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Sample records for burst switching networks

  1. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  2. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  3. Longest queue first scheduled assembly for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhaobiao; Wang, Hongbo; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2005-11-01

    Proposed in this paper is a novel burst assembly scheme called longest queue first scheduled assembly (LQF-SA) mechanism, where burst assembly and burst scheduling for optical burst-switching networks are integrated. In the proposed mechanism, ingress edge nodes have multiple assembly queues where IP packets are stored according to their egresses and QoS classes. Among these queues, the longest one is scheduled to assemble bursts by a scheduler at a fixed interval. In real networks, traffic usually distributes non-uniformly and there exists heavier traffic between some source and destination pairs. Simulation results show that LQF-SA could adapt well to the non-uniform traffic profiles. Furthermore, even under uniform traffic, LQF-SA is also super to round-robin scheduled assembly (RR-SA) in terms of burst size distribution, assembly efficiency, and burst loss rate.

  4. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  5. Advanced Optical Burst Switched Network Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejabati, Reza; Aracil, Javier; Castoldi, Piero; de Leenheer, Marc; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Valcarenghi, Luca; Zervas, Georgios; Wu, Jian

    In recent years, as the bandwidth and the speed of networks have increased significantly, a new generation of network-based applications using the concept of distributed computing and collaborative services is emerging (e.g., Grid computing applications). The use of the available fiber and DWDM infrastructure for these applications is a logical choice offering huge amounts of cheap bandwidth and ensuring global reach of computing resources [230]. Currently, there is a great deal of interest in deploying optical circuit (wavelength) switched network infrastructure for distributed computing applications that require long-lived wavelength paths and address the specific needs of a small number of well-known users. Typical users are particle physicists who, due to their international collaborations and experiments, generate enormous amounts of data (Petabytes per year). These users require a network infrastructures that can support processing and analysis of large datasets through globally distributed computing resources [230]. However, providing wavelength granularity bandwidth services is not an efficient and scalable solution for applications and services that address a wider base of user communities with different traffic profiles and connectivity requirements. Examples of such applications may be: scientific collaboration in smaller scale (e.g., bioinformatics, environmental research), distributed virtual laboratories (e.g., remote instrumentation), e-health, national security and defense, personalized learning environments and digital libraries, evolving broadband user services (i.e., high resolution home video editing, real-time rendering, high definition interactive TV). As a specific example, in e-health services and in particular mammography applications due to the size and quantity of images produced by remote mammography, stringent network requirements are necessary. Initial calculations have shown that for 100 patients to be screened remotely, the network

  6. Study of traffic statistics of assembled burst traffic in optical burst-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang; Chen, Yang; Qiao, Chunming

    2002-07-01

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) is considered as a promising switching technique for building the next generation optical Internet. In OBS networks, one important issue is how the performance will be affected by bursts assembled from packets, which is the basic transmission unit in OBS. In this paper, we study the fundamental statistic properties such as the burst length distribution, inter-arrival time distribution, as well as correlation structure of assembled burst traffic from burst assembly algorithms. From both theoretical and empirical results, it is demonstrated that after the assembly, the traffic will in general approach the Gaussian distribution. In particular, the variance of assembled traffic decreases with the increase in the assembly window size and the traffic load. However, the long range dependence in the input traffic will not change after assembly. Such smoothed assembled traffic will enhance the OBS performance by reducing burst loss and increase OBS throughput. This result is useful for the future study of OBS node and networks.

  7. A data channel scheduling algorithm based on burst migration for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Hui

    2004-05-01

    Currently optical burst switching (OBS) has been regarded as the most promising backbone networking technology for the next-generation Internet. In the OBS network, the data channel scheduling is one of key problems. Bandwidth efficiency and QoS support are its two concern focuses. However, the existing algorithms pay more attention to bandwidth efficiency. In this paper, we develop an efficient data channel scheduling algorithm, called BM-VF-SBD. It effectively integrates several mechanisms (i.e., void filling, burst migration and selective burst discard) to reduce the bandwidth fragment and support QoS. Its basic idea is in that a new burst is scheduled by migrating some bursts to other channels if none of voids in any channels can accommodate it; otherwise repeating the above processes after selectively dropping some bursts. Meanwhile under an effective data structure, such as the balanced binary search tree, its computational complexity will be o[(2w+1)log w] at most, and be close to LAUC-VF and ODBR. In the proposed algorithm, burst migration plays a key role in the improvement of bandwidth efficiency while selective burst discard has great effects on the two sides. The simulation results show that it performs much better than LAUC-VF and ODBR in burst loss probability (overall or individual) and bandwidth fragment ratio.

  8. QoS differentiation scheme with multiple burst transmission and virtual resource reservation for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Yutaka; Yamanaka, Naoaki

    2007-08-01

    We propose what we believe to be a new scheme to provide basic quality of service (QoS) in optical burst switching networks. Our proposal consists of multiple burst transmission (MBT) and virtual resource reservation (VRR). With MBT, consecutive bursts headed to the same destination are serially transmitted, and, at the transmission of high-priority bursts, the wavelength resource reserved by the head burst is kept reserving for the following bursts. We call it VRR. Computer simulations show that our proposal offers a larger differentiation of burst loss than the conventional offset-based QoS differentiation scheme. Also, it can improve the burst loss rate of both high-priority and low-priority bursts. Moreover, it can minimize the burst loss rate of high-priority bursts even when the high-priority traffic occupies a large percentage of the network traffic. The proposed scheme can be applied to the future multiservice optical network architecture.

  9. O/E/O storage mechanism for burst contention resolution in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yutong; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Pu, Tao; Wang, Lei; Guo, Yili

    2005-11-01

    Burst contention resolution is one of the most important issues in optical burst switching (OBS) networks. In this paper, an O/E/O conversion and electronic storage mechanism for contention resolution is proposed. Compared with fiber delay lines (FDL) O/E/O strategy can provide much longer and continuous delay time for the contending bursts, which can significantly reduce burst loss rate. For this mechanism, a new burst scheduling algorithm called Shortest Delay- Best Fit (SD-BF) is proposed here to improve bandwidth utilization. In a network, O/E/O can be implemented with FDL to achieve a better performance while reducing node cost. In this paper, a semi-share structure for this combination strategy is proposed to balance the cost and performance. Numerical results show that a better performance is achieved by the combination strategy in the long haul back-bone networks. We also investigate the maximum electronic RAM capacity needed in the nodes to support O/E/O storage, and how to implement Quality-of-Service (QoS) with O/E/O storage.

  10. A new scheduling algorithm to provide proportional QoS in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wei; Luo, Yunhan; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Du; Pan, Yonghong; Li, Lemin

    2005-02-01

    A new scheduling algorithm, which aims to provide proportional and controllable QoS in terms of burst loss probability for OBS (optical burst switching) networks, is proposed on the basis of a summary of current QoS schemes in OBS. With simulations, performance analyses and comparisons are studied in detail. The results show that, in the proposed scheme, burst loss probabilities are proportional to the given factors and the control of QoS performance can be achieved with better performance. This scheme will be beneficial to the OBS network management and the tariff policy making.

  11. Design and implementation of burst switching nodes for WDM optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongmei; Hashiguchi, Tomohiro; Minh, Vu Quang; Wang, Xi; Morioka, Hiroyuki; Aoyama, Tomonori

    2005-02-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) has been paid increasing attention as an attractive alternative for building future photonic Internet. Besides pure theoretical research, experimental prototype and proof-of-concept demonstration are also significant parts toward practical burst switched WDM optical networks. This paper describes hardware architecture, software module and experimental results of optical burst switching nodes using a just-enough-time (JET) protocol and contention resolutions. The core node forwards bursts in the optical domain with deflection routing resolution. It is designed to be transparent to the format, the protocol and the bit rate of traffic. The edge node performs burst assembly/disassembly, as well as burst forwarding, which makes it flexible to be applied to various topologies. The related control protocols and algorithms are implemented taking into account characteristics of being used commercial off-the-shelf devices. By the experiments, the basic function of optical burst switching is demonstrated, the delay measurement result is analyzed, and the effort direction is given.

  12. Two novel batch scheduling algorithms with insufficient wavelength converters in optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; Pang, Hong-Feng; Li, Ling-Xia

    2013-03-01

    In optical burst switching networks, wavelength converters (WCs) of core nodes are used to decrease the burst loss rate. The implementation of the WCs is difficult in the current technology and the cost of WCs is high. So some core nodes may be configured insufficient WCs to reduce the cost in OBS networks. However, many data channel scheduling algorithms do not count the number of WCs and the performance of burst loss rate is not good in the condition of insufficient WCs. To overcome the defect, two novel batch scheduling algorithm with insufficiency of WC are proposed in this paper. The former algorithm improves the WCs' resource utilization probability to reduce the burst loss rate and the later algorithm saves the WCs' resource for the incoming bursts to use to improve the burst loss performance. The later algorithm can reduce more burst loss rate with the same number of WCs, compared with the other scheduling algorithms. The simulation results show that the later algorithm is more effective in reducing the burst loss rate with insufficient WCs.

  13. Network-element view information model for an optical burst core switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Chao; Balt, Halt; Michel, Stephane R.; Verchere, Dominique G.

    2001-10-01

    To natively support the bursty IP datagrams over all-optical Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) networks, the Optical Burst Switching (OBS) WDM network has been proposed as a suitable architecture for future optical Internet backbone networks. However, managing the OBS network will be complicated due to the scale of the networks and the correlation between different technology layers. This paper presents an information model for the OBS core node, from the network-element view, to describe the management information flows between the optical burst layer and the traditional WDM transport layer, and how to model them using various Managed Objects (MOs). We also provide the structure of Management Information Base (MIB) used in SNMP management interface for managing the parameters identified at different layers.

  14. Burst switching without guard interval in all-optical software-define star intra-data center network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Philip N.; Wang, Ting

    2014-02-01

    Optical switching has been introduced in intra-data center networks (DCNs) to increase capacity and to reduce power consumption. Recently we proposed a star MIMO OFDM-based all-optical DCN with burst switching and software-defined networking. Here, we introduce the control procedure for the star DCN in detail for the first time. The timing, signaling, and operation are described for each step to achieve efficient bandwidth resource utilization. Furthermore, the guidelines for the burst assembling period selection that allows burst switching without guard interval are discussed. The star all-optical DCN offers flexible and efficient control for next-generation data center application.

