under-recognized and under-reported because it is difficult to define non-accidental injury. On the other hand, false accusation of burn abuse is extremely damaging to the family. Bizarre and unusual burn injuries can be caused by accident and should not automatically be assumed to be deliberate injury. Three boys of age 1-7 years with bizarre facial burns were admitted to the Burns Unit at the Prince of Wales Hospital between February 1995 and July 1999. One was burned by his baby-sitter with hot water steam and the other two were burned by their mothers with hot boiled eggs. The unusual causes of their burns raised the suspicion of child abuse and formal investigations were carried out by the Social Services Department. Detail assessment including a developmental history of the child and the psychosocial assessment of the family revealed that these three boys were burned because of poor medical advice and innocent cultural belief. PMID:10812279

  4. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing. PMID:26360824

  5. Screening of candidate genes in fibroblasts derived from patients with Dupuytren's contracture using bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoyu; Yin, Weitian; Liu, Biao; Liu, Yan; Guo, Baofeng; Wei, Zhuang

    2015-08-01

    Our study aimed to identify candidate genes associated with Dupuytren's contracture (DC) and elucidate their roles in DC development. The microarray data of GSE21221 were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including six samples from carpal tunnel-derived fibroblasts and six samples from DC-derived fibroblasts. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in DC samples were screened using limma package. GO annotation and KEGG pathway analyses were performed by DAVID online tool. Protein-protein interaction network and expression correlation network were constructed to identify crucial relationships between DEGs. Finally, candidate DC-associated genes were predicted based on comparative toxicogenomics database. A total of 529 DEGs (138 up- and 391 down-regulated) in DC-derived fibroblasts were screened and compared with carpal tunnel-derived fibroblasts. Only ten DC-associated genes, such as neurotrophin 3 (NTF3) and protein kinase C, epsilon (PRKCE), were further screened. In addition, NTF3 was significantly enriched in MAPK signaling pathway, in which other DEGs, such as nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 (NR4A1), fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) and BDNF, were enriched. Besides, NTF3 could co-express with fibrillin 2 (FBN2), and PRKCE could co-express with zinc finger protein 516 (ZNF516), solute carrier organic anion transporter family, member 2A1 (SLCO2A1), chromosome 10 open reading frame 10 (C10orf10) and Kelch domain containing 7A (KLHDC7A). Our study indicates that these DEGs, including NTF3, FBN2, NR4A1, FGF22, BDNF, PRKCE, ZNF516, SLCO2A1, C10orf10 and KLHDC7A, may play important roles in DC development and serve as candidate molecular targets for treating DC. PMID:25963801

  6. The Healing Effect of Curcumin on Burn Wounds in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Davood; Farjam, Mojtaba; Geramizadeh, Bita; Tanideh, Nader; Amini, Masood; Panjehshahin, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burns are still considered one of the most devastating conditions in emergency medicine affecting both genders and all age groups in developed and developing countries, resulting into physical and psychological scars and cause chronic disabilities. This study was performed to determine the healing effect of curcumin on burn wounds in rat. METHODS Seventy female Sprague-Dawley 180-220 g rats were randomly divided into 5 equal groups. Groups of A-C received 0.1, 0.5 and 2% curcumin respectively and Group D, silver sulfadiazine ointment. Group E was considered as control group and received eucerin. After 7, 14 and 21 days of therapy, the animals were sacrificed and burn areas were macroscopically examined and histologically were scored. RESULTS Administration of curcumin resulted into a decrease in size of the burn wounds and a reduction in inflammation after 14th days. Reepithelialization was prominent in groups A-C while more distinguishable in group C. In group C, epidermis exhibited well structured layers without any crusting. There were spindle shaped fibroblasts in fascicular pattern, oriented parallel to the epithelial surface with eosinophilic collagen matrix. CONCLUSION Curcumin as an available and inexpensive herbal was shown be a suitable substitute in healing of burn wounds especially when 2% concentration was applied. PMID:25606474

  7. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  8. 4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Five Point Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 12 miles Northwest of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  9. 8. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, East Timothy Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 8.4 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  10. 9. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, East Timothy Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 8.4 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  11. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder. PMID:25439143

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Wound Healing and Subsequent Scarring Literature Report

    E-print Network

    Vuik, Kees

    Mathematical Modeling of Wound Healing and Subsequent Scarring Literature Report W. M. Boon Nov 11th , 2013 #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Wound healing is a process orchestrated by many closely related mediators. Each of these mediators plays its own specific role as the wound heals in a series of different

  13. [Nonablative fractional lasers: Acne scars and other indications].

    PubMed

    Degitz, K

    2015-10-01

    Nonablative photothermolysis has become an established technique in laser dermatology. It is mainly used for restructuring dermal connective tissue in order to treat, for example, acne scars or solar elastosis. It is also applied to the treatment of melasma and other benign cutaneous pigment disorders. This article discusses various indications in light of published observations and with regard to practical considerations. PMID:26253115

  14. Ectopic Pregnancy in caesarean section scar: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Rajarshi; Solanki, Narayan; Kakadiya, Ketan; Bansal, Ashank; Joshi, Manisha; Nawale, Ajita

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of ectopic pregnancy occurring in the scar of a previous caesarean section, diagnosed by ultrasonography and confirmed by 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging of pelvis. We present the clinical details and imaging findings, followed by discussion of the etiology, pathogenesis, and imaging of this condition. PMID:26649124

  15. The evolution of laser surgery for acne and other scarring processes.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of acne scars is an important part of a laser specialist's practice. For the last 20 years, the technology available for this application has progressed from nonablative to ablative and eventually to fractional lasers that are effective for a range of scar types. Although patients with mild to severe acne scarring have long been good laser candidates, we are beginning to understand the use of lasers for severe traumatic scars which can be disfiguring and functionally limiting in nature. PMID:25830249

  16. Painful nodule in the caesarean section scar of a young woman.

    PubMed

    Russo, Veronica A; Alikhan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is the presence of ectopic endometrial tissue outside the uterus and cutaneous endometriosis is a rare manifestation of this disease that may be found at the sites of surgical scars as a result of iatrogenic implantation. Herein we present a case of scar endometriosis in a 35-year-old woman. The scar was sustained following a remote caesarean section. PMID:26632937

  17. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under high heat loads in the laboratory, combat clothing can ignite, but there is little evidence that clothing ignition is a common occurrence in military burn casualties. Thermoplastic materials have many benefits in civil and military clothing. There is little objective evidence that they exacerbate burns, or complicate burn management. Their use in military clothing must be based on objective evidence, not hearsay. PMID:11307683

  18. [Value and place of tenolysis of the flexors of the fingers in the complex treatment of tenogenic contractures].

    PubMed

    Kolonta?, Iu Iu; Bely?, S I

    1989-07-01

    Having analysed their experience in the treatment of 102 patients with tendogenic contractures of the hand fingers the authors have proposed a test for prognosis of the recovery of the slipping function of the flexor tendons after suturing and tendoplasty. In cases of ineffective conservative therapy it is recommended to make tenolysis at the early stages of rehabilitation. Indications and contraindications, the operative technique including application of microsurgical technique and the authors' devices have been determined. The principles of postoperative management of this category of patients have been elucidated. It has been noted that tenolysis at the early stages allows to considerably reduce the terms of rehabilitation. PMID:2682432

  19. Changes of Achilles tendon properties via 12-week PNF based robotic rehabilitation of ankle joints with spasticity and/or contracture.

    PubMed

    Zhihao Zhou; Yuan Zhou; Ninghua Wang; Fan Gao; Long Wang; Kunlin Wei; Qining Wang

    2014-08-01

    Ankle joint with spasticity and/or contracture can severely affect mobility and independence of stroke survivors. Due to that, the Achilles tendon(AT) is affected. In this paper, we aim to study changes of AT properties via proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) treatment. A robotic ankle-foot rehabilitation system has been proposed, which consists of a robotic ankle-foot platform and a graphic user interface. In this pilot study, two post-stroke patients participated and carried out a 12-week PNF treatment with the robotic system. The treatment is evaluated quantitatively in AT properties. The evaluation shows that after the PNF treatment, the average decrease of AT length is 4.1 mm (6.5%) and the recovery ratio is 30.4%, while the thickness has no change. The results indicate that the PNF based robotic rehabilitation for ankle joints with spasticity and/or contracture is effective to improve the ankle spasticity/contracture. PMID:25570183

  20. Minor burns - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... possible, especially if the burn is caused by chemicals, hold the burned skin under cool running water for 10 to 15 minutes until it does not hurt as much. Use a sink, shower, or garden hose. If this is not possible, put a ...

  1. IL-6 Trans-signaling-STAT3 Pathway Mediates ECM and Cellular Proliferation in Fibroblasts from Hypertrophic Scar

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sutapa; Ju, Xiaoxi; Sun, Hong; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Brasier, Allan R

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms behind the pathogenesis of post-burn hypertrophic scar (HS) remain unclear. Here, we investigate the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) trans-signaling-STAT3 pathway in HS fibroblasts (HSF) derived from burned-induced HS skin. HSF showed increased Tyr 705 STAT3 phosphorylation over normal fibroblast (NF) after IL-6•IL-6R? stimulation by immunoassays. The endogenous STAT3 target gene, SOCS3, was upregulated in HSF and showed increased STAT3 binding on its promoter relative to NF in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay. We observed that the cell surface signaling transducer glycoprotein 130 is upregulated in HSF using Q-RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The production of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM), including the expression of alpha2 (1) procollagen (Col1A2) and fibronectin 1 (FN) were seen in HSFs. A STAT3 peptide inhibitor abrogated FN and Col1A2 gene expression in HSF indicating involvement of STAT3 in ECM production. The cellular proliferation markers Cyclin D1, Bcl-Xl and c-Myc were also upregulated in HSF and knockdown of STAT3 by siRNA attenuated c-Myc expression indicating the essential role of STAT3 in fibroblast proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that the IL-6-trans-signaling-STAT3 pathway may play an integral role in HS pathogenesis and disruption of this pathway could be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced HS. PMID:23303450

  2. Incidence of bladder neck contracture after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Benjamin N.; Davis, Cole B.; Cowan, Janet E.; Kane, Christopher J.; Carroll, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the incidence and risk factors for bladder neck contracture (BNC) in men treated with robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) and open radical prostatectomy (ORP), as BNC is a well-described complication of ORP and may be partially attributable to technique. PATIENTS AND METHODS The University of California San Francisco Urologic Oncology Database was queried for patients undergoing RALP or ORP from 2002 to 2008. Patient demographics, prostate cancer-specific information, surgical data, and follow-up were collected. For each surgical approach, multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to evaluate associations of demographics and clinical characteristics with BNC. Time to BNC after RP was evaluated using life table and Kaplan–Meier methods. RESULTS From 2002 to 2008, 988 patients underwent RP as primary treatment and had at least 12 months of follow-up. Of these men, 695 underwent ORP and 293 underwent RALP. The mean (SD) age was 59.3 (6.80) years and 91% of men were Caucasian. D’Amico risk groups at diagnosis were low (38%), intermediate (38%), and high (24%). The BNC incidence was 2.2% (22 cases) overall, 1.4% (four) for RALP, and 2.6% (18) for ORP (P = 0.12). Patients with BNC were diagnosed a median (range) of 4.7 (1–15) months after surgery. At 18 months after surgery, the BNC-free rate was 97% for ORP and 99% for RALP (log-rank P = 0.13). The most common presenting complaint was slow stream, followed by urinary retention. In Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, earlier year of surgery, older age at diagnosis and higher PSA level at diagnosis were significantly associated with BNC among ORP patients. In the RALP group, none of the covariates were associated with BNC. CONCLUSIONS The overall incidence of BNC was low in both RALP and ORP groups. Technical factors such as enhanced magnification and a running bladder anastomosis may explain the lower BNC incidence in the RALP group. PMID:20438567

  3. Release of insulin from PLGA-alginate dressing stimulates regenerative healing of burn wounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Dhall, Sandeep; Silva, João P; Liu, Yan; Hrynyk, Michael; Garcia, Monika; Chan, Alex; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Neufeld, Ronald J; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    Burn wound healing involves a complex set of overlapping processes in an environment conducive to ischaemia, inflammation and infection costing $7.5 billion/year in the U.S.A. alone, in addition to the morbidity and mortality that occur when the burns are extensive. We previously showed that insulin, when topically applied to skin excision wounds, accelerates re-epithelialization and stimulates angiogenesis. More recently, we developed an alginate sponge dressing (ASD) containing insulin encapsulated in PLGA [poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] microparticles that provides a sustained release of bioactive insulin for >20 days in a moist and protective environment. We hypothesized that insulin-containing ASD accelerates burn healing and stimulates a more regenerative, less scarring healing. Using heat-induced burn injury in rats, we show that burns treated with dressings containing 0.04 mg insulin/cm(2) every 3 days for 9 days have faster closure, a higher rate of disintegration of dead tissue and decreased oxidative stress. In addition, in insulin-treated wounds, the pattern of neutrophil inflammatory response suggests faster clearing of the burned dead tissue. We also observe faster resolution of the pro-inflammatory macrophages. We also found that insulin stimulates collagen deposition and maturation with the fibres organized more like a basket weave (normal skin) than aligned and cross-linked (scar tissue). In summary, application of ASD-containing insulin-loaded PLGA particles on burns every 3 days stimulates faster and more regenerative healing. These results suggest insulin as a potential therapeutic agent in burn healing and, because of its long history of safe use in humans, insulin could become one of the treatments of choice when repair and regeneration are critical for proper tissue function. PMID:26310669

  4. Clinimetric properties and clinical utility in rehabilitation of postsurgical scar rating scales: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, Stefano; Ferriero, Giorgio; Sartorio, Francesco; Cisari, Carlo; Bravini, Elisabetta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to review and critically assess the most used and clinimetrically sound outcome measures currently available for postsurgical scar assessment in rehabilitation. We performed a systematic review of the Medline and Embase databases to June 2015. All published peer-reviewed studies referring to the development, validation, or clinical use of scales or questionnaires in patients with linear scars were screened. Of 922 articles initially identified in the literature search, 48 full-text articles were retrieved for assessment. Of these, 16 fulfilled the inclusion criteria for data collection. Data were collected pertaining to instrument item domains, validity, reliability, and Rasch analysis. The eight outcome measures identified were as follows: Vancouver Scar Scale, Dermatology Life Quality Index, Manchester Scar Scale, Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale, Bock Quality of Life (Bock QoL) questionnaire, Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale, Patient-Reported Impact of Scars Measure, and Patient Scar Assessment Questionnaire. Scales were examined for their clinimetric properties, and recommendations for their clinical or research use and selection were made. There is currently no absolute gold standard to be used in rehabilitation for the assessment of postsurgical scars, although the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and the Patient-Reported Impact of Scars Measure emerged as the most robust scales. PMID:26426285

  5. Retinoic acid and glycolic acid combination in the treatment of acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, BS; Ashwini, KR; Vasanth, Vani; Navale, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acne is a prevalent condition in society affecting nearly 80-90% of adolescents often resulting in secondary damage in the form of scarring. Retinoic acid (RA) is said to improve acne scars and reduce postinflammatory hyperpigmentation while glycolic acid (GA) is known for its keratolytic properties and its ability to reduce atrophic acne scars. There are studies exploring the combined effect of retinaldehyde and GA combination with positive results while the efficacy of retinoic acid and GA (RAGA) combination remains unexplored. Aim: The aim of this study remains to retrospectively assess the efficacy of RAGA combination on acne scars in patients previously treated for active acne. Materials and Methods: A retrospective assessment of 35 patients using topical RAGA combination on acne scars was done. The subjects were 17-34 years old and previously treated for active acne. Case records and photographs of each patient were assessed and the acne scars were graded as per Goodman and Baron's global scarring grading system (GSGS), before the start and after 12 weeks of RAGA treatment. The differences in the scar grades were noted to assess the improvement. Results: At the end of 12 weeks, significant improvement in acne scars was noticed in 91.4% of the patients. Conclusion: The RAGA combination shows efficacy in treating acne scars in the majority of patients, minimizing the need of procedural treatment for acne scars. PMID:25821727

  6. Delineation of the 3p14.1p13 microdeletion associated with syndromic distal limb contractures.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Monnier, Nicole; Callier, Patrick; Dieterich, Klaus; Francoise, Michel; Montgomery, Tara; Kjaergaard, Susanne; Neas, Katherine; Dixon, Joanne; Dahm, Thomas Lee; Huet, Frédéric; Ragon, Clémence; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Marle, Nathalie; Duplomb, Laurence; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Mugneret, Francine; Vokes, Steve A; Tucker, Haley W; Lunardi, Joël; Faivre, Laurence; Jouk, Pierre Simon; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2014-12-01

    Distal limb contractures (DLC) represent a heterogeneous clinical and genetic condition. Overall, 20-25% of the DLC are caused by mutations in genes encoding the muscle contractile apparatus. Large interstitial deletions of the 3p have already been diagnosed by standard chromosomal analysis, but not associated with a specific phenotype. We report on four patients with syndromic DLC presenting with a de novo 3p14.1p13 microdeletion. The clinical features associated multiple contractures, feeding problems, developmental delay, and intellectual disability. Facial dysmorphism was constant with low-set posteriorly rotated ears and blepharophimosis. Review of previously reported cases with a precise mapping of the deletions, documented a 250?kb smallest region of overlap (SRO) necessary for DLC. This region contained one gene, EIF4E3, the first three exons of the FOXP1 gene, and an intronic enhancer of FOXP1 named hs1149. Sanger sequencing and locus quantification of hs1149, EIF4E3, and FOXP1 in a cohort of 11 French patients affected by DLC appeared normal. In conclusion, we delineate a new microdeletion syndrome involving the 3p14.1p13 locus and associated with DLC and severe developmental delay. PMID:25258245

  7. Comparison of different laser systems in the treatment of hypertrophic and atrophic scars and keloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharschmidt, D.; Algermissen, Bernd; Willms-Jones, J.-C.; Philipp, Carsten M.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1997-12-01

    Different laser systems and techniques are used for the treatment of hypertrophic scars, keloids and acne scars. Significant criteria in selecting a suitable laser system are the scar's vascularization, age and diameter. Flashlamp- pumped dye-lasers, CO2-lasers with scanner, Argon and Nd:YAG-lasers are used. Telangiectatic scars respond well to argon lasers, erythematous scars and keloids to dye-laser treatment. Using interstitial Nd:YAG-laser vaporization, scars with a cross-section over 1 cm can generally be reduced. For the treatment of atrophic and acne scars good cosmetic results are achieved with a CO2-laser/scanner system, which allows a precise ablation of the upper dermis with low risk of side-effects.

  8. [Indications for surgical treatment of hard scarring gastric ulcers].

    PubMed

    Durleshter, V M; Korochanskaia, N V; Serikova, S N

    2014-01-01

    It was done the comparative analysis of the morphofunctional state of the upper gastrointestinal tract between 350 patients with effective conservative treatment and 104 patients with hard scarring gastric ulcers. The analysis identified the predictors of ineffective medical treatment and led to deliver the indications for timely surgical treatment. It was identified the next indications for planned organ-preserving surgical treatment of patients with hard scarring gastric ulcers: penetrating and non-healing ulcers with large or gigantic size in case of the adequate medical therapy, high-grade dysplasia and colonic metaplasia of the gastric epithelium in the borders or fundus of the ulcer,ulcers combination with fixed cardio-fundal or fundo-corporal hiatal hernias; hypotonic-hypokinetic type of the gastric and duodenal activity with the development of gastrostasis and pronounced duodenogastric reflux. PMID:24781063

  9. Avoiding Extended Scar in Skin Expansion: Alagoz Technique.

    PubMed

    Alagöz, Murat ?ahin; Öksüz, Sinan; Keskin, Mustafa; Ya?ar, Emrah Ka?an; Eren, Fikret; Hasdemir, Mustafa; Ülkür, Ersin

    2015-06-01

    The principal aim of skin expansion is to provide additional donor tissue without extra donor-site morbidity. Most of the reports about tissue expansion are focused on the properties of expander. Donor-site decision is usually underestimated. Here, we offer to use the defect area and surrounding healthy tissue as the donor site.In 4 cases, expanders were placed just under the defect in a fashion to extend 1 to 2 cm more laterally toward the encircling healthy tissue. The expanded tissue was not mobilized for longer distances; thus, there was no loss in flap gain. The resulting final scar was linear or crescentic. In the Alagoz technique, tissue gain similar in size to the defect is sufficient for reconstruction. The simpler the flap, the best the resulting scar. PMID:26080234

  10. Quantitative assessment of graded burn wounds in a porcine model using spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI)

    PubMed Central

    Ponticorvo, Adrien; Burmeister, David M.; Yang, Bruce; Choi, Bernard; Christy, Robert J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and timely assessment of burn wound severity is a critical component of wound management and has implications related to course of treatment. While most superficial burns and full thickness burns are easily diagnosed through visual inspection, burns that fall between these extremes are challenging to classify based on clinical appearance. Because of this, appropriate burn management may be delayed, increasing the risk of scarring and infection. Here we present an investigation that employs spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI) as non-invasive technologies to characterize in-vivo burn severity. We used SFDI and LSI to investigate controlled burn wounds of graded severity in a Yorkshire pig model. Burn wounds were imaged starting at one hour after the initial injury and daily at approximately 24, 48 and 72 hours post burn. Biopsies were taken on each day in order to correlate the imaging data to the extent of burn damage as indicated via histological analysis. Changes in reduced scattering coefficient and blood flow could be used to categorize burn severity as soon as one hour after the burn injury. The results of this study suggest that SFDI and LSI information have the potential to provide useful metrics for quantifying the extent and severity of burn injuries. PMID:25360365

  11. The Use of Chemotherapeutics for the Treatment of Keloid Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher David; Guiot, Luke; Samy, Mike; Gorman, Mark; Tehrani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scars are pathological scars, which develop as a result of exaggerated dermal tissue proliferation following cutaneous injury and often cause physical, psychological and cosmetic problems. Various theories regarding keloidogenesis exist, however the precise pathophysiological events remain unclear. Many different treatment modalities have been implicated in their management, but currently there is no entirely satisfactory method for treating all keloid lesions. We review a number of different chemotherapeutic agents which have been proposed for the treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars while giving insight into some of the novel chemotherapeutic drugs which are currently being investigated. Non-randomized trials evaluating the influence of different chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); mitomycin C; bleomycin and steroid injection, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents or alternative treatment modalities, for the treatment of keloids were identified using a predefined PubMed search strategy. Twenty seven papers were identified. Scar improvement ?50% was found in the majority of cases treated with 5-FU, with similar results found for mitomycin C, bleomycin and steroid injection. Combined intralesional 5-FU and steroid injection produced statistically significant improvements when compared to monotherapy. Monotherapy recurrence rates ranged from 0-47% for 5-FU, 0-15% for bleomycin and 0-50% for steroid injection. However, combined therapy in the form of surgical excision and adjuvant 5-FU or steroid injections demonstrated lower recurrence rates; 19% and 6% respectively. Currently, most of the literature supports the use of combination therapy (usually surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy) as the mainstay treatment of keloids, however further investigation is necessary to determine success rates over longer time frames. Furthermore, there is the potential for novel therapies, but further investigation is required to elucidate their true efficacy. PMID:26236447

  12. Treatment of Acne Scars With High Intensity Focused Radio Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimi, Omar A; Weiss, Robert A; Weiss, Margaret A; Halvorson, Christian R; Mayoral, Flor; Ross, E Victor; Cohen, Joel L

    2015-09-01

    In this multi-site case series, the efficacy of high intensity focused radiofrequency (RF) delivered to the dermis was evaluated for treating acne scars. A novel delivery system that uses insulated microneedles to deliver a desired thermal effect to multiple depths of the dermis while sparing the epidermis from RF injury was used. Four (4) healthy subjects from four different practices were evaluated and used in this case report. The subjects were treated between 3 or 4 times depending on the severity of the acne scars presented. The depth of thermal delivery was adjusted before each pass and all subjects received at a minimum, three passes to the treated area. Before and after photographs along with adverse effects were recorded. The theory behind the use of insulated needles with the active RF delivery at the distal tip is to allow for significant thermal injury to several layers of the dermis while avoiding thermal injury to the epidermis. This case report demonstrates significant improvement on acne scars and that all skin types should be safely treatable with minimum downtime realized. PMID:26355629

  13. Management of subcostal scars during DIEP-flap raising.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, Thomas; Huemer, Georg M; Kolehmainen, Maija; Otto-Schoeller, Angela; Wechselberger, Gottfried

    2004-09-01

    The lower abdomen continues to be the favourite donor site for free tissue transplantation in autologous breast reconstruction. The deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEP)-flap has revolutionised microsurgical reconstruction of the breast after mastectomy. However, previous abdominal operations with resulting subcostal scars limit the use of this flap due to possible severe complications such as fat necrosis or wound break down at the donor site. We present a method to avoid such problems that could equally be applied in simple abdominoplasties under similar conditions. After harvest of the DIEP-flap the cephalad wound edge has to be undermined for direct wound closure. Instead of ligating encountered perforating vessels, one of these perforators is prepared and left intact to provide perfusion for the distal part of the cranial abdominal flap below the scar. With this technique, the DIEP-flap can be harvested safely even in the presence of abdominal scars and, thus, is not contraindicated under these circumstances any longer. PMID:15308396

  14. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry K.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  15. Burns (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hot faucet to an accidental tipping of a coffee cup, burns are a potential hazard in every ... culprit (from steam, hot bath water, tipped-over coffee cups, hot foods, cooking fluids, etc.) contact with ...

