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Sample records for burner rig combustion

  1. Material response from Mach 0.3 burner rig combustion of a coal-oil mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Calfo, F. D.; Kohl, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    Wedge shaped specimens were exposed to the combustion gases of a Mach 0.3 burner rig fueled with a mixture of 40 weight percent micron size coal particles dispersed in No. 2 fuel oil. Exposure temperature was about 900 C and the test duration was about 44 one hour cycles. The alloys tested were the nickel base superalloys, IN-100, U-700 and IN-792, and the cobalt base superalloy, Mar-M509. The deposits on the specimens were analyzed and the extent of corrosion/erosion was measured. The chemical compositions of the deposits were compared with the predictions from an equilibrium thermodynamic analysis. The experimental results were in very good agreement with the predictions.

  2. Deposition and material response from Mach 0.3 burner rig combustion of SRC 2 fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Fryburg, G. C.; Johnson, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Collectors at 1173K (900 C) were exposed to the combustion products of a Mach 0.3 burner rig fueled with various industrial turbine liquid fuels from solvent refined coals. Four fuels were employed: a naphtha, a light oil, a wash solvent and a mid-heavy distillate blend. The response of four superalloys (IN-100, U 700, IN 792 and M-509) to exposure to the combustion gases from the SRC-2 naphtha and resultant deposits was also determined. The SRC-2 fuel analysis and insights obtained during the combustion experience are discussed. Particular problems encountered were fuel instability and reactions of the fuel with hardware components. The major metallic elements which contributed to the deposits were copper, iron, chromium, calcium, aluminum, nickel, silicon, titanium, zinc, and sodium. The deposits were found to be mainly metal oxides. An equilibrium thermodynamic analysis was employed to predict the chemical composition of the deposits. The agreement between the predicted and observed compounds was excellent. No hot corrosion was observed. This was expected because the deposits contained very little sodium or potassium and consisted mainly of the unreactive oxides. However, the amounts of deposits formed indicated that fouling is a potential problem with the use of these fuels.

  3. Deposition of Na2SO4 from salt-seeded combustion gases of a high velocity burner rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    With a view to developing simulation criteria for the laboratory testing of high-temperature materials for gas turbine engines, the deposition rates of sodium sulfate from sodium salt-seeded combustion gases were determined experimentally using a well instrumented high-velocity burner. In the experiments, Na2SO4, NaCl, NaNO3, and simulated sea salt solutions were injected into the combustor of the Mach 0.3 burner rig operating at constant fuel/air ratios. The deposits formed on an inert rotating collector were then weighed and analyzed. The experimental results are compared to Rosner's vapor diffusion theory. Some additional test results, including droplet size distribution of an atomized salt spray, are used in interpreting the deposition rate data.

  4. Deposition of Na2SO4 from salt-seeded combustion gases of a high velocity burner rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    The mechanism of deposition of Na2SO4 was studied under controlled laboratory conditions and the results have been compared to a recently developed comprehensive theory of vapor deposition. Thus Na2SO4, NaCl, NaNO3 and simulated sea salt solutions were injected into the combustor of a nominal Mach 0.3 burner rig burning jet fuel at constant fuel/air ratios. The deposits formed on inert collectors, rotation in the cross flow of the combustion gases, were weighed and analyzed. Collector temperature was uniform and could be varied over a large range by internal air cooling. Deposition rates and dew point temperatures were determined. Supplemental testing included droplet size measurements of the atomized salt solutions. These tests along with thermodynamic and transport calculations were utilized in the interpretation of the deposition results.

  5. Deposition of Na2SO4 from salt-seeded combustion gases of a high velocity burner rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of deposition of Na2SO4 was studied under controlled laboratory conditions and the results have been compared to a recently developed comprehensive theory of vapor deposition. Thus Na2SO4, NaCl, NaNO3 and simulated sea salt solutions were injected into the combustor of a nominal Mach 0.3 burner rig burning jet fuel at constant fuel/air ratios. The deposits formed on inert collectors, rotation in the cross flow of the combustion gases, were weighed and analyzed. Collector temperature was uniform and could be varied over a large range by internal air cooling. Deposition rates and dew point temperatures were determined. Supplemental testing included droplet size measurements of the atomized salt solutions. These tests along with thermodynamic and transport calculations were utilized in the interpretation of the deposition results.

  6. Experimental and theoretical deposition rates from salt-seeded combustion gases of a Mach 0.3 burner rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Deposition rates on platinum-rhodium cylindrical collectors rotating in the cross streams of the combustion gases of a salt-seeded Mach 0.3 burner rig were determined. The collectors were internally air cooled so that their surface temperatures could be widely varied while they were exposed to constant combustion gas temperatures. The deposition rates were compared with those predicted by the chemically frozen boundary layer (CFBL) computer program, which is based on multicomponent vapor transport through the boundary layer. Excellent agreement was obtained between theory and experiment for the NaCl-seeded case, but the agreement lessened as the seed was changed to synthetic sea salt, NaNO3, and K2SO4, respectively, and was particularly poor in the case of Na2SO4. However, when inertial impaction was assumed to be the deposition mechanism for the Na2SO4 case, the predicted rates agreed well with the experimental rates. The former were calculated from a mean particle diameter that was derived from the measured intial droplet size distribution of the solution spray. Critical experiments showed that liquid phase deposits were blown off the smooth surface of the platinum-rhodium collectors by the aerodynamic shear forces of the high-velocity combustion gases but that rough or porous surfaces retained their liquid deposits.

  7. Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Researchers from the NASA Lewis Research Center have obtained the first combustion/emissions data under extreme future engine operating conditions. In Lewis' new world-class 60-atm combustor research facility--the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR)--a flametube was used to conduct combustion experiments in environments as extreme as 900 psia and 3400 F. The greatest challenge for combustion researchers is the uncertainty of the effects of pressure on the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Consequently, U.S. engine manufacturers are using these data to guide their future combustor designs. The flametube's metal housing has an inside diameter of 12 in. and a length of 10.5 in. The flametube can be used with a variety of different flow paths. Each flow path is lined with a high-temperature, castable refractory material (alumina) to minimize heat loss. Upstream of the flametube is the injector section, which has an inside diameter of 13 in. and a length of 0.5-in. It was designed to provide for quick changeovers. This flametube is being used to provide all U.S. engine manufacturers early assessments of advanced combustion concepts at full power conditions prior to engine production. To date, seven concepts from engine manufacturers have been evaluated and improved. This collaborated development can potentially give U.S. engine manufacturers the competitive advantage of being first in the market with advanced low-emission technologies.

  8. Experimental verification of vapor deposition model in Mach 0.3 burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical framework of deposition from combustion gases was developed covering the spectrum of various mass delivery mechanisms including vapor, thermophoretically enhanced small particle, and inertially impacting large particle deposition. Rational yet simple correlations were provided to facilitate engineering surface arrival rate predictions. Experimental verification of the deposition theory was validated using burner rigs. Toward this end, a Mach 0.3 burner rig apparatus was designed to measure deposition rates from salt-seeded combustion gases on an internally cooled cylindrical collector.

  9. Experimental verification of vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Santoro, Gilbert J.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective has been the experimental verification of the corrosive vapor deposition theory in high-temperature, high-velocity environments. Towards this end a Mach 0.3 burner-rig appartus was built to measure deposition rates from salt-seeded (mostly Na salts) combustion gases on the internally cooled cylindrical collector. Deposition experiments are underway.

  10. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  11. Thermal barrier coatings: Burner rig hot corrosion test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Stecura, S.; Gedwill, M. A.; Zaplatynsky, I.; Levine, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    A Mach 0.3 burner rig test program was conducted to examine the sensitivity of thermal barrier coatings to Na and V contaminated combustion gases simulating potential utility gas turbine environments. Coating life of the standard ZrO2-12Y2O3/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y NASA thermal barrier coating system which was developed for aircraft gas turbines was significantly reduced in such environments. Two thermal barrier coating systems, Ca2SiO4/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y and ZrO2-8Y2O3/Ni-16.4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y and a less insulative cermet coating system, 50 volume percent MgO-50 volume percent Ni-19.6Cr-17.1Al-0.97Y/Ni-16.2Cr-5.6Al-0.6Y, were identified as having much improved corrosion resistance compared to the standard coating.

  12. Combustion furnace and burner

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, J. G.

    1985-12-03

    The combustion system includes a hearth lined with refractory, a combustion chamber formed in the refractory, an air manifold mounted on the hearth, a plurality of gas manifold extending through the air manifold and into the combustion chamber, and a diffuser mounted on the manifolds to cause turbulence in the air/gas mixture. The gas manifolds include aspirating means for combining the air and gas. The combustion chamber is elongated and has an elongated neck with a flue gas exit slot over which the work piece passes. The flue gas from the combustion of the air/gas mixture in the combustion chamber increases in velocity as the flue gas passes through the elongated neck and exits the flue gas exit slot. The slot has a length sufficient to permit the work piece to rotate 360/sup 0/ as the work piece rotates and travels through the hearth. This causes the work piece to be uniformly heated over every square inch of its surface.

  13. Active control of the acoustic boundary conditions of combustion test rigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothien, Mirko R.; Moeck, Jonas P.; Oliver Paschereit, Christian

    2008-12-01

    In the design process of burners for gas turbines, new burner generations are generally tested in single or multi burner combustion test rigs. With these experiments, computational fluid dynamics, and finite element calculations, the burners' performance in the full-scale engine is sought to be predicted. Especially, information about the thermoacoustic behaviour and the emission characteristics is very important. As the thermoacoustics strongly depend on the acoustic boundary conditions of the system, it is obvious that test rig conditions should match, or be close to those of the full-scale engine. This is, however, generally not the case. Hence, if the combustion process in the test rig is stable at certain operating conditions, it may show unfavourable dynamics at the same conditions in the engine. In this work, a method is proposed which uses an active control scheme to manipulate the acoustic boundary conditions of the test rig. Using this method, the boundary conditions can be continuously modified, ranging from anechoic to fully reflecting in a broad frequency range. The concept is applied to an atmospheric combustion test rig with a swirl-stabilized burner. It is shown that the test rig's properties can be tuned to correspond to those of the full-scale engine. For example, the test rig length can be virtually extended, thereby introducing different resonance frequencies, without having to implement any hardware changes. Furthermore, the acoustic boundary condition can be changed to that of a choked flow without actually needing the flow to be choked.

  14. Burner rig corrosion of SiC at 1000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Stearns, C. A.; Smialek, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Sintered alpha-SiC was examined in both oxidation and hot corrosion with a burner rig at 400 kPa (4 atm) and 1000 C with a flow velocity of 94 m/s. Oxidation tests for times to 46 h produced virtually no attack, whereas tests with 4 ppm Na produced extensive corrosion in 13.5 h. Thick glassy layers composed primarily of sodium silicate formed in the salt corrosion tests. This corrosion attack caused severe pitting on the silicon carbide substrate and led to a 32 percent decrease in strength, compared to the as-received material. Parallel furnace tests of Na2SO4/air-induced attack yielded basically similar results, with slight product composition differences. The differences are explained in terms of the continuous sulfate deposition which occurs in a burner rig.

  15. The effect of fuel-to-air ratio on burner-rig hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.; Kohl, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    Samples of a cobalt-base alloy, Mar M-509, were subjected to hot corrosion in a Mach-0.3 burner rig. The corrodent was NaCl added as an aqueous solution to the combustion products of a sulfur-containing Jet-A fuel. The metal temperature was fixed at 900 C. The extent of hot corrosion increased by a factor of three as the fuel-to-air mass ratio was increased from 0.033 to 0.050. Because the depositing salt was always Na2SO4, the increased attack appeared to be related to the gas composition.

  16. Experimental verification of corrosive vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to predict deposition rates is required to facilitate modelling of high temperature corrosion by fused salt condensates in turbine engines. A corrosive salt vapor deposition theory based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layers (CFBL) has been successfully verified by high velocity burner rig experiments. The experiments involved internally air-impingement cooled, both rotating full and stationary segmented cylindrical collectors located in the crossflow of sodium-seeded combustion gases. Excellent agreement is found between the CFBL theory an the experimental measurements for both the absolute amounts of Na2SO4 deposition rates and the behavior of deposition rate with respect to collector temperature, mass flowrate (velocity) and Na concentration.

  17. Deposition stress effects on thermal barrier coating burner rig life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  18. Burner rig study of variables involved in hole plugging of air cooled turbine engine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of combustion gas composition, flame temperatures, and cooling air mass flow on the plugging of film cooling holes by a Ca-Fe-P-containing deposit were investigated. The testing was performed on film-cooled vanes exposed to the combustion gases of an atmospheric Mach 0.3 burner rig. The extent of plugging was determined by measurement of the open hole area at the conclusion of the tests as well as continuous monitoring of some of the tests using stop-action photography. In general, as the P content increased, plugging rates also increased. The plugging was reduced by increasing flame temperature and cooling air mass flow rates. At times up to approximately 2 hours little plugging was observed. This apparent incubation period was followed by rapid plugging, reaching in several hours a maximum closure whose value depended on the conditions of the test.

  19. Burner Rig Hot Corrosion of a Single Crystal Ni-48Al-Ti-Hf-Ga Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Darolia, Ram; Cuy, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of a single crystal Ni-48Al-1Ti-0.5Hf-0.2Ga alloy was examined in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 C for 300 hours. The combustion chamber was doped with 2 ppmw synthetic sea salt. The hot corrosion attack produced a random mound morphology on the surface. Microstructurally, the hot corrosion attack appeared to initiate with oxide-filled pits which were often broad and shallow. At an intermediate stage, the pits increased in size to incorporate unoxidized Ni islands in the corrosion product. The rampant attack stage, which was observed only at sharp sample corners, was characterized by rapid inward growth of alumina in finger-like protrusions incorporating significant amounts of Al-depleted Ni islands. Aluminum consumption in the oxide fingers resulted in the growth of a gamma' layer ahead of the advancing oxide fingers.

  20. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  1. Burner Rig with an Unattached Duct for Evaluating the Erosion Resistance of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Extensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling backed by experimental observation has demonstrated the feasibility of using an unattached duct to increase the velocity and spatial spread of erodent particles exiting from a burner rig. It was shown that gas velocity and temperature are mostly retained if the inner diameter of the unattached duct equaled the exit diameter of the burner rig nozzle. For particles having a mean diameter of 550 millimeters, the modeled velocity attained at a distance 2.0 in. (50.8 millimeters) beyond the exit of a 12 in. (305 millimeters) long duct was approximately twice as large as the velocity the same distance from the nozzle when the duct was not present. For finer particles, the relative enhancement was somewhat less approximately 1.5 times greater. CFD modeling was also used to guide the construction of a device for slowing down the velocity of the particles being injected into the burner rig. This device used a simple 45 degree fitting to slow the particle velocity in the feed line from 20 meters per second, which is in the range needed to convey the particles, to about 3 meters per second just as they are injected into the burner. This lower injection velocity would lessen the severity of the collision of large particles with the wall of the burner liner opposite the injection port, thereby reducing potential damage to the burner liner by high-velocity particles.

  2. Dual structure infrared surface combustion burner

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.R.; Burlingame, N.H.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes an improvement in a surface combustion radiant heat burner comprising an inlet plenum for receiving fuel and oxidant gas mixtures from at least one supply inlet and a burner body secured in communication with the inlet plenum. The burner body having an inlet side facing the plenum and an outlet side defining a radiating surface. It comprises: the burner body comprising a first layer of porous ceramic material adjacent the inlet side and a second layer of porous ceramic material adjacent the outlet side defining the radiating surface, the first layer of porous ceramic material having a thickness of at least about 0.90:01 inch and a fine interconnected porous structure with a mean pore diameter ranging from 0.00004 inch to 0.10 inch, the second layer of porous ceramic material having a thickness of at least about 0.05 inch and a coarse interconnected porous structure with a mean diameter ranging from 0.05 to 0.40 inch, and at least the outer surfaces of the first porous layer and substantially all surfaces of the second porous layer being provided with a fully dense ceramic coating.

  3. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  4. Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

    2007-10-09

    The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

  5. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Chamberland; Aku Raino; David Towle

    2006-09-30

    For more than two decades, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has developed a range of low cost, in-furnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes ALSTOM's internally developed TFS 2000 firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As of 2004, more than 200 units representing approximately 75,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with ALSTOM low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coals to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coals, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing (retrofit) boiler equipment. If enacted, proposed Clear Skies legislation will, by 2008, require an average, effective, domestic NOx emissions rate of 0.16 lb/MMBtu, which number will be reduced to 0.13 lb/MMBtu by 2018. Such levels represent a 60% and 67% reduction, respectively, from the effective 2000 level of 0.40 lb/MMBtu. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. In light of these needs, ALSTOM, in cooperation with the DOE, is developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner which, when integrated with ALSTOM's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems, will provide a means to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx at less than 3/4 the cost of an SCR with low to no impact on balance of plant issues when firing a high volatile bituminous coal. Such coals can be more economic to fire than subbituminous or Powder River Basin (PRB) coals, but are more problematic from a NOx control standpoint as existing

  6. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: CELLO PULSE COMBUSTION BURNER SYSTEM/SONOTECH INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sonotech, Inc. (Sonotech), of Atlanta, GA, the developer of the Cello® pulse combustion burner, claims that its burner system can be beneficial to a variety of combustion processes. The system incorporates a combustor that can be tuned to induce large amplitude sonic pulsation...

  7. NASA Lewis Research Center lean-, rich-burn materials test burner rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Robinson, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The lean-, rich-burn materials test burner rig at NASA LeRC is used to evaluate the high temperature environmental durability of aerospace materials. The rig burns jet fuel and pressurized air, and sample materials can be subjected to both lean-burn and rich-burn environments. As part of NASA's Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program, an existing rig was adapted to simulate the rich-burn quick-quench lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept which is being considered for the HSCT (high speed civil transport) aircraft. RQL materials requirements exceed that of current superalloys, thus ceramic matrix composites (CMC's) emerged as the leading candidate materials. The performance of these materials in the quasi reducing environment of the rich-burn section of the RQL is of fundamental importance to materials development. This rig was developed to conduct such studies, and its operation and capabilities are described.

  8. Oxidation of a Silica-Containing Material in a Mach 0.3 Burner Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.; Cuy, Michael D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primarily silica-containing material with traces of organic compounds, as well as aluminum and calcium additions, was exposed to a Mach 0.3 burner rig at atmospheric pressure using jet fuel. The sample was exposed for 5 continuous hours at 1370 C. Post exposure x-ray diffraction analyses indicate formation of cristobalite, quartz, NiO and Spinel (Al(Ni)CR2O4). The rig hardware is composed of a nickel-based superalloy with traces of Fe. These elements are indicated in the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results. This material was studied as a candidate for high temperature applications under an engine technology program.

  9. Burner rig corrosion of SiC at 1000 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Stearns, C. A.; Smialek, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Sintered alpha-SiC was examined in both oxidation and hot corrosion with a burner rig at 400 kPa (4 atm) and 1000 C with a flow velocity of 310 ft/sec. Oxidation tests for times to 46 hr produced virtually no attack, whereas tests with 4 ppm Na produced extensive corrosion in 13-1/2 hr. Thick glassy layers composed primarily of sodium silicate formed in the salt corrosion tests. This corrosion attack caused severe pitting of the silicon carbide substrate which led to a 32 percent strength decrease below the as-received material. Parallel furnace tests of Na2SO4/air induced attacked yielded basically similar results with some slight product composition differences. The differences are explained in terms of the continuous sulfate deposition which occurs in a burner rig.

  10. Performance of laser glazed Zr02 TBCs in cyclic oxidation and corrosion burner test rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of laser glazed zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was evaluated in cyclic oxidation and cyclic corrosion tests. Plasma sprayed zirconia coatings of two thicknesses were partially melted with a CO2 laser. The power density of the focused laser beam was varied from 35 to 75 W/sq mm, while the scanning speed was about 80 cm per minute. In cyclic oxidation tests, the specimens were heated in a burner rig for 6 minutes and cooled for 3 minutes. It is indicated that the laser treated samples have the same life as the untreated ones. However, in corrosion tests, in which the burner rig flame contained 100 PPM sodium fuel equivalent, the laser treated samples exhibit nearly a fourfold life improvement over that of the reference samples vary. In both tests, the lives of the samples inversely with the thickness of the laser melted layer of zirconia.

  11. Mach 0.3 Burner Rig Facility at the NASA Glenn Materials Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Perez, Michael; Cuy, Michael D.; Robinson, R. Craig

    2011-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum presents the current capabilities of the state-of-the-art Mach 0.3 Burner Rig Facility. It is used for materials research including oxidation, corrosion, erosion and impact. Consisting of seven computer controlled jet-fueled combustors in individual test cells, these relatively small rigs burn just 2 to 3 gal of jet fuel per hour. The rigs are used as an efficient means of subjecting potential aircraft engine/airframe advanced materials to the high temperatures, high velocities and thermal cycling closely approximating actual operating environments. Materials of various geometries and compositions can be evaluated at temperatures from 700 to 2400 F. Tests are conducted not only on bare superalloys and ceramics, but also to study the behavior and durability of protective coatings applied to those materials.

  12. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    SciTech Connect

    David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

    2007-06-30

    For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic

  13. Tensile Behavior of As-Fabricated and Burner-Rig Exposed SiC/SiC Composites with Hi-Nicalon Type-S Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Dicarlo, J. A.; Ogbuji, L. T.; Chen, Y. L.

    2002-01-01

    Tensile stress-strain curves were measured at room temperature and 1315 C for 2D-woven SiC/BN/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) reinforced by two variations of Hi-Nicalon Type-S SiC fibers. These fibers, which contained a thin continuous carbon-rich layer on their as-produced surface, provided the as-fabricated CMC with good composite behavior and an ultimate strength and strain of -350 MPa and -0.5%, respectively. However, after un-stressed burner-rig exposure at 815 C for -100 hrs, CMC tensile specimens with cut edges and exposed interphases showed a significant decrease in ultimate properties with effectively no composite behavior. Microstructural observations show that the degradation was caused by internal fiber-fiber oxide bonding after removal of the carbon-rich fiber surface layer by the high-velocity combustion gases. On the other hand, SiC/BN/SiC CMC with Sylramic-iBN fibers without carbon-rich surfaces showed higher as-fabricated strength and no loss in strength after the same burner rig exposure. Based on the strong role of the carbon layer in these observations, a process method was developed and demonstrated for achieving better strength retention of Hi-Nicalon Type-S CMC during burner rig exposure. Other general approaches for minimizing this current deficiency with as-produced Type-S fibers are discussed.

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: THE PYRETRON OXYGEN BURNER, AMERICAN COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pyretron is a burner which is designed to allow for the injection of oxygen into the combustion air stream for the purpose of increasing the efficiency of a hazardous waste incinerator. The SITE demonstration of the Pyretron took place at the U.S. EPA's Combustion Re...

  15. Pressurized cyclonic combustion method and burner for particulate solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffert, F.D.; Milligan, J.D.; Morrison, J.A.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a method of operating a burner for burning particulate combustible fuel for producing a hot gas under pressure for operating a gas turbine, the burner comprising a housing having side wall means forming a cylindrical shape primary combustion chamber, a secondary chamber, and a choke opening of reduced size between the primary combustion chamber and the secondary chamber, the secondary chamber being in fluid communication with the primary combustion chamber through the choke opening, the end of the primary combustion chamber opposite the choke opening being closed by end wall means, the end of the secondary chamber opposite the choke opening having an outlet opening for the passage of hot gas for use of operating a gas turbine, a particulate fuel opening formed through the side wall means of the primary combustion chamber near the end wall means.

  16. Numerical Simulation of the RTA Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoudzadeh, Farhad; Buehrle, Robert; Liu, Nan-Suey; Winslow, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    The Revolutionary Turbine Accelerator (RTA)/Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) project is investigating turbine-based propulsion systems for access to space. NASA Glenn Research Center and GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) planned to develop a ground demonstrator engine for validation testing. The demonstrator (RTA-1) is a variable cycle, turbofan ramjet designed to transition from an augmented turbofan to a ramjet that produces the thrust required to accelerate the vehicle from Sea Level Static (SLS) to Mach 4. The RTA-1 is designed to accommodate a large variation in bypass ratios from sea level static to Mach 4 conditions. Key components of this engine are new, such as a nickel alloy fan, advanced trapped vortex combustor, a Variable Area Bypass Injector (VABI), radial flameholders, and multiple fueling zones. A means to mitigate risks to the RTA development program was the use of extensive component rig tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

  17. Experiments for the determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer to burner rig test targets comparable in size to jet stream diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.; Gokoglu, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    The application of a recently formulated vapor transport theory to predict deposition rates of corrosive salts from alkali-seeded combustion gases of a small-capacity, high-velocity, atmospheric-pressure burner rig was hampered by the relatively large dimensions of the cylindrical deposit collector compared to the diameter of the combustion gas stream. The relative dimensions lead to a highly nonadiabatic combustion gas flow around the collector and necessitate two series of experiments. In the first series, mass transfer coefficients are determined by utilizing the naphthalene sublimation technique. The second series of experiments determines the dilution effect on the sodium species concentrations due to the entrainment of ambient air. This second series involves the measurement of the temperature variation along the surface of the collector under steady state conditions. Vapor deposition rates are determined exploiting this information and the results are found to compare favorably with experimentally obtained rates.

  18. The effect of laser glazing on life of ZrO2 TBCs in cyclic burner rig tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of laser glazed zirconia (containing 8 wt% Y2O3) TBC's was evaluated in burner rig cyclic oxidation tests at 1000 and 1050 C. It was found that the cycle duration has no effect on life of TBC's and that the increase in thickness of the glazed layer caused a slight reduction in life.

  19. Burner Rig Evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coating Systems for Nickel-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Eight plasma sprayed bond coatings were evaluated for their potential use with ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TECs) which are being developed for coal derived fuel fired gas turbines. Longer TBC lives in cyclic burner rig oxidation to 1050 C were achieved with the more oxidation resistant bond coatings. These were Ni-14.1Cr-13.4A1-0.10Ar, Ni-14.1C4-14.4Al-0.16Y, and Ni-15.8Cr-12.8Al-0.36Y on Rene 41. The TBC systems performed best when 0.015-cm thick bond coatings were employed that were sprayed at 20 kW using argon 3.5v/o hydrogen. Cycling had a more life limiting influence on the TBC than accumulated time at 1050 C.

  20. Deposition stress effects on the life of thermal barrier coatings on burner rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  1. Low temperature (650 to 700/sup 0/C) burner rig testing

    SciTech Connect

    Aprigliano, L.F.

    1982-11-01

    A low temperature (677/sup 0/C (1250/sup 0/F)) 500-h burner rig test using a fuel with 2% by weight of sulfur was made of IN939, a standard cobalt, chromium, aluminum, yttrium (CoCrAlY) coating, and a nickel, chromium, aluminum, yttrium (NiCrAlY) coating. Both the IN939 and the CoCrAlY coating were found to hot-corrode readily. The CoCrAlY coating hot-corroded by a Type 2 mechanism (low-melting point mixed sulfate), while the IN939 showed evidence of both Type 1 (sulfidation) and Type 2 hot corrosion. The NiCrAlY coating was relatively unattacked. A change in the mode of attack was noted in the CoCrAlY coating when the rig temperature dropped to 650/sup 0/C(1200/sup 0/F) for 24 h. The corrosion mode may have changed from one in which solid cobaltous oxide is the stable phase at the gas/scale interface to one in which solid cobalt sulfate is the stable phase.

  2. Flex-flame burner and combustion method

    DOEpatents

    Soupos, Vasilios; Zelepouga, Serguei; Rue, David M.; Abbasi, Hamid A.

    2010-08-24

    A combustion method and apparatus which produce a hybrid flame for heating metals and metal alloys, which hybrid flame has the characteristic of having an oxidant-lean portion proximate the metal or metal alloy and having an oxidant-rich portion disposed above the oxidant lean portion. This hybrid flame is produced by introducing fuel and primary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber containing the metal or metal alloy in a substoichiometric ratio to produce a fuel-rich flame and by introducing a secondary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber above the fuel-rich flame in a manner whereby mixing of the secondary combustion oxidant with the fuel-rich flame is delayed for a portion of the length of the flame.

  3. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to determine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2SO4 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  4. Combustion dynamics linked to flame behaviour in a partially premixed swirled industrial burner

    SciTech Connect

    Biagioli, Fernando; Guethe, Felix; Schuermans, Bruno

    2008-07-15

    Previous work [Biagioli, F., Stabilization mechanism of turbulent premixed flames in strongly swirled flows, Combustion, Theory and Modelling 10 (3) (2006) 389-412; Guethe, F., Lachner, R., Schuermans, B., Biagioli, F., Geng, W., Inauen, A., Schenker, S., Bombach, R., Hubschmid, W., Flame imaging on the ALSTOM EV-burner: thermo acoustic pulsations and CFD-validation, in: AIAA Paper 2006-437 presented at the 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, Nevada, January 9-12, 2006] has shown that turbulent dry low NO{sub x} (partially premixed) flames in high swirl conical burners may be subject to a large change of their anchoring location at the symmetry axis when a critical value of the bulk equivalence ratio is reached, i.e. they are bi-stable. This flame behavior is linked here to combustion pressure dynamics measured in an atmospheric test rig for a prototype version of the Alstom EnVironmental (EV) conical burner. The link is made via the solution of the problem of the 'travelling flameholder', which shows that the unsteady displacement of the flame anchoring location implies an unsteady variation of the flame surface area and therefore unsteady heat release. The relevance of this source of unsteady heat release - which is different from more usual ones due to variations in turbulent burning rate and in the sensible enthalpy jump across the flame - to the generation of combustion dynamics in strongly swirled flows is confirmed here by the strong positive correlation between the tendency of the flame to be displaced and the measured amplitude of pressure pulsations. (author)

  5. NOx formation in combustion of gaseous fuel in ejection burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimár, Miroslav; Kulikov, Andrii

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare model for researching of the formation in combustion of gaseous fuels. NOx formation is one of the main ecological problems nowadays as nitrogen oxides is one of main reasons of acid rains. The ANSYS model was designed according to the calculation to provide full combustion and good mixing of the fuel and air. The current model is appropriate to research NOx formation and the influence of the different principles of NOx reduction method. Applying of designed model should spare both time of calculations and research and also money as you do not need to measure the burner characteristics.

  6. Burner Rig Hot Corrosion of Five Ni-Base Alloys Including Mar-M247

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Helmink, R.; Harris, K.; Erickson, G.

    2000-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of four new Ni-base superalloys was compared to that of Mar-M247 by testing in a Mach 0.3 burner rig at 900 C for 300 1-hr cycles. While the Al content was held the same as in the Mar-M247, the Cr and Co levels in the four new alloys were decreased while other strengthening elements (Re, Ta) were increased. Surprisingly, despite their lower Cr and Co contents, the hot corrosion behavior of all four new alloys was superior to that of the Mar-M247 alloy. The Mar-M247 alloy began to lose weight almost immediately whereas the other four alloys appeared to undergo an incubation period of 50-150 1-hr cycles. Examination of the cross-sectional microstructures showed regions of rampant corrosion attack (propagation stage) in all five alloys after 300 1-hr cycles . This rampant corrosion morphology was similar for each of the alloys with Ni and Cr sulfides located in an inner subscale region. The morphology of the attack suggests a classic "Type I", or high temperature, hot corrosion attack.

  7. Composite propellant combustion modeling with a porous plate burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R. N.; Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    A burner is designed to model on a large scale (millimeters) the complex vapor phase processes that take place on awkwardly small scales (about a hundred microns) in the combustion of practical AP/ composite propellants at conventional pressures. Binder vapor evolution is modeled with gaseous fuel (ethane in the experiments reported) flow through a porous plate and oxidizer vapor with the flow of a gaseous oxidizer (air and enriched air in the experiments reported) through discrete holes in the porous plate. Measured flame standoff distance and surface temperature variations are consistent with theoretical predictions at atmospheric pressure. Data obtained at several atmospheres are discussed in the light of the current theories of propellant burning that place varying emphasis on the roles of chemical kinetics and fluid dynamic diffusion/mixing in the vapor phase of a burning composite propellant. The potential and proposed future applications of the burner are indicated.

  8. Effect of cycled combustion ageing on a cordierite burner plate

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Eugenio

    2010-11-15

    A combination of {sup 57}Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray Powder Diffraction analysis has been employed to study modifications in chemical and mechanical stability occurring in a cordierite burner aged under combustion conditions which simulate the working of domestic boilers. Moessbauer study shows that Fe is distributed into the structural sites of the cordierite lattice as Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions located mostly at octahedral sites. Ferric oxide impurities, mainly hematite, are also present in the starting cordierite material accounting for {approx_equal}40% of the total iron phases. From Moessbauer and X-ray diffraction data it can be deduced that, under the combustion conditions used, new crystalline phases were formed, some of the substitutional Fe{sup 3+} ions existing in the cordierite lattice were reduced to Fe{sup 2+}, and ferric oxides underwent a sintering process which results in hematite with higher particle size. All these findings were detected in the burner zone located in the proximity of the flame and were related to possible chemical reactions which might explain the observed deterioration of the burner material. Research Highlights: {yields}Depth profile analyses used as a probe to understand changes in refractory structure. {yields}All changes take place in the uppermost surface of the burner, close to the flame. {yields}Reduction to Fe{sup 2+} of substitutional Fe{sup 3+} ions and partial cordierite decomposition. {yields}Heating-cooling cycling induces a sintering of the existing iron oxide particles. {yields}Chemical changes can explain the alterations observed in the material microstructure.

  9. Study of oil combustion in the TGMP-314 boiler with hearth burners

    SciTech Connect

    Usman, Yu.M.; Shtal'man, S.G.; Enyakin, Yu.P.; Abryutin, A.A.; Levin, M.M.; Taran, O.E.; Chuprov, V.V.; Antonov, A.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the TGMP-314 boiler with hearth configured burners included the gas mixture in the boiler, the degree of fuel combustion at various heights in the boiler, hydrogen sulfide content in the near-wall zones of the boiler, and temperature distribution fields. Experimental data showed that the hearth burners, in conjunction with steam-mechanical atomizing burners, operate with the least possible excess air over a wide range of load changes. The operation and performance of the hearth burners are discussed.

  10. Disposal of Liquid Combustible Wastes using Flameless Burners with Porous Carbon Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Sergei; Savchenko, Evgenii; Khaustov, Sergei; Tabakaev, Roman; Zavorin, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Two modifications of flameless burners with a carbon porous media in the combustion area were investigated. Kerosene TS-1 and mixtures of highly flammable liquids wastes (HIL) were used as fuel. Experimental data are presented in a graphical form as plot of the burner thermal capacity. Results show capacity for of the developed devices and prove the prospects of disposal of liquid combustible wastes using flameless burners with porous carbon matrix.

  11. Operational characteristics of a parallel jet MILD combustion burner system

    SciTech Connect

    Szegoe, G.G.; Dally, B.B.; Nathan, G.J.

    2009-02-15

    This study describes the performance and stability characteristics of a parallel jet MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion burner system in a laboratory-scale furnace, in which the reactants and exhaust ports are all mounted on the same wall. Thermal field measurements are presented for cases with and without combustion air preheat, in addition to global temperature and emission measurements for a range of equivalence ratio, heat extraction, air preheat and fuel dilution levels. The present furnace/burner configuration proved to operate without the need for external air preheating, and achieved a high degree of temperature uniformity. Based on an analysis of the temperature distribution and emissions, PSR model predictions, and equilibrium calculations, the CO formation was found to be related to the mixing patterns and furnace temperature rather than reaction quenching by the heat exchanger. The critical equivalence ratio, or excess air level, which maintains low CO emissions is reported for different heat exchanger positions, and an optimum operating condition is identified. Results of CO and NO{sub x} emissions, together with visual observations and a simplified two-dimensional analysis of the furnace aerodynamics, demonstrate that fuel jet momentum controls the stability of this multiple jet system. A stability diagram showing the threshold for stable operation is reported, which is not explained by previous stability criteria. (author)

  12. Occurrence of benzo(a)pyrene in combustion effluents of kerosene and diesel burners

    SciTech Connect

    Gharaibeh, S.H.; Abuirjeie, M.A.; Hunaiti, A.A.

    1988-09-01

    Due to limited Jordanian resources, kerosene and diesel burners have been widely used for heating homes and water, warming bread, grilling meat and cooking food. Jordan annually imports and average of 204 tons of burners which corresponds to approximately 20,400 burners. Considerable amounts of combustion products are produced such as gases, aerosols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), especially benzo(a)pyrene (Bp), the well known carcinogen for man and animal. Since most Jordanians use burners more than five months a year, a considerable amount of combustion effluents accumulate indoors. Some of these materials can enter the human body via various routes, and are potential health hazards. Little information is available about the chemical nature and amount of the combustion effluents produced by these burners; therefore the present study was designed to screen for benzo(a)pyrene in the indoor-accumulated combustion effluent.

  13. A CFD-Based Study of the Feasibility of Adapting an Erosion Burner Rig for Examining the Effect of CMAS Deposition Corrosion on Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic and computational fluid dynamics modeling has been conducted to examine the feasibility of adapting the NASA-Glenn erosion burner rigs for use in studies of corrosion of environmental barrier coatings by the deposition of molten CMAS. The effect of burner temperature, Mach number, particle preheat, duct heating, particle size, and particle phase (crystalline vs. glass) were analyzed. Detailed strategies for achieving complete melting of CMAS particles were developed, thereby greatly improving the probability of future successful experimental outcomes.

  14. Characterization of Ceramic Matrix Composite Fasteners Exposed in a Combustion Liner Rig Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Brewer, David; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Combustion tests on SiC/SiC CMC (Ceramic Matrix Composite) components were performed in an aircraft combustion environment using the Rich-burn, Quick-quench, Lean-burn (RQL) sector rig. SiC/SiC fasteners were used to attach several of these components to the metallic rig structure. The effect of combustion exposure on the fastener material was characterized via microstructural examination. Fasteners were also destructively tested, after combustion exposure, and the failure loads of fasteners exposed in the sector rig were compared to those of as-manufactured fasteners. Combustion exposure reduced the fastener failure load by 50% relative to the as-manufactured fasteners for exposure times ranging from 50 to 260 hours. The fasteners exposed in the combustion environment demonstrated failure loads that varied with failure mode. Fasteners that had the highest average failure load, failed in the same manner as the unexposed fasteners.

  15. Combustion Characteristics of Oxy-fuel Burners for CO2 Capturing Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joon; Kim, Hyouck Ju; Choi, Kyu Sung

    Oxy-fuel boilers have been developed to capture CO2 from the exhaust gas. A 50 kW class model burner has been developed and tested in a furnace type boiler. The burner has been scaled up to 0.5 and 3 MW class for fire-tube type boilers. The burners are commonly laid out in a coaxial type to effectively heat the combustion chamber of boilers. Burners are devised to support air and oxy-fuel combustion modes for the retrofitting scenario. FGR (flue gas recirculation) has been tried during the scale-up procedure. Oxy-fuel combustion yields stretched flame to uniformly heat the combustion chamber. It also provides the high CO2 concentration, which is over 90% in dry base. However, pure oxy-fuel combustion increases NO concentration, because of the reduced flow rate. The FGR can suppress the thermal NOx induced by the infiltration of the air.

  16. Plasma-assisted combustion technology for NOx reduction in industrial burners.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Hoon; Kim, Kwan-Tae; Kang, Hee Seok; Song, Young-Hoon; Park, Jae Eon

    2013-10-01

    Stronger regulations on nitrogen oxide (NOx) production have recently promoted the creation of a diverse array of technologies for NOx reduction, particularly within the combustion process, where reduction is least expensive. In this paper, we discuss a new combustion technology that can reduce NOx emissions within industrial burners to single-digit parts per million levels without employing exhaust gas recirculation or other NOx reduction mechanisms. This new technology uses a simple modification of commercial burners, such that they are able to perform plasma-assisted staged combustion without altering the outer configuration of the commercial reference burner. We embedded the first-stage combustor within the head of the commercial reference burner, where it operated as a reformer that could host a partial oxidation process, producing hydrogen-rich reformate or synthesis gas product. The resulting hydrogen-rich flow then ignited and stabilized the combustion flame apart from the burner rim. Ultimately, the enhanced mixing and removal of hot spots with a widened flame area acted as the main mechanisms of NOx reduction. Because this plasma burner acted as a low NOx burner and was able to reduce NOx by more than half compared to the commercial reference burner, this methodology offers important cost-effective possibilities for NOx reduction in industrial applications. PMID:24032692

  17. SITE PROGRAM EVALUATION OF THE SONOTECH PULSE COMBUSTION BURNER TECHNOLOGY - TECHNICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of demonstration tests was performed at the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Incineration Research Facility (IRF) under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. These tests, twelve in all, evaluated a pulse combustion burner technology dev...

  18. Rotrix `vortex breakdown` burner turbulence-stabilized combustion of heating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Hofbauer, P.

    1995-04-01

    For the past two years, the Viessmann MatriX radiant burner has been setting the standard for low emission combustion of gas. Now, with the RotriX burner, Viessmann has succeeded in drastically reducing nitrogenoxide emissions in the combustoin of oil. After a successful test period, the RotriX burner is now being introduced to the market. The RotriX oil burner consequently takes into account the mechanisms in the creation of harmful emissions in the combustion of heating oil No. 2, and guarantees stable combustion under any operating conditions. The burner has the following features: heating oil is combusted only after complete vaporization and mixing with combustion air and recirculated flue gases; the flame is not stabilized with a turbulator disk, but a strong turbulating current is created by means of the Vortex Breakdown phenomenon, which develops a very stable flame under any operating conditions; and high internal flue gas recirculation rates lower the flame temperature to the point where thermal NO formation is reduced to the same low level as in the combustion of gas. The new burner has extremely low emissions of NOx < 60 mg/kWh, and CO < 5 mg/kWh at a CO{sub 2} concentraiton of 14%.

  19. Effect of fuel to air ratio on Mach 0.3 burner rig hot corrosion of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    A Mach 0.3 burner rig test program was conducted to determine how the fuel to air mass ratio affects the durability of ZrO2-Y2O3/Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.31Y thermal barrier coating systems in combustion products containing 5 ppm Na and 2 ppm V. As the fuel to air mass ratio was increased from 0.039 to 0.049, the durability of ZrO2-6Y2O3, ZrO2-8Y2O3 and ZrO2-12Y2O3 coatings decreased. ZrO2-8Y2O3 coatings were approximately 2X and 1.3X more durable than ZrO2-12Y2O3 and ZrO2-6Y2O3 coatings respectively at the fuel to air mass ratio of 0.039. The number of one hour cycles endured by ZrO2-8Y2O3 coatings varied from averages of 53 to 200 for the fuel to air mass ratios of 0.049 and 0.039, respectively. At the fuel to air mass ratio of 0.049, all ZrO2-Y2O3 coated specimens failed in 40 to 60 one hour cycles

  20. Individual burner control for combustion optimization in industrial boilers. [Spectral flame analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, S.K.; Cole, W.; Metcalfe, C.

    1986-11-01

    Combustion of fuels in large industrial boilers is monitored by measuring CO, CO/sub 2/, and O/sub 2/ in the flue gas exiting the boiler. Thermo Electron Corporation has under development an instrument called Spectral Flame Analyzer for monitoring the combustion conditions in individual burners in a multi-burner boiler. The instrument is presently being tested in an industrial boiler. This paper describes the principle of operation of the Spectral Flame Analyzer, the results of the tests carried out at the M.I.T. Combustion Research Facility and the proposed test program for an industrial boiler at the Polaroid Company.

  1. SONOTECH, INC. FREQUENCY-TUNABLE PULSE COMBUSTION SYSTEM (CELLO PULSE BURNER) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sonotech, Inc. (Sonotech) of Atlanta, Georgia, has developed a pulse combustion burner technology that claims to offer benefits when applied in a variety of combustion processes. The technology incorporates a combustor that can be tuned to induce large-amplitude acoustic or soni...

  2. SITE DEMONSTRATION OF THE AMERICAN COMBUSTION PYRETRON OXYGEN-ENHANCED BURNER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the American Combustion Pyretron TM oxygen-enhanced burner was conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. he Demonstration was conducted at the U.S. EPA's Combustion Research Facility (CRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. n eight wee...