  15. Enhanced just-in-time plus protocol for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.; Gregório, José M. B.; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2010-07-01

    We propose a new one-way resource reservation protocol for optical burst switching (OBS) networks, called Enhanced Just-in-Time Plus (E-JIT+). The protocol is described in detail, and its formal specification is presented, following an extended finite state machine approach. The performance evaluation of E-JIT+ is analyzed in comparison with other proposed OBS protocols (JIT+ and E-JIT) for the following network topologies: rings; degree-two, degree-three, and degree-four chordal rings; mesh-torus; NSFNET; ARPANET; FCCN-NET; and the European Optical Network. We evaluate and compare the performance of the different protocols in terms of burst loss probability, taking into account the most important OBS network parameters. It was shown that E-JIT+ performs better than available one-way resource reservation protocols for all the evaluated network topologies. Moreover, the scalability of E-JIT+ was observed, and when the network traffic increases, the burst loss probability also increases, leading to a worse network performance.

  16. A burst compression and expansion technique for variable-rate users in satellite-switched TDMA networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A burst compression and expansion technique is described for asynchronously interconnecting variable-data-rate users with cost-efficient ground terminals in a satellite-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SS/TDMA) network. Compression and expansion buffers in each ground terminal convert between lower rate, asynchronous, continuous-user data streams and higher-rate TDMA bursts synchronized with the satellite-switched timing. The technique described uses a first-in, first-out (FIFO) memory approach which enables the use of inexpensive clock sources by both the users and the ground terminals and obviates the need for elaborate user clock synchronization processes. A continous range of data rates from kilobits per second to that approaching the modulator burst rate (hundreds of megabits per second) can be accommodated. The technique was developed for use in the NASA Lewis Research Center System Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility. Some key features of the technique have also been implemented in the gound terminals developed at NASA Lewis for use in on-orbit evaluation of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) high burst rate (HBR) system.

  17. A burst compression and expansion technique for variable-rate users in satellite-switched TDMA networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A burst compression and expansion technique is described for asynchronously interconnecting variable-data-rate users with cost-efficient ground terminals in a satellite-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SS/TDMA) network. Compression and expansion buffers in each ground terminal convert between lower rate, asynchronous, continuous-user data streams and higher-rate TDMA bursts synchronized with the satellite-switched timing. The technique described uses a first-in, first-out (FIFO) memory approach which enables the use of inexpensive clock sources by both the users and the ground terminals and obviates the need for elaborate user clock synchronization processes. A continuous range of data rates from kilobits per second to that approaching the modulator burst rate (hundreds of megabits per second) can be accommodated. The technique was developed for use in the NASA Lewis Research Center System Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility. Some key features of the technique have also been implemented in the ground terminals developed at NASA Lewis for use in on-orbit evaluation of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) high burst rate (HBR) system.

  18. Providing QoS for Anycasting over Optical Burst Switched Grid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathula, Balagangadhar G.; Elmirghani, Jaafar M. H.

    This paper presents a mathematical framework to provide Quality of Service (QoS) for Grid Applications over optical networks. These QoS parameters include, resource availability, reliability, propagation delay, and quality of transmission (QoT). These multiple services are needed to ensure the successful completion of a Grid job. With the help of link-state information available at each Network Element (NE), the bursts are scheduled to its next link. This de-centralized way of routing helps to provide optimal QoS and hence decreases the loss of Grid jobs due to multiple constraints.

  19. Electronic implementation of optical burst switching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Ilijc; Darcie, Thomas E.; Ganti, Sudhakar

    2013-10-01

    Extensive research effort is ongoing in energy-efficient Internet-based communications. Optical Flow Switching (OFS) and Optical Burst Switching (OBS) offer potentially efficient alternatives to IP-router-based networks for large data transactions, but significant challenges remain. OFS requires each user to install expensive core network technology, limiting application to highly specialized nodes. OBS can achieve higher scalability but burst assembly/disassembly procedures reduce power efficiency. Finally both OFS and OBS use all-optical switching technologies for which energy efficiency and flexibility remain subject to debate. Our study aims at combining the advantages of both OBS and OFS while avoiding their shortcomings. We consider using a two-way resource reservation protocol for periodic concatenations of large (e.g. 1 Mb) packets or Media Frames (MFs). These chains of MFs (MFCs) are semi-transparent with a periodicity referred to as the "transparency degree". Each MFC is assembled and stored at an end-user machine during the resource reservation procedure and is then switched and buffered electronically along its path. The periodic configuration of each MFC enables interleaving of several chains using buffering only to align the MFs in each MFC in time, largely reducing the buffer requirements with respect to OBS. This periodicity also enables a simple scheduling algorithm to schedule large transactions with minimal control plane processing, achieving link utilization approaching 99.9%. In summary, results indicate that implementing optical burst switching techniques in the electronic domain is a compelling path forward to high-throughput power-efficient networking.

  20. Enhancing the Quality of Service for Real Time Traffic over Optical Burst Switching (OBS) Networks with Ensuring the Fairness for Other Traffics.

    PubMed

    Al-Shargabi, Mohammed A; Shaikh, Asadullah; Ismail, Abdulsamad S

    2016-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) networks have been attracting much consideration as a promising approach to build the next generation optical Internet. A solution for enhancing the Quality of Service (QoS) for high priority real time traffic over OBS with the fairness among the traffic types is absent in current OBS' QoS schemes. In this paper we present a novel Real Time Quality of Service with Fairness Ratio (RT-QoSFR) scheme that can adapt the burst assembly parameters according to the traffic QoS needs in order to enhance the real time traffic QoS requirements and to ensure the fairness for other traffic. The results show that RT-QoSFR scheme is able to fulfill the real time traffic requirements (end to end delay, and loss rate) ensuring the fairness for other traffics under various conditions such as the type of real time traffic and traffic load. RT-QoSFR can guarantee that the delay of the real time traffic packets does not exceed the maximum packets transfer delay value. Furthermore, it can reduce the real time traffic packets loss, at the same time guarantee the fairness for non real time traffic packets by determining the ratio of real time traffic inside the burst to be 50-60%, 30-40%, and 10-20% for high, normal, and low traffic loads respectively. PMID:27583557

  1. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, D.B.

    1994-07-19

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination. 9 figs.

  2. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, Dario B.

    1994-01-01

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination.

  3. Neuromorphic Atomic Switch Networks

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Shieh, Hsien Hang; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system. PMID:22880101

  4. A new bursty assigned traffic model and performance analysis in optical burst switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenfang; Li, Minghao; Chen, Chunhan; Yu, Zhang

    2007-11-01

    In OBS network, one key factor is implementing a switching fabric to achieve low bursts loss rate as low as possible. Another key factor in OBS network is scheduling bursts after switch fabric to an output port to achieve best utilizing bandwidth. Until now the performance of switch fabric and scheduling algorithm is analyzed with a uniform assigned traffic so called in this paper. The uniform assigned traffic is meant that the input traffic go to every output port with a same probability of 1/N independently. Unfortunately, this uniform assigned traffic may not the most suitable way to present the real world traffic. To deal with this problem, we present a new bursty assigned traffic model for analysis and performance evaluation of OBS network. Like a legacy bursty traffic the bursty assigned traffic is divided to two cycle: bursty cycle and nonbursty cycle. The input traffic is directed to an output port with a probability larger than 1/N in bursty cycle and is directed to an output port with a probability less than 1/N or none in nonbursty cycle. Then making use of the definition the bursts loss ratio of switch fabric and the LAUC-VF scheduling algorithm under uniform assigned and bursty assigned traffic is presented and compared in the paper.

  5. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  6. Coherence resonance in bursting neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, June Hoan; Lee, Ho Jun; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2015-10-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are one of the most noticeable dynamic features of neural networks, being essential for various phenomena in neuroscience, yet their complex dynamics are not well understood. With extrinsic electrical and optical manipulations on cultured neural networks, we demonstrate that the regularity (or randomness) of burst sequences is in many cases determined by a (few) low-dimensional attractor(s) working under strong neural noise. Moreover, there is an optimal level of noise strength at which the regularity of the interburst interval sequence becomes maximal—a phenomenon of coherence resonance. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced through computer simulations on a well-established neural network model, suggesting that the same phenomena may occur in many in vivo as well as in vitro neural networks.

  7. Downhole drilling network using burst modulation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Hall; David R. , Fox; Joe

    2007-04-03

    A downhole drilling system is disclosed in one aspect of the present invention as including a drill string and a transmission line integrated into the drill string. Multiple network nodes are installed at selected intervals along the drill string and are adapted to communicate with one another through the transmission line. In order to efficiently allocate the available bandwidth, the network nodes are configured to use any of numerous burst modulation techniques to transmit data.

  8. Bounding switching delay in mobile TV broadcast networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsin; Hefeeda, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Since mobile devices are battery powered, several mobile TV standards dictate using energy saving schemes to increase the viewing time on mobile devices. The most common scheme for saving energy is to make the base station broadcast the video data of a TV channel in bursts with a bit rate much higher than the encoding rate of the video stream, which enables mobile devices to turn off their radio frequency circuits when not receiving bursts. While broadcasting bursts saves energy, it increases the channel switching delay. The switching delay is an important performance metric, because long and variable switching delays are annoying to users and may turn them away from the mobile TV service. In this paper, we first analyze the burst broadcasting scheme currently used in many deployed mobile TV networks, and we show that it is not efficient in terms of controlling the channel switching delay. We then propose new schemes to guarantee that a given maximum switching delay is not exceeded and that the energy consumption of mobile devices is minimized. We prove the correctness of the proposed schemes and derive closed-form equations for the achieved energy saving. We also implement the proposed schemes in a mobile TV testbed to show their practicability and to validate our theoretical analysis.

  9. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.