  16. Lava Flow Burning Vegetation

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Lava flow activity continues to burn vegetation in the kipuka adjacent to the trail, causing the viewing trail to be closed beyond the trailhead. The new viewing area is still very close to the active flows. ...

  17. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Shocks, and Fires Firesetting Kitchen: Household Safety Checklist Fireworks Safety A to Z: Burn, Second-Degree A ... Use the Oven and Stove? Finding Out About Fireworks Safety Being Safe in the Kitchen Dealing With ...

  18. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mock, David; Chugh, Deepika

    2010-01-01

    Most clinicians dread seeing the patient presenting with a primary complaint of a burning pain on one or more oral mucosal surfaces. Unlike most other clinical conditions presenting in a dental office, burning mouth syndrome is poorly understood with few evidence based remedies. More recently, advances have been made towards clarifying the possible etiology of the disorder and testing the possible therapeutic modalities available. This article attempts to summarize the “state of the art” today. PMID:20690412

  19. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  20. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications

  1. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the companyused technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  2. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process.

  3. Ball lightning burn.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, Gennaro; Monstrey, Stan; von Heimburg, Dennis; Hamdi, Mustapha; Van Landuyt, Koen; Blondeel, Phillip

    2003-05-01

    Ball lightning is a rare physical phenomenon, which is not yet completely explained. It is similar to lightning but with different, peculiar characteristics. It can be considered a mix of fire and electricity, concentrated in a fireball with a diameter of 20-cm that most commonly appears suddenly, even in indoor conditions, during a thunderstorm. It moves quickly for several meters, can change direction, and ultimately disappears. During a great storm, a 28-year-old man and his 5-year-old daughter sustained burn wounds after ball lightning came from the outdoors through a chimney. These two patients demonstrated signs of fire and electrical injuries. The father, who lost consciousness, sustained superficial second-degree burn wounds bilaterally on the zygomatic area and deep second-degree burn wounds on his right hand (total body surface area, 4%). His daughter demonstrated superficial second-degree burn wounds on the left part of the face and deep second-degree and third-degree burn wounds (total body surface area, 30%) on the left neck, both upper arms, and the back. In this article, the authors report the first two cases of burn injuries resulting from ball lightning contact indoors. The literature on this rare phenomenon is reviewed to elucidate the nature of ball lightning. Emphasis is placed on the nature of injuries after ball lightning contact, the therapy used, and the long-term complications. PMID:12792547

  4. Aesthetic restoration of the severely disfigured face in burn victims: a comprehensive strategy.

    PubMed

    Rose, E H

    1995-12-01

    Although highly specialized burn centers have significantly reduced mortality rates following extensive total body surface area burns, survivors are often left with grotesque facial disfigurement. The strategy of modern facial restoration emphasizes enhancement of aesthetic appearance as significantly as mitigation of functional impairment. Criteria for success are (1) an undistracted "normal" look at conversational distance, (2) facial balance and symmetry, (3) distinct aesthetic units fused by inconspicuous scars, (4) "doughy" skin texture appropriate for corrective makeup, and (5) dynamic facial expression. Since 1985, the author has successfully restored 17 severely disfigured burned faces by replacement of entire aesthetic units with microvascular "prepatterned" composite flaps blended into the facial canvas by cosmetic camouflage techniques. The series includes hemiface (2), neck/jaw (5), chin/lower lip (3), cheek/malar (5), peri-orbital (2), nose (3), upper lip (4), and ear reconstructions (4). Flaps represented are free preauricular (1), radial forearm (6), ulnar forearm (1), free scapular (6), ilio-osteocutaneous (2), temporoparietal (8), vascularized forehead island (3), supraclavicular (1), and SMAS (1). Important to outcome is extensive initial intraoperative "sculpting" to simulate normal planes and contours. Seams are placed at junctions of facial components. Three-dimensional imaging is used to assess architectural asymmetries, and bone grafts are aided by computer-generated acrylic models. Adjunctive procedures include tensor fasciae latae slings, intraoperative tissue expansion, suction-assisted lipectomy, and scar management. After restoration of facial form and texture, flesh color make-up and/or tattooing of beard, lips, scars, eyebrows, etc., aid to hide scars and pigment the skin to harmonize with the rest of the face. In all cases, facial integrity has been aesthetically restored and, in most instances, with makeup, is near normal in social settings at conversational distances. Facial animation is retained and color matches are excellent. One flap was lost early in the series. PMID:7480277

  5. PBXN-110 Burn Rate Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E

    2008-08-11

    It is estimated that PBXN-110 will burn laminarly with a burn function of B = (0.6-1.3)*P{sup 1.0} (B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is pressure in MPa). This paper provides a brief discussion of how this burn behavior was estimated.

  6. ?2-Adrenoceptor Activation Modulates Skin Wound Healing Processes to Reduce Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Le Provost, Gabrielle S; Pullar, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    During wound healing, excessive inflammation, angiogenesis, and differentiated human dermal fibroblast (HDF?) function contribute to scarring, whereas hyperpigmentation negatively affects scar quality. Over 100 million patients heal with a scar every year. To investigate the role of the beta 2 adrenergic receptor (?2AR) in wound scarring, the ability of beta 2 adrenergic receptor agonist (?2ARag) to alter HDF differentiation and function, wound inflammation, angiogenesis, and wound scarring was explored in HDFs, zebrafish, chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM), and a porcine skin wound model, respectively. Here we identify a ?2AR-mediated mechanism for scar reduction. ?2ARag significantly reduced HDF differentiation, via multiple cAMP and/or fibroblast growth factor 2 or basic FGF (FGF2)-dependent mechanisms, in the presence of transforming growth factor beta?1, reduced contractile function, and inhibited mRNA expression of a number of profibrotic markers. ?2ARag also reduced inflammation and angiogenesis in zebrafish and CAMs in vivo, respectively. In Red Duroc pig full-thickness wounds, ?2ARag reduced both scar area and hyperpigmentation by almost 50% and significantly improved scar quality. Indeed, mechanisms delineated in vitro and in other in vivo models were evident in the ?2ARag-treated porcine scars in vivo. Both macrophage infiltration and angiogenesis were initially decreased, whereas DF function was impaired in the ?2ARag-treated porcine wound bed. These data collectively reveal the potential of ?2ARag to improve skin scarring. PMID:25050597

  7. Non-invasive evaluation of therapeutic response in keloid scar using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Yang, Chao-Chun; Lee, Julia Yu-Yun; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Chen, Wan-Rung; Hughes, Michael; Chen, Yu-Wen; Liao, Yu-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis and ideal treatment of keloid are still largely unknown, and it is essential to develop an objective assessment of keloid severity to evaluate the therapeutic response. We previously reported that our diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system could assist clinicians in understanding the functional and structural condition of keloid scars. The purpose of this study was to understand clinical applicability of our DRS system on evaluating the scar severity and therapeutic response of keloid. We analyzed 228 spectral data from 71 subjects with keloid scars. The scars were classified into mild (0-3), moderate (4-7) and severe (8-11) according to the Vancouver scar scale. We found that as the severity of the scar increased, collagen concentration and water content increased, and the reduced scattering coefficient at 800 nm and oxygen saturation (SaO2) decreased. Using the DRS system, we found that collagen bundles aligned in a specific direction in keloid scars, but not in normal scars. Water content and SaO2 may be utilized as reliable parameters for evaluating the therapeutic response of keloid. In conclusion, the results obtained here suggest that the DRS has potential as an objective technique with which to evaluate keloid scar severity. In addition, it may be useful as a tool with which to track longitudinal response of scars in response to various therapeutic interventions. PMID:25780731

  8. The media glorifying burns: a hindrance to burn prevention.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2003-01-01

    The media have a profound influence on the actions of children and adults. Burns and burn prevention tend to be ignored or even mocked. The purpose of this presentation is to reveal the callousness of the media in its dealings with burns and burn prevention. Printed materials with a relationship to burns, risk of burning, or disrespect for the consequences of burns were collected. The materials were tabulated into four categories: comics, advertisements (ads), articles that made light of burns, and television shows that portrayed behavior that would risk burn injury. Most burn-related materials were found in comics or advertisements. Several comics made light of high-risk behavior with flames, scald injury, contact injury, or burns. In addition, several advertisements showed people on fire or actions that could easily lead to burns. Several articles and televisions shows portrayed high-risk behavior that, in some instances, led to copycat injuries. Flames are frequently used to sell items that target adolescent boys or young men. The high incidence injuries that frequent this population parallel the high-risk behaviors portrayed by the media. The media portrays flames and high-risk behavior for burn injury as being cool, funny, and without consequence. The use of flames on clothing and recreational equipment (skateboards, hot rods) particularly targets the high-risk adolescent male. The burn community should make the media aware of the harm it causes with its callous depiction and glorification of burns. PMID:12792237

  9. Global burned-land estimation in Latin America using MODIS composite data.

    PubMed

    Chuvieco, Emilio; Opazo, Sergio; Sione, Walter; Del Valle, Hector; Anaya, Jesús; Di Bella, Carlos; Cruz, Isabel; Manzo, Lilia; López, Gerardo; Mari, Nicolas; González-Alonso, Federico; Morelli, Fabiano; Setzer, Alberto; Csiszar, Ivan; Kanpandegi, Jon Ander; Bastarrika, Aitor; Libonati, Renata

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results of the AQL2004 project, which has been develope within the GOFC-GOLD Latin American network of remote sensing and forest fires (RedLatif). The project intended to obtain monthly burned-land maps of the entire region, from Mexico to Patagonia, using MODIS (moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer) reflectance data. The project has been organized in three different phases: acquisition and preprocessing of satellite data; discrimination of burned pixels; and validation of results. In the first phase, input data consisting of 32-day composites of MODIS 500-m reflectance data generated by the Global Land Cover Facility (GLCF) of the University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland, U.S.A.) were collected and processed. The discrimination of burned areas was addressed in two steps: searching for "burned core" pixels using postfire spectral indices and multitemporal change detection and mapping of burned scars using contextual techniques. The validation phase was based on visual analysis of Landsat and CBERS (China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite) images. Validation of the burned-land category showed an agreement ranging from 30% to 60%, depending on the ecosystem and vegetation species present. The total burned area for the entire year was estimated to be 153 215 km2. The most affected countries in relation to their territory were Cuba, Colombia, Bolivia, and Venezuela. Burned areas were found in most land covers; herbaceous vegetation (savannas and grasslands) presented the highest proportions of burned area, while perennial forest had the lowest proportions. The importance of croplands in the total burned area should be taken with reserve, since this cover presented the highest commission errors. The importance of generating systematic products of burned land areas for different ecological processes is emphasized. PMID:18372556

  10. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta is a potential marker of joint contracture: an experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    He, Ronghan; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Yunxiang; Huang, Junqi; Ren, Jianhua; Wang, Kun

    2015-11-01

    Joint contracture is a fibroproliferative disorder that restricts joint mobility, resulting in tissue degeneration and deformity. However, the etiology of joint contracture is still unknown. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta) is reported to increase in fibrotic diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CCT-eta is implicated in joint contracture and to determine the role of CCT-eta in the progression of joint contracture by analyzing a rat model. We immobilized the left knee joint of rat by internal fixation for 8 weeks. The non-immobilized right leg served as a control. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee was investigated. Fibroblasts were obtained from the posterior joint capsule of the joints. The outcome was followed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), Western blot, fibroblast migration assay, and collagen assay. The effect of CCT-eta on the functions of fibroblasts was observed by utilizing a short inhibitory RNA (siRNA) targeting CCT-eta. The ROM of the immobilized joints was significantly limited compared to the contralateral joints (p?contracture disease. PMID:26220476

  11. Familial occurrence of typical and severe lethal congenital contractural arachnodactyly caused by missplicing of exon 34 of fibrillin-2

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mei; Godfrey, M.; Clericuzio, C.L.

    1996-11-01

    Genetic linkage studies have linked congenital contractual arachnodactyly (CCA), a usually mild heritable connective-tissue disorder, to FBN2, the fibrillin gene on chromosome 5. Recently, FBN2 mutations in two patients with CCA have been described. Here we report an A{r_arrow}T transversion at the -2 position of the consensus acceptor splice site, resulting in the missplicing of exon 34, a calcium-binding epidermal growth factor-like repeat in fibrillin-2 in a mother and daughter with CCA. Significantly, the mother exhibited a classic CCA phenotype with arachnodactyly, joint contractures, and abnormal pinnae, whereas her daughter exhibited a markedly more severe CCA phenotype, which included cardiovascular and gastrointestinal anomalies that led to death in infancy. Analysis of cloned fibroblasts showed that the mother is a somatic mosaic for the exon 34 missplicing mutation, whereas all the daughter`s cells harbored the mutation. 48 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Reconstruction of Acquired Breast Hypoplasia by Subcutaneous Scar Releasing and Repeated Fat Grafting Combination

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, Gökhan; Dulgar, Ahmet Gökhan; Gencel, Eyüphan; Yavuz, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Breast hypoplasia may have a congenital or acquired etiology. One of the acquired reasons is postinfectious scars, which results in skin restriction and breast hypoplasia in the long term. Reconstruction of breast hypoplasia is performed by autologous tissues, implants, or both. In this report we present a hypoplastic breast reconstruction by subcutaneous scar releasing and multiple autologous fat grafting in a 21-year-old female with a right breast hypoplasia due to postinfectious scar. No complications were observed at 24 months follow-up after treatment by subcutaneous scar releasing and repeated (three times) fat grafting. Safe and natural reconstruction of mild breast hypoplasia due to fibrotic scars can be accomplished by performing a combination of subcutaneous scar releasing and multiple fat grafting. PMID:26180709

  13. Evaluation of a highly skin permeable low-molecular-weight protamine conjugated epidermal growth factor for novel burn wound healing therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hae; Bae, Il-Hong; Choi, Jin Kyu; Park, Jin Woo

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the laser induced burn wound healing efficacy of a recombinant low-molecular-weight protamine conjugated epidermal growth factor (rLMWP-EGF). rLMWP-EGF was prepared by genetically combining LMWP with the N-terminal sequence of EGF; we obtained a homogeneous modified EGF without reduced biological activity. Because of the protein transduction domain of LMWP, rLMWP-EGF showed enhanced drug penetration across artificial skin constructs and excised mouse skin layers versus EGF and showed significantly improved burn wound healing efficacy, with accelerated wound closure and minimized eschar and scar formation, compared with EGF or no treatment. Histological examination also revealed that rLMWP-EGF permeated through the intact skin around the wound and facilitated residual epithelial cell proliferation in an integrated manner to reform an intact epidermis. Radiofrequency microwound formation was effective for reducing large hypertrophic scars formed after severe laser burning by collagen remodeling but rLMWP-EGF did not show a meaningful synergistic effect in burn scar reduction. However, rLMWP-EGF was helpful for forming skin with a more normal appearance and texture. Thus, rLMWP-EGF demonstrated therapeutic potential as a novel topical burn wound healing drug with no obvious toxic effect. PMID:24018779

  14. Effectiveness and Complications of Percutaneous Needle Tenotomy with a Large Needle for Muscle Contractures: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Chesnel, Camille; Genêt, François; Almangour, Waleed; Denormandie, Philippe; Parratte, Bernard; Schnitzler, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Background Twenty-two percent of institutionalised elderly persons have muscle contractures. Contractures have important functional consequences, rendering hygiene and positioning in bed or in a chair difficult. Medical treatment (such as botulinum toxin injections, physiotherapy or positioning) is not very effective and surgery may be required. Surgery is carried out in the operating theatre, under local or general anaesthesia but is often not possible in fragile patients. Mini-invasive tenotomy could be a useful alternative as it can be carried out in ambulatory care, under local anaesthesia. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous needle tenotomy and the risks of damage to adjacent structures in cadavers. Method Thirty two doctors who had never practiced the technique (physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, geriatricians and orthopaedic surgeons) carried out 401 tenotomies on the upper and lower limbs of 8 fresh cadavers. A 16G needle was used percutaneous following location of the tendons. After each tenotomy, a neuro-orthopaedic surgeon and an anatomist dissected the area in order to evaluate the success of the tenotomy and any adjacent lesions which had occurred. Results Of the 401 tenotomies, 72% were complete, 24.9% partial and 2.7% failed. Eight adjacent lesions occurred (2%): 4 (1%) in tendons or muscles, 3 (0.7%) in nerves and 1 (0.2%) in a vessel. Conclusion This percutaneous needle technique effectively ruptured the desired tendons, with few injuries to adjacent structures. Although this study was carried out on cadavers, the results suggest it is safe to carry out on patients. PMID:26624990

  15. Airborne lidar observations of smoke haze during SCAR-B 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, William D.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1998-01-01

    The Smoke, Clouds, Aerosol, and Radiation Brazil(SCAR-B) field campaign was conducted to study the effects that widespread and persistent biomass burning have upon radiative and chemical processes in the atmosphere. The radiative transfer characteristics of the atmosphere are altered by the introduction of particulate and gaseous materials which are the products of the combustion of vegetative material at ground level. These substances are transported and distributed horizontally and vertically by atmospheric dynamical processes which may be perturbed by the heat energy from the fires. As the pollutants disperse, their physical and chemical properties change substantially. A complete description of the effects of smoke requires that the evolution back to the natural situation be fully examined. A most important component of smoke haze investigation is finding its vertical and horizontal distribution in relation to the driving factors of dynamics and the related horizontal transport. In this presentation, we employ data from the Cloud Lidar System(CLS), carried aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft, to provide a unique view of the particulate or aerosol loading produced by fires, especially with regard to the geometrical distribution of the aerosols in the vertical plane. The lidar has the ability to measure aerosol optical properties in a continuous fashion at quite fine vertical and horizontal resolution. The results from the lidar provide measurements that are largely independent of influences that corrupt passive instruments and thus it can serve to corroborate their results. The extended horizontal and vertical range of lidar results can also augment ground based and airborne in situ measurements which have limited horizontal and vertical scope. We present the results of our analysis of CLS observations taken during the SCAR-B field campaign. Observations of the the aerosol optical thickness from the Aerosol Robotic Network(AERONET) of solar photometers are employed in conjunction with CLS data to derive extinction to backscatter ratio values which are used to convert the lidar backscatter coefficient into extinction coefficient. The extinction coefficient is integrated vertically to find aerosol optical thickness along ER-2 flight tracks. We use images of the CLS derived extinction coefficient to depict its horizontal and vertical distribution. Multispectral photometer optical thickness is used to compute the Angstrom exponent. With these, we examine the hypothesis that the values of extinction to backscatter ratio can be related to the Anstrom coefficient since both of these would be a function of the refractive index and size distribution of the aerosols.

  16. Axonal regeneration through the fibrous scar in lesioned goldfish spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Takeda, A; Atobe, Y; Kadota, T; Goris, R C; Funakoshi, K

    2015-01-22

    Spontaneous nerve regeneration beyond the scar frequently occurs in fish after spinal cord lesions, in contrast to mammals. Here we examined the spatiotemporal relationship between the fibrous scar and axonal regeneration in the goldfish. Within 1 week after hemisection of the spinal cord, the open wound was closed by a fibrous scar that was demarcated from the surrounding nervous tissue by the glia limitans, which was immunoreactive for laminin. Within 1 week after hemisection, regenerating axons entered the fibrous scar, and were surrounded by laminin-coated tubular structures continuous with the glia limitans. Regenerating axons that initially entered the fibrous scar were usually accompanied by glial processes. Within 2-3 weeks after hemisection, the tubular structures became enlarged, and the regenerating axons increased in number, fasciculating in the tubules. Glial processes immunoreactive for glial fibrillary acid protein and 5-hydroxytryptamine neurons then entered the tubular structures to associate with the regenerating axons. The tubular structures developed further, creating tunnels that penetrated the fibrous scar, through which the regenerating axons passed. At 6-12 weeks after hemisection, the fibrous scar was smaller and the enlarged tunnels contained many glial processes and several axons. The findings of present study demonstrated that, following spinal lesions in goldfish, regenerating axons enter and pass the scar tissue. The regenerating axons first enter the fibrous scar with glial elements and then grow through laminin-coated tubular structures within the fibrous scar. Invasion by glial processes and neuronal elements into the tubular structures reduces the fibrous scar area and allows for more regenerating axons to pass beyond the fibrous scar. PMID:25290012

  17. A Translational Animal Model for Scar Compression Therapy Using an Automated Pressure Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalil, A.; Tejiram, S.; Travis, T. E.; Prindeze, N. J.; Carney, B. C.; Moffatt, L. T.; Johnson, L. S.; Ramella-Roman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pressure therapy has been used to prevent and treat hypertrophic scars following cutaneous injury despite the limited understanding of its mechanism of action and lack of established animal model to optimize its usage. Objectives: The aim of this work was to test and characterize a novel automated pressure delivery system designed to deliver steady and controllable pressure in a red Duroc swine hypertrophic scar model. Methods: Excisional wounds were created by dermatome on 6 red Duroc pigs and allowed to scar while assessed weekly via gross visual inspection, laser Doppler imaging, and biopsy. A portable novel automated pressure delivery system was mounted on developing scars (n = 6) for 2 weeks. Results: The device maintained a pressure range of 30 ± 4 mm Hg for more than 90% of the 2-week treatment period. Pressure readings outside this designated range were attributed to normal animal behavior and responses to healing progression. Gross scar examination by the Vancouver Scar Scale showed significant and sustained (>4 weeks) improvement in pressure-treated scars (P < .05). Histological examination of pressure-treated scars showed a significant decrease in dermal thickness compared with other groups (P < .05). Pressure-treated scars also showed increased perfusion by laser Doppler imaging during the treatment period compared with sham-treated and untreated scars (P < .05). Cellular quantification showed differential changes among treatment groups. Conclusion: These results illustrate the applications of this technology in hypertrophic scar Duroc swine model and the evaluation and optimization of pressure therapy in wound-healing and hypertrophic scar management. PMID:26171101

  18. Nd:YAG Laser Treatment for Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: An Analysis of 102 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Sachiko; Akaishi, Satoshi; Nagashima, Yuki; Dohi, Teruyuki; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present retrospective cohort study was performed to determine the efficacy of contact-mode 1064 nm neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser laser for keloids and hypertrophic scars. The indication and limitations of this modality are discussed. Methods: The cohort consisted of 102 consecutive Japanese patients (23 males and 79 females) with keloids and hypertrophic scars for more than 1 year. They were treated every 3–4 weeks for 1 year with a long-pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser (Cutera, Brisbane, Calif.) in contact mode. Thirty-eight patients had hypertrophic scars and 64 had keloids. The scars were evaluated before the treatment commenced and 1 month after the last session by using the Japan Scar Workshop Scar Scale 2011. Recurrence was assessed at 6 months after the termination of treatment. Results: The average total Japan Scar Workshop score of the keloid and hypertrophic scar region groups dropped significantly after 1 year of treatment compared with before treatment (all P < 0.05). None of the hypertrophic scars or keloids deteriorated. However, 3 of the 34 anterior chest keloids (8.8%) did not respond. The following recurrence rates were observed 6 months after stopping laser treatment: 1 of the abdomen hypertrophic scars (4%), 18 of the anterior chest keloids (52.9%), 5 of the upper arm keloids (35.7%), and 4 of the scapula keloids (25%). Conclusions: Hypertrophic scars responded significantly better to 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser treatment than keloids. However, keloid recurrence occurred when there was remaining redness and induration, even if only a small part of the scar was affected. PMID:25587506

  19. Cesarean scar pregnancy: a rare cause of uterine arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Akbayir, Ozgur; Gedikbasi, Ali; Akyol, Alpaslan; Ucar, Adem; Saygi-Ozyurt, Sezin; Gulkilik, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    A 38-year-old gravida 4, para 2 woman with a history of two Cesarean sections and one curettage was referred to our hospital, because of painless vaginal bleeding and 6 weeks + 2 days of amenorrhea. The first diagnosis was Cesarean scar pregnancy, managed with methotrexate. Subsequently, an arteriovenous malformation developed, which was diagnosed with color Doppler imaging. The diagnosis was confirmed with angiography. Successful bilateral uterine artery embolization was performed with ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx), n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Histoacryl), and gelfoam. PMID:21647920

  20. Burning trees and bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1990-01-01

    Most burning of biomass is the result of human activity, and on a global scale it is increasing. Tropospheric concentrations of CO2, CO, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and ozone are all increasing with time; global biomass burning may make an important contribution to this increase and thus to potential global climate change. The nitrogen cycle also can have important climatic effects. Nitrous oxide put into the atmosphere by biomass burning is a greenhouse gas 250 times more powerful (molecule for molecule) than carbon dioxide. Nitric oxide, as well as being a photochemical precursor of ozone, a major pollutant in the troposphere, produces nitric acid, the fastest-growing component of acid rain. Hence, the new bridge in the nitrogen cycle is of more than mere technical interest.