  3. THE SITE DEMONSTRATION OF THE AMERICAN COMBUSTION PYRETRON OXYGEN-ENHANCED BURNER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of the American Combustion PyretronTM oxygen-enhanced burner ws conducted under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The Demonstration was conducted at the U.S. EPA's Combustion Research Facility (CRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas....

  4. Heat transfer and combustion characteristics of a burner with a rotary regenerative heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Yasuo; Kaji, Hitoshi; Arai, Norio

    1998-07-01

    The authors have developed a Rotary Regenerative Combustion (RRX) System, which is coupled with a compact high efficiency regenerative air heat exchanger and a combustion burner. This system contributes to saving energy of fuel firing industrial furnaces and decreases NO{sub x} emission. This technology can be considered as a solution of greenhouse problem. This paper, discusses a compact high efficiency regenerative air heat exchanger in comparison with the existing types of regenerative burners and reverse firing with high momentum fuel jet (with motive fluid) in the furnace. This burner is compact in size, with high fuel efficiency, low NOx emission, easy to operate, and reliable, based on the results of field tests and commercial operations. The authors can say that the RRX system is a regenerative burner of the second generation.

  5. Numerical simulation of turbulent mixing and combustion near the inlet of a burner

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1993-02-01

    The COYOTE computer program was used to simulate the flow field and turbulent mixing near the fuel and air inlets in a simplified burner that was proposed for experimental study at the Combustion Laboratory at the University of California at Irvine. Four cases are presented, with and without chemical reactions, with two different outflow boundary conditions, and with two different swirl numbers. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability of COYOTE to simulate burners, and they illustrate some limitations and requirements of such modeling.

  6. Characterization of a gas burner to simulate a propellant flame and evaluate aluminum particle combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Matt; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Gill, Walt

    2008-04-15

    This study details the characterization and implementation of a burner designed to simulate solid propellant fires. The burner was designed with the ability to introduce particles (particularly aluminum) into a gas flame. The aluminized flame conditions produced by this burner are characterized based on temperature and heat flux measurements. Using these results, flame conditions are quantified in comparison to other well-characterized reactions including hydrocarbon and propellant fires. The aluminized flame is also used to measure the burning rate of the particles. This work describes the application of this burner for re-creating small-scale propellant flame conditions and as a test platform for experiments that contribute to the development of a particle combustion model, particularly in propellant fires. (author)

  7. Pressurized cyclonic combustion method and burner for particulate solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffert, F.D.; Milligan, J.D.; Morrison, J.A.

    1989-07-25

    This paper describes an apparatus for burning particulate combustible fuel to produce a pressurized gas for operating a gas turbine. It comprises: a housing having side wall means forming a generally cylindrically shaped primary combustion chamber, a secondary chamber and a choke opening of reduced size between the primary combustion chamber and the secondary chamber; a fuel opening formed through the side wall means of the primary combustion chamber near the end wall means for introducing a particulate fuel under pressure therein generally tangentially to the inner wall of the primary combustion chamber and transverse to its axis; a plurality of spaced apart tuyere openings formed through the side wall means of the primary combustion chamber; at least one quench gas opening formed through side wall means of the choke opening intermediate its ends for introducing a quench gas into the choke opening for cooling the hot gas flowing.

  8. Effect of thermal cycling in a Mach 0.3 burner rig on properties and structure of directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime - delta eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Sanders, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Tensile and stress rupture properties at 1040 C of a thermally cycled gamma/gamma prime - delta eutectic were essentially equivalent to the as-grown properties. Tensile strength and rupture life at 760 C appeared to decrease slightly by thermal cycling. Thermal cycling resulted in gamma prime coarsening and Widmanstatten delta precipitation in the gamma phase. An unidentified precipitate, presumably gamma prime, was observed within the delta phase. The eutectic alloy exhibited a high rate of oxidation-erosion weight loss during thermal cycling in the Mach 0.3 burner rig.

  9. Pressurized cyclonic combustion method and burner for particulate solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffert, F.D.; Milligan, J.D.; Morrison, J.A.

    1988-02-16

    A system for burning particulate combustible fuel to produce a pressurized gas for operating a gas turbine is described comprising: a housing having side wall means forming a primary combustion chamber, a secondary chamber and a choke opening for reduced size between the primary combustion chamber and the secondary chamber. The secondary chamber is in fluid communication with the primary combustion chamber through the choke opening. The end of the primary combustion chamber opposite the choke opening is closed by end wall means. The end of the secondary chamber opposite the choke opening has an outlet opening for the passage of hot gas therethrough. A gas turbine is coupled to the outlet opening of the secondary chamber for operation by the gas passing through the outlet opening. A fuel opening is formed through the side wall means of the primary combustion chamber near the end wall means for introducing a particulate fuel under pressure therein generally tangentially to the inner wall of the primary combustion chamber and transverse to its axis such that the particulate fuel travels toward the choke opening in a helical path around the inner wall of the primary combustion chamber for burning therein for the production of hot gas under pressure for flow through the choke opening to the secondary chamber.

  10. Method for reducing NOx during combustion of coal in a burner

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Bing; Parasher, Sukesh; Hare, Jeffrey J.; Harding, N. Stanley; Black, Stephanie E.; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2008-04-15

    An organically complexed nanocatalyst composition is applied to or mixed with coal prior to or upon introducing the coal into a coal burner in order to catalyze the removal of coal nitrogen from the coal and its conversion into nitrogen gas prior to combustion of the coal. This process leads to reduced NOx production during coal combustion. The nanocatalyst compositions include a nanoparticle catalyst that is made using a dispersing agent that can bond with the catalyst atoms. The dispersing agent forms stable, dispersed, nano-sized catalyst particles. The catalyst composition can be formed as a stable suspension to facilitate storage, transportation and application of the catalyst nanoparticles to a coal material. The catalyst composition can be applied before or after pulverizing the coal material or it may be injected directly into the coal burner together with pulverized coal.

  11. Regenerative burner

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, T.E.; Quinn, D.E.; Watson, J.E.

    1986-08-05

    A regenerative burner is described operable in fire and flue modes comprising: a burner shell having first and second internal chambers, the first chamber being disposed on the flame axis of the burner and the second chamber surrounding the radial perimeter of the first chamber; a gas permeable annular regenerative bed separating the first and second chambers such that gas flow between the first and second chambers must travel through the regenerative bed in a generally radial direction with respect to the flame axis; means for supplying combustion air to the second chamber when the burner is in the fire mode and for exhausting the products of combustion from the second chamber when the burner is in the flue mode; and means for supplying fuel in the vicinity of the flame axis for mixing with combustion air to support combustion when the burner is in the fire mode.

  12. Burner rig thermal fatigue failure of SiC continuous fiber/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ertuerk, T.; Park, K.; Sung, C.

    1995-10-01

    The burner rig thermal fatigue properties of SiC continuous fiber/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic composites were examined under impinged jet fuel flame, a constant applied tensile stress and thermal cycling in the temperature range 500--1,350 C. The SCS-9 SiC fiber/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites failed within the flame impinged zone, whereas the SCS-6 fiber/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites failed outside the flame impinged zone due to the high thermal stresses resulting from high-temperature gradients. Analytical transmission electron microscopy was sued to investigate the microstructure and chemistry of the fiber, matrix and fiber/matrix interface in the failed SCS-9 SiC fiber/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites. The partial degradation of columnar structure of the fiber was interpreted as the dominant mechanism of burner rig thermal fatigue failure of SCS-9 SiC fiber/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites.

  13. Supersonic Free-Jet Combustion in a Ramjet Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J.; Dippold, Vance F., III

    2010-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor concept intended for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is similar to that of a traditional ram combustor which allows operation at higher efficiency, and to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle. The maximum flight Mach number of this scheme is governed largely by the same physics as its classical counterpart. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated. Given the parallel nature of the present scheme, overall flowpath length is less than that of present dual-mode configurations. Cycle analysis was done to define the flowpath geometry for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, and then to determine performance based on the CFD results. CFD results for Mach 5, 8, and 12 flight conditions indicate stable supersonic free-jet formation and nozzle reattachment, thereby establishing the basic feasibility of the concept. These results also reveal the structure of, and interactions between the free-jet and recirculating combustion chamber flows. Performance based on these CFD results is slightly less than that of the constant-pressure-combustion cycle analysis primarily due to these interactions. These differences are quantified and discussed. Additional CFD results at the Mach 8 flight condition show the effects of nozzle throat area variation on combustion chamber pressure, flow structure, and performance. Calculations with constant temperature walls were also done to evaluate heat flux and overall heat loads. Aspects of the concept that warrant further study are outlined. These include diffuser design, ramjet operation, mode transition, loss

  14. Regenerative burner

    SciTech Connect

    Gitman, G.M.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method of combusting fuel in a furnace having a pair of regenerative burners, each burner having a combustion chamber. It comprises: supplying fuel and oxygen alternatively to each burner to create alternating firing burners wherein the oxygen is supplied from two sources providing first and second oxidizing gases having different oxygen concentrations and simultaneously alternating the application of negative pressure to the remaining non-firing burner to recover heat from flue gases exhausted by the regenerative bed of the non-firing burner to be used further to preheat at least part of the oxygen being supplied to the firing burner; mixing the fuel with a fraction of the oxygen under substoichiometric combustion condition to create products of incomplete combustion to form a hot, luminous flame core containing partially pyrolized fuel; and mixing the partially pyrolyzed fuel with a remaining fraction of the oxygen to complete combustion of the pyrolized fuel; and controlling the total flow of fuel and oxygen supplied to each burner to provide each burner with a desired flame stoichiometry.

  15. Ensemble Diffraction Measurements of Spray Combustion in a Novel Vitiated Coflow Turbulent Jet Flame Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabra, R.; Hamano, Y.; Chen, J. Y.; Dibble, R. W.; Acosta, F.; Holve, D.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation is presented of a novel vitiated coflow spray flame burner. The vitiated coflow emulates the recirculation region of most combustors, such as gas turbines or furnaces; additionally, since the vitiated gases are coflowing, the burner allows exploration of the chemistry of recirculation without the corresponding fluid mechanics of recirculation. As such, this burner allows for chemical kinetic model development without obscurations caused by fluid mechanics. The burner consists of a central fuel jet (droplet or gaseous) surrounded by the oxygen rich combustion products of a lean premixed flame that is stabilized on a perforated, brass plate. The design presented allows for the reacting coflow to span a large range of temperatures and oxygen concentrations. Several experiments measuring the relationships between mixture stoichiometry and flame temperature are used to map out the operating ranges of the coflow burner. These include temperatures as low 300 C to stoichiometric and oxygen concentrations from 18 percent to zero. This is achieved by stabilizing hydrogen-air premixed flames on a perforated plate. Furthermore, all of the CO2 generated is from the jet combustion. Thus, a probe sample of NO(sub X) and CO2 yields uniquely an emission index, as is commonly done in gas turbine engine exhaust research. The ability to adjust the oxygen content of the coflow allows us to steadily increase the coflow temperature surrounding the jet. At some temperature, the jet ignites far downstream from the injector tube. Further increases in the coflow temperature results in autoignition occurring closer to the nozzle. Examples are given of methane jetting into a coflow that is lean, stoichiometric, and even rich. Furthermore, an air jet with a rich coflow produced a normal looking flame that is actually 'inverted' (air on the inside, surrounded by fuel). In the special case of spray injection, we demonstrate the efficacy of this novel burner with a

  16. High Velocity Burner Rig Oxidation and Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Si3N4- and SiC Base Ceramics to 1370 Deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. A.; Johnston, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    One SiC material and three Si3N4 materials including hot-pressed Si3N4 as a baseline were exposed in a Mach-1-gas-velocity burner rig simulating a turbine engine environment. Criteria for the materials selection were: potential for gas-turbine usage, near-net-shape fabricability and commercial/domestic availability. Cyclic exposures of test vanes up to 250 cycles (50 hr at temperature) were at leading-edge temperatures to 1370 C. Materials and batches were compared as to weight change, surface change, fluorescent penetrant inspection, and thermal fatigue behavior. Hot-pressed Si3N4 survived the test to 1370 C with slight weight losses. Two types of reaction-sintered Si3N4 displayed high weight gains and considerable weight-change variability, with one material exhibiting superior thermal fatigue behavior. A siliconized SiC showed slight weight gains, but considerable batch variability in thermal fatigue.

  17. Ultra-low pollutant emissions radiant gas burner with stabilized porous-phase combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, T.Y.

    1992-09-15

    This patent describes a radiant gas burner. It comprises a fuel/air mixture inlet, a flow distributor positioned near an inlet downstream end of the fuel/air mixture inlet, a porous matrix bed comprising one of a plurality of discrete particles and fibers, the porous matrix bed having an upstream matrix end, a downstream matrix end and a cross-sectional area, the upstream matrix end positioned downstream from the flow distributor, and flame stabilization means for stabilizing a combustion flame within the porous matrix bed, and a radiant surface layer adjacent and downstream from the downstream matrix end, the radiant surface layer comprising a rigid porous plate.

  18. Ceramic burner

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, W.; Hebel, R.; Artelt, P.; Esfeld, G.; Jacob, A.

    1981-03-31

    Improvements in the mixing body and supporting structure of a molded-ceramic-brick burner enable the burner to withstand the vibrations induced during its operation. Designed for the combustion chambers of air heaters, the burner has a mixing body composed of layers of shaped ceramic bricks that interlock and are held together vertically by a ceramic holding bar. The mixing body is shaped like a mushroom - the upper layers have a larger radius than the lower ones.

  19. Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-09-30

    Oxy-fuel combustion has been used previously in a wide range of industrial applications. Oxy- combustion is carried out by burning a hydrocarbon fuel with oxygen instead of air. Flames burning in this configuration achieve higher flame temperatures which present opportunities for significant efficiency improvements and direct capture of CO2 from the exhaust stream. In an effort to better understand and characterize the fundamental flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion this research presents the experimental measurements of flame stability of various oxyfuel flames. Effects of H2 concentration, fuel composition, exhaust gas recirculation ratio, firing inputs, and burner diameters on the flame stability of these fuels are discussed. Effects of exhaust gas recirculation i.e. CO2 and H2O (steam) acting as diluents on burner operability are also presented. The roles of firing input on flame stability are then analyzed. For this study it was observed that many oxy-flames did not stabilize without exhaust gas recirculation due to their higher burning velocities. In addition, the stability regime of all compositions was observed to decrease as the burner diameter increased. A flashback model is also presented, using the critical velocity gradient gF) values for CH4-O2-CO2 flames. The second part of the study focuses on the experimental measurements of the flow field characteristics of premixed CH4/21%O2/79%N2 and CH4/38%O2/72%CO2 mixtures at constant firing input of 7.5 kW, constant, equivalence ratio of 0.8, constant swirl number of 0.92 and constant Reynolds Numbers. These measurements were taken in a swirl stabilized combustor at atmospheric pressure. The flow field visualization using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) technique is implemented to make a better understanding of the turbulence characteristics of

  20. Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

    2012-09-30

    A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

  1. Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion

    DOEpatents

    Tuthill, Richard Sterling; Bechtel, II, William Theodore; Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur; Black, Stephen Hugh; Bland, Robert James; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne; Meyer, Stefan Martin; Taura, Joseph Charles; Battaglioli, John Luigi

    2002-01-01

    A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

  2. Combustion systems: a porous-matrix burner and a surface combustor. Topical report, June 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Jasionowski, W.J.; Kunc, W.; Khinkis, M.J.; Zawacki, T.S.

    1987-12-01

    In this study, two combustion systems were experimentally evaluated for potential application to gas-fired appliances: an atmospheric porous-matrix burner and a packed-bed surface combustor. The normal radiant output of a porous matrix burner was measured over a range of input from 30,000 to 110,000 Btu/h-sq ft and aerations from 0% to 40% excess air. The data were compared to similar published data for radiant tile burners. Emissions of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), and carbon monoxide (CO) were also measured and reported. The potential advantage of the type of burner is its ability to produce high levels of radiation heat at high gas-loading levels (Btu/h-sq ft.).

  3. Product Module Rig Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor); Chiappetta, Louis, Jr.; Hautman, Donald J.; Ols, John T.; Padget, Frederick C., IV; Peschke, William O. T.; Shirley, John A.; Siskind, Kenneth S.

    2004-01-01

    The low emissions potential of a Rich-Quench-Lean (RQL) combustor for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) application was evaluated as part of Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.0.2.7 of the NASA Critical Propulsion Components (CPC) Program under Contract NAS3-27235. Combustion testing was conducted in cell 1E of the Jet Burner Test Stand at United Technologies Research Center. Specifically, a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor, utilizing reduced scale quench technology implemented in a quench vane concept in a product-like configuration (Product Module Rig), demonstrated the capability of achieving an emissions index of nitrogen oxides (NOx EI) of 8.5 gm/Kg fuel at the supersonic flight condition (relative to the program goal of 5 gm/Kg fuel). Developmental parametric testing of various quench vane configurations in the more fundamental flametube, Single Module Rig Configuration, demonstrated NOx EI as low as 5.2. All configurations in both the Product Module Rig configuration and the Single Module Rig configuration demonstrated exceptional efficiencies, greater than 99.95 percent, relative to the program goal of 99.9 percent efficiency at supersonic cruise conditions. Sensitivity of emissions to quench orifice design parameters were determined during the parametric quench vane test series in support of the design of the Product Module Rig configuration. For the rectangular quench orifices investigated, an aspect ratio (length/width) of approximately 2 was found to be near optimum. An optimum for orifice spacing was found to exist at approximately 0.167 inches, resulting in 24 orifices per side of a quench vane, for the 0.435 inch quench zone channel height investigated in the Single Module Rig. Smaller quench zone channel heights appeared to be beneficial in reducing emissions. Measurements were also obtained in the Single Module Rig configuration on the sensitivity of emissions to the critical combustor parameters of fuel/air ratio, pressure drop, and residence

  4. Research Data Acquired in World-Class, 60-atm Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Wey, Changlie

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's new, world-class, 60-atmosphere (atm) combustor research facility, the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR), is in operation and producing highly unique research data. Specifically, data were acquired at high pressures and temperatures representative of future subsonic engines from a fundamental flametube configuration with an advanced fuel injector. The data acquired include exhaust emissions as well as pressure and temperature distributions. Results to date represent an improved understanding of nitrous oxide (NOx) formation at high pressures and temperatures and include an NOx emissions reduction greater than 70 percent with an advanced fuel injector at operating pressures to 800 pounds per square inch absolute (psia). ASCR research is an integral part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Propulsion Program. This program is developing critical low-emission combustion technology that will result in the next generation of gas turbine engines producing 50 to 70 percent less NOx emissions in comparison to 1996 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) limits. The results to date indicate that the AST low-emission combustor goals of reducing NOx emissions by 50 to 70 percent are feasible. U.S. gas turbine manufacturers have started testing the low-emissions combustors at the ASCR. This collaborative testing will enable the industry to develop low-emission combustors at the high pressure and temperature conditions of future subsonic engines. The first stage of the flametube testing has been implemented. Four GE Aircraft Engines low-emissions fuel injector concepts, three Pratt & Whitney concepts, and two Allison concepts have been tested at Lewis ASCR facility. Subsequently, the flametube was removed from the test stand, and the sector combustor was installed. The testing of low emissions sector has begun. Low-emission combustors developed as a result of ASCR research will enable U.S. engine manufacturers to compete on a

  5. Sodium sulfate-induced corrosion of pure nickel and superalloy Udimet 700 in a high velocity burner rig at 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Sodium sulfate-induced corrosion of pure nickel and a commercial nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700 (U-700), were studied at 900 C in a Mach 0.3 burner rig with different Na levels in the combustor. The corrosion rate of Ni was independent of the Na level in the combustor and considerably lower than that measured in laboratory salt spray tests. The lower rates are associated with the deposition of only a small amount of Na2SO4 on the surface of the NiO scale. Corrosion of U-700 was observed to occur in two stages. During the first stage, the corrosion proceeds by reaction of Cr2O3 scale with the Na2SO4 and evaporation of the Na2CrO4 reaction product from the surface of the corroding sample. Cr depletion in the alloy occurs and small sulfide particles are formed in the Cr depletion zone. Extensive sulfidation occurs during the second state of corrosion, and a thick scale forms. The relationship between the corrosion rate of U-700 and the Na level in the combustor gives a good correlation in the range of 0.3 to 1.5 ppm by weight Na. Very low levels of Na in the combustor cause accelerated oxidation of U-700 without producing the typical hot corrosion morphology.

  6. Effect of thermal cycling in a Mach 0.3 burner rig on properties and structure of directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-delta eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Sanders, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to evaluate the effect of cyclic thermal exposures on the mechanical properties of a gamma/gamma prime-delta eutectic alloy parallel to the growth direction. The alloy had a nominal composition by weight of Ni-20 Nb-6 Cr-2.5 Al and was directionally solidified at 3 cm/hr in a furnace with a thermal gradient of at least 200 C/cm. Bars of the alloy were exposed in a Mach 0.3 burner rig and cycled 300 times between 1100 and 425 C. Oxidation-erosion characteristics of the alloy were determined by weight loss measurements at 300-cycle intervals. After cyclic exposure, stress rupture and tensile tests were performed at both 760 and 1040 C. Microstructural changes from cyclic exposure were determined. Thermal cycling resulted in gamma prime coarsening and Widmanstaetten delta precipitation in the gamma phase. An unidentified precipitate, presumably gamma prime, was observed within the delta phase. These microstructural changes did not affect the mechanical properties of the eutectic. High oxidation-erosion weight loss rate was observed.

  7. Digital temperature and velocity control of mach 0.3 atmospheric pressure durability testing burner rigs in long time, unattended cyclic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Hardware and software were developed to implement the hybrid digital control of two Jet A-1 fueled Mach 0.3 burners from startup to completion of a preset number of hot corrosion flame durability cycle tests of materials at 1652 F. This was accomplished by use of a basic language programmable microcomputer and data aquisition and control unit connected together by the IEEE-488 Bus. The absolute specimen temperature was controlled to + or - 3 F by use of digital adjustment of the fuel flow using a P-I-D (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) control algorithm. The specimen temperature was within + or - 2 F of the set point more than 90 percent of the time. Pressure control was achieved by digital adjustment of the combustion air flow using a proportional control algorithm. The burner pressure was controlled at 1.0 + or - 0.02 psig. Logic schemes were incorporated into the system to protect the test specimen from abnormal test conditions in the event of a hardware of software malfunction.

  8. A higher-order projection method for the simulation of unsteady turbulent nonpremixed combustion in an industrial burner

    SciTech Connect

    Pember, R.B.; Almgren, A.S.; Bell, J.B.; Colella, P.; Howell, L.; Lai, M.

    1994-12-01

    The modeling of transient effects in burners is becoming increasingly important. The problem of ensuring the safe performance of an industrial burner, for example, is much more difficult during the startup or shutdown phases of operation. The peak formation of pollutants is also much more dependent on transient behavior, in particular, on peak temperatures, than on average operating conditions. In this paper we present a new methodology for the modeling of unsteady, nonpremixed, reacting flow in industrial burners. The algorithm uses a second-order projection method for unsteady, low-Mach number reacting flow and accounts for species diffusion, convective and radiative heat transfer, viscous transport, turbulence, and chemical kinetics. The time step used by the method is restricted solely by an advective CFL condition. The methodology is applicable only in the low-Mach number regime (M < .3), typically met in industrial burners. The projection method for low-Mach number reacting flow is an extension of a higher-order projection method for incompressible flow [9, 5, 3,4] to the low-Mach number equations of reacting flow. Our method is based on an approximate projection formulation. Radiative transport is modeled using the discrete ordinates method. The main goal of this work is to introduce and investigate the simulation of burners using a higher-order projection method for low-Mach number combustion. As such, the methodology is applied here only to axisymmetric flow in gas-fired burners for which the boundaries can be aligned with a rectangular grid. The perfect gas law is also assumed. In addition, we use a one-step reduced kinetics mechanism, a {kappa} {minus} {epsilon} model for turbulent transport, and a simple turbulent combustion model.

  9. Phase averaging of the precessing vortex core in a swirl burner under piloted and premixed combustion conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Froud, D.; O`Doherty, T.; Syred, N.

    1995-02-01

    The flow patterns produced in and past the exhaust of a 100-KW swirl burner have been investigated experimentally under piloted premixed combustion conditions. The well-known three-dimensional time-dependent instability called the precessing vortex core (PVC) dominates the flow and mixing patterns. The PVC and its associated cycle time were used to trigger a three-component laser anemometry system. Successive cycles were overlaid and phase averaged to give a three-dimensional picture of the rotating flow fields. Measurements were obtained over successive slices of the flow, extending to X/De = 2.5 past the burner exit. A description of the flow was thus obtained in terms of phase averaged tangential, axial and radial velocities in tangential/radial and axial/radial planes. The results confirm previous reported work on the same burner operated isothermally and show that the center of the vortex flow is displaced from the central axis of the burner, creating the PVC phenomena as the center of the vortex precesses around the central axis of symmetry. As a consequence of this displacement the reverse flow zone (RFZ) is also displaced, while also partially lagging behind the PVC by up to 180{degree}. The RFZ acts as a feedback mechanism for the PVC phenomena. As a consequence of the displaced vortex center, flow between the PVC center and the wall is squeezed. Thus, due to angular momentum flux consideration, it produces a considerable increase in tangential velocity and gives the characteristic PVC signal. The displaced RFZ is both rotating through a region of forward flow while also being of an intermittent nature, giving rise to the excellent flame stabilization and mixing characteristics of these types of burners. Similar results were obtained for isothermal and premixed combustion conditions providing the flame was stabilized close to the burner exit nozzle.

  10. Origin of activated combustion in steady-state premixed burner flame with superposition of dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaima, Kazunori; Akashi, Haruaki; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the mechanism of plasma-assisted combustion in a steady-state premixed burner flame. We examined the spatiotemporal variation of the density of atomic oxygen in a premixed burner flame with the superposition of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). We also measured the spatiotemporal variations of the optical emission intensities of Ar and OH. The experimental results reveal that atomic oxygen produced in the preheating zone by electron impact plays a key role in the activation of combustion reactions. This understanding is consistent with that described in our previous paper indicating that the production of “cold OH(A2Σ+)” via CHO + O → OH(A2Σ+) + CO has the sensitive response to the pulsed current of DBD [K. Zaima and K. Sasaki, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 53, 110309 (2014)].

  11. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2014-10-01

    Residential wood burning contributes significantly to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming significant quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle and gas phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings, however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ± 2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in

  12. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Residential wood burning contributes to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas-phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming considerable quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA, and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle- and gas-phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings; however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ±2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high-load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average-load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average-load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in PAH and

  13. Preliminary results from screening tests of commercial catalysts with potential use in gas turbine combustors. II - Combustion test rig evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1976-01-01

    Several commercial monolithic catalysts were tested in a combustion test rig to determine their suitability for use in a gas-turbine combustor primary zone. The catalyst test bed consisted of two to four elements of 12-centimeter diameter by 2.5-centimeter long monolith. Results are presented of the measured combustion efficiency and catalyst bed temperature history for an inlet propane-air mixture temperature of 800 K, a pressure of 300,000 newtons per square meter, inlet velocities of 10 to 25 meters per second and equivalence ratios of 0.1 to 0.3. The best catalysts tested gave combustion efficiencies of virtually 100% for reaction temperatures ranging from 1325 K at 10 meters per second to 1400 K at 25 meters per second. This performance was only possible with fresh catalysts. The catalysts tested were not specifically developed for use at these conditions and showed some loss in activity after about 3 hours' testing.

  14. Opposed jet burner studies of hydrogen combustion with pure and N2, NO-contaminated air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    A counterflow diffusion flame formed by an argon-bathed tubular-opposed jet burner (OJB) was used to determine the 'blowoff' and 'restore' combustion characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures and for jets of air contaminated by NO (which normally occurs in high-enthalpy airflows supplied to hypersonic test facilities for scramjet combustors). Substantial divergence of 'blowoff' and 'restore' limits occurred as H2 mass flux, M(H)2, increased, the H2 jet became richer, and the M(air)/M(H2 + N2) ratio increased from 1 to 3 (molar H2/O2 from 1 to 16). Both OJB limits were sensitive to reactant composition. One to six percent NO in air led to significant N2-corrected decreases in the M(H2) values for 'blowoff' (2-8 percent) and 'restore' (6-12 percent) for mole fractions of H2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.95. However, when H2/O2 was held constant, all N2-corrected changes in M(H2) were negligible.

  15. Experimental study on NOx emission and unburnt carbon of a radial biased swirl burner for coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Xue; Shi'en Hui; Qulan Zhou; Tongmo Xu

    2009-07-15

    Pilot tests were carried out on a 1 MW thermal pulverized coal fired testing furnace. Symmetrical combustion was implemented by use of two whirl burners with dual air adjustment. The burnout air device was installed in various places at the top of the main burner, which consists of a primary air pipe with a varying cross-section and an impact ring. In the primary air pipe, the air pulverized coal (PC) stream was separated into a whirling stream that was thick inside and thin outside, thus realizing the thin-thick distribution at the burner nozzle in the radial direction. From the comparative combustion tests of three coals with relatively great characteristic differences, Shaanbei Shenhua high rank bituminous coal (SH coal), Shanxi Hejin low rank bituminous coal (HJ coal), and Shanxi Changzhi meager coal (CZ coal), were obtained such test results as the primary air ratio, inner secondary air ratio, outer secondary air ratio, impact of the change of outer secondary air, change of the relative position for the layout of burnout air, change of the swirling intensity of the primary air and secondary air, etc., on the NOx emission, and unburnt carbon content in fly ash (CFA). At the same time, the relationship between the NOx emission and burnout ratio and affecting factors of the corresponding test items on the combustion stability and economic results were also acquired. The results may provide a vital guiding significance to engineering designs and practical applications. According to the experimental results, the influence of each individual parameter on NOx formation and unburned carbon in fly ash agrees well with the existing literature. In this study, the influences of various combinations of these parameters are also examined, thus providing some reference for the design of the radial biased swirl burner, the configuration of the furnace, and the distribution of the air. 23 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Importance of atomic oxygen in preheating zone in plasma-assisted combustion of a steady-state premixed burner flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaima, K.; Akashi, H.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-09-01

    It is widely believed that electron impact processes play essential roles in plasma-assisted combustion. However, the concrete roles of high-energy electrons have not been fully understood yet. In this work, we examined the density of atomic oxygen in a premixed burner flame with the superposition of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The density of atomic oxygen in the reaction zone was not affected by the superposition of DBD, indicating that the amount of atomic oxygen produced by combustion reactions was much larger than that produced by electron impact processes. On the other hand, in the preheating zone, we observed high-frequency oscillation of the density of atomic oxygen at the timings of the pulsed current of DBD. The oscillation suggests the rapid consumption of additional atomic oxygen by combustion reactions. A numerical simulation using Chemkin indicates the shortened ignition delay time when adding additional atomic oxygen in the period of low-temperature oxidation. The present results reveals the importance of atomic oxygen, which is produced by the effect of high-energy electrons, in the preheating zone in plasma-assisted combustion of the steady-state premixed burner flame.

  17. Burner systems

    DOEpatents

    Doherty, Brian J.

    1984-07-10

    A burner system particularly useful for downhole deployment includes a tubular combustion chamber unit housed within a tubular coolant jacket assembly. The combustion chamber unit includes a monolithic tube of refractory material whose inner surface defines the combustion zone. A metal reinforcing sleeve surrounds and extends the length of the refractory tube. The inner surface of the coolant jacket assembly and outer surface of the combustion chamber unit are dimensioned so that those surfaces are close to one another in standby condition so that the combustion chamber unit has limited freedom to expand with that expansion being stabilized by the coolant jacket assembly so that compression forces in the refractory tube do not exceed about one-half the safe compressive stress of the material; and the materials of the combustion chamber unit are selected to establish thermal gradient parameters across the combustion chamber unit to maintain the refractory tube in compression during combustion system start up and cool down sequences.

  18. Emissions and properties of Bio-oil and Natural Gas Co-combustion in a Pilot Stabilised Swirl Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Dylan

    Fast pyrolysis oil, or bio-oil, has been investigated to replace traditional fossil fuels in industrial burners. However, flame stability is a challenge due to its high water content. In order to address its instability, bio-oil was co-fired with natural gas in a lab scale 10kW swirl burner at energy ratios from 0% bio-oil to 80% bio-oil. To evaluate the combustion, flame shape, exhaust and particulate emissions, temperatures, as well as infrared emission were monitored. As the bio-oil energy fraction increased, NO emissions increased due to the nitrogen content of bio-oil. CO and particulate emissions increased likely due to carbonaceous residue exiting the combustion zone. Unburnt Hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions increased rapidly as combustion became poor at 60-80% bio-oil energy. The temperature and infrared output decreased with more bio-oil energy. The natural gas proved to be effective at anchoring the bio-oil flame to the nozzle, decreasing instances of extinction or blowout.

  19. Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains a minimum of 189 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Low NO sub x regenerative burner

    SciTech Connect

    Hovis, J.E.; Finke, H.P.

    1991-01-08

    This patent describes improvements in a regenerative burner having a regenerative bed, a burner port and a fuel nozzle. The improvement comprises: a burner baffle having apertures therein for selectively directing combustion air and inducing combustion gas recirculation into a primary combustion zone for suppressing NO{sub x} emissions, the baffle and the fuel nozzle being positioned substantially adjacent the burner port and being substantially coplanar in a plane perpendicular to a burner axis.

  1. Combustion of a Methane-Air Mixture in a Slot Burner with an Inert Insert in Mass Transfer to the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, A. Yu.; Moiseeva, K. M.

    2016-03-01

    A problem on combustion of a methane-air mixture in a slot burner with an internal insert in mass transfer from the burner's exterior wall to the environment has been solved. A mathematical formulation of the problem takes account of the dependence of the diffusion, thermal-conductivity, and heat-transfer coefficients on temperature, and also of the heat removal from the gas to the environment by convective and radiant heat transfer. A numerical investigation has been carried out in a one-dimensional mathematical formulation of the problem in dimensional variables. The boundary of existence of a stable high-temperature regime of combustion of the methane-air mixture has been determined as a function of the rate of feed of the gas, the environmental temperature, and the width of the flow area of the burner.

  2. The development of an optically accessible, high-power combustion test rig.

    PubMed

    Slabaugh, Carson D; Pratt, Andrew C; Lucht, Robert P; Meyer, Scott E; Benjamin, Michael; Lyle, Kent; Kelsey, Mark

    2014-03-01

    This work summarizes the development of a gas turbine combustion experiment which will allow advanced optical measurements to be made at realistic engine conditions. Facility requirements are addressed, including instrumentation and control needs for remote operation when working with high energy flows. The methodology employed in the design of the optically accessible combustion chamber is elucidated, including window considerations and thermal management of the experimental hardware under extremely high heat loads. Experimental uncertainties are also quantified. The stable operation of the experiment is validated using multiple techniques and the boundary conditions are verified. The successful prediction of operating conditions by the design analysis is documented and preliminary data are shown to demonstrate the capability of the experiment to produce high-fidelity datasets for advanced combustion research. PMID:24689618

  3. Numerical simulation of ash vaporization during pulverized coal combustion in the laboratory-scale single-burner furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Jiancai Sui; Minghou Xu; Jihua Qiu; Yu Qiao; Yun Yu; Xiaowei Liu; Xiangpeng Gao

    2005-08-01

    CFD tools have been developed to effectively simulate complex, reacting, multiphase flows that exist in utility boilers. In this paper, a model of ash vaporization was established and integrated into a self-developed CFD code to predict ash vaporization in the coal combustion process. Experimental data from a single-particle combustion was used to validate the above model. The calibrated model was then applied to simulate the ash vaporization in a 92.9 kW laboratory-scale single-burner furnace. The effects of different combustion conditions, including air staging, on the ash vaporization were investigated. The results showed that the fraction of ash vaporization is mostly sensitive to coal particle temperature. Ash vaporization primarily occurred after a short interval along the coal particle trajectories when the particle temperatures increased to 1800 K. Air staging influenced the ash vaporization by changing the gas temperature distribution in the furnace. The simulation results showed that the more extreme the staging condition, the lower the overall peak temperature, and hence the lower the amount of ash vaporization. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Diesel fuel burner for diesel emissions control system

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Cynthia C.; Mathis, Jeffrey A.

    2006-04-25

    A burner for use in the emissions system of a lean burn internal combustion engine. The burner has a special burner head that enhances atomization of the burner fuel. Its combustion chamber is designed to be submersed in the engine exhaust line so that engine exhaust flows over the outer surface of the combustion chamber, thereby providing efficient heat transfer.

  5. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, T.

    1994-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared(PIR) burner at various barometric pressures (operating altitude) and gas compositions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. In this program, the theoretical basis for the behavior of PIR burners will be established through analysis of the combustion, heat and mass transfer, and other related processes which determine the performance of PIR burners. Based on the results of this study, a first order model of the performance of the burner, including radiant output will be developed. The model will be applied to predict the performance of the selected burner and modified through comparison with test results. Concurrently, an experimental setup will be devised and built. This experimental rig will be a modified appliance, capable of measuring the heat and combustion product output, as well as providing a means by which the radiant heat output can be measured. The burner will be selected from an existing commercial appliance, a commercial deep fat fryer, and will be of a scale that will be compatible with the laboratory facilities in the Combustion Laboratory at Clark Atlanta University. Theoretical analysis and formulation of the PIR burner performance model has been started and the development of the test facilities and experimental setup has also been initiated. These are described.

  6. Effects of arc current on the life in burner rig thermal cycling of plasma sprayed ZrOsub2-Ysub2Osub3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of thermal cycle life data for four sets of eight thermal barrier coated specimens representing arc currents (plasma gun power) of 525, 600, 800, or 950 amps is presented. The ZrO2-8Y2O3/NiCrAlY plasma spray coated Rene 41 rods were thermal cycled to 1040 C in a Mach 0.3-Jet A/air burner flame. The experimental results indicate the existance of a minimum or threshold power level which coating life expectancy is less than 500 cycles. Above the threshold power level, coating life expectancy more than doubles and increases with arc current.

  7. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  8. The effect of Cr, Co, Al, Mo and Ta on a series of cast Ni-base superalloys on the stability of an aluminide coating during cyclic oxidation in Mach 0.3 burner rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.; Barrett, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of varying the content of Co, Cr, Mo, Ta, and Al in a series of cast Ni-based gamma/gamma'superalloys on the behavior of aluminide coatings was studied in burner rig cyclic oxidation tests at 1100 C. The alloys had nominally fixed levels of Ti, W, Cb, Zr, C, and B. The alloy compositions were based on a full 2(sup 5)-fractional statistical design supplemented by 10 star point alloys and a center point alloy. This full central composite design of 43 alloys plus two additional alloys with extreme Al levels allowed a complete second degree estimating equation to be derived from the 5-compositional variables. The weight change/time data for the coated samples fitted well to the paralinear oxidation model and enabled a modified oxidation attack parameter, K'(sub a) to be derived to rank the alloys and log K' (sub a ) to be used as the dependent variable in the estimating equation to determine the oxidation resistance of the coating as a function of the underlying alloy content. The most protective aluminide coatings are associated with the highest possible base ally contents of CR and Al and at a 4 percent Ta level. The Mo and Co effects interact but at fixed levels of 0, 5, or 10% Co. A 4% Mo level is optimum.

  9. LOW NOX BURNER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.

    2004-09-30

    The objective of the task is to develop concepts for ultra low NOx burners. One approach that has been tested previously uses internal recirculation of hot gases and the objective was to how to implement variable recirculation rates during burner operation. The second approach was to use fuel oil aerosolization (vaporization) and combustion in a porous medium in a manner similar to gas-fired radiant burners. This task is trying the second approach with the use of a somewhat novel, prototype system for aerosolization of the liquid fuel.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL RADIATIVELY/CONDUCTIVELY STABILIZED BURNER FOR SIGNIFICANT REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSIONS AND FOR ADVANCING THE MODELING AND UNDERSTANDING OF PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Noam Lior; Stuart W. Churchill

    2003-10-01

    The primary objective of the proposed study was the study and analysis of, and design recommendations for, a novel radiatively-conductively stabilized combustion (RCSC) process for pulverized coal, which, based on our prior studies with both fluid fuels and pulverized coal, holds a high promise to reduce NO{sub x} production significantly. We have primarily engaged in continuing and improving our process modeling and analysis, obtained a large amount of quantitative information about the effects of the major parameters on NO{sub x} production, conducted an extensive exergy analysis of the process, evaluated the practicalities of employing the Radiatively-Conductively Stabilized Combustor (RCSC) to large power and heat plants, and improved the experimental facility. Prior experimental work has proven the feasibility of the combustor, but slagging during coal combustion was observed and should be dealt with. The primary outcomes and conclusions from the study are: (1) we developed a model and computer program that represents the pulverized coal combustion in the RCSC, (2) the model predicts that NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced by a number of methods, detailed in the report. (3) the exergy analysis points out at least a couple of possible ways to improve the exergetic efficiency in this combustor: increasing the effectiveness of thermal feedback, and adjusting the combustor mixture exit location, (4) because of the low coal flow rates necessitated in this study to obtain complete combustion in the burner, the size of a burner operating under the considered conditions would have to be up to an order of magnitude, larger than comparable commercial burners, but different flow configurations of the RCSC can yield higher feed rates and smaller dimensions, and should be investigated. Related to this contract, eleven papers were published in journals and conference proceedings, and ten invited presentations were given at university and research institutions, as well as at

  11. Preliminary results from screening tests of commercial catalysts with potential use in gas turbine combustors. Part 2: Combustion test rig evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1976-01-01

    Several commercial monolithic catalysts were tested in a combustion test rig to determine their suitability for use in a gas turbine combuster primary zone. The catalyst test bed consisted of two to four elements of 12-centimeter diameter by 2.5-centimeter long monolith. Results are presented of the measured combustion efficiency and catalyst bed temperature history for an inlet propane-air mixture temperature of 800 K, a pressure of 300,000 newtons per square meter, inlet velocities of 10 to 25 meters per second and equivalence ratios of 0.1 to 0.3. The best catalysts tested gave combustion efficiencies of virtually 100 percent for reaction temperatures ranging from 1,325 K at 10 meters per second to 1,400 K at 25 meters per second. This performance was only possible with fresh catalysts. The catalysts tested were not specifically developed for use at these conditions and showed some loss in activity after about 3 hours' testing.

  12. Low NO{sub x} combustion system with DSVS{trademark} rotating classifier retrofit for a 630 MW{sub e} cell burner unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, S.A.; Maringo, G.J.; Shah, A.I.; Madden, V.F.

    1996-12-31

    New England Power Company`s (NEP) 630 MW{sub e} Brayton Point Unit 3 is a universal pressure (UP) type supercritical boiler originally equipped with pulverized coal (PC) fired cell burners. In order to comply with the Phase 1 NO{sub x} emissions requirements under Title I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the unit has been retrofitted with a low NO{sub x} staged combustion system during the spring 1995 outage. The unit was restarted in early May 1995 and was operating under the State Compliance emission levels by the end of the month. Additional optimization testing was performed in August, 1995. The retrofit scope consisted of replacing the cell burners with low NO{sub x} DRB-XCL{reg_sign} type PC/oil burners and overfire air ports within the existing open windbox, with no change in the firing pattern. A 70% NO{sub x} reduction from baseline levels was achieved while maintaining acceptable unburned carbon (UBC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels. To maintain low UBC levels, the scope included modifying the MPS-89 pulverizers by replacing the existing stationary classifiers with the B and W DSVS{trademark} (Dynamically Staged Variable Speed) two stage rotating classifiers. The DSVS{trademark} classifiers provide higher fineness for UBC control without derating the mill capacity. This paper will describe the project and discuss the retrofit emissions data. The paper will conclude with recommendations for retrofitting other similarly designed units.

  13. Pulverized coal burner

    DOEpatents

    Sivy, Jennifer L.; Rodgers, Larry W.; Koslosy, John V.; LaRue, Albert D.; Kaufman, Keith C.; Sarv, Hamid

    1998-01-01

    A burner having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO.sub.x burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO.sub.x back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing.