    2010-02-23

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  10. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-04

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  11. Approach and analysis of contention resolution in optical switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Dang, Mingrui; Mao, Youju; Zhang, Min; Li, Lemin

    2002-09-01

    As the Internet traffic exponentially growing, the next generation IP network is forced to scale far beyond its present performances. The more and more mature optical switching technology, such as optical burst switching, is expected to provide an ideal infrastructure for meeting the demands. However in optical switching, there is one critical issue, namely contention, which roots from multiple optical data requesting the same output port How to resolve contention in optical domain will have a significant effect on the performance (in terms of the burst-loss rate, average delay time and network throughput) of optical switching network. The paper proposes a contention resolution scheme based on FDL, AWG and TWC. Here FDL is used as two functions, i.e. forwarding and feedback for smaller or longer buffering time requirements respectively. In the paper we incorporate the scheme into the design of optical switch. We descript the optical data buffering strategy when contention occurs. We also study the performance of the scheme in a Markov process model under the assumption of uniform Bernoulli traffic, and validate the analysis through numerical simulation. The computer simulation results show that the scheme can efficiently use FDL buffering and AWG switching capacities, hence can obviously reduce the contentions.

  12. BACODINE/3rd Interplanetary Network burst localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1996-08-01

    Even with only two widely separated spacecraft (Ulysses and GRO), 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) localizations can reduce the areas of BATSE error circles by two orders of magnitude. Therefore it is useful to disseminate them as quickly as possible following BATSE bursts. We have implemented a system which transmits the light curves of BACODINE/BATSE bursts directly by e-mail to UC Berkeley immediately after detection. An automatic e-mail parser at Berkeley watches for these notices, determines the Ulysses crossing time window, and initiates a search for the burst data on the JPL computer as they are received. In ideal cases, it is possible to retrieve the Ulysses data within a few hours of a burst, generate an annulus of arrival directions, and e-mail it out to the astronomical community by local nightfall. Human operators remain in this loop, but we are developing a fully automated routine which should remove them, at least for intense events, and reduce turn-around times to an absolute minimum. We explain the current operations, the data types used, and the speed/accuracy tradeoffs.

  13. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  14. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pal'shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V.; Hurley, K.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  15. RF switch positioner for communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, A. G.; Griesser, H. P.; Grant, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The RF switch positioner is a simple, lightweight, redundant positioning mechanism used to reconfigure the antenna beam on the INTELSAT VI satellite. It simultaneously rotates approximately 100 squareax waveguide switches through a full 360 deg. The RF switch positioner has been space qualified and has performed to expectations in conjunction with the feed networks in range testing.

  16. Burst synchronization transitions in a neuronal network of subnetworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Lei, Jinzhi; Perc, Matjaž; Kurths, Jürgen; Chen, Guanrong

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the transitions of burst synchronization are explored in a neuronal network consisting of subnetworks. The studied network is composed of electrically coupled bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. Numerical results show that two types of burst synchronization transitions can be induced not only by the variations of intra- and intercoupling strengths but also by changing the probability of random links between different subnetworks and the number of subnetworks. Furthermore, we find that the underlying mechanisms for these two bursting synchronization transitions are different: one is due to the change of spike numbers per burst, while the other is caused by the change of the bursting type. Considering that changes in the coupling strengths and neuronal connections are closely interlaced with brain plasticity, the presented results could have important implications for the role of the brain plasticity in some functional behavior that are associated with synchronization.

  17. Investigation of primordial black hole bursts using interplanetary network gamma-ray bursts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ukwatta, Tilan Niranjan; Hurley, Kevin; MacGibbon, Jane H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'Shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; et al

    2016-07-25

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected bymore » the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Furthermore, assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.« less

  18. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts Using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Hurley, K.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Connaughton, V.; Yamaoka, K.; Ohno, M.; Ohmori, N.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; McTiernan, J.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  19. Design of microwave beam-switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, M. L.

    1983-12-01

    An investigation of RF beam-switching networks for creating, with a multiple-beam antenna (MBA), a set of electronically steerable antenna beams, shows that there are three main classes of network. Taking the case of a 61-beam MBA with 8 simultaneously steered beams as an example, we can describe these classes as: (1) networks which can connect any one of the 8 output ports to any one of the 61 beam feeds, (2) networks which can connect the 8 output ports to any set of 8 beam feeds selected from the 61, but with a constraint imposed on the order in which the 8 ports are connected to the 8 selected feeds, and (3) networks in which the set of 8 beam feeds cannot be selected arbitrarily - some fraction of the total number of conceivable interconnections cannot be completed. Networks exist in each of the three classes having very similar traffic handling performance and yet requiring a total number of switches which is very different from one class to the next. Their number is 907, 387, and 175 for the unconstrained, order-constrained and selection-constrained networks, respectively, needed to do the 61-to-8 switching job described above. The report examines the design, performance and complexity of such networks for general N and M. Included are two further measures of complexity, as well as the switching algorithm and the effect of non-uniform traffic. The results are presented as graphs, tables and formulas.

  20. Modified Benes networks for photonic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiun-Shjou; Huang, Yang-Tung

    2001-10-01

    The Benes network has two major advantages: one is that it has the lowest system insertion loss and the other is that it needs the fewest switches and drivers. However, lower signal- to-noise ratio (SNR) is its major disadvantage. The generally modified dilated Benes (GMDB) network has been proposed to obtain a higher SNR, but this network needs much more drivers. In this presentation, the modified Benes network is proposed to obtain a higher SNR with the same number of drivers as Benes network.

  1. Software Defined Networking (SDN) controlled all optical switching networks with multi-dimensional switching architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hui; Xiong, Qianjin; Qiu, Shaofeng

    2014-08-01

    Ultrahigh throughout capacity requirement is challenging the current optical switching nodes with the fast development of data center networks. Pbit/s level all optical switching networks need to be deployed soon, which will cause the high complexity of node architecture. How to control the future network and node equipment together will become a new problem. An enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN) control architecture is proposed in the paper, which consists of Provider NOX (P-NOX) and Node NOX (N-NOX). With the cooperation of P-NOX and N-NOX, the flexible control of the entire network can be achieved. All optical switching network testbed has been experimentally demonstrated with efficient control of enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN). Pbit/s level all optical switching nodes in the testbed are implemented based on multi-dimensional switching architecture, i.e. multi-level and multi-planar. Due to the space and cost limitation, each optical switching node is only equipped with four input line boxes and four output line boxes respectively. Experimental results are given to verify the performance of our proposed control and switching architecture.

  2. Delayed switching applied to memristor neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Frank Z.; Helian, Na; Wu, Sining; Yang, Xiao; Guo, Yike; Lim, Guan; Rashid, Md Mamunur

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic flux and electric charge are linked in a memristor. We reported recently that a memristor has a peculiar effect in which the switching takes place with a time delay because a memristor possesses a certain inertia. This effect was named the "delayed switching effect." In this work, we elaborate on the importance of delayed switching in a brain-like computer using memristor neural networks. The effect is used to control the switching of a memristor synapse between two neurons that fire together (the Hebbian rule). A theoretical formula is found, and the design is verified by a simulation. We have also built an experimental setup consisting of electronic memristive synapses and electronic neurons.

  3. Delayed switching applied to memristor neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Frank Z.; Yang Xiao; Lim Guan; Helian Na; Wu Sining; Guo Yike; Rashid, Md Mamunur

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic flux and electric charge are linked in a memristor. We reported recently that a memristor has a peculiar effect in which the switching takes place with a time delay because a memristor possesses a certain inertia. This effect was named the ''delayed switching effect.'' In this work, we elaborate on the importance of delayed switching in a brain-like computer using memristor neural networks. The effect is used to control the switching of a memristor synapse between two neurons that fire together (the Hebbian rule). A theoretical formula is found, and the design is verified by a simulation. We have also built an experimental setup consisting of electronic memristive synapses and electronic neurons.

  4. Epigenetic switches and network transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Masaki

    2012-02-01

    We investigate dynamics of gene networks which are regulated by both the fast binding/unbinding of transcription factors to/from DNA and the slow processes of chromatin structural change or histone modification. This heterogeneous dynamics consisting of different time scales is analyzed by the mean-field approximation and the stochastic simulation to show that the network exhibits multiple metastable states and is characterized by transitions among them. We discuss distribution and fluctuation of states of the core gene network of embryonic stem cells as an example of such heterogeneous dynamics and the simulated transitions are compared with the experimental data on the distribution of stem cell states.

  5. An Efficience Scheme to Reduce Burst Loss Rate and Supporting Differentiated Services in All-Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Amit Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Due to their one-way resource reservation mechanism, Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks experience high bursts (thus packets) loss rate. In OBS networks, the contention is resolved either by dropping one of the contending bursts or more efficiently by dropping from one of the contending bursts only the parts that overlap with the other bursts. In both situations, only one data source will suffer the data loss in favor to the other. In this paper, an efficient scheme to reduce burst loss rate has been proposed in conjunction with an appropriate mechanism to provide differentiated service in order to support the quality of service (QoS) requirements of different applications. Simulation results show that the performance of the proposed scheme is better than existing mechanisms in terms of reducing burst (packets) loss. Numerical results show that the proposed scheme provides an accurate fit for the performance of the highest traffic class and lower bounds for the other traffic classes that are tighter than earlier known results.