  1. Extracellular Matrix Reorganization During Wound Healing and Its Impact on Abnormal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Meilang; Jackson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: When a cutaneous injury occurs, the wound heals via a dynamic series of physiological events, including coagulation, granulation tissue formation, re-epithelialization, and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. The final stage can take many months, yet the new ECM forms a scar that never achieves the flexibility or strength of the original tissue. In certain circumstances, the normal scar is replaced by pathological fibrotic tissue, which results in hypertrophic or keloid scars. These scars cause significant morbidity through physical dysfunction and psychological stress. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The cutaneous ECM comprises a complex assortment of proteins that was traditionally thought to simply provide structural integrity and scaffolding characteristics. However, recent findings show that the ECM has multiple functions, including, storage and delivery of growth factors and cytokines, tissue repair and various physiological functions. Abnormal ECM reconstruction during wound healing contributes to the formation of hypertrophic and keloid scars. Whereas adult wounds heal with scarring, the developing foetus has the ability to heal wounds in a scarless fashion by regenerating skin and restoring the normal ECM architecture, strength, and function. Recent studies show that the lack of inflammation in fetal wounds contributes to this perfect healing. Future Directions: Better understanding of the exact roles of ECM components in scarring will allow us to produce therapeutic agents to prevent hypertrophic and keloid scars. This review will focus on the components of the ECM and their role in both physiological and pathological (hypertrophic and keloid) cutaneous scar formation. PMID:25785236

  2. [THE PECULIARITIES OF UTERINE STRUCTURE AFTER DELIVERY IN RATS WITH THE MYOMETRIAL SCAR].

    PubMed

    Maiborodin, I V; Pekarev, O G; Yakimova, N V; Pekareva, Ye O; Maiborodina, V I; Perminova, Ye I

    2015-01-01

    The uterine tissues of female rats (n=30) with a scarred myometrium were examined by methods of light microscopy after the delivery. 1.5-2 months after the delivery no significant differences in the parameters of blood and lymph flow in the deep layers of the endometrium, myometrium and the myometrial scar tissue were found between the intact rats, nulliparous rats with a scarred uterus, rats that gave birth after laparotomy only and those that gave birth under the conditions of myometrial scar. In the course of pregnancy and labor activity, the damage of the tissues was observed not in the uterine scar proper, but at its borders with the myometrium. This is supported by the old hemorrhages and lymphostasis phenomena, greater number of lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and erythrocytes. In determining the indications and contraindications to vaginal childbirth in women with scarred uterus it is necessary to examine not only the scar proper, but also its border with the myometrium. The myometrial scar by itself, is not an absolute contraindication to vaginal delivery, the natural delivery is feasible in the absence of cavities with liquid and hemorrhages in the tissues of the uterine scar and at its border with myometrium. PMID:26234040

  3. Cesarean scar pregnancy treated by curettage and aspiration guided by laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shan-rong; Luo, Xin; Wang, Zhi-xin; Yao, Yu-hong

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in a cesarean scar is the rarest form of an ectopic pregnancy. The treatment for cesarean scar pregnancy mainly includes systemic methotrexate and uterine artery embolization. Here, we reported a case of cesarean scar pregnancy treated by curettage and aspiration guided by laparoscopy. The treatment plan included two phases. Three days after a combination of methotrexate and mifepristone was administered, the gestational sac was removed under laparoscopy, which enabled a successful treatment for the unruptured ectopic pregnancy in a previous cesarean scar and made it possible to preserve the reproductive capability of the patient. PMID:26345396

  4. Comparative efficacy of intralesional verapamil hydrochloride and triamcinolone acetonide in hypertrophic scars and keloids.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Rajeev B; Chatterjee, Pallab

    2014-06-01

    There is not much level 1 evidence based literature to guide management of hypertrophic scars and keloids despite an array of therapeutic modalities at disposal. Intralesional (i/l) triamcinolone injections have remained a gold standard in non surgical management. Sporadic reports on use of i/l verapamil suggest its efficacy. Since verapamil has not found sufficient mention as an effective alternative modality, it was decided to undertake a randomized study which could also address some additional clinical parameters. A randomized, parallel group and observer blinded comparison with 40 patients (48 scars) was carried out to compare the effects of i/l triamcinolone (T) (22 scars) and verapamil injections (V) (26 scars). 1.5 ml was the maximum indicative volume decided in the study protocol for both the drugs (triamcinolone @40 mg/ml and verapamil @ 2.5 mg/ml). Patients included were aged between 15-60 years with scars ranging between 0.5-5 cm (but total area roughly <6 cm(2)), and scars under 2 years duration. Patients with keloidal diathesis were excluded. Injections were scheduled every three weeks until complete flattening of the scar or eight sessions, which ever came earlier. No concomitant therapies like massage, silicone gel or pressure garments were used. Scar evaluation at each stage was done by serial photographic records as well as by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). Comparative survival analysis between the two drugs was done using Kaplan Meier curves, and VSS scores were analyzed using Wilcoxon test and log rank test. Mean zero VSS scores were achieved with treatments in respect of scar height (T-12 weeks, V-21 weeks), vascularity (T-15 weeks, V-18 weeks) and pliability (T-15 weeks, V-21 weeks). The improvement in scar vascularity and pliability kept pace with decrease in scar height, in both the groups. There was not much difference in the rate of change of scar pigmentation with either drug but almost 60% patients in both the groups regained normal pigmentation. Our study adds to evidence of verapamil's capability in flattening the raised scars. With an extremely low cost and fewer adverse effects it deserves better positioning in the wide armamentarium against hypertrophic scars. It also offers several therapeutic possibilities to alternate with triamcinolone or be used simultaneously in larger (or multiple) scars. PMID:24182692

  5. Planning a Prescribed Burn 

    E-print Network

    Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2009-04-01

    per acre Closely grazed buffalo grass Curly mesquite and buffalo, mowed lawn Buffalo grass Texas wintergrass Sands dropseed Tobosa Sideoats gram Kleingrass Little bluestem Johnsongrass 300 600 1,000 2,000 2,200 2,300 3,000 5,000 6,200 7,000 Table 1... is vital for achieving the beneficial effects of a prescribed burn. The elements of a plan are described in Extension publication E-37, Prescribed Range Burning in Texas, which is available from your county Extension agent or on the web at http...

  6. NEDD4-1 and PTEN expression in keloid scarring.

    PubMed

    Sang, P F; Wang, H; Wang, M; Hu, C; Zhang, J S; Li, X J; Zhu, F

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scarring remains a major problem in plastic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of the PTEN tumor suppressor and NEDD4-1 genes in keloid tissue and explore their effect on the formation of such scarring. Twenty keloid patients were enrolled in the study and underwent surgical removal of keloid tissue. No patient had received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy prior to treatment. PTEN and NEDD4-1 mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription PCR, while PTEN protein expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that levels of PTEN were significantly diminished in keloid samples (P < 0.05), whereas those of NEDD4-1 did not significantly differ between keloid tissue and normal skin (P > 0.05). Furthermore, we found that NEDD4-1 expression is high and inversely correlated with that of PTEN in keloids. Our results suggest that the PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway may play an important role in keloid formation and reduces PTEN expression in such tissue. Finally, although NEDD4-1 has previously been identified as a factor in keloid susceptibility, and the protein for which it encodes is known to degrade PTEN by catalyzing its polyubiquitylation, the detailed mechanism behind its involvement in keloid formation needs to be further studied. PMID:26535660

  7. Comparing kinematically detachable rock masses and rockfall scar volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrouli, O.; Corominas, J.

    2015-09-01

    In rockfall prone areas the evaluation of the risk due to worst case scenarios requires the establishment of maximum thresholds for the expected rockfall volumes. The magnitude of such instabilities is often related to the properties of the jointed rock mass, with the characteristics of the existing unfavorably dipping joint sets playing a major role. The study- site here is the chute of Forat Negre in Andorra. The size distribution of the missing volumes from the scars was calculated using terrestrial laser scanner point cloud data and reaches up to few thousands of m3. On the other hand, the application of Markland criteria on a Digital Elevation Model of the zone indicated the kinematically detachable rock masses to be up to tens of thousands of m3. As the size of the scar areas does not indicate the occurrence of such events in the past, the effect of the joint persistence as assumed for the two analyses is discussed here. The areas of the exposed joint surfaces belonging to each discontinuity set are obtained and their use as a measure of the relative persistence of each set is proposed. The average and median length of the sets F3 and F5 (sliding planes) are found to be similar to the average and median spacing of the intersecting set F7 (tension crack), suggesting that the F7 set exerts a control over the persistence of the former ones.

  8. Utility of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI) to non-invasively diagnose burn depth in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, David M; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Yang, Bruce; Becerra, Sandra C; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J; Christy, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    Surgical intervention of second degree burns is often delayed because of the difficulty in visual diagnosis, which increases the risk of scarring and infection. Non-invasive metrics have shown promise in accurately assessing burn depth. Here, we examine the use of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI) for predicting burn depth. Contact burn wounds of increasing severity were created on the dorsum of a Yorkshire pig, and wounds were imaged with SFDI/LSI starting immediately after-burn and then daily for the next 4 days. In addition, on each day the burn wounds were biopsied for histological analysis of burn depth, defined by collagen coagulation, apoptosis, and adnexal/vascular necrosis. Histological results show that collagen coagulation progressed from day 0 to day 1, and then stabilized. Results of burn wound imaging using non-invasive techniques were able to produce metrics that correlate to different predictors of burn depth. Collagen coagulation and apoptosis correlated with SFDI scattering coefficient parameter [Formula: see text] and adnexal/vascular necrosis on the day of burn correlated with blood flow determined by LSI. Therefore, incorporation of SFDI scattering coefficient and blood flow determined by LSI may provide an algorithm for accurate assessment of the severity of burn wounds in real time. PMID:26138371

  9. TIRES, OPEN BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter describes available information on the health effects from open burning of rubber tires. It concentrates on the three known sources of detailed measurements: (1) a small-scale emissions characterization study performed by the U.S. EPA in a facility designed to simulat...

  10. TRIAL BURNS: METHODS PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    When conducting a trial burn, it is necessary to make a number of measurements in order to adequately define the performance of the incinerator. n addition to flue gas emissions for particulate matter, HCl, and selected organics, it is also necessary to measure selected organics ...

  11. Hot spring burns.

    PubMed

    Baruchin, A M

    1996-03-01

    This case report describes a woman who, while visiting a hot spring, received partial- and full-thickness immersion scald burns of both ankles and heels. The prevention of such accidents is most important; efforts should be made to educate guides and tourists about the potential hazards inherent in these resorts. PMID:8634128

  12. The Earth Could Burn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarrow, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    Environmental educators are worried about the ultimate ecological threat--nuclear war, which could burn thousands of square miles, sterilize the soil, destroy 70 percent of the ozone layer letting in lethal ultraviolet rays, and cause severe radiation sickness. Educators must inform themselves, teach others, contact government representatives, and…

  13. Burns and Fire Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a high risk area for burn and scald incidents. 12 • All code-making bodies at the national ... www. nfpa. org/ categoryList. asp? categoryID= 278& URL= Safety% 20Information/ For% 20consumers/ Fire% 20& % 20safety% 20equipment/ S moke% ...

  14. Gas Hydrates Burning

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    An image of gas hydrates burning. Gas hydrates are naturally-occurring “ice-like” combinations of natural gas and water that have the potential to provide an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions....

  15. Treating and Preventing Burns

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ignition sources. Lower the temperature of your water heater to below 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48.9 degrees Celsius) to prevent hot water scalds and burns. Don’t plug appliances or other electrical equipment into extension cords if they place too much “amperage” or load on the cord, ...

  16. Scar formation and tuberculin conversion following BCG vaccination in infants: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dhanawade, Sara S.; Kumbhar, Suhas G.; Gore, Alka D.; Patil, Vijay N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is considerable variation in BCG scar failure rate on available data and correlation between BCG scar and tuberculin conversion remains controversial. Through this study we aimed to determine the scar failure rate and tuberculin conversion in term infants vaccinated with BCG within the first month. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted among 85 consecutive infants weighing >2 kg attending the immunization clinic of a medical college hospital. Fifteen subjects who could not complete the follow up were excluded. Total of 70 cases were analyzed. All babies were administered 0.1 ml of BCG and examined at 3 months (+1 week) for scar. Tuberculin test was done with 5TU PPD. An induration of >5 mm was considered positive. Statistical analysis was done using Microsoft Excel and SPSS-22. Results: Out of the 70 infants, 41 (58.6%) were males. Although majority (72.9%) of infants were vaccinated within 7 days, only 18 (25.7%) received BCG within 48 hours of birth. Sixty-four (91.4%) had a visible scar at 12 weeks post vaccination representing a scar failure rate of 8.6%. Tuberculin test was positive in 50 (71.4%). The mean ± s.d. for scar and tuberculin skin test (TST) reaction size was 4.93 ± 2.01 mm and 6.01 ± 3.22 mm, respectively. The association between scar formation and tuberculin positivity was highly significant (P < 0.001). There was significant correlation between scar size and TST size (r = 0.401, P = 0.001) Conclusions: Less than 10% of infants fail to develop a scar following BCG vaccination. There is good correlation between scar positivity and tuberculin conversion. PMID:26288778

  17. Anti-inflammatory cytokine TSG-6 inhibits hypertrophic scar formation in a rabbit ear model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Zhao; Li, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Li; Tang, Yue-Ling

    2015-03-15

    Hypertrophic scars are characterized by excessive fibrosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and can be functionally and cosmetically problematic; however, there are few satisfactory treatments for controlling hypertrophic scars. The inflammatory cells and cytokines involved in excessive inflammation during wound healing facilitate fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition, leading to pathologic scar formation. TSG-6 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity. This study examined the effect of recombinant TSG-6 on inflammation in hypertrophic scars using a rabbit ear model. Six 7-mm, full-thickness, circular wounds were made on the ears of 12 rabbits. TSG-6 and PBS were intradermally injected into the right and left ear wounds, respectively. The methods of TEM and TUNEL were used to detect fibroblast apoptosis. The expressions of inflammatory factors: IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-?, were detected by immunohistochemistry and real time polymerase chain reaction. Collagen I and III expression detected by immunohistochemistry and Masson?s trichrome staining and SEI (scar elevation index) was used to evaluate the extent of scarring. TSG-6 injection mitigated the formation of a hypertrophic scar in the rabbit ear. TSG-6-treated wounds exhibited decreased inflammation compared with the control group, as evidenced by the lower levels of IL-1?, IL-6, TNF-? and MPO. The SEI and the synthesis of collagens I and III were significantly decreased in the TSG-6-treated scars compared with control scars. The apoptosis rate was higher in the TSG-6-treated scars. TSG-6 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects during the wound healing process and cicatrization and significantly diminished hypertrophic scar formation in a rabbit ear model. PMID:25661977

  18. Using Satellite Imagery to Improve the Characterization of Crop Residue Burning Emissions in the U.S. National Emission Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, T. E.; Pouliot, G.; Rao, V.; McCarty, J. L.; Soja, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning contributes to the degradation of air quality because of its impact on ozone and particulate matter. One sector of the U.S. National Emission Inventory (NEI), crop residue burning, has been difficult to characterize. Previous "bottom up" efforts have resulted in omissions in some regions and unrealistic gradients of emissions across state boundaries. This work integrates daily fire locations from NOAA's Hazard Mapping System (HMS), burn scar products from NASA satellite imagery, and updated emission factors to build an improved characterization of temporally and spatially resolved emission datasets for regional air quality modeling. Comparisons with earlier estimates show significant changes in the temporal and spatial distribution of crop residue burning emissions. Results from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system exercised at a 12 km resolution across the continental U.S. show relatively small but appreciable changes in fine particulate (PM2.5) concentrations over parts of the modeling domain.

  19. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... injury. Learn More Burn Community Blog PEG Helps 16 Students Continue Their Education in 2015-16 23 Nov 2015 Sixteen burn survivors are furthering their education in 2015-16 with the financial assistance of a... Continue Reading ...

  20. The overall patterns of burns

    PubMed Central

    Almoghrabi, A.; Abu Shaban, N.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Burn patterns differ across the whole world and not only in relation to lack of education, overcrowding, and poverty. Cultures, habits, traditions, psychiatric illness, and epilepsy are strongly correlated to burn patterns. However, burns may also occur because of specific religious beliefs and activities, social events and festivals, traditional medical practices, occupational activities, and war. PMID:22639565

  1. Biomass Burning Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-21

    Biomass Burning Data and Information This data set represents ... geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ... models of the atmosphere. Project Title:  Biomass Burning Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry ...

  2. 13, 3226932289, 2013 Biomass burning

    E-print Network

    Dong, Xiquan

    ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern Great Plains T (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP if available. Biomass burning aerosol Geosciences Union. 32269 #12;ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern

  3. Long-term Observation of Soil Creep Activity around a Landslide Scar

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate of sediment infilling into landslide scars by soil creep is needed to estimate the timing of subsequent landslide activity at a particular site. However, knowledge about the spatial distribution of its activity around the landslide scar is scarce. Additionally, there are few...

  4. SCARS, MARKS AND TATTOOS (SMT): SOFT BIOMETRIC FOR SUSPECT AND VICTIM IDENTIFICATION

    E-print Network

    SCARS, MARKS AND TATTOOS (SMT): SOFT BIOMETRIC FOR SUSPECT AND VICTIM IDENTIFICATION Jung-Eun Lee 48823, USA ABSTRACT Scars, marks and tattoos (SMT) are being increasingly used for suspect and victim identification in forensics and law enforcement agencies. Tattoos, in particular, are getting serious attention

  5. SCAR makers and multiplex PCR-based rapid molecular typing of Lentinula edodes strains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueqian; Li, Haibo; Zhao, Weiwei; Fu, Lizhong; Peng, Huazheng; He, Liang; Cheng, Junwen; Wei, Hailong; Wu, Qingqi

    2010-11-01

    Lentinula edodes is the second most important cultivated mushroom worldwide, the most commercial strains have been identified only through traditional phenotypic analysis. In this study, a simple rapid PCR-based molecular method was developed for distinguishing commercial strains of L. edodes by developing specific sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers and establishing multiplex PCR assays with the SCAR primers. Derived from the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) techniques, 10 informative SCAR markers were generated from 10 polymorphic RAPD and SRAP bands. The differences in SCAR phenotypes among different strains made these SCAR markers potentially useful to characterize 6 strains and identify them from other studied strains. Moreover, different SCAR phenotypes also made the other 17 studied strains to be divided into four distinguishable groups. The multiplex PCR assays were further established for the joint use of some SCAR markers efficiently. Compared with some identification methods reported previously, the special feature of this new molecular method is technically rapid and convenient in the practical use and suitable for analyzing large numbers of samples. Thus, the simple rapid PCR-based molecular method can be used as a helpful assistant tool for the lentinula industry. To our knowledge, this study is the first to describe a development of a new SCAR maker-based multiplex PCR assay for rapid molecular typing of edible mushroom. PMID:20358374

  6. SCAR Mediates Light-Induced Root Elongation in Arabidopsis through Photoreceptors and Proteasomes[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dyachok, Julia; Zhu, Ling; Liao, Fuqi; He, Ji; Huq, Enamul; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2011-01-01

    The ARP2/3 complex, a highly conserved nucleator of F-actin, and its activator, the SCAR complex, are essential for growth in plants and animals. In this article, we present a pathway through which roots of Arabidopsis thaliana directly perceive light to promote their elongation. The ARP2/3-SCAR complex and the maintenance of longitudinally aligned F-actin arrays are crucial components of this pathway. The involvement of the ARP2/3-SCAR complex in light-regulated root growth is supported by our finding that mutants of the SCAR complex subunit BRK1/HSPC300, or other individual subunits of the ARP2/3-SCAR complex, showed a dramatic inhibition of root elongation in the light, which mirrored reduced growth of wild-type roots in the dark. SCAR1 degradation in dark-grown wild-type roots by constitutive photomorphogenic 1 (COP1) E3 ligase and 26S proteasome accompanied the loss of longitudinal F-actin and reduced root growth. Light perceived by the root photoreceptors, cryptochrome and phytochrome, suppressed COP1-mediated SCAR1 degradation. Taken together, our data provide a biochemical explanation for light-induced promotion of root elongation by the ARP2/3-SCAR complex. PMID:21972261

  7. Recovery From Major Depressive Disorder Among Female Adolescents: A Prospective Test of the Scar Hypothesis

    E-print Network

    Beevers, Christopher

    these factors may help to reduce depression incidence and recurrence among female adolescents. Keywords: majorRecovery From Major Depressive Disorder Among Female Adolescents: A Prospective Test of the Scar depression, consequences, psychosocial scars, adolescence, longitudinal One of the strongest predictors

  8. Episodic nitrous oxide soil emissions in Brazilian savanna (cerrado) fire-scars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobre, A. D.; Crill, P. M.; Harriss, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The seasonally burned cerrados of Brazil are the largest savanna-type ecosystem of South America and their contribution to the global atmospheric nitrous oxide (N20) budget is unknown. Four types of fire-scarred cerrado along a vegetation gradient from grassland to forest were investigated during the wet season of 1992/93. The effect of fire and subsequent water additions on epiodic emissions of N2O and the associated profile dynamic of soil/gas phase N2O concentrations were studied for several months. Additionally, the effect on episodic emissions of N2O of nitrate and glucose additions to a cerrado soil after fire and the associated profile dynamic of soil/gas phase N2O mixing ratios were determined. Finally, N2O episodic emissions in cerrado converted to corn, soybean, and pasture fields were investigated during one growing/wet season. Results showed N2O consumption/emission for the four fire-scared savanna ecosystems, for nitrogen and carbon fertilization, and for agriculture/pasture ranging from -0.3 to +0.7, 1.8 to 9.1, and 0.5 to 3.7 g N2O-N ha(exp -1) d(exp -1), respectively. During the wet season the cerrado biome does not appear to be a major source of N2O to the troposphere, even following fire events. However, the results of this study suggest that conversion of the cerrado to high input agriculture, with liming and fertilization, can increase N2O emissions more than ten fold.

  9. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning... obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  10. A Novel Triple Medicine Combination Injection for the Resolution of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars remain one of the more difficult treatment concerns for clinicians. A variety of therapies have been used in the past with moderate success. On occasion, combination therapy has been used to treat these lesion, in an attempt to lessen the symptoms of pain and pruritus that often accompanies keloids and hypertrophic scars, as well as treating the actual lesions themselves. A novel triple combination injection process is introduced here in an attempt to further reduce the signs and symptoms of these lesions. The combination includes 5-fluoruracil, triamcinolone acetonide, and hyaluronidase. All three work in concert to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars, and this is the first work at looking at these medicines given together, at the same time, in a series of recalcitrant keloids and hypertrophic scars. The positive results warrant further investigation and hope for those with keloids and hypertrophic scars. PMID:25489380

  11. Near-infrared hyperspectral imaging: the road traveled to a clinical burn application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, Michelle; Leonardi, Lorenzo; Payette, Jeri; Kohlenberg, Elicia; Sowa, Michael; Fish, Joel S.; Cross, Karen; Gomez, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    The process of taking a concept to a clinical device begins with the idea for a technological solution to an unmet clinical challenge. Burns are one of the most destructive insults to the skin causing damage, scarring, and in some cases death. The approach most commonly used to evaluate burns is based on the appearance of the wound. This technique is somewhat subjective and unreliable, relying on clinical experience to assess the burn. Instrument based diagnostic techniques as an adjunct to current practices has the potential to enhance the quality and timeliness of decisions concerning wound assessment and treatment. Near Infrared Spectroscopy is a promising technique that can track changes within the tissue, and can therefore provide insight as to how deep the burn actually penetrates before visual signs become apparent. Preliminary bench and animal studies were used to prove the concept of a near infrared based method of burn assessment. This study demonstrated the ability of near infrared imaging to detect and monitor the hemodynamics of burn injuries in the early post-burn period. Based on this study, a pre-prototype near infrared spectroscopic system was built with the goal of developing a reliable yet simple system that could be used in a clinical setting. A pilot clinical study was designed and implemented at the Ross Tilley Burn Center (Toronto, Canada) in order to assess the feasibility of our strategy in the clinical realm. The goal of this preliminary clinical study was to determine if the pre-prototype could be integrated into the strict regiment of an active burn centre. Both the instrument performance in a clinical setting and the injury assessment based on the analysis of near infrared reflectance measurements were a success.

  12. The onic dependence of the strength and spontaneous relations of the potassium contracture induced in the heart of the frog Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Chapman, R A

    1973-06-01

    1. The tension generated by isolated frog atrial trabecules, during exposure to solutions containing a high potassium concentration, is not maintained but spontaneously relaxes. The final part of this relaxation can be fitted by a single exponential function.2. The recovery of the tension generating mechanisms following the spontaneous relaxation of a potassium contracture depends on the preceding membrane potential and the time since the last contracture.3. The rate of the exponential phase of the spontaneous relaxation is independent of the [K](o) and hence the membrane potential, the [Ca](o); and when the [Ca](o)/[Na](o) (2) ratio is maintained it is also independent of the [Na](o). This relaxation is not influenced by atropine or pronethalol.4. When sodium is totally excluded from the bathing medium the rate of relaxation of a later potassium contracture is much increased. It is argued that this change is due to a fall in the intracellular sodium concentration.5. The consequences of these results are discussed, and the hypothesis that is favoured would require that contraction is induced by a transient release of calcium into the sarcoplasm, probably triggered by a potential dependent, and probably also transient, influx of calcium through the cell membrane. Relaxation is supposed to occur when this activator-calcium is then removed by an intracellular relaxing system that resembles the sarcoplasmic reticulum of other muscles. What this intracellular structure might be, is also discussed. PMID:4146462

  13. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silchenko, Alexander N.; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5?-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process.