  14. Pulverized coal burner

    DOEpatents

    Sivy, J.L.; Rodgers, L.W.; Koslosy, J.V.; LaRue, A.D.; Kaufman, K.C.; Sarv, H.

    1998-11-03

    A burner is described having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO{sub x} burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO{sub x} back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing. 8 figs.

  15. Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Penrod

    2006-12-31

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

  16. Design and Checkout of a High Speed Research Nozzle Evaluation Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Wolter, John D.

    1997-01-01

    The High Flow Jet Exit Rig (HFJER) was designed to provide simulated mixed flow turbojet engine exhaust for one- seventh scale models of advanced High Speed Research test nozzles. The new rig was designed to be used at NASA Lewis Research Center in the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig and the 8x6 Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Capabilities were also designed to collect nozzle thrust measurement, aerodynamic measurements, and acoustic measurements when installed at the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig. Simulated engine exhaust can be supplied from a high pressure air source at 33 pounds of air per second at 530 degrees Rankine and nozzle pressure ratios of 4.0. In addition, a combustion unit was designed from a J-58 aircraft engine burner to provide 20 pounds of air per second at 2000 degrees Rankine, also at nozzle pressure ratios of 4.0. These airflow capacities were designed to test High Speed Research nozzles with exhaust areas from eighteen square inches to twenty-two square inches. Nozzle inlet flow measurement is available through pressure and temperature sensors installed in the rig. Research instrumentation on High Speed Research nozzles is available with a maximum of 200 individual pressure and 100 individual temperature measurements. Checkout testing was performed in May 1997 with a 22 square inch ASME long radius flow nozzle. Checkout test results will be summarized and compared to the stated design goals.

  17. SITE PROGRAM APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS ASSESSMENT OF SUPERFUND APPLICATIONS FOR THE AMERICAN COMBUSTION INC. PYRETRON OXYGEN ENHANCED BURNER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incineration is widely used to clean up Superfund sites. Modifications which improve the efficiency with which waste can be incinerated are therefore of interest to EPA. Oxygen/air burners are of interest because their installation on conventional incinerators can allow for signi...

  18. Cryogenic Feedthrough Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skaff, Antony

    2009-01-01

    The cryogenic feedthrough test rig (CFTR) allows testing of instrumentation feedthroughs at liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen temperature and pressure extremes (dangerous process fluid) without actually exposing the feedthrough to a combustible or explosive process fluid. In addition, the helium used (inert gas), with cryogenic heat exchangers, exposes the feedthrough to that environment that allows definitive leak rates of feedthrough by typical industry-standard helium mass spectrometers.

  19. ACHIEVING NEW SOURCE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS (NSPS) EMISSION STANDARDS THROUGH INTEGRATION OF LOW-NOx BURNERS WITH AN OPTIMIZATION PLAN FOR BOILER COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Penrod; David Moyeda

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub x} emissions levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project consists of the integration of low-NO{sub x} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The project includes the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software that can optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub x} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program is being performed in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler is being equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler will be equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub x} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler will be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub x} emissions to be achieved. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II will permit optimization of the boiler performance, output, and emissions. During this reporting period, efforts were focused on Phase I and Phase II activities. The furnace sensors were procured and installed in February 2003. Baseline testing was performed following the sensor installation. The low-NO{sub x} burner modifications, the coal flow dampers, and the coal flow monitoring system were procured and installed during a boiler outage in March 2003. Process design activities were performed to support design of the equipment installed and to develop specifications for the overfire air system. The overfire air system preliminary engineering design was initiated.

  20. NASA Glenn's Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig Supported the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Project's Emissions Reduction Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Subsonic Combustor Rig (ASCR) is NASA Glenn Research Center's unique high-pressure, high-temperature combustor facility supporting the emissions reduction element of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project. The facility can simulate combustor inlet test conditions up to a pressure of 900 psig and a temperature of 1200 F (non-vitiated). ASCR completed three sector tests in fiscal year 2003 for General Electric, Pratt & Whitney, and Rolls-Royce North America. This will provide NASA and U.S. engine manufacturers the information necessary to develop future low-emission combustors and will help them to better understand durability and operability at these high pressures and temperatures.

  1. Monitoring near burner slag deposition with a hybrid neural network system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. K.; Wilcox, S. J.; Ward, J.; Lewitt, M.

    2003-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a system to detect and monitor slag growth in the near burner region in a pulverized-fuel (pf) fired combustion rig. These slag deposits are commonly known as 'eyebrows' and can markedly affect the stability of the burner. The study thus involved a series of experiments with two different coals over a range of burner conditions using a 150 kW pf burner fitted with simulated eyebrows. These simulated eyebrows consisted of annular refractory inserts mounted immediately in front of the original burner quarl. Data obtained by monitoring the infra-red radiation and sound emitted by the flame were processed to yield time and frequency-domain features, which were then used to train and test a hybrid neural network. This hybrid 'intelligent' system was based on self organizing map and radial-basis-function neural networks. This system was able to classify different sized eyebrows with a success rate of at least 99.5%. Consequently, it is possible not only to detect the presence of an eyebrow by monitoring the flame, but also the network can provide an estimate of the size of the deposit, over a reasonably large range of conditions.

  2. Experimental and numerical study of the accuracy of flame-speed measurements for methane/air combustion in a slot burner

    SciTech Connect

    Selle, L.; Ferret, B.; Poinsot, T.

    2011-01-15

    Measuring the velocities of premixed laminar flames with precision remains a controversial issue in the combustion community. This paper studies the accuracy of such measurements in two-dimensional slot burners and shows that while methane/air flame speeds can be measured with reasonable accuracy, the method may lack precision for other mixtures such as hydrogen/air. Curvature at the flame tip, strain on the flame sides and local quenching at the flame base can modify local flame speeds and require corrections which are studied using two-dimensional DNS. Numerical simulations also provide stretch, displacement and consumption flame speeds along the flame front. For methane/air flames, DNS show that the local stretch remains small so that the local consumption speed is very close to the unstretched premixed flame speed. The only correction needed to correctly predict flame speeds in this case is due to the finite aspect ratio of the slot used to inject the premixed gases which induces a flow acceleration in the measurement region (this correction can be evaluated from velocity measurement in the slot section or from an analytical solution). The method is applied to methane/air flames with and without water addition and results are compared to experimental data found in the literature. The paper then discusses the limitations of the slot-burner method to measure flame speeds for other mixtures and shows that it is not well adapted to mixtures with a Lewis number far from unity, such as hydrogen/air flames. (author)

  3. Augmented RIGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminskas, R. A.; Mcguire, D.

    1974-01-01

    The results of the Phase 2 Resonant Infrasonic Gauging System (RIGS) development program are presented. The program consisted of design, fabrication, and testing of an "augmented" RIGS concept. The RIGS is a gauging system capable of measuring propellant quantities in zero-g as well as under accelerated conditions. Except for hydrogen, it can be used to gauge virtually any propellant in liquid form, including cryogenics. The gage consists of a sensor unit which is attached to the propellant tank and an electronic control unit which may be positioned separately from the sensor. The control unit receives signals from the sensor as well as the propellant temperature measurement and the ullage gas pressure, and computes the propellant quantity in the tank.

  4. Advances in measurements and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in burners/combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. X.

    2009-02-01

    Innovative coal combustors were developed, and measurement and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in such combustors were done in the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University. LDV/PDPA measurements are made to understand the behavior of turbulent gas-particle flows in coal combustors. Coal combustion test was done for the non-slagging cyclone coal combustor. The full two-fluid model developed by the present author was used to simulate turbulent gas-particle flows, coal combustion and NOx formation. It is found by measurements and simulation that the optimum design can give large-size recirculation zones for improving the combustion performance for all the combustors. The combustion test shows that the nonslagging coal combustor can burn 3-5mm coal particles with good combustion efficiency and low NO emission. Simulation in comparison with experiments indicates that the swirl number can significantly affect the NO formation in the swirl coal combustor.

  5. Airfoil cooling hole plugging by combustion gas impurities of the type found in coal derived fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The plugging of airfoil cooling holes by typical coal-derived fuel impurities was evaluated using doped combustion gases in an atmospheric pressure burner rig. Very high specific cooling air mass flow rates reduced or eliminated plugging. The amount of flow needed was a function of the composition of the deposit. It appears that plugging of film-cooled holes may be a problem for gas turbines burning coal-derived fuels.

  6. Reactivity of NH{sub 3} and HCN during low-grade fuel combustion in a swirling flow burner

    SciTech Connect

    Chunyang Wu; Dale Tree; Larry Baxter

    2007-07-01

    The experimentally measured major gas species profiles in the near-burner region provide insight on flame structure and pollutant formation mechanisms during pilot-scale biomass, coal, and biomass-coal cofiring tests. All tests involved separately metered but jointly fed coal and biomass in a variable-swirl burner. Locally fuel-rich regions form under overall fuel-lean conditions, as is typical of such flames, although there are no regions of the combustor that indicate average oxygen concentration reaches zero. The data strongly suggest that instantaneous oxygen concentrations reach zero, so the average finite values are indicative of turbulent intermittency between fuel-rich and fuel-lean eddies. Such intermittency impacts the entire flame structure in these and many previously published flames, though this feature may not be widely appreciated. Detectable HCN concentrations appear in the fuel-rich eddies in the coal-dominated flames with little or no detectable NH{sub 3}, whereas NH{sub 3} appears in the biomass-dominated flames with little or no detectable HCN. These data indicate that biomass predominantly forms NH{sub 3} whereas coal predominantly forms HCN as stable, fuel-rich, gas-phase compounds. Kinetics calculations demonstrate that NH{sub 3} has higher thermal stability and is more reactive within the flame front than HCN. Both species have similar conversion to NO at the same temperatures. The results confirm that NOx precursor formation depends on the parent fuel and form of nitrogen, at least for the coal and biomass fuels investigated here. 24 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Combustion initiation and evolution during the first 400 ms in a gas burner at 10 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strojnik, M.; Paez, G.; Scholl, M. K.

    2013-11-01

    Employing the IR at 10 μm we record, process, and visualize the combustion ignition process and propagation in a domestic stovetop gas heater, during the first half of a second after the electrical spark has initiated it. We record the IR imagery at a rate of 770 frames per second. Only 315 frames are employed to record the propagation around the heater rim in about 0.4 s. Due to the rapidity of the combustion evolution, the exposure time of 80 μs was implemented electronically. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reporting of the exact processes that take place during the combustion initiation, including precise determination of time and place of this occurrence. Furthermore, we believe that this work presents the first description of the combustion evolution during the initial half a second after the successful ignition. The visualization led the designers to implement a more effective and safe design of the electric spark sequence, fuel influx ducts, and the combustion chamber configuration.

  8. BURNER DESIGN CRITERIA FOR NOX CONTROL FROM LOW-BTU GAS COMBUSTION: VOLUME II. ELEVATED FUEL TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a program to provide quantitative data on combustion emissions from high-temperature low-Btu gas. It complements a recently completed EPA project that evaluated emissions resulting from the burning of ambient-temperature low-Btu gas. The experimental r...

  9. Wood fuel in suspension burners

    SciTech Connect

    Wolle, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    Experience and criteria for solid fuel suspension burning is presented based on more than ten years of actual experience with commercially installed projects. Fuel types discussed range from dried wood with less than 15% moisture content, wet basis, to exotic biomass material such as brewed tea leaves and processed coffee grounds. Single burner inputs range from 1,465 kW (5,000 Mbh) to 13,771 kW (47,000 Mbh) as well as multiple burner applications with support burning using fuel oil and/or natural gas. General requirements for self-sustaining combustion will be reviewed as applied to suspension solid fuel burning, together with results of what can happen if these requirements are not met. Solid fuel preparation, sizing, transport, storage, and metering control is essential for proper feed. Combustion chamber volume, combustion air requirements, excess air, and products of combustion are reviewed, together with induced draft fan sizing. (Refs. 7).

  10. Chemical and toxicological characterization of residential oil burner emissions: I. Yields and chemical characterization of extractables from combustion of No. 2 fuel oil at different Bacharach Smoke Numbers and firing cycles.

    PubMed Central

    Leary, J A; Biemann, K; Lafleur, A L; Kruzel, E L; Prado, G P; Longwell, J P; Peters, W A

    1987-01-01

    Particulates and complex organic mixtures were sampled from the exhaust of a flame retention head residential oil burner combusting No. 2 fuel oil at three firing conditions: continuous at Bacharach Smoke No. 1, and cyclic (5 min on, 10 min off) at Smoke Nos. 1 and 5. The complex mixtures were recovered by successive Soxhlet extraction of filtered particulates and XAD-2 sorbent resin with methylene chloride (DCM) and then methanol (MeOH). Bacterial mutagenicity [see Paper II (8)] was found in the DCM extractables. Samples of DCM extracts from the two cyclic firing conditions and of the raw fuel were separated by gravity column chromatography on alumina. The resulting fractions were further characterized by a range of instrumental methods. Average yields of both unextracted particulates and of DCM extractables, normalized to a basis of per unit weight of fuel fired, were lower for continuous firing than for cyclic firing. For cyclic firing, decreasing the smoke number lowered the particulates emissions but only slightly reduced the average yield of DCM extractables. These and similar observations, here reported for two other oil burners, show that adjusting the burner to a lower smoke number has little effect on, or may actually increase, emissions of organic extractables of potential public health interest. Modifications of the burner firing cycle aimed at approaching continuous operation offer promise for reducing the amount of complex organic emissions. Unburned fuel accounted for roughly half of the DCM extractables from cyclic firing of the flame retention head burner at high and low smoke number. Large (i.e., greater than 3 ring) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were not observed in the DCM extractables from cyclic firing. However, nitroaromatics, typified by alkylated nitronaphthalenes, alkyl-nitrobiphenyls, and alkyl-nitrophenanthrenes were found in a minor subfraction containing a significant portion of the total mutagenic activity of the cyclic low

  11. Accurate burner air flow measurement for low NO{sub x} burners

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, D.; Penterson, C.

    1998-07-01

    In 1990, Congress enacted an amendment to the Clean Air Act that required reductions in NO{sub x} emissions through the application of low NO{sub x} burner systems on fossil fueled utility steam generators. For most of the existing steam generator population, the original burning equipment incorporated highly turbulent burners that created significant in-furnace flame interaction. Thus, the measurement and control of air flow to the individual burners was much less critical than in recent years with low NO{sub x} combustion systems. With low NO{sub x} systems, the reduction of NO{sub x} emissions, as well as minimizing flyash unburned carbon levels, is very much dependent on the ability to control the relative ratios of air and fuel on a per-burner basis and their rate of mixing, particularly in the near burner zones. Air Monitor Corporation (AMC) and DB Riley, Inc. (DBR), and a large Midwestern electric utility have successfully developed and applied AMC's equipment to low NO{sub x} coal burners in order to enhance NO{sub x} control combustion systems. The results have improved burner optimization and provided real time continuous air flow balancing capability and the control of individual burner stoichiometries. To date, these enhancements have been applied to wall-fired low NO{sub x} systems for balancing individual burner air flows in a common windbox and to staged combustion systems. Most recently, calibration testing in a wind tunnel facility of AMC's individual burner air measurement (IBAM{trademark}) probes installed in DB Riley's low NO{sub x} CCV{reg{underscore}sign} burners has demonstrated the ability to produce reproducible and consistent air flow measurement accurate to within 5%. This paper will summarize this product development and quantify the benefits of its application to low NO{sub x} combustion systems.

  12. Experimental Evaluation of a Low Emissions High Performance Duct Burner for Variable Cycle Engines (VCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Mador, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    An evaluation was conducted with a three stage Vorbix duct burner to determine the performance and emissions characteristics of the concept and to refine the configuration to provide acceptable durability and operational characteristics for its use in the variable cycle engine (VCE) testbed program. The tests were conducted at representative takeoff, transonic climb, and supersonic cruise inlet conditions for the VSCE-502B study engine. The test stand, the emissions sampling and analysis equipment, and the supporting flow visualization rigs are described. The performance parameters including the fuel-air ratio, the combustion efficiency/exit temperature, thrust efficiency, and gaseous emissions calculations are defined. The test procedures are reviewed and the results are discussed.

  13. Intensification of heat transfer by changing the burner nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DzurÅák, Róbert; Kizek, Ján; Jablonský, Gustáv

    2016-06-01

    Thermal aggregates are using burner which burns combustible mixture with an oxidizing agent, by adjustment of the burner nozzle we can achieve better conditions of combustion to intensify heat transfer at furnace space. The aim of the present paper was using a computer program Ansys Workbench to create a computer simulation which analyzes the impact of the nozzle on the shape of a flame thereby intensifies heat transfer in rotary drum furnaces and radiation heat transfer from the flue gas into the furnace space. Article contains analysis of the geometry of the burner for achieving temperature field in a rotary drum furnace using oxy-combustion and the practical results of computer simulations

  14. Low Emission Combustor Technology Program. Final report, October 1, 1982-October 31, 1984. [Multiannular Swirl Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.G.; Toof, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    Purpose is to evaluate coal water mixture (CWM) in a low emissions staged rich-lean combustor for stationary combustion turbines. This evaluation was made with the Multiannular Swirl Burner (MASB). The MASB configuration was scaled up from the 5-inch diameter previously tested to a 10-inch diameter and modified for the combustion of CWM and for testing at 3 to 10 atmospheres pressure and 2000/sup 0/F (1094/sup 0/C) turbine inlet temperature. This testing was performed in the Westinghouse Advanced Combustor Development Rig at Concordville, Pa. Testing was done with CWM and No. 2 fuel oil for comparison. In addition, No. 2 fuel oil doped with pyridine was used to simulate the effect of fuel bound nitrogen on NO/sub x/ production. The design of the MASB for CWM combustion has encompassed several subtasks which provided valuable design data. These include numerical combustor flow field calculations by the computer code CORA 2-83, nozzle spray tests on CWM to select the proper nozzle, and the selection of the appropriate CWM. Test results to date on the MASB operating in both the rich-lean mode and lean-lean mode indicate that CWM combustion in a metal walled combustor such as the MASB is feasible. The NO/sub x/ results for oil show an increase in the NO/sub x/ from the 5-inch MASB obtained previously. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.9% were obtained on oil. CWM combustion with a methane gas pilot has shown combustion efficiencies up to 99.5%. However, combustion to date of CWM alone has only shown combustion efficiencies up to 53%.

  15. Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Leto, Anthony

    1983-01-01

    A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

  16. Radiant energy burner

    SciTech Connect

    Granberg, D.N.

    1986-07-08

    In a radiant energy burner, a combustion element is described comprising a porous metal support having an inner surface and an outer surface, a woven fabric disposed on the outer surface of the support and composed of substantially continuous ceramic fibers, connecting means for securing end portions of the fabric to the support, the connecting means being metal and being enclosed in a ring-like sleeve of woven ceramic fiber. The central portion of the fabric is free of attachment to the support, supply means including a blower to supply a gaseous fuel through the support and the fabric, and fuel igniting means disposed adjacent to the outer surface of the fabric to ignite the fuel.

  17. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant

  18. Coal-water mixture fuel burner

    DOEpatents

    Brown, T.D.; Reehl, D.P.; Walbert, G.F.

    1985-04-29

    The present invention represents an improvement over the prior art by providing a rotating cup burner arrangement for use with a coal-water mixture fuel which applies a thin, uniform sheet of fuel onto the inner surface of the rotating cup, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel on the inner surface of the cup, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge from the rotating cup, and further atomizes the fuel as it enters the combustion chamber by subjecting it to the high shear force of a high velocity air flow. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide for improved combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel. It is another object of the present invention to provide an arrangement for introducing a coal-water mixture fuel into a combustion chamber in a manner which provides improved flame control and stability, more efficient combustion of the hydrocarbon fuel, and continuous, reliable burner operation. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide for the continuous, sustained combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel without the need for a secondary combustion source such as natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a burner arrangement capable of accommodating a coal-water mixture fuel having a wide range of rheological and combustion characteristics in providing for its efficient combustion. 7 figs.

  19. RQL Integrated Module Rig Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, Frederick S.; Ols, John T.; Padget, Frederick C., IV; Siskind, Kenneth S.; Holdeman, James D. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the activities conducted under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.0.2.7 of the NASA Critical Components (CPC) Program to evaluate the low emissions potential of a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor capable of achieving the program goal of emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOxEI) less than 5 gm/Kg fuel at the supersonic light condition while maintaining combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.9 percent. The chosen combustor module would then be tested in the subscale annular rig test prior to testing in the subscale core engine demonstrator, if the RQL concept were to be chosen at the Combustor Downselect.

  20. FIELD EVALUATION OF LOW-EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON UTILITY BOILERS. VOLUME I. DISTRIBUTED MIXING BURNER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study in which NOx emissions and general combustion performance characteristics of four burners were evaluated under experimental furnace conditions. Of primary interest was the performance of a low NOx Distributed Mixing Burner (DMB), which was test...

  1. Influence of staged-air on airflow, combustion characteristics and NO(x) emissions of a down-fired pulverized-coal 300 MW(e) utility boiler with direct flow split burners.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengqi; Kuang, Min; Zhang, Jia; Han, Yunfeng; Zhu, Qunyi; Yang, Lianjie; Kong, Weiguang

    2010-02-01

    Cold airflow experiments were conducted to investigate the aerodynamic field in a small-scale furnace of a down-fired pulverized-coal 300 MW(e) utility boiler arranged with direct flow split burners enriched by cyclones. By increasing the staged-air ratio, a deflected flow field appeared in the lower furnace; larger staged-air ratios produced larger deflections. Industrial-sized experiments on a full-scale boiler were also performed at different staged-air damper openings with measurements taken of gas temperatures in the burner region and near the right-side wall, wall heat fluxes, and gas components (O(2), CO, and NO(x)) in the near-wall region. Combustion was unstable at staged-air damper openings below 30%. For openings of 30% and 40%, late ignition of the pulverized coal developed and large differences arose in gas temperatures and heat fluxes between the regions near the front and rear walls. In conjunction, carbon content in the fly ash was high and boiler efficiency was low with high NO(x) emission above 1200 mg/m(3) (at 6% O(2) dry). For fully open dampers, differences in gas temperatures and heat fluxes, carbon in fly ash and NO(x) emission decreased yielding an increase in boiler efficiency. The optimal setting is fully open staged-air dampers. PMID:20050661

  2. Radiant-burner technology base - burner research and development. Final report, February 1986-January 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Tidball, R.K.; Donaldson, R.J.; Gorrerba, J.A.

    1989-03-01

    The objective of the three-year project was to improve the technology of direct, gas-fired, surface-combustion radiant burners to promote their wider application in industrial process-heating applications. Four types of burners were considered, including Ceramic Fiber, Ported Ceramic Tile, Porous Ceramic Foam, and Sintered Metal Fiber constructions. For each of these, specific goals included increasing surface firing capacities, reducing materials degradation, and determining radiant output over the useful operating range of each burner. This was achieved by characterizing thermal and combustion performance and degradation mechanisms, and developing design materials, and fabrications improvements to achieve acceptable durability in industrial process heating environments. All literature collected during the project was compiled into a data base for access through GRI's Library Services DIALOG information service. The project had several significant results. First, a large body of applications data was generated which can be used to properly match advanced burners to specific industrial processes. A ceramic fiber burner formulation was developed that increases life in severe industrial environments by over a factor of two. The sintered metal fiber burner demonstrated even longer lifetime in these environments. Improvements were identified for porous ceramic foam burners.

  3. High-Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) Facility Completed for Quantitative Laser Diagnostics Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2002-01-01

    A gas-fueled high-pressure combustion facility with optical access, which was developed over the last 2 years, has just been completed. The High Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center can operate at sustained pressures up to 60 atm with a variety of gaseous fuels and liquid jet fuel. The facility is unique as it is the only continuous-flow, hydrogen-capable, 60-atm rig in the world with optical access. It will provide researchers with new insights into flame conditions that simulate the environment inside the ultra-high-pressure-ratio combustion chambers of tomorrow's advanced aircraft engines. The facility provides optical access to the flame zone, enabling the calibration of nonintrusive optical diagnostics to measure chemical species and temperature. The data from the HPGB rig enables the validation of numerical codes that simulate gas turbine combustors, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC). The validation of such numerical codes is often best achieved with nonintrusive optical diagnostic techniques that meet these goals: information-rich (multispecies) and quantitative while providing good spatial and time resolution. Achieving these goals is a challenge for most nonintrusive optical diagnostic techniques. Raman scattering is a technique that meets these challenges. Raman scattering occurs when intense laser light interacts with molecules to radiate light at a shifted wavelength (known as the Raman shift). This shift in wavelength is unique to each chemical species and provides a "fingerprint" of the different species present. The facility will first be used to gather a comprehensive data base of laser Raman spectra at high pressures. These calibration data will then be used to quantify future laser Raman measurements of chemical species concentration and temperature in this facility and other facilities that use Raman scattering.

  4. Charcoal burner

    SciTech Connect

    Bakic, M.C.

    1988-12-27

    A combustible fuel apparatus is described comprising: side walls formed contiguous with and extending upward from a base and converging to form a closed container, having stacked charcoal fuel particles therein. The base may be placed directly on a substantially horizontal surface and the container may be ignited and substantially burned to ash, and the charcoal fuel particles may be ignited and sufficiently burned for cooking, wherein the charcoal fuel particles are stacked on the base in a relatively stable position prior to the igniting of the container, and are maintained in a relatively stable position during and after the igniting and burning of the container, whereby a mound of ignited charcoal fuel particles remains on the substantially horizontal surface after the burning of the container, the mound having a configuration substantially similar to the shape of the container prior to the combustion thereof.

  5. Improved radiant burner material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.V.; Shoultz, R.A.; Bourque, M.M.; Milewski, E.B.

    1998-01-01

    Under DOE/ERIP funds were made available to Superkinetic, Inc. for the development of an improved radiant burner material. Three single crystal ceramic fibers were produced and two fiber materials were made into felt for testing as radiant burner screens. The materials were alpha alumina and alpha silicon nitride. These fibers were bonded with a high temperature ceramic and made into a structurally sound trusswork like screen composed of million psi fiber members. These screens were about 5% solid for 95 porosity as needed to permit the flow of combustable natural gas and air mixture. Combustion test proved that they performed very satisfactory and better than the current state of art screen and showed no visable degrade after testing. It is recommended that more time and money be put into expanding this technology and test these new materials for their maximum temperature and durability for production applications that require better burner material.

  6. A 3D numerical study of LO2/GH2 supercritical combustion in the ONERA-Mascotte Test-rig configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmansour, Abdelkrim; Liazid, Abdelkrim; Logerais, Pierre-Olivier; Durastanti, Jean-Félix

    2016-02-01

    Cryogenic propellants LOx/H2 are used at very high pressure in rocket engine combustion. The description of the combustion process in such application is very complex due essentially to the supercritical regime. Ideal gas law becomes invalid. In order to try to capture the average characteristics of this combustion process, numerical computations are performed using a model based on a one-phase multi-component approach. Such work requires fluid properties and a correct definition of the mixture behavior generally described by cubic equations of state with appropriated thermodynamic relations validated against the NIST data. In this study we consider an alternative way to get the effect of real gas by testing the volume-weighted-mixing-law with association of the component transport properties using directly the NIST library data fitting including the supercritical regime range. The numerical simulations are carried out using 3D RANS approach associated with two tested turbulence models, the standard k-Epsilon model and the realizable k-Epsilon one. The combustion model is also associated with two chemical reaction mechanisms. The first one is a one-step generic chemical reaction and the second one is a two-step chemical reaction. The obtained results like temperature profiles, recirculation zones, visible flame lengths and distributions of OH species are discussed.

  7. Rotary Burner Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Flanagan

    2003-04-30

    The subject technology, the Calcpos Rotary Burner (CRB), is a burner that is proposed to reduce energy consumption and emission levels in comparison to currently available technology. burners are used throughout industry to produce the heat that is required during the refining process. Refineries seek to minimize the use of energy in refining while still meeting EPA regulations for emissions.

  8. PROTOTYPE EVALUATION OF COMMERCIAL SECOND GENERATION LOW-NO BURNER PERFORMANCE AND SULFUR CAPTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of pilot-scale combustion tests of a Riley Stoker second-generation low-NOx burner combined with dry sorbent injection for SO2 control. The burner design is based on the distributed mixing concept. Combustion tests were conducted at 100 million Btu/hr in ...

  9. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    DOEpatents

    Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1985-11-05

    The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

  10. Ignition and combustion characteristics of metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turns, S. R.; Mueller, D. C.; Scott, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Research designed to develop detailed knowledge of the secondary atomization and ignition characteristics of aluminum slurry propellants was started. These processes are studied because they are the controlling factors limiting the combustion efficiency of aluminum slurry propellants in rocket applications. A burner and spray rig system allowing the study of individual slurry droplets having diameters from about 10 to 100 microns was designed and fabricated. The burner generates a near uniform high temperature environment from the merging of 72 small laminar diffusion flames above a honeycomb matrix. This design permits essentially adiabatic operation over a wide range of stoichiometries without danger of flashback. A single particle sizing system and velocimeter also were designed and assembled. Light scattered from a focused laser beam is related to the particle (droplet) size, while the particle velocity is determined by its transit time through the focal volume. Light from the combustion of aluminum is also sensed to determine if ignition was achieved. These size and velocity measurements will allow the determination of disruption and ignition times as functions of drop sizes and ambient conditions.

  11. Theoretical and experimental studies of the deposition of Na2So4 from seeded combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Santoro, G. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Fryburg, G. C.; Rosner, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Flames in a Mach 0.3 atmospheric pressure laboratory burner rig were doped with sea salt, NaS04, and NaCl, respectively, in an effort to validate theoretical dew point predictions made by a local thermochemical equilibrium (LTCE) method of predicting condensation temperatures of sodium sulfate in flame environments. Deposits were collected on cylindrical platinum targets placed in the combustion products, and the deposition was studied as a function of collector temperature. Experimental deposition onset temperatures checked within experimental error with LTCE-predicted temperatures. A multicomponent mass transfer equation was developed to predict the rate of deposition of Na2SO4(c) via vapor transport at temperatures below the deposition onset temperature. Agreement between maximum deposition rates predicted by this chemically frozen boundary layer (CFBL) theory and those obtained in the seeded laboratory burner experiments is good.

  12. Automatic gas burner block for thermal units

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhanovskii, K.S.; Senatov, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe a new computerized control system and gas burner configuration for natural gas furnaces used for the heat treatment of ceramics and porcelain which is designed to control and monitor combustion and temperature regimes in the furnace and optimize fuel efficiency. The system permits simultaneous operation and thermal load control of up to 12 burners, automatic maintenance of the desired fuel-air ratio over the entire temperature range, and protection of the furnace against overload by the use of a fuel cutoff switch. Specifications on productivity and efficiency and results of performance evaluations are listed.

  13. Diesel exhaust cleaner with burner vortex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Riddel, J.W.

    1983-05-17

    A diesel engine exhaust cleaner and burner system includes at least one exhaust cleaner member with a filter positioned therein to effect removal of particulates from a stream of exhaust gas delivered thereto via an inlet manifold. A fuel burner supplied with fuel by a fuel nozzle is operatively associated with the inlet manifold to supply the necessary heat to effect incineration of particulates collected on the filter. A cyclone duct providing a vortex chamber therein is operatively positioned downstream of the fuel nozzle and is supplied with sufficient air so as to effect both the complete combustion of the fuel and the controlled incineration of the particulates by increasing the residence time of the fuel in the reaction region within the vortex chamber and also effecting a more uniform distribution of the heat of combustion across the inlet face of the filter for the uniform heating of the particulates thereon to their combustion temperature.

  14. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat... Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam generating...

  15. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Are duct burners and waste heat... Stationary Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered...

  16. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat... Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam generating...

  17. Burner safety system

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, K.N.

    1986-09-23

    In combination with a fuel burner, this patent describes a pilot light burner disposed adjacent the fuel burner for lighting the fuel burner, and a solenoid-operated valve controlling the supply of fuel to the fuel burner, a thermocouple operable when heated to produce a thermoelectric current placed to be heated by the heat of the pilot light burner, an electromagnetic coil connected across the thermocouple energized by the thermoelectric current of the thermocouple, a reed switch unit including an envelope and switch contacts within the envelope actuated by the application of a magnetic flux thereto, the reed switch being mounted adjacent and in the magnetic field of the coil with energizing of the coil, a magnet, a mounting for the magnet wherein such is spaced from the reed switch unit, and circuit means connected to the reed switch unit and actuated by the unit to control actuation of the solenoid of the solenoid-operated valve.

  18. Infrared radiant burner

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneau, D.L.

    1984-03-06

    An infrared radiant burner uses a porous, fibrous refractory board matrix supported by two pairs of frame members, forming a gas-air mixture chamber between a flat sheet, the frame supports, and the matrix. The hollow frame members receive a noncombustible gas that is directed out through a narrow path along the sides of the matrix. The burner's air knife construction grips the matrix edge so as to prevent gas leakage while delivering air through the air knives around the burner periphery.

  19. Micronized coal burner facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calfo, F. D.; Lupton, M. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A combustor or burner system in which the ash resulting from burning a coal in oil mixture is of submicron particle size is described. The burner system comprises a burner section, a flame exit nozzle, a fuel nozzle section, and an air tube by which preheated air is directed into the burner section. Regulated air pressure is delivered to a fuel nozzle. Means are provided for directing a mixture of coal particles and oil from a drum to a nozzle at a desired rate and pressure while means returns excess fuel to the fuel drum. Means provide for stable fuel pressure supply from the fuel pump to the fuel nozzle.

  20. Industrial Energy Conservation, Forced Internal Recirculation Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2003-06-19

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop and evaluate an industrial low NOx burner for existing and new gas-fired combustion systems for intermediate temperature (1400 degree to 2000 degree F) industrial heating devices such as watertube boilers and process fluid heaters. A multi-phase effort is being pursued with decision points to determine advisability of continuance. The current contract over Phases II and III of this work. The objectives of each phase are as follows. Phase II - to design, fabricate, and evaluate prototype burners based on the Forced Internal Recirculation (FIR) concept. Phase III - to evaluate the performance of an FIR burner under actual operating conditions in a full-scale field test and establish the performance necessary for subsequent commercialization

  1. LOW NOX, HIGH EFFICIENCY MULTISTAGED BURNER: GASEOUS FUEL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the evaluation of a multistaged combustion burner design on a 0.6 MW package boiler simulator for in-furnace NOx control and high combustion efficiency. Both deep air staging, resulting in a three-stage configuration, and boiler front wall fuel staging of undo...

  2. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  3. Performance evaluation of porous radiant gas burners

    SciTech Connect

    Speyer, R.F.; Lin, Wen-Yi; Agarwal, G.

    1995-12-31

    A porous radiant burner testing facility was built, consisting of temperature and gas composition measurements as a function of position, as well as spectral and total radiosity measurements. Uncombusted hydrocarbons were detected within the flame support layer for only low flow rates (e.g 7.1 1/min for a reticulated ceramic flame support layer); only combustion products mixed with the atmosphere were detected at higher rates. Radiosity increased with increasing flow rate via increasing surface temperatures, while burner efficiencies decreased because of less effectual heat transfer of combustion product gases to solid surfaces. Stainless steel screen-based flame support layers demonstrated optimum performance as compared to ceramic and metal tube-based, and reticulated ceramic-based flame support layers. Increased turbulent flow and surface area for convective heat transfer between the base surface and the end of the flame support layer were factors attributed to improved burner radiosity and efficiency. The greybody temperatures and emittances of burners were determined using a simplex algorithm fit of spectral radiosity data to Planck`s equation. The significantly higher and more grey emittance (hence radiosity) of CoAl$-(2)$O$-(4)$-coated mullite flame support tubes, as compared to alumina tubes of identical geometry, was demonstrated using this method.

  4. Variable capacity gasification burner

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, D.I.

    1985-03-05

    A variable capacity burner that may be used in gasification processes, the burner being adjustable when operating in its intended operating environment to operate at two different flow capacities, with the adjustable parts being dynamically sealed within a statically sealed structural arrangement to prevent dangerous blow-outs of the reactants to the atmosphere.

  5. Combustor burner vanelets

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Zuo, Baifang

    2012-02-14

    The present application provides a burner for use with a combustor of a gas turbine engine. The burner may include a center hub, a shroud, a pair of fuel vanes extending from the center hub to the shroud, and a vanelet extending from the center hub and/or the shroud and positioned between the pair of fuel vanes.

  6. Residential oil burners with low input and two stages firing

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Krajewski, R.; Leigh, R.

    1997-12-31

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized, retention head burner. At low firing rates pressure atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low pressure air-atomized burner has been developed watch can operate at fining rates as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low fining rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space heating loads.

  7. Combustion device for liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Y.; Ohmukai, Y.; Tomisawa, T.

    1980-10-21

    A device is described which includes a porous burner head capable of containing a liquid fuel in a liquid state and in which air is supplied to the surface of the burner head to vaporize and burn the fuel contained therein. The burner head is made of a heat resistant porous material having extending therethrough minute channels which are predominantly up to 100 mu M in diameter and give the burner head a porosity of at least 25%. The burner head is capable of raising the liquid fuel at a rate of at least 0.001 g/cm/sub 2/ min to a height of up to 70 mm. The use of the burner head assures clean combustion and high combustion efficiency.

  8. Computational Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  9. Prospects for residential oil burners with reduced emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.; Krajewski, R.F.; Celebi, Y.; McDonald, R.J.; Batey, J.

    1992-04-01

    In considering the emissions characteristics of residential oil heating equipment it is important to consider the magnitude of these emissions relative to all other sources. Laboratory and field test data show that home oil burners produce very low levels of pollutants when compared to all other combustion sources in the US. Home oil burners are relatively clean burning and produce less air pollution than the average combustion source in the US. This is especially true for carbon monoxide, particulates, and hydrocarbons, which are a small fraction of the average emission of other combustion equipment. In this paper results are presented of emission tests done with a number of oil burners selected as being representative of modern equipment or representing a recent development trend or a novel approach. The primary purpose of this work was to provide a benchmark of what oil equipment can do today and what the effects of some of these alternative designs are on emissions.

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

    2001-09-04

    It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

  11. Low emission characteristics of radiant burner

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Nie, J.X.; Wang, Z.; Shang, J.

    1998-12-31

    A commercial infrared burner is characterized in terms of its radiant efficiency and its emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, unburned hydrocarbon, and NOx in the exhaust gases. It has been found that when methane is used as the fuel the burner reached its maximum radiation efficiency of 31.4% at the equivalence ratio {Phi} = 1. CO{sub 2} also reached its maximum value of 10.7% at {Phi} = 1. In the fuel-lean region, the concentrations of CO and unburned total hydrocarbon (UHC) were kept in a couple of hundred ppm ranges. In fuel-rich region, the CO and UHC concentrations quickly jumped to thousands of ppm or more as {Phi} increased. The NOx formation was strongly dependent on the equivalence ratio at which the burner was operated. The NOx reached its maximum of 8 ppm at {Phi} = 1, which was significantly lower than those from traditional gas burners. The NOx decreased significantly as the burner was operated at conditions away from stoichiometric. Tests were also conducted with fuel mixtures of methane and propane, which represented peak-saving gas in the industry. To simulate possible flash back, fuel mixture of methane and hydrogen was tested. Results from these tests provided insight into the effects of gas composition variations upon the IR burner performance characteristics. It has been found that the addition of propane in the fuel produced a higher combustion temperature and higher levels of NOx emission. It was also revealed by the test results that the addition of hydrogen to the methane fuel did not significantly affect the production of NOx, CO{sub 2} and CO.

  12. CHP Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldini, Carlo; Darby, Eric

    2013-09-30

    division of Sempra Energy. These match funds were provided via concurrent contracts and investments available via CMCE, Altex, and Leva Energy The project attained all its objectives and is considered a success. CMCE secured the support of GI&E from Italy to supply 100 kW Turbec T-100 microturbines for the project. One was purchased by the project’s subcontractor, Altex, and a second spare was purchased by CMCE under this project. The microturbines were then modified to convert from their original recuperated design to a simple cycle configuration. Replacement low-NOx silo combustors were designed and bench tested in order to achieve compliance with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 emission limits for NOx and CO when in CHP operation. The converted microturbine was then mated with a low NOx burner provided by Altex via an integration section that allowed flow control and heat recovery to minimize combustion blower requirements; manage burner turndown; and recover waste heat. A new fully integrated control system was designed and developed that allowed one-touch system operation in all three available modes of operation: (1) CHP with both microturbine and burner firing for boiler heat input greater than 2 MMBtu/hr; (2) burner head only (BHO) when the microturbine is under service; and (3) microturbine only when boiler heat input requirements fall below 2 MMBtu/hr. This capability resulted in a burner turndown performance of nearly 10/1, a key advantage for this technology over conventional low NOx burners. Key components were then assembled into a cabinet with additional support systems for generator cooling and fuel supply. System checkout and performance tests were performed in the laboratory. The assembled system and its support equipment were then shipped and installed at a host facility where final performance tests were conducted following efforts to secure fabrication, air, and operating permits. The installed power burner is now in commercial

  13. Correlation of velocity and velocity-density turbulence in the exhaust of an atmospheric burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1985-01-01

    In the experiment described herein, temperature (density) and velocity are measured separately but simultaneously as functions of time so that it is possible to determine the relationships among velocity, density, and the product of density and velocity. An atmospheric burner rig was used to provide the flow for the experiment.

  14. Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project is presented. The overview includes project metrics, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on some of the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Objective: Development of comprehensive detailed and reduced kinetic mechanisms of jet fuels for chemically-reacting flow modeling. Scientific Challenges: 1) Developing experimental facilities capable of handling higher hydrocarbons and providing benchmark combustion data. 2) Determining and understanding ignition and combustion characteristics, such as laminar flame speeds, extinction stretch rates, and autoignition delays, of jet fuels and hydrocarbons relevant to jet surrogates. 3) Developing comprehensive kinetic models for jet fuels.

  15. Power burner for compact furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, J.A.

    1980-09-23

    A compact gas power burner is provided which includes a cylindrical mixing tube into which combustion air is discharged tangentially from a centrifugal blower located adjacent the closed end of the mixing tube, and gaseous fuel is admitted into the discharge airstream of the blower upstream from the admission location of the airstream into the mixing tube so that the swirling component of the air in the mixing tube during its passage to the open end of the tube will promote the mixing of the air and gaseous fuel, the mixing tube being provided with a honeycomb ceramic disc at its end to which it is attached to a cylindrical heat exchanger, and ignition means and flame sensors are provided on the downstream side of the ceramic disc.

  16. DISTRIBUTED MIXING BURNER (DMB) ENGINEERING DESIGN FOR APPLICATION TO INDUSTRIAL AND UTILITY BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the design of two prototype distributed mixing burners (DMBs) for application to industrial and utility boilers. The DMB is a low-NOx pulverized-coal-fired burner in which: (1) mixing of the coal with combustion air is controlled to minimize NOx emissions, a...

  17. Industrial Combustion Vision: A Vision by and for the Industrial Combustion Community

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1998-05-01

    The Industrial Combustion Vision is the result of a collaborative effort by manufacturers and users of burners, boilers, furnaces, and other process heating equipment. The vision sets bold targets for tomorrow's combustion systems.

  18. Burner swirls NO{sub x} away

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, J.C.

    1997-11-01

    Cleaner boilers that will help reduce acid rain, photochemical smog and tropospheric ozone are now coming on-line, partly as a result of a new burner design for power-generation boilers based on MIT research and now commercialized under exclusive license to ABB C-E Services Inc. The rapidly stratified flame core (RSFC) burner achieved very large nitrogen oxide reductions of up to 90% with natural gas as fuel, and 70 to 80% when burning pulverized coal and heavy fuel oil, respectively. The RSFC design provides a fuel-rich (oxygen deficient), high-temperature environment early in the flame to allow the chemical conversion of the NO{sub x} precursors to harmless molecular nitrogen. A subsequent lower-temperature, fuel-lean environment, in which the remainder of the air is mixed with the remaining fuel, then ensures complete combustion. Another integral feature of the RSFC burner register is its uniquely shaped refractory throat quarl. The throat collimates the airflow as opposed to the divergent airflow from a traditional burner (bell mouth) nozzle shape. The cylindrical shape tends to enforce stratification.