  6. Neuronal Networks during Burst Suppression as Revealed by Source Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reinicke, Christine; Moeller, Friederike; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Pressler, Ronit; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burst-suppression (BS) is an electroencephalography (EEG) pattern consisting of alternant periods of slow waves of high amplitude (burst) and periods of so called flat EEG (suppression). It is generally associated with coma of various etiologies (hypoxia, drug-related intoxication, hypothermia, and childhood encephalopathies, but also anesthesia). Animal studies suggest that both the cortex and the thalamus are involved in the generation of BS. However, very little is known about mechanisms of BS in humans. The aim of this study was to identify the neuronal network underlying both burst and suppression phases using source reconstruction and analysis of functional and effective connectivity in EEG. Material/Methods Dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) was applied to EEG segments of 13 neonates and infants with burst and suppression EEG pattern. The brain area with the strongest power in the analyzed frequency (1–4 Hz) range was defined as the reference region. DICS was used to compute the coherence between this reference region and the entire brain. The renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) was used to describe the informational flow between the identified sources. Results/Conclusion Delta activity during the burst phases was associated with coherent sources in the thalamus and brainstem as well as bilateral sources in cortical regions mainly frontal and parietal, whereas suppression phases were associated with coherent sources only in cortical regions. Results of the RPDC analyses showed an upwards informational flow from the brainstem towards the thalamus and from the thalamus to cortical regions, which was absent during the suppression phases. These findings may support the theory that a “cortical deafferentiation” between the cortex and sub-cortical structures exists especially in suppression phases compared to burst phases in burst suppression EEGs. Such a deafferentiation may play a role in the poor neurological outcome of

  7. Effect of network architecture on burst and spike synchronization in a scale-free network of bursting neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effect of network architecture on burst and spike synchronization in a directed scale-free network (SFN) of bursting neurons, evolved via two independent α- and β-processes. The α-process corresponds to a directed version of the Barabási-Albert SFN model with growth and preferential attachment, while for the β-process only preferential attachments between pre-existing nodes are made without addition of new nodes. We first consider the "pure" α-process of symmetric preferential attachment (with the same in- and out-degrees), and study emergence of burst and spike synchronization by varying the coupling strength J and the noise intensity D for a fixed attachment degree. Characterizations of burst and spike synchronization are also made by employing realistic order parameters and statistical-mechanical measures. Next, we choose appropriate values of J and D where only burst synchronization occurs, and investigate the effect of the scale-free connectivity on the burst synchronization by varying (1) the symmetric attachment degree and (2) the asymmetry parameter (representing deviation from the symmetric case) in the α-process, and (3) the occurrence probability of the β-process. In all these three cases, changes in the type and the degree of population synchronization are studied in connection with the network topology such as the degree distribution, the average path length Lp, and the betweenness centralization Bc. It is thus found that just taking into consideration Lp and Bc (affecting global communication between nodes) is not sufficient to understand emergence of population synchronization in SFNs, but in addition to them, the in-degree distribution (affecting individual dynamics) must also be considered to fully understand for the effective population synchronization. PMID:27131467

  8. Consistent stabilizability of switched Boolean networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Wang, Yuzhen

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the consistent stabilizability of switched Boolean networks (SBNs) by using the semi-tensor product method, and presents a number of new results. First, an algebraic expression of SBNs is obtained by the semi-tensor product, based on which the consistent stabilizability is then studied for SBNs and some necessary and sufficient conditions are presented for the design of free-form and state-feedback switching signals, respectively. Finally, the consistent stabilizability of SBNs with state constraints is considered and some necessary and sufficient conditions are proposed. The study of illustrative examples shows that the new results obtained in this paper are very effective in designing switching signals for the consistent stabilizability of SBNs. PMID:23787170

  9. Future large broadband switched satellite communications networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Harvey, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Critical technical, market, and policy issues relevant to future large broadband switched satellite networks are summarized. Our market projections for the period 1980 to 2000 are compared. Clusters of switched satellites, in lieu of large platforms, etc., are shown to have significant advantages. Analysis of an optimum terrestrial network architecture suggests the proper densities of ground stations and that link reliabilities 99.99% may entail less than a 10% cost premium for diversity protection at 20/30 GHz. These analyses suggest that system costs increase as the 0.6 power of traffic. Cost estimates for nominal 20/30 GHz satellite and ground facilities suggest optimum system configurations might employ satellites with 285 beams, multiple TDMA bands each carrying 256 Mbps, and 16 ft ground station antennas. A nominal development program is outlined.

  10. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Dion, Seth-Andrew T.; Karl, Justin O.; Spivey, Nicholas S.; Walker, James L., II

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were collected during the hydroburst testing of eleven 15 inch diameter filament wound composite overwrapped pressure vessels. A neural network burst pressure prediction was generated from the resulting AE amplitude data. The bottles shared commonality of graphite fiber, epoxy resin, and cure time. Individual bottles varied by cure mode (rotisserie versus static oven curing), types of inflicted damage, temperature of the pressurant, and pressurization scheme. Three categorical variables were selected to represent undamaged bottles, impact damaged bottles, and bottles with lacerated hoop fibers. This categorization along with the removal of the AE data from the disbonding noise between the aluminum liner and the composite overwrap allowed the prediction of burst pressures in all three sets of bottles using a single backpropagation neural network. Here the worst case error was 3.38 percent.

  11. The origin of spontaneous synchronized burst in cultured neuronal networks based on multi-electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanping; Chen, Lin; Lin, Yunsheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-08-01

    Many neural networks in mammalian central nervous system (CNS) fire single spike and complex spike burst. In fact, the conditions for triggering burst are not well understood. In the paper multi-electrode arrays (MEA) are used to record the spontaneous electrophysiological activities of cultured rat hippocampal neuronal network for a long time. After about 3 weeks culture, a transition from single spike to burst is observed in several networks. All of these spikes fire quickly before burst begins. The firing rate during the burst is lower than that just before the burst, but differences of inter-spike intervals (ISIs) between two firing patterns are not clear. Moreover, the electrical activities on neighboring electrodes show strong synchrony during the burst activities. In a word, the generation of the burst requires that network should have a sufficient level of excitation as well as a balance of synaptic inhibition. PMID:16533555

  12. Inhibition of the lymphocyte metabolic switch by the oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Philip A; Prichard, Lynn; Chacko, Balu; Ravi, Saranya; Overton, E Turner; Heath, Sonya L; Darley-Usmar, Victor

    2015-09-01

    Activation of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX-2) in neutrophils is a critical process in the innate immune system and is associated with elevated local concentrations of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hypochlorous acid. Under pathological conditions, NOX-2 activity has been implicated in the development of autoimmunity, indicating a role in modulating lymphocyte effector function. Notably, T-cell clonal expansion and subsequent cytokine production requires a metabolic switch from mitochondrial respiration to aerobic glycolysis. Previous studies demonstrate that H2O2 generated from activated neutrophils suppresses lymphocyte activation but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that activated neutrophils would prevent the metabolic switch and suppress the effector functions of T-cells through a H2O2-dependent mechanism. To test this, we developed a model co-culture system using freshly isolated neutrophils and lymphocytes from healthy human donors. Extracellular flux analysis was used to assess mitochondrial and glycolytic activity and FACS analysis to assess immune function. The neutrophil oxidative burst significantly inhibited the induction of lymphocyte aerobic glycolysis, caused inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and suppressed lymphocyte activation through a H2O2-dependent mechanism. Hydrogen peroxide and a redox cycling agent, DMNQ, were used to confirm the impact of H2O2 on lymphocyte bioenergetics. In summary, we have shown that the lymphocyte metabolic switch from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis is prevented by the oxidative burst of neutrophils. This direct inhibition of the metabolic switch is then a likely mechanism underlying the neutrophil-dependent suppression of T-cell effector function. PMID:25951298

  13. Neural Network Aided Glitch-Burst Discrimination and Glitch Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Salvatore; Pierro, Vincenzo; Troiano, Luigi; Pinto, Innocenzo M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the potential of neural-network based classifiers for discriminating gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) of a given canonical family (e.g. core-collapse supernova waveforms) from typical transient instrumental artifacts (glitches), in the data of a single detector. The further classification of glitches into typical sets is explored. In order to provide a proof of concept, we use the core-collapse supernova waveform catalog produced by H. Dimmelmeier and co-Workers, and the data base of glitches observed in laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) data maintained by P. Saulson and co-Workers to construct datasets of (windowed) transient waveforms (glitches and bursts) in additive (Gaussian and compound-Gaussian) noise with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Principal component analysis (PCA) is next implemented for reducing data dimensionality, yielding results consistent with, and extending those in the literature. Then, a multilayer perceptron is trained by a backpropagation algorithm (MLP-BP) on a data subset, and used to classify the transients as glitch or burst. A Self-Organizing Map (SOM) architecture is finally used to classify the glitches. The glitch/burst discrimination and glitch classification abilities are gauged in terms of the related truth tables. Preliminary results suggest that the approach is effective and robust throughout the SNR range of practical interest. Perspective applications pertain both to distributed (network, multisensor) detection of GWBs, where some intelligence at the single node level can be introduced, and instrument diagnostics/optimization, where spurious transients can be identified, classified and hopefully traced back to their entry points.

  14. An evaluation of Access Tier local area network switches.

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, John M.; Olsberg, Ronald R.

    2004-06-01

    This reports tabulates the Test and Evaluation results of the Access Class Switch tests conducted by members of Department 9336. About 15 switches were reviewed for use in the enterprise network as access tier switches as defined in a three tier architecture. The Access Switch Tier has several functions including: aggregate customer desktop ports, preserve and apply QoS tags, provide switched LAN access, provide VLAN assignment, as well as others. The typical switch size is 48 or less user ports. The evaluation team reviewed network switch evaluation reports from the Tolly Group as well as other sources. We then used these reports as a starting point to identify particular switches for evaluation. In general we reviewed the products of dominant equipment manufacturers. Also, based on architectural design requirements, the majority of the switches tested were of relatively small monolithic unit variety.

  15. Intermittent synchronization in a network of bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L.

    2011-09-01

    Synchronized oscillations in networks of inhibitory and excitatory coupled bursting neurons are common in a variety of neural systems from central pattern generators to human brain circuits. One example of the latter is the subcortical network of the basal ganglia, formed by excitatory and inhibitory bursters of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus, involved in motor control and affected in Parkinson's disease. Recent experiments have demonstrated the intermittent nature of the phase-locking of neural activity in this network. Here, we explore one potential mechanism to explain the intermittent phase-locking in a network. We simplify the network to obtain a model of two inhibitory coupled elements and explore its dynamics. We used geometric analysis and singular perturbation methods for dynamical systems to reduce the full model to a simpler set of equations. Mathematical analysis was completed using three slow variables with two different time scales. Intermittently, synchronous oscillations are generated by overlapped spiking which crucially depends on the geometry of the slow phase plane and the interplay between slow variables as well as the strength of synapses. Two slow variables are responsible for the generation of activity patterns with overlapped spiking, and the other slower variable enhances the robustness of an irregular and intermittent activity pattern. While the analyzed network and the explored mechanism of intermittent synchrony appear to be quite generic, the results of this analysis can be used to trace particular values of biophysical parameters (synaptic strength and parameters of calcium dynamics), which are known to be impacted in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Computation by Switching in Complex Networks of States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittler Neves, Fabio; Timme, Marc

    2012-07-01

    Complex networks of dynamically connected saddle states persistently emerge in a broad range of high-dimensional systems and may reliably encode inputs as specific switching trajectories. Their computational capabilities, however, are far from being understood. Here, we analyze how symmetry-breaking inhomogeneities naturally induce predictable persistent switching dynamics across such networks. We show that such systems are capable of computing arbitrary logic operations by entering into switching sequences in a controlled way. This dynamics thus offers a highly flexible new kind of computation based on switching along complex networks of states.