  14. Fire Scars Area Estimation Using CHRIS PROBA Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filchev, Lachezar; Dimitrov, Petar

    2013-12-01

    The dawn of 21st century is marked by severe and unpredictable natural and man - made hazards and disasters linked as to climate change as to human impact on environment. To study their effects on natural landscapes and protected areas it is important to perform, in some restrict regime protected areas, a continuous monitoring. Earth observation by satellites is one of the most promising instruments for this as it has the necessary time, spatial, and spectral resolution for this as well as it provides for non-contact estimation of the overall condition of the environment. This study presents preliminary results of fire scars area estimation on the territory of Bistrishko Branishte UNESCO Man and Biosphere (MAB) reserve in Vitosha Mountain, Bulgaria using CHRIS/PROBA satellite data. During the summer and early autumn of 2012 CHRIS/PROBA instrument was tasked to perform a series of acquisitions with a view to study the vegetation structure. The study uses two CHRIS/PROBA scenes acquired subsequently on 22 June 2012 and on 28 September 2012. The wildfire, which effects are studied, took place during the first two weeks of July 2012. After it was settled the second acquisition of CHRIS/PROBA instrument made possible the analysis of the post fire situation. The methods used for the study are the standard methods for image change detection based on spectral data employed in ENVI software (Academic license). In order to perform the change detection, the CHRIS/PROBA source data was geometrically and atmospherically corrected as well as co-registered. The multi angle product of CHRIS/PROBA Mode 1, consisting of 5 images, was used to check to what extent the five viewing angles affect the area estimation of the fire scars in the mountainous area following same procedures. The results from the analysis shown that almost 60 hectares from the coniferous vegetation (dead and healthy tree stands) were devastated by the wildfire.

  15. How important is hydrotherapy? Effects of dynamic action of hot spring water as a rehabilitative treatment for burn patients in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Moufarrij, S; Deghayli, L; Raffoul, W; Hirt-Burri, N; Michetti, M; de Buys Roessingh, A; Norberg, M; Applegate, L A

    2014-12-31

    Burn rehabilitation using hydrotherapy can have multiple benefits for the burn patient. The therapy uses specific mineral enriched hot spring water and water jets with varied hydro-pressure to combat hypertrophy, inflammatory reaction signs, abnormal pigmentation, and, more specifically, redness and scarring. Standard operating procedures for burn rehabilitation have been developed and integrated into the Standard of Care at the CHUV hospital using localized hydro-mechanical stimulation of burn sites (20 minutes of alternating anatomical sites) followed by constant pressure large-bore and filiform showers targeting specific scarred areas. These therapeutic regimens are repeated daily for 2 to 3 weeks. Patients showed lasting effects from this regimen (up to 3-6 months), the results becoming permanent with more uniform skin structure, color and visco-elasticity in addition to a decrease in pruritus. The specifications of clinical protocols are described herein along with the virtues of hot spring hydro-pressure therapy for burn rehabilitation. The use of hydrotherapy, which has been a controversial topic among burn units across the world, is also discussed. In North America, hydrotherapy is defined only within the scope of in-patient wound cleansing and is thought to lead to microbial auto-contamination and bacterial resistance. In Switzerland and France the emphasis of hydrotherapy is on rehabilitation after the wound has closed. PMID:26336365

  16. Bending Burning Matches and Crumpling Burning Paper Texas A&M University

    E-print Network

    Keyser, John

    Bending Burning Matches and Crumpling Burning Paper Zeki Melek Texas A&M University Department burning. Specifically, we can simulate the bending of burning matches, and the folding of burning paper objects. Examples include the upward bending seen in burning matches and the crumpling of burning paper

  17. Use of radiofrequency in cosmetic dermatology: focus on nonablative treatment of acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Brian J; Griffith, Robert D; Falto-Aizpurua, Leyre A; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Acne is a common affliction among many teens and some adults that usually resolves over time. However, the severe sequela of acne scarring can lead to long-term psychological and psychiatric problems. There exists a multitude of modalities to treat acne scars such as more invasive surgical techniques, subcision, chemical peels, ablative lasers, fractional lasers, etc. A more recent technique for the treatment of acne scars is nonablative radiofrequency (RF) that works by passing a current through the dermis at a preset depth to produce small thermal wounds in the dermis which, in turn, stimulates dermal remodeling to produce new collagen and soften scar defects. This review article demonstrates that out of all RF modalities, microneedle bipolar RF and fractional bipolar RF treatments offers the best results for acne scarring. An improvement of 25%–75% can be expected after three to four treatment sessions using one to two passes per session. Treatment results are optimal approximately 3 months after final treatment. Common side effects can include transient pain, erythema, and scabbing. Further studies are needed to determine what RF treatment modalities work best for specific scar subtypes, so that further optimization of RF treatments for acne scars can be determined. PMID:25540589

  18. Chemokines in Wound Healing and as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Reducing Cutaneous Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Peter Adam; Greaves, Nicholas Stuart; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous scarring is an almost inevitable end point of adult human wound healing. It is associated with significant morbidity, both physical and psychological. Pathological scarring, including hypertrophic and keloid scars, can be particularly debilitating. Manipulation of the chemokine system may lead to effective therapies for problematic lesions. Recent Advances: Rapid advancement in the understanding of chemokines and their receptors has led to exciting developments in the world of therapeutics. Modulation of their function has led to clinically effective treatments for conditions as diverse as human immunodeficiency virus and inflammatory bowel disease. Potential methods of targeting chemokines include monoclonal antibodies, small-molecule antagonists, interference with glycosaminoglycan binding and the use of synthetic truncated chemokines. Early work has shown promising results on scar development and appearance when the chemokine system is manipulated. Critical Issues: Chemokines are implicated in all stages of wound healing leading to the development of a cutaneous scar. An understanding of entirely regenerative wound healing in the developing fetus and how the expression of chemokines and their receptors change during the transition to the adult phenotype is central to addressing pathological scarring in adults. Future Directions: As our understanding of chemokine/receptor interactions and scar formation evolves it has become apparent that effective therapies will need to mirror the complexities in these diverse biological processes. It is likely that sophisticated treatments that sequentially influence multiple ligand/receptor interactions throughout all stages of wound healing will be required to deliver viable treatment options. PMID:26543682

  19. Skin Regeneration in Adult Axolotls: A Blueprint for Scar-Free Healing in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Ashley W.; Monaghan, James R.; Voss, S. Randal; Maden, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    While considerable progress has been made towards understanding the complex processes and pathways that regulate human wound healing, regenerative medicine has been unable to develop therapies that coax the natural wound environment to heal scar-free. The inability to induce perfect skin regeneration stems partly from our limited understanding of how scar-free healing occurs in a natural setting. Here we have investigated the wound repair process in adult axolotls and demonstrate that they are capable of perfectly repairing full thickness excisional wounds made on the flank. In the context of mammalian wound repair, our findings reveal a substantial reduction in hemostasis, reduced neutrophil infiltration and a relatively long delay in production of new extracellular matrix (ECM) during scar-free healing. Additionally, we test the hypothesis that metamorphosis leads to scarring and instead show that terrestrial axolotls also heal scar-free, albeit at a slower rate. Analysis of newly forming dermal ECM suggests that low levels of fibronectin and high levels of tenascin-C promote regeneration in lieu of scarring. Lastly, a genetic analysis during wound healing comparing epidermis between aquatic and terrestrial axolotls suggests that matrix metalloproteinases may regulate the fibrotic response. Our findings outline a blueprint to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms coordinating scar-free healing that will be useful towards elucidating new regenerative therapies targeting fibrosis and wound repair. PMID:22485136

  20. Should Cesarean Scar Defect Be Treated Laparoscopically? A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Api, Murat; Boza, Aysen; Gorgen, Husnu; Api, Olus

    2015-01-01

    Several obstetric complications due to inappropriately healed cesarean scar such as placenta accreta, scar dehiscence, and ectopic scar pregnancy are increasingly reported along with rising cesarean rates. Furthermore, many gynecologic conditions, including abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain and infertility, are imputed to deficient cesarean scar healing. Hysteroscopy is the most commonly reported approach for the revision of cesarean scar defects (CSDs). Nevertheless, existing evidence is inadequate to conclude that either hysteroscopy or laparoscopy is effective or superior to each other. Although several management options have been suggested recently, the laparoscopic approach has not been thoroughly scrutinized. We present a case and reviewed the data related to the laparoscopic repair of CSDs and compared the hysteroscopic and laparoscopic management options based on the data from previously published articles. As a result of our analyses, the laparoscopic approach increases uterine wall thickness when compared with the hysteroscopic approach, and both surgical techniques seem to be effective for the resolution of gynecologic symptoms. Hysteroscopic treatment most likely corrects the scar defect but does not strengthen the uterine wall; thus, the potential risk of dehiscence or rupture in subsequent pregnancies does not seem to be improved. Because large uterine defects are known risk factors for scar dehiscence, the repair of the defect to reinforce the myometrial endurance seems to be an appropriate method of treatment. PMID:26122897

  1. A multimodal assessment of melanin and melanocyte activity in abnormally pigmented hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Travis, Taryn E; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Prindeze, Nicholas J; Paul, Dereck W; Moffatt, Lauren T; Jordan, Marion H; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    Using a validated swine model of human scar formation, hyperpigmented and hypopigmented scar samples were examined for their histological and optical properties to help elucidate the mechanisms and characteristics of dyspigmentation. Full-thickness wounds were created on the flanks of red Duroc pigs and allowed to heal. Biopsies from areas of hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, and uninjured tissue were fixed and embedded for histological examination using Azure B and primary antibodies to S100B, HMB45, and ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?-MSH). Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was then used to examine the optical properties of scars. Hyperpigmentation was first noticeable in healing wounds around weeks 2 to 3, gradually becoming darker. There was no significant difference in S100B staining for the presence of melanocytes between hyperpigmented and hypopigmented scar samples. Azure B staining of melanin was significantly greater in histological sections from hyperpigmented areas than in sections from both uninjured skin and hypopigmented scar (P < .0001). There was significantly greater staining for ?-MSH in hyperpigmented samples compared with hypopigmented samples (P = .0121), and HMB45 staining was positive for melanocytes in hyperpigmented scar. SFDI at a wavelength of 632 nm resulted in an absorption coefficient map correlating with visibly hyperpigmented areas of scars. In a red Duroc model of hypertrophic scar formation, melanocyte number is similar in hyperpigmented and hypopigmented tissues. Hyperpigmented tissues, however, show a greater amount of melanin and ?-MSH, along with immunohistochemical evidence of stimulated melanocytes. These observations encourage further investigation of melanocyte stimulation and the inflammatory environment within a wound that may influence melanocyte activity. Additionally, SFDI can be used to identify areas of melanin content in mature, pigmented scars, which may lead to its usefulness in wounds at earlier time points before markedly apparent pigmentation abnormalities. PMID:25162947

  2. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  3. SystemBurn

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-30

    SystemBurn is a tool for creating a synthetic computational load for the purpose of measuring how much power a computer will draw under that type of load. The loads include fundamental library function calls like matrix multiply, memory copies, fourier transforms, bit manipulation, I/O, network packet transfers, and some code contrived to cause the processor to dray more or less power. The code produces some diagnostic and progress output, but the actual measurements would bemore »recorded from the power panels within the computer room.« less

  4. Burn Scar Mapping in Attica, Greece using the dNBR (differenced Normalised Burn Ratio) Index on Landsat TM/ETM+ Satellite Imagery 

    E-print Network

    Stratoulias, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    was estimated 19,607ha during the periods 1984-1991 and 2003-2009. Accuracy assessment was carried out with reference to a highly accurate validated source. High levels of accuracy were attributed principally to the dNBR index performance. This study comes...

  5. Optimal treatment of partial thickness burns in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vloemans, A F P M; Hermans, M H E; van der Wal, M B A; Liebregts, J; Middelkoop, E

    2014-03-01

    A large part of the patient population of a burn centre consists of children, most of whom are younger than four years. The majority of these young children suffer from superficial and deep partial thickness scald burns that may easily deepen to full thickness burns. A proper wound therapy, that prevents infection and ensures a moist wound condition, might prevent the deterioration of the wound. Therefore, we performed a systematic review of wound management and dressing materials to select the best treatment option for children with burns. A search in Medline and Embase revealed 51 articles for a critical appraisal. The articles were divided into randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and a group of case-reports. Total appraisal did not differ much amongst the groups; the level of evidence was highest in the randomized controlled trials and lowest in the case-reports. In 16 out of 34 comparative studies, silver sulfadiazine or a silver sulfadiazine/chlorhexidine-gluconate combination was the standard of wound care treatment. The competitor dressing was Biobrane(®) in six studies and amnion membrane in three. Tulle gauze, or tulle gauze impregnated with an antibacterial addition were the standard of care treatment in seven studies. In general, membranous dressings like Biobrane(®) and amnion membrane performed better than the standard of care on epithelialization rate, length of hospital stay and pain for treatment of partial thickness burns in children. However, hardly any of the studies investigated long-term results like scar formation. PMID:24290852

  6. The Healing Effect of Nettle Extract on Second Degree Burn Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Hosein; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Iranpour, Maryam; Khodarahmi, Ali; Baghaee, Mehrdad; Pedram, Mir Sepehr; Saleh, Sahar; Araghi, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Numerous studies were carried out to develop more sophisticated dressings to expedite healing processes and diminish the bacterial burden in burn wounds. This study assessed the healing effect of nettle extract on second degree burns wound in rats in comparison with silver sulfadiazine and vaseline. METHODS Forty rats were randomly assigned to four equal groups. A deep second-degree burn was created on the back of each rat using a standard burning procedure. The burns were dressed daily with nettle extract in group 1, silver sulfadiazine in group 2, vaseline in group 3 and without any medication in group 4 as control group. The response to treatment was assessed by digital photography during the treatment until day 42. Histological scoring was undertaken for scar tissue samples on days 10 and 42. RESULTS A statistically significant difference was observed in group 1 compared with other groups regarding 4 scoring parameters after 10 days. A statistically significant difference was seen for fibrosis parameter after 42 days. In terms of difference of wound surface area, maximal healing was noticed at the same time in nettle group and minimal repair in the control group. CONCLUSION Our findings showed maximal rate of healing in the nettle group. So it may be a suitable substitute for silver sulfadiazine and vaseline when available. PMID:25606473

  7. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning January 1, 2007, a person must apply for... under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  8. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning January 1, 2007, a person must apply for... under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  9. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning January 1, 2007, a person must apply for... under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  10. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning January 1, 2007, a person must apply for... under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits....

  11. Burning Fuel Droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 4 1997, MET:2/05:40 (approximate). The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (121KB JPEG, 654 x 977 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300169.html.

  12. Investigation of biomass burning and aerosol loading and transport in South America utilizing geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzel, Paul; Prins, Elaine

    1995-01-01

    This study attempts to assess the extent of burning and associated aerosol transport regimes in South America and the South Atlantic using geostationary satellite observations, in order to explore the possible roles of biomass burning in climate change and more directly in atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer processes. Modeling and analysis efforts have suggested that the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols from biomass burning may play a major role in the radiative balance of the earth and are an important factor in climate change calculations. One of the most active regions of biomass burning is located in South America, associated with deforestation in the selva (forest), grassland management, and other agricultural practices. As part of the NASA Aerosol Interdisciplinary Program, we are utilizing GOES-7 (1988) and GOES-8 (1995) visible and multispectral infrared data (4, 11, and 12 microns) to document daily biomass burning activity in South America and to distinguish smoke/aerosols from other multi-level clouds and low-level moisture. This study catalogues the areal extent and transport of smoke/aerosols throughout the region and over the Atlantic Ocean for the 1988 (July-September) and 1995 (June-October) biomass burning seasons. The smoke/haze cover estimates are compared to the locations of fires to determine the source and verify the haze is actually associated with biomass burning activities. The temporal resolution of the GOES data (half-hourly in South America) makes it possible to determine the prevailing circulation and transport of aerosols by considering a series of visible and infrared images and tracking the motion of smoke, haze and adjacent clouds. The study area extends from 40 to 70 deg W and 0 to 40 deg S with aerosol coverage extending over the Atlantic Ocean when necessary. Fire activity is estimated with the GOES Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (ABBA). To date, our efforts have focused on GOES-7 and GOES-8 ABBA development, algorithm development for aerosol monitoring, data acquisition and archiving, and participation in the SCAR-C and SCAR-B field programs which have provided valuable information for algorithm testing and validation. Implementation of the initial version of the GEOS-8 ABBA on case studies in North, Central, and South America has demonstrated the improved capability for monitoring diurnal fire activity and smoke/aerosol transport with the GOES-8 throughout the Western Hemisphere.

  13. Endometriosis in an episiotomy scar: a case report.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Vincenzo; Di Natale, William; Meola, Cristiano; Gilio, Mario; Cavalli, Sebastiano; Ferrari, Luisa; De Giuli, Paolo; Camera, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in an anatomical location other than the uterine cavity. The episiotomy scar is a fairly rare site for endometriosis. The authors present the case of a 42-year-old woman referred 7 years ago for the development of a tender perianal mass at the episiotomy site associated with perianal pain and pruritus which varied in relation to menses, becoming most intense just before and immediately after the onset of menstrual bleeding. Anal endosonography performed with a B&K mechanical probe rotating through 360 degrees with a frequency of 7 and 10 Mhz showed a hypoechoic area with a diameter of 3 cm not involving the external sphincter and extending from the perianal skin to the mid third of the anal canal. Proctosigmoidoscopy findings were normal. A complete local excision was performed. Complete surgical excision of perineal endometriomas should be curative. Recurrence, supposedly due to incomplete removal, usually appears within one year. PMID:15553449

  14. Transforming the radiological interpretation process: the SCAR TRIP initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Morin, Richard L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Carrino, John A.; Erickson, Bradley J.; Horii, Steven C.; Piraino, David W.; Reiner, Bruce I.; Seibert, James A.; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2004-04-01

    The Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) Transforming the Radiological Interpretation Process (TRIP) Initiative aims to spearhead research, education, and discovery of innovative solutions to address the problem of information and image data overload. The initiative will foster inter-disciplinary research on technological, environmental and human factors to better manage and exploit the massive amounts of data. TRIP will focus on the following basic objectives: improving the efficiency of interpretation of large data sets, improving the timeliness and effectiveness of communication, and decreasing medical errors. The ultimate goal of the initiative is to improve the quality and safety of patient care. Interdisciplinary research into several broad areas will be necessary to make progress in managing the ever-increasing volume of data. The six concepts involved include: human perception, image processing and computer-aided detection (CAD), visualization, navigation and usability, databases and integration, and evaluation and validation of methods and performance. The result of this transformation will affect several key processes in radiology, including image interpretation; communication of imaging results; workflow and efficiency within the health care enterprise; diagnostic accuracy and a reduction in medical errors; and, ultimately, the overall quality of care.

  15. Engineered alternative skin for partial and full-thickness burns

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Quenton

    2014-01-01

    Engineered alternative skin in all its forms and shapes serve to provide temporary or permanent wound closure such as in the case of partial and full-thickness burns. The need for collagen-based regeneration templates is motivated by the fact that dermal regeneration of full-thickness injuries does not occur spontaneously and is inundated by contraction and scarring. Partial-thickness burns in turn can regress as a result of infection and improper treatment and require appropriate treatment. Nylon-silicone laminates such as Biobrane®, and more recently AWBAT®, address this by serving as a temporary barrier. Enhanced collagen-based scaffolds today, although not perfect, remain invaluable. Our initial approach was to characterize the design considerations and explore the use of collagen in the fabrication of a dermal regeneration matrix and a silicone-nylon bilaminate. Here we expand our initial research on scaffold fabrication and explore possible strategies to improve the outcome of collagen-scaffold medicated wound healing. PMID:24651001

  16. 76 FR 6650 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Splendors of Faith/Scars...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... of the Missions of Northern New Spain, 1600-1821'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following... ``Splendors of Faith/Scars of Conquest: The Arts of the Missions of Northern New Spain, 1600-1821,''...

  17. Effects of scars on icosahedral crystalline shell stability under external pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Duanduan; Bowick, Mark J.; Sknepnek, Rastko

    2015-03-01

    We study how the stability of spherical crystalline shells under external pressure is influenced by the defect structure. In particular, we compare stability for shells with a minimal set of topologically required defects to shells with extended defect arrays (grain boundary "scars" with nonvanishing net disclination charge). We perform both Monte Carlo and conjugate gradient simulations to compare how shells with and without scars deform quasistatically under external hydrostatic pressure. We find that the critical pressure at which shells collapse is lowered for scarred configurations that break icosahedral symmetry and raised for scars that preserve icosahedral symmetry. The particular shapes which arise from breaking of an initial icosahedrally symmetric shell depend on the Föppl-von Kármán number.

  18. [Evolution conservativity of scar DNA localization in warm-blooded vertebrates isochores].

    PubMed

    Sizova, T V; Karpova, O I

    2014-01-01

    In meiotic prophase I attached to the lateral elements of the synaptonemal complex chromatin fibrils form loops. SCARs DNA (Synaptonemal Complex Associated Regions of DNA) is a family of genomic DNA sequences tightly associated with the synaptonemal complex and lying at the loop basements. Isochore compositional fractions of the human and chicken genomes were used as 32P-labeled probes for hybridization with the SCARs DNA isolated previously from the spermatocyte nucleus of the golden hamster Mesocricetus auratus. The localization of sequences, similar to golden hamster SCARs DNA in the human and chicken genome isochores was established. It was concluded that SCARs DNA localization into isochore com- partments of examined genomes is evolutionary conservative. PMID:25831889

  19. Crmp4 deletion promotes recovery from spinal cord injury by neuroprotection and limited scar formation

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Jun; Kitamura, Yoshiteru; Owada, Kazuki; Yamashita, Naoya; Takei, Kohtaro; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth inhibitors and scar formation are two major obstacles to central nervous system (CNS) repair. No target molecule that regulates both axonal growth and scarring has been identified. Here we identified collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4), a common mediator of inhibitory signals after neural injury, as a crucial factor that contributes to both axonal growth inhibition and scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI). We found increases in the inhibitory and toxic forms of CRMP4 in injured spinal cord. Notably, CRMP4 expression was evident in inflammatory cells as well as in neurons after spinal cord transection. Crmp4?/? mice displayed neuroprotection against SCI and reductions in inflammatory response and scar formation. This permissive environment for axonal growth due to CRMP4 deletion restored locomotor activity at an unusually early phase of healing. These results suggest that deletion of CRMP4 is a unique therapeutic strategy that overcomes two obstacles to CNS repair after SCI. PMID:25652774

  20. Oral Rehydration Therapy in Burn Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-24

    Burn Any Degree Involving 20-29 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 30-39 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 40-49 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 50-59 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 60-65 Percent of Body Surface

  1. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization...STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine waste fires shall be...

  2. Sweat gland regeneration after burn injury: is stem cell therapy a new hope?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuiping; Chen, Yan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-05-01

    Stem cells are the seeds of tissue repair and regeneration and a promising source for novel therapies. The skin of patients with an extensive deep burn injury is repaired by a hypertrophic scar without regeneration of sweat glands and therefore loses the function of perspiration. Stem cell therapy provides the possibility of sweat gland regeneration. In particular, recent studies have reported the reprogramming of mesenchymal stromal cells into sweat gland-like (SGL) cells. We present an overview of recent researches into sweat gland regeneration with stem cells. Difficulties of sweat gland regeneration after deep burns have been elaborated. The advantage and disadvantage of several stem cell types in sweat gland regeneration have been discussed. Additionally, the possible mechanisms for reprogramming stem cells to SGL cells are summarized. A brief discussion on clinical application of stem cell-derived SGL cells is also presented. This review may possibly provide some implications for sweat gland regeneration. PMID:25533933

  3. Seepage of methane at Jaco Scar, a slide caused by seamount subduction offshore Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Susan; Rehder, Gregor; Sahling, Heiko; Schleicher, Tina; Linke, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Methane (CH4) concentrations and CH4 stable carbon isotopic composition () were investigated in the water column within Jaco Scar. It is one of several scars formed by massive slides resulting from the subduction of seamounts offshore Costa Rica, a process that can open up structural and stratigraphical pathways for migrating CH4. The release of large amounts of CH4 into the adjacent water column was discovered at the outcropping lowermost sedimentary sequence of the hanging wall in the northwest corner of Jaco Scar, where concentrations reached up to 1,500 nmol L-1. There CH4-rich fluids seeping from the sedimentary sequence stimulate both growth and activity of a dense chemosynthetic community. Additional point sources supplying CH4 at lower concentrations were identified in density layers above and below the main plume from light carbon isotope ratios. The injected CH4 is most likely a mixture of microbial and thermogenic CH4 as suggested by values between -50 and -62 ‰ Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite. This CH4 spreads along isopycnal surfaces throughout the whole area of the scar, and the concentrations decrease due to mixing with ocean water and microbial oxidation. The supply of CH4 appears to be persistent as repeatedly high CH4 concentrations were found within the scar over 6 years. The maximum CH4 concentration and average excess CH4 concentration at Jaco Scar indicate that CH4 seepage from scars might be as significant as seepage from other tectonic structures in the marine realm. Hence, taking into account the global abundance of scars, such structures might constitute a substantial, hitherto unconsidered contribution to natural CH4 sources at the seafloor.

  4. Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.; McBeth, Jamie L.