  19. Development of isothermal rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminskas, R. A.; Malone, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The results of the Resonant Infrasonic Gauging System (RIGS) development program are reported. The RIGS is a gauging system that is capable of measuring propellant quantity under zero-G as well as under accelerated (one-G) conditions. With the exception of liquid hydrogen, it can be used to gauge virtually any propellant in liquid form including cryogenics. The gauge consists of a sensor unit which is attached to the propellant tank and electronic control unit which may be positioned separately from the sensor. The control unit receives the signals from the sensor as well as the ullage gas pressure and propellant temperature measurements, and computes the propellant quantity remaining in the tank. During the course of this program two prototype RIGS sensors were designed and constructed. The sensors were tested first in the laboratory using water as the simulated propellant and, later, using LN2 in a 100-gallon tank. The system tests proved that the gauge operates virtually as predicted by theory and yielded an accuracy better than 1%.

  20. Fan Atomized Burner design advances & commercial development progress

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, B.; Butcher, T.A.

    1996-07-01

    As a part of the Oil Heat Research and Development program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has an on-going interest in advanced combustion technologies. This interest is aimed at: improving the initial efficiency of heating equipment, reducing long term fouling and efficiency degradation, reducing air pollutant emissions, and providing practical low-firing rate technologies which may lead to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The Fan-Atomized Burner (FAB) technology is being developed at BNL as part of this general goal. The Fan-Atomized Burner uses a low pressure, air atomizing nozzle in place of the high pressure nozzle used in conventional burners. Because it is air-atomized the burner can operate at low firing rates without the small passages and reliability concerns of low input pressure nozzles. Because it uses a low pressure nozzle the burner can use a fan in place of the small compressor used in other air-atomized burner designs. High initial efficiency of heating equipment is achieved because the burner can operate at very low excess air levels. These low excess air levels also reduce the formation of sulfuric acid in flames. Sulfuric acid is responsible for scaling and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces.

  1. Process and apparatus for igniting a burner in an inert atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Coolidge, Dennis W.; Rinker, Franklin G.

    1994-01-01

    According to this invention there is provided a process and apparatus for the ignition of a pilot burner in an inert atmosphere without substantially contaminating the inert atmosphere. The process includes the steps of providing a controlled amount of combustion air for a predetermined interval of time to the combustor then substantially simultaneously providing a controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and to a flame generator. The controlled mixture of fuel and air to the flame generator is then periodically energized to produce a secondary flame. With the secondary flame the controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and the combustion air is ignited to produce a pilot burner flame. The pilot burner flame is then used to ignited a mixture of main fuel and combustion air to produce a main burner flame. The main burner flame then is used to ignite a mixture of process derived fuel and combustion air to produce products of combustion for use as an inert gas in a heat treatment process.

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF THE STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION SYMPOSIUM (2ND) HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LA. ON AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 1, 1977. VOLUME III. STATIONARY ENGINE, INDUSTRIAL PROCESS COMBUSTION SYSTEMS, AND ADVANCED PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ;Contents: Application of combustion modifications to industrial combustion equipment; Boiler burner design criteria for retrofit with low-Btu gases; Environmental assessment of afterburner combustion systems; Advanced combustion systems for stationary gas turbine engines; Develo...

  3. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Tiejun; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared burner is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. Applications of radiant burners includes boilers, air heaters, deep fat fryers, process heaters, and immersion heaters. On reason for the present interest in this type of burner is its low NO{sub x} emissions, which is attributed to the fact that a large proportion of the combustion heat is given out as radiation from the burner surface, which results in relatively low gas temperature in the combustion zone compared to that of a conventional free-flame burner. As a consequence, such burners produce less NO{sub x}, mainly by the so-called prompt-NO mechanism. A porous radiant burner testing facility was built, consisting of spectral radiance as well as flue gas composition measurements. Measurement capabilities were tested using methane; results were consistent with literature.

  4. Characterization of Noise and Instability in a Commercial Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Stewart; Agrawal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    A range of combustion applications produce noise as a significant and undesirable output. Concurrently, efforts to reduce emissions through lean premixed combustion have shown this process to be prone to developing instabilities. In this study a commercial-style combustor was investigated to characterize combustion noise and instabilities. Knowledge in this area is intended for future research involving the application of porous inert media (PIM) in industrial burners. Porous media has been used to passively suppress both combustion noise and instabilities in a laboratory setting, but has yet to be implemented in a commercial burner. Combustion experiments were conducted in an industrial-scale lean premixed burner using natural gas while varying equivalence ratio and reactant flow rate. Acoustic data was acquired using a microphone probe placed in the plane of the combustor exit. Measurements were analyzed in the frequency spectrum to quantify noise spectra and detect the development of instabilities. Results have indicated the occurrence of strong combustion instability at certain conditions. Additionally, research has supported the general relationship of increased noise production with increasing equivalence ratio and heat release rate. Adverse effects of combustion instability were accompanied with flashback and downstream acoustic excitation. Funding for this research provided by NSF REU grant 1062611.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Research of a Novel Combustion Chamber for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, J.; Kubata, J.; Betak, V.; Hybl, R.

    2013-04-01

    New combustion chamber concept (based on burner JETIS-JET Induced Swirl) for small gas turbine engine (up to 200kW) is presented in this article. The combustion chamber concept is based on the flame stabilization by the generated swirl swirl generated by two opposite tangentially arranged jet tubes in the intermediate zone, this arrangement replaces air swirler, which is very complicated and expensive part in the scope of small gas turbines with annular combustion chamber. The mixing primary jets are oriented partially opposite to the main exhaust gasses flow, this enhances hot product recirculation and fuel-air mixing necessary for low NOx production and flame stability. To evaluate the designed concept a JETIS burner demonstrator (methane fuel) was manufactured and atmospheric experimental measurements of CO, NOx for various fuel nozzles and jet tubes the configuration were done. Results of these experiments and comparison with CFD simulation are presented here. Practical application of the new chamber concept in small gas turbine liquid fuel combustor was evaluated (verified) on 3 nozzles planar combustor sector test rig at atmospheric conditions results of the experiment and numerical simulation are also presented.

  6. Combustion in a multiburner furnace with selective flow of oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Bool, III, Lawrence E.; Kobayashi, Hisashi

    2004-03-02

    Improved operational characteristics such as improved fuel efficiency, reduction of NOx formation, reduction of the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, and lessened tendency to corrosion at the tube wall, in a multi-burner furnace are obtained by reducing the flow rate of combustion air to the burners and selectively individually feeding oxidant to only some of the burners.

  7. Coal gasification burner

    SciTech Connect

    Sternling, C.V.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes a process for burning hydrocarbon in a combustion zone, comprising: introducing combustion oxygen and the hydrocarbon into a combustion chamber as a central gas flow; surrounding the combustion oxygen with a transpiration gas; and passing at least some of the transpiration gas through a porous metal passage surrounding the combustion oxygen and having a non-constricted part of lower porosity metal next to the combustion zone, the porous metal comprising a compressed powdered metal.

  8. Atmospheric low swirl burner flow characterization with stereo PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Mathieu; Nogueira, José; Lecuona, Antonio; Nauri, Sara; Rodríguez, Pedro A.

    2010-05-01

    The lean premixed prevaporized (LPP) burner concept is now used in most of the new generation gas turbines to reduce flame temperature and pollutants by operating near the lean blow-off limit. The common strategy to assure stable combustion is to resort to swirl stabilized flames in the burner. Nevertheless, the vortex breakdown phenomenon in reactive swirling flows is a very complex 3D mechanism, and its dynamics are not yet completely understood. Among the available measurement techniques to analyze such flows, stereo PIV (S-PIV) is now a reliable tool to quantify the instantaneous three velocity components in a plane (2D-3C). It is used in this paper to explore the reactive flow of a small scale, open to atmosphere, LPP burner (50 kW). The burner is designed to produce two distinct topologies (1) that of a conventional high swirl burner and (2) that of a low swirl burner. In addition, the burner produces a lifted flame that allows a good optical access to the whole recirculation zone in both topologies. The flow is studied over a wide range of swirl and Reynolds numbers at different equivalence ratios. Flow statistics are presented for 1,000 S-PIV snapshots at each configuration. In both reactive and cold nonreactive flow, stability diagrams define the domains of the low and high swirl topologies. Due to the relatively simple conception of the physical burner, this information can be easily used for the validation of CFD computations of the burner flow global structure. Near field pressure measurements reveal the presence of peaks in the power spectra, which suggests the presence of periodical coherent features for almost all configurations. Algorithms have been developed to identify and track large periodic traveling coherent structures from the statistically independent S-PIV realizations. Flow temporal evolution is reconstructed with a POD-based method, providing an additional tool for the understanding of flow topologies and numerical codes validation.

  9. Ultralean low swirl burner

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, R.K.

    1998-04-07

    A novel burner and burner method has been invented which burns an ultra lean premixed fuel-air mixture with a stable flame. The inventive burning method results in efficient burning and much lower emissions of pollutants such as oxides of nitrogen than previous burners and burning methods. The inventive method imparts weak swirl (swirl numbers of between about 0.01 to 3.0) on a fuel-air flow stream. The swirl, too small to cause recirculation, causes an annulus region immediately inside the perimeter of the fuel-air flow to rotate in a plane normal to the axial flow. The rotation in turn causes the diameter of the fuel-air flow to increase with concomitant decrease in axial flow velocity. The flame stabilizes where the fuel-air mixture velocity equals the rate of burning resulting in a stable, turbulent flame. 11 figs.

  10. Ultralean low swirl burner

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1998-01-01

    A novel burner and burner method has been invented which burns an ultra lean premixed fuel-air mixture with a stable flame. The inventive burning method results in efficient burning and much lower emissions of pollutants such as oxides of nitrogen than previous burners and burning methods. The inventive method imparts weak swirl (swirl numbers of between about 0.01 to 3.0) on a fuel-air flow stream. The swirl, too small to cause recirculation, causes an annulus region immediately inside the perimeter of the fuel-air flow to rotate in a plane normal to the axial flow. The rotation in turn causes the diameter of the fuel-air flow to increase with concomitant decrease in axial flow velocity. The flame stabilizes where the fuel-air mixture velocity equals the rate of burning resulting in a stable, turbulent flame.

  11. Basic research on radiant burners. Final report, February 1987-February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, R.M.; DesJardin, S.T.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    A computer model was modified and used to predict the operating characteristics of natural gas fired porous surface radiant burners. Performance parameters studied during this contract included radiant flux from the burner surface, burner surface temperature, NOx emissions, and flame attachment and flashback stability limits. Each year, computational work was performed to predict radiant burner performance. Concurrently, experimental work was performed to compare to these computational results. Validation of the code against experimental data allows the code to be used as a design tool in the further development of radiant burner combustion systems. Thermal performance, limits of stable operation, and NOx emissions have been correlated to experimental data in the report. In addition, catalytic radiant burners were fabricated and tested during the first and fourth years of the contract.

  12. How Efficient is a Laboratory Burner in Heating Water?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which chemistry students determine the efficiency of a laboratory burner used to heat water. The reaction is assumed to be the complete combustion of methane, CH4. The experiment is appropriate for secondary school chemistry students familiar with heats of reaction and simple calorimetry. Contains pre-laboratory and…

  13. EVALUATION OF LOW EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON INDUSTRIAL BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the second year's effort under EPA Contract 68-02-3127. The objective of the program is to conduct field evaluations of the distributed mixing burner (DMB) on two industrial size boilers. The DMB concept provides for controlled mixing of coal with combustion...

  14. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter (Inventor); Hutto, William R. (Inventor); Philips, Albert R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  15. Optimization of the Number of Burner Nozzles in a Hot Blast Stove by the Way of Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongwei; Yan, Bingji; Zhang, Jianliang; Liu, Feng; Pei, Yi

    2014-07-01

    The structure of the burner nozzles in a blast furnace hot stove including their number, location, and angle has a vital effect on the flow field, temperature distribution, combustion efficiency, etc. In this article, simulation models were established for the hot stove located at Shougang Qianan. The model, eddy dissipation model, and P-1 model were used for the modeling of turbulence, combustion, and radiative heat transfer, respectively. The effect of different number of burner nozzles on the flow field and temperature distribution in the combustion chamber was investigated. The results indicated that 19 or 21 burner nozzles were preferred to obtain the optimum flow field and temperature distribution.

  16. Environmentally safe burner for offshore well testing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    One of the problems that occurs during offshore well testing has been the discharge of unburned hydrocarbon emissions into the air and sea that leave deposits of oily slicks or {open_quotes}sheen{close_quotes} on the water surface. This residue results from inefficient flaring operations and can have adverse effects on marine environment. This paper will discuss a new burner that has been developed to address the environmentally unfriendly fallout conditions that have occurred from crude oil disposal during traditional well testing operations. To support a broad range of applications, the design criteria for this burner included not only the capability to perform fallout free in the wide range of conditions expected during well testing but also to be simple to operate, have a compact lightweight design with a stable pilot and igniter system, provide clean startup, and require low oil pressure. Burner performance is significantly affected by fuel oil properties and its atomization characteristics. The paper will include an overview of these topics and their relationship to the combustion process, how these topics were addressed in the development of the design, and the testing that was performed by an independent Norwegian environmental testing company to verify the burner`s efficiency. The burner designed to these specifications includes an array of atomizers, uniquely placed to improve flame turbulence and air ingestion important to efficient combustion. Engineering tests performed with 18 degree API crude oil were fallout free and smokeless, and tests performed by the independent environmental testing company verified that the new burner design performed with 99.9 percent efficiency as a burning disposal system.

  17. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    DOEpatents

    Nodd, Dennis G.; Walker, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    A carbonaceous material-water slurry burner includes a high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer for directing a carbonaceous material-water slurry into a combustion chamber for burning therein without requiring a support fuel or oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Introduction of the carbonaceous material-water slurry under pressure forces it through a fixed atomizer wherein the slurry is reduced to small droplets by mixing with an atomizing air flow and directed into the combustion chamber. The atomizer includes a swirler located immediately adjacent to where the fuel slurry is introduced into the combustion chamber and which has a single center channel through which the carbonaceous material-water slurry flows into a plurality of diverging channels continuous with the center channel from which the slurry exits the swirler immediately adjacent to an aperture in the combustion chamber. The swirler includes a plurality of slots around its periphery extending the length thereof through which the atomizing air flows and by means of which the atomizing air is deflected so as to exert a maximum shear force upon the carbonaceous material-water slurry as it exits the swirler and enters the combustion chamber. A circulating coolant system or boiler feed water is provided around the periphery of the burner along the length thereof to regulate burner operating temperature, eliminate atomizer plugging, and inhibit the generation of sparklers, thus increasing combustion efficiency. A secondary air source directs heated air into the combustion chamber to promote recirculation of the hot combustion gases within the combustion chamber.

  18. Oil well service rig

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.H.

    1981-03-24

    An oil well service rig having three reels, two of the reels actuated by a hydraulic pump through a gear box which provides for selective engagement or disengagement and a two speed gear ratio change for either reel, the hydraulic pump being driven by a gasoline engine. An independent hydraulically operated brake system is utilized on the reels wherein one side of each reel is provided with a greater diameter than the other side, the larger side having a brake caliper pad assembly in engagement therewith. A smaller reel, also controlled by the hydraulic motor, controls the inclination and disposition of a mast having a double sheave assembly at its top receiving cables from each main reel for raising and lowering tools into the oil well shaft.

  19. Rig Diagnostic Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soileau, Kerry M.; Baicy, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Rig Diagnostic Tools is a suite of applications designed to allow an operator to monitor the status and health of complex networked systems using a unique interface between Java applications and UNIX scripts. The suite consists of Java applications, C scripts, Vx- Works applications, UNIX utilities, C programs, and configuration files. The UNIX scripts retrieve data from the system and write them to a certain set of files. The Java side monitors these files and presents the data in user-friendly formats for operators to use in making troubleshooting decisions. This design allows for rapid prototyping and expansion of higher-level displays without affecting the basic data-gathering applications. The suite is designed to be extensible, with the ability to add new system components in building block fashion without affecting existing system applications. This allows for monitoring of complex systems for which unplanned shutdown time comes at a prohibitive cost.

  20. Demonstration test of burner liner strain measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetson, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    A demonstration test was conducted for two systems of static strain measurement that had been shown to have potential for application jet engine combustors. A modified JT12D combustor was operated in a jet burner test stand while subjected simultaneously to both systems of instrumentation, i.e., Kanthal A-1 wire strain gages and laser speckle photography. A section of the burner was removed for installation and calibration of the wire gages, and welded back into the burner. The burner test rig was modified to provide a viewing port for the laser speckle photography such that the instrumented section could be observed during operation. Six out of ten wire gages survived testing and showed excellent repeatability. The extensive precalibration procedures were shown to be effective in compensating for the large apparent strains associated with these gages. Although all portions of the speckle photography system operated satisfactorily, a problem was encountered in the form of optical inhomogeneities in the hot, high-pressure gas flowing by the combustor case which generate large and random apparent strain distributions.

  1. Analysis of a bilayered porous radiant burner

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, M.R.; Peck, R.E.

    1996-08-23

    A theoretical study of the heating effectiveness of a composite porous radiant burner (PRB) is conducted. A one-dimensional laminar premixed flame model incorporating a radiatively participating inert porous medium consisting of two layers of different properties is used to describe the heat release/transfer processes. Combined conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer is considered. The spherical harmonics method with the P-3 approximation is used to model the radiation part. A multistep reaction mechanism for premixed methane-air combustion is employed. A parametric study is carried out to determine the effect of the radiative properties of the two porous layers on burner performance. Calculations indicate that a significant improvement in the radiative output of a PRB can be attained by optimizing the burner properties upstream and downstream of the flame. Generally, the upstream layer should be of lower porosity, shorter length, and higher optical thickness than the downstream layer. Also, the upstream layer should be highly scattering, while the downstream layer should be nonscattering.

  2. Preliminary Tests of a Burner for Ram-Jet Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W.

    1947-01-01

    Preliminary tests have been made of a small burner to meet the requirements for application to supersonic ram jets. The principal requirements were taken as: (1) efficient combustion in a high-velocity air stream, (2) utilization for combustion of only a small fraction of the air passing through the unit, (3) low resistance to air flow, (4) simple construction, and (5) light weight. Tests of a small burner were carried to stream velocities of nearly 150 feet per second and fuel rates such that one-eighth to one-fourth of the total air was involved in combustion. Commercial propane was selected as the fuel since its low boiling point facilitated vaporization. Combustion which was 80 percent complete along with low aerodynamic losses was obtained by injecting the fuel evenly, prior to ignition, and allowing it to mix with the air without appreciably disturbing the stream. The pressure drop due to frictional losses around the burner and to the adjacent inside walls of the ram jet is small compared with the pressure drop due to combustion.

  3. Hoisting and Rigging (Formerly Hoisting and Rigging Manual)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This standard is intended as a reference document to be used by supervisors, line managers, safety personnel, equipment operators, and any other personnel responsible for safety of hoisting and rigging operations at DOE sites. It quotes or paraphrases the US OSHA and ANSI requirements. It also encompasses, under one cover,hoisting and rigging requirements, codes, standards, and regulations, eliminating the need to maintain extensive (and often incomplete) libraries of hoisting and rigging standards throughout DOE. The standard occasionally goes beyond the minimum general industry standards established by OSHA and ANSI, and also delineates the more stringent requirements necessary to accomplish the complex, diversified, critical, and often hazardous hoisting and rigging work found with the DOE complex.

  4. Premixed burner studies of NO{sub x} formation and control

    SciTech Connect

    Casleton, K.H.; Straub, D.L.; Moran, C.; Stephens, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    One of the primary reasons for using this type of premixed, flat flame burner is that it is essentially one-dimensional (1-D), i.e., that important parameters such as temperature are nearly constant in regions near the central vertical axis of the burner for a fixed height above the burner surface. As a result of this 1-D nature, computer codes such as Sandia National Laboratory`s PREMIX can be used to model the important chemical interactions involved in the combustion processes. These predictions can be compared with experimental measurements to gain valuable insight into the formation of nitrogen oxides. The bulk of the burner experiments performed to date have been focussed primarily toward characterization of burner and the sample extraction and analysis system. All experiments thus far have been for methane/air flames at one atmosphere pressure. Figure 2 shows the burner centerline temperature profile for an equivalence ratio of {Phi} = 0.87. The sharp peak in temperature near 0.3 cm corresponds to the luminous zone of the flame. The high temperature in the luminous zone shows an abrupt decay with increasing height above the burner. The temperature gradient in the non-luminous post-flame zone is much smaller, approximately 2.5{degree}C decrease in temperature for each millimeter increase in height over the range of 1.3 to 4 cm above the burner. Radial temperature profiles have also been measured to assess the onedimensional nature of this burner.

  5. Burners and stingers.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J H

    2000-11-01

    The burner or stinger syndrome is one of the most common injuries in football and most likely represents an upper cervical root injury. Other sports reported include wrestling, hockey, basketball, boxing, and weight lifting. The athlete experiences radiating pain, numbness, or tingling down one upper limb, usually lasting less than 1 minute. Recurrences are common and can lead to permanent neurologic deficits. Burners are usually diagnosed and treated based on physical examination findings, but radiographs, MR imaging, and electrodiagnostic testing may help localize the precise level of injury, identify other associated pathology, and quantify neurologic injury. Management should include education on proper tackling techniques, restoration of neck motion, functional strengthening, and carefully fitted orthosis. PMID:11092018

  6. High efficiency gas burner

    DOEpatents

    Schuetz, Mark A.

    1983-01-01

    A burner assembly provides for 100% premixing of fuel and air by drawing the air into at least one high velocity stream of fuel without power assist. Specifically, the nozzle assembly for injecting the fuel into a throat comprises a plurality of nozzles in a generally circular array. Preferably, swirl is imparted to the air/fuel mixture by angling the nozzles. The diffuser comprises a conical primary diffuser followed by a cusp diffuser.

  7. Combustion appliance with a safety device

    SciTech Connect

    Furumai, K.; Indo, M.; Kawabata, N.; Tanaka, E.

    1982-11-09

    There is provided a combustion appliance with a safety device. An oxygen partial pressure sensor made up of a transition metal oxide or rare earth metal oxide is normally disposed in a position in which the excess air ratio downstream of a flame formed by a burner can be detected and, at times of abnormality, within the flame. The resistance change of said oxygen partial pressure is detected and the combustion is stopped when incomplete combustion occurs due to oxygen depression, clogging of the primary air orifice of the burner or clogging of the combustion chamber with the products of combustion.

  8. Shaft drilling rig

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Ajiro, S.

    1986-06-17

    A shaft drilling rig is described which consists of: a supporting structure for a drill string having a plurality of components for drilling a shaft into the earth by imparting a turning and thrust for drilling at least to a drill bit on the drill string, the drilling being down to a predetermined depth, and then a further drill string component having at least at the bottom end thereof an inner wall extending substantially in the axial direction of the component being newly added to the drill string for further drilling; means for receiving at least the bottom end of the further drill string component and for supporting it, and having a member with the outer circumference engageable with the inner wall of the further component, the receiving means supporting the further drill string component in a free standing position; means for supporting the receiving means and having a guiding device for guiding the receiving means between a position where the further drill string component is to be added to the drill string and a parking position spaced laterally of the drill string from the first mentioned position; and means for holding a lower part of the drill string which has been separated from the upper part of the drill string preparatory to adding the further drill string component so that the axis of the lower part is substantially aligned with the drilling direction.

  9. SMALL OIL BURNER CONCEPTS BASED ON LOW PRESSURE AIR ATOMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    BUTCHER,T.; CELEBI,Y.; WEI,G.; KAMATH,B.

    2000-03-16

    The development of several novel oil burner applications based on low pressure air atomization is described. The atomizer used is a prefilming, airblast nozzle of the type commonly used in gas turbine combustion. The air pressure used can be as low as 1,300 Pa and such pressure can be easily achieved with a fan. Advantages over conventional, pressure-atomized nozzles include ability to operate at low input rates without very small passages and much lower fuel pressure requirements. The development of three specific applications is presented. The first two are domestic heating burners covering a capacity range 10 to 26 kW. The third application presented involves the use of this burner in an oil-fired thermophotovoltaic power generator system. Here the design firing rate is 2.9 kW and the system produces 500 watts of electric power.

  10. Materials evaluations with the pulsed black liquor burner test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A.

    1997-08-01

    A pulsed burner was designed to provide sufficient heat to convert a fluidized bed of black Kraft liquor into combustible gas which would be used to produce process steam. The pulsed burner design provides a significant increase in the heat transfer capability and consequently significantly increases the efficiency of the conversion process. High temperature corrosion tests were performed in a fluidized bed of black Kraft liquor using a pulsed burner process to determine the optimum materials for use in a commercial application. The materials tested included three different austenitic stainless steels, Type 446 martensitic stainless steel, a high temperature carbon steel, 153MA, and four nickel base alloys. All materials performed well with no corrosion attributed to the environment created by the decomposition of a black Kraft liquor. This behavior was contrary to what was expected due to the high concentration of H{sub 2}S present in the high temperature, 562 C, atmosphere.

  11. Ultra low emission air heat burner. Final report, April 1989-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.N.; Spielman, L.

    1994-02-01

    This report describes the findings using different techniques for reduction of NOx and CO on a line type fixed air nozzle mixing burner. Included are the effects on NOx and CO emissions due to air and gas jet velocities and placement, combuster volume, catalyst coating of the combuster, partial premix, steam injection and insertion of porous ceramic foam matrix in the flame.

  12. Combustion system for hybrid solar fossil fuel receiver

    DOEpatents

    Mehos, Mark S.; Anselmo, Kenneth M.; Moreno, James B.; Andraka, Charles E.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Corey, John; Bohn, Mark S.

    2004-05-25

    A combustion system for a hybrid solar receiver comprises a pre-mixer which combines air and fuel to form an air-fuel mixture. The mixture is introduced tangentially into a cooling jacket. A burner plenum is fluidically connected to the cooling jacket such that the burner plenum and the cooling jacket are arranged in thermal contact with one another. The air-fuel mixture flows through the cooling jacket cooling the burner plenum to reduce pre-ignition of the air-fuel mixture in the burner plenum. A combustion chamber is operatively associated with and open to the burner plenum to receive the air-fuel mixture from the burner plenum. An igniter is operatively positioned in the combustion chamber to combust the air-fuel mixture, releasing heat. A recuperator is operatively associated with the burner plenum and the combustion chamber and pre-heats the air-fuel mixture in the burner plenum with heat from the combustion chamber. A heat-exchanger is operatively associated and in thermal contact with the combustion chamber. The heat-exchanger provides heat for the hybrid solar receiver.

  13. Development of an air-atomized oil burner

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.

    1996-06-01

    A new concept for the design of a residential oil burner is presented involving a low pressure, air atomizing nozzle. Advantages of this approach, relative to conventional, pressure atomized burners include: ability to operate at very low excess air levels without smoke, ability to operate at low (and possibly variable) rates, reduced boiler fouling, and low NO{sub x}. The nozzle used is a low pressure, airblast atomizer which can achieve fuel spray drop sizes similar to conventional nozzles and very good combustion performance with air pressure as low as 5 inches of water (1.24 kPa). A burner head has been developed for this nozzle and combustion test results are presented in a wide variety of equipment including cast iron and steel boilers, warm air furnaces, and water heaters over the firing rate range 0.25 gph to 1.0 gph (10 to 41 kW). Beyond the nozzle and combustion head the burner system must be developed and two approaches have been taken. The first involves a small, brushless DC motor/fan combination which uses high fan speed to achieve air pressures from 7 to 9 inches of water (1.74 to 2.24 kPa). Fuel is delivered to the atomizer at less than 1 psig (6.9 kPa) using a solenoid pump and flow metering orifice. At 0.35 gph (14 kW) the electric power draw of this burner is less than 100 watts. In a second configuration a conventional motor is used with a single stage fan which develops 5 to 6 inches of water pressure (1.24 to 1.50 kPa) at similar firing rates. This burner uses a conventional type fuel pump and metering orifice to deliver fuel. The fuel pump is driven by the fan motor, very much like a conventional burner. This second configuration is seen as more attractive to the heating industry and is now being commercialized. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination.

  14. Altitude Performance Characteristics of Tail-pipe Burner with Convergingconical Burner Section on J47 Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, William R; Mcaulay, John E

    1950-01-01

    An investigation of turbojet-engine thrust augmentation by means of tail-pipe burning was conducted in the NACA Lewis altitude wind tunnel. Performance data were obtained with a tail-pipe burner having a converging conical burner section installed on an axial-flow-compressor type turbojet engine over a range of simulated flight conditions and tail-pipe fuel-air ratios with a fixed-area exhaust nozzle. A maximum tail-pipe combustion efficiency of 0.86 was obtained at an altitude of 15,000 feet and a flight Mach number of 0.23. Tail-pipe burner operation was possible up to an altitude of 45,000 feet at a flight Mach number of 0.23.

  15. Simulation Modeling of an Enhanced Low-Emission Swirl-Cascade Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2004-09-01

    ''Cascade-burners'' is a passive technique to control the stoichiometry of the flame through changing the flow dynamics and rates of mixing in the combustion zone with a set of venturis surrounding the flame. Cascade-burners have shown advantages over other techniques; its reliability, flexibility, safety, and cost makes it more attractive and desirable. On the other hand, the application of ''Swirl-burners'' has shown superiority in producing a stable flame under a variety of operating conditions and fuel types. The basic idea is to impart swirl to the air or fuel stream, or both. This not only helps to stabilize the flame but also enhances mixing in the combustion zone. As a result, nonpremixed (diffusion) swirl burners have been increasingly used in industrial combustion systems such as gas turbines, boilers, and furnaces, due to their advantages of safety and stability. Despite the advantages of cascade and swirl burners, both are passive control techniques, which resulted in a moderate pollutant emissions reduction compared to SCR, SNCR and FGR (active) methods. The present investigation will study the prospects of combining both techniques in what to be named as ''an enhanced swirl-cascade burner''. Natural gas jet diffusion flames in baseline, cascade, swirl, and swirl-cascade burners were numerically modeled using CFDRC package. The thermal, composition, and flow (velocity) fields were simulated. The numerical results showed that swirl and cascade burners have a more efficient fuel/air mixing, a shorter flame, and a lower NOx emission levels, compared to the baseline case. The results also revealed that the optimal configurations of the cascaded and swirling flames have not produced an improved performance when combined together in a ''swirl-cascade burner''. The non-linearity and complexity of the system accounts for such a result, and therefore, all possible combinations, i.e. swirl numbers (SN) versus venturi diameter ratios (D/d), need to be considered.

  16. Design and evaluation of a porous burner for the mitigation of anthropogenic methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Susie; Fletcher, David F; Joseph, Stephen D; Dawson, Adrian; Harris, Andrew T

    2009-12-15

    Methane constitutes 15% of total global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The mitigation of these emissions could have a significant near-term effect on slowing global warming, and recovering and burning the methane would allow a wasted energy resource to be exploited. The typically low and fluctuating energy content of the emission streams makes combustion difficult; however porous burners-an advanced combustion technology capable of burning low-calorific value fuels below the conventional flammability limit-are one possible mitigation solution. Here we discuss a pilot-scale porous burner designed for this purpose. The burner comprises a cylindrical combustion chamber filled with a porous bed of alumina saddles, combined with an arrangement of heat exchanger tubes for preheating the incoming emission stream. A computational fluid dynamics model was developed to aid in the design process. Results illustrating the burner's stable operating range and behavior are presented: stable ultralean combustion is demonstrated at natural gas concentrations as low as 2.3 vol%, with transient combustion at concentrations down to 1.1 vol%; the system is comparatively stable to perturbations in the operating conditions, and emissions of both carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons are negligible. Based on this pilot-scale demonstration, porous burners show potential as a methane mitigation technology. PMID:20000525

  17. A critical review of noise production models for turbulent, gas-fueled burners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The combustion noise literature for the period between 1952 and early 1984 is critically reviewed. Primary emphasis is placed on past theoretical and semi-empirical attempts to predict or explain observed direct combustion noise characteristics of turbulent, gas-fueled burners; works involving liquid-fueled burners are reviewed only when ideas equally applicable to gas-fueled burners are pesented. The historical development of the most important contemporary direct combustion noise theories is traced, and the theories themselves are compared and criticized. While most theories explain combustion noise production by turbulent flames in terms of randomly distributed acoustic monopoles produced by turbulent mixing of products and reactants, none is able to predict the sound pressure in the acoustic farfield of a practical burner because of the lack of a proven model which relates the combustion noise source strenght at a given frequency to the design and operating parameters of the burner. Recommendations are given for establishing a benchmark-quality data base needed to support the development of such a model.

  18. Oil burner nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Donald G.

    1982-01-01

    An oil burner nozzle for use with liquid fuels and solid-containing liquid fuels. The nozzle comprises a fuel-carrying pipe, a barrel concentrically disposed about the pipe, and an outer sleeve retaining member for the barrel. An atomizing vapor passes along an axial passageway in the barrel, through a bore in the barrel and then along the outer surface of the front portion of the barrel. The atomizing vapor is directed by the outer sleeve across the path of the fuel as it emerges from the barrel. The fuel is atomized and may then be ignited.

  19. Pyromat CSB{trademark} low emissions burner for boilers, steam generators and process heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Duret, M.J.; Minden, A.C.

    1995-08-01

    Alzeta has developed a low NO{sub x} burner for boiler and process heater applications that achieves very low emissions without complicated emissions controls such as flue gas recirculation or staged fuel and air. The Pyromat CSB burner is a semi-radiant, premixed, natural gas fired burner which uses a patented technique to form radiant and blue-flame zones adjacent to each other on a cylindrical porous metal surface. This new technology offers surface heat release rates that are 10 times greater than traditional surface combusters. Because the flame shape is constant over the entire range of operation, and is sized and shaped to meet the specific requirements of the heater, there is no change for flame impingement or nonuniform heating. In one application, thermally enhanced oil recovery, the Pyromat CSB burner is firing on low-Btu gas containing H{sub 2}S drawn from oil wells. Low NO{sub x} FGR burners cannot serve this application because the combustion products corrode the ducting. In addition, premixed burners can operate on low-Btu gases without supplemental natural gases which saves operating expenses. In another application, process heating of fragile fluids, flame impingement can overheat the heat transfer liquid and cause premature tube failure. The Pyromat CSB burner has a constant flame shape over its entire turndown ratio so there is no chance for flame impingement.

  20. Results of initial operation of the Jupiter Oxygen Corporation oxy-fuel 15 MWth burner test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Ochs, Danylo Oryshchyn, Rigel Woodside, Cathy Summers, Brian Patrick, Dietrich Gross, Mark Schoenfield, Thomas Weber and Dan O'Brien

    2009-04-01

    Jupiter Oxygen Corporation (JOC), in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), constructed a 15 MWth oxy-fuel burner test facility with Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPRTM) to test high flame temperature oxy-fuel combustion and advanced carbon capture. Combustion protocols include baseline air firing with natural gas, oxygen and natural gas firing with and without flue gas recirculation, and oxygen and pulverized coal firing with flue gas recirculation. Testing focuses on characterizing burner performance, determining heat transfer characteristics, optimizing CO2 capture, and maximizing heat recovery, with an emphasis on data traceability to address retrofit of existing boilers by directly transforming burner systems to oxy-fuel firing.

  1. Dual-water mixture fuel burner

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Reehl, Douglas P.; Walbert, Gary F.

    1986-08-05

    A coal-water mixture (CWM) burner includes a conically shaped rotating cup into which fuel comprised of coal particles suspended in a slurry is introduced via a first, elongated inner tube coupled to a narrow first end portion of the cup. A second, elongated outer tube is coaxially positioned about the first tube and delivers steam to the narrow first end of the cup. The fuel delivery end of the inner first tube is provided with a helical slot on its lateral surface for directing the CWM onto the inner surface of the rotating cup in the form of a uniform, thin sheet which, under the influence of the cup's centrifugal force, flows toward a second, open, expanded end portion of the rotating cup positioned immediately adjacent to a combustion chamber. The steam delivered to the rotating cup wets its inner surface and inhibits the coal within the CWM from adhering to the rotating cup. A primary air source directs a high velocity air flow coaxially about the expanded discharge end of the rotating cup for applying a shear force to the CWM in atomizing the fuel mixture for improved combustion. A secondary air source directs secondary air into the combustion chamber adjacent to the outlet of the rotating cup at a desired pitch angle relative to the fuel mixture/steam flow to promote recirculation of hot combustion gases within the ignition zone for increased flame stability.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW PRESSURE, AIR ATOMIZED OIL BURNER WITH HIGH ATOMIZER AIR FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    BUTCHER,T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5--8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or FAB has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a torroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the tiring rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% 0{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

  3. Residential oil burners with low input and two-stage firing

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.; Leigh, R.; Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.; Fisher, L.; Kamath, B.

    1997-12-31

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner. At low firing rates, pressure-atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low-pressure air-atomized burner has been developed that can operate at firing rates, as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low firing rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a sidewall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single-purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two-stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space-heating loads.

  4. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL GAS-SWIRL BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2005-03-01

    A numerical simulation of a turbulent natural gas jet diffusion flame at a Reynolds number of 9000 in a swirling air stream is presented. The numerical computations were carried out using the commercially available software package CFDRC. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The thermal, composition, flow (velocity), as well as stream function fields for both the baseline and air-swirling flames were numerically simulated in the near-burner region, where most of the mixing and reactions occur. The results were useful to interpret the effects of swirl in enhancing the mixing rates in the combustion zone as well as in stabilizing the flame. The results showed the generation of two recirculating regimes induced by the swirling air stream, which account for such effects. The present investigation will be used as a benchmark study of swirl flow combustion analysis as a step in developing an enhanced swirl-cascade burner technology.

  5. High capacity oil burner

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrosa, O.A. Jr.; Couto, N.C.; Fanqueiro, R.C.C.

    1983-11-01

    The present invention relates to a high capacity oil burner comprising a cylindrical atomizer completely surrounded by a protective cylindrical housing having a diameter from 2 to 3 times greater than the diameter of said atomizer; liquid fuels being injected under pressure into said atomizer and accumulating within said atomizer in a chamber for the accumulation of liquid fuels, and compressed air being injected into a chamber for the accumulation of air; cylindrical holes communicating said chamber for the accumulation of liquid fuels with the outside and cylindrical holes communicating said chamber for the accumulation of air with said cylindrical holes communicating the chamber for the accumulation of liquids with the outside so that the injection of compressed air into said liquid fuel discharge holes atomizes said fuel which is expelled to the outside through the end portions of said discharge holes which are circumferentially positioned to be burnt by a pilot flame; said protecting cylindrical housing having at its ends perforated circular rings into which water is injected under pressure to form a protecting fan-like water curtain at the rear end of the housing and a fan-like water curtain at the flame to reduce the formation of soot; the burning efficiency of said burner being superior to 30 barrels of liquid fuel per day/kg of the apparatus.

  6. Design and evaluation of a low nitrogen oxides natural gas-fired conical wire-mesh duct burner for a micro-cogeneration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Omar Barka Ab

    A novel low NOx conical wire-mesh duct burner was designed, built and tested in the present research. This thesis documents the design process and the in-depth evaluation of this novel duct burner for the development of a more efficient micro-cogeneration unit. This duct burner provides the thermal energy necessary to raise the microturbine exhaust gases temperature to increase the heat recovery capability. The duct burner implements both lean-premixed and surface combustion techniques to achieve low NOx and CO emissions. The design of the duct burner was supported by a qualitative flow visualization study for the duct burner premixer to provide insight into the premixer flow field (mixing process). Different premixer geometries were used to control the homogeneity of the fuel-oxidant mixture at the exit of the duct burner premixer. Laser sheet illumination (LSI) technique was used to capture images of the mixing process, for each configuration studied. A quasi-quantitative analysis technique was developed to rank the different premixer geometries in terms of mixing effectiveness. The premixer geometries that provided better mixing were selected and used for the combustion tests. The full-scale gas-fired duct burner was installed in the exhaust duct of a micro-cogeneration unit for the evaluation. Three wire-mesh burners with different pressure drops were used. Each burner has a conical shape made from FeCrAL alloy mat and was designed based on a heat release per unit area of 2500 kW/m2 and a total heat release of 240kW at 100 percent excess air. The local momentum of the gaseous mixture introduced through the wire-mesh was adjusted so that the flame stabilized outside the burner mesh (surface combustion). Cold flow tests (i.e., the duct burner was off, but the microturbine was running) were conducted to measure the effect of different duct burner geometrical parameters on flow split between the combustion zone and the bypass channel, and on pressure drop across

  7. Hybrid Bearing Prognostic Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Certo, Joseph M.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Dimofte, Florin

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a new Hybrid Bearing Prognostic Test Rig to evaluate the performance of sensors and algorithms in predicting failures of rolling element bearings for aeronautics and space applications. The failure progression of both conventional and hybrid (ceramic rolling elements, metal races) bearings can be tested from fault initiation to total failure. The effects of different lubricants on bearing life can also be evaluated. Test conditions monitored and recorded during the test include load, oil temperature, vibration, and oil debris. New diagnostic research instrumentation will also be evaluated for hybrid bearing damage detection. This paper summarizes the capabilities of this new test rig.

  8. Combustion physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  9. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  10. Experimental study of the thermal-acoustic efficiency in a long turbulent diffusion-flame burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A two-year study of noise production in a long tubular burner is described. The research was motivated by an interest in understanding and eventually reducing core noise in gas turbine engines. The general approach is to employ an acoustic source/propagation model to interpret the sound pressure spectrum in the acoustic far field of the burner in terms of the source spectrum that must have produced it. In the model the sources are assumed to be due uniquely to the unsteady component of combustion heat release; thus only direct combustion-noise is considered. The source spectrum is then the variation with frequency of the thermal-acoustic efficiency, defined as the fraction of combustion heat release which is converted into acoustic energy at a given frequency. The thrust of the research was to study the variation of the source spectrum with the design and operating parameters of the burner.

  11. COSMIC: Carbon Monoxide and Soot in Microgravity Inverse Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, L. G.; Fernandez, M. G.; Mulholland, G. W.; Davis, R. W.; Moore, E. F.; Steel, E. B.; Scott, J. H. J.

    2001-01-01

    Almost seventy percent of deaths in accidental fires are caused by inhalation of toxins such as carbon monoxide (CO) and smoke (soot) that form during underventilated burning. The COSMIC project examines the formation mechanisms of CO and soot during underventilated combustion, achieved presently using laminar, inverse diffusion flames (IDFs) formed between an air jet and surrounding fuel. A major hypothesis of the project is that the IDF mimics underventilated combustion because carbon-containing species that form on the fuel side of the flame (such as CO and soot) can escape without passing through an oxidizing flame tip. An IDF literature review was presented at the last microgravity workshop, and a few additional IDF papers have appeared since that meeting. The COSMIC project is entering the third year of its four-year funding cycle. The first two years have been devoted to designing and constructing a rig for use in the NASA 2.2-second drop tower. A few computations and laboratory experiments have been performed. The goals of this paper are to discuss the use of numerical simulation during burner design, to present computational and experimental results that support the hypothesis that IDFs are similar to underventilated flames, and to delineate future plans.

  12. PNNL Hoisting and Rigging Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Haynie, Todd O.; Fullmer, Michael W.

    2008-12-29

    This manual describes the safe and cost effective operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair requirements for cranes, hoists, fork trucks, slings, rigging hardware, and hoisting equipment. It is intended to be a user's guide to requirements, codes, laws, regulations, standards, and practices that apply to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its subcontractors.

  13. Hoisting and rigging manual: Uncontrolled document

    SciTech Connect

    1991-05-01

    This document is a draft copy of a Hoisting and Rigging Manual for the Department of Energy. The manual is divided into ten chapters. The chapter titles follow: terminology and definitions; operator training and qualification; overhead and gantry cranes; mobile cranes; forklift trucks; hoists; hooks; wire rope, slings, and rigging accessories; construction hoisting and rigging equipment requirements; references.