  17. The mechanisms of generation and propagation of synchronized bursting in developing networks of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Maeda, E; Robinson, H P; Kawana, A

    1995-10-01

    The characteristics and mechanisms of synchronized firing in developing networks of cultured cortical neurons were studied using multisite recording through planar electrode arrays (PEAs). With maturation of the network (from 3 to 40 d after plating), the frequency and propagation velocity of bursts increased markedly (approximately from 0.01 to 0.5 Hz and from 5 to 100 mm/sec, respectively), and the sensitivity to extracellular magnesium concentration (0-10 mM) decreased. The source of spontaneous bursts, estimated from the relative delay of onset of activity between electrodes, varied randomly with each burst. Physical separation of synchronously bursting networks into several parts using an ultraviolet laser, divided synchronous bursting into different frequencies and phases in each part. Focal stimulation through the PEA was effective at multiple sites in eliciting bursts, which propagated over the network from the site of stimulation. Stimulated bursts exhibited both an absolute refractory period and a relative refractory period, in which partially propagating bursts could be elicited. Periodic electrical stimulation (at 1 to 30 sec intervals) produced slower propagation velocities and smaller numbers of spikes per burst at shorter stimulation intervals. These results suggest that the generation and propagation of spontaneous synchronous bursts in cultured cortical neurons is governed by the level of spontaneous presynaptic firing, by the degree of connectivity of the network, and by a distributed balance between excitation and recovery processes. PMID:7472441

  18. Applications of optical switches in fiber optic communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Daniel; Gosset, Nathalie M.

    1991-01-01

    The growing deployment of fiber optics which are vulnerable to single point failure creates an urgent need for a means of automatic protection switching test access and reconfiguration in telephone networks. Fiber switching is a technology which is beginning to be used in trunk and subscriber ioop applications to satisfy this need. This paper focuses on several applications of fiber switching in public networks including the economic and technical advantages of this technology.

  19. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BeppoSAX GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Guidorzi, C.; Frontera, F.; Montanari, E.; Rossi, F.; Feroci, M.; Mazets, E.; Golenetskii, S.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Starr, R.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barraud, C.; Pelangeon, A.; Boer, M.; Vanderspek, R.

    2010-11-15

    Between 1996 July and 2002 April, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network detected 786 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and/or Wide-Field X-Ray Camera experiments aboard the BeppoSAX spacecraft. During this period, the network consisted of up to six spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 475 bursts were obtained. We present the localization data for these events.

  20. Network burst activity in hippocampal neuronal cultures: the role of synaptic and intrinsic currents.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Jyothsna; Radojicic, Mihailo; Pesce, Lorenzo L; Bhansali, Anita; Wang, Janice; Tryba, Andrew K; Marks, Jeremy D; van Drongelen, Wim

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this work was to define the contributions of intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms toward spontaneous network-wide bursting activity, observed in dissociated rat hippocampal cell cultures. This network behavior is typically characterized by short-duration bursts, separated by order of magnitude longer interburst intervals. We hypothesize that while short-timescale synaptic processes modulate spectro-temporal intraburst properties and network-wide burst propagation, much longer timescales of intrinsic membrane properties such as persistent sodium (Nap) currents govern burst onset during interburst intervals. To test this, we used synaptic receptor antagonists picrotoxin, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), and 3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonate (CPP) to selectively block GABAA, AMPA, and NMDA receptors and riluzole to selectively block Nap channels. We systematically compared intracellular activity (recorded with patch clamp) and network activity (recorded with multielectrode arrays) in eight different synaptic connectivity conditions: GABAA + NMDA + AMPA, NMDA + AMPA, GABAA + AMPA, GABAA + NMDA, AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and all receptors blocked. Furthermore, we used mixed-effects modeling to quantify the aforementioned independent and interactive synaptic receptor contributions toward spectro-temporal burst properties including intraburst spike rate, burst activity index, burst duration, power in the local field potential, network connectivity, and transmission delays. We found that blocking intrinsic Nap currents completely abolished bursting activity, demonstrating their critical role in burst onset within the network. On the other hand, blocking different combinations of synaptic receptors revealed that spectro-temporal burst properties are uniquely associated with synaptic functionality and that excitatory connectivity is necessary for the presence of network-wide bursting. In addition to confirming the critical contribution of direct

  1. Bipolar resistive switching behaviors of ITO nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Gong, Zhina; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Jiangteng; Zhang, Ye; Yun, Feng

    2016-02-01

    We have fabricated indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowire (NW) networks on aluminum electrodes using electron beam evaporation. The Ag/ITO-NW networks/Al capacitor exhibits bipolar resistive switching behavior. The resistive switching characteristics of ITO-NW networks are related to the morphology of NWs. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to obtain the chemical nature from the NWs surface, investigating the oxygen vacancy state. A stable switching voltages and a clear memory window were observed in needle-shaped NWs. The ITO-NW networks can be used as a new two-dimensional metal oxide material for the fabrication of high-density memory devices.

  2. Optimal Intrinsic Dynamics for Bursting in a Three-Cell Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmyre, Justin R.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    Previous numerical and analytical work has shown that synaptic coupling can allow a network of model neurons to synchronize despite heterogeneity in intrinsic parameter values. In particular, synchronous bursting oscillations can arise in a network with excitatory synaptic coupling, even in the absence of intrinsically bursting neurons. In this work, we explore how the intrinsic dynamics of neurons within a reduced three-cell network influence its ability to exhibit synchronous bursting and the frequency range over which such activity can occur. We establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of synchronous bursting solutions and perform related numerical experiments in three-cell networks that include a quiescent cell, a tonically active cell, and a third added cell. Our results show that, in most cases, the addition of a quiescent cell is optimal for synchronous network bursting, in a variety of ways, and that intrinsically bursting cells can be detrimental to synchronous bursting, and we explain the mechanisms underlying these effects. These findings may help explain how robust synchronous oscillations arise in neuronal central pattern generators, such as the mammalian inspiratory network, despite the presence of significant cellular heterogeneity. They also support the idea that intrinsic burst capabilities of individual cells need not be central to these networks' rhythms.

  3. Network mechanisms of responsiveness to continuous theta-burst stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Sviatlana; Ptak, Radek; Nyffeler, Thomas; Schnider, Armin; Guggisberg, Adrian G

    2013-10-01

    Continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) can modify behavior, but effects are inconsistent and their mechanisms insufficiently understood. As coherence in resting-state networks influences human behavior, we hypothesized that cTBS may act via modulation of neural oscillation coherence. This study used electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate whether behavioral effects of cTBS on visuospatial attention are associated with coherence changes in the attention network. In healthy human subjects, cTBS of the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and the right frontal eye field was compared with sham stimulation. Effects on visuospatial attention were quantified with a visual exploration task, and network effects were assessed from surface EEG with inverse solutions and source coherence analyses. Before stimulation, left visual exploration was linearly correlated with alpha-band coherence between the right temporo-parietal cortex and the rest of the brain. Posterior parietal cortex stimulation induced neglect-like visual exploration behavior in the majority, but not all, subjects. It reduced alpha-band coherence between the stimulation site and the rest of the brain but also enhanced it between the contralateral left parietal cortex and the rest of the brain. The contralateral increase correlated with the induced reduction in left visual attention. The behavioral response of individual participants to cTBS could be predicted by coherence in the right temporo-parietal junction before stimulation. Behavioral effects of cTBS therefore depend on network states before stimulation and are linearly associated with changes in network interactions. In particular, cTBS modulates an interhemispheric competition in alpha-band coherence. EEG network imaging might help to optimize therapeutic cTBS in the future. PMID:23941616

  4. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BURST AND TRANSIENT SOURCE EXPERIMENT 5B CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Briggs, M. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Boynton, W.; Starr, R.; McNutt, R.; Boer, M.

    2011-09-01

    We present Interplanetary Network localization information for 343 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) between the end of the 4th BATSE catalog and the end of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) mission, obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts at the Ulysses, Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), and CGRO spacecraft. For any given burst observed by CGRO and one other spacecraft, arrival time analysis (or 'triangulation') results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between 11 arcsec and 21{sup 0}, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in an average reduction of the area of a factor of 20. When all three spacecraft observe a burst, the result is an error box whose area varies between 1 and 48,000 arcmin{sup 2}, resulting in an average reduction of the BATSE error circle area of a factor of 87.

  5. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    PubMed

    Dranias, Mark R; Westover, M Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI. PMID:25755638

  6. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts

    PubMed Central

    Dranias, Mark R.; Westover, M. Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI. PMID:25755638

  7. Synchronization and rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network consisting of mixed bursting neurons with hybrid synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xia; Xi, Wenqi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, burst synchronization and rhythm dynamics of a small-world neuronal network consisting of mixed bursting types of neurons coupled via inhibitory-excitatory chemical synapses are explored. Two quantities, the synchronization parameter and average width factor, are used to characterize the synchronization degree and rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network. Numerical results show that the percentage of the inhibitory synapses in the network is the major factor for we get a similarly bell-shaped dependence of synchronization on it, and the decrease of the average width factor of the network. We also find that not only the value of the coupling strength can promote the synchronization degree, but the probability of random edges adding to the small-world network also can. The ratio of the long bursting neurons has little effect on the burst synchronization and rhythm dynamics of the network.