    2014-01-01

    The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in southwest Wyoming has stimulated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. Central to many wildlife assessments is the use of geospatial methods that rely on digital representation of energy infrastructure. Surface disturbance of the well pad scars associated with oil and natural gas extraction has been an important but unavailable infrastructure layer. To provide a digital baseline of this surface disturbance, we extracted visible oil and gas well pad scars from 1-meter National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery (NAIP) acquired in 2009 for a 7.7 million-hectare region of southwest Wyoming. Scars include the pad area where wellheads, pumps, and storage facilities reside, and the surrounding area that was scraped and denuded of vegetation during the establishment of the pad. Scars containing tanks, compressors, and the storage of oil and gas related equipment, and produced-water ponds were also collected on occasion. Our extraction method was a two-step process starting with automated extraction followed by manual inspection and clean up. We used available well-point information to guide manual clean up and to derive estimates of year of origin and duration of activity on a pad scar. We also derived estimates of the proportion of non-vegetated area on a scar using a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index derived using 1-meter NAIP imagery. We extracted 16,973 pad scars of which 15,318 were oil and gas well pads. Digital representation of pad scars along with time-stamps of activity and estimates of non-vegetated area provides important baseline (circa 2009) data for assessments of wildlife responses, land-use trends, and disturbance-mediated pattern assessments.

  5. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) Program from 1972 to Mid-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography documents publications of the supersonic cruise aircraft research (SCAR) program that were generated during the first 5 years of effort. The reports are arranged according to systems studies and five SCAR disciplines: propulsion, stratospheric emissions impact, structures and materials, aerodynamic performance, and stability and control. The specific objectives of each discipline are summarized. Annotation is included for all NASA inhouse and low-number contractor reports. There are 444 papers and articles included.

  6. On the central muscle attachment scar pattern of Suchonella Spizharsky 1939

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohn, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    The fortuitous spalling of a carapace of the nonmarine Permian Suchonella typica Spizharsky 1939 disclosed the adductor muscle attachment scar as well as two accessory scars on both the right side of the steinkern and the inside of the spalled right valve. This central muscle field is illustrated and discussed. An objective list of species described in or referred to Suchonella Spizharsky 1939 is appended.

  7. Opuntia Extract Reduces Scar Formation in Rabbit Ear Model: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Quan; Huang, Chunlan; You, Chuangang; Ma, Shaolin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the effect of Opuntia stricta H (Cactaceae) extract on suppression of hypertrophic scar on ventral surface wounds of rabbit ears. Full thickness skin defection was established in a rabbit ear to simulate hypertrophic scar. Opuntia extract was sprayed on the wounds in the experimental group, and normal saline was used in the control group. After the wounds healed with scar formation, the hypertrophic scar tissue was harvested on days 22, 39, and 54 for histological analysis. The expression of type I and type III collagen and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that the scar of the control group is more prominent compared with the opuntia extract group. The expression of type I collagen in the opuntia extract group was lower than the control group, while type III collagen in opuntia extract group gradually increased and exceeded control group. The expression of MMP-1 decreased in the opuntia extract group, while the control group increased over time, but the amount of MMP-1 was much higher than that in the control group on day 22. In conclusion, opuntia extract reduces hypertrophic scar formation by means of type I collagen inhibition, and increasing type III collagen and MMP-1.T he novel application of opuntia extract may lead to innovative and effective antiscarring therapies. PMID:26315898

  8. Ultrasound detection of lacunae-like image of a cesarean scar pregnancy in the first trimester.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Okuda, Naotaka; Kawabata, Ikuno; Nakai, Akihito; Takeshita, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy is one of the rare types of ectopic pregnancy. Ultrasonography enables early diagnosis and the successful preservation of the uterus. However, the correct diagnosis of cesarean scar pregnancy can be difficult in some cases. We describe a case of cesarean scar pregnancy that was initially misdiagnosed on the basis of current ultrasonographic criteria. Ultrasonographic images at 9 weeks' gestation demonstrated no gestational sac but did show a bulging mass in uterine wall with irregularly shaped hypoechoic areas, which resembled the lacunae in placenta previa. Color Doppler imaging demonstrated that the lacunae-like areas were richly perfused. Cesarean scar pregnancy was finally diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a lack of myometrium in the lower anterior uterine wall with placental invasion. Histological examination of the uterus after hysterectomy revealed the direct invasion of trophoblasts into the mural zone which had resulted in a deficit of myometrium at the previous cesarean scar. A mass in the myometrium with richly perfused lacunae-like areas should be considered as one of the important ultrasonographic findings indicating cesarean scar pregnancy. PMID:23470809

  9. Caesarean scar choriocarcinoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical characteristics, pathologic findings and treatments of a patient with a Caesarean scar choriocarcinoma. Patient history A 22-year-old woman had a diagnosis of primary gestational choriocarcinoma in a uterine Caesarean scar misdiagnosed as a normal Caesarean scar pregnancy. The patient underwent selective uterine artery embolization coupled with methotrexate arterial injection, along with dilatation and curettage of the uterine Caesarean scar. Finally, she received eight courses of multiagent chemotherapy. The reproductive function of the patient was preserved. Conclusions Primary gestational choriocarcinoma out of the uterine corpus is a rare disease. A Caesarean scar choriocarcinoma is an extremely unusual example of this entity because of its unique position. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this phenomenon. Our experience and a literature review suggest that a clinical diagnosis of a primary gestational choriocarcinoma of the uterine Caesarean scar is difficult to make, and uterine artery embolization is beneficial to prevent massive bleeding before curettage. PMID:24887563

  10. Enhanced in vivo delivery of 5-fluorouracil by ethosomal gels in rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model.

    PubMed

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  11. The Relationship between Proliferative Scars and Endothelial Function in Surgically Revascularized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ziyrek, Murat; ?ahin, Sinan; Acar, Zeydin; ?en, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proliferative scars are benign fibrotic proliferations which demonstrate abnormal wound healing in response to skin injuries. As postulated in the “response to injury hypothesis”, atherosclerosis is also triggered by an endothelial injury. Keloid and atherosclerotic processes have many pathophysiological and cytological features in common. Aims: In this study, we investigated the relationship between proliferative scars and endothelial function in surgically revascularized patients. We aimed to test the hypothesis that atherosclerosis is a wound healing abnormality. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Consecutive patients who were admitted to the cardiology outpatient clinic with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting operation were evaluated. Thirty-three patients with proliferative scars at the median sternotomy site formed the keloid group, and 36 age- and sex-matched patients with no proliferative scar at the median sternotomy site formed the control group. Endothelial function was evaluated by flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery via ultrasonograhic examination. Results: There is no signicant difference according to the demographic data, biochemical parameters, clinical parameters and number of grafts between keloid and control groups. Endothelial-dependent vasodila-tory response was lower in the keloid group than the control group (9.30±3.5 and 18.68±8.2, respectively; p=0.001). Conclusion: This study showed that endothalial dysfunction, which is strongly correlated with atherosclerosis, was more prominent in patients with proliferative scars. As proliferative scars and atherosclerosis have many features in common, we might conclude that atherosclerosis is a wound healing abnormality.

  12. A review of the effects of moisturizers on the appearance of scars and striae.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, A V; Bielfeldt, S; Lombard, K J

    2012-12-01

    Scars are well known to have a stratum corneum (SC) that is malfunctional. Increases in transepidermal water loss and decreases in SC capacitance and conductance have been reported. Occlusion therapy is a well-known route to improving the signs and symptoms of scarring. Until recently that has been assumed to be totally pressure related. However, studies have demonstrated that the direct effects of hydration on keratinocytes and fibroblasts contribute to the reduction in hypertrophic scarring. Now it is well known that occlusion can regulate epidermal cytokine and growth factor production; changes in profibrotic and anti-fibrotic factors have been established. As a result, it is to be expected that moisturizers may improve the signs and symptoms of scars. As striae have been suggested to be anatomically similar to scars and as it is well established that paracrine signalling occurs in skin, it is expected that striae have similar SC issues. While one cannot exclude the effects of some of the ingredients used in the products, several studies are reported in this review that demonstrates that moisturization is a key component to reducing the clinical signs and symptoms of scars and striae. This is a good example of how knowledge of corneobiology leads to corneotherapies for these skin condition problems. The review is being written in memory of Professor Johann Wiechers who, before he died tragically in November 2011, performed two of the reported studies together with colleagues. PMID:22994859

  13. A review of the effects of moisturisers on the appearance of scars and striae.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, A V; Bielfeldt, S; Lombard, K J

    2012-09-23

    Scars are well known to have a stratum corneum that is malfunctional. Increases in transepidermal water loss and decreases in stratum corneum capacitance and conductance have been reported. Occlusion therapy is a well-known route to improving the signs and symptoms of scarring. Until recently that has been assumed to be totally pressure related. However, studies have demonstrated that the direct effects of hydration on keratinocytes and fibroblasts contribute to the reduction in hypertrophic scarring. Now it is well known that occlusion can regulate epidermal cytokine and growth factor production; changes in profibrotic and antifibrotic factors have been established. As a result it is to be expected that moisturisers may improve the signs and symptoms of scars. As striae have been suggested to be anatomically similar to scars and since it is well established that paracrine signalling occurs in skin it is expected that striae have similar stratum corneum issues. While one cannot exclude the effects of some of the ingredients used in the products, several studies are reported in this review which demonstrates that moisturisation is a key component to reducing the clinical signs and symptoms of scars and striae. This is a good example of how knowledge of corneobiology leads to corneotherapies for these skin condition problems. The paper is being written in memory of Professor Johann Wiechers who, before he died tragically in November 2011, performed two of the reported studies together with colleagues. © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie. PMID:22998580

  14. Treatment of hot tar burns

    PubMed Central

    Bose, B.; Tredget, T.

    1982-01-01

    Hot tar burns, although rare, usually occur in workers in the paving and roofing industries. When tar is heated to high temperatures it can cause deep burns, and its removal often causes further damage. However, the use of one of the polysorbates (surface-active agents) makes removal easy and painless. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:7083105

  15. Burned Wetland Near Tebicuary River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In the rangelands of southern Paraguay, wetlands are burned to encourage new growth for cattle grazing. The burned wetland grasses are in the Family Poaceae (Gramineae), and may be in one of these genera: Panicum, Paspalum, Pennisetum, Tripogon. The Ñeembucú Region is typified by exten...

  16. Forest Understory Fire in the Brazilian Amazon in ENSO and Non-ENSO Years: Area Burned and Committed Carbon Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alencar, A.; Nepstad, D.; Ver-Diaz, M. Del. C.

    2004-01-01

    "Understory fires" that burn the floor of standing forests are one of the most important types of forest impoverishment in the Amazon, especially during the severe droughts of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes. However, we are aware of no estimates of the areal extent of these fires for the Brazilian Amazon and, hence, of their contribution to Amazon carbon fluxes to the atmosphere. We calculated the area of forest understory fires for the Brazilian Amazon region during an El Nino (1998) and a non El Nino (1995) year based on forest fire scars mapped with satellite images for three locations in eastern and southern Amazon, where deforestation is concentrated. The three study sites represented a gradient of both forest types and dry season severity. The burning scar maps were used to determine how the percentage of forest that burned varied with distance from agricultural clearings. These spatial functions were then applied to similar forest/climate combinations outside of the study sites to derive an initial estimate for the Brazilian Amazon. Ninety-one percent of the forest area that burned in the study sites was within the first kilometer of a clearing for the non ENSO year and within the first four kilometers for the ENSO year. The area of forest burned by understory forest fire during the severe drought (ENSO) year (3.9 millions of hectares) was 13 times greater than the area burned during the average rainfall year (0.2 million hectares), and twice the area of annual deforestation rate. Dense forest was, proportionally, the forest area most affected by understory fires during the El Nino year, while understory fires were concentrated in transitional forests during the year of average rainfall. Our estimate of aboveground tree biomass killed by fire ranged from 0.06 Pg to 0.38 Pg during the ENSO and from 0,004 Pg to 0,024 Pg during the non ENSO.

  17. Comparison of the Application of Allogeneic Fibroblast and Autologous Mesh Grafting With the Conventional Method in the Treatment of Third-Degree Burns.

    PubMed

    Moravvej, Hamideh; Hormozi, Abdoljalil Kalantar; Hosseini, Seyed Nejat; Sorouri, Rahim; Mozafari, Naser; Ghazisaidi, Mohammad Reza; Rad, Mahnaz Mahmoudi; Moghimi, Mohammad Hossein; Sadeghi, Shahin Mohammad; Mirzadeh, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a multipart process involving different cell types and growth factors. Third-degree burns are usually treated by early excision and skin grafting. Tissue engineering has been developed in this field in response to limitations associated with autografts. Allogeneic fibroblasts on meshed split thickness skin grafts (STSGs) are known to have useful properties in wound healing and can be used to construct a new model of living skin substitute. Fourteen patients were chosen from June 2009 until December 2010 as the sample for this study. After debridement and wound excision, meshed STSG was used to cover the entire wound. Alloskin (allofibroblasts cultured on a combination of silicone and glycosaminoglycan) was applied on one side and petroleum jelly-impregnated gauze (Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute) was applied on the other. The healing time, scar formation, and pigmentation score were assessed for the patients. All analyses were undertaken with SPSS 17 software. Alloskin demonstrated good properties compared to petroleum jelly-impregnated gauze. The average healing time and hypertrophic scar formation were significantly different between the two groups. In addition, the skin pigmentation score in the alloskin group was closer to normal. Alloskin grafting, including fibroblasts on meshed STSG, may be a useful method to reduce healing time and scar size and may require less autologous STSG in extensive burns where a high percentage of skin is burned and there is a lack of available donor sites. PMID:22683986

  18. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  19. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  20. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  1. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  2. Assessment of health status of adolescent burn victims undergoing rehabilitation: a cross-sectional field study.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Júlia Teixeira; de Carvalho, Viviane Fernandes; Sabatés, Ana Llonch; Paggiaro, André Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Teenagers may experience physiological and psychological changes when they suffer from a severe burn. The aim of this study was to assess the state of health of teenagers who were undergoing a rehabilitation process following a severe burn. A cross-sectional field study was carried out with 63 teenagers and young adults who had suffered burns. The tests applied were social, demographic, and clinical instruments. The specific tests included the Burn Specific Health Scale-Revised, Beck Depression Inventory, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, and Functional Independence Measurement. The results were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance, variance analysis, and Cronbach's reliability analysis. The social and demographic analysis of the population has shown a prevalence of female (60.3%), single subjects (93.7%), and ages between 12 and 20 years (mean age of 15.95 years). The mean total body surface area burn was 23.84%, with accidents as the main causative factor (92.10%). More than half (52.4%) reported functional and aesthetic effects after the burn, with 81% concerned about the visible scar. Cronbach's reliability analysis has shown statistically confident results for all the instruments as applied. The multivariate analysis showed a correlation between the work domain and marital status, whereas there was no evidence to show a correlation between sex, age, physical or aesthetic sequelae or visibility of burns, and depression, self-esteem, functional independence, or current state of health. The results obtained prove the reliability of the instruments applied, making it possible to assess the state of teenagers and young adults health during the rehabilitation process. PMID:24297081

  3. Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nfpa.org Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen The air is normally 21% oxygen. Oxygen is not flammable, but fire needs it to burn. ¾ When more oxygen is present, any fire that starts will burn ...

  4. Minor burn management: potions and lotions

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Ela J; Connolly, Siobhan M; Fox, Jade A; Harvey, John G

    2015-01-01

    Summary The first aid for burns is to run cold water over the burn for 20 minutes. This is effective for up to three hours after the injury. Assess the affected body surface area using the rule of nines. Consult a burn unit if more than 5% of the total body surface area is burnt in a child or if more than 10% in an adult. Extensive or deep burns and burns to special areas, such as the hands, should be referred. Chemical or electrical burns should also be assessed by a burn unit. For minor burns, antimicrobial dressings are recommended, but oral antibiotics should be avoided unless there are signs of infection. As burns are tetanus prone, check the patient’s immunisation status. Burns that become infected or are slow to heal should be discussed with a burn unit. The burn unit can also provide advice if there are uncertainties about how to manage a patient. PMID:26648640

  5. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...disapproved because they relax the control on open burning (including agricultural burning) without accompanying analyses demonstrating...52.223, are retained as applicable to the burning of wood waste.) (ii) Regulation VII...

  6. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...disapproved because they relax the control on open burning (including agricultural burning) without accompanying analyses demonstrating...52.223, are retained as applicable to the burning of wood waste.) (ii) Regulation VII...

  7. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...disapproved because they relax the control on open burning (including agricultural burning) without accompanying analyses demonstrating...52.223, are retained as applicable to the burning of wood waste.) (ii) Regulation VII...

  8. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...disapproved because they relax the control on open burning (including agricultural burning) without accompanying analyses demonstrating...52.223, are retained as applicable to the burning of wood waste.) (ii) Regulation VII...

  9. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...disapproved because they relax the control on open burning (including agricultural burning) without accompanying analyses demonstrating...52.223, are retained as applicable to the burning of wood waste.) (ii) Regulation VII...

  10. Smartphones and burn size estimation: “Rapid Burn Assessor”

    PubMed Central

    Kamolz, L.P.; Lumenta, D.B.; Parvizi, D.; Dirnberger, J.; Owen, R.; Höller, J.; Giretzlehner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Estimation of the total body surface area burned (%TBSA) following a burn injury is used in determining whether to transfer the patient to a burn center and the required fluid resuscitation volumes. Unfortunately, the commonly applied methods of estimation have revealed inaccuracies, which are mostly related to human error. To calculate the %TBSA (quotient), it is necessary to divide the burned surface area (Burned BSA) (numerator in cm2) by the total body surface area (Total BSA) (denominator in cm2). By using everyday objects (eg. credit cards, smartphones) with well-defined surface areas as reference for estimations of Burned BSA on the one hand and established formulas for Total BSA calculation on the other (eg. Mosteller), we propose an approximation method to assess %TBSA more accurately than the established methods. To facilitate distribution, and respective user feedback, we have developed a smartphone app integrating all of the above parameters, available on popular mobile device platforms. This method represents a simple and ready-to-use clinical decision support system which addresses common errors associated with estimations of Burned BSA (=numerator). Following validation and respective user feedback, it could be deployed for testing in future clinical trials. This study has a level of evidence of IV and is a brief report based on clinical observation, which points to further study. PMID:26170784

  11. Biomechanical Screening of Cell Therapies for Vocal Fold Scar.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Rebecca S; Gaston, Joel D; Yen, Tom Y; Ye, Shuyun; Kendziorski, Christina; Thibeault, Susan L

    2015-09-01

    Candidate cell sources for vocal fold scar treatment include mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow (BM-MSC) and adipose tissue (AT-MSC). Mechanosensitivity of MSC can alter highly relevant aspects of their behavior, yet virtually nothing is known about how MSC might respond to the dynamic mechanical environment of the larynx. Our objective was to evaluate MSC as a potential cell source for vocal fold tissue engineering in a mechanically relevant context. A vibratory strain bioreactor and cDNA microarray were used to evaluate the similarity of AT-MSC and BM-MSC to the native cell source, vocal fold fibroblasts (VFF). Posterior probabilities for each of the microarray transcripts fitting into specific expression patterns were calculated, and the data were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Significant wound healing and cell differentiation GO terms are reported. In addition, proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated with immunohistochemistry. Results revealed that VFF shared more GO terms related to epithelial development, extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, growth factor activity, and immune response with BM-MSC than with AT-MSC. Similarity in glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan activity dominated the ECM analysis. Analysis of GO terms relating to MSC differentiation toward osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages revealed that BM-MSC expressed fewer osteogenesis GO terms in the vibrated and scaffold-only conditions compared to polystyrene. We did not evaluate if vibrated BM-MSC recover osteogenic expression markers when returned to polystyrene culture. Immunostaining for Ki67 and cleaved caspase 3 did not vary with cell type or mechanical condition. We conclude that VFF may have a more similar wound healing capacity to BM-MSC than to AT-MSC in response to short-term vibratory strain. Furthermore, BM-MSC appear to lose osteogenic potential in the vibrated and scaffold-only conditions compared to polystyrene, potentially attenuating the risk of osteogenesis for in vivo applications. PMID:26119510

  12. Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming: 2012 update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.; McBeth, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in the Greater Green River Basin of southwest Wyoming has accentuated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. The location and extent of surface disturbance that is created by oil and natural gas well pad scars are key pieces of information used to assess the effects of energy infrastructure on wildlife populations and habitat. A digital database of oil and natural gas pad scars had previously been generated from 1-meter (m) National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery (NAIP) acquired in 2009 for a 7.7-million hectare (ha) (19,026,700 acres) region of southwest Wyoming. Scars included the pad area where wellheads, pumps, and storage facilities reside and the surrounding area that was scraped and denuded of vegetation during the establishment of the pad. Scars containing tanks, compressors, the storage of oil and gas related equipment, and produced-water ponds were also collected on occasion. This report updates the digital database for the five counties of southwest Wyoming (Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, Uinta) within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) study area and for a limited portion of Fremont, Natrona, and Albany Counties using 2012 1-m NAIP imagery and 2012 oil and natural gas well permit information. This report adds pad scars created since 2009, and updates attributes of all pad scars using the 2012 well permit information. These attributes include the origination year of the pad scar, the number of active and inactive wells on or near each pad scar in 2012, and the overall status of the pad scar (active or inactive). The new 2012 database contains 17,404 pad scars of which 15,532 are attributed as oil and natural gas well pads. Digital data are stored as shapefiles projected to the Universal Transverse Mercator (zones 12 and 13) coordinate system. These data are available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds934.

  13. Comparison of Healing Effect of Aloe Vera Extract and Silver Sulfadiazine in Burn Injuries in Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Akhoondinasab, Mohammad Reza; Akhoondinasab, Motahhare; Saberi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Wound healing is widely discussed in the medical literature. This study compared the healing effect of aloe vera extract and silver sulfadiazine in burn injuries in experimental rat model. METHODS Sixteen rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups, each group 8 rats. A deep second-degree burn on the lower back and 3rd degree burn on upper back of each rat were created with a standard burning procedure. Burns were dressed daily with aloe vera extract in group 2 and silver sulfadiazine in group 1. Response to treatment was assessed by digital photography during treatment until day 32. Histological parameters (PMN, epithelialization, fibrosis and angiogenesis) were assessed after biopsy of scar at the end of research. RESULTS Wound healing was more visible in aloe vera group. Also the speed of healing in aloe vera group was better than silver sulfadiazine group. CONCLUSIONS Based on our findings, aloe vera can be a therapy of choice for burn injuries. PMID:25489521

  14. Burns treatment in ancient times.

    PubMed

    Pe?anac, Marija; Janji?, Zlata; Komarcevi?, Aleksandar; Paji?, Milos; Dobanovacki, Dusanka; Miskovi?, Sanja Skeledzija

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of fire at the dawn of prehistoric time brought not only the benefits to human beings offering the light and heat, but also misfortune due to burns; and that was the beginning of burns treatment. Egyptian doctors made medicines from plants, animal products and minerals, which they combined with magic and religious procedures. The earliest records described burns dressings with milk from mothers of male babies. Goddess Isis was called upon to help. Some remedies and procedures proved so successful that their application continued for centuries. The Edwin Smith papyrus (1500 BC) mentioned the treatment of burns with honey and grease. Ebers Papyrus (1500 BC) contains descriptions of application of mud, excrement, oil and plant extracts. They also used honey, Aloe and tannic acid to heal burns. Ancient Egyptians did not know about microorganisms but they knew that honey, moldy bread and copper salts could prevent infections from dirt in burns healing. Thyme, opium and belladona were used for pain relief. In the 4th century BC, Hippocrates recorded that Greek and Roman doctors used rendered pig fat, resin and bitumen to treat burns. Mixture of honey and bran, or lotion of wine and myrrh were used by Celsus. Honey was also known in Ayurveda (Indian medicine) time. Ayurvedic records Characa and Sushruta included honey in their dressing aids to purify sores and promote the healing. Burn treatment in Chinese medicine was traditional. It was a compilation of philosophy, knowledge and herbal medicine. The successful treatment of burns started in recent time and it has been made possible by better knowledge of the pathophysiology of thermal injuries and their consequences, medical technology advances and improved surgical techniques. PMID:23888738

  15. MicroRNA-21 Regulates hTERT via PTEN in Hypertrophic Scar Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jia-Qi; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Cai, Wei-Xia; Bai, Xiao-Zhi; Jia, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Bin; Wu, Xue; Li, Jun; Hu, Da-Hai

    2014-01-01

    Background As an important oncogenic miRNA, microRNA-21 (miR-21) is associated with various malignant diseases. However, the precise biological function of miR-21 and its molecular mechanism in hypertrophic scar fibroblast cells has not been fully elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed significant upregulation of miR-21 in hypertrophic scar fibroblast cells compared with that in normal skin fibroblast cells. The effects of miR-21 were then assessed in MTT and apoptosis assays through in vitro transfection with a miR-21 mimic or inhibitor. Next, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) was identified as a target gene of miR-21 in hypertrophic scar fibroblast cells. Furthermore, Western-blot and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that miR-21 increased the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) via the PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway. Introduction of PTEN cDNA led to a remarkable depletion of hTERT and PI3K/AKT at the protein level as well as inhibition of miR-21-induced proliferation. In addition, Western-blot and qRT-PCR analyses confirmed that hTERT was the downstream target of PTEN. Finally, miR-21 and PTEN RNA expression levels in hypertrophic scar tissue samples were examined. Immunohistochemistry assays revealed an inverse correlation between PTEN and hTERT levels in high miR-21 RNA expressing-hypertrophic scar tissues. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that miR-21 regulates hTERT expression via the PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway by directly targeting PTEN, therefore controlling hypertrophic scar fibroblast cell growth. MiR-21 may be a potential novel molecular target for the treatment of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:24817011

  16. Development of SCAR marker associated with downy mildew disease resistance in pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.).