  14. Micronized-Coal Burner Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calfo, F. D.; Lupton, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Micronized-coal (coal-in-oil mix) burner facility developed to fulfill need to generate erosion/corrosion data on series of superalloy specimens. In order to successfully operate gas turbine using COM, two primary conditions must be met. First, there must be adequate atomization of COM and second, minimization of coking of burner. Meeting these conditions will be achieved only by clean burning and flame stability.

  15. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this

  16. Advanced radiant combustion system. Final report, September 1989--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.D.; Carswell, M.G.; Long, F.S.

    1996-09-01

    Results of the Advanced Radiant Combustion System (ARCS) project are presented in this report. This work was performed by Alzeta Corporation as prime contractor under a contract to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technologies as part of a larger DOE program entitled Research Program for Advanced Combustion Systems. The goals of the Alzeta ARCS project were to (a) Improve the high temperature performance characteristics of porous surface ceramic fiber burners, (b) Develop an Advanced Radiant Combustion System (ARCS) that combines combustion controls with an advanced radiant burner, and (c) Demonstrate the advanced burner and controls in an industrial application. Prior to the start of this project, Alzeta had developed and commercialized a porous surface radiant burner, the Pyrocore{trademark} burner. The product had been commercially available for approximately 5 years and had achieved commercial success in a number of applications ranging from small burners for commercial cooking equipment to large burners for low temperature industrial fluid heating applications. The burner was not recommended for use in applications with process temperatures above 1000{degrees}F, which prevented the burner from being used in intermediate to high temperature processes in the chemical and petroleum refining industries. The interest in increasing the maximum use temperature of the burner was motivated in part by a desire to expand the number of applications that could use the Pyrocore product, but also because many of the fluid sensitive heating applications of interest would benefit from the distributed flux characteristic of porous surface burners. Background information on porous surface radiant burners, and a discussion of advantages that would be provided by an improved product, are presented in Section 2.

  17. Technology Being Developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Ultra-Low- Emission Combustion Technologies for Heat and Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    The Combustion Technologies Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed simple, low-cost, yet robust combustion technologies that may change the fundamental design concept of burners for boilers and furnaces, and injectors for gas turbine combustors. The new technologies utilize lean premixed combustion and could bring about significant pollution reductions from commercial and industrial combustion processes and may also improve efficiency. The technologies are spinoffs of two fundamental research projects: An inner-ring burner insert for lean flame stabilization developed for NASA- sponsored reduced-gravity combustion experiments. A low-swirl burner developed for Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences research on turbulent combustion.

  18. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fam powered, infrared, natural gas burners

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Tiejun

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (PIR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. This project consists of both experimental research and numerical analysis. To conduct the experiments, an experimental setup has been developed and installed in the Combustion Laboratory at Clerk Atlanta University (CAU). This setup consists of a commercial deep fat fryer that has been modified to allow in-situ radiation measurements on the surface of the infrared burner via a view port installed on the side wall of the oil vat. Proper instrumentation including fuel/air flow rate measurement, exhaust gas emission measurement, and radiation measurement has been developed. The project is progressing well. The scheduled tasks for this period of time were conducted smoothly. Specifically: 1. Baseline experimental study at CAU has been completed. The data are now under detailed analysis and will be reported in next quarterly report. 2. Theoretical formulation and analysis of the PIR burner performance model are continuing. Preliminary results have been obtained.

  19. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  20. Stacked rig refurbished for ultradeep gas drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Noevig, T.; Gutsche, W. )

    1995-01-09

    A heavy drilling rig, cold stacked for several years, recently underwent numerous structural, equipment, and computer upgrades for drilling ultradeep (8,000 m) gas wells in Germany. The technical improvements on the rig included supplementary installations and modifications to safety, quality, engineering, noise abatement, and environmental protection systems. With a maximal hook load of 700 tons, the drilling rig is one of the heaviest of its kind in Europe. The rig has a drilling depth range of 7,000--8,000 m, and the top drive system enables horizontal drilling. The paper describes the rig site, mast, top drive, substructure, draw works, power station, mud system, instrumentation, and other equipment.

  1. NOx Emissions from a Lobed Fuel Injector/Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. G.; Smith, L. L.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.

    1996-01-01

    The present experimental study examines the performance of a novel fuel injector/burner configuration with respect to reduction in nitrogen oxide NOx emissions. The lobed injector/burner is a device in which very rapid initial mixing of reactants can occur through strong streamwise vorticity generation, producing high fluid mechanical strain rates which can delay ignition and thus prevent the formation of stoichiometric diffusion flames. Further downstream of the rapid mixing region. this flowfield produces a reduced effective strain rate, thus allowing ignition to occur in a premixed mode, where it is possible for combustion to take place under locally lean conditions. potentially reducing NOx emissions from the burner. The present experiments compare NO/NO2/NOx emissions from a lobed fuel injector configuration with emissions from a straight fuel injector to determine the net effect of streamwise vorticity generation. Preliminary results show that the lobed injector geometry can produce lean premixed flame structures. while for comparable flow conditions, a straight fuel injector geometry produces much longer. sooting diffusion flames or slightly rich pre-mixed flames. NO measurements show that emissions from a lobed fuel injector/burner can be made significantly lower than from a straight fuel injector under comparable flow conditions.

  2. Rig designers continue fine-tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, S.S.

    1993-04-01

    Rig designers and owners continue to fine-tune a variety of sophisticated new generation semisubmersible and jackup designs that will go into production once supply catches up with demand, later in the decade. The units will be designed to meet the latest international safety requirements, be more highly specialized that most existing rigs, and they will be expensive. Rising oil prices and improved rig utilization will be the catalysts to spur future rig orders. Over the longer term, the aging semi fleet will need to be upgraded or replaced beginning in the second half of the deacade. Rig life extension programs will be economically justified for many rigs, but new construction will pay a significant role in the semi fleet this decade. Many rig designs will be capable of ultra-deep-water drilling and production in water depths as deep as 10,000 feet. Additional designs concepts and projects are discussed.

  3. Demonstration tests of new burner diagnostic system on a 650 MW coal-fired utility boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Khesin, M.; Quenan, D.; Jesikiewicz, T.; Kenien, D.; Girvan, R.

    1997-09-01

    Forney Corporation, MK Engineering (MKE) and NYSEG jointly conducted extensive testing of a new Burner Diagnostic System (BDS) based on analysis of flame turbulence in the burner ignition zone. Tests were conducted on the 700 MW coal-fired unit at NYSEG Kintigh Station with the objective to evaluate the new system`s capabilities and its potential for improvements in combustion efficiency and NO{sub x} reduction. The overall objectives in creating this new product included the following: develop and test a set of advanced algorithms correlating flame signatures with combustion parameters, such as air-fuel ratio, combustion efficiency, flame stability, CO and NO{sub x} emissions; develop a new generation of flame sensors with improved flame detection and burner management capabilities; develop new advanced combustion optimization strategies and systems, and to equip the operator with an effective new tool to improve combustion performance; and evaluate the new system feasibility and to compare the data with results of the NYSEG`s SMG-10 application (which provides precision measurements of coal and primary air flows to each burner).

  4. Experimental study of the thermal-acoustic efficiency in a long turbulent diffusion-flame burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic source/propagation model is used to interpret measured noise spectra from a long turbulent burner. The acoustic model is based on the perturbation solution of the equations describing the unsteady one-dimensional flow of an inviscid ideal gas with a distributed heat source. The model assumes that the measured noise spectra are due uniquely to the unsteady component of combustion heat release. The model was applied to a long cylindrical hydrogen burner operating over a range of power levels between 4.5 kW and 22.3 kW. Acoustic impedances at the inlet to the burner and at the exit of the tube downstream of the burner were measured and are used as boundary conditions for the model. These measured impedances are also presented.

  5. Somebody better find some rigs

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries of the Middle East. Field development projects abound, as the larger exporting nations pursue ambitious policies of production expansion. However, their plans may be hampered by the growing worldwide shortage of rigs. Separate evaluations are given for Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Yemen, Syria, Dubai, Turkey, Sharjah, and briefly for Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, UAE-Ajman, and UAE-Ras al-Khaimah.

  6. Burner ignition system

    DOEpatents

    Carignan, Forest J.

    1986-01-21

    An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

  7. Scaling characteristics of the aerodynamics and low-NOx properties of industrial natural gas burners: The scaling 400 study. Part 3. The 30kw test results

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, J.F.; Dahm, W.J.A.; Wu, M.S.

    1993-08-15

    The objective of the SCALING 400 study is to assist in the development of new ultra-low NOx natural gas burners for industrial and utility operations so as to maintain and expand future demand for natural gas as the fuel of choice for clean combustion applications. The study is determining the scaling characteristics of near-burner aerodynamics and low-NOx properties of industrial natural gas burners, thereby yielding valuable new engineering information on the scaling of natural gas burners to contribute to the development of new low-NOx designs.

  8. Combustion roar as observed in industrial furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, A.A.

    1982-10-01

    Factory noise has received increasing attention, both because of the action of regulatory bodies and because of increased industrial awareness of detrimental effects to workers. A significant source of factory noise, combustion roar, accompanies any turbulent flame, premixed or diffusion. Generally, it increases with the rate and intensity of combustion. The effects of several variables, such as firing rate, turbulence intensity, and burner type, on the noise output of flames in an acoustically-infinite situation are first considered. Then, the available information on the changes in the acoustic performance of burners when they are placed in furnaces is discussed. Finally, some remarks are made concerning the suppression of combustion roar.

  9. 14 CFR 31.47 - Burners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.47 Burners. (a) If a burner is used to provide the... fuel pressure is 40 to 60 percent of the range between the maximum fuel pressure referenced...

  10. Numerical simulation of radiative heat loss in an experimental burner

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.; Brookshaw, L.

    1993-09-01

    We describe the numerical algorithm used in the COYOTE two-dimensional, transient, Eulerian hydrodynamics program to allow for radiative heat losses in simulations of reactive flows. The model is intended primarily for simulations of industrial burners, but it is not confined to that application. It assumes that the fluid is optically thin and that photons created by the fluid immediately escape to free space or to the surrounding walls, depending upon the application. The use of the model is illustrated by simulations of a laboratory-scale experimental burner. We find that the radiative heat losses reduce the local temperature of the combustion products by a modest amount, typically on the order of 50 K. However, they have a significant impact on NO{sub x} production.

  11. Composite propellant combustion modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1977-01-01

    A review is presented of theoretical and experimental studies of composite propellant combustion. The theoretical investigations include a model of the combustion of a nonmetallized ammonium perchlorate (AP) propellant (noting time scales for vapor-phase combustion and the condensed phase) and response functions in pressure-coupled oscillations. The experimental studies are discussed with reference to scale-modeling apparatus, flame standoff distance versus velocity as a function of pressure, and results from T-burner firings of a nonmetallized AP/polysulfide propellant. Research applications including problems with nitramine propellants, the feasibility of stop-restart rockets with salt quench, and combustion problems in large boosters are outlined.

  12. On burner-stabilized cylindrical premixed flames in microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, J.A.; Law, C.K.; Zhu, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    The structure and response of the curved but unstretched cylindrically symmetric one-dimensional premixed flame generated by a cylindrical porous burner has been studied using (1) activation energy asymptotics with one-step reaction and constant properties, (2) numerical computation with detailed chemistry and transport, and (3) drop-tower microgravity experimentation. The study emphasizes the relative importance of heat loss (to the burner surface) vs flow divergence as the dominant mechanism for flame stabilization, the possibility of establishing a one-dimensional, adiabatic, unstretched, premixed flame in microgravity, the influence of curvature on the upstream and downstream burning rates of the flame, and the relation of these burning rates to those of the inherently nonadiabatic flat-burner flame as well as the freely propagating adiabatic planar flame. Results show that, with increasing flow discharge rate, the dominant flame stabilization mechanism changes from heat loss to flow divergence, hence demonstrating the feasibility of establishing a freely standing, adiabatic, one-dimensional, unstretched flame. It is further shown that, in this adiabatic, divergence-stabilized regime in which the burner discharge flux exceeds that of the adiabatic planar flame, the downstream burning flux is equal to the (constant) burning flux of the adiabatic planar flame while the upstream burning flux exceeds it, and the upstream burning velocity exhibits a maximum with increasing discharge rate. Based on the property of the downstream burning flux, it is also proposed that the laminar burning velocity of a combustible can be readily determined from the experimental values of the burner discharge rate and flame radius. Microgravity results on the flame radius compare favorably with the computed values, while the corresponding laminar burning velocity also agrees well with that obtained from independent numerical computation.

  13. Interaction of turblence and chemistry in a low-swirl burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. B.; Cheng, R. K.; Day, M. S.; Beckner, V. E.; Lijewski, M. J.

    2008-07-01

    New combustion systems based on ultra-lean premixed combustion have the potential for dramatically reducing pollutant emissions in transportation systems, heat, and stationary power generation. However, lean premixed flames are highly susceptible to fluid-dynamical combustion instabilities, making robust and reliable systems difficult to design. Low-swirl burners are emerging as an important technology for meeting design requirements in terms of both reliability and emissions for next-generation combustion devices. In this paper, we present simlations of a laboratory-scale low-swirl burner using detailed chemistry and transport without incorporating explicit models for turbulence or turbulence/chemistry interaction. We consider two fuels, methane and hydrogen, each at two turbulent intensities. Here we examine some of the basic properties of the flow field and the flame structure. We focus on the differences in flame behavior for the two fuels, particularly on the hydrogen flame, which burns with a cellular structures.

  14. 14 CFR 31.47 - Burners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Burners. 31.47 Section 31.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.47 Burners. (a) If a burner is used to provide the lifting means, the system must be designed...

  15. 14 CFR 31.47 - Burners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Burners. 31.47 Section 31.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.47 Burners. (a) If a burner is used to provide the lifting means, the system must be designed...

  16. Modular designs highlight several new rigs

    SciTech Connect

    Rappold, K.

    1995-12-04

    A new platform drilling rig for offshore Trinidad and two new land rigs for the former Soviet Union feature the latest in drilling and construction technology and modular components for quick rig up/rig down. The Sundowner 801 was mock-up tested in Galveston, TX, a few weeks ago in preparation for its load-out to the Dolphin field offshore Trinidad. Two other new units, UNOC 500 DE series land rigs, were recently constructed and mock-up tested in Ekaterinburg, Russia, for upcoming exploratory work for RAO Gazprom, a large natural gas producer in Russia. These rigs are unique in that they were constructed from new components made both in the US and in Russia. The paper describes all three units.

  17. EVALUATION OF LOW EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON INDUSTRIAL BOILERS. THIRD ANNUAL REPORT (1981)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the third year's effort under EPA Contract 68-02-3127. The objective of the program is to conduct a field evaluation of the distributed mixing burner (DMB) on an industrial size boiler. The DMB concept provides for controlled mixing of coal with combustion a...

  18. LOW-NOX BURNERS FOR PULVERIZED-COAL-FIRED BOILERS IN JAPAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes nitrogen oxide (NOx) abatement by low-NOx burners (LNBs) and combustion modification (CM) for dry-bottom pulverized-coal-fired boilers in Japan. LNBs have been widely used in Japan as a simple way to reduce NOx emissions by 20-50%. NOx abatement by a LNB and C...

  19. Cooling Characteristics of an Experimental Tail-pipe Burner with an Annular Cooling-air Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Harold R; Koffel, William K

    1952-01-01

    The effects of tail-pipe fuel-air ratio (exhaust-gas temperatures from approximately 3060 degrees to 3825 degrees R), radial distributiion of tail-pipe fuel flow, and mass flow of combustion gas and the inside wall were determined for an experimental tail-pipe burner cooled by air flowing through and insulated cooling-air to combustion gas mass flow from 0.066 to 0.192 were also determined.

  20. Boiler using combustible fluid

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  1. Development of a Low Pressure, Air Atomized Oil Burner with High Atomizer Air Flow: Progress Report FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5-8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or ''FAB'' has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a toroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the firing rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% O{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

  2. High-Flow Jet Exit Rig Designed and Fabricated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Robert J.; Trimarchi, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The High-Flow Jet Exit Rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center is designed to test single flow jet nozzles and to measure the appropriate thrust and noise levels. The rig has been designed for the maximum hot condition of 16 lbm/sec of combustion air at 1960 R (maximum) and to produce a maximum thrust of 2000 lb. It was designed for cold flow of 29.1 lbm/sec of air at 530 R. In addition, it can test dual-flow nozzles (nozzles with bypass flow in addition to core flow) with independent control of each flow. The High- Flow Jet Exit Rig was successfully fabricated in late 2001 and is being readied for checkout tests. The rig will be installed in Glenn's Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory. The High-Flow Jet Exit Rig consists of the following major components: a single component force balance, the natural-gas-fueled J-79 combustor assembly, the plenum and manifold assembly, an acoustic/instrumentation/seeding (A/I/S) section, a table, and the research nozzles. The rig will be unique in that it is designed to operate uncooled. The structure survives the 1960 R test condition because it uses carefully selected high temperature alloy materials such as Hastelloy-X. The lower plenum assembly was designed to operate at pressures to 450 psig at 1960 R, in accordance with the ASME B31.3 piping code. The natural gas-fueled combustor fires directly into the lower manifold. The hot air is directed through eight 1-1/2-in. supply pipes that supply the upper plenum. The flow is conditioned in the upper plenum prior to flowing to the research nozzle. The 1-1/2-in. supply lines are arranged in a U-shaped design to provide for a flexible piping system. The combustor assembly checkout was successfully conducted in Glenn's Engine Component Research Laboratory in the spring of 2001. The combustor is a low-smoke version of the J79 combustor used to power the F4 Phantom military aircraft. The natural gas-fueled combustor demonstrated high-efficiency combustion over a wide range of operating

  3. A microgravity vibration isolation rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Bibhuti B.; Knospe, Carl R.; Allaire, Paul E.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that the spacecraft environment deviates from a state of zero gravity due to various random as well as repetitive sources. Science experiments that require a microgravity environment must therefore be isolated from these disturbances. Active control of noncontact magnetic actuators enables such isolation. A one degree of freedom test rig has been constructed to demonstrate the isolation capability achievable using magnetic actuators. A cylindrical mass on noncontacting electromagnetic supports simulates a microgravity experiment on board an orbiter. Disturbances generated by an electrodynamic shaker are transmitted to the mass via dashpots representing umbilicals. A compact Lorentz actuator has been designed to provide attenuation of this disturbance.

  4. Development of a wood pellet fired burner for space heating applications in the range 5 kW--300 kW

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, J.

    1999-07-01

    A compact burner has been developed, fired by wood pellets, which can compete with fossil fuel burners for space heating applications in terms of efficiency, emissions, load following capability, economics, and physical size. Greenhouse gas emissions (CO{sub 2}) are reduced by 80% or more when used to displace fossil fuel fired appliances. This includes consideration of energy use in the pelleting process. The pellet fired burner is a stand-alone hot gas generator that can be externally mounted on an existing hot water boiler, directly replacing an oil or gas fired burner. The boiler thermostat directly controls the burner. Alternatively, the burner can be integrated into a forced air furnace or a dedicated boiler for OEM applications. The burner has been scaled from 20 kW for residential use up to more than 300 kw for commercial applications. The burner incorporates a fuel metering and delivery system, an insulated refractory firebox, an agitated grate system, preheated forced air combustion, and an open loop electronic control. Pellets are delivered from a separate storage bin, and the burner exhausts not gases in excess of 1,000 C from the burner tube. Excess air for combustion is controlled below 30% and emissions, CO and NO, are less than 100 ppm. the burner can be operated at these conditions as low as 30% rated power output. Upon heat demand from the thermostat control, pellets are fed to the grate, they ignite within 2--3 minutes using an electric resistance cartridge heater, and 90% rated power output is reached within 6--8 minutes of ignition. The burner can cycle 2--3 times per hour following the load demand.

  5. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    DOEpatents

    Bohn, Mark S.; Anselmo, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  6. Visualisation of isothermal large coherent structures in a swirl burner

    SciTech Connect

    Valera-Medina, A.; Syred, N.; Griffiths, A.

    2009-09-15

    Lean premixed combustion using swirl flame stabilisation is widespread amongst gas turbine manufacturers. The use of swirl mixing and flame stabilisation is also prevalent in many other non-premixed systems. Problems that emerge include loss of stabilisation as a function of combustor geometry and thermo-acoustic instabilities. Coherent structures and their relationship with combustion processes have been a concern for decades due to their complex nature. This paper thus adopts an experimental approach to characterise large coherent structures in swirl burners under isothermal conditions so as to reveal the effects of swirl in a number of geometries and cold flow patterns that are relevant in combustion. Aided by techniques such as Hot Wire Anemometry, High Speed Photography and Particle Image Velocimetry, the recognition of several structures was achieved in a 100 kW swirl burner model. Several varied, interacting, structures developed in the field as a consequence of the configurations used. New structures never observed before were identified, the results not only showing the existence of very well defined large structures, but also their dependency on geometrical and flow parameters. The PVC is confirmed to be a semi-helical structure, contrary to previous simulations performed on the system. The appearance of secondary recirculation zones and suppression of the vortical core as a consequence of geometrical constrictions are presented as a mechanism of flow control. The asymmetry of the Central Recirculation Zone in cold flows is observed in all the experiments, with its elongation dependent on Re and swirl number used. (author)

  7. Low No sub x /SO sub x burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.; Martin, L.; Smith, J.

    1991-05-01

    The Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} (LNS) Burner Retrofit for Utility Cyclone Boilers program consists of the retrofit and subsequent demonstration of the technology at Southern Illinois Power Cooperative's (SIPC's) 33-MW unit 1 cyclone boiler located near Marion, Illinois. The LNS Burner employs a simple innovative combustion process burning high-sulfur Illinois coal to provide substantial SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control within the burner. A complete series of boiler performance and characterization tests, called the baseline tests, was conducted in October 1990 on unit 1 of SIPC's Marion Station. The primary objective of the baseline test was to collect data from the existing plant that could provide a comparison of performance after the LNS Burner retrofit. These data could confirm the LNS Burner's SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions control and any effect on boiler operation. Further, these tests would provide to the project experience with the operating characteristics of the host unit as well as engineering design information to minimize technical uncertainties in the application of the LNS Burner technology.

  8. Dynamic characterization of an industrial burner in working conditions by laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paone, Nicola; Revel, Gian M.

    1998-06-01

    The paper presents the application of a laser Doppler vibrometer in order to characterize the dynamic behavior of a burner during normal working conditions. The burner is a 1:4 scale model of a real CH4 industrial burner for gas turbines, with a 120 kW power. A first series of test has been performed in order to determine the resonance frequencies of burner components, in such a way as to correlate the results achieved in working conditions with the characteristics of the structure. In a second series of tests the burner has been tested in exercise, firstly with only a cold jet of air flowing from the nozzle, then in real working conditions. In each test both vibration and acoustic measurements have been performed, in order to find correlation between combustion noise and structural vibrations. The laser Doppler vibrometer has been chosen to carry out measurements on the burner because of its capability of 'remotely' and non-intrusively determine vibrations. In order to assess the accuracy of vibrometer measurements through the flame, a theoretical model previously developed by the authors has been employed, which describes the interactions between laser interferometer and refractive index variations induced by the flame, in such a way as to estimate interfering and modifying inputs of the measurements system.

  9. Composition surveys of test gas produced by a hydrogen-oxygen-air burner. [for supersonic ramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    As a result of the need for a uniform hot gas test stream for fuel injector development for hydrogen fueled supersonic combustion ramjet engines, an experimental study of injector configuration effect on exit flow uniformity of a hydrogen fueled oxygen replenished, combustion burner was made. Measurements used to investigate the burner nozzle exit profiles were pitot and gas sample measurements. Gas composition and associated temperature profiles were reduced to an acceptable level by burner injector modifications. The effect of the injector modifications was to redistribute the hydrogen fuel, increase the air pressure drop, promote premixing of the oxygen and air, and establish a uniform flow pattern where the oxygen-air mixture comes into contact with the hydrogen fuel. The most sensitive phenomenon which affected the composition profiles was the uniformity of the air distribution supplied to the combustion chamber.

  10. Ultra clean burner for an AMTEC system suitable for hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Mital, R.; Sievers, R.K.; Hunt, T.K.

    1997-12-31

    High power Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) systems have the potential to make the hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) program a success by meeting the challenging standards put forth by the EPA for the automobile industry. The premise of the whole concept of using AMTEC cells, as discussed by Hunt et al. (1995), for power generation in HEV`s is based on the utilization of a high efficiency external combustion system. The key requirement being a burner which will produce extremely low quantities of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen, emit minimal amounts of hydrocarbon, will have high radiative and convective efficiencies and at least a 4:1 turndown ratio. This work presents one such burner which has the potential to meet all of these demands and more. After investigation of a number of burners, including, metal fiber, ported metal, ceramic fiber and ported ceramic, it is believed that cellular ceramic burners will be the best candidates for integration with AMTEC cells for a high power system suitable for hybrid electric vehicles. A detailed study which includes the operating range, radiation efficiency, total heat transfer efficiency, spectral intensity, exit gas temperature and pollutant emission indices measurement has been carried out on circular and square shaped burners. Total heat transfer efficiencies as high as 65--70% have been measured using a water calorimeter. With efficient recuperation, a burner/recuperator efficiency of 80% at peak power and 90% at peak efficiency operating points are conceivable with this burner. Establishment of combustion within the porous matrix leads to low peak temperatures and hence lower NO{sub x}. The emission indices of CO and HC are also quite low. The stability range measurements show a 6:1 turndown ratio at an equivalence ratio of 0.9.

  11. Lean stability augmentation study. [on gas turbine combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, J. B.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical conceptual design study and an experimental test program were conducted to investigate techniques and develop technology for improving the lean combustion limits of premixing, prevaporizing combustors applicable to gas turbine engine main burners. The use of hot gas pilots, catalyzed flameholder elements, and heat recirculation to augment lean stability limits was considered in the conceptual design study. Tests of flameholders embodying selected concepts were conducted at a pressure of 10 arm and over a range of entrance temperatures simulating conditions to be encountered during stratospheric cruise. The tests were performed using an axisymmetric flametube test rig having a nominal diameter of 10.2 cm. A total of sixteen test configurations were examined in which lean blowout limits, pollutant emission characteristics, and combustor performance were evaluated. The use of a piloted perforated plate flameholder employing a pilot fuel flow rate equivalent to 4 percent of the total fuel flow at a simulated cruise condition resulted in a lean blowout equivalence ratio of less than 0.25 with a design point (T sub zero = 600k, Phi = 0.6) NOx emission index of less than 1.0 g/kg.

  12. Experimental investigation of fuel vaporization on combustion efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Zakkay, V.; Agnone, A.; Clisset, H.

    1980-12-01

    The development of a residential size vaporizing oil burner is presented along with its operational and performance characteristics. The vaporization scheme consists of spraying No. 2 oil onto a regeneratively heated surface at a temperature above the oil vaporization temperature (650/sup 0/F). The vaporized oil mixes with a preheated air (T = 250/sup 0/F) stream to produce a uniform fuel air mixture. The premixed vaporized fuel/air stream produces short blue flamelets anchored to a steel screen flame holder. The operational and performance characteristics of this burner are presented for a range of the air and oil flow parameters around the stoichiometric condition, and for a nominal firing rate of less than or equal to 1.2 gph. Operation with less than 3% excess air is demonstrated with very little soot formation. The combustion quality of the vaporizing oil burner is substantially improved compared to conventional spray combustion and recirculation type blue flame burners. The vaporizing oil burner was adapted to a conventional boiler and the thermal efficiency was determined by a calorimeter technique and compared to the stack method. The thermal efficiency with the vaporized combustion mode is about 4% greater than conventional spray combustion burners. The increase is realized through the reduced excess air requirements. The increased efficiency can result in reduced oil consumption from 12% to 20% depending on the location and usage of the burner unit.

  13. Combustion Technology Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis' High Speed Research (HSR) Propulsion Project Office initiated a targeted outreach effort to market combustion-related technologies developed at Lewis for the next generation of supersonic civil transport vehicles. These combustion-related innovations range from emissions measurement and reduction technologies, to diagnostics, spray technologies, NOx and SOx reduction of burners, noise reduction, sensors, and fuel-injection technologies. The Ohio Aerospace Institute and the Great Lakes Industrial Technology Center joined forces to assist Lewis' HSR Office in this outreach activity. From a database of thousands of nonaerospace firms considered likely to be interested in Lewis' combustion and emission-related technologies, the outreach team selected 41 companies to contact. The selected companies represent oil-gas refineries, vehicle/parts suppliers, and manufacturers of residential furnaces, power turbines, nonautomobile engines, and diesel internal combustion engines.

  14. Cut drydocking costs for offshore rigs

    SciTech Connect

    Albaugh, E.K.

    1985-07-01

    Heavy-lift transport vessels (HLVs) can provide an economic alternative to the conventional shipyard approach of drydocking mobile offshore rigs for regulatory body inspections and/or repairs. Contractors now can drydock rigs in areas of the world where conventional drydocks are unavailable. This article discusses pros and cons of conventional shipyard drydocking and the HLV approach.

  15. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  16. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  17. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  18. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  19. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  20. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  1. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  2. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  3. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  4. Unique rig fulfills unusual mobility requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This article describes a unique rig designed by SEDCO FOREX operating in the Paris basin of France. Built to drill clusters of wells from a single pad, Rig 47 significantly reduces the time needed to move from well to well on a pad and from location to location.

  5. Development of mesoscale burner arrays for gas turbine reheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunyoup

    Mesoscale burner arrays allow combustion to be conducted in a distributed fashion at a millimeter (meso) scale. At this scale, diffusive processes are fast, but not yet dominant, such that numerous advantages over conventional gas turbine combustion can be achieved without giving up the possibility to use fluid inertia to advantage. Since the scale of the reaction zone follows from the scale at which the reactants are mixed, very compact flames result. This compact, distributed form of combustion can provide the opportunity of inter-turbine reheat as well as the potential for lean premixed or highly vitiated combustion to suppress NOx emissions. As a proof-of-concept, a 4x4 array with burner elements on 5-mm centers was fabricated in silicon nitride via assembly mold SDM. Each burner element was designed in a single monolithic unit with its own combination of reactant inlets, fuel plenum and injection nozzles, and swirler to induce flame stabilization. Results using methane, including pressure drop, flame stability, temperature distribution in the burnt gas, and NO emissions are reported for both fully premixed (mixing prior to injection) and nonpremixed (mixing in the array) configurations. These results demonstrate the degree to which premixed performance can be achieved with this design and pointed to ways in which the array design could be improved over this first-generation unit. Given what was learned from the 4x4 array, a next-generation 6x6 array was developed. Major design changes include addition of a bluff-body stabilizer to each burner element to improve stability and use of a multilayer architecture to enhance the degree of reactant mixing. Tests using methane in both operating conditions were performed for two stabilization configurations---with and without the bluff bodies. The results for nonpremixed operation show that nearly complete air/fuel mixing was achieved using the 6x6 design, leading to NO emission levels obtainable under fully premixed

  6. Application of RBC burners in 220 t/h boilers in Xinhua Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengqi; Sun Shaozeng; Sun Rui; Chen Lizhe; Wang Zhijin; Wu Shaohua; Qin Yukun

    1997-12-31

    The Radial Bias Combustion (RBC) pulverized coal burner was developed to simultaneously solve five problems, i.e. combustion efficiency, flame stability, slagging, high temperature corrosion of furnace wall tube metal and NOx emission, that existed in firing low grade Chinese coal. It was developed for wall fired systems. A RBC burner is usually facilitated in the following way: A fuel enricher of high enriching ratio is installed in the fuel transport channel which separates radially the fuel air stream into two streams of proper fuel concentration. The fuel-rich stream injects through the fuel nozzles, forming a high temperature annular core just outside the recirculation zone in the center of the flame; the fuel-lean stream injects through the fuel lean nozzles outside fuel rich flame and blanketing high temperature flame core with an out layer of more oxidizing atmosphere. RBC burners have been applied to the retrofit of coal burners of No.1 and No.2 boilers in the Xinhua Power Plant. These boilers are high pressure ones of 220 t/h rated steam capacity which were retrofitted from oil fired boilers. Prior to the retrofit with RBC burners, flame stability was very poor. It needed auxiliary fuel oil to enhance its stability at 70--80% rated capacity. NOx emissions did not meet environmental regulations. Satisfactory results have been obtained after the retrofit. Flame stability has been improved a great deal. The minimum load without auxiliary fuel has reached 40%. Furthermore, RBC burners raised the combustion efficiency. Lastly, NOx emission have been abated and meet Chinese legislation.

  7. Experimental study of the premixed combustion within the nonhomogeneous porous ceramic media

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.F.

    1996-12-01

    An experimental investigation of premixed methane-air combustion within the one-dimensional porous ceramic burners for various burner configurations is presented. The burner is nonhomogeneous because of different pore size ceramic block used in different section of the burner. Therefore, the thermophysical and transport properties are nonuniform along the burner core length. The burners are constructed of partially stabilized zirconia. The CO and NO{sub x} emissions, flame speed, and flame stability are examined and compared at lean equivalence ratios for five different burner configurations. The sandwich-structured burner has very favorable flame stabilizing characteristic due to the radiation reflecting region. While the combustion proceeds at faster rate than other burner configurations, the radiation reflecting region and the exit surface have low temperature. Thus the NO{sub x} emission can be kept at the same low level as the other burner configurations exhibit., It is found that the sandwich-structured burner has the potential for applications such as the liquid waste and volatile organic compounds incinerations. By placing a radiant shield during the emission sampling to simulated hot exit boundary condition, no discernible effect is found on the emission levels.

  8. Reynolds number effects in combustion noise

    SciTech Connect

    Seshan, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    Acoustic emission spectra have been obtained for non-premixed turbulent combustion from two small diameter laboratory gas burners, two commercial gas burners and a large gas burner in the firebox of a Babcock-Wilcox Boiler (50,000 lb steam/hr). The changes in burner size and firing rate represent changes in Reynolds number and changes in air/fuel ratio represent departure from stoichiometric proportions. The combustion efficiency was measured independently through gas analysis. The acoustic spectra obtained from the various burners exhibit a persistent shape over the Reynolds number range of 8200-82,000. The spectra were analyzed for identification of a predictable frequency domain that is most responsive to, and readily correlated with, combustion efficiency. A simple parameter (consisting of the ratio of the average acoustic power output in the most responsive frequency bandwidth to the acoustic power level of the loudest frequency) is proposed whose value increases significantly and unmistakably as combustion efficiency approaches 100%. The dependence of the most responsive frequency domain on the various Reynolds numbers associated with turbulent jets is discussed.

  9. Simplified Configuration for the Combustor of an oil Burner using a low Pressure, high flow air-atomizing Nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Thomas; Celebi, Yusuf; Fisher, Leonard

    1998-09-28

    The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The inventors have devised a fuel burner that uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle. The improved fuel burner does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design.

  10. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2008-03-31

    In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia

  11. Four rigs refurbished for West Africa drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-10

    In April and May 1990, Shell Petroleum Development Co. of Nigeria Ltd. awarded Noble Drilling West Africa Inc. four separate contracts to drill oil and gas wells in the inland waterways of Nigeria. The contracted rigs included a shallow water jack up, the NN-1, and three posted barges, the Gene Rosser, the Chuck Syring, and the Lewis Dugger. The jack up was built in 1978, and the three posted barges are 1980s vintage. Three of the rigs have been idle for a number of years. The Shell Nigeria contracts required major modifications to the rigs before putting them into international service. Noble replaced or refurbished all major pieces of equipment in the drilling, power, and service systems on the rigs. Rig crews serviced all other equipment. A significant amount of general service piping and electrical wiring was replaced. Each rig also required additional motor control centers to support the new drilling and mud processing equipment. Alfa-Laval waste-heat water desalination plants and new sewage treatment units were installed on all four rigs. Because of the tidal variances and high silt conditions expected in the African waterways, all engine cooling systems were converted from heat exchangers to radiators. Rotary tables were made common on all rigs at 37 1/2 in. Noble had all traveling equipment completely inspected and modified as necessary. Strict attention was paid to certification and documentation of all equipment. Safety upgrades conformed to both Shell and Noble standards. Fire and gas detection systems were installed throughout each rig. Water and foam deluge systems were installed in the wellhead areas, and new foam systems and monitors were installed on the helldecks.

  12. Low No{sub x}/SO{sub x} burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Baseline test report: Issue A

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.; Martin, L.; Smith, J.

    1991-05-01

    The Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} (LNS) Burner Retrofit for Utility Cyclone Boilers program consists of the retrofit and subsequent demonstration of the technology at Southern Illinois Power Cooperative`s (SIPC`s) 33-MW unit 1 cyclone boiler located near Marion, Illinois. The LNS Burner employs a simple innovative combustion process burning high-sulfur Illinois coal to provide substantial SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control within the burner. A complete series of boiler performance and characterization tests, called the baseline tests, was conducted in October 1990 on unit 1 of SIPC`s Marion Station. The primary objective of the baseline test was to collect data from the existing plant that could provide a comparison of performance after the LNS Burner retrofit. These data could confirm the LNS Burner`s SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions control and any effect on boiler operation. Further, these tests would provide to the project experience with the operating characteristics of the host unit as well as engineering design information to minimize technical uncertainties in the application of the LNS Burner technology.

  13. REAL TIME FLAME MONITORING OF GASIFIER BURNER AND INJECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    James Servaites; Serguei Zelepouga; David Rue

    2003-10-01

    This report is submitted to the United States Department of Energy in partial fulfillment of the contractual requirements for Phase I of the project titled, ''Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors'', under co-operative agreement number DE-FS26-02NT41585. The project is composed of three one-year budget periods. The work in each year is divided into separate Tasks to facilitate project management, orderly completion of all project objectives, budget control, and critical path application of personnel and equipment. This Topical Report presents results of the Task 1 and 2 work. The 2 D optical sensor was developed to monitor selected UV and visible wavelengths to collect accurate flame characterization information regarding mixing, flame shape, and flame rich/lean characteristic. Flame richness, for example, was determined using OH and CH intensity peaks in the 300 to 500 nanometer range of the UV and visible spectrum. The laboratory burner was operated over a wide range of air to fuel ratio conditions from fuel rich to fuel lean. The sooty oxygen enriched air flames were established to test the sensor ability to characterize flame structures with substantial presence of hot solid particles emitting strong ''black body radiation''. The knowledge gained in these experiments will be very important when the sensor is used for gasifier flame analyses. It is expected that the sensor when installed on the Global Energy gasifier will be exposed to complex radiation patterns. The measured energy will be a combination of spectra emitted by the combusting gases, hot solid particulates, and hot walls of the gasifier chamber. The ability to separate flame emissions from the ''black body emissions'' will allow the sensor to accurately determine flame location relative to the gasifier walls and the injectors, as well as to analyze the flame's structure and condition. Ultimately, this information should enable the gasification processes to be monitored and

  14. Transmitting drilling data rig to office

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.O.

    1985-08-12

    Rig-to-office data telecommunications is discussed in this article as a practical and promising solution to rig-site data overload. The barrage of rig data that includes monitoring while drilling, mud logging, wireline logging, directional, drillstring configuration, operational, weather, crew data, etc., is collected on the well site and then transmitted into an oil or service company office for expert and/or computer analysis. Through this approach, the best expertise of the oil and service companies can be applied to many wells. Real time systems and batch systems are reviewed in this article.

  15. Rigged Configurations and the Bethe Ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Anne

    2003-07-01

    This note is a review of rigged configurations and the Bethe Ansatz. In the first part, we focus on the algebraic Bethe Ansatz for the spin 1/2 XXX model and explain how rigged configurations label the solutions of the Bethe equations. This yields the bijection between rigged configurations and crystal paths/Young tableaux of Kerov, Kirillov and Reshetikhin. In the second part, we discuss a generalization of this bijection for the symmetry algebra Dn(1) , based on work in collaboration with Okado and Shimozono.

  16. Real-time combustion controller

    DOEpatents

    Lindner, J.S.; Shepard, W.S.; Etheridge, J.A.; Jang, P.R.; Gresham, L.L.

    1997-02-04

    A method and system are disclosed for regulating the air to fuel ratio supplied to a burner to maximize the combustion efficiency. Optical means are provided in close proximity to the burner for directing a beam of radiation from hot gases produced by the burner to a plurality of detectors. Detectors are provided for sensing the concentration of, inter alia, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O. The differences between the ratios of CO to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O to CO are compared with a known control curve based on those ratios for air to fuel ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.30. The fuel flow is adjusted until the difference between the ratios of CO to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O to CO fall on a desired set point on the control curve. 20 figs.

  17. Real-time combustion controller

    DOEpatents

    Lindner, Jeffrey S.; Shepard, W. Steve; Etheridge, John A.; Jang, Ping-Rey; Gresham, Lawrence L.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system of regulating the air to fuel ratio supplied to a burner to maximize the combustion efficiency. Optical means are provided in close proximity to the burner for directing a beam of radiation from hot gases produced by the burner to a plurality of detectors. Detectors are provided for sensing the concentration of, inter alia, CO, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. The differences between the ratios of CO to CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O to CO are compared with a known control curve based on those ratios for air to fuel ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.30. The fuel flow is adjusted until the difference between the ratios of CO to CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O to CO fall on a desired set point on the control curve.

  18. Two-layer thermal barrier coating for turbine airfoils - furnace and burner rig test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, two-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system was developed which has the potential for protecting high temperature air-cooled gas turbine components. Of those coatings initially examined, the most promising system consisted of a Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.6Y (in wt%) thermal barrier coating (about 0.005 to 0.010 cm thick) and a ZrO2-12Y2O3 (in wt%) thermal barrier coating (about 0.025 to 0.064 cm thick). This thermal barrier substantially lowered the metal temperature of an air-cooled airfoil. The coating withstood 3,200 cycles (80 sec at 1,280 C surface temperature) and 275 cycles (1 hr at 1,490 C surface temperature) without cracking or spalling. No separation of the thermal barrier from the bond coating or the bond coating from the substrate was observed.

  19. Effect of fuel volatility on performance of tail-pipe burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barson, Zelmar; Sargent, Arthur F , Jr

    1951-01-01

    Fuels having Reid vapor pressures of 6.3 and 1.0 pounds per square inch were investigated in a tail-pipe burner on an axial-flow-type turbojet engine at a simulated flight Mach number of 0.6 and altitudes from 20,000 to 45,000 feet. With the burner configuration used in this investigation, having a mixing length of only 8 inches between the fuel manifold and the flame holder, the low-vapor-pressure fuel gave lower combustion efficiency at a given tail-pipe fuel-air ratio. Because the exhaust-nozzle area was fixed, the lower efficiency resulted in lower thrust and higher specific fuel consumption. The maximum altitude at which the burner would operate was practically unaffected by the change in fuel volatility.

  20. Fully Premixed Low Emission, High Pressure Multi-Fuel Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A low-emissions high-pressure multi-fuel burner includes a fuel inlet, for receiving a fuel, an oxidizer inlet, for receiving an oxidizer gas, an injector plate, having a plurality of nozzles that are aligned with premix face of the injector plate, the plurality of nozzles in communication with the fuel and oxidizer inlets and each nozzle providing flow for one of the fuel and the oxidizer gas and an impingement-cooled face, parallel to the premix face of the injector plate and forming a micro-premix chamber between the impingement-cooled face and the in injector face. The fuel and the oxidizer gas are mixed in the micro-premix chamber through impingement-enhanced mixing of flows of the fuel and the oxidizer gas. The burner can be used for low-emissions fuel-lean fully-premixed, or fuel-rich fully-premixed hydrogen-air combustion, or for combustion with other gases such as methane or other hydrocarbons, or even liquid fuels.

  1. Fiber burner development for gas-fired hydronic heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tidball, R.K.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Alzetta Corporation, under the sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute (GRI), has recently developed a radiant burner for a new high efficiency residential hydronic heater. The burner chosen for development was the porous radiant ceramic fiber burner. This paper discusses the burner requirements which were satisfied by the burner and describes the development process. Burner development challenges and solutions are analyzed and results of life testing are presented.