  8. A centralized quantum switch network based on probabilistic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Wu, Re-Bing; Li, Hui; Zhang, Zeng-ke

    2013-01-01

    We present a practical scheme for deterministically teleporting quantum information via probabilistic communication channels in a centralized quantum switch network. In the network, a central quantum switch agent is assigned for regulating probabilistic channels so as to construct a direct deterministic channel between the sender and the receiver. This scheme is further extended to a hierarchical network and a tree network involving multiple agents. The advantage of the scheme is that all required multi qubit gates from distributed terminal agents are uniformly performed by a central agent, with which the physical design of terminal nodes is greatly simplified and more reliable deterministic teleportation can be realized in a centralized quantum probabilistic network.

  9. Satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Andro, Monty; Nagy, Lawrence A.; Budinger, James M.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1989-01-01

    A versatile experimental Ka-band network simulator has been implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate and evaluate a satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SMS-TDMA) network and to evaluate future digital ground terminals and radiofrequency (RF) components. The simulator was implemented by using proof-of-concept RF components developed under NASA contracts and digital ground terminal and link simulation hardware developed at Lewis. This simulator provides many unique capabilities such as satellite range delay and variation simulation and rain fade simulation. All network parameters (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, satellite range variation rate, burst density, and rain fade) are controlled and monitored by a central computer. The simulator is presently configured as a three-ground-terminal SMS-TDMA network.

  10. Satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Andro, Monty; Nagy, Lawrence A.; Budinger, James M.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1990-01-01

    A versatile experimental Ka-band network simulator has been implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate and evaluate a satellite-matrix-switched, time-division-multiple-access (SMS-TDMA) network and to evaluate future digital ground terminals and radiofrequency (RF) components. The simulator was implemented by using proof-of-concept RF components developed under NASA contracts and digital ground terminal and link simulation hardware developed at Lewis. This simulator provides many unique capabilities such as satellite range delay and variation simulation and rain fade simulation. All network parameters (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, satellite range variation rate, burst density, and rain fade) are controlled and monitored by a central computer. The simulator is presently configured as a three-ground-terminal SMS-TDMA network.

  11. Motif for controllable toggle switch in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chen; Bin, Ao; Ye, Weiming; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2015-02-01

    Toggle switch as a common phenomenon in gene regulatory networks has been recognized important for biological functions. Despite much effort dedicated to understanding the toggle switch and designing synthetic biology circuit to achieve the biological function, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of the intrinsic dynamics behind such phenomenon and the minimum structure that is imperative for producing toggle switch. In this paper, we discover a minimum structure, a motif that enables a controllable toggle switch. In particular, the motif consists of a transformative double negative feedback loop (DNFL) that is regulated by an additional driver node. By enumerating all possible regulatory configurations from the driver node, we identify two types of motifs associated with the toggle switch that is captured by the existence of bistable states. The toggle switch is controllable in the sense that the gap between the bistable states is adjustable as determined by the regulatory strength from the driver nodes. We test the effect of the motifs in self-oscillating gene regulatory network (SON) with respect to the interplay between the motifs and the other genes, and find that the switching dynamics of the whole network can be successfully controlled insofar as the network contains a single motif. Our findings are important to uncover the underlying nonlinear dynamics of controllable toggle switch and can have implications in devising biology circuit in the field of synthetic biology.

  12. Broadband packet switches based on dilated interconnection networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tony T.; Liew, Soung C.

    1994-02-01

    A theoretical foundation for evaluation and comparison of a very broad spectrum of fast packet-switching techniques is developed in this paper. Based on this framework, we investigate the complexity of various packet switch designs, and demonstrate the advantage of dilation as a switch-design technique. Packet switches are classified either as loss systems or waiting systems, according to whether packets losing contention are dropped or queued. In a loss system, the packet loss probability can be made arbitrary small by providing enough paths between inputs and outputs. We focus on the question: How does the switch complexity grow as a function of switch size for a given loss probability requirement? A uniform approach to this problem is developed here. We show that for an N x N switch, the required number of switch elements for both the parallel-banyan network and the tandem-banyan network is of order N(log N)(sup 2), whereas the complexity of a dilated-banyan network is of order N log N(log log N). Within the class of waiting systems, we show that the parallel banyan networks in a Batcher-parallel-banyan network can be replaced by a dilated-banyan network without sacrificing the nonblocking property. Thus, as with parallelization, dilation can also be used to increase the throughput of a waiting system. In addition, we also explore the application of dilation in a large modular switch design which is realized by an interconnection structure consisting of Batcher-dilated-banyan networks and statistical multiplexers.

  13. Chaotic burst synchronization in a two-small-world-layer neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanhong; Wang, Haixia

    2015-09-01

    Chaotic burst synchronization in a two-small-world-layer neuronal network is studied in this paper. For a neuronal network coupled by two single-small-world-layer networks with link probability differences between layers, the two-layer network can achieve synchrony as the interlayer coupling strength increases. When chaotic layer network is coupled with chaotic-burst-synchronization layer network, the latter is dominant at small interlayer coupling strength, so it can make the layer with the irregular pattern show some regular and also exhibit the same pattern with the other layer. However, when chaotic layer is coupled with firing synchronization layer, the ordered layer is dominated by a disordered one with the interlayer coupling strength increasing. When the interlayer coupling strength is large enough, both networks are chaotic burst synchronization. Therefore, the synchronous states strongly depend on the interlayer coupling strength and the link probability. Moreover, the spatiotemporal pattern synchronization between the networks is robust to small noise.

  14. Neural networks supporting switching, hypothesis testing, and rule application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiya; Braunlich, Kurt; Wehe, Hillary S; Seger, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    We identified dynamic changes in recruitment of neural connectivity networks across three phases of a flexible rule learning and set-shifting task similar to the Wisconsin Card Sort Task: switching, rule learning via hypothesis testing, and rule application. During fMRI scanning, subjects viewed pairs of stimuli that differed across four dimensions (letter, color, size, screen location), chose one stimulus, and received feedback. Subjects were informed that the correct choice was determined by a simple unidimensional rule, for example "choose the blue letter". Once each rule had been learned and correctly applied for 4-7 trials, subjects were cued via either negative feedback or visual cues to switch to learning a new rule. Task performance was divided into three phases: Switching (first trial after receiving the switch cue), hypothesis testing (subsequent trials through the last error trial), and rule application (correct responding after the rule was learned). We used both univariate analysis to characterize activity occurring within specific regions of the brain, and a multivariate method, constrained principal component analysis for fMRI (fMRI-CPCA), to investigate how distributed regions coordinate to subserve different processes. As hypothesized, switching was subserved by a limbic network including the ventral striatum, thalamus, and parahippocampal gyrus, in conjunction with cortical salience network regions including the anterior cingulate and frontoinsular cortex. Activity in the ventral striatum was associated with switching regardless of how switching was cued; visually cued shifts were associated with additional visual cortical activity. After switching, as subjects moved into the hypothesis testing phase, a broad fronto-parietal-striatal network (associated with the cognitive control, dorsal attention, and salience networks) increased in activity. This network was sensitive to rule learning speed, with greater extended activity for the slowest

  15. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states. PMID:26869313

  16. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states. PMID:26869313

  17. Network management technology for Ethernet switch based on cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xian-Cheng; Yun, Xiang

    2004-04-01

    Currently, network administration involves repetitive and time-consuming tasks. Clustering enables network administrators to overcome hurdles when they attempt to manage their LANs. Clustering is proved to be a breakthrough for LANs. Under the cluster management model, all switches can be managed as a cluster based on a single IP address. A single command switch for each cluster would automatically discover and control all switches in a cluster, regardless of where they are located. Switch Clustering is implemented over the TCP/IP protocol. The hardware scheme is present in this paper. Then the cluster communication protocol is analyzed in detail. It involves CTP (Cluster Topology Protocol) and CMP (Cluster Management Protocol). At last we present two typical examples for Switch Clustering.

  18. Switching synchronization in one-dimensional memristive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipko, Valeriy A.; Shumovskyi, Mykola; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2015-11-01

    We report on a switching synchronization phenomenon in one-dimensional memristive networks, which occurs when several memristive systems with different switching constants are switched from the high- to low-resistance state. Our numerical simulations show that such a collective behavior is especially pronounced when the applied voltage slightly exceeds the combined threshold voltage of memristive systems. Moreover, a finite increase in the network switching time is found compared to the average switching time of individual systems. An analytical model is presented to explain our observations. Using this model, we have derived asymptotic expressions for memory resistances at short and long times, which are in excellent agreement with results of our numerical simulations.

  19. Switching synchronization in one-dimensional memristive networks.

    PubMed

    Slipko, Valeriy A; Shumovskyi, Mykola; Pershin, Yuriy V

    2015-11-01

    We report on a switching synchronization phenomenon in one-dimensional memristive networks, which occurs when several memristive systems with different switching constants are switched from the high- to low-resistance state. Our numerical simulations show that such a collective behavior is especially pronounced when the applied voltage slightly exceeds the combined threshold voltage of memristive systems. Moreover, a finite increase in the network switching time is found compared to the average switching time of individual systems. An analytical model is presented to explain our observations. Using this model, we have derived asymptotic expressions for memory resistances at short and long times, which are in excellent agreement with results of our numerical simulations. PMID:26651772