    PubMed

    Jogaiah, Sudisha; Sharathchandra, R G; Raj, Niranjan; Vedamurthy, A B; Shetty, H Shekar

    2014-12-01

    Pearl Millet is an important crop coarse grain cereal crop in the semi arid tropics which is extremely susceptible to oomycete plant pathogen Sclerospora graminicola causing downy mildew (DM) disease. The aim of the current study is to breed resistance against downy mildew disease into high yielding cultivars of pearl millet. Hence, in the present work a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker was developed as a molecular screening tool to identify DM resistance source and presented here. Of the 27 inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) decamer primers used to identify polymorphism amongst pearl millet genotypes ICMR-01007 (P1) and ICMR-01004 (P2) and their populations (F1 and F2), only one primer pair ISSR-22 produced polymorphic bands on ICMR-01004 producing 1.4 kb size. The PCR amplification of 1.4 kb band was found tightly linked to the resistant line of ICMR-01004 and also in F2 segregation population was in the ratio 3:1. This band was cloned, sequenced and candidate SCAR primer (SCAR ISSR 863 ) was designed. Segregant analysis of their F2 progeny revealed that the SCAR ISSR 863 marker was linked to downy mildew resistance linkage group (?(2) 3:1 = 0.86, P = 0.22) with a genetic distance of 0.72 cM. This SCAR marker was further validated using diverse pearl millet lines of India and Africa. Results indicated that the SCAR ISSR 863 band was amplified in all the seven resistant lines and were absent in five susceptible lines. The confirmation of the ISSR-derived SCAR marker in different genetic backgrounds of pearl millet lines suggests that this marker can be exploited for DM resistance screening in pearl millet breeding programs. PMID:25156533

  17. Efficacy of moist exposed burn ointment on burns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Qi; Yip, Tsui-Pik; Hui, Irene; Lai, Vincy; Wong, Ann

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we sought to test the medical efficacy of a Chinese medical herb product, moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO), on wound healing rate and infection control in burn injury. Standardized deep burn wounds were created on the back skin of rats by applying a hot brass bar for 12 to 18 seconds. MEBO was applied four times per day and compared with petroleum jelly, silver sulfadiazine, and dry exposure therapy. Under such a controlled setting, although MEBO had a better wound healing rate than the dry exposure treatment, it did not show the medical advantage statistically, as has been claimed, over the other two treatments (P > .05), either in terms of wound healing rate or bacterial control. We conclude that the MEBO is not suitable for deep burn wound treatment, particularly when infection is a concern. PMID:15879746

  18. Burn Safety Awareness on Playgrounds: Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... burns from playground equipment. You may remember the metal slides of your youth and how they could ... plastic slide. I only have to worry about metal slides, right? No. Metal is not the only ...

  19. Nursing a teenager with burns.

    PubMed

    Wallace, E

    Development of body image is an integral part of a teenager's psychological growth. Burned teenagers experience great difficulty in readjusting psychosocially after injury as they have not yet formed their own self-concept and sense of worth. Burns patients experience a range of psychological problems as a consequence of disfigurement. These include depression, phobias, insomnia, sexual problems, high divorce rates, juvenile delinquency and impaired employment or academic status. Few nursing research articles have addressed the psychosocial problems of burns patients. Even if nurses are not skilled in counselling they must be able to recognize problems and refer patients to colleagues with the appropriate skills. PMID:8485360

  20. Evaluating the Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy with 20% Aminolevulinic Acid and Microdermabrasion as a Combination Treatment Regimen for Acne Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Jim On, Shelbi; Haddican, Madelaine; Singer, Giselle; Shim-Chang, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Acne scarring is a consequence of abnormal resolution of wound healing after damage that occurs in the sebaceous follicle during acne inflammation. No trial to date has evaluated the efficacy of the combination of microdermabrasion and photodynamic therapy for acne scarring. This single-center, double-blinded pilot study enrolled subjects with moderate-to-severe acne scarring who were randomly assigned in a blinded fashion to use aminolevulinic acid and vehicle in a split-face fashion after full-face treatment with microdermabrasion. On average, 80 percent of the patients displayed more improvement in scarring on the aminolevulinic acid split face versus the vehicle split face after five treatments. Using two different noninvasive mechanisms of targeting acne scarring provided for a safe treatment regimen characterized by more efficacious results with respect to higher rates of scarring improvement. PMID:24847407

  1. Clustered parrotfish feeding scars trigger partial coral mortality of massive Porites colonies on the inshore Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, J. Q.; Bonaldo, R. M.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    Coral predation by parrotfishes can cause damage to coral colonies, but research into the dynamics of their feeding scars on Indo-Pacific corals is limited. We monitored feeding scars of the parrotfish Chlorurus microrhinos on massive Porites colonies at Orpheus Island (inshore Great Barrier Reef) over 4 months. Of the 30 marks monitored, 11 were single feeding scars, which all healed completely. The remaining 19 feeding marks consisted of clusters of scars. Eight began to recover, while 11 increased in size by 1,576 ± 252 % (mean ± SE). A logistic regression predicted that a single feeding scar on a Porites colony had a 97 % probability of healing; however, where more than three feeding scars were present, this dropped below 50 %. As excavating parrotfishes in the Indo-Pacific often take multiple focused bites, they may have a significant impact on the growth and mortality of massive Porites colonies at Orpheus Island.

  2. Getting beyond burning dirt

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, R.J. )

    1994-05-01

    To fix and make the nation's Superfund law work, two related questions must be answered. First, where will the innovative technology come from the clean up Superfund and other waste sites Burning dirt--the best technology currently available--is an expensive nonsolution. Second, can man muster the political will to make Superfund a waste cleanup law instead of an expanding welfare program for lawyers Under the sponsorship of EPA, a number of companies and other groups are participating in the Remediation Technology Development Forum, focusing on the areas where the real breakthroughs might occur and the most promising collaborations. Currently, this effort is focused on bioremediation, the lasagna process, soil flushing, and characterization. Another area of investigation is stabilization technology--stabilizing a site to keep contaminants from flowing away. Some scientists, for example, are looking at vitrification technology, which fuses contaminated soil into a glass-like brick. And still other technology efforts include air flushing of contaminated sites and vapor extraction and heating processes. A number of groups and consortia have been working on waste remediation technologies. For the first time since 1980, when Superfund became law, one can give positive answers to the two critical questions. Groups are finding innovative technologies to clean up Superfund and other waste sites. And, as a nation, Americans are exercising the political will to create a Superfund law that will work effectively and fairly.

  3. Burning coal's waste

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, J.M.; Duffy, T.J.

    1988-07-01

    In an old Pennsylvania coal valley, growing fresh produce and eliminating ancient waste piles both depend on a fluidized bed boiler cogeneration plant. The builders of a complex now nearing completion at Archbald, however, will soon begin to turn two of the waste piles, called culm banks, into economic assets. Culm will burn although it has a low, variable heat content. The project combines several recently developed technologies to use culm as fuel for a fluidized bed boiler cogeneration plant that will heat a hydroponic greenhouse. What makes the venture economically viable are the products that will be sold: 23 mw of electricity to the local utility and fresh produce to meet burgeoning demands in East Coast supermarkets. For instance, if the ''salad plant'' were completely devoted to growing lettuce, 3 million heads could be harvested in 11 hydroponic seasons a year. The owners, Archbald Power Corp., chose a 271 acre stie that had been mined for anthracite by both open pit and deep shaft methods.

  4. Several Flame Balls Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Structure of Flameballs at Low Lewis Numbers (SOFBALL) experiments aboard the space shuttle in 1997 a series of sturningly successful burns. This sequence was taken during STS-94, July 12, 1997, MET:10/08:18 (approximate). It was thought these extremely dim flameballs (1/20 the power of a kitchen match) could last up to 200 seconds -- in fact, they can last for at least 500 seconds. This has ramifications in fuel-spray design in combustion engines, as well as fire safety in space. The SOFBALL principal investigator was Paul Ronney, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (925KB, 9-second MPEG spanning 10 minutes, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300186.html.

  5. Involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors in the pathogenesis of Dupuytren's contracture: a novel target for a possible future therapeutic strategy?

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Taurone, Samanta; Bardella, Lia; Signore, Alberto; Pompili, Elena; Sessa, Vincenzo; Chiappetta, Caterina; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Di Gioia, Cira; Pastore, Francesco S; Scarpa, Susanna; Artico, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a benign fibro-proliferative disease of the hand causing fibrotic nodules and fascial cords which determine debilitating contracture and deformities of fingers and hands. The present study was designed to characterize pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors involved in the pathogenesis, progression and recurrence of this disease, in order to find novel targets for alternative therapies and strategies in controlling DC. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and of growth factors was detected by immunohistochemistry in fibrotic nodules and normal palmar fascia resected respectively from patients affected by DC and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS; as negative controls). Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis and immunofluorescence were performed to quantify the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1, interleukin (IL)-1? and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by primary cultures of myofibroblasts and fibroblasts isolated from Dupuytren's nodules. Histological analysis showed high cellularity and high proliferation rate in Dupuytren's tissue, together with the presence of myofibroblastic isotypes; immunohistochemical staining for macrophages was completely negative. In addition, a strong expression of TGF-?1, IL-1? and VEGF was evident in the extracellular matrix and in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in Dupuytren's nodular tissues, as compared with control tissues. These results were confirmed by RT-PCR and by immunofluorescence in pathological and normal primary cell cultures. These preliminary observations suggest that TGF-?1, IL-1? and VEGF may be considered potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of Dupuytren's disease (DD). PMID:26201022

  6. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin. PMID:24930134

  7. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... Tribe of Idaho § 49.10411 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and... person must apply for and obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and...

  8. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... Tribe of Idaho § 49.10411 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and... person must apply for and obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and...

  9. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... Tribe of Idaho § 49.10411 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and... person must apply for and obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and...

  10. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... Reservation, Oregon § 49.11021 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and..., 2007, a person must apply for and obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry...

  11. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... Tribe of Idaho § 49.10411 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and... person must apply for and obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and...

  12. Prescribed Range Burning in Texas 

    E-print Network

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-04-25

    Prescribed burning is an effective brush management technique for improving pasture accessibility and increasing the production of forage and browse. Fire also suppresses most brush and cactus species. This bulletin discusses how to plan...

  13. Preventing Burns in Your Home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hot water burns in our home? Test the water temperature before you or your children get into the ... the faucet handles during a bath. Set the temperature on your water heater to 120º F, or use the "low- ...

  14. Lawn mower-related burns.

    PubMed

    Still, J; Orlet, H; Law, E; Gertler, C

    2000-01-01

    Lawn mower-related injuries are fairly common and are usually caused by the mower blades. Burns may also be associated with the use of power lawn mowers. We describe 27 lawn mower-related burn injuries of 24 male patients and 3 female patients. Three of the patients with burn injuries were children. Burn sizes ranged from 1% to 99% of the total body surface area (mean, 18.1%). Two of the patients died. The hospital stay ranged from 1 day to 45 days. Twenty-six injuries involved gasoline, which is frequently associated with refueling accidents. Safety measures should involve keeping children away from lawn mowers that are being used. The proper use and storage of gasoline is stressed. PMID:11020046

  15. Wave pattern and weak localization of chaotic versus scarred modes in stadium-shaped surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y T; Tuan, P H; Chiang, P Y; Liang, H C; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2011-11-01

    We explore the lasing mode selection between the chaotic and scarred modes in stadium-shaped vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). Experimental results reveal that the spatial gain distribution in the active layer of a VCSEL can be modified via the aperture size to favor the generation of either the chaotic or the scarred modes. Experimentally obtained chaotic and scarred modes are further employed to perform statistical analysis of wave function intensities for making a comparison with predictions based on the nonlinear ? model. We verify that the scarring effect can be quantitatively relevant to the weak-localization correction in the intensity probability distribution. PMID:22181478

  16. WAVE/SCAR promotes endocytosis and early endosome morphology in polarized C. elegans epithelia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Falshruti B; Soto, Martha C

    2013-05-15

    Cells can use the force of actin polymerization to drive intracellular transport, but the role of actin in endocytosis is not clear. Studies in single-celled yeast demonstrate the essential role of the branched actin nucleator, Arp2/3, and its activating nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) in the process of invagination from the cell surface through endocytosis. However, some mammalian studies have disputed the need for F-actin and Arp2/3 in Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis (CME) in multicellular organisms. We investigate the role of Arp2/3 during endocytosis in Caenorhabditis elegans, a multicellular organism with polarized epithelia. Arp2/3 and its NPF, WAVE/SCAR, are essential for C. elegans embryonic morphogenesis. We show that WAVE/SCAR and Arp2/3 regulate endocytosis and early endosome morphology in diverse tissues of C. elegans. Depletion of WAVE/SCAR or Arp2/3, but not of the NPF Wasp, severely disrupts the distribution of molecules proposed to be internalized via CME, and alters the subcellular enrichment of the early endosome regulator RAB-5. Loss of WAVE/SCAR or of the GEFs that regulate RAB-5 results in similar defects in endocytosis in the intestine and coelomocyte cells. This study in a multicellular organism supports an essential role for branched actin regulators in endocytosis, and identifies WAVE/SCAR as a key NPF that promotes Arp2/3 endocytic function in C. elegans. PMID:23510716

  17. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-?-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of ? smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-? signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  18. Influence of the scar geometry on landslide dynamics and deposits: Application to Martian landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Antoine; Mangeney, Anne; Mège, Daniel; Bouchut, François

    2011-10-01

    Landslides dynamics prediction remains difficult in spite of a considerable number of studies. The runout distance is widely used in analysis of landslide dynamics and in the calibration of the rheological parameters involved in numerical modeling. However, the unknown impact of the significant uncertainty in the shape of the initial released mass on the runout distance and on the overall shape of the deposit raises questions about the relevance of these approaches. The impact of the initial scar geometry on flow and distribution of the deposits is studied here using satellite data and numerical modeling of theoretical landslides, and Martian landslides informed by geomorphological analysis, by varying the initial scar geometry from spoon-shaped to steep wall geometry. Our results show that the runout distance is a very robust parameter that is only slightly affected by the change in the geometry of the initial scar. On the contrary, the lateral extent of the deposit is shown to be controlled by the scar geometry, providing unique insights into the initial landsliding conditions on Mars and makes it possible to accurately recover the volume initially involved, an essential ingredient for volume balance calculation. A feedback analysis of Valles Marineris landslides can be drawn, showing good agreement between numerical results and geomorphological analysis; the geometry of the initial scar inferred from numerical modeling is strongly correlated with the regional tectonic history in Valles Marineris area.

  19. Comparison of Two Kinds of Lasers in the Treatment of Acne Scars.

    PubMed

    Reinholz, Markus; Schwaiger, Hannah; Heppt, Markus V; Poetschke, J; Tietze, J; Epple, Andreas; Ruzicka, T; Kaudewitz, P; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2015-10-01

    Acne scars are common and stigmatizing for the affected patients. Besides surgery, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, and microneedling, the treatment with fractional laser is a standard therapy. The results of reducing acne scars treated either with a fractional Er:YAG (erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet [Er:Y3Al5O1]) or a carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser at different wavelengths were compared and evaluated in the pilot study presented here. Fourteen patients with severe scars on both cheeks were treated four times in a random split-face approach: on one side with Er:YAG laser and on the contralateral side with CO2 laser following a standardized protocol. Therapeutic success was evaluated through the use of a high-resolution, 3D small-field capture system (PRIMOS), digital photography, and the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) questionnaire. The evaluation was performed by a blinded investigator. Treatment results displayed a higher efficacy of the fractional CO2 laser compared with the Er:YAG laser as displayed by digital photographs. Additionally, objective (high-resolution, 3D small-field capture; PRIMOS) and subjective (POSAS) measuring results correlated positively in certain qualities (color, stiffness, thickness, surface, overall opinion). Using a novel scientific approach, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of different fractional lasers on acne scars using a rater-blinded approach. Compared with an Er:YAG laser, better skin smoothening was achieved by fractional CO2 laser treatment. PMID:26579867

  20. Inactivation of salmonella on tomato stem scars by edible chitosan and organic Acid coatings.

    PubMed

    Jin, T; Gurtler, J B

    2012-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of antimicrobial coatings for inactivation of Salmonella on the surface of tomato stem scars. Scars were inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella (serovars Montevideo, Newport, Saintpaul, and Typhimurium) and coated with acid-chitosan solutions. The chitosan coating with three acids (3A plus chitosan), the chitosan coating with one acid, and the three-acid solution without chitosan reduced the populations of Salmonella by 6.0, 3.6, and 5.3 log CFU per stem scar, respectively. Addition of allyl isothiocyanate (10 ?l/ml) to the 3A plus chitosan coating did not significantly increase (P > 0.05) the antimicrobial efficacy. Although the populations of Salmonella in the controls (ca. 7.5 log CFU per stem scar) did not change significantly throughout the 14-day storage period at 10° C, Salmonella cells were reduced to undetectable levels (< 0.7 log CFU per stem scar) in the samples treated with 3A plus chitosan coating after two days of storage, and no growth was observed for the remaining storage period. Results from this study demonstrate that coatings of acid plus chitosan provide an alternative antimicrobial intervention for decontamination of tomatoes. PMID:22856559

  1. Fibrinogen triggers astrocyte scar formation by promoting the availability of active TGF-? after vascular damage

    PubMed Central

    Schachtrup, Christian; Ryu, Jae K.; Helmrick, Matthew; Vagena, Eirini; Galanakis, Dennis K.; Degen, Jay L.; Margolis, Richard U.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Scar formation in the nervous system begins within hours after traumatic injury and is characterized primarily by reactive astrocytes depositing proteoglycans that inhibit regeneration. A fundamental question in CNS repair has been the identity of the initial molecular mediator that triggers glial scar formation. Here we show that the blood protein fibrinogen, which leaks into the CNS immediately after blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption or vascular damage, serves as an early signal for the induction of glial scar formation via the TGF-?/Smad signaling pathway. Our studies revealed that fibrinogen is a carrier of latent TGF-? and induces phosphorylation of Smad2 in astrocytes that leads to inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Consistent with these findings, genetic or pharmacologic depletion of fibrinogen in mice reduces active TGF-?, Smad2 phosphorylation, glial cell activation and neurocan deposition following cortical injury. Furthermore, stereotactic injection of fibrinogen into the mouse cortex is sufficient to induce astrogliosis. Inhibition of the TGF-? receptor pathway abolishes the fibrinogen-induced effects on glial scar formation in vivo and in vitro. These results identify fibrinogen as a primary astrocyte activation signal, provide evidence that deposition of inhibitory proteoglycans is induced by a blood protein that leaks in the CNS after vasculature rupture, and point to TGF-? as a molecular link between vascular permeability and scar formation. PMID:20427645

  2. A SCAR marker for the analysis of chloroplast DNA from different cultivars of Cornus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Liu, R X; Wang, J; Zhang, T; Li, J; Shi, J H; Kang, B Y; Chen, S Q

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprint database of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) from different cultivars of Cornus officinalis and to convert RAPD markers to sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) markers. A method of extraction was established that was suitable for obtaining cpDNA from samples rapidly dried in silicone; an RAPD fingerprint database was built; and the genetic distance between samples was used as statistical clustering variables for calculating DICE genetic similarity coefficients and for building a kinship tree chart. RAPD markers were converted to SCAR markers to design specific primers, and samples from C. officinalis cultivars, plants of the same family, and its adulterants, were used for amplification and identification. Fifteen amplified primers with stable polymorphisms were screened for amplification of 130 copies of materials. In total, 57 sites were achieved, 40 of which were polymorphic, and the polymorphic rate was up to 70.18%. A genetic tree was built based on seven cultivars. SCAR markers of C. officinalis cpDNA were successfully converted into RAPD markers. cpDNA samples from hawthorn, C. officinalis, Cornus wood, and grape were used for SCAR amplification, and their bands were distinctly different. In conclusion, SCAR markers and cpDNA may be used for research on C. officinalis and its adulterants, and the results may provide a basis for identifying germplasm and screening fine varieties at a molecular level. PMID:26681064

  3. Paclitaxel reduces formation of hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-ping; Wang, Guo-qi; Jia, Zi-shan; Chen, Jing-wen; Wang, Gang; Wang, Xing-lin

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective The onset and progression of pathological scarring involves multiple cytokines and complex mechanisms. However, hyperplasia of fibroblasts and neovascularization plays important roles, which can be inhibited by paclitaxel. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of paclitaxel in the treatment of hypertrophic scars on rabbit ears. Methods Rabbit ear models of hypertrophic scars were established to observe the therapeutic effects of paclitaxel at different concentrations (12 mg/L, 24 mg/L, 48 mg/L, 96 mg/L, 18 mg/L, 54 mg/L, 162 mg/L, 486 mg/L, 30 mg/L, 150 mg/L, 750 mg/L, 3,750 mg/L). The outcome measures included hypertrophic index (HI), density of fibroblasts, density of collagenous fibers, and microvessel density. Results In comparison with the control group, the concentrations of 96 mg/L, 150 mg/L, and 162 mg/L significantly reduce the formation of hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear models. However, local necrosis was found in the rabbit ear models treated with paclitaxel solution >400 mg/L. Conclusion Paclitaxel has strong inhibitory effects on the hyperplasia of fibroblasts, deposition of collagen, and microangiogenesis in hypertrophic scars on rabbit ears within the concentration range from 48 mg/L to 162 mg/L, without causing local necrosis. PMID:26251604

  4. Factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendritic cells in keloids and hypertrophic and mature scars.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Masayuki; Ueno, Masaki; Ito, Osamu; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Igawa, Hiroharu H; Sakamoto, Haruhiko

    2007-06-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars have several common features. Both are reddish, firm, slightly protruding lesions that consist of proliferative fibroblastic cells and collagenous tissues. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of factor XIIIa (FXIIIa)-positive dermal dendritic cells to formation of keloids and hypertrophic scars. The numbers of FXIIIa-positive cells were counted in the keloid, hypertrophic scar and mature scar, each of which was divided into fibrocollagenous area and superficial dermal area overlying the nodular lesion. The features of the FXIIIa-positive cells were examined using immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic techniques. More FXIIIa-positive cells were present in the overlying dermal area than in the fibrocollagenous area, commonly in three types of dermal lesion. The number of FXIIIa-positive dendritic cells was significantly greater in the overlying dermal area of keloids than in the corresponding area of hypertrophic or mature scar. Immunoelectron microscopic examination showed that the immunoreactivity for FXIIIa was seen mainly at the periphery of the cytoplasm of dermal dendritic cells. These results suggest that FXIIIa-positive dendritic cells in the overlying dermal area play active roles in formation of keloids and may contribute to dermal-epidermal interactions in keloids. PMID:17539964

  5. Burning wastes in steam boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Feeley, F.G.

    1984-01-01

    A review of the advantages and precautions in the burning of a wide variety of industrial wastes is presented. The reasons for burning industrial wastes are economics and pollution control. The incineration of the following industrial wastes is discussed: pulp cooking liquors, wood wastes, coffee grounds and other biomass, pitch and tars, gases, and miscellaneous solid fuels. Boiler cycles and types are also discussed. (RCK)

  6. Regimes of Helium Burning

    SciTech Connect

    Timmes, F. X.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2000-07-10

    The burning regimes encountered by laminar deflagrations and Zeldovich von Neumann Doering [ZND] detonations propagating through helium-rich compositions in the presence of buoyancy-driven turbulence are analyzed. Particular attention is given to models of X-ray bursts that start with a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a neutron star and to the thin-shell helium instability of intermediate-mass stars. In the X-ray burst case, turbulent deflagrations propagating in the lateral or radial direction encounter a transition from the distributed regime to the flamelet regime at a density of {approx}108 g cm-3. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}106 g cm-3. Self-sustained laminar deflagrations traveling in the radial direction cannot exist below this density. Similarly, the planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}107 g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. In the thin helium shell case, turbulent deflagrations traveling in the lateral or radial direction encounter the distributed regime at densities below {approx}107 g cm-3 and the flamelet regime at larger densities. In the radial direction, the purely laminar deflagration width is larger than the pressure scale height for densities smaller than {approx}104 g cm-3, indicating that steady state laminar deflagrations cannot form below this density. The planar ZND detonation width becomes larger than the pressure scale height at {approx}5x10{sup 4} g cm-3, suggesting that steady state, self-sustained detonations cannot come into existence in the radial direction. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  7. Pharmacological Suppression of CNS Scarring by Deferoxamine Reduces Lesion Volume and Increases Regeneration in an In Vitro Model for Astroglial-Fibrotic Scarring and in Rat Spinal Cord Injury In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Krafft, Stefanie; Estrada, Veronica; Brazda, Nicole; Ziegler, Brigida; Faissner, Andreas; Müller, Hans Werner