  2. Full-scale demonstration of low-NO{sub x} cell{trademark} burner retrofit. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhart, C.F.; Kitto, J.B.; Kleisley, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    The objective of the Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark}Burner (LNCB{trademark}) demonstration is to evaluate the applicability of this technology for reducing NO{sub x} emissions in full-scale, cell burner-equipped boilers. More precisely, the program objectives are to: (1) Achieve at least a 50% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. (2) Reduce NO{sub x} with no degradation to boiler performance or life of the unit. (3) Demonstrate a technically and economically feasible retrofit technology. Cell burner equipped boilers comprise 13% of the Pre-New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) coal-fired generating capacity. This relates to 34 operating units generating 23,639 MWe, 29 of which are opposed wall fired with two rows of two-nozzle cell burners on each wall. The host site was one of these 29. Dayton Power & Light offered use of J.M. Stuart Station`s Unit No. 4 as the host site. It was equipped with 24, two-nozzle cell burners arranged in an opposed wall configuration. To reduce NO{sub x} emissions, the LNCB{trademark} has been designed to delay the mixing of the fuel and combustion air. The delayed mixing, or staged combustion, reduces the high temperatures normally generated in the flame of a standard cell burner. A key design criterion for the burner was accomplishing delayed fuel-air mixing with no pressure part modifications to facilitate a {open_quotes}plug-in{close_quotes} design. The plug-in design reduces material costs and outage time required to complete the retrofit, compared to installing conventional, internally staged low-NO{sub x} burners.

  3. Scaling the weak-swirl burner from 15 kW to 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Yegian, D.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Hack, R.L.; Miyasato, M.M.; Chang, A.; Samuelsen, G.S.

    1998-03-01

    With the passage of SCAQMD 1146.2, low NO{sub x} regulations will be enforced for new water heaters and boilers from 22 to 585 kW starting January 1, 2000; less than two years away. This has given an added impetus to develop a burner capable of producing NO{sub x} < 30 ppm and CO < 400 ppm without substantial manufacturing costs or complexity. Developed at the Berkeley Lab, the Weak-Swirl Burner (WSB) operates in the lean premixed combustion mode over a wide firing and equivalence ratio range. This work investigated scaling issues (e.g. swirl rates and stability limits) of the WSB when fired at higher rates useful to industry. Three test configurations which varied the ratio of furnace area to burner area were utilized to understand the effects of burner chamber coupling on emissions and stability. Preliminary tests from 12 to 18 kW of a WSB in a commercial heat exchanger were undertaken at LBNL, with further testing from 18 to 105 kW completed at UCI Combustion Laboratory in an octagonal enclosure. After scaling the small (5 cm diameter) to a 10 cm WSB, the larger burner was fired from 150 to 600 kW within a 1.2 MW furnace simulator at UCICL. Test results demonstrate that NO{sub x} emissions (15 ppm at 3% O{sub 2} at equivalence ratio {phi} = 0.80) were invariant with firing rate and chamber/burner ratio. However, the data indicates that CO and UHC are dependent on system parameters, such that a minimum firing rate exists below which CO and UHC rise from lower limits of 25 ppm and 0 ppm respectively.

  4. Pollutant emissions reduction and performance optimization of an industrial radiant tube burner

    SciTech Connect

    Scribano, Gianfranco; Solero, Giulio; Coghe, Aldo

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation performed upon a single-ended self-recuperative radiant tube burner fuelled by natural gas in the non-premixed mode, which is used in the steel industry for surface treatment. The main goal of the research activity was a systematic investigation of the burner aimed to find the best operating conditions in terms of optimum equivalence ratio, thermal power and lower pollutant emissions. The analysis, which focused on the main parameters influencing the thermal efficiency and pollutant emissions at the exhaust (NO{sub x} and CO), has been carried out for different operating conditions of the burner: input thermal powers from 12.8 up to 18kW and equivalence ratio from 0.5 (very lean flame) to 0.95 (quasi-stoichiometric condition). To significantly reduce pollutant emissions ensuring at the same time the thermal requirements of the heating process, it has been developed a new burner configuration, in which a fraction of the exhaust gases recirculates in the main combustion region through a variable gap between the burner efflux and the inner flame tube. This internal recirculation mechanism (exhaust gases recirculation, EGR) has been favoured through the addition of a pre-combustion chamber terminated by a converging nozzle acting as a mixing/ejector to promote exhaust gas entrainment into the flame tube. The most important result of this solution was a decrease of NO{sub x} emissions at the exhaust of the order of 50% with respect to the original burner geometry, for a wide range of thermal power and equivalence ratio. (author)

  5. Jack-up rig for marine drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S. R.

    1981-05-26

    This invention relates to a mobile drilling platform of the jack -up type equipped with a special system which allows the said drilling platform to work as a drilling derrick and alternatively as a hoisting crane rig for marine service.

  6. RIG-I in RNA virus recognition.

    PubMed

    Kell, Alison M; Gale, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Antiviral immunity is initiated upon host recognition of viral products via non-self molecular patterns known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Such recognition initiates signaling cascades that induce intracellular innate immune defenses and an inflammatory response that facilitates development of the acquired immune response. The retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) protein family are key cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptors that are implicated in the recognition of viruses across genera and virus families, including functioning as major sensors of RNA viruses, and promoting recognition of some DNA viruses. RIG-I, the charter member of the RLR family, is activated upon binding to PAMP RNA. Activated RIG-I signals by interacting with the adapter protein MAVS leading to a signaling cascade that activates the transcription factors IRF3 and NF-κB. These actions induce the expression of antiviral gene products and the production of type I and III interferons that lead to an antiviral state in the infected cell and surrounding tissue. RIG-I signaling is essential for the control of infection by many RNA viruses. Recently, RIG-I crosstalk with other pathogen recognition receptors and components of the inflammasome has been described. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge regarding the role of RIG-I in recognition of a variety of virus families and its role in programming the adaptive immune response through cross-talk with parallel arms of the innate immune system, including how RIG-I can be leveraged for antiviral therapy. PMID:25749629

  7. RIG-I in RNA virus recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Alison M.; Gale, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Antiviral immunity is initiated upon host recognition of viral products via non-self molecular patterns known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Such recognition initiates signaling cascades that induce intracellular innate immune defenses and an inflammatory response that facilitates development of the acquired immune response. The retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) protein family are key cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptors that are implicated in the recognition of viruses across genera and virus families, including functioning as major sensors of RNA viruses, and promoting recognition of some DNA viruses. RIG-I, the charter member of the RLR family, is activated upon binding to PAMP RNA. Activated RIG-I signals by interacting with the adapter protein MAVS leading to a signaling cascade that activates the transcription factors IRF3 and NF-κB. These actions induce the expression of antiviral gene products and the production of type I and III interferons that lead to an antiviral state in the infected cell and surrounding tissue. RIG-I signaling is essential for the control of infection by many RNA viruses. Recently, RIG-I crosstalk with other pathogen recognition receptors and components of the inflammasome has been described. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge regarding the role of RIG-I in recognition of a variety of virus families and its role in programming the adaptive immune response through cross-talk with parallel arms of the innate immune system, including how RIG-I can be leveraged for antiviral therapy. PMID:25749629

  8. How ''flat'' is the rich premixed flame produced by your McKenna burner?

    SciTech Connect

    Migliorini, F.; De Iuliis, S.; Cignoli, F.; Zizak, G.

    2008-05-15

    McKenna burners are widely used in the combustion community for producing ''flat'' premixed flames. These flames are considered as standards for the development and calibration of optical techniques. Rich premixed flames produced by McKenna burners are frequently investigated in order to understand soot formation processes both by optical and by sampling techniques. Measurements are normally performed along the axis of the flames, with a uniform distribution of temperature and species concentration assumed in the radial direction. In this work it is shown that the soot radial profiles of rich premixed ethylene-air flames produced by a McKenna burner with a stainless steel porous plug may be far from being ''flat.'' Soot is mainly distributed in an annular region and nonsoot fluorescing species are present in the core of the flames. This surprising result was verified under several working conditions. Furthermore, flames cannot be considered axial-symmetric but present a skewed soot distribution. Another McKenna burner with a bronze porous disk was used to produce flames of the same equivalence ratio and flows. These flames show a completely different soot radial profile, closer to the claimed flat distribution. These results cast doubts about the conclusions drawn in several studies on soot formation performed with a stainless steel McKenna burner. (author)

  9. Performance Evaluation of a High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Modulation Valve for Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saus, Joseph R.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a characterization rig was designed and constructed for the purpose of evaluating high bandwidth liquid fuel modulation devices to determine their suitability for active combustion control research. Incorporated into the rig s design are features that approximate conditions similar to those that would be encountered by a candidate device if it were installed on an actual combustion research rig. The characterized dynamic performance measures obtained through testing in the rig are planned to be accurate indicators of expected performance in an actual combustion testing environment. To evaluate how well the characterization rig predicts fuel modulator dynamic performance, characterization rig data was compared with performance data for a fuel modulator candidate when the candidate was in operation during combustion testing. Specifically, the nominal and off-nominal performance data for a magnetostrictive-actuated proportional fuel modulation valve is described. Valve performance data were collected with the characterization rig configured to emulate two different combustion rig fuel feed systems. Fuel mass flows and pressures, fuel feed line lengths, and fuel injector orifice size was approximated in the characterization rig. Valve performance data were also collected with the valve modulating the fuel into the two combustor rigs. Comparison of the predicted and actual valve performance data show that when the valve is operated near its design condition the characterization rig can appropriately predict the installed performance of the valve. Improvements to the characterization rig and accompanying modeling activities are underway to more accurately predict performance, especially for the devices under development to modulate fuel into the much smaller fuel injectors anticipated in future lean-burning low-emissions aircraft engine combustors.

  10. {open_quote}Nintendo Rig{close_quote} lets two men do work of three on traditional servicing rig

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, B.

    1996-01-01

    New well servicing rig saves costs and increases safety by using a robot derrickman. The rigs is called the Nintendo Rig, taking the name from the joystick that controls the robot on the racking board 25 feet above the ground. An automated tong/slip package permanently mounted on the front of the rig handles pipe and rods on the ground.

  11. An experimental investigation of hybrid kerosene burner configurations for TPV applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, K.L.; Rose, M.F.; Burkhalter, J.E.

    1995-01-05

    A key element in thermophotovoltaic power generation is the development of a compact and efficient configuration for the thermal source and emitter. In the present work, a hybrid configuration was investigated which was composed of a liquid fueled diffusion type burner utilizing the emitting or mantle structure as the combustion chamber. The prototype burner operates on kerosene at fuel flow rates up to 1.0 kg/hr. Fuel is atomized using an 78 kHz ultrasonic nozzle with multifuel capabilities. Combustion is stabilized and heat transfer is enhanced via forced recirculation interior to the mantle structures. These structures range in size from 600 to 1200 cm{sup 3} and are porous in nature. This paper presents an introduction to issues specific to the use of small scale liquid fueled burners for TPV applications, and burner performance data for a series of configurations, in terms of combustor surface temperature distribution, maximum mass loading and efficiency. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Design report: Low NOx burners for package boilers. Final report, May 1985-March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.; Dehne, H.; Eaton, S.; Mason, H.B.; Torbov, S.

    1990-01-01

    The report describes a low-NOx burner design, presented for residual-oil-fired industrial boilers and boilers cofiring conventional fuels and nitrated hazardous wastes. The burner offers lower NOx emission levels for these applications than conventional commercial burners. The burner utilizes two-stage combustion in a deep staging mode in which a precombustor firing substoichiometrically is retrofitted to the front of the boiler. The completion of the combustion in the second stage is achieved through sidefire air ports to be retrofitted to the boiler. The precombustor is a cylindrical shell of 2.1 m internal diameter fabricated of lightweight refractory blocks with a Saffil based coating. This material gives a lightweight, non-regenerative precombustor which can adapt to the start-up, shutdown, and load following transients typical of industrial boilers. The precombustor is designed for the capacity range of 15-29 MW heat input. A modular design using annular spool sections adapts to different design loads within this range. For larger loads, a geometric scale-up is required. Design data are also given for 59 MW capacity.

  13. Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Timothy W.; Sathe, Sanjeev B.; Peck, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics in oil burner design

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    In Computational Fluid Dynamics, the differential equations which describe flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are approximately solved using a very laborious numerical procedure. Flows of practical interest to burner designs are always turbulent, adding to the complexity of requiring a turbulence model. This paper presents a model for burner design.

  15. 14 CFR 31.47 - Burners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... emergency operation. (d) The burner system (including the burner unit, controls, fuel lines, fuel cells...) Five hours at the maximum fuel pressure for which approval is sought, with a burn time for each one... intermediate fuel pressure, with a burn time for each one minute cycle of three to ten seconds. An...

  16. Improved low NOx firing systems for pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.; Laux, S.; Grusha, J.; Rosin, T.; Hausman, G.L.

    1999-07-01

    More stringent emission limits or the addition of post combustion NOx control create the need for improvements of NOx emissions from pulverized coal boilers. Many boilers retrofitted with Low NOx technology during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the CAAA fail or marginally meet their requirements. Technical solutions range from addition of overfire air and state-of-the-art low NOx burners to low cost additions of combustion enhancements. Regardless of the combustion NOx control method used, stoichiometries local to the burners must be maintained at the designed values at all times to provide high NOx performance at low efficiency loss due to unburned fuel. This paper describes Foster Wheeler's approach to NOx emission improvements for existing low NOx firing systems. The technology to measure air and coal flow individually for each burner and to control the parameters for optimum combustion are presented and discussed. Field experience shows the installation and advantages of the technology.

  17. Low NOx burners--prediction of emissions concentration based on design, measurements and modelling.

    PubMed

    Bebar, Ladislav; Kermes, Vit; Stehlik, Petr; Canek, Josef; Oral, Jaroslav

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes possible ways of prediction of nitrogen oxides formation during combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. Mathematical model based on experimental data acquired from the testing facility has been developed. The model enables to predict--at a high probability measure--the extent of nitrogen oxides emissions. The mathematical model of nitrogen oxide formation relies on the application of simplified kinetic equations describing the formation of nitrogen oxides at so-called equivalent temperature. It is a semi-empirical model that comes out of experimental knowledge. An important role played by the burner design itself has been emphasized and therefore an important supplementary parameter of the model is the characteristic of the burner design. It has been established that there was a good agreement between experimental data and those calculated by the application of the model to various conditions marked out by different combustion parameters in the combustion chamber. The results obtained by application of the model respect the influence of parameters validated by industrial practice that control the formation of nitrogen oxides in the course of fuel combustion. Such parameters-first of all-tare the temperature in the combustion chamber and the concentration of the substances taking part in the reaction. By application of the model, it is possible to assess the consequence of, for example the surplus of combustion air, the increase of temperature of combustion air, the supply of inert gas, etc. on the nitrogen oxides emissions of the operating burner under evaluation. Efficient combining of experience and sophisticated approach together with importance of thus access for an improved design are shown. PMID:12099503

  18. Numerical simulation of a porous honeycomb burner

    SciTech Connect

    Hackert, C.L.; Elizey, J.L.; Ezekoye, O.A.

    1997-07-01

    A two-dimensional simulation of a honeycomb burner using single step global chemistry is used to investigate the importance of thermal properties and boundary conditions to inert porous burners. Comparisons to available experimental results are made where possible, and a parametric study of the effects of burner properties on the flame is performed. The burner solid emissivity is found to be relatively unimportant to the achievable burning rate and radiant output fraction, so long as it is above a certain minimum value (about 0.3). In contrast, increases in solid conductivity always lead to marked increases in burning rate. The flame is shown to exhibit significant curvature on both a pore scale and burner scale.

  19. ESTABLISHMENT OF DESIGN CRITERIA FOR OPTIMUM BURNERS FOR APPLICATION TO HEAVY FUEL FIRED PACKAGE BOILERS. VOLUME 1. LABORATORY SCALE TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a research program to develop low-NOx heavy oil burners for application to industrial package boilers. Volume I documents Phase 1 of the program, bench scale studies which defined optimum conditions for two-stage combustion. The information led to a co...

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF DESIGN CRITERIA FOR OPTIMUM BURNERS FOR APPLICATION TO HEAVY FUEL FIRED PACKAGE BOILERS. VOLUME 2. PILOT SCALE TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a research program to develop low-NOx heavy oil burners for application to industrial package boilers. Volume I documents Phase 1 of the program, bench scale studies which defined optimum conditions for two-stage combustion. The information led to a co...

  1. Simplified configuration for the combustor of an oil burner using a low pressure, high flow air-atomizing nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Butcher, Thomas A.; Celebi, Yusuf; Fisher, Leonard

    2000-09-15

    The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion of oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The improved fuel burner uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle that does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design. Inventors:

  2. Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared, Natural Gas Burners

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-31

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is a simple, fast, reliable and nondestructive analytical method. By using the method developed in Clark Atlanta University, consistent and reliable infrared spectral results can be obtained. An accurate radiant energy can be calculated from these infrared spectra by using a blackbody as the calibration standards. By means of the specially-designed-and-lab-made sampling inlet and the Horiba gas analyzers, the compositions of CO{sub 2}, CO, UCH, NOx and O{sub 2} etc. from the combustion exhaust gases have been on-line accurately analyzed. The commercial natural gas IR burner performed differently in the different conditions. For the methane-air combustion, at the equivalence ratio {Phi} = 1, the IR burner produced its maximum radiation efficiency, {approximately}31.4%, and the concentration of CO{sub 2} reached its maximum value, {approximately}10.7%. In the fuel-lean region, the O{sub 2} concentration in the emission gas decreased proportionally as {Phi} increased, but the concentrations of CO and UHC were kept in a couple of hundred ppm ranges. In the fuel-rich region, the O{sub 2} concentration was kept as a constant, {approximately}0.2%, but the CO and UHC concentrations were quickly jumped to thousands ppm or more as {Phi} further increased. The NOx formation was mainly dependent on the combustion temperature, and reached its maximum, {approximately}8 ppm, at {Phi}= {approximately}1. Because of the uniform temperature distribution, the IR burner produced lower NOx than traditional gas burners. Nitrogen is a non-combustible gas. It worked only as diluent for the combustion, reducing the radiant efficiency. Propane has a higher molar combustion enthalpy. It produced a higher combustion temperature and NOx, while maintaining similar radiant efficiency. Hydrogen has a lower combustion activation energy. It enhanced the radiant efficiency, and did not significantly affect the production of NOx, CO{sub 2} and CO.

  3. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  4. Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Michael F.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  5. Premixed burner experiments: Geometry, mixing, and flame structure issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.K.; Lewis, M.J.; Gupta, M.

    1995-10-01

    This research program is exploring techniques for improved fuel-air mixing, with the aim of achieving combustor operations up to stoichiometric conditions with minimal NO x and maximum efficiency. The experimental studies involve the use of a double-concentric natural gas burner that is operable in either premixed or non-premixed modes, and the system allows systematic variation of equivalence ratio, swirl strength shear length region and flow momentum in each annulus. Flame structures formed with various combinations of swirl strengths, flow throughput and equivalence ratios in premixed mode show the significant impact of swirl flow distribution on flame structure emanating from the mixedness. This impact on flame structure is expected to have a pronounced effect on the heat release rate and the emission of NO{sub x}. Thus, swirler design and configuration remains a key factor in the quest for completely optimized combustion. Parallel numerical studies of the flow and combustion phenomena were carried out, using the RSM and thek-{epsilon} turbulence models. These results have not only indicated the strengths and limitations of CFD in performance and pollutants emission predictions, but have provided guidelines on the size and strength of the recirculation produced and the spatio-temporal structure of the combustion flowfield. The first stage of parametric studies on geometry and operational parameters at Morgan State University have culminated in the completion of a one-dimensional flow code that is integrated with a solid, virtual model of the existing premixed burner. This coupling will provide the unique opportunity to study the impact of geometry on the flowfield and vice-versa, with particular emphasis on concurrent design optimization.

  6. Burner retrofits reduce brewery emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    In 1988, the South Coast Air Quality Management District in California (SCAQMD) tightened its grip on industrial emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The new statute, Rule 1146, mandates a 75% reduction in NOx emissions over a five-year period ending this July. Anheuser-Busch Inc.'s second-largest brewery in Van Nuys fell under the new law's jurisdiction. Under the new law, the maximum allowable NOx emission must be reduced from 120 to 30 ppm for the two largest boilers. There were two alternatives: either prevent its formation inside the boiler, or remove it from the off-gases via selective catalytic reduction (SCR) or selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR). Prevention was chosen, because the NOx-removal technologies are unproven in the US on natural-gas-fired boilers. In addition, it was not known whether SCR or SNCR could respond to the wide swings in boiler demand. At any given time, loads between 30 and 100% of capacity would be required from the boilers. The brewery retrofitted the 125,000-lb/h boilers with Variflame burners, based upon an earlier retrofit at Anheuser-Busch's Merrimack, N.H., brewery. The paper describes this burner and its performance.

  7. COST-EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF NOx WITH INTEGRATED ULTRA LOW-NOx BURNERS AND SNCR

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid Farzan; Jennifer Sivy; Alan Sayre; John Boyle

    2003-07-01

    Under sponsorship of the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI), the Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), and Fuel Tech teamed together to investigate an integrated solution for NOx control. The system was comprised of B&W's DRB-4Z{trademark} low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner technology and Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT{reg_sign}, a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) technology. The technology's emission target is achieving 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu for full-scale boilers. Development of the low-NOx burner technology has been a focus in B&W's combustion program. The DRB-4Z{trademark} burner (see Figure 1.1) is B&W's newest low-NO{sub x} burner capable of achieving very low NO{sub x}. The burner is designed to reduce NO{sub x} by diverting air away from the core of the flame, which reduces local stoichiometry during coal devolatilization and, thereby, reduces initial NO{sub x} formation. Figure 1.2 shows the historical NO{sub x} emission levels from different B&W burners. Figure 1.2 shows that based on three large-scale commercial installations of the DRB-4Z{trademark} burners in combination with OFA ports, using Western subbituminous coal, the NO{sub x} emissions ranged from 0.16 to 0.18 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. It appears that with continuing research and development the Ozone Transport Rule (OTR) emission level of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu is within the reach of combustion modification techniques for boilers using western U.S. subbituminous coals. Although NO{sub x} emissions from the DRB-4Z{trademark} burner are nearing OTR emission level with subbituminous coals, the utility boiler owners that use bituminous coals can still benefit from the addition of an SNCR and/or SCR system in order to comply with the stringent NO{sub x} emission levels facing them.

  8. effect of hydrogen addition and burner diameter on the stability and structure of lean, premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Kelsey Leigh

    Low swirl burners (LSBs) have gained popularity in heating and gas power generation industries, in part due to their proven capacity for reducing the production of NOx, which in addition to reacting to form smog and acid rain, plays a central role in the formation of the tropospheric ozone layer. With lean operating conditions, LSBs are susceptible to combustion instability, which can result in flame extinction or equipment failure. Extensive work has been performed to understand the nature of LSB combustion, but scaling trends between laboratory- and industrial-sized burners have not been established. Using hydrogen addition as the primary method of flame stabilization, the current work presents results for a 2.54 cm LSB to investigate potential effects of burner outlet diameter on the nature of flame stability, with focus on flashback and lean blowout conditions. In the lean regime, the onset of instability and flame extinction have been shown to occur at similar equivalence ratios for both the 2.54 cm and a 3.81 cm LSB and depend on the resolution of equivalence ratios incremented. Investigations into flame structures are also performed. Discussion begins with a derivation for properties in a multicomponent gas mixture used to determine the Reynolds number (Re) to develop a condition for turbulent intensity similarity in differently-sized LSBs. Based on this requirement, operating conditions are chosen such that the global Reynolds number for the 2.54 cm LSB is within 2% of the Re for the 3.81 cm burner. With similarity obtained, flame structure investigations focus on flame front curvature and flame surface density (FSD). As flame structure results of the current 2.54 cm LSB work are compared to results for the 3.81 cm LSB, no apparent relationship is shown to exist between burner diameter and the distribution of flame surface density. However, burner diameter is shown to have a definite effect on the flame front curvature. In corresponding flow conditions, a

  9. MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang; K.A. Davis; M. Denison; H. Shim

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this program is to provide insight into the formation and minimization of NO{sub x} in multi-burner arrays, such as those that would be found in a typical utility boiler. Most detailed studies are performed in single-burner test facilities, and may not capture significant burner-to-burner interactions that could influence NO{sub x} emissions. Thus, investigations of such interactions were made by performing a combination of single and multiple burner experiments in a pilot-scale coal-fired test facility at the University of Utah, and by the use of computational combustion simulations to evaluate full-scale utility boilers. In addition, fundamental studies on nitrogen release from coal were performed to develop greater understanding of the physical processes that control NO formation in pulverized coal flames--particularly under low NO{sub x} conditions. A CO/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} flame was operated under fuel-rich conditions in a flat flame reactor to provide a high temperature, oxygen-free post-flame environment to study secondary reactions of coal volatiles. Effects of temperature, residence time and coal rank on nitrogen evolution and soot formation were examined. Elemental compositions of the char, tar and soot were determined by elemental analysis, gas species distributions were determined using FTIR, and the chemical structure of the tar and soot was analyzed by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. A laminar flow drop tube furnace was used to study char nitrogen conversion to NO. The experimental evidence and simulation results indicated that some of the nitrogen present in the char is converted to nitric oxide after direct attack of oxygen on the particle, while another portion of the nitrogen, present in more labile functionalities, is released as HCN and further reacts in the bulk gas. The reaction of HCN with NO in the bulk gas has a strong influence on the overall conversion of char-nitrogen to nitric oxide; therefore, any model that

  10. Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    The Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig (SHJAR), located in the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, was commissioned in 2001 to test jet noise reduction concepts at low technology readiness levels (TRL 1-3) and develop advanced measurement techniques. The first series of tests on the SHJAR were designed to prove its capabilities and establish the quality of the jet noise data produced. Towards this goal, a methodology was employed dividing all noise sources into three categories: background noise, jet noise, and rig noise. Background noise was directly measured. Jet noise and rig noise were separated by using the distance and velocity scaling properties of jet noise. Effectively, any noise source that did not follow these rules of jet noise was labeled as rig noise. This method led to the identification of a high frequency noise source related to the Reynolds number. Experiments using boundary layer treatment and hot wire probes documented this noise source and its removal, allowing clean testing of low Reynolds number jets. Other tests performed characterized the amplitude and frequency of the valve noise, confirmed the location of the acoustic far field, and documented the background noise levels under several conditions. Finally, a full set of baseline data was acquired. This paper contains the methodology and test results used to verify the quality of the SHJAR rig.

  11. Tumor suppressor activity of RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Yang; Guo, He-Zhou; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I), named for the observation that its mRNA expression is highly upregulated in the progression of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced maturation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells, has been well documented as a pivotal virus-associated molecular pattern recognition receptor (PRR) responsible for triggering innate immunity. Upon recognizing viral RNA ligands, RIG-I experiences a series of programmed conformational changes and modifications that unleash its activity through the formation of complexes with various binding partners. Such partners include the mitochondria membrane-anchored protein IPS-1 (also named MAVS/VISA/Cardif) that activates both the IRF3/7 and NF-κB pathways. These partnerships and resulting pathway activations underlie the synthesis of type I interferon and other inflammatory factors. Recent studies have demonstrated that RIG-I is also involved in the regulation of basic cellular processes outside of innate immunity against viral infections, such as hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation, maintenance of leukemic stemness, and tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, we will highlight recent studies leading up to the recognition that RIG-I performs an essential function as a tumor suppressor and try to reconcile this activity of RIG-I with its well-known role in protecting cells against viral infection. PMID:27308362

  12. Burning anthracite at B and W downshot unit and burner upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.

    1998-12-31

    Low volatile matter (VM) coals have difficulty on ignition, flame stability and burnout. A conventional utility boiler can`t successfully utilize such coals. The applications of enhancing ignition steps, proper burner type and its arrangement plus staging combustion as well as a suitable furnace configuration, along or in combination, may burn such low VM coals with high efficiency. B&W downshot units in Shang An Power Plant (S-Plant) in China applies a downshot firing with a W-shape flame plus primary air exchange burner (PAX) and staging combustion in a combination which achieved a great success in burning the design coal. The design coal is a blended coal (25% Yangquan (YQ) anthracite and 75% Shuyang lean) resulting a 13.95% VMdmf ranking as a semi-anthracite per ASTM-D338. In 1995, all 20 burner registers of Unit 1 had been upgraded. S-Plant and B and W decided to conduct a high anthracite blending coal (75% anthracite) combustion tests. The unit had demonstrated a great fuel flexibility. Based on the achievements, the all burner and staging ports of Unit 2 has been upgraded in 1997. In order to further demonstrate the great enhancing ignition feature, B and W had entrusted Chinese TPRI to conduct 100% YQ anthracite burn tests in May 1998. These tests reveal that with 100% anthracite firing, the ignition was fast and on time; the flame and combustion were very stable. Three days (58 continuous hours) 100% anthracite firing was carried out with the load range from the full (350 MW) to half (170--175 MW). The minimum load of 170--175 MW (48--50% MCR) without oil support was easy to maintain. Due to the plant policy, they don`t allow further reduction of the minimum load lower than 50% MCR. These tests have greatly demonstrated the capability of these units burning 100% anthracite.

  13. An economical solution for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from cell burner boilers firing pulverized coal

    SciTech Connect

    Penterson, C.A.; Dorai, X.A.

    1995-10-01

    Over 12% (26,000 MWe) of the US generating capacity is produced from utility boilers equipped with pre-New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) cell burners. These burners, manufactured in the 1950`s and 60`s, rapidly mix the pulverized coal and combustion air resulting in highly turbulent and efficient combustion. Unfortunately, NO{sub x} emissions produced by this type of firing configuration are extremely high typically averaging 1.0 to 1.8 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. This paper presents the results of retrofitting American Electric Power`s Muskingum River Unit 5, a 600 MWe supercritical cell burner boiler with Riley low NO{sub x} CCV{trademark} burners. Results of this project successfully demonstrated the ability to reduce NO{sub x} emissions greater than 50% without the requirement for overfire air (OFA), off stoichiometric firing, burner respacing, mill system or coal piping changes or pressure part modifications. Emissions and boiler performance results are presented along with the typical costs for this type of retrofit.

  14. Investigation of Combustion in 16-inch Ram Jet Under Simulated Conditions of High Altitude and High Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nussdorfer, T J; Sederstrom, D C; Perchonok, E

    1957-01-01

    Results obtained with three different burner configurations in a connected-pipe investigation of a 16-inch ram jet are presented. The radial position of the fuel injector and the engine-outlet area both affected burner performance. For a given configuration, only slight changes in total-pressure ratio across the combustion chamber were obtained over the complete range of operation. With one burner, combustion efficiencies obtained at a combustion-chamber-inlet static pressure of 800 pounds per square foot absolute were greater than those obtained at 1920 pounds per square foot absolute.

  15. Burners

    MedlinePlus

    ... among people who play contact sports such as football and wrestling. Symptoms How do I know if ... each stretch for 20 seconds. If you play football, wear extra neck protection. Questions to Ask Your ...

  16. The effects of chemical kinetics and wall temperature on performance of porous media burners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    mohammadi, Iman; Hossainpour, Siamak

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports a two-dimensional numerical prediction of premixed methane-air combustion in inert porous media burner by using of four multi-step mechanisms: GRI-3.0 mechanism, GRI-2.11 mechanism and the skeletal and 17 Species mechanisms. The effects of these models on temperature, chemical species and pollutant emissions are studied. A two-dimensional axisymmetric model for premixed methane-air combustion in porous media burner has developed. The finite volume method has used to solve the governing equations of methane-air combustion in inert porous media burner. The results indicate that the present four models have the same accuracy in predicting temperature profiles and the difference between these profiles is not more than 2 %. In addition, the Gri-3.0 mechanism shows the best prediction of NO emission in comparison with experimental data. The 17 Species mechanism shows good agreement in prediction of temperature and pollutant emissions with GRI-3.0, GRI-2.11 and the skeletal mechanisms. Also the effects of wall temperature on the gas temperature and mass fraction of species such as NO and CH4 are studied.

  17. FIELD EVALUATION OF LOW-EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON UTILITY BOILERS VOLUME II. SECOND GENERATION LOW-NOX BURNERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes tests to evaluate the performance characteristics of three Second Generation Low-NOx burner designs: the Dual Register burner (DRB), the Babcock-Hitachi NOx Reducing (HNR) burner, and the XCL burner. The three represent a progression in development based on t...

  18. Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

    2013-09-30

    This research and development efforts produced low-emission burner technology capable of operating on natural gas as well as crude glycerin and/or fatty acids generated in biodiesel plants. The research was conducted in three stages (1) Concept definition leading to the design and development of a small laboratory scale burner, (2) Scale-up to prototype burner design and development, and (3) Technology demonstration with field vefiication. The burner design relies upon the Flow Blurring (FB) fuel injection based on aerodynamically creating two-phase flow near the injector exit. The fuel tube and discharge orifice both of inside diameter D are separated by gap H. For H < 0.25D, the atomizing air bubbles into liquid fuel to create a two-phase flow near the tip of the fuel tube. Pressurized two-phase fuel-air mixture exits through the discharge orifice, which results in expansion and breakup of air bubbles yielding a spray with fine droplets. First, low-emission combustion of diesel, biodiesel and straight VO (soybean oil) was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine sprays for these fuels with significantly different physical properties. Visual images for these baseline experiments conducted with heat release rate (HRR) of about 8 kW illustrate clean blue flames indicating premixed combustion for all three fuels. Radial profiles of the product gas temperature at the combustor exit overlap each other signifying that the combustion efficiency is independent of the fuel. At the combustor exit, the NOx emissions are within the measurement uncertainties, while CO emissions are slightly higher for straight VO as compared to diesel and biodiesel. Considering the large variations in physical and chemical properties of fuels considered, the small differences observed in CO and NOx emissions show promise for fuel-flexible, clean combustion systems. FB injector has proven to be very effective in atomizing fuels with very different physical properties, and it offers a

  19. Rig scarcity prompts innovative drilling solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimore, G.M.; Gott, T.; Feagin, J.

    1997-11-01

    Unable to locate a shallow-water offshore rig for its program in Indonesia, British Gas International developed an innovative pad/ballasted barge configuration to utilize a land rig, which was available. Many non-typical problems were encountered and solved to establish the drilling location 600 m (2,000 ft) from the shore in Bintuni Bay in Irian Jaya, eastern Indonesia. The final hybrid configuration has sparked interesting debate as to whether the operation should be designated as onshore or offshore. The paper discusses the project overview, concept development, construction, and operations.

  20. Magnetic Suspension for Dynamic Spin Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Dynamic Spin Rig, located in Building 5, Test Cell CW-18, is used to test turbomachinery blades and components by rotating them in a vacuum chamber. A team from Lewis' Machine Dynamics Branch successfully integrated a magnetic bearing and control system into the Dynamic Spin Rig. The magnetic bearing worked very well both to support and shake the shaft. It was demonstrated that the magnetic bearing can transmit more vibrational energy into the shaft and excite some blade modes to larger amplitudes than the existing electromagnetic shakers can.

  1. Catalytic reactor with improved burner

    DOEpatents

    Faitani, Joseph J.; Austin, George W.; Chase, Terry J.; Suljak, George T.; Misage, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

  2. Performance test reports and comparison of emission characteristics of prototype liquid multifuel burners developed for US military field cooking applications

    SciTech Connect

    Litzke, W.; Celebi, Y.; McDonald, R.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this project is to provide data to the U.S. Army Natick RD&E Center on the performance of three prototype burners, which have the capability of firing with multiple types of fuels (diesel and JP-8), and the conventional gasoline-fired M-2 burner. The prototype burners are intended to replace the M-2 unit currently used in food cooking appliances in the Army. The burners supplied to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the purpose of testing under this project included one M-2 unit, one M-3 prototype unit designed by Natick, one Babington prototype unit designed by Babington Engineering, and one ITR prototype designed by International Thermal Research Ltd. It should be noted, however, that after the project began, Babington Engineering provided an upgraded prototype unit for testing which replaced the unit initially provided by the Natick Center. The M-3 unit replaced the Karcher unit listed in the contract. The test procedures which were described in a Test Method Report allowed for the measurement of the concentrations of specific compounds emitted from the burners. These compounds included oxygen (O{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), formaldehyde, and particulate emissions. The level of smoke produced was also measured by using a Bacharach Smoke Number system (ASTM Standard D2156). A separate Performance Test Report for each burner was prepared as part of this project, and is attached as part of this report. In those reports details of the measurement techniques, instrumentation, test operating conditions, and data for each burner were included. This paper provides a summary and a comparison of the results for all burners. A brief discussion of emissions from other similar small oil combustion systems is also part of this document to provide perspective on the type of contaminants and levels expected from these systems.

  3. Design and Implementation of a Characterization Test Rig for Evaluating High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Flow Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; DeLaat, John C.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    A test rig was designed and developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the purpose of characterizing high bandwidth liquid fuel flow modulator candidates to determine their suitability for combustion instability control research. The test rig is capable of testing flow modulators at up to 600 psia supply pressure and flows of up to 2 gpm. The rig is designed to provide a quiescent flow into the test section in order to isolate the dynamic flow modulations produced by the test article. Both the fuel injector orifice downstream of the test article and the combustor are emulated. The effect of fuel delivery line lengths on modulator dynamic performance can be observed and modified to replicate actual fuel delivery systems. For simplicity, water is currently used as the working fluid, although future plans are to use jet fuel. The rig is instrumented for dynamic pressures and flows and a high-speed data system is used for dynamic data acquisition. Preliminary results have been obtained for one candidate flow modulator.

  4. Reverberatory screen for a radiant burner

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Paul E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to porous mat gas fired radiant burner panels utilizing improved reverberatory screens. The purpose of these screens is to boost the overall radiant output of the burner relative to a burner using no screen and the same fuel-air flow rates. In one embodiment, the reverberatory screen is fabricated from ceramic composite material, which can withstand higher operating temperatures than its metallic equivalent. In another embodiment the reverberatory screen is corrugated. The corrugations add stiffness which helps to resist creep and thermally induced distortions due to temperature or thermal expansion coefficient differences. As an added benefit, it has been unexpectedly discovered that the corrugations further increase the radiant efficiency of the burner. In a preferred embodiment, the reverberatory screen is both corrugated and made from ceramic composite material.

  5. Alzeta porous radiant burner. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    An Alzeta Pyrocore porous radiant burner was tested for the first time at elevated pressures and mass flows. Mapping of the burner`s stability limits (flashback, blowoff, and lean extinction limits) in an outward fired configuration and hot wall environment was carried out at pressures up to 18 atm, firing rates up to 180 kW, and excess air rates up to 100%. A central composite experimental design for parametric testing within the stability limits produced statistically sound correlations of dimensionless burner temperature and NO{sub x} emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, dimensionless firing rate, and reciprocal Reynolds number. The NO{sub x} emissions were below 4 ppmvd at 15% O{sub 2} for all conditions tested, and the CO and unburned hydrocarbon levels were simultaneously low. As a direct result of this cooperative research effort between METC and Alzeta, Solar Turbines has already expressed a strong interest in this novel technology.

  6. Reverberatory screen for a radiant burner

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.E.

    1999-11-23

    The present invention relates to porous mat gas fired radiant burner panels utilizing improved reverberatory screens. The purpose of these screens is to boost the overall radiant output of the burner relative to a burner using no screen and the same fuel-air flow rates. In one embodiment, the reverberatory screen is fabricated from ceramic composite material, which can withstand higher operating temperatures than its metallic equivalent. In another embodiment the reverberatory screen is corrugated. The corrugations add stiffness which helps to resist creep and thermally induced distortions due to temperature or thermal expansion coefficient differences. As an added benefit, it has been unexpectedly discovered that the corrugations further increase the radiant efficiency of the burner. In a preferred embodiment, the reverberatory screen is both corrugated and made from ceramic composite material.

  7. 25. Photocopied 1973 from The Rig & Reel Magazine, (March, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopied 1973 from The Rig & Reel Magazine, (March, 1923) p. 1. TYPICAL ENDLESS-WIRE RIG IN VOLCANO. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  8. Putting combustion optimization to work

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, N.

    2009-05-15

    New plants and plants that are retrofitting can benefit from combustion optimization. Boiler tuning and optimization can complement each other. The continuous emissions monitoring system CEMS, and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy TDLAS can be used for optimisation. NeuCO's CombustionOpt neural network software can determine optimal fuel and air set points. Babcock and Wilcox Power Generation Group Inc's Flame Doctor can be used in conjunction with other systems to diagnose and correct coal-fired burner performance. The four units of the Colstrip power plant in Colstrips, Montana were recently fitted with combustion optimization systems based on advanced model predictive multi variable controls (MPCs), ABB's Predict & Control tool. Unit 4 of Tampa Electric's Big Bend plant in Florida is fitted with Emerson's SmartProcess fuzzy neural model based combustion optimisation system. 1 photo.

  9. APPLICATION OF STAGED COMBUSTION AND REBURNING TO THE CO-FIRING OF NITROGENATED WASTES: CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of a 0.6 MW precombustion chamber burner, designed for in-furnace NOx control and high combustion efficiency (CE) for high nitrogen content waste co-firing. The 250- to 750-ms residence time precombustion chamber burner mounted on a protot...

  10. Silane-propane ignitor/burner

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Richard W.; Skinner, Dewey F.; Thorsness, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

  11. Silane-propane ignitor/burner

    DOEpatents

    Hill, R.W.; Skinner, D.F. Jr.; Thorsness, C.B.

    1983-05-26

    A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

  12. Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) Startup Report

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Park

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the work accomplished to date to design, procure, assemble, authorize, and startup the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the reasons for establishing this capability, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, initial success, and plans for completing the initial 1,000 hour test.

  13. Status of the Combined Cycle Engine Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Dave; Slater, John; Dippold, Vance

    2009-01-01

    Status for the past year is provided of the turbine-based Combined-Cycle Engine (CCE) Rig for the hypersonic project. As part of the first stage propulsion of a two-stage-to-orbit vehicle concept, this engine rig is designed with a common inlet that supplies flow to a turbine engine and a dual-mode ramjet / scramjet engine in an over/under configuration. At Mach 4 the inlet has variable geometry to switch the airflow from the turbine to the ramjet / scramjet engine. This process is known as inlet mode-transition. In addition to investigating inlet aspects of mode transition, the rig will allow testing of turbine and scramjet systems later in the test series. Fully closing the splitter cowl "cocoons" the turbine engine and increases airflow to the scramjet duct. The CCE Rig will be a testbed to investigate integrated propulsion system and controls technology objectives. Four phases of testing are planned to 1) characterize the dual inlet database, 2) collect inlet dynamics using system identification techniques, 3) implement an inlet control to demonstrate mode-transition scenarios and 4) demonstrate integrated inlet/turbine engine operation through mode-transition. Status of the test planning and preparation activities is summarized with background on the inlet design and small-scale testing, analytical CFD predictions and some details of the large-scale hardware. The final stages of fabrication are underway.

  14. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... provided, the guys shall be so placed as to produce a minimum stress and not permit the boom to...

  15. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... provided, the guys shall be so placed as to produce a minimum stress and not permit the boom to...

  16. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... provided, the guys shall be so placed as to produce a minimum stress and not permit the boom to...

  17. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... provided, the guys shall be so placed as to produce a minimum stress and not permit the boom to...

  18. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... provided, the guys shall be so placed as to produce a minimum stress and not permit the boom to...

  19. MECHANISM AND KINETICS OF THE FORMATION OF NOX AND OTHER COMBUSTION POLLUTANTS. PHASE II. MODIFIED COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives Phase II results of a combined experimental/theoretical study to define the mechanisms and kinetics of the formation of NOx and other combustion pollutants. Two experimental devices were used in Phase II. A special flat-flame burner with a controlled-temperature ...

  20. Burner modifications for cost effective NO{sub x} control

    SciTech Connect

    Melick, T.A.; Payne, R.; Kersch, J.

    1999-11-01

    Low NO{sub x} Burners achieve their NO{sub x} reduction principally by control of the rate of fuel/air mixing. Based on many years of low NO{sub x} burner development experience for wall fired applications, Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has found that low NO{sub x} fuel/air mixing conditions can be incorporated into conventional burners by modifying the burners as an alternative to complete burner replacement. The NO{sub x} control achieved with such Low NO{sub x} Burner Modifications is, in many cases, comparable to that of new burners but the cost to the utility is much lower. This paper presents an update on EER`s experience in applying Low NO{sub x} Burner Modifications to circular burners focusing on Delmarva Power and Light`s (Connectiv) Indian River Station.