  20. A Reconnection Switch to Trigger gamma-Ray Burst Jet Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2012-03-14

    Prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission requires some mechanism to dissipate an ultrarelativistic jet. Internal shocks or some form of electromagnetic dissipation are candidate mechanisms. Any mechanism needs to answer basic questions, such as what is the origin of variability, what radius does dissipation occur at, and how does efficient prompt emission occur. These mechanisms also need to be consistent with how ultrarelativistic jets form and stay baryon pure despite turbulence and electromagnetic reconnection near the compact object and despite stellar entrainment within the collapsar model. We use the latest magnetohydrodynamical models of ultrarelativistic jets to explore some of these questions in the context of electromagnetic dissipation due to the slow collisional and fast collisionless reconnection mechanisms, as often associated with Sweet-Parker and Petschek reconnection, respectively. For a highly magnetized ultrarelativistic jet and typical collapsar parameters, we find that significant electromagnetic dissipation may be avoided until it proceeds catastrophically near the jet photosphere at large radii (r {approx} 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14}cm), by which the jet obtains a high Lorentz factor ({gamma} {approx} 100-1000), has a luminosity of L{sub j} {approx} 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg s{sup -1}, has observer variability timescales of order 1s (ranging from 0.001-10s), achieves {gamma}{theta}{sub j} {approx} 10-20 (for opening half-angle {theta}{sub j}) and so is able to produce jet breaks, and has comparable energy available for both prompt and afterglow emission. A range of model parameters are investigated and simplified scaling laws are derived. This reconnection switch mechanism allows for highly efficient conversion of electromagnetic energy into prompt emission and associates the observed prompt GRB pulse temporal structure with dissipation timescales of some number of reconnecting current sheets embedded in the jet. We hope this work helps motivate the

  1. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is achieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  2. Interconnecting network for switching data packets and method for switching data packets

    DOEpatents

    Benner, Alan Frederic; Minkenberg, Cyriel Johan Agnes; Stunkel, Craig Brian

    2010-05-25

    The interconnecting network for switching data packets, having data and flow control information, comprises a local packet switch element (S1) with local input buffers (I(1,1) . . . I(1,y)) for buffering the incoming data packets, a remote packet switch element (S2) with remote input buffers (I(2,1) . . . I(2,y)) for buffering the incoming data packets, and data lines (L) for interconnecting the local and the remote packet switch elements (S1, S2). The interconnecting network further comprises a local and a remote arbiter (A1, A2) which are connected via control lines (CL) to the input buffers (I(1,1) . . . I(1,y), I(2,1) . . . I(2,y)), and which are formed such that they can provide that the flow control information is transmitted via the data lines (L) and the control lines (CL).

  3. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  4. Scaling silicon photonic switch fabrics for data center interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Dessislava; Rumley, Sébastien; Calhoun, David; Li, Qi; Hendry, Robert; Samadi, Payman; Bergman, Keren

    2015-01-26

    With the rapidly increasing aggregate bandwidth requirements of data centers there is a growing interest in the insertion of optically interconnected networks with high-radix transparent optical switch fabrics. Silicon photonics is a particularly promising and applicable technology due to its small footprint, CMOS compatibility, high bandwidth density, and the potential for nanosecond scale dynamic connectivity. In this paper we analyze the feasibility of building silicon photonic microring based switch fabrics for data center scale optical interconnection networks. We evaluate the scalability of a microring based switch fabric for WDM signals. Critical parameters including crosstalk, insertion loss and switching speed are analyzed, and their sensitivity with respect to device parameters is examined. We show that optimization of physical layer parameters can reduce crosstalk and increase switch fabric scalability. Our analysis indicates that with current state-of-the-art devices, a high radix 128 × 128 silicon photonic single chip switch fabric with tolerable power penalty is feasible. The applicability of silicon photonic microrings for data center switching is further supported via review of microring operations and control demonstrations. The challenges and opportunities for this technology platform are discussed. PMID:25835876

  5. The generation of the synchronized burst in the cultured neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangning; Sun, Jing; Chen, Wenjuan; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2009-02-01

    The spontaneous synchronous activity is a common behavior in a developing brain and plays a critical role in establishing appropriate connections and certain clinical diseases. Therefore, the investigation of the synchronous firing is important for understanding the formation of functional circuits and their implications in the network plasticity. In a limited period of time during development, the neuronal networks show synchronous activities, which occur simultaneously on a large amount of cells and varies wildly among different preparations. In this study, the spontaneous synchronous bursts are observed during the development of cultured neuron networks on multi-electrode array. The initiating site of a round of spontaneous synchronous burst, estimated from the relative delays of onsets of activities between electrodes, distributed randomly from each burst, while our statistical results confirmed that the positions of such initiating sites are stable. By calculating the cross-correlation function of the spike trains recorded from different electrodes simultaneously, the spreading mode and the spreading topography of the synchronized bursting activity were described. To access the changes in firing patterns in disinhibited cultured networks, the spontaneous activities were compared with the firings when the network exposed to bicuculline, the blocker of GABAA receptor. The results showed that the generation of synchronous bursts in cultured neuron networks is governed by the level of spontaneous activities and by the balance between excitation and inhibition circuits.

  6. Optical fiber switch for sensor networks: design principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borecki, M.; Szmidt, J.; Wrzosek, P.; Beblowska, M.

    2006-10-01

    Photonic cross-sections play a crucial role in transparent optical networks. Designs intended for telecommunication networks are already well known, whereas those intended for sensor networks are still at a preliminary stage of development. The present paper presents a design and a model of a switch suitable for sensor networks. The idea underlying the design is the use of optical fibers with cores of relatively large diameters. The paper describes the basic assumptions adopted in the design, and the reasoning conducted to find the optimum configuration of the 1x2 switch microsystem. i.e. the switching lattice and its driver. The lattice is constructed of a fiber positioning circuit and an actuator. A model of the switch head for polymer clad silica fibers is presented. The underlying idea consists of the use of an electromagnetic actuator with a magnetic thumb-lock. This design enables the switch to be manufactured in short series and permits decreasing the dimensions of the entire microsystem.

  7. Optical packet switch architectures for ultrahigh-speed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, M. J.; Klonidis, Dimitris; Politi, Christina; Negabati, Reza; Simeonidou, Dimitra

    2005-11-01

    Optical packet switching is commonly considered as a possible technology for future telecommunication networks, due to its compatibility with bursty traffic, eg Internet protocol (IP), and efficient use of wavelength channels. Current transport networks are voice-optimised and connection oriented, however the amount of data traffic is rapidly increasing, resulting in a continuous increase of average traffic through major exchanges exceeding 30% per annum (in Europe). Thus optical packet switching is seen as a future technology that will support diverse traffic profiles and give more efficient bandwidth utilisation through its ability to provide multiplexing at the packet level. In recent years the significance of optical packet switching as an emerging technology has been identified and researched by a number of research groups. Earlier optical packet switching demonstrators presented switching of mainly ATM compatible synchronously transmitted packets at bit rates up to 2.5b/s with the optical header encoded either in series or in parallel to the payload using the sub-carrier modulation technique. More recent projects have demonstrated switching capabilities at 10Gb/s using more advanced approaches with special encoding schemes for header and header detection, together with sophisticated control mechanisms for contention resolution. The capability of switching optical packets at bit rates up to 160Gb/s has recently been demonstrated. This paper discusses the architectures currently proposed for high speed optical packet switching, including the key techniques of header processing and payload switching. The focus is on a high speed demonstrator [OPSnet] capable of operation at rates >100 Gb/s.

  8. Effects of glial release and somatic receptors on bursting in synchronized neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xuan; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, C. K.

    2011-07-01

    A model is constructed to study the phenomenon of bursting in cultured neuronal networks by considering the effects of glial release and the extrasynaptic receptors on neurons. In the frequently observed situations of synchronized bursting, the whole neuronal network can be described by a mean-field model. In this model, the dynamics of the synchronized network in the presence of glia is represented by an effective two-compartment neuron with stimulations on both the dendrite and soma. Numerical simulations of this model show that most of the experimental observations in bursting, in particular the high plateau and the slow repolarization, can be reproduced. Our findings suggest that the effects of glia release and extrasynaptic receptors, which are usually neglected in neuronal models, can become important in intense network activities. Furthermore, simulations of the model are also performed for the case of glia-suppressed cultures to compare with recent experimental results.

  9. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE HETE-2 GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barraud, C.; Pelangeon, A.; Boeer, M.; Vanderspek, R.; Ricker, G.; Mazets, E.; Golenetskii, S.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Smith, D. M.; Wigger, C.; Hajdas, W.; Rau, A.; Von Kienlin, A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S. [Space Research Institute, 84 and others

    2011-12-01

    Between 2000 November and 2006 May, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network (IPN) detected 226 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the French Gamma-Ray Telescope experiment on board the High Energy Transient Experiment 2 spacecraft. During this period, the IPN consisted of up to nine spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 157 bursts were obtained. We present the IPN localization data on these events.

  10. Fast packet switching algorithms for dynamic resource control over ATM networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, R.P.; Keattihananant, P.; Chang, T.; Heieh, J.; Du, D.

    1996-12-01

    Real-time continuous media traffic, such as digital video and audio, is expected to comprise a large percentage of the network load on future high speed packet switch networks such as ATM. A major feature which distinguishes high speed networks from traditional slower speed networks is the large amount of data the network must process very quickly. For efficient network usage, traffic control mechanisms are essential. Currently, most mechanisms for traffic control (such as flow control) have centered on the support of Available Bit Rate (ABR), i.e., non real-time, traffic. With regard to ATM, for ABR traffic, two major types of schemes which have been proposed are rate- control and credit-control schemes. Neither of these schemes are directly applicable to Real-time Variable Bit Rate (VBR) traffic such as continuous media traffic. Traffic control for continuous media traffic is an inherently difficult problem due to the time- sensitive nature of the traffic and its unpredictable burstiness. In this study, we present a scheme which controls traffic by dynamically allocating/de- allocating resources among competing VCs based upon their real-time requirements. This scheme incorporates a form of rate- control, real-time burst-level scheduling and link-link flow control. We show analytically potential performance improvements of our rate- control scheme and present a scheme for buffer dimensioning. We also present simulation results of our schemes and discuss the tradeoffs inherent in maintaining high network utilization and statistically guaranteeing many users` Quality of Service.

  11. Phase synchronization of bursting neural networks with electrical and delayed dynamic chemical couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megam Ngouonkadi, Elie B.; Nono, Martial Kabong; Tamba, Victor Kamdoum; Fotsin, Hilaire B.