    2015-01-01

    Lesion-induced scarring is a major impediment for regeneration of injured axons in the central nervous system (CNS). The collagen-rich glial-fibrous scar contains numerous axon growth inhibitory factors forming a regeneration-barrier for axons. We demonstrated previously that the combination of the iron chelator 2,2’-bipyridine-5,5’-decarboxylic acid (BPY-DCA) and 8-Br-cyclic AMP (cAMP) inhibits scar formation and collagen deposition, leading to enhanced axon regeneration and partial functional recovery after spinal cord injury. While BPY-DCA is not a clinical drug, the clinically approved iron chelator deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) may be a suitable alternative for anti-scarring treatment (AST). In order to prove the scar-suppressing efficacy of DFO we modified a recently published in vitro model for CNS scarring. The model comprises a co-culture system of cerebral astrocytes and meningeal fibroblasts, which form scar-like clusters when stimulated with transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?). We studied the mechanisms of TGF-?-induced CNS scarring and compared the efficiency of different putative pharmacological scar-reducing treatments, including BPY-DCA, DFO and cAMP as well as combinations thereof. We observed modulation of TGF-?-induced scarring at the level of fibroblast proliferation and contraction as well as specific changes in the expression of extracellular matrix molecules and axon growth inhibitory proteins. The individual and combinatorial pharmacological treatments had distinct effects on the cellular and molecular aspects of in vitro scarring. DFO could be identified as a putative anti-scarring treatment for CNS trauma. We subsequently validated this by local application of DFO to a dorsal hemisection in the rat thoracic spinal cord. DFO treatment led to significant reduction of scarring, slightly increased regeneration of corticospinal tract as well as ascending CGRP-positive axons and moderately improved locomotion. We conclude that the in vitro model for CNS scarring is suitable for efficient pre-screening and identification of putative scar-suppressing agents prior to in vivo application and validation, thus saving costs, time and laboratory animals. PMID:26222542

  8. The Healing Effect of Arnebia Euchroma Ointment versus Silver Sulfadiazine on Burn Wounds in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Akbari, Jafar; Enayati-Fard, Reza; Azizi, Sohail; Azadbakht, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is still a majordevastating condition in emergency medicine departments among both genders and all age groups in all developed and developing countries, leading to physical, psychological scars and economical burden. The present study aimed to determine the healing effect of topical treatment with Arnebia euchroma on second-degree burn wound in rats. METHODS Fifty rats were divided into 4 equal groups receiving the ointment base, normal saline (NS), standard 1% silver sulfadiazine (SSD), and 5% and 10% Arnebia euchroma ointments (AEO). The mean of burn area, percentage of wound contraction, histopathological and bacteriological assessments in the injured area were dtermined during the study. RESULTS Average area of wound on the 10th day was 10.2±2.3, 8.4±2.6, 12.4±2.5, 5.9±2.2 and 5.7±2 cm2 for ointment base, NS, 1% SSD, and 5% and 10% AEO, respectively. Wound size was significantly lower in 10% AEO than 1% SSD and control groups on the 10th day post-burn injury. On day 11, the percentage of wound contraction in 5% and 10% AEO was 53.9%±14.7% and 55.9±10.5% which was more than 1% SSD (15.3±10.8%). The collagen fibers were well formed and horizontally-oriented in 5% and 10% AEO groups when compared with other groups. CONCLUSION Arnebia euchroma ointment was an effective treatment for healing of burn wounds in comparison with SSD and can be regarded as an alternative topical treatment for burn wounds. PMID:26284182

  9. Understanding burn injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children: protocol for a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Rebecca Q; Hunter, Kate; Clapham, Kathleen; Coombes, Julieann; Fraser, Sarah; Lo, Serigne; Gabbe, Belinda; Hendrie, Delia; Read, David; Kimble, Roy; Sparnon, Anthony; Stockton, Kellie; Simpson, Renee; Quinn, Linda; Towers, Kurt; Potokar, Tom; Mackean, Tamara; Grant, Julian; Lyons, Ronan A; Jones, Lindsey; Eades, Sandra; Daniels, John; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in Australia have higher risk of burns compared with non-Aboriginal children, their access to burn care, particularly postdischarge care, is poorly understood, including the impact of care on functional outcomes. The objective of this study is to describe the burden of burns, access to care and functional outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in Australia, and develop appropriate models of care. Methods and analysis All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged under 16?years of age (and their families) presenting with a burn to a tertiary paediatric burn unit in 4 Australian States (New South Wales (NSW), Queensland, Northern Territory (NT), South Australia (SA)) will be invited to participate. Participants and carers will complete a baseline questionnaire; follow-ups will be completed at 3, 6, 12 and 24?months. Data collected will include sociodemographic information; out of pocket costs; functional outcome; and measures of pain, itch and scarring. Health-related quality of life will be measured using the PedsQL, and impact of injury using the family impact scale. Clinical data and treatment will also be recorded. Around 225 participants will be recruited allowing complete data on around 130 children. Qualitative data collected by in-depth interviews with families, healthcare providers and policymakers will explore the impact of burn injury and outcomes on family life, needs of patients and barriers to healthcare; interviews with families will be conducted by experienced Aboriginal research staff using Indigenous methodologies. Health systems mapping will describe the provision of care. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by ethics committees in NSW, SA, NT and Queensland. Study results will be distributed to community members by study newsletters, meetings and via the website; to policymakers and clinicians via policy fora, presentations and publication in peer-reviewed journals. PMID:26463225

  10. Combined Treatment with Botulinum Toxin and 595-nm Pulsed Dye Laser for Traumatic Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ju; Jeong, Se Yeong; No, Yeon A; Kim, Beom Joo

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic scars on skin covering areas of high movement, especially areas on the face, can be stressful for patients. We report two cases of traumatic scars that occurred on the chin, and that were successfully treated with a combined therapy of 595-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) and intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin. After the treatment, good cosmetic results were achieved in both patients. The only adverse effect during and after the treatments was mild pain, which resolved within several days without any additional treatment. In conclusion, the combination of 595-nm PDL and intramuscular botulinum toxin injection was shown to be a safe and effective treatment for traumatic scars on the mobile chin area in Korean patients. PMID:26719648

  11. Management of acne scars: fulfilling our duty of care for patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Viera, M

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory lesions commonly associated with acne have a propensity to form scars which can substantially impact an individual's quality of life. As a result of variations in collagen levels during the wound-healing process, different types of scars can form requiring a tailored approach to treatment; treatment success depends on the modality of the treatment chosen. Here, I briefly discuss the different acne scar types, and their relationship with skin anatomy and histology, in relation to the different treatment options available. This paper was developed to accompany my state of the art presentation at 'The Changing Faces of Acne' meeting in June 2014 and I aim to share my personal experiences in order to offer guidance for appropriate treatment decisions. PMID:25597636

  12. Up-to-date approach to manage keloids and hypertrophic scars: A useful guide

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Barret, Juan P.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars occur anywhere from 30 to 90% of patients, and are characterized by pathologically excessive dermal fibrosis and aberrant wound healing. Both entities have different clinical and histochemical characteristics, and unfortunately still represent a great challenge for clinicians due to lack of efficacious treatments. Current advances in molecular biology and genetics reveal new preventive and therapeutical options which represent a hope to manage this highly prevalent, chronic and disabling problem, with long-term beneficial outcomes and improvement of quality of life. While we wait for these translational clinical products to be marketed, however, it is imperative to know the basics of the currently existing wide array of strategies to deal with excessive scars: from the classical corticotherapy, to the most recent botulinum toxin and lasers. The main aim of this review paper is to offer a useful up-to-date guideline to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. PMID:24767715

  13. A Case of Misdiagnosed Cesarean Scar Pregnancy with a Viable Birth at 28 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Nukaga, Sakiko; Aoki, Shigeru; Kurasawa, Kentaro; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2014-01-01

    We report our experience with a case of presumptive cesarean scar pregnancy, based on detection of a gestational sac (GS) in early pregnancy at the site of a previous cesarean scar. The GS grew into the uterine cavity as the pregnancy progressed, showing an ultrasound image similar to that of a normal pregnancy. Thus, the pregnancy continued, resulting in a viable birth at 28 weeks of gestation. Cesarean scar pregnancy is classified as myometrial implantation or implantation growth into the uterine cavity. In the latter type, the gestational sac moves upward with increasing gestational weeks and it shows the same ultrasound image as a normal pregnancy. Therefore, the diagnosis must be made in the early pregnancy. PMID:25371837

  14. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  15. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  16. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  17. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted...

  18. Burn plasma transfer induces burn edema in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Thomas; Abé, Dorotheé; Weihrauch, Marc; Peters, Christopher; Gebhardt, Martha Maria; Germann, Guenter; Heitmann, Christoph; Walther, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    Thermal injuries greater than 20% body surface area (BSA) result in systemic shock with generalized edema in addition to local tissue destruction. Burn shock is induced by a variety of mediators, mainly immunomodulative cytokines. This experimental study evaluates if burn shock can be induced in healthy rats by transfer of burn plasma (BP) with mediators. Thermal injury was induced by hot water (100 degrees C water, 12 s, 30% BSA) in male syngenic Wistar rats. Donor rats were killed 4 h posttrauma, and BP was harvested. Burn plasma was transferred to healthy animals by continuous intravenous infusion in three types of dilution (100%, 10%, and 1%). Positive controls were directly examined 4 h after thermal injury, and negative control rats had a continuous infusion done with sham burn (SB) plasma (37 degrees C water, 12 s, 30% BSA). Afterwards, intravital fluorescence microscopy was performed in postcapillary mesenteric venules at 0, 60, and 120 min. Edema formation was assessed by relative changes over time in fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-albumin in the intravascular versus the extravascular space. The interactions of leucocytes and endothelium were evaluated by quantification of leukocyte sticking. Additionally, microhemodynamic (volumetric blood flow, erythrocyte velocity, venular wall shear rate, venular diameters) and macrohemodynamic parameters (blood pressure, heart frequency, temperature) were assessed online (arterial catheter). For statistics, an ANOVA was performed with Bonferroni adjustment procedure. Differences were considered significant when P < 0.05. There are no statistically significant differences in microhemodynamics or macrohemodynamics between study groups. Burn plasma infusion and thermal injury lead to significant increases in fluorescein isothiocyanate-albumin extravasation, whereas SB plasma shows no significant changes. Even BP diluted in 0.9% saline (10% and 1%) results in a similar transvascular flux of plasma proteins as direct thermal injury. Differences between positive controls and BP infusion are not significant, whereas all groups are statistically different from the SB group (P<0.05). Leukocyte sticking is significantly increased in all groups except the SB group, and the number of adherent leukocytes is dose dependent. The present study demonstrates that as early as 4 h after thermal injury, there are sufficient factors (e.g., cytokines) in BP to induce systemic burn shock in healthy rats even in diluted plasma (1%). However, the "key" cytokines are not identified at this point. The burned tissue is no longer required for burn shock induction, and the pathophysiologic process seems to be self-perpetuating as early as 4 h posttrauma. Leukocytes are activated by thermal injury and BP infusion. The role of leukocyte-endothelium interactions for edema formation remains uncertain and requires further investigation. PMID:18323747

  19. Review of Burn Research for Year 2014.

    PubMed

    Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina; Greenhalgh, David

    2015-01-01

    Management of burn injuries requires treatments and interventions from many disciplines. Worldwide, burn patients suffer from physical and psychological challenges that impact their lives socially and economically. In this review, we will highlight a handful of the numerous articles published in multiple areas of burn care. The areas of burn care addressed in the article are: epidemiology; burn resuscitation, critical care, and infection; nutrition and metabolism; pain and rehabilitation; prevention and firefighter safety; psychology; and reconstruction and wounds. PMID:26204384

  20. How Does the Ca2+-paradox Injury Induce Contracture in the Heart?—A Combined Study of the Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics and Cell Structures in Perfused Rat Hearts—

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hideo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Ikegawa, Masaya; Dai, Ping; Fujita, Naohisa; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    The calcium (Ca2+)-paradox injury of the heart, induced by restoration of extracellular Ca2+ after its short-term depletion, is known to provoke cardiomyocyte contracture. However, undetermined is how the Ca2+-paradox provokes such a distinctive presentation of myocytes in the heart. To address this, we imaged sequential intracellular Ca2+ dynamics and concomitant structures of the subepicardial ventricular myocytes in fluo3-loaded, Langendorff-perfused rat hearts produced by the Ca2+ paradox. Under rapid-scanning confocal microscopy, repletion of Ca2+ following its depletion produced high-frequency Ca2+ waves in individual myocytes with asynchronous localized contractions, resulting in contracture within 10 min. Such alterations of myocytes were attenuated by 5-mM NiCl2, but not by verapamil, SEA0400, or combination of ryanodine and thapsigargin, indicating a contribution of non-specific transmembrane Ca2+ influx in the injury. However, saponin-induced membrane permeabilization of Ca2+ showed no apparent contracture despite the emergence of high-frequency Ca2+ waves, indicating an essential role of myocyte-myocyte and myocyte-extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical connections in the Ca2+ paradox. In immunohistochemistry Ca2+ depletion produced separation of the intercalated disc that expresses cadherin and dissipation of ?-dystroglycan located along the sarcolemma. Taken together, along with the trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx, disruption of cell-cell and cell-ECM connections is essential for contracture in the Ca2+-paradox injury. PMID:25861132

  1. Large arcuate scars: A geological legacy of the Earth's accretionary past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saul, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Immediately following accretion, the surface of the Earth was densely patterned with circular scars which were the surface expressions of 3-D craterform structures. In the course of geological time these structures would have become less and less visible due to the workings of the Earth's atmosphere, surface waters, and plate tectonics regime but there is no compelling reason to assume that they have been entirely eradicated. Furthermore, a very imperfect analogy with the other inner planets suggests that geological processes may not in fact be capable of totally erasing such deep features. Some illustrative examples of arcuate scars are discussed.

  2. Microvascular changes during acne lesion initiation and scarring is revealed in vivo using optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Li, Yuandong; Choi, Woo J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Acne is a common skin disease in society and often leads to scarring. In this paper, we demonstrate the capabilities of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) in detecting specific features of acne lesion initiation and scarring on human facial skin in vivo over 30 days. Optical microangiography (OMAG) technique made it possible to image 3D tissue microvasculature changes up to 1 mm depth in vivo without the need of exogenous contrast agents in ~10 seconds. The presented results show promise to facilitate clinical trials of treatment and prognosis of acne vulgaris by detecting cutaneous microvasculature and structural changes within human skin in vivo.

  3. Astronomy and Astrophysics from Antarctica: a new SCAR Scientific Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, J. W. V.

    2010-11-01

    In July 2008 the IAU became a union member of the ICSU body SCAR—the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. At the same time, SCAR initiated a Planning Group to establish a Scientific Research Program in Astronomy and Astrophysics from Antarctica. Broadly stated, the objectives of Astronomy and Astrophysics from Antarctica are to coordinate astronomical activities in Antarctica in a way that ensures the best possible outcomes from international investment in Antarctic astronomy, and maximizes the opportunities for productive interaction with other disciplines.

  4. [Results of cryosurgery in 394 patients with hypertrophic scars and keloids].

    PubMed

    Ernst, K; Hundeiker, M

    1995-07-01

    Cryosurgery with liquid nitrogen led to total or partial success in 64% of 336 patients with keloids and in 82% of 58 persons with hypertrophic scars. In 11% and 3% of the patients, respectively, the results were disappointing. In 19% and 12%, patients broke off the painful and long-term therapy. Nonetheless, in view of the results of other therapeutic methods, we prefer cryosurgery (either as monotherapy or combined with corticoids or conventional surgery) for keloids. For hypertrophic scars, however, the therapy is restricted to exceptional cases since nearly all lesions regress spontaneously within a few years. PMID:7672984

  5. Mating scars reveal mate size in immature female blue shark Prionace glauca.

    PubMed

    Calich, H J; Campana, S E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the size and maturity status of the male blue sharks Prionace glauca attempting to mate with small, immature females in the north-west Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between male curved fork length (LFC ) and jaw gape was used in conjunction with the diameter of the mating scar to estimate the LFC and infer the maturity status of the male shark that produced the mating scar. The results indicate that mature males with a mean ± s.d. LFC of 218 cm ± 23 cm were attempting to mate with sexually immature females. PMID:25903032

  6. Ontogeny of the skin and the transition from scar-free to scarring phenotype during wound healing in the pouch young of a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J R; Ferguson, M W

    1995-05-01

    The marsupial Monodelphis domestica provides a versatile model for the study of "fetal" wound healing. The pouch young of this species have been used to perform a systematic histological study of wound healing and skin development throughout pouch life; from Pouch Day 0 to Pouch Day 30 with comparisons drawn against adults. We have demonstrated that pouch young heal without macroscopic scars if wounded before Pouch Day 9 and that a transition into a scarring healing phenotype occurs around the ninth pouch day. The inflammatory reaction of wounds and aspects of skin differentiation such as dermal collagen organisation, adipose layer development, hair follicle growth, and epithelial maturation have been documented using simple ranking scales to highlight trends through pouch life. Inflammation was noted to become prominent after Pouch Day 9. There was also a general temporal correlation between the other aspects of differentiation and the transition into a scarring phenotype. It is concluded that although fetal wounds may have different cytokine profiles due to the differences of inflammatory reaction compared to adults, other aspects of skin development play a role in determining the healing phenotype. PMID:7750642

  7. Telemedicine and burns: an overview.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Dibo, S A; Janom, H H

    2014-06-30

    Access to specialized burn care is becoming more difficult and is being restricted by the decreasing number of specialized burn centers. It is also limited by distance and resources for many patients, particularly those living in poverty or in rural medically underserved communities. Telemedicine is a rapidly evolving technology related to the practice of medicine at a distance through rapid access to remote medical expertise by telecommunication and information technologies. Feasibility of telemedicine in burn care has been demonstrated by various centers. Its use facilitates the delivery of care to patients with burn injuries of all sizes. It allows delivery of acute care and can be appropriately used for a substantial portion of the long-term management of patients after a burn by guiding less-experienced surgeons to treat and follow-up patients more appropriately. Most importantly, it allows better effective triage which reduces unnecessary time and resource demanding referrals that might overwhelm system capacities. However, there are still numerous barriers to the implementation of telemedicine, including technical difficulties, legal uncertainties, limited financial support, reimbursement issues, and an inadequate evidence base of its value and efficiency. PMID:26170782

  8. Diffusion, capture and recycling of SCAR/WAVE and Arp2/3 complexes observed in cells by single-

    E-print Network

    Weiner, Orion

    Diffusion, capture and recycling of SCAR/WAVE and Arp2/3 complexes observed in cells by single, ongoing actin polymerization facilitates recycling of SCAR/WAVE and Arp2/3 complexes. Key words: Actin data from these techniques can hide local differences in actin assembly, researchers have recently used

  9. Post-oak fire scars as a function of diameter, growth, and tree age Richard P. Guyette*

    E-print Network

    Stambaugh, Michael C

    , and ecological information about historic fires. Fire scars, commonly located at the base of the tree tree-ring data from many trees from the same site can increase the length of the fire history recordPost-oak fire scars as a function of diameter, growth, and tree age Richard P. Guyette* , Michael C

  10. Anti-Fibrotic Actions of Interleukin-10 against Hypertrophic Scarring by Activation of PI3K/AKT and STAT3 Signaling Pathways in Scar-Forming Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weixia; Bai, Xiaozhi; Fang, Xiaobing; Hu, Xiaolong; Wang, Yaojun; Wang, Hongtao; Zheng, Zhao; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai; Zhu, Xiongxiang

    2014-01-01

    Background The hypertrophic scar (HS) is a serious fibrotic skin condition and a major clinical problem. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) has been identified as a prospective scar-improving compound based on preclinical trials. Our previous work showed that IL-10 has anti-fibrotic effects in transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1-stimulated fibroblasts, as well as potential therapeutic benefits for the prevention and reduction of scar formation. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying IL-10-mediated anti-fibrotic and scar-improvement actions. Objective To explore the expression of the IL-10 receptor in human HS tissue and primary HS fibroblasts (HSFs), and the molecular mechanisms contributing to the anti-fibrotic and scar-improvement capabilities of IL-10. Methods Expression of the IL-10 receptor was assessed in HS tissue and HSFs by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and polymerase chain reaction analysis. Primary HSFs were treated with IL-10, a specific phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) or a function-blocking antibody against the IL-10 receptor (IL-10RB). Next, Western blot analysis was used to evaluate changes in the phosphorylation status of AKT and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) 3, as well as the expression levels of fibrosis-related proteins. Results HS tissue and primary HSFs were characterized by expression of the IL-10 receptor and by high expression of fibrotic markers relative to normal controls. Primary HSFs expressed the IL-10 receptor, while IL-10 induced AKT and STAT3 phosphorylation in these cells. In addition, LY294002 blocked AKT and STAT phosphorylation, and also up-regulated expression levels of type I and type III collagen (Col 1 and Col 3) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) in IL-10-treated cells. Similarly, IL-10RB reduced STAT3/AKT phosphorylation and blocked the IL-10-mediated mitigation of fibrosis in HSFs. Conclusion IL-10 apparently inhibits fibrosis by activating AKT and STAT3 phosphorylation downstream of the IL-10 receptor, and by facilitating crosstalk between the PI3K/AKT and STAT3 signal transduction pathways. PMID:24878845

  11. Droplet burning at zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Questions of the importance and feasibility of performing experiments on droplet burning at zero gravity in Spacelab were studied. Information on the physics and chemistry of droplet combustion, with attention directed specifically to the chemical kinetics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics of the phenomena involved, are presented. The work was divided into three phases, the justification, the feasibility, and the conceptual development of a preliminary design. Results from the experiments performed revealed a few new facts concerning droplet burning, notably burning rates in excess of theoretical prediction and a phenomenon of flash extinction, both likely traceable to accumulation of carbon produced by gas-phase pyrolysis in the fuel-rich zone enclosed by the reaction surface. These experiments also showed that they were primarily due to timing difficulties.

  12. Burn Control Mechanisms in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Maxwell; Stacey, Weston

    2013-10-01

    Burn control and passive safety in accident scenarios will be an important design consideration in future tokamaks, especially those used as a neutron source for fusion-fission hybrid reactors, such as the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor (SABR) concept. At Georgia Tech, we are developing a new burning plasma dynamics code to investigate passive safety mechanisms that could prevent power excursions in tokamak reactors. This code solves the coupled set of balance equations governing burning plasmas in conjunction with a two-point SOL-divertor model. Predictions have been benchmarked against data from DIII-D. We are examining several potential negative feedback mechanisms to limit power excursions: i) ion-orbit loss, ii) thermal instabilities, iii) the degradation of alpha-particle confinement resulting from ripples in the toroidal field, iv) modifications to the radial current profile, v) ``divertor choking'' and vi) Type 1 ELMs.

  13. Nutrition in Burns: Galveston Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Noe A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Williams, Felicia N.; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive nutrition support is recommended following severe burn injury. Initially, such injury results in a prolonged and persistent hypermetabolic response mediated by a 10- to 20-fold elevation in plasma catecholamines, cortisol, and inflammatory mediators. This response leads to twice-normal metabolic rates, whole-body catabolism, muscle wasting, and severe cachexia. Thus, it is relevant to review the literature on nutrition in burns to adjust/update treatment. Failure to meet the increased substrate requirements may result in impaired wound healing, multiorgan dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infection, and death. Therefore, aggressive nutrition support is essential to ensure adequate burn care, attenuate the hypermetabolic response, optimize wound healing, minimize devastating catabolism, and reduce morbidity and mortality. Here, the authors provide nutrition recommendations gained from prospective trials, retrospective analyses, and expert opinions based on the authors' practices in Galveston, Texas, and Vienna, Austria. PMID:21975669

  14. Unemployment scarring by gender: Human capital depreciation or stigmatization? Longitudinal evidence from the Netherlands, 1980-2000.