  1. 46 CFR 162.050-17 - Separator test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Separator test rig. 162.050-17 Section 162.050-17...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment § 162.050-17 Separator test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of separators....

  2. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-04-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

  3. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PIR) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances in containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. During this period, experimental setup with optical and electronic instrumentation that is necessary for measuring the radiant heat output and the emission gas output of the burner has been established. The radiation measurement instrument, an FTIR, has been purchased and installed in the porous burner experimental system. The radiation measurement capability of the FTIR was tested and found to be satisfactory. A standard blackbody source, made by Graseby Infrared, was employed to calibrate the FTIR. A collection duct for emission gas measurement was fabricated and connected to the existing Horiba gas analyzer. Test runs are being conducted for flue gas analysis. A number of published research papers on modeling of porous burners were reviewed. The physical mechanism and theoretical analysis of the combustion process of the PIR burner was formulated. The numerical modeling, and implementation of a PIR burner code at CAU`s computing facility is in progress.

  4. Measurement and prediction of interactions between burners in multi-low NOx burner systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, S.J.; Allen, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements using Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) have been carried out on the isothermal flow from multiple small-scale burners enclosed in a furnace-type geometry. These have been used to validate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models using the commercial unstructured CFD code FLUENT/UNS version 4.1. The flows from arrays of two, four and six co- and counter-rotating burners have been measured at various burner pitches. Measurements show that the isothermal flows impinge on one another and interact significantly when the burner pitch is reduced to 1.3 burner exit diameters, although interactions between flows do not significantly affect the main central core flow. Predictions indicate that the burner jet entrainment is significantly affected by interactions, and the entrainment rate if dependent on the number of burners and whether a co- or counter-rotating swirl arrangement is adopted. Both two and four counter-rotating flows entrain greater amounts of surrounding air than a single burner flow, with the greatest entrainment found with two counter-rotating flows.

  5. Combustion accelerated swirling flows in high confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Roman; Dugue, Jacques

    Nine cold flows, 15 well-mixed flames, and eight type II diffusion flames of coke-oven gas are measured in the present study of the effect of combustion on the properties of swirl-induced internal recirculation zones (IRZ) formed in the vicinity of swirl-stabilized burners. Formulae for calculating the effective swirl number are presented. Attention is given to experiments in which initial swirling cold flows are combustion-accelerated; the position and degree of acceleration are systematically varied. The experimental results obtained deepen current understanding of the effects of combustion on swirling flows.

  6. Low emission U-fired boiler combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Ake, Terence; Beittel, Roderick; Lisauskas, Robert A.; Reicker, Eric

    2000-01-01

    At least one main combustion chamber contains at least one pulverized coal burner. Each pulverized coal burner is operatively arranged for minimizing NO.sub.X production and for maintaining a predetermined operating temperature to liquefy ash within the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber includes a slag drain for removing slag from the combustion chamber. A slag screen is positioned in a generally U-shaped furnace flow pattern. The slag screen is positioned between the combustion chamber and a radiant furnace. The radiant furnace includes a reburning zone for in-furnace No.sub.X reduction. The reburning zone extends between a reburning fuel injection source and at least one overfire air injection port for injecting air.

  7. Large eddy simulation of forced ignition of an annular bluff-body burner

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, V.; Domingo, P.; Vervisch, L.

    2010-03-15

    The optimization of the ignition process is a crucial issue in the design of many combustion systems. Large eddy simulation (LES) of a conical shaped bluff-body turbulent nonpremixed burner has been performed to study the impact of spark location on ignition success. This burner was experimentally investigated by Ahmed et al. [Combust. Flame 151 (2007) 366-385]. The present work focuses on the case without swirl, for which detailed measurements are available. First, cold-flow measurements of velocities and mixture fractions are compared with their LES counterparts, to assess the prediction capabilities of simulations in terms of flow and turbulent mixing. Time histories of velocities and mixture fractions are recorded at selected spots, to probe the resolved probability density function (pdf) of flow variables, in an attempt to reproduce, from the knowledge of LES-resolved instantaneous flow conditions, the experimentally observed reasons for success or failure of spark ignition. A flammability map is also constructed from the resolved mixture fraction pdf and compared with its experimental counterpart. LES of forced ignition is then performed using flamelet fully detailed tabulated chemistry combined with presumed pdfs. Various scenarios of flame kernel development are analyzed and correlated with typical flow conditions observed in this burner. The correlations between, velocities and mixture fraction values at the sparking time and the success or failure of ignition, are then further discussed and analyzed. (author)

  8. MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

    2000-04-01

    Coal continues to be one of the principal energy sources for electric power generation in the United States. One of the biggest environmental challenges involved with coal utilization is the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formed during coal combustion. The most economical method of NO{sub x} abatement in coal combustion is through burner modification. Air-staging techniques have been widely used in the development of low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal burners, promoting the conversion of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} by delaying the mixing in the fuel-rich zone near the burner inlet. Previous studies have looked at the mechanisms of NO{sub x} evolution at relatively low temperatures where primary pyrolysis is dominant, but data published for secondary pyrolysis in the pulverized coal furnace are scarce. In this project, the nitrogen evolution behavior during secondary coal pyrolysis will be explored. The end result will be a complete model of nitrogen evolution and NO{sub x} precursor formation due to primary and secondary pyrolysis.

  9. Industrial pulverized coal low NO{sub x} burner. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-23

    The objective of Phase 1 of this program is to develop a novel low NO{sub x} pulverized coal burner, which offers near-term commercialization potential, uses preheated combustion air of up to 1000{degree}F, and which can be applied to high-temperature industrial heating furnaces, chemical process furnaces, fired heaters, and boilers. In the low NO{sub x} coal burner concept, the flue gas is recycled to the burner by jet pump action provided by the momentum of the primary air flow. The recycled flue gas is used to convey the pulverized coal to the jet pump where mixing with the primary air takes place. Ignition occurs downstream of the jet mixing section. The recycled flue gas is at high temperature. When the pulverized coal is entrained, it is heated by conduction from the flue gas. The coal is pyrolyzed to a large extent before being mixed with the primary air. These pyrolysis products are the source of energy for the downstream flame. In this process, the fuel nitrogen associated with pyrolysis products can be converted to molecular nitrogen in the pyrolysis flame if the oxygen is held to substoichiometric concentrations based upon the burning species (pyrolysis products and some char). Pyrolysis products combustion is believed to be the primary source of NO{sub x} emissions in coal combustors. Progress is described.

  10. Radiant burner technology base B burner research and development. Final report, February 1986-January 1989. Appendix M. Arizona State University final report: Emission measurements of porous radiant burners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Radiant burners offer many advantages to industrial users and there are numerous applications that would benefit from the technology. Industrial operations, however, place severe restrictions on the use of radiant burners. These limits are related to high furnace temperatures, varied production schedules, and dirty work environments. The work has identified operational and materials limits of present day radiant burner technologies and has projected what their capabilities may be. The results of the report recommend techniques to improve the state-of-the-art in radiant burners and increasing the number of industrial applications for the gas-fired burner.

  11. CFD analysis helps TSV burner meet strict NOx emission requirements at Conectiv Indian River Unit 4, a DB Riley turbo furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, K.R.; Bradshaw, W. Jr.; Little, L.E.

    1999-07-01

    This project is the first application of low NOx circular-type burners to a Turbo Furnace coal-fired utility boiler design. It is an important part of Conectiv's (formerly Delmarva Power and Light Co.) compliance strategy for the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990 (CAAA). In project Phase 1, installation of dynamic classifiers successfully reduced flyash unburned carbon loss by nearly 50%. This paper describes Phase 2, the design and retrofit of new low-NOx burners. The two phases met all performance requirement, including a NOx guarantee of 0.42 lbs/10{sup 6} Btu at 105% load. Initially the Model 2 Tertiary Staged Venturi (TSV{reg{underscore}sign}) burner design installed at Conectiv Indian River Station Unit 4 did not meet required NOx levels. Field observations indicated poor flame retention as well as poor flame scanner signals, particularly at lower loads. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and working with DB Riley Inc.'s (DBR) parent company Deutsche Babcock, DBR engineers developed a promising design solution incorporating elements of other DBR low-NOx coal burner technology into the TSV{reg{underscore}sign} burner design. The CFD modeling goal was to improve burner aerodynamics in the burner near-field region to produce better flame retention while limiting hardware changes. Past experience has shown that better flame retention promotes lower NOx. Although the design process consisted of a series of 2-D axi-symmetric, purely aerodynamic CFD models with no combustion or NOx calculations, several key CFD models added coal combustion for flame visualization purpose. A significant NOx improvement was expected with the final design chosen, based on significantly improved burner aerodynamics and flame attachment. This analysis ultimately proved to be correct.

  12. Multi-ported, internally recuperated burners for direct flame impingement heating applications

    DOEpatents

    Abbasi, Hamid A.; Kurek, Harry; Chudnovsky, Yaroslav; Lisienko, Vladimir G.; Malikov, German K.

    2010-08-03

    A direct flame impingement method and apparatus employing at least one multi-ported, internally recuperated burner. The burner includes an innermost coaxial conduit having a first fluid inlet end and a first fluid outlet end, an outermost coaxial conduit disposed around the innermost coaxial conduit and having a combustion products outlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a combustion products inlet end proximate the first fluid outlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit, and a coaxial intermediate conduit disposed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit, whereby a second fluid annular region is formed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the intermediate coaxial conduit and a combustion products annular region is formed between the intermediate coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit. The intermediate coaxial conduit has a second fluid inlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a second fluid outlet end proximate the combustion products inlet end of the outermost coaxial conduit.

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF NOVEL LOW-NOx BURNERS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, David

    2006-12-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), together with Hamworthy Peabody Combustion Incorporated (formerly Peabody Engineering Corporation), the University of Utah, and Far West Electrochemical have developed and demonstrated an innovative combustion system suitable for natural gas and coke-oven gas firing within the steel industry. The combustion system is a simple, low-cost, energy-efficient burner that can reduce NOx by more than 75%. The U.S. steel industry needs to address NOx control at its steelmaking facilities. A significant part of NOx emissions comes from gas-fired boilers. In steel plants, byproduct gases – blast furnace gas (BFG) and coke-oven gas (COG) – are widely used together with natural gas to fire furnaces and boilers. In steel plants, natural gas can be fired together with BFG and COG, but, typically, the addition of natural gas raises NOx emissions, which can already be high because of residual fuel-bound nitrogen in COG. The Project Team has applied its expertise in low-NOx burners to lower NOx levels for these applications by combining advanced burner geometry and combustion staging with control strategies tailored to mixtures of natural gas and byproduct fuel gases. These methods reduce all varieties of NOx – thermal NOx produced by high flame temperatures, prompt NOx produced by complex chain reactions involving radical hydrocarbon species and NOx from fuel-bound nitrogen compounds such as ammonia found in COG. The Project Team has expanded GTI’s highly successful low-NOx forced internal recirculation (FIR) burner, previously developed for natural gas-fired boilers, into facilities that utilize BFG and COG. For natural gas firing, these burners have been shown to reduce NOx emissions from typical uncontrolled levels of 80-100 vppm to single-digit levels (9 vppm). This is done without the energy efficiency penalties incurred by alternative NOx control methods, such as external flue gas recirculation (FGR), water injection, and selective non

  14. Oscillating-flow regenerator test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. G.; Gedeon, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed in setting up and performing tests on a regenerator test rig. An earlier status report presented test results, together with heat transfer correlations, for four regenerator samples (two woven screen samples and two felt metal samples). Lessons learned from this testing led to improvements to the experimental setup, mainly instrumentation as well as to the test procedure. Given funding and time constraints for this project it was decided to complete as much testing as possible while the rig was set up and operational, and to forego final data reduction and analysis until later. Additional testing was performed on several of the previously tested samples as well an on five newly fabricated samples. The following report is a summary of the work performed at OU, with many of the final test results included in raw data form.

  15. Jet Exit Rig Six Component Force Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Wolter, John; Woike, Mark; Booth, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    A new six axis air balance was delivered to the NASA Glenn Research Center. This air balance has an axial force capability of 800 pounds, primary airflow of 10 pounds per second, and a secondary airflow of 3 pounds per second. Its primary use was for the NASA Glenn Jet Exit Rig, a wind tunnel model used to test both low-speed, and high-speed nozzle concepts in a wind tunnel. This report outlines the installation of the balance in the Jet Exit Rig, and the results from an ASME calibration nozzle with an exit area of 8 square-inches. The results demonstrated the stability of the force balance for axial measurements and the repeatability of measurements better than 0.20 percent.

  16. Glenn Extreme Environments Rig (GEER) Independent Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smiles, Michael D.; George, Mark A.; Ton, Mimi C.; Le, Son K.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief of the Space Science Project Office at Glenn Research Center (GRC) requested support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to satisfy a request from the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Associate Administrator and the Planetary Science Division Chief to obtain an independent review of the Glenn Extreme Environments Rig (GEER) and the operational controls in place for mitigating any hazard associated with its operation. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  17. Sealed, nozzle-mix burners for silica deposition

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Meryle D. M.; Brown, John T.; Misra, Mahendra K.

    2003-07-08

    Burners (40) for producing fused silica boules are provided. The burners employ a tube-in-tube (301-306) design with flats (56, 50) on some of the tubes (305, 301) being used to limit the cross-sectional area of certain passages (206, 202) within the burner and/or to atomize a silicon-containing, liquid source material, such as OMCTS. To avoid the possibility of flashback, the burner has separate passages for fuel (205) and oxygen (204, 206), i.e., the burner employs nozzle mixing, rather than premixing, of the fuel and oxygen. The burners are installed in burner holes (26) formed in the crown (20) of a furnace and form a seal with those holes so that ambient air cannot be entrained into the furnace through the holes. An external air cooled jacket (60) can be used to hold the temperature of the burner below a prescribed upper limit, e.g., 400.degree. C.

  18. Central recirculation zone analysis in an unconfined tangential swirl burner with varying degrees of premixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valera-Medina, A.; Syred, N.; Kay, P.; Griffiths, A.

    2011-06-01

    Swirl-stabilised combustion is one of the most widely used techniques for flame stabilisation, uses ranging from gas turbine combustors to pulverised coal-fired power stations. In gas turbines, lean premixed systems are of especial importance, giving the ability to produce low NOx systems coupled with wide stability limits. The common element is the swirl burner, which depends on the generation of an aerodynamically formed central recirculation zone (CRZ) and which serves to recycle heat and active chemical species to the root of the flame as well as providing low-velocity regions where the flame speed can match the local flow velocity. Enhanced mixing in and around the CRZ is another beneficial feature. The structure of the CRZ and hence that of the associated flames, stabilisation and mixing processes have shown to be extremely complex, three-dimensional and time dependent. The characteristics of the CRZ depend very strongly on the level of swirl (swirl number), burner configuration, type of flow expansion, Reynolds number (i.e. flowrate) and equivalence ratio. Although numerical methods have had some success when compared to experimental results, the models still have difficulties at medium to high swirl levels, with complex geometries and varied equivalence ratios. This study thus focuses on experimental results obtained to characterise the CRZ formed under varied combustion conditions with different geometries and some variation of swirl number in a generic swirl burner. CRZ behaviour has similarities to the equivalent isothermal state, but is strongly dependent on equivalence ratio, with interesting effects occurring with a high-velocity fuel injector. Partial premixing and combustion cause more substantive changes to the CRZ than pure diffusive combustion.

  19. Computers make rig life extension an option

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The worldwide semisubmersible drilling rig fleet is approaching retirement. But replacement is not an attractive option even though dayrates are reaching record highs. In 1991, Schlumberger Sedco Forex managers decided that an alternative might exist if regulators and insurers could be convinced to extend rig life expectancy through restoration. Sedco Forex chose their No. 704 semisubmersible, an 18-year North Sea veteran, to test their process. The first step was to determine what required restoration, meaning fatigue life analysis of each weld on the huge vessel. If inspected, the task would be unacceptably time-consuming and of questionable accuracy. Instead a suite of computer programs modeled the stress seen by each weld, statistically estimated the sea states seen by the rig throughout its North Sea service and calibrated a beam-element model on which to run their computer simulations. The elastic stiffness of the structure and detailed stress analysis of each weld was performed with ANSYS, a commercially available finite-element analysis program. The use of computer codes to evaluate service life extension is described.

  20. Dual fuel low NOx burner

    SciTech Connect

    Shyhching Yang; Bortz, S.J.

    1993-08-31

    A dual fuel burner is described comprising: a divergent quarl having an entrance, and exit downstream from said entrance, and a plurality of axially extending staging air ports equally spaced around said exit; a wind pipe coaxially connected to said entrance of said quarl; a swirl generator coaxially received in said wind pipe, said swirl generator having a plurality of vanes and a center hole; a gas gun including a tube and a gas nozzle, said tube having an upstream end and a downstream end and being coaxially positioned within said center hole of said swirl generator said gas nozzle being mounted to said downstream end of said tube and positioned in the vicinity of said entrance of said quarl, said gas nozzle having a plurality of passageways having center lines that diverge in the downstream direction and are inclined at an angle of about 15 to 40 degrees with respect to the centerline of said quarl; an oil gun including an oil tube, an oil nozzle, and a high pressure air tube, said oil gun tube having an upstream end and a downstream end, said oil gun tube being coaxially positioned within said gas gun tube, said oil nozzle being mounted to said downstream end of said oil gun tube and positioned in the vicinity of said entrance of said quarl, said oil nozzle including a plurality of passageways having center lines that diverge in the downstream direction and are inclined at an angle of about 15 to 40 degrees with respect to the centerline of said quarl; said high pressure tube provided within said oil gun tube, said high pressure tube being in fluid communication with said oil nozzle passageways.

  1. Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

  2. Real-Time Thermographic-Phosphor-Based Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coating Surfaces Subjected to a High-Velocity Combustor Burner Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Allison, Stephen W.; Cruzen, Scott; Condevaux, J. J.; Senk, J. R.; Paul, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    Surface temperature measurements were conducted on metallic specimens coated with an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) with a YAG:Dy phosphor layer that were subjected to an aggressive high-velocity combustor burner environment. Luminescence-based surface temperature measurements of the same TBC system have previously been demonstrated for specimens subjected to static furnace or laser heating. Surface temperatures were determined from the decay time of the luminescence signal of the YAG:Dy phosphor layer that was excited by a pulsed laser source. However, the furnace and laser heating provides a much more benign environment than that which exists in a turbine engine, where there are additional challenges of a highly radiant background and high velocity gases. As the next step in validating the suitability of luminescence-based temperature measurements for turbine engine environments, new testing was performed where heating was provided by a high-velocity combustor burner rig at Williams International. Real-time surface temperature measurements during burner rig heating were obtained from the decay of the luminescence from the YAG:Dy surface layer. The robustness of several temperature probe designs in the sonic velocity, high radiance flame environment was evaluated. In addition, analysis was performed to show whether the luminescence decay could be satisfactorily extracted from the high radiance background.

  3. Stability of the porous plug burner flame

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmaster, J.

    1983-12-01

    The linear stability of a premixed flame attached to a porous plug burner, using activaton energy asymptotics, is examined. Limit function-expansions are not an appropriate mathematical framework for this problem, and are avoided. A dispersion relation is obtained which defines the stability boundaries in the wave-, Lewis-number plane, and the movement of these boundaries is followed as the mass flux is reduced below the adiabatic value and the flame moves towards the burner from infinity. Cellular instability is suppressed by the burner, but the pulsating instability usually associated with Lewis numbers greater than 1 is, at first, enhanced. For some parameter values the flame is never stable for all wavenumbers the Lewis number stability band that exists for the unbounded flame disappears. For sufficiently small values of the stand-off distance the pulsating instability is suppressed. 9 references.

  4. Low NO.sub.x burner system

    DOEpatents

    Kitto, Jr., John B.; Kleisley, Roger J.; LaRue, Albert D.; Latham, Chris E.; Laursen, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    A low NO.sub.x burner system for a furnace having spaced apart front and rear walls, comprises a double row of cell burners on each of the front and rear walls. Each cell burner is either of the inverted type with a secondary air nozzle spaced vertically below a coal nozzle, or the non-inverted type where the coal nozzle is below the secondary air port. The inverted and non-inverted cells alternate or are provided in other specified patterns at least in the lower row of cells. A small percentage of the total air can be also provided through the hopper or hopper throat forming the bottom of the furnace, or through the boiler hopper side walls. A shallow angle impeller design also advances the purpose of the invention which is to reduce CO and H.sub.2 S admissions while maintaining low NO.sub.x generation.

  5. Specifics of phytomass combustion in small experimental device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhard, Richard; Mičieta, Jozef; Jandačka, Jozef; Gavlas, Stanislav

    2015-05-01

    A wood pellet combustion carries out with high efficiency and comfort in modern pellet boilers. These facts help to increase the amount of installed pellet boilers in households. The combustion process quality depends besides the combustion conditions also on the fuel quality. The wood pellets, which don`t contain the bark and branches represent the highest quality. Because of growing pellet demand, an herbal biomass (phytomass), which is usually an agricultural by-product becomes economically attractive for pellet production. Although the phytomass has the net calorific value relatively slightly lower than the wood biomass, it is often significantly worse in view of the combustion process and an emission production. The combustion of phytomass pellets causes various difficulties in small heat sources, mainly due to a sintering of fuel residues. We want to avoid the ash sintering by a lowering of temperature in the combustion chamber below the ash sintering temperature of phytomass via the modification of a burner design. For research of the phytomass combustion process in the small boilers is constructed the experimental combustion device. There will investigate the impact of cooling intensity of the combustion chamber on the combustion process and emissions. Arising specific requirements from the measurement will be the basis for the design of the pellet burner and for the setting of operating parameters to the trouble-free phytomass combustion was guaranteed.

  6. Development of a lean premixed burner for hydrogen utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.O.

    1996-10-01

    The long-term mandate of the hydrogen program is to develop the technologies needed to establish a hydrogen economy. Although a hydrogen fueled automobile has been established as a demonstration project, there are at least three other end use sectors that are recognized by the H{sub 2} program and that are addressed by this project. These end uses are: (1) power generation from stationary turbines, (2) generation of process heat or steam, and (3) commercial and residential direct use applications. Eliminating carbon from the fuel will remove carbon containing species from the emissions, however, NO{sub x} resulting from thermal NO production cannot be ignored. Thermal NO production is minimized by reducing the peak combustion temperature and the residence time at the peak temperature. NO can be reduced to extremely low levels (a few ppm) by operating sufficiently lean to reduce the peak combustion temperatures below 1700 to 1800 K. The objectives for this project are to: (1) develop an environmentally benign and safe burner operating on hydrogen in a lean premixed mode, (2) provide a facility in which fundamental investigations can be performed to support other programs.

  7. Coal Particle Flow Patterns for O2 Enriched, Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer Sinclair Curtis

    2005-08-01

    This project involved a systematic investigation examining the effect of near-flame burner aerodynamics on standoff distance and stability of turbulent diffusion flames and the resultant NO{sub x} emissions from actual pulverized coal diffusion flames. Specifically, the scope of the project was to understand how changes in near-flame aerodynamics and transport air oxygen partial pressure can influence flame attachment and coal ignition, two properties essential to proper operation of low NO{sub x} burners. Results from this investigation utilized a new 2M tall, 0.5m in diameter combustor designed to evaluate near-flame combustion aerodynamics in terms of transport air oxygen partial pressure (Po{sub 2}), coal fines content, primary fuel and secondary air velocities, and furnace wall temperature furnish insight into fundamental processes that occur during combustion of pulverized coal in practical systems. Complementary cold flow studies were conducted in a geometrically similar chamber to analyze the detailed motion of the gas and particles using laser Doppler velocimetry. This final technical report summarizes the key findings from our investigation into coal particle flow patterns in burners. Specifically, we focused on the effects of oxygen enrichment, the effect of fines, and the effect of the nozzle velocity ratio on the resulting flow patterns. In the cold flow studies, detailed measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) were made to determine the details of the flow. In the hot flow studies, observations of flame stability and measurements of NO{sub x} were made to determine the effects of the flow patterns on burner operation.

  8. DESIGN REPORT: LOW-NOX BURNERS FOR PACKAGE BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a low-NOx burner design, presented for residual-oil-fired industrial boilers and boilers cofiring conventional fuels and nitrated hazardous wastes. The burner offers lower NOx emission levels for these applications than conventional commercial burners. The bu...

  9. 30 CFR 56.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 56.7803 Section 56.7803... Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  10. 30 CFR 57.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 57.7803 Section 57.7803... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  11. 30 CFR 57.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 57.7803 Section 57.7803... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  12. 30 CFR 57.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 57.7803 Section 57.7803... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  13. 30 CFR 56.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 56.7803 Section 56.7803... Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  14. 30 CFR 56.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 56.7803 Section 56.7803... Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  15. 30 CFR 57.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 57.7803 Section 57.7803... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  16. 30 CFR 56.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 56.7803 Section 56.7803... Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  17. 30 CFR 57.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 57.7803 Section 57.7803... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  18. 30 CFR 56.7803 - Lighting the burner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lighting the burner. 56.7803 Section 56.7803... Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7803 Lighting the burner. A suitable means of protection shall be provided for the employee when lighting the burner....

  19. DESIGN REPORT LOW-NOX BURNERS FOR PACKAGE BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a low-NOx burner design, presented for residual-oil-fired industrial boilers and boilers cofiring conventional fuels and nitrated hazardous wastes. The burner offers lower NOx emission levels for these applications than conventional commercial burners. The bu...

  20. Advanced combustion system for industrial boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, August 1987--October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Attig, R.C.; Foote, J.P.; Millard, W.P.; Schulz, R.J.; Wagoner, C.L.

    1987-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to develop an advanced coal-combustion system for industrial boilers. With the new combustion system, coal could be used to replace oil and possibly gas as fuel for many industrial boilers. The advanced combustion system is comprised of several parts: (1) A new burner-design concept for coal fuels, developed from the familiar gas turbine combustor-can designs that have proven efficient, reliable, durable, and safe for the combustion of liquid fuel oils. (2) A coal storage and dense-phase feed system for injecting clean, ultrafine pulverized coal into the burner at a low velocity. (3) An automatic control system based on feedback from low-cost automotive combustion-quality transducers. A cold flow model of an initial phase of the new burner design and the associated laser flow-visualization techniques were developed during this quarter. A series of modifications of the initial cold flow model will be tested to establish details of design for the new burner. Also a 200 hp firetube boiler has been installed and tested using number 2 oil as a fuel. This boiler will be used for future combustion testing with the new burner and ultrafine pulverized coal. Additionally an ultrafine-coal injector has been designed which will be evaluated separately as a replacement for the oil gun in the firetube boiler. Two tons of deep-cleaned, ultrafine coal were received for initial tests with the coal injector.

  1. Pollutant Emissions and Lean Blowoff Limits of Fuel Flexible Burners Operating on Gaseous Renewable and Fossil Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colorado, Andres

    This study provides an experimental and numerical examination of pollutant emissions and stability of gaseous fueled reactions stabilized with two premixed-fuel-flexible and ultra-low NOx burner technologies. Both burners feature lean combustion technology to control the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The first fuel--flexible burner is the low-swirl burner (LSB), which features aerodynamic stabilization of the reactions with a divergent flow-field; the second burner is the surface stabilized combustion burner (SSCB), which features the stabilization of the reactions on surface patterns. For combustion applications the most commonly studied species are: NOx, carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC). However these are not the only pollutants emitted when burning fossil fuels; other species such as nitrous oxide (N2O), ammonia (NH3) and formaldehyde (CH2O) can be directly emitted from the oxidation reactions. Yet the conditions that favor the emission of these pollutants are not completely understood and require further insight. The results of this dissertation close the gap existing regarding the relations between emission of pollutants species and stability when burning variable gaseous fuels. The results of this study are applicable to current issues such as: 1. Current combustion systems operating at low temperatures to control formation of NOx. 2. Increased use of alternative fuels such as hydrogen, synthetic gas and biogas. 3. Increasing recognition of the need/desire to operate combustion systems in a transient manner to follow load and to offset the intermittency of renewable power. 4. The recent advances in measurement methods allow us to quantify other pollutants, such as N 2O, NH3 and CH2O. Hence in this study, these pollutant species are assessed when burning natural gas (NG) and its binary mixtures with other gaseous fuels such as hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), ethane (C 2H6) and propane (C3H8) at variable operation modes including

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Thermal Process in a W-Shape Radiant Tube Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Jiyong; Zhang, Lifeng; Ling, Haitao; Li, Yanlong

    2014-07-01

    In the current work, three-dimensional mathematical models were developed for the heat transfer and combustion in a W-shape radiant tube burner (RTB) and were solved using Fluent software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The standard k- ɛ model, nonpremixed combustion model, and the discrete ordinate model were used for the modeling of turbulence, combustion, and radiant heat transfer, respectively. In addition, the NO x postprocessor was used for the prediction of the NO emission. A corresponding experiment was performed for the validation of mathematical models. The details of fluid flow, heat transfer, and combustion in the RTB were investigated. Moreover, the effect of the air/fuel ratio (A/F) and air staging on the performance of RTB was studied with the reference indexes including heat efficiency, maximum temperature difference on shell wall, and NO emission at the outlet. The results indicated that a low speed zone formed in the vicinity of the combustion chamber outlet, and there were two relative high-temperature zones in the RTB, one in combustion chamber that favored the flame stability and the other from the main flame in the RTB. The maximum temperature difference was 95.48 K. As the A/F increased, the temperature increased first and then decreased. As the ratio of the primary to secondary air increased, the recirculation zone at the outlet of combustion chamber shrank gradually to disappear, and the flame length was longer and the temperature in flame decreased correspondingly.

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF THE STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION SYMPOSIUM (2ND) HELD AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 1, 1977. VOLUME V. ADDENDUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contents: Effects of fuel and atomization on NOx control for heavy liquid fuel-fired package boilers, NOx control techiques for package boilers - Comparison of burner design, fuel modification and combustion modification; Design and scale-up of low emission burners for industrial...

  4. High-Temperature-Turbine Technology Program: Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Design and development of the liquid-fueled high-temperature combustor for the Turbine Spool Technology Rig

    SciTech Connect

    1981-06-01

    The concept selected by Curtiss-Wright for this DOE sponsored High Temperature Turbine Technology (HTTT) Program utilizes transpiration air-cooling of the turbine subsystem airfoils. With moderate quantities of cooling air, this method of cooling has been demonstrated to be effective in a 2600 to 3000/sup 0/F gas stream. Test results show that transpiration air-cooling also protects turbine components from the aggressive environment produced by the combustion of coal-derived fuels. A new single-stage, high work transpiration air-cooled turbine has been designed and fabricated for evaluation in a rotating test vehicle designated the Turbine Spool Technology Rig (TSTR). The design and development of the annular combustor for the TSTR are described. Some pertinent design characteristics of the combustor are: fuel, Jet A; inlet temperature, 525/sup 0/F; inlet pressure, 7.5 Atm; temperature rise, 2475/sup 0/F; efficiency, 98.5%; exit temperature pattern, 0.25; and exit mass flow, 92.7 pps. The development program was conducted on a 60/sup 0/ sector of the full-round annular combustor. Most design goals were achieved, with the exception of the peak gas exit temperature and local metal temperatures at the rear of the inner liner, both of which were higher than the design values. Subsequent turbine vane cascade testing established the need to reduce both the peak gas temperature (for optimum vane cooling) and the inner liner metal temperature (for combustor durability). Further development of the 60/sup 0/ combustor sector achieved the required temperature reductions and the final configuration was incorporated in the TSTR full-annular burner.

  5. Stabilization of premixed flames on rotating Bunsen burners

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, J.M.; Sohrab, S.H.

    1996-09-01

    The effect of rotation on stabilization of methane-air premixed Bunsen flame sis experimentally investigated. Both the flame blowoff and flashback contours are determined in the fuel mole fraction versus Reynolds number plane (X{sub F}-Re) with the rotational Reynolds number Re{sub 4} as a parameter. It is found that rotation of the gas increases the flame stabilization area A{sub s} = A{sub B} {minus} A{sub F} defined as the difference between the flame blowoff A{sub B} and flashback A{sub F} areas in the (X{sub F}-Re) plane. The flame stabilization efficiency is defined as {eta}{sub s} = 1 {minus} A{sub F}/A{sub B} that approaches unity in either A{sub B} {yields} {infinity} or A{sub F} {yields} 0 limit. The experimental results suggest that rotation decreases the flame stabilization efficiency. However, rotation is found to substantially increase the flame stabilization coefficient defined as {beta}{sub s} = A{sub s}/A{sub st}, where A{sub st} is the stabilization area of the standard nonrotating burner. The parameters {eta}{sub s} and {beta}{sub s} may be useful in combustion technology for quantitative evaluation of the stabilization performance of different types of flame holders. In addition, the local hydrodynamics near the center of rotating Bunsen burner is simulated by investigating stabilization of planar laminar premixed flames on rotating porous disks with uniform surface velocity. Physical concepts concerning mechanisms of flame stabilization are discussed in terms of three important parameters namely the translational Reynolds number Re, the rotation Reynolds number Re{sub r}, and the fuel mole fraction X{sub F}. The results of the experimental findings are shown to be in accordance with prior theoretical investigation.

  6. RNF122 suppresses antiviral type I interferon production by targeting RIG-I CARDs to mediate RIG-I degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendie; Jiang, Minghong; Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Shikun; Liu, Wei; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Jiyan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-08-23

    The activation of retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I), a cytoplasmic innate sensor for viral RNA, is tightly regulated to maintain immune homeostasis properly and prevent excessive inflammatory reactions other than initiation of antiviral innate response to eliminate RNA virus effectively. Posttranslational modifications, particularly ubiquitination, are crucial for regulation of RIG-I activity. Increasing evidence suggests that E3 ligases play important roles in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation and antiviral innate signaling. Here we identify that E3 ubiquitin ligase RING finger protein 122 (RNF122) directly interacts with mouse RIG-I through MS screening of RIG-I-interacting proteins in RNA virus-infected cells. The transmembrane domain of RNF122 associates with the caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs) of RIG-I; this interaction effectively triggers RING finger domain of RNF122 to deliver the Lys-48-linked ubiquitin to the Lys115 and Lys146 residues of RIG-I CARDs and promotes RIG-I degradation, resulting in a marked inhibition of RIG-I downstream signaling. RNF122 is widely expressed in various immune cells, with preferential expression in macrophages. Deficiency of RNF122 selectively increases RIG-I-triggered production of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages. RNF122-deficient mice exhibit more resistance against lethal RNA virus infection, with increased production of type I IFNs. Thus, we demonstrate that RNF122 acts as a selective negative regulator of RIG-I-triggered antiviral innate response by targeting CARDs of RIG-I and mediating proteasomal degradation of RIG-I. Our study outlines a way for E3 ligase to regulate innate sensor RIG-I for the control of antiviral innate immunity. PMID:27506794

  7. Heat transfer improvement and NOx reduction in an industrial furnace by regenerative combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    Suzukawa, Yutaka; Sugiyama, Syunichi; Mori, Isao

    1996-12-31

    Recent development of the regenerative combustion system, in which ceramic honeycomb is used as a heat storage medium in a regenerator, has raised preheated air temperature up to 1,600 K. By preheating the combustion air, the heating potential of the furnace gas is increased and the fuel consumption is reduced dramatically. However, higher air temperature increases the potential of NOx formation. Therefore, to apply this technology for commercial use, development of low NOx burner is strongly requested. In this paper, newly developed low NOx burner as well as the high performance honeycomb regenerator is explained. Also, theoretical and numerical analysis of fuel saving by the high preheated air combustion is discussed.

  8. Pulse combustion technology for heating applications. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, F.W.; Clinch, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research program is to develop and expand the technology base for fossil-fuel-fired pulse combustion heating systems. A major goal is to develop design data and design procedures for pulse combustion burners. This design capability will contribute to the accelerated industrial development of cost-effective, high-efficiency systems for a variety of heating applications.

  9. Pulse-combustion deep fat fryer, Phase 2. Final report, December 1983-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A pulse-combustion burner system was developed that met both efficiency and cooking-performance goals. Work involved modifications to the pulse-combustion deep fat fryer to reduce the sound level, eliminate vibrations, and ensure reliable ignition. Field testing in a major fast-food restaurant chain was initiated, demonstrating that the pulse fryer is reliable and acceptable.

  10. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  11. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  12. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  13. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  14. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... stationary combustion turbine? 60.4305 Section 60.4305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... my stationary combustion turbine? (a) If you are the owner or operator of a stationary...

  15. High-heat transfer low-NO.sub.x combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Abbasi, Hamid A.; Hobson, Jr., William J.; Rue, David M.; Smirnov, Valeriy

    2005-09-06

    A combustion apparatus comprising a pre-combustor stage and a primary combustion stage, the pre-combustor stage having two co-axial cylinders, one for oxidant and one for fuel gas, in which the fuel gas is preheated and the primary combustion stage having rectangular co-axial passages through which fuel and oxidant are admitted into a refractory burner block. Both passages converge in the vertical plane and diverge in the horizontal plane. The passage through the refractory burner block also has a rectangular profile and diverges in the horizontal plane. The outlets to the primary combustion stage are recessed in the refractory burner block at a distance which may be varied.

  16. Innovative technology for a cost-effective land rig

    SciTech Connect

    Mehra, S.; Bryce, T.

    1996-05-01

    Sedco Forex has recently completed a new land drilling rig, currently deployed in Gabon, that integrates well construction activities with multiskilling to create cost savings across the board in drilling operations. Historically, operators have produced a comprehensive tender package specifying strictly the type and size of individual rig components and the number of personnel required to drill. In this case, the drilling contractor provides a fit-for-purpose rig, consistent with field location, well profile, operator`s priorities, and local constraints.

  17. Combustion of dense streams of coal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Annamalai, K.

    1992-04-14

    Research on coal combustion continued. Activities during November 29, 1991 to February 28, 1992 includes: Further analytical results on char array combustion and internal ignition of porous char; preliminary runs using a flat flame burner have been made and a blue flat flame has been obtained; a CID camera, EPIX frame grabber and software, Sony monitor and a 486 Computer to handle image processing frame by frame have been acquired; a new coal feeder has been constructed for feeding through the flat flame burner. Coal experiments have not yet been conducted. Coal samples from Penn State Coal Bank were also acquired for use in the experiments. They include bituminous and subbituminous coals of differing VM.

  18. Emissions from gas fired agricultural burners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of the Federal Clean Air Act, the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD) began defining Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for NOx emissions from cotton gin drying system gas fired burners in its jurisdiction. The NOx emission levels of conventionally used...

  19. Analytical model of nonlinear thermo-acoustic effects in a matrix burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, Maria A.

    2013-08-01

    This paper considers a fundamental thermo-acoustic test rig developed by Noiray (Linear and Nonlinear Analysis of Combustion Instabilities, Application to Multipoint Injection Systems and Control Strategies", Ph.D. Thesis, École Centrale Paris, 2007) and models it with an entirely analytical approach. The measured flame describing function is represented by a surprisingly simple time-lag law, which is then used to derive the governing equation for a single acoustic mode in the test rig. This equation turns out to be that of a harmonic oscillator with a damping/amplification coefficient that depends on the velocity amplitude. On this basis we find analytically the pattern of the oscillation regimes in parameter space, in particular the frequency and amplitude of limit cycles at various tube lengths. There is good qualitative agreement with some, but not all, features of Noiray's observations.

  20. Characterization of Liquid Fuel Evaporation of a Lifted Methanol Spray Flame in a Vitiated Coflow Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabra, Ricardo; Dibble, Robert W.; Chen, Jyh-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation of lifted spray flames in a coflow of hot, vitiated gases is presented. The vitiated coflow burner is a spray flame that issues into a coaxial flow of hot combustion products from a lean, premixed H2/Air flame. The spray flame in a vitiated coflow emulates the combustion that occurs in many advanced combustors without the detailed fluid mechanics. Two commercially available laser diagnostic systems are used to characterize the spray flame and to demonstrate the vitiated coflow burner's amenability to optical investigation. The Ensemble Particle Concentration and Size (EPCS) system is used to measure the path-average droplet size distribution and liquid volume fraction at several axial locations while an extractive probe instrument named the Real-time Fuel-air Analyzer (RFA) is used to measure the air to fuel ratio downstream of the spray nozzle with high temporal and spatial resolution. The effect of coflow conditions (stoichiometry) and dilution of the fuel with water was studied with the EPCS optical system. As expected, results show that water retards the evaporation and combustion of fuels. Measurements obtained by the RFA extractive probe show that while the Delavan manufactured nozzle does distribute the fuel over the manufacturer specified spray angle, it unfortunately does not distribute the fuel uniformly, providing conditions that may result in the production of unwanted NOx. Despite some limitations due to the inherent nature of the experimental techniques, the two diagnostics can be readily applied to spray flames in the vitiated coflow environment.

  1. Effect of hydrogen injection stability and emissions of an experimental premixed prevaporized propane burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen in quantities up to 5 percent by weight of the total fuel flow was injected into a premixed propane burner. The hydrogen was either premixed with the propane and air upstream of the burner or introduced as a torch at the flameholder. Emissions of total nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbon are reported as are combustion efficiencies and lean blowout limits. To maintain at least 99 percent combustion efficiency at a 700 K inlet mixture temperature with no hydrogen added, it was necessary to burn with a propane equivalence ratio of 0.525. When 4 percent hydrogen was premixed with the propane and air, a combustion efficiency greater than 99 percent was recorded at a propane equivalence ratio of 0.425. The total nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions corresponding to these two conditions were 0.8 g NO2/kg equivalent propane and 0.44 g NO2/kg equivalent propane, respectively. The hydrogen torch did not reduce NOx emissions.

  2. Market assessment for the fan atomized oil burner

    SciTech Connect

    Westphalen, D.

    1996-07-01

    The market potential for the fan atomized burner (FAB) in water and space heating applications was examined. The major findings of the study are as follows. (1). The FAB`s low-input capability allows development of oil-fired room heaters and wall furnaces, a new market area for oil heat. (2). Among conventional oil-fired products, furnaces will benefit most from the burner`s low input capability due to (1) their quick delivery of heat and (2) their more prevalent use in warmer climates and smaller homes. (3). The greatest potential for increased product sales or oil sales exists in the use of the burner with new products (i.e., room heaters). Sales of boilers and direct-fired water heaters are not likely to increase with the use of the burner. (4). Acceptance of the burner will be dependent on proof of reliability. Proof of better reliability than conventional burners would accelerate acceptance.

  3. Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

    2006-05-09

    The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of

  4. CaO interaction in the staged combustion of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.; Merryman, E.L.; Rising, B.W.

    1983-12-19

    The LIMB (limestone injection multi-stage burner) process offers special potential for reducing NO/sub x/ and SO/sub x/ by at least 50 percent in coal combustion. This is to be accomplished by adding limestone with fuel and/or air in a low NO/sub x/ burner. This program has been directed to defining the chemistry and kinetics necessary to optimize sulfur capture in LIMB combustion. More specifically, this program has attempted to clarify the role of calcium sulfide in LIMB chemistry. When limestone is added in a staged burner, there is a strong possibility that under certain circumstances CaS is produced in the reducing (fuel-rich) zone of the burner. Since CaS is more stable than CaSO/sub 4/, this affords the opportunity to (1) operate the burner at a higher temperature, 2200 to 2500 F, (2) pass the CaS rapidly through the high temperature zone (before dissociation), and (3) complete the combustion in a lean (air-rich) region where the sulfur is finally retained in CaSO/sub 4/. For these reasons this program has concentrated on the high temperature chemistry and kinetics of CaS. To achieve the program objective, the program was divided into three tasks. These involved (1) a study of CaS formation, (2) a brief examination of CaS oxidation, and (3) a laboratory examination of the combustion of coal in the presence of CaO under first stage, fuel-rich conditions. In the most general sense, the study has shown that the formation of CaS in the reducing zones of the burner may be restricted by competing kinetics and thermodynamics. The addition of lime in LIMB will require special care to optimize the ability to capture sulfur. 36 references, 44 figures, 10 tables.