    PubMed

    Mooi-Reci, Irma; Ganzeboom, Harry B

    2015-07-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Dutch Labor Force Supply Panel (OSA), this article examines how unemployment scarring (i.e., wage setbacks following unemployment) and its underlying mechanisms operate across gender in the Netherlands over the period 1985-2000. A series of fixed effect panel models that correct for unobserved heterogeneity, reveal a notable disparity in unemployment scarring by gender. Interestingly, while unemployment scarring is short-lived and partly conditional upon human capital differences among women, it is strongly persistent among men and contingent upon old age, ethnicity, and tight economic conditions. Our findings provide new evidence regarding unemployment scarring by gender while they support the hypothesis that among women the effects of unemployment scarring are predominantly driven by human capital depreciation, while among men stigma effects dominate. PMID:26004486

  15. Treating acne scars in patients with Fitzpatrick skin types IV to VI using the 1450-nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Semchyshyn, Natalie; Prodanovic, Edward; Varade, Reena

    2013-07-01

    Individuals with Fitzpatrick skin types IV to VI are becoming a larger proportion of our patient base. Although acne scarring can be difficult to treat in all skin types, it presents a greater challenge in darker skin types due to an increased risk for scarring and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). Few studies have focused on infrared laser treatment of acne scarring in darker skin types. In this study, we assess the efficacy and side-effect profile of a 1450-nm diode laser for the treatment of acne scars in participants with Fitzpatrick skin types IV to VI. Our findings show the nonablative 1450-nm diode laser to be safe and effective in improving the appearance of atrophic acne scars in darker skin types. Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation was a common occurrence. PMID:23961527

  16. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Imaging for Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification in Patients with Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chattranukulchai, Pairoj

    2015-01-01

    In patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), risk stratification for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and selection of patients who would benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillators remains challenging. We aim to discuss the evidence of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial scar for the prediction of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in NICM. From the 15 studies analyzed, with a total of 2747 patients, the average prevalence of myocardial scar was 41%. In patients with myocardial scar, the risk for adverse cardiac events was more than 3-fold higher, and risk for arrhythmic events 5-fold higher, as compared to patients without scar. Based on the available observational, single center studies, CMR scar assessment may be a promising new tool for SCD risk stratification, which merits further investigation. PMID:26175568

  17. De Novo Mutations in NALCN Cause a Syndrome Characterized by Congenital Contractures of the Limbs and Face, Hypotonia, and Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; Armenteros, Jose R.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Nkinsi, Naomi T.; Boyle, Evan A.; Berry, Margaret N.; Bocian, Maureen; Foulds, Nicola; Uzielli, Maria Luisa Giovannucci; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Kaplan, Paige; Kline, Antonie D.; Mercer, Catherine L.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Klein Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S.; McPherson, Elizabeth W.; Moreno, Regina A.; Scheuerle, Angela E.; Shashi, Vandana; Stevens, Cathy A.; Carey, John C.; Monteil, Arnaud; Lory, Philippe; Tabor, Holly K.; Smith, Joshua D.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, or distal arthrogryposis type 2A (DA2A), is an autosomal-dominant condition caused by mutations in MYH3 and characterized by multiple congenital contractures of the face and limbs and normal cognitive development. We identified a subset of five individuals who had been putatively diagnosed with “DA2A with severe neurological abnormalities” and for whom congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and global developmental delay had resulted in early death in three cases; this is a unique condition that we now refer to as CLIFAHDD syndrome. Exome sequencing identified missense mutations in the sodium leak channel, non-selective (NALCN) in four families affected by CLIFAHDD syndrome. We used molecular-inversion probes to screen for NALCN in a cohort of 202 distal arthrogryposis (DA)-affected individuals as well as concurrent exome sequencing of six other DA-affected individuals, thus revealing NALCN mutations in ten additional families with “atypical” forms of DA. All 14 mutations were missense variants predicted to alter amino acid residues in or near the S5 and S6 pore-forming segments of NALCN, highlighting the functional importance of these segments. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that NALCN alterations nearly abolished the expression of wild-type NALCN, suggesting that alterations that cause CLIFAHDD syndrome have a dominant-negative effect. In contrast, homozygosity for mutations in other regions of NALCN has been reported in three families affected by an autosomal-recessive condition characterized mainly by hypotonia and severe intellectual disability. Accordingly, mutations in NALCN can cause either a recessive or dominant condition characterized by varied though overlapping phenotypic features, perhaps based on the type of mutation and affected protein domain(s). PMID:25683120

  18. A novel TNNI2 mutation causes Freeman-Sheldon syndrome in a Chinese family with an affected adult with only facial contractures.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefu; Jiang, Miao; Han, Weitian; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Wei; Sui, Yu; Lu, Yongping; Li, Jianxin

    2013-09-25

    Distal arthrogryposes (DAs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by congenital contractures with predominant involvement of the hands and feet, can be classified into at least 12 different forms. These autosomal dominant disorders are of variable expressivity and reduced penetrance. Mutations in sarcomeric protein genes, including troponin I2 (TNNI2), troponin T3 (TNNT3), tropomyosin 2 (TPM2), embryonic myosin heavy chain 3 (MYH3), and myosin binding protein C1 (MYBPC1), have been identified in distal arthrogryposis type 1 (DA1, MIM 108120), type 2B (DA2B, MIM 601680) and type 2A (DA2A)/Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS, MIM 193700). However, mutations causing FSS have only been reported in MYH3. Herein we describe a Chinese DA family whose members meet classical strict criteria for FSS, as well as one member of the family who has isolated facial features consistent with FSS. No disease-causing mutation was found in MYH3. Segregation of microsatellite markers flanking the TNNI2 and TNNT3 genes at 11p15.5 was compatible with linkage. Subsequent sequencing of TNNI2 revealed a novel mutation, c.A493T (p.I165F), located in the C-terminal region, which is critical for proper protein function. This mutation was found to cosegregate with the FSS phenotype in this family, and assessment using SIFT and PolyPhen-2 predicted a damaging effect. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first TNNI2 mutation in classical FSS and describe an atypical adult FSS case with only facial contractures resulting from somatic mosaicism. We infer that DA1, DA2B and FSS represent a phenotypic continuum of the same disorder and provide further genetic evidence for this hypothesis. PMID:23850728

  19. De novo mutations in NALCN cause a syndrome characterized by congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; McMillin, Margaret J; Shively, Kathryn M; Beck, Anita E; Marvin, Colby T; Armenteros, Jose R; Buckingham, Kati J; Nkinsi, Naomi T; Boyle, Evan A; Berry, Margaret N; Bocian, Maureen; Foulds, Nicola; Uzielli, Maria Luisa Giovannucci; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kaplan, Paige; Kline, Antonie D; Mercer, Catherine L; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Klein Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Moreno, Regina A; Scheuerle, Angela E; Shashi, Vandana; Stevens, Cathy A; Carey, John C; Monteil, Arnaud; Lory, Philippe; Tabor, Holly K; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, or distal arthrogryposis type 2A (DA2A), is an autosomal-dominant condition caused by mutations in MYH3 and characterized by multiple congenital contractures of the face and limbs and normal cognitive development. We identified a subset of five individuals who had been putatively diagnosed with "DA2A with severe neurological abnormalities" and for whom congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and global developmental delay had resulted in early death in three cases; this is a unique condition that we now refer to as CLIFAHDD syndrome. Exome sequencing identified missense mutations in the sodium leak channel, non-selective (NALCN) in four families affected by CLIFAHDD syndrome. We used molecular-inversion probes to screen for NALCN in a cohort of 202 distal arthrogryposis (DA)-affected individuals as well as concurrent exome sequencing of six other DA-affected individuals, thus revealing NALCN mutations in ten additional families with "atypical" forms of DA. All 14 mutations were missense variants predicted to alter amino acid residues in or near the S5 and S6 pore-forming segments of NALCN, highlighting the functional importance of these segments. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that NALCN alterations nearly abolished the expression of wild-type NALCN, suggesting that alterations that cause CLIFAHDD syndrome have a dominant-negative effect. In contrast, homozygosity for mutations in other regions of NALCN has been reported in three families affected by an autosomal-recessive condition characterized mainly by hypotonia and severe intellectual disability. Accordingly, mutations in NALCN can cause either a recessive or dominant condition characterized by varied though overlapping phenotypic features, perhaps based on the type of mutation and affected protein domain(s). PMID:25683120

  20. Ocular burn from microwaved egg.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P C

    1994-08-01

    Ocular thermal injuries from improper use of a microwave oven are rare. Manufacturers recommend cooking eggs in the microwave only after the shell has been removed and the yolk sac has been pierced with a pin. Failure to follow these instructions is likely to result in ocular and facial burns. Only eight adult cases of such injuries have been documented so far. Ocular burn from the explosion of a microwaved egg in a pediatric patient is being reported for the first time in the English medical literature. PMID:7937303

  1. A comprehensive evidence-based review on the role of topicals and dressings in the management of skin scarring.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing after dermal injury is an imperfect process, inevitably leading to scar formation as the skin re-establishes its integrity. The resulting scars have different characteristics to normal skin, ranging from fine-line asymptomatic scars to problematic scarring including hypertrophic and keloid scars. Scars appear as a different colour to the surrounding skin and can be flat, stretched, depressed or raised, manifesting a range of symptoms including inflammation, erythema, dryness and pruritus, which can result in significant psychosocial impact on patients and their quality of life. In this paper, a comprehensive literature review coupled with an analysis of levels of evidence (LOE) for each published treatment type was conducted. Topical treatments identified include imiquimod, mitomycin C and plant extracts such as onion extract, green tea, Aloe vera, vitamin E and D, applied to healing wounds, mature scar tissue or fibrotic scars following revision surgery, or in combination with other more established treatments such as steroid injections and silicone. In total, 39 articles were included, involving 1703 patients. There was limited clinical evidence to support their efficacy; the majority of articles (n = 23) were ranked as category 4 LOE, being of limited quality with individual flaws, including low patient numbers, poor randomisation, blinding, and short follow-up periods. As trials were performed in different settings, they were difficult to compare. In conclusion, there is an unmet clinical need for effective solutions to skin scarring, more robust long-term randomised trials and a consensus on a standardised treatment regime to address all aspects of scarring. PMID:26044054

  2. The Impact of Post-Acne Scars on the Quality of Life Among Young Adults in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Chuah, Sai Yee; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Post-acne scarring is a common and well-known sequelae of acne vulgaris. We aim to study the impact of post-acne scarring on the quality of life (QOL) among young adults in Singapore. Settings and Design: This was a non-interventional prospective study. Materials and Methods: Patients aged 21-40 years with atrophic and hypertrophic acne scars who attended the National Skin Centre, Singapore were recruited in the study. They answered a simple questionnaire and the clinical severity of their acne scars were assessed by the doctor. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analyses using absolute and percentage frequencies were performed on all data. The test of significance was two-sided and was set at 5% (P ? 0.05). Differential analyses were conducted using the parametric, independent two-sample t-test and non-parametric Mann–Whitney U-test. The statistical assessments were performed using SPSS version 18.0. Results: A total of 100 patients were studied. The mean patients’ subjective self-scoring on the severity of their post-acne scars was 5.78/10 and the mean Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) for post-acne scars was 5.61. Many (36%, n = 36) were self-conscious of their acne scars and 24%, (n = 24) felt that their acne scars was affecting their social activities. Conclusions: Our study showed that post-acne scars have a significant negative effect on the QOL of young adults. It highlights the need to increase public awareness of acne vulgaris and its sequelae through education programs and advocating early treatment to reduce the risk of scarring. PMID:26644739

  3. Conducting a Prescribed Burn and Prescribed Burning Checklist

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasslands of the central Great Plains developed with periodic fire. Prescribed burning is an important tool for managing grasslands to maintain desirable species composition, increase grazing livestock performance, maintain productivity, and control invasive weeds. The safe and effective use of pre...

  4. Scarred Pacific Salmon, Oncorhynchus spp., at Freshwater Recovery Sites in Southeastern Alaska

    E-print Network

    Scarred Pacific Salmon, Oncorhynchus spp., at Freshwater Recovery Sites in Southeastern Alaska SIDNEY G. TAYLOR Introduction Over 500,000 metric tons (t) of Pacific salmon, Oncorhynchus spp., were of more than $600 million, which makes this salmon fishery perhaps the most valuable in the world

  5. Persistent scarring, atrophy, and dyspigmentation in a preteen girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    High, Whitney A; Costner, Melissa I

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is an uncommon autoimmune disease with distinctive cutaneous findings. Descriptions of chronic cutaneous sequelae are rare. We describe a 12-year-old girl with persistent dyspigmentation, scarring, and atrophy as a result of neonatal lupus occurring during infancy. PMID:12664034

  6. Calpastatin overexpression impairs postinfarct scar healing in mice by compromising reparative immune cell recruitment and activation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Feng; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Houssaini, Amal; Abid, Shariq; Czibik, Gabor; Sawaki, Daigo; Marcos, Elisabeth; Dubois-Rande, Jean-Luc; Baud, Laurent; Adnot, Serge; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Gellen, Barnabas

    2015-12-01

    The activation of the calpain system is involved in the repair process following myocardial infarction (MI). However, the impact of the inhibition of calpain by calpastatin, its natural inhibitor, on scar healing and left ventricular (LV) remodeling is elusive. Male mice ubiquitously overexpressing calpastatin (TG) and wild-type (WT) controls were subjected to an anterior coronary artery ligation. Mortality at 6 wk was higher in TG mice (24% in WT vs. 44% in TG, P < 0.05) driven by a significantly higher incidence of cardiac rupture during the first week post-MI, despite comparable infarct size and LV dysfunction and dilatation. Calpain activation post-MI was blunted in TG myocardium. In TG mice, inflammatory cell infiltration and activation were reduced in the infarct zone (IZ), particularly affecting M2 macrophages and CD4(+) T cells, which are crucial for scar healing. To elucidate the role of calpastatin overexpression in macrophages, we stimulated peritoneal macrophages obtained from TG and WT mice in vitro with IL-4, yielding an abrogated M2 polarization in TG but not in WT cells. Lymphopenic Rag1(-/-) mice receiving TG splenocytes before MI demonstrated decreased T-cell recruitment and M2 macrophage activation in the IZ day 5 after MI compared with those receiving WT splenocytes. Calpastatin overexpression prevented the activation of the calpain system after MI. It also impaired scar healing, promoted LV rupture, and increased mortality. Defective scar formation was associated with blunted CD4(+) T-cell and M2-macrophage recruitment. PMID:26453333

  7. Comparative assessment of iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires using an in vitro glial scar assay.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Evon S; Khan, Saida; Newaz, Golam; Zhang, Jinsheng; Auner, Gregory W; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar. Therefore, it is imperative to assess the biocompatibility of materials before employing them in neural electrode fabrication. Platinum alloy and iridium oxide have been identified as good candidates as neural electrode biomaterials due to their mechanical and electrical properties, however, effect of glial scar formation for these two materials is lacking. In this study, we applied a glial scarring assay to observe the cellular reactivity to platinum alloy and iridium oxide wires in order to assess the biocompatibility based on previously defined characteristics. Through real-time PCR, immunostaining and imaging techniques, we will advance the understanding of the biocompatibility of these materials. Results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Cells cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Collectively, these results indicated that platinum alloy wires were more biocompatible than the iridium oxide wires. PMID:23764951

  8. Development of 5Ns chromosome-specific SCAR markers for utilization in future wheat breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Wang, L M; Du, W L; Chen, L G; Liu, S H; Wu, J; Zhao, J X; Yang, Q H; Chen, X H

    2014-06-01

    In previous studies, we developed a wheat-Psathyrostachys huashanica Keng disomic addition line 3-8-10-2, which exhibited high stripe rust resistance and could be used as a donor source for introducing novel disease resistance gene(s) into wheat in future breeding programs. It was identified using cytology, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), EST-SSR, EST-STS and morphological analyses. However, these techniques are not suitable for breeding programs that require the rapid screening of large numbers of genotypes because they are highly technical and time-consuming. In this study, three Ns genome-specific SCAR markers were developed via random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. These SCAR markers were further validated using a complete set of wheat-P. huashanica disomic addition lines, which segregated the 5Ns disomic addition line individuals. Our results indicated that the SCAR markers associated with the 5Ns chromosome of P. huashanica and they provide a low cost, high efficiency, alternative tool for screening 5Ns chromosomes in a wheat background. These newly developed SCAR markers that species-specificity of the markers was proved by analysis of a wide range of cereal species, and specific for 5Ns chromosome, which should be useful in marker-assisted selection for wheat breeders who want to screen genotypes that may contain 5Ns chromatin. PMID:25715460

  9. Development of a SCAR Marker Linked to Male Fertility Traits in `Jinkyool' (Citrus sunki)

    E-print Network

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    Development of a SCAR Marker Linked to Male Fertility Traits in `Jinkyool' (Citrus sunki) Chi Won Chae 1 , Manjul Dutt 2 , Su Hyun Yun 1 , Jae Ho Park 1 and Dong Hoon Lee 1 * 1 Citrus Research Station 2 Citrus Research and Education Center, University of Florida/IFAS, 700 Experiment Station Road

  10. The reinnervation pattern of wounds and scars may explain their sensory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J; Terenghi, G; McGrouther, D A; Ferguson, M W J

    2006-01-01

    Anaesthesia, pruritus and pain are common in cutaneous scars. The reinnervation pattern of healing wounds and scars might help to explain these symptoms, as sensory neurotransmitters are known to be mediators of inflammation and healing. We quantified the regeneration patterns of blood vessels and nerves in excisional skin wounds as they matured into scars. Mice underwent 1cm(2) full thickness skin excisions. Wounds were harvested between five and 84 days. Sections underwent immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) a pan-neuronal marker, and the sensory neuropeptides calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). The endothelial marker von Willebrand factor (VWF) was used to allow co-localisation and quantification of blood vessels. Nerve fibre density was quantified at multiple sites within wounds. There was no difference in the reinnervation/revascularisation pattern between peripheral and central sites. The density of PGP9.5, CGRP, SP and VWF peaked between 14 and 42 days, and levels of PGP9.5, CGRP and VWF all decreased to approximately those found in unwounded skin by 84 days (mature scar). SP levels, however, remained elevated at approximately twice the density found in unwounded skin. Increased densities of SP and CGRP in healing wounds could explain the unpleasant sensory symptoms of healing wounds. PMID:16920586

  11. Inactivation of Salmonella on tomato stem scars by edible chitosan and organic acid coatings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the efficacy of antimicrobial coatings on inactivation of Salmonella on the surface of tomato stem scars, which was inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella (S. Montevideo. S. Newport. S. Saintpaul, and S. Typhimurium) and coated with acid-chitosan solutions. The ...

  12. Landslide Scar Geometry Effect on Flow Spreading: Application to Martian Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, A.; Mangeney, A.; Mège, D.; Bouchut, F.

    2009-03-01

    The geometry of the landslide scar may play a role mass spreading but it is usually unknown. Numerical tests have been performed so as to figure out this effect. Application to martian cases and implications in terms of mass balance will be discussed.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Adjunct to Ultrasound in Evaluating Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rebecca; Klein, Michelle A.; Mahboob, Sabrina; Gupta, Mala; Katz, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are a relatively rare form of ectopic pregnancy in which the embryo is implanted within the fibrous scar of a previous cesarean section. A greater number of cases of CSPs are currently being reported as the rates of cesarean section are increasing globally and as detection of scar pregnancy has improved with use of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) with color Doppler imaging. Delayed diagnosis and management of this potentially life-threatening condition may result in complications, predominantly uterine rupture and hemorrhage with significant potential maternal morbidity. Diagnosis of a cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) requires a high index of clinical suspicion, as up to 40% of patients may be asymptomatic. TVUS has a reported sensitivity of 84.6% and has become the imaging examination of choice for diagnosis of a CSP. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used in a small number of patients as an adjunct to TVUS. In the present report, MRI is highlighted as a problem-solving tool capable of more precisely identifying the relationship of a CSP to adjacent structures, thereby providing additional information critical to directing appropriate patient management and therapy. PMID:23814688

  14. Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) fire scars reveal new details of a frequent fire regime

    E-print Network

    Stambaugh, Michael C

    these ideas, little quantitative data exist that document frequent fire events (e.g., 3 yr) prior to major ecosystem processes, designing scientifi- cally-based fire management objectives and explaining the ecologyLongleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) fire scars reveal new details of a frequent fire regime

  15. Zigzag Skin Incision Effectively Camouflages the Scar and Alopecia for Moyamoya Disease: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    SANADA, Yasuhiro; YABUUCHI, Tomonari; YOSHIOKA, Hiromasa; KUBOTA, Hisashi; KATO, Amami

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is commonly diagnosed in children, and requires various vascular reconstruction to improve symptoms. Therefore, scar widening and hair loss after craniotomy, which sometimes occurs in this disease, are serious problems for patients. A variety of plastic surgical techniques in scalp have been reported to minimize the scar widening and hair loss. However, any neurosurgical reports describing this purpose have never been published for moyamoya disease. The objective of this study was to investigate whether these plastic surgical techniques could be applied to bypass surgery without any compromise of vascular reconstruction for moyamoya disease. We performed direct and indirect vascular reconstruction in six hemispheres of moyamoya disease patients not only in the middle cerebral artery territory but also in the anterior cerebral artery territory. The scalp incision was designed not parallel to the hair stream, and the bevelled incision was conducted not to jeopardize the hair follicles. The scar and hair loss were effectively camouflaged throughout the postoperative period in all cases. This study demonstrates that our design of scalp incision achieve effective vascular reconstruction and obscure the scar and hair loss. PMID:25739436

  16. Control of Scar Tissue Formation in the Cornea: Strategies in Clinical and Corneal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samantha L.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Yang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Corneal structure is highly organized and unified in architecture with structural and functional integration which mediates transparency and vision. Disease and injury are the second most common cause of blindness affecting over 10 million people worldwide. Ninety percent of blindness is permanent due to scarring and vascularization. Scarring caused via fibrotic cellular responses, heals the tissue, but fails to restore transparency. Controlling keratocyte activation and differentiation are key for the inhibition and prevention of fibrosis. Ophthalmic surgery techniques are continually developing to preserve and restore vision but corneal regression and scarring are often detrimental side effects and long term continuous follow up studies are lacking or discouraging. Appropriate corneal models may lead to a reduced need for corneal transplantation as presently there are insufficient numbers or suitable tissue to meet demand. Synthetic optical materials are under development for keratoprothesis although clinical use is limited due to implantation complications and high rejection rates. Tissue engineered corneas offer an alternative which more closely mimic the morphological, physiological and biomechanical properties of native corneas. However, replication of the native collagen fiber organization and retaining the phenotype of stromal cells which prevent scar-like tissue formation remains a challenge. Careful manipulation of culture environments are under investigation to determine a suitable environment that simulates native ECM organization and stimulates keratocyte migration and generation. PMID:24955637

  17. Evaluation of ball and disk wear scar data in the HFRR lubricity test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high-frequency reciprocating rig (HFRR) lubricity tester has become a widespread method for determining the lubricity of diesel fuels. The test is a ball-on-disk method, in which a steel ball scrapes over a steel disk immersed in the liquid to be tested. According to standards the wear scar ge...

  18. Proteoglycans of uterine fibroids and keloid scars: similarity in their proteoglycan composition.

    PubMed

    Carrino, David A; Mesiano, Sam; Barker, Nichole M; Hurd, William W; Caplan, Arnold I

    2012-04-15

    Fibrosis is the formation of excess and abnormal fibrous connective tissue as a result of either a reparative or reactive process. A defining feature of connective tissue is its extracellular matrix, which provides structural support and also influences cellular activity. Two common human conditions that result from fibrosis are uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) and keloid scars. Because these conditions share a number of similarities and because their growth is due primarily to excessive extracellular matrix deposition, we compared the proteoglycans of uterine fibroids and keloid scars with corresponding normal tissues. Our analysis indicates that uterine fibroids and keloid scars contain higher amounts of glycosaminoglycans relative to normal myometrium and normal adult skin respectively. Proteoglycan composition is also different in the fibrotic tissues. Compared with unaffected tissues, uterine fibroids and keloid scars contain higher relative amounts of versican and lower relative amounts of decorin. There is also evidence for a higher level of versican catabolism in the fibrotic tissues compared with unaffected tissues. These qualitative and quantitative proteoglycan differences may play a role in the expansion of these fibroses and in their excessive matrix deposition and matrix disorganization, due to effects on cell proliferation, TGF (transforming growth factor)-? signalling and/or collagen fibril formation. PMID:22257180

  19. Principles of microvascular reconstruction in burn and electrical burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, S; Köller, M; Dragu, A; Germann, G; Sauerbier, M

    2005-02-01

    Free tissue transplantation is a rarely indicated procedure in burn reconstruction. As the versatility and variability of free flaps have significantly developed during recent years, so have the indications for this procedure expanded. This study reports retrospectively the results of 75 free flaps in 60 severely burned patients using 20 different free flaps. This experience enabled us to establish reconstructive principles pertinent to the type of injury (burn versus high voltage injuries) and the timing of reconstruction procedures. In high voltage injuries (n = 26) early free flap coverage (<21 days after trauma) with muscular flaps was the most frequently used type of reconstruction. Reconstruction site was predominantly the upper extremity and forearm. In burn injuries (flame, contact, fluid), free flap coverage was performed during a later stage of the treatment course (3-6 weeks after trauma), or as a secondary procedure. Reconstruction with cutaneous flaps was the preferred method. In contrast to high voltage injuries, the trunk and the face were also recipient sites. In the upper extremity, the elbow and dorsum of the hand were the most frequent sites of reconstruction. Overall, the flap failure rate was 13% (n = 10). We were able to show a relationship between flap failure rate and timing of the procedure. Eight out of 10 flap failures occurred within 5-21 days after trauma, all 10-flap failures occurred between 5 days and 6 weeks. No flap failure occurred during secondary reconstruction. For the reconstruction of complex or large defects (n = 14), we recommended combined 'chimeric' flaps, pre-expansion of free flaps, or the combination of a free and local flap. Our data demonstrate that burn and high voltage injuries are distinct entities, each requiring custom tailored reconstructive solution. PMID:15639372

  20. Assessment of Anti-Scarring Therapies in Ex Vivo Organ Cultured Rabbit Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Sriniwas; Gibson, Daniel; Robinson, Paulette; Pi, Liya; Tuli, Sonal; Lewin, Alfred S.; Schultz, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The effects of a triple combination of siRNAs targeting key scarring genes was assessed using an ex vivo organ culture model of excimer ablated rabbit corneas. The central 6 mm diameter region of fresh rabbit globes was ablated to a depth of 155 microns with an excimer laser. Corneas were excised, cultured at the air-liquid interface in defined culture medium supplemented with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1), and treated with either 1% prednisolone acetate or with 22.5 ?M cationic nanoparticles complexed with a triple combination of siRNAs (NP-siRNA) targeting TGFB1, TGFB Receptor (TGFBR2) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Scar formation was measured using image analysis of digital images and levels of smooth muscle actin (SMA) were assessed in ablated region of corneas using qRT-PCR and immunostaining. Ex vivo cultured corneas developed intense haze-like scar in the wounded areas and levels of mRNAs for pro-fibrotic genes were significantly elevated 3 to 8 fold in wounded tissue compared to unablated corneas. Treatment with NP-siRNA or steroid significantly reduced quantitative haze levels by 55% and 68%, respectively, and reduced SMA mRNA and immunohistostaining. This ex vivo corneal culture system reproduced key molecular patterns of corneal scarring and haze formation generated in rabbits. Treatment with NP-siRNAs targeting key scarring genes or an anti-inflammatory steroid reduced corneal haze and SMA mRNA and protein. PMID:24971495