  5. Performance of High Temperature Air Combustion Boiler with Low NOx Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiromichi; Ito, Yoshihito; Tsuruta, Naoki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    Thermal performance in the experiments and three-dimensional numerical simulations for a high temperature air combustion boiler where fuel can be efficiently combusted by high temperature preheated air (800°C-1000°C) is examined. The boiler can burn not only natural gas but also low calorific gas (e. g. full gasification gas obtained from coal or wastes). In the boiler, four regenerative burners are installed. This boiler has new features that not only air but also gasification gas is heated up to 900°C, and combination of burners is switched every 15 seconds where two burners are used as inlets of fuel and air and the other two burners are used as outlets of exhaust gas. Natural gas and syngas obtained from coal are burned. The NOx emission for each fuel is less than 50ppm. The heat transfer of three-dimensional calculation is predicted higher than that of experiment.

  6. Experimental gas-fired pulse-combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomquist, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on a gas-fired, water-cooled, Helmholtz-type pulse combustion burner are discussed. In addition to the experimental work, information is presented on the evolution of pulse combustion, the types of pulse combustion burners and their applications, and the types of fuels used. Also included is a survey of other pertinent studies of gas-fired pulse combustion. The burner used in the Argonne research effort was equipped with adjustable air and gas flapper valves and was operated stably over a heat-input range of 30,000 to 200,000 Btu/h. The burner's overall heat transfer in the pulsating mode was 22 to 31% higher than when the unit was operated in the steady mode. Important phenomena discussed include (1) effects on performance produced by inserting a corebustor to change tailpipe diameter, (2) effects observed following addition of an air-inlet decoupling chamber to the unit, and (3) occurrence of carbon monoxide in the exhaust gas.

  7. Gas turbine combustion and emission control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetter, B.

    The fundamentals of combustion are discussed in the context of gaseous and liquid fuels and gas turbine fuels. Methods for reducing the emission of pollutants in gas turbines are considered. These emissions are carbon monoxide, unburnt hydrocarbons, smoke/soot, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and carbon dioxide. The focus is on nitrogen oxides. The general principles of combustor and burner design are considered: aero/can type combustors, silo combustors, and annular combustors. Premix and diffusion flames are discussed.

  8. Plasma enhancement of combustion of solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Askarova, A.S.; Karpenko, E.I.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B.

    2006-03-15

    Plasma fuel systems that increase the coal burning efficiency are discussed. The systems were tested for fuel oil-free startup of boilers and stabilizating a pulverized-coal flame in power-generating boilers equipped with different types of burner and burning all types of power-generating coal. Plasma ignition, thermochemical treatment of an air-fuel mixture prior to combustion, and its burning in a power-generating boiler were numerically simulated. Environmental friendliness of the plasma technology was demonstrated.

  9. On mathematical modelling of flameless combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Marco; Schwoeppe, Patrick; Weber, Roman; Orsino, Stefano

    2007-07-15

    A further analysis of the IFRF semi-industrial-scale experiments on flameless (mild) combustion of natural gas is carried out. The experimental burner features a strong oxidizer jet and two weak natural gas jets. Numerous publications have shown the inability of various RANS-based mathematical models to predict the structure of the weak jet. We have proven that the failure is in error predictions of the entrainment and therefore is not related to any chemistry submodels, as has been postulated. (author)

  10. Fluidized-bed calciner with combustion nozzle and shroud

    DOEpatents

    Wielang, Joseph A.; Palmer, William B.; Kerr, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A nozzle employed as a burner within a fluidized bed is coaxially enclosed within a tubular shroud that extends beyond the nozzle length into the fluidized bed. The open-ended shroud portion beyond the nozzle end provides an antechamber for mixture and combustion of atomized fuel with an oxygen-containing gas. The arrangement provides improved combustion efficiency and excludes bed particles from the high-velocity, high-temperature portions of the flame to reduce particle attrition.

  11. COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS FOR O2 ENRICHED, LOW NOx BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer L. Sinclair

    2001-09-30

    Over the past year, the hot flow studies have focused on the validation of a novel 2M near-flame combustion furnace. The 2M furnace was specifically designed to investigate burner aerodynamics and flame stability phenomena. Key accomplishments include completion of coal & oxygen mass balance calculations and derivation of emission conversion equations, upgrade of furnace equipment and flame safety systems, shakedown testing and partial completion of a parametric flame stability study. These activities are described in detail below along with a description of the 2M furnace and support systems.

  12. Exploiting by combustion for secondary products resulting from metallurgical coke-processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ioana, A.; Gaba, A.; Paunescu, L.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes the design, operation, and performance of a coke-gas burner that is capable of mitigating flow blockage of the gas to the burner when coal tars are present in the coke oven gas. This is accomplished by a flow-limiting nozzle and a three-staged combustion air flame stabilizer. A prototype was constructed and field tested on chamber furnaces at the Maintenance-Forge-Section, SIDEX-Galati.

  13. Component Development to Accelerate Commercial Implementation of Ultra-Low Emissions Catalytic Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Jon; Berry, Brian; Lundberg, Kare; Anson, Orris

    2003-03-31

    This final report describes a 2000-2003 program for the development of components and processes to enhance the commercialization of ultra-low emissions catalytic combustion in industrial gas turbines. The range of project tasks includes: development of more durable, lower-cost catalysts and catalytic combustor components; development and design of a catalytic pre-burner and a catalytic pilot burner for gas turbines, and on-site fuel conversion processing for utilization of liquid fuel.

  14. A pore scale study on turbulent combustion in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouybari, N. F.; Maerefat, M.; Nimvari, M. E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents pore scale simulation of turbulent combustion of air/methane mixture in porous media to investigate the effects of multidimensionality and turbulence on the flame within the pores of porous media. In order to investigate combustion in the pores of porous medium, a simple but often used porous medium consisting of a staggered arrangement of square cylinders is considered in the present study. Results of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent viscosity ratio, temperature, flame speed, convective heat transfer and thermal conductivity are presented and compared for laminar and turbulent simulations. It is shown that the turbulent kinetic energy increases from the inlet of burner, because of turbulence created by the solid matrix with a sudden jump or reduction at the flame front due to increase in temperature and velocity. Also, the pore scale simulation revealed that the laminarization of flow occurs after flame front in the combustion zone and turbulence effects are important mainly in the preheat zone. It is shown that turbulence enhances the diffusion processes in the preheat zone, but it is not enough to affect the maximum flame speed, temperature distribution and convective heat transfer in the porous burner. The dimensionless parameters associated with the Borghi-Peters diagram of turbulent combustion have been analyzed for the case of combustion in porous media and it is found that the combustion in the porous burner considered in the present study concerns the range of well stirred reactor very close to the laminar flame region.

  15. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  16. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Davies

    2004-10-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activities during this reporting period were the continuation of test section detail design and developing specifications for auxiliary systems and facilities.

  17. 46 CFR 162.050-17 - Separator test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Separator test rig. 162.050-17 Section 162.050-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment § 162.050-17 Separator test rig. (a) This section...

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Investigation of Sensitivity of Furnace Operational Conditions to Burner Flow Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Cremer; Dave Wang; Connie Senior; Andrew Chiodo; Steven Hardy; Paul Wolff

    2005-07-01

    This is the Final Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-02NT41580. The goal of this project was to systematically assess the sensitivity of furnace operational conditions to burner air and fuel flows in coal fired utility boilers. The focus of this project was to quantify the potential impacts of ''fine level'' controls rather than that of ''coarse level'' controls (i.e. combustion tuning). Although it is well accepted that combustion tuning will generally improve efficiency and emissions of an ''out of tune'' boiler, it is not as well understood what benefits can be derived through active multiburner measurement and control systems in boiler that has coarse level controls. The approach used here was to utilize existing baseline furnace models that have been constructed using Reaction Engineering International's (REI) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Using CFD analyses provides the ability to carry out a carefully controlled virtual experiment to characterize the sensitivity of NOx emissions, unburned carbon (UBC), furnace exit CO (FECO), furnace exit temperature (FEGT), and waterwall deposition to burner air and fuel flow rates. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided co-funding for this program, and instrument and controls experts from EPRI's Instrument and Controls (I&C) Center have been active participants in this project. CFD simulations were completed for five coal fired boilers as planned: (1) 150 MW wall fired, (2) 500 MW opposed wall fired, (3) 600 MW T-Fired, (4) 330 MW cyclone-fired, and (5) 200 MW T-Fired Twin Furnace. In all cases, the unit selections were made in order to represent units that were descriptive of the utility industry as a whole. For each unit, between 25 and 44 furnace simulations were completed in order to evaluate impacts of burner to burner variations in: (1) coal and primary air flow rate, and (2) secondary air flow rate. The parametric matrices of cases that were completed were

  19. A scaled roller test rig for high-speed vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allotta, Benedetto; Pugi, Luca; Malvezzi, Monica; Bartolini, Fabio; Cangioli, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Scaled roller rigs are quite widespread among railway research centres, and several examples are described in the literature. Due to their low costs and ease of use compared with full-scale counterparts, these types of rigs are used for a wide range of studies concerning dynamical stability, comfort, mechatronic subsystem and wear. Furthermore, scaled roller rigs can be a powerful education tool for railway engineering students. In this paper, the design and the main features of the scaled rolled rig that will be installed in the Mechatronics and Dynamic Modeling Laboratory of the University of Florence located in Pistoia, Italy, are described. The main feature of the proposed rig will be the simulation of degraded adhesion conditions. This feature is very important for hardware-in-the loop testing of many safety relevant on-board subsystems like wheel slide protection systems, traction and stability controls, odometry and automatic train protection and control.

  20. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  1. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  2. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  3. Instability in hydraulic machines demonstration rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.; Braun, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    In fluid flow machines, the working fluid involved in rotative motion due to shaft rotation significantly modifies the rotor synchronous response. This can result in the rotor maintaining the high vibration amplitude that occurs at resonance over an extended rotative speed range. The phase changes in this range are typically very small. The fluid may also create rotor instability, i.e., subsynchronous self-excited vibrations, when the rotative speed is sufficiently high. This rotor instability is often related and increases with higher rotor unbalance (Opposite to other types of instability such as oil whirl/whip, internal friction, etc.). The rotor rig demonstrates typical dynamic behavior of hydraulic machines. At lower speeds the effect of amplitude/phase mentioned above is noticeable; at higher speeds the subsynchronous instability occurs.

  4. PULSE DRYING EXPERIMENT AND BURNER CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Robert States

    2006-07-15

    Non steady impingement heat transfer is measured. Impingement heating consumes 130 T-BTU/Yr in paper drying, but is only 25% thermally efficient. Pulse impingement is experimentally shown to enhance heat transfer by 2.8, and may deliver thermal efficiencies near 85%. Experimental results uncovered heat transfer deviations from steady theory and from previous investigators, indicating the need for further study and a better theoretical framework. The pulse burner is described, and its roll in pulse impingement is analyzed.

  5. Field testing the prototype BNL fan-atomized oil burner

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Celebi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    BNL has developed a new oil burner design referred to as the Fan Atomized burner System. The primary objective of the field study was to evaluate and demonstrate the reliable operation of the Fan Atomized Burner. The secondary objective was to establish and validate the ability of a low firing rate burner (0.3-0.4 gph) to fully satisfy the heating and domestic hot water load demands of an average household in a climate zone with over 5,000 heating-degree-days. The field activity was also used to evaluate the practicality of side-wall venting with the Fan Atomized Burner with a low stack temperature (300F) and illustrate the potential for very high efficiency with an integrated heating system approach based on the Fan Atomized Burner.

  6. Oxy-coal Combustion Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.; Eddings, E.; Lighty, J.; Ring, T.; Smith, P.; Thornock, J.; Y Jia, W. Morris; Pedel, J.; Rezeai, D.; Wang, L.; Zhang, J.; Kelly, K.

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this project is to move toward the development of a predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. This validation research brings together multi-scale experimental measurements and computer simulations. The combination of simulation development and validation experiments is designed to lead to predictive tools for the performance of existing air fired pulverized coal boilers that have been retrofitted to various oxy-firing configurations. In addition, this report also describes novel research results related to oxy-combustion in circulating fluidized beds. For pulverized coal combustion configurations, particular attention is focused on the effect of oxy-firing on ignition and coal-flame stability, and on the subsequent partitioning mechanisms of the ash aerosol.

  7. Emissions Measurements from a Lobed Fuel Injector/Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. G.; Smith, L. L.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.

    1998-01-01

    The present experimental study examines NO(x) and CO emissions associated with alternative fuel injector geometries. These injectors mix fuel and air to differing extents and thus create different local equivalence ratios upstream of flame ignition and stabilization. Two of the devices studied are lobed fuel injectors, in which mixing of reactants is associated with stream wise vorticity generation and straining of fuel-air interfaces, while the third is a non-lobed fuel injector which creates relatively little fuel-air mixing prior to ignition.Results show that one lobed injector geometry appears to produce locally lean premixed flame structures, resulting in low NO. emissions when compared with non-lobed injector emissions. The other lobed injector geometry appears to produce a local fuel-air mixture which is closer to stoichiometric conditions, with NO(x) emissions that are actually higher than for the non-lobed injector. For both lobed injector geometries examined here, CO emissions become high for over-all lean operating conditions, consistent with premixed combustion behavior. The present study demonstrates the importance of control of the local equivalence ratio in minimizing burner emissions.

  8. Performance of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor. Task 2, Pilot scale combustion tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toqan, M.A.; Paloposki, T.; Yu, T.; Teare, J.D.; Beer, J.M.

    1989-12-01

    Under contract from DOE-PETC, Combustion Engineering, Inc. undertook the lead-role in a multi-task R&D program aimed at development of a new burner system for coal-based fuels; the goal was that this burner system should be capable of being retrofitted in oil- or gas-fired industrial boilers, or usable in new units. In the first phase of this program a high efficiency advanced coal combustor was designed jointly by CE and MIT. Its burner is of the multiannular design with a fixed shrouded swirler in the center immediately surrounding the atomizer gun to provide the ``primary act,`` and three further annuli for the supply of the ``secondary air.`` The degree of rotation (swirl) in the secondary air is variable. The split of the combustion air into primary and secondary air flows serves the purpose of flame stabilization and combustion staging, the latter to reduce NO{sub x} formation.

  9. Evaluation of a high-temperature burner-duct-recuperator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R and D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. OIT has funded a multiyear R and D project by the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) to design, fabricate, field test, and evaluate a high-temperature burner-duct-recuperator (HTBDR) system. This ceramic-based recuperator system recovers waste heat from the corrosive, high-temperature (2170 F) flue gas stream of a steel soaking pit to preheat combustion air to as high as 1700 F. The preheated air is supplied to a high-temperature burner. The B and W R and D program, which is now complete, involved several activities, including selecting and evaluating ceramic materials, designing the system, and developing and evaluating the prototype. In addition, a full-scale unit was tested at a B and W steel soaking pit. The full-scale system consisted of a modular single-stage ceramic recuperator, a conventional two-pass metallic recuperator, a high-temperature burner, fans, insulated ducting, and associated controls and instrumentation. The metallic recuperator preheated combustion air to about 750 F before it passed to the ceramic module. This technical case study describes the DOE/B and W recuperator project and highlights the field tests of the full-scale recuperator system. The document makes results of field tests and data analysis available to other researchers and private industry. It discusses project status, summarizes field tests, and reviews the potential effects the technology will have on energy use and system economics.

  10. Industrial burner modeling: Final report for the CIEE

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1994-12-01

    The COYOTE computer program was used as basis for a comprehensive numerical model of industrial burners. This program is based on the full multicomponent Navier-Stokes equations and includes a subgrid-scale turbulence model. The model was used to simulate the flows in a laboratory-scale burner being studied experimentally at UC-Irvine. We summarize what has been learned in the last 3 years from simulations of this burner. This model provides detailed information about the flow field in the furnace, making it a useful tool for studying the physics of burners.

  11. A heated chamber burner for atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venghiattis, A A

    1968-07-01

    A new heated chamber burner is described. The burner is of the premixed type, and burner heads of the types conventionally used in atomic absorption may be readily adapted to it. This new sampling system has been tested for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti, and Zn in aqueous solutions. An improvement of the order of ten times has been obtained in sensitivity, and in detection limits as well, for the elements determined. Interferences controllable are somewhat more severe than in conventional burners but are controllable. PMID:20068792

  12. Large eddy simulation modelling of combustion for propulsion applications.

    PubMed

    Fureby, C

    2009-07-28

    Predictive modelling of turbulent combustion is important for the development of air-breathing engines, internal combustion engines, furnaces and for power generation. Significant advances in modelling non-reactive turbulent flows are now possible with the development of large eddy simulation (LES), in which the large energetic scales of the flow are resolved on the grid while modelling the effects of the small scales. Here, we discuss the use of combustion LES in predictive modelling of propulsion applications such as gas turbine, ramjet and scramjet engines. The LES models used are described in some detail and are validated against laboratory data-of which results from two cases are presented. These validated LES models are then applied to an annular multi-burner gas turbine combustor and a simplified scramjet combustor, for which some additional experimental data are available. For these cases, good agreement with the available reference data is obtained, and the LES predictions are used to elucidate the flow physics in such devices to further enhance our knowledge of these propulsion systems. Particular attention is focused on the influence of the combustion chemistry, turbulence-chemistry interaction, self-ignition, flame holding burner-to-burner interactions and combustion oscillations. PMID:19531515

  13. A low emission technology -- low cost coal water mixture fired fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Jianhua Yan; Xuguang Jiang; Yong Chi

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, low cost coal water mixture (CWM) FBC technology is described. Low cost CWM may be coal washery sludge or the mixture of water and coal crashed easily. This technology is featured by agglomerate combustion of low cost MM. Experimental results in 0.5MW FBC test rig are reported. lie effects of bed temperate excess air, staged combustion on combustion and emission performance has been studied. The comparison combustion tests by using dry coal and CWM we made ha 0.5MW FBC test rig. Also coal washery sludge of different origins are also tested in the test rig. Based on the test rig comments a demonstration AFBC boiler with capacity of 35 T/H steam for utility application (6 MW) is designed. The design features will be presented in this paper Both the operation experience of test rig and demonstration unit show the developed low cost CWM FBC technology is of high combustion efficiency and low emission. This technology is being commercialized and applied in China in top priority by Chinese government.

  14. Task 2—Materials for Advanced Boiler and Oxy-combustion Systems (NETL-US),” a

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb

    2010-05-01

    Develop a method for determining the solubility of protective oxides (Fe2O3, Cr2O3 and NiO) in an ash exposed at a particular temperature and gas composition. Metal oxide powder (Cr2O3 and NiO) will be mixed with a synthetic ash, milled for complete mixing, exposed at a variety of exposure times, and removed for analysis. • A decision will be made based on the results on to going further with the next tasks. • Perform the solubility tests on synthetic ashes and ashes collected from various oxyfuel burner rigs. • Correlate the solubility with long term corrosion tests and variables from the b i 4 burner rig tests.

  15. Development of high temperature air combustion technology in pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Zhang; Guangxi Yue; Junfu Lu; Zhen Jia; Jiangxiong Mao; Toshiro Fujimori; Toshiyuki Suko; Takashi Kiga

    2007-07-01

    High temperature air combustion (HTAC) is a promising technology for energy saving, flame stability enhancement and NOx emission reduction. In a conventional HTAC system, the combustion air is highly preheated by using the recuperative or regenerative heat exchangers. However, such a preheating process is difficult to implement for pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers. In this paper, an alternative approach is proposed. In the proposed HTAC system, a special burner, named PRP burner is introduced to fulfill the preheating process. The PRP burner has a preheating chamber with one end connected with the primary air and the other end opened to the furnace. Inside the chamber, gas recirculation is effectively established such that hot flue gases in the furnace can be introduced. Combustible mixture instead of combustion air is highly preheated by the PRP burner. A series of experiments have been conducted in an industrial scale test facility, burning low volatile petroleum coke and an anthracite coal. Stable combustion was established for burning pure petroleum coke and anthracite coal, respectively. Inside the preheating chamber, the combustible mixture was rapidly heated up to a high temperature level close to that of the hot secondary air used in the conventional HTAC system. The rapid heating of the combustible mixture in the chamber facilitates pyrolysis, volatile matter release processes for the fuel particles, suppressing ignition delay and enhancing combustion stability. Moreover, compared with the results measured in the same facility but with a conventional low NOx burner, NOx concentration at the furnace exit was at the same level when petroleum coke was burnt and 50% less when anthracite was burnt. Practicability of the HTAC technology using the proposed approach was confirmed for efficiently and cleanly burning fossil fuels. 16 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Demonstration of a steam jet scrubber off-gas system and the burner efficiency of a mixed waste incinerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, H; Charlesworth, D L

    1988-01-01

    A full-scale incinerator system, the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF), is being designed to process solid and liquid low-level radioactive, mixed, and RCRA hazardous waste. This facility will consist of a rotary kiln, secondary combustion chamber (SCC), and a wet off-gas system. A prototype steam jet scrubber off-gas system has been tested to verify design assumptions for the CIF. The scrubber wastewater will be immobilized in a cement matrix after the blowdown has been concentrated to a maximum solids concentration in a cross-flow filtration system. A sintered metal inertial filter system has been successfully tested. Burner efficiency was tested in a high intensity vortex burner, which destroyed the hazardous waste streams tested.

  17. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  18. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  19. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  20. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  1. 14. FACILITY IDENTIFICATION STENCILED ON ROOF BEAM, 'RIGGING LOFT' PORTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. FACILITY IDENTIFICATION STENCILED ON ROOF BEAM, 'RIGGING LOFT' PORTION OF BUILDING 4. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Public Works Shop, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  2. 3. EASTERN VIEW OF HOISTING RIG FOR OXYGEN LANCES ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EASTERN VIEW OF HOISTING RIG FOR OXYGEN LANCES ON THE FLUX STORAGE FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  3. 24. CARRIAGE DRIVE, CARRIAGE, HEAD RIG LOOKING WEST FROM INTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CARRIAGE DRIVE, CARRIAGE, HEAD RIG LOOKING WEST FROM INTERIOR OF MAIN BUILDING. NOTE CABLE DRIVE DRUM AND FLY WHEELS OF CARRIAGE DRIVE STEAM ENGINE IN FOREGROUND. - Hull-Oakes Lumber Company, 23837 Dawson Road, Monroe, Benton County, OR

  4. 28. Photocopied 1973 from The Rig & Reel Magazine, (March, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopied 1973 from The Rig & Reel Magazine, (March, 1923) p. 2. INTERIOR OF CENTRAL POWERHOUSE AT VOLCANO - NOW DISMANTLED. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  5. 27. Photocopied 1973 from The Rig & Reel Magazine, (March, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopied 1973 from The Rig & Reel Magazine, (March, 1923) p. 5. EARLIER ENDLESS-WIRE TRANSMISSION NOW IN RUINS. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  6. 26. Photocopied 1973 from The Rig & Reel Magazine, (March, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopied 1973 from The Rig & Reel Magazine, (March, 1923) p. 1. TYPICAL WELL HOOK-UP. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  7. Regenerative Fuel Cell Test Rig at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Bents, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell development effort at Glenn Research Center (GRC) involves the integration of a dedicated fuel cell and electrolyzer into an energy storage system test rig. The test rig consists of a fuel cell stack, an electrolysis stack, cooling pumps, a water transfer pump, gas recirculation pumps, phase separators, storage tanks for oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2), heat exchangers, isolation valves, pressure regulators, interconnecting tubing, nitrogen purge provisions, and instrumentation for control and monitoring purposes. The regenerative fuel cell (RFC) thus formed is a completely closed system which is capable of autonomous cyclic operation. The test rig provides direct current (DC) load and DC power supply to simulate power consumption and solar power input. In addition, chillers are used as the heat sink to dissipate the waste heat from the electrochemical stack operation. Various vents and nitrogen (N2) sources are included in case inert purging is necessary to safe the RFC test rig.

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center High Speed Turbopump Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Moore, Chip; Thom, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a unique test rig that is used to test and develop rolling element bearings used in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. The tester is unique in that it uses liquid hydrogen as the coolant for the bearings. This test rig can simulate speeds and loads experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps. With internal modifications, the tester can be used for evaluating fluid film, hydrostatic, and foil bearing designs. At the present time, the test rig is configured to run two ball bearings or a ball and roller bearing, both with a hydrostatic bearing. The rig is being used to evaluate the lifetimes of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride rolling elements and steel races.

  9. Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew; Kurkov, Anatole; Mehmed, Oral; Johnson, Dexter; Montague, Gerald; Duffy, Kirsten; Jansen, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    The Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig is an apparatus for vibration testing of turbomachine blades in a vacuum at rotational speeds from 0 to 40,000 rpm. This rig includes (1) a vertically oriented shaft on which is mounted an assembly comprising a rotor holding the blades to be tested, (2) two actively controlled heteropolar radial magnetic bearings at opposite ends of the shaft, and (3) an actively controlled magnetic thrust bearing at the upper end of the shaft. This rig is a more capable successor to a prior apparatus, denoted the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR), that included a vertically oriented shaft with a mechanical thrust bearing at the upper end and a single actively controlled heteropolar radial magnetic bearing at the lower end.

  10. Multilateral installation from a floating rig

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Troll Olje gas province is approximately 100 km northwest of Bergen, Norway, in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea at a water depth of approximately 315 to 340 m. Troll Olje is part of the Troll gas field, where Norsk Hydro is responsible for developing two areas with thin oil rims. Before spudding the multilateral well described in this paper, 17 wells had been drilled and completed in the Troll Olje oil province. The multilateral-well concept was introduced in the gas province primarily to increase the drainage area for each well. When producing from two separate laterals, a lower drawdown pressure exists throughout the horizontal section. Therefore, gas coning is less likely to occur, and higher production rates can be sustained for a longer period of time. In addition, cost savings are substantial because of reduced well-construction time for each horizontal reservoir-drainage section and because of the reduced number of completion strings, subsea wellheads, and pipelines required for total field development. The full-length paper details design, development, testing, and installation of the first successful multilateral well installed from a floating rig offshore Norway. The paper gives a synopsis.

  11. Combined Heat and Power Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    This factsheet describes a project that will seamlessly integrate a gas-fired simple-cycle 100 kWe microturbine with a new ultra-low NOx gas-fired burner to develop a CHP assembly called the Boiler Burner Energy System Technology.

  12. The role of a burner head choke in NOx reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, A.; Christenson, D.L.

    1997-07-01

    The emission of NOx and CO from flames of burners are a major nuisance for the boiler and burner industry. The current EPA legislation have restricted the emissions of NOx and CO from natural gas commercial burners to 30 ppm (25 ppm in Southern California) and 200 ppm, corrected to 3% O{sub 2}, respectively. The recent experiments performed at the authors` laboratory on low NOx gas burners in a 1 MW refractory steam generator have shown that significant improvement in NOx emissions, without increasing CO, is possible by mounting a converging cone (choke) on the head of a conventional gas burner. A burner mounted with a choke produces up to 405 less NOx than a burner without a choke. The oxides of nitrogen could be further reduced to meet the EPA requirements by using Steam Injection (SI) or external Flue Gas Recirculation(FGR). Due to the already low levels of NOx emission with a choked burner, very little amount of SI or FGR is needed. The flue gas composition at different excess air levels and varying equivalence ratios are plotted. The effect of NOx emission on the amount of FGR and SI is also shown.

  13. Low NOx gas burner apparatus and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.E.; Napier, S.O.; Jones, A.P.

    1993-08-24

    An improved gas burner apparatus is described for discharging a mixture of fuel gas and air into a furnace space wherein said mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO[sub x] content are formed therefrom comprising: a housing having an open end attached to said furnace space; means for introducing a controlled flow rate of said air into said housing attached thereto; a refractory burner tile attached to the open end of said housing having a base portion, an opening formed in said base portion for allowing air to pass there through and having a wall portion surrounding said opening which extends into said furnace space, the exterior sides of said wall portion being slanted towards said opening and the interior sides thereof being spaced from the periphery of said opening whereby a ledge is provided within the interior of said wall portion; at least one passage formed in said burner tile for conducting primary fuel gas and flue gases from the exterior of said wall portion to the interior thereof; means for forming a fuel gas jet in said passage and drawing flue gases there through adapted to be connected to a source of fuel gas and positioned with respect to said passage whereby a mixture of primary fuel gas and flue gases from said furnace space is discharged from said passage to within the interior of said wall portion; and at least one nozzle adapted to be connected to a source of fuel gas positioned outside said wall portion of said burner tile adjacent the intersection of an exterior slanted side of said wall portion with the surface of said base portion for discharging secondary fuel gas adjacent said external slanted side of said wall portion whereby said secondary fuel gas mixes with flue gases and air in said furnace space. A method is also described for discharging a mixture of fuel gas and air into a furnace space wherein said mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO[sub x] content are formed therefrom.

  14. Development of the Radiation Stabilized Distributed Flux Burner, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, A.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1997-06-01

    This report covers progress made during Phase 2 of a three-phase DOE-sponsored project to develop and demonstrate the Radiation Stabilized Distributed Flux burner (also referred to as the Radiation Stabilized Burner, or RSB) for use in industrial watertube boilers and process heaters. The goal of the DOE-sponsored work is to demonstrate an industrial boiler burner with NOx emissions below 9 ppm and CO emissions below 50 ppm (corrected to 3% stack oxygen). To be commercially successful, these very low levels of NOx and CO must be achievable without significantly affecting other measures of burner performance such as reliability, turndown, and thermal efficiency. Phase 1 of the project demonstrated that sub-9 ppm NOx emissions and sub-50 ppm CO emissions (corrected to 3% oxygen) could be achieved with the RSB in a 3 million Btu/Hr laboratory boiler using several methods of NOx reduction. The RSB was also tested in a 60 million Btu/hr steam generator used by Chevron for Thermally Enhanced Oil Recovery (TEOR). In the larger scale tests, fuel staging was demonstrated, with the RSB consistently achieving sub-20 ppm NOx and as low as 10 ppm NOx. Large-scale steam generator tests also demonstrated that flue gas recirculation (FGR) provided a more predictable and reliable method of achieving sub-9 ppm NOx levels. Based on the results of tests at San Francisco Thermal and Chevron, the near-term approach selected by Alzeta for achieving low NOx is to use FGR. This decision was based on a number of factors, with the most important being that FGR has proved to be an easier approach to transfer to different facilities and boiler designs. In addition, staging has proved difficult to implement in a way that allows good combustion and emissions performance in a fully modulating system. In Phase 3 of the project, the RSB will be demonstrated as a very low emissions burner product suitable for continuous operation in a commercial installation. As such, the Phase 3 field demonstration

  15. Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65

  16. Multi-Axis Gimble Rig in AWT with Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Multi-Axis Space Test Inertia Facility (MASTIF) also known as the Gimbal Rig in Altitude Wind Tunnel (AWT) with pilot during Project Mercury. The Gimbal Rig was used to train astronauts how to pull the space capsule out of a potentially dangerous spin and regain control of the spacecraft. And boy, doesn't it look like fun?! The training and tests were run at the Altitude Wind Tunnel at Lewis Research Center, now John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  17. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-01-01

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program initiated this quarter, provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principle activity during this first reporting period were preparing for and conducting a project kick-off meeting, working through plans for the project implementation, and beginning the conceptual design of the test section.

  18. Rig Rover System views wellhead from every angle

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    The Rig Rover System (RRS), a new type of submersible remotely operated vehicle (ROV), has been introduced by Deep Ocean Technology, Oakland, California. It is described as a sophisticated wellhead TV with remote controlled arms, or a remotely controlled vehicle that is deployed like a wellhead TV. The RRS is available in 2 models. Rig Rover was designed specifically to support offshore exploration drilling to 2000 ft. of water.

  19. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  20. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  1. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  2. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  3. Transient change in the shape of premixed burner flame with the superposition of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaima, Kazunori; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the transient phenomena in a premixed burner flame with the superposition of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The length of the flame was shortened by the superposition of DBD, indicating the activation of combustion chemical reactions with the help of the plasma. In addition, we observed the modulation of the top position of the unburned gas region and the formations of local minimums in the axial distribution of the optical emission intensity of OH. These experimental results reveal the oscillation of the rates of combustion chemical reactions as a response to the activation by pulsed DBD. The cycle of the oscillation was 0.18–0.2 ms, which could be understood as the eigenfrequency of the plasma-assisted combustion reaction system.

  4. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen, and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. The paper presents: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions; (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  5. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. Presented are: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions: (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  6. Simulation of 0.3 MWt AFBC test rig burning Turkish lignites

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk, N.; Degirmenci, E.; Oymak, O.

    1997-12-31

    A system model coupling bed and freeboard models for continuous combustion of lignite particles of wide size distribution burning in their own ash in a fluidized bed combustor was modified to incorporate: (1) a procedure for faster computation of particle size distributions (PSDs) without any sacrifice in accuracy; (2) energy balance on char particles for the determination of variation of temperature with particle size, (3) plug flow assumption for the interstitial gas. An efficient and accurate computer code developed for the solution of the conservation equations for energy and chemical species was applied to the prediction of the behavior of a 0.3 MWt AFBC test rig burning low quality Turkish lignites. The construction and operation of the test rig was carried out within the scope of a cooperation agreement between Middle East Technical University (METU) and Babcock and Wilcox GAMA (BWG) under the auspices of Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). Predicted concentration and temperature profiles and particle size distributions of solid streams were compared with measured data and found to be in reasonable agreement. The computer code replaces the conventional numerical integration of the analytical solution of population balance with direct integration in ODE form by using a powerful integrator LSODE (Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations) resulting in two orders of magnitude decrease in CPU (Central Processing Unit) time.

  7. An advanced combustion research facility for validating computational fluid dynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, J. B.; Hurley, C. D.; Eccles, N. C.

    1991-12-01

    The Sector Combustion Rig (SCR), built to obtain experimental data which could be used to verify computational fluid dynamic programs and to investigate the formation and consumption of combustion products through a combustor, is described. This rig was designed to accommodate sectors of full size engine combustion chambers and to test them at real or simulated engine operating conditions. Changes made to improve the operating, measurement, and data handling capabilities of the rig as a result of experience from several years of operations are described together with some of the features which contribute to the uniqueness of the SCR. The SCR gas analysis system and instrumentation are described. Extracts from some results obtained during a recent program of tests on a Rolls-Royce RB211 combustor are given.

  8. Advanced oil burner for residential heating -- development report

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The development of advanced oil burner concepts has long been a part of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) oil heat research program. Generally, goals of this work include: increased system efficiency, reduced emissions of soot and NO{sub x}, and the practical extension of the firing rate range of current burners to lower input rates. The report describes the results of a project at BNL aimed at the development of air atomized burners. Two concepts are discussed. The first is an air atomizer which uses air supplied at pressures ranging from 10 to 20 psi and requiring the integration of an air compressor in the system. The second, more novel, approach involves the use of a low-pressure air atomizing nozzle which requires only 8-14 inches of water air pressure for fuel atomization. This second approach requires the use of a fan in the burner instead of a compressor although the fan pressure is higher than with conventional, pressure atomized retention head burners. In testing the first concept, high pressure air atomization, a conventional retention head burner was modified to accept the new nozzle. In addition, the burner head was modified to reduce the flow area to maintain roughly 1 inch of water pressure drop across the head at a firing rate of 0.25 gallons of oil per hour. The burner ignited easily and could be operated at low excess air levels without smoke. The major disadvantage of this burner approach is the need for the air compressor as part of the system. In evaluating options, a vane-type compressor was selected although the use of a compressor of this type will lead to increased burner maintenance requirements.

  9. PROCEEDINGS: 1987 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL. HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON MARCH 23-26, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings document the 1987 Joint (EPA and EPRI) Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 23-26, 1987 in New Orleans, LA. The 49 presentations covered: low NOx combustion developments (e.g., reburning and burner design modifications); coal-, oil...

  10. Vapour phase details in the oscillatory combustion of propellants A porous plate analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.; Magiawala, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    A perforated porous plate burner is designed to scale up the vapor phase details in composite propellant combustion. A fuel vapor is passed through the pores and an oxidizer vapor is passed through the discrete perforations drilled in the plate. Discussion of the scale modeling of the vapor phase details in oscillatory combustion of composite propellants leads to the following conclusions: (1) the concept of a perforated porous plate analog for the composite propellant vapor phase combustion appears to be valid during oscillatory combustion as well; (2) the flame standoff distance can be conveniently determined with motion picture photography; (3) the flame standoff distance varies with the flow velocity during oscillatory combustion much the same way as during time-independent combustion; and (4) the overall structure of the combustion zone (flame) does not appear to vary too much from its time-independent structure during oscillatory combustion

  11. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    2005-09-30

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions

  12. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1997-10-31

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions

  13. Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric

  14. Combustion Stages of a Single Heavy Oil Droplet in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, M.; Xu, G.; Ikeda, K.; Honma, S.; Nagaishi, H.; Dietrich, D. L.; Struk, P. M.; Takeshita, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy oil is a common fuel for industrial furnaces, boilers, marines and diesel engines. Previous studies showed that the combustion of heavy oil involves not only the complete burning of volatile matters but also the burn-out of coke residues. Detailed knowledge about heavy oil combustion therefore requires an understanding of the different burning stages of heavy oil droplets in the burner. This in turn, demands knowledge about the single droplet evaporation and combustion characteristics. This study measured the temperature and size histories of heavy oil (C glass) droplets burning in microgravity to elucidate the various stages that occur during combustion. The elimination of the gravity-induced gas convection in microgravity allows the droplet combustion to be studied in greater detail. Noting that the compositions of heavy oil are various, we also tested the fuel blends of a diesel light oil (LO) and a heavy oil residue (HOR).

  15. Operations Recognition at Drill-Rigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmael, B.; Fruhwirth, R.; Arnaout, A.; Thonhauser, G.

    2012-04-01

    Drilling an oil & gas well is always guided by the demand to prevent crises affecting technique, investment and security. To overcome uncertainties caused by lack of knowledge about geological formations during drilling, real-time sensor measurements are used to support the prediction and thus the prevention of such crises. The proposed method supports the extraction of knowledge from sensor data to improve productivity and performance, prevent from mistakes and resolve problems faster. Many mechanical parameters, such as hookload and block position are continuously measured during drilling oil wells. Considering the amount and complexity of the drilling data, it is a real big challenge for a human expert to discover and understand the patterns within the data. In this work machine learning techniques are applied to discover and understand the patterns occurring in such drilling data. We propose a hierarchical approach for drilling operations recognition to break the total drilling time down into a set of pre-defined operation states. This process supports the drilling engineers not only to measure the performance of the drilling process but also to identify patterns in the data that presumably indicate emerging crises. The proposed approach consists of two phases. In the first phase, five principal states describing very basic operational states at the rig will be recognized by use of the sensor data. In the second phase, those principal states will be combined to a set of drilling operational states. The principal operation states can be considered as an intermediate layer between sensor data and high level drilling operations. The five physical states used in the intermediate layer are related to drill string rotation & movement, mud circulation, the actual drilling itself and a state where the drill string is suspended from the hook. All those states are binary (yes/no) except drill string movement which has three values (up/down/static). For recognition of

  16. Structural insights into RNA recognition by RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C.; Vela, Adriana; Kohlway, Andrew; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2011-01-01

    Summary Intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, including RIG-I, MDA-5, and LGP-2) recognize viral RNAs as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate an antiviral immune response. To understand the molecular basis of this process, we determined the crystal structure of RIG-I in complex with double-stranded RNA. The dsRNA is sheathed within a network of protein domains that include a conserved “helicase” domain (regions HEL1 and HEL2), a specialized insertion domain (HEL2i), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTD). A V-shaped pincer connects HEL2 and the CTD by gripping an α-helical shaft that extends from HEL1. In this way, the pincer coordinates functions of all the domains and couples RNA binding with ATP hydrolysis. RIG-I falls within the Dicer-RIG-I clade of super family 2 of helicases and this structure reveals complex interplay between motor domains, accessory mechanical domains and RNA that has implications for understanding the nanomechanical function this protein family and other ATPases more broadly. PMID:22000018

  17. Advanced jack up rig breaking U.S. construction drought

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.

    1997-03-10

    A new heavy duty jack up, due in mid-1998, will be able to simultaneously drill and produce wells in harsher environments and deeper water than current jack ups in the worldwide fleet. Rowan Cos. Inc.`s Gorilla V is the only mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU) currently under construction in the US. Two more enhanced Gorilla design rigs are planned before the year 2000. The enhanced Gorilla class jack up represents the most technologically advanced jack up unit constructed to date. The rigs are structurally designed to meet year-round weather challenges in the harshest geographical environments. Rising demand for drilling rigs, coupled with a dwindling fleet, is generating supply shortages around the world, particularly at the high-specification end of the market. Even increasing the historical retirement age from 20 to 25 years, rig attrition continues at a level of about 18 rigs per year. Apart from the jack up market per se, however, Rowan`s strategy in designing and building enhanced Gorillas is to improve existing jack up drilling technology and offer the versatility to operate as a drilling unit, a mobile production unit, or both simultaneously in either open water locations or alongside existing platforms. The paper discusses the market for these heavy jack-ups, the use of one on the Cohasset project in Nova Scotia, the Gorilla V and enhanced Gorillas, geographical range of use, and MOPU economics.

  18. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by RIG-I

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C.; Vela, Adriana; Kohlway, Andrew; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2011-10-27

    Intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, including RIG-I, MDA-5, and LGP2) recognize viral RNAs as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate an antiviral immune response. To understand the molecular basis of this process, we determined the crystal structure of RIG-I in complex with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The dsRNA is sheathed within a network of protein domains that include a conserved 'helicase' domain (regions HEL1 and HEL2), a specialized insertion domain (HEL2i), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTD). A V-shaped pincer connects HEL2 and the CTD by gripping an {alpha}-helical shaft that extends from HEL1. In this way, the pincer coordinates functions of all the domains and couples RNA binding with ATP hydrolysis. RIG-I falls within the Dicer-RIG-I clade of the superfamily 2 helicases, and this structure reveals complex interplay between motor domains, accessory mechanical domains, and RNA that has implications for understanding the nanomechanical function of this protein family and other ATPases more broadly.

  19. Combustion and heat transfer in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Sathe, S.B.; Peck, R.E.; Tong, T.W.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to generate fundamental knowledge about heat transfer and combustion in porous radiant burners (PRBs) in order to improve their performance. A theoretical heat transfer and combustion model is developed to study the characteristics of PRBs. The model accounts for non-local thermal equilibrium between the solid and gas phases. The solid is assumed to absorb, emit and scatter radiant energy. Combustion is modeled as a one-step global reaction. It is revealed that the flame speed inside the porous medium is enhanced compared to the adiabatic flame speeds due to the higher conductivity of the solid compared to the gas as well as due to radiative preheating of the reactants. The effects of the properties of the porous material on the flame speeds, radiative outputs and efficiencies were investigated. To improve the radiative output from the burner, it is desirable that the porous layer has an optical thickness of about ten. The radiative output and the efficiency is higher for lower scattering albedo. The heat transfer coupling between the solid and gas phases should be high enough to ensure local thermal equilibrium, by choosing a fine porous matrix. Higher solid phase conduction enhances the flame speed and the radiative output. Experiments are performed on a ceramic foam to verify the theoretical findings. The existence of the two stability regions was verified experimentally.

  20. Altitude Performance Characteristics of Turbojet-engine Tail-pipe Burner with Variable-area Exhaust Nozzle Using Several Fuel Systems and Flame Holders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Lavern A; Meyer, Carl L

    1950-01-01

    A tail-pipe burner with a variable-area exhaust nozzle was investigated. From five configurations a fuel-distribution system and a flame holder were selected. The best configuration was investigated over a range of altitudes and flight Mach numbers. For the best configuration, an increase in altitude lowered the augmented thrust ratio, exhaust-gas total temperature, and tail-pipe combustion efficiency, and raised the specific fuel consumption. An increase in flight Mach number raised the augmented thrust ratio but had no apparent effect on exhaust-gas total temperature, tail-pipe combustion efficiency, or specific fuel consumption.