    2015-11-01

    Diffusive electrical connections in neuronal networks are instantaneous, while excitatory or inhibitory couplings through chemical synapses contain a transmission time-delay. Moreover, chemical synapses are nonlinear dynamical systems whose behavior can be described by nonlinear differential equations. In this work, neuronal networks with diffusive electrical couplings and time-delayed dynamic chemical couplings are considered. We investigate the effects of distributed time delays on phase synchronization of bursting neurons. We observe that in both excitatory and Inhibitory chemical connections, the phase synchronization might be enhanced when time-delay is taken into account. This distributed time delay can induce a variety of phase-coherent dynamical behaviors. We also study the collective dynamics of network of bursting neurons. The network model presents the so-called Small-World property, encompassing neurons whose dynamics have two time scales (fast and slow time scales). The neuron parameters in such Small-World network, are supposed to be slightly different such that, there may be synchronization of the bursting (slow) activity if the coupling strengths are large enough. Bounds for the critical coupling strengths to obtain burst synchronization in terms of the network structure are given. Our studies show that the network synchronizability is improved, as its heterogeneity is reduced. The roles of synaptic parameters, more precisely those of the coupling strengths and the network size are also investigated.

  12. On-board congestion control for satellite packet switching networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Pong P.

    1991-01-01

    It is desirable to incorporate packet switching capability on-board for future communication satellites. Because of the statistical nature of packet communication, incoming traffic fluctuates and may cause congestion. Thus, it is necessary to incorporate a congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing to smooth and regulate the bursty traffic. Although there are extensive studies on congestion control for both baseband and broadband terrestrial networks, these schemes are not feasible for space based switching networks because of the unique characteristics of satellite link. Here, we propose a new congestion control method for on-board satellite packet switching. This scheme takes into consideration the long propagation delay in satellite link and takes advantage of the the satellite's broadcasting capability. It divides the control between the ground terminals and satellite, but distributes the primary responsibility to ground terminals and only requires minimal hardware resource on-board satellite.

  13. Switched electrical networks and bilinear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    State equations arising in the description of power processing systems are described. The role played by Lie groups and Lie algebras in characterizing the inherent dynamical features of these systems is outlined, and network examples are presented for illustration.

  14. Switched electrical networks and bilinear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the state equations which arise in the description of power processing systems. Attention is given to the role played by Lie groups and Lie algebras in the characterization of the dynamical features of the systems. The bilinear equations used for the representation of the network characteristics are discussed along with the nature of the solutions for the equations. The application of the described approaches is illustrated with the aid of a number of network examples.

  15. Embryonic----Fetal Hb switch in humans: studies on erythroid bursts generated by embryonic progenitors from yolk sac and liver.

    PubMed

    Peschle, C; Migliaccio, A R; Migliaccio, G; Petrini, M; Calandrini, M; Russo, G; Mastroberardino, G; Presta, M; Gianni, A M; Comi, P

    1984-04-01

    The synthesis of embryonic (zeta, epsilon), fetal (alpha, gamma), and adult (beta) globin was evaluated in human yolk sacs (YS) and livers at different ontogenic stages (i.e., from 6 through 10-12 wk of age) by means of analytical isoelectric focusing. Globin production was comparatively evaluated in vivo (i.e., in directly labeled erythroblasts from YS and liver) and in vitro [i.e., in erythroid bursts generated in culture by erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) from the same erythropoietic tissues]. Erythroid bursts generated in vitro by BFU-E from 6-wk livers and YS show essentially a "fetal" globin synthetic pattern: this is in sharp contrast to the "embryonic" pattern in corresponding liver and YS erythroblasts directly labeled in vivo. The invitro phenomenon suggests that (i) 6-wk BFU-E constitute a new generation of progenitors, which have already switched from an embryonic to a fetal program, and/or (ii) expression of their fetal program is induced by unknown in vitro factor(s), which may underlie the in vivo switch at later ontogenic stages. It is emphasized that 6- to 7-wk BFU-E are endowed with the potential for in vitro synthesis of not only epsilon- and gamma-chains but also some beta-globin. In general, we observed an inverse correlation between the levels of epsilon- and beta-chain synthesis. These results, together with previous studies on fetal, perinatal, and adult BFU-E, are compatible with models suggesting that in ontogeny the chromatin configuration is gradually modified at the level of the non-alpha gene cluster, thus leading to a 5'----3' activation of globin genes in a balanced fashion. PMID:6201856

  16. Large optical 3D MEMS switches in access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Kaman, Volkan; Yuan, Shifu; Jerphagnon, Olivier; Helkey, Roger; Bowers, John E.

    2007-09-01

    Interest is high among residential customers and businesses for advanced, broadband services such as fast Internet access, electronic commerce, video-on-demand, digital broadcasting, teleconferencing and telemedicine. In order to satisfy such growing demand of end-customers, access technologies such as fiber-to-the-home/building (FTTH/B) are increasingly being deployed. Carriers can reduce maintenance costs, minimize technology obsolescence and introduce new services easily by reducing active elements in the fiber access network. However, having a passive optical network (PON) also introduces operational and maintenance challenges. Increased diagnostic monitoring capability of the network becomes a necessity as more and more fibers are provisioned to deliver services to the end-customers. This paper demonstrates the clear advantages that large 3D optical MEMS switches offer in solving these access network problems. The advantages in preventative maintenance, remote monitoring, test and diagnostic capability are highlighted. The low optical insertion loss for all switch optical connections of the switch enables the monitoring, grooming and serving of a large number of PON lines and customers. Furthermore, the 3D MEMS switch is transparent to optical wavelengths and data formats, thus making it easy to incorporate future upgrades, such higher bit rates or DWDM overlay to a PON.

  17. 76 FR 36154 - In the Matter of Certain Equipment for Communications Networks, Including Switches, Routers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Equipment for Communications Networks, Including Switches, Routers... United States after importation of certain equipment for communications networks, including switches... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain equipment for...

  18. Neural network/acoustic emission burst pressure prediction for impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.L.; Workman, G.L.; Russell, S.S.; Hill, E.V.K.

    1997-08-01

    Acoustic emission signal analysis has been used to measure the effect impact damage has on the burst pressure of 146 mm (5.75 in.) diameter graphite/epoxy and the organic polymer, Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels. Burst pressure prediction models were developed by correlating the differential acoustic emission amplitude distribution collected during low level hydroproof tests to known burst pressures using backpropagation artificial neural networks. Impact damage conditions ranging from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination were included in this work. A simulated (inert) propellant was also cast into a series of the vessels from each material class, before impact loading, to provide boundary conditions during impact that would simulate those found on solid rocket motors. The results of this research effort demonstrate that a quantitative assessment of the effects that impact damage has on burst pressure can be made for both organic polymer/epoxy and graphite/epoxy pressure vessels. Here, an artificial neural network analysis of the acoustic emission parametric data recorded during low pressure hydroproof testing is used to relate burst pressure to the vessel`s acoustic signature. Burst pressure predictions within 6.0% of the actual failure pressure are demonstrated for a series of vessels.

  19. Search for gravitational waves associated with the InterPlanetary Network short gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi, V.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Hurley, Kevin; IPN Collaboration

    2012-06-01

    We outline the scientific motivation behind a search for gravitational waves associated with short gamma ray bursts detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The InterPlanetary Network localisation of short gamma ray bursts is limited to extended error boxes of different shapes and sizes and a search on these error boxes poses a series of challenges for data analysis. We will discuss these challenges and outline the methods to optimise the search over these error boxes.

  20. Propagation of Spiking and Burst-Spiking Synchronous States in a Feed-Forward Neuronal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Huang, Hong-Bin; Li, Pei-Jun; Wu, Fang-Ping; Wu, Wang-Jie; Jiang, Min

    2012-12-01

    Neuronal firing that carries information can propagate stably in neuronal networks. One important feature of the stable states is their spatiotemporal correlation (STC) developed in the propagation. The propagation of synchronous states of spiking and burst-spiking neuronal activities in a feed-forward neuronal network with high STC is studied. Different dynamic regions and synchronous regions of the second layer are clarified for spiking and burst-spiking neuronal activities. By calculating correlation, it is found that five layers are needed for stable propagation. Synchronous regions of the 4th layer and the 10th layer are compared.

  1. Passivity of switched recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the passivity analysis for switched neural networks subject to stochastic disturbances and time-varying delays. First, using the multiple Lyapunov functions method, a state-dependent switching law is designed to present a stochastic passivity condition. Second, a hysteresis switching law involving both the current state and the previous value of the switching signal are presented to avoid chattering resulted from the state-dependent switching. Third, based on the average dwell-time approach, a class of switching signals is determined to guarantee the switched neural network stochastically passive. Finally, three numerical examples are provided to illustrate the characteristics of three proposed switching laws. PMID:25576577

  2. Chaotic phase synchronization in small-world networks of bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Wong, Y. K.; Chan, W. L.; Tsang, K. M.; Yu, Ziqi

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the chaotic phase synchronization in a system of coupled bursting neurons in small-world networks. A transition to mutual phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled oscillators, while on the spiking time scale, they behave asynchronously. It is shown that phase synchronization is largely facilitated by a large fraction of shortcuts, but saturates when it exceeds a critical value. We also study the external chaotic phase synchronization of bursting oscillators in the small-world network by a periodic driving signal applied to a single neuron. It is demonstrated that there exists an optimal small-world topology, resulting in the largest peak value of frequency locking interval in the parameter plane, where bursting synchronization is maintained, even with the external driving. The width of this interval increases with the driving amplitude, but decrease rapidly with the network size. We infer that the externally applied driving parameters outside the frequency locking region can effectively suppress pathologically synchronized rhythms of bursting neurons in the brain.

  3. Structure-dynamics relationships in bursting neuronal networks revealed using a prediction framework.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Ruohonen, Keijo; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2013-01-01

    The question of how the structure of a neuronal network affects its functionality has gained a lot of attention in neuroscience. However, the vast majority of the studies on structure-dynamics relationships consider few types of network structures and assess limited numbers of structural measures. In this in silico study, we employ a wide diversity of network topologies and search among many possibilities the aspects of structure that have the greatest effect on the network excitability. The network activity is simulated using two point-neuron models, where the neurons are activated by noisy fluctuation of the membrane potential and their connections are described by chemical synapse models, and statistics on the number and quality of the emergent network bursts are collected for each network type. We apply a prediction framework to the obtained data in order to find out the most relevant aspects of network structure. In this framework, predictors that use different sets of graph-theoretic measures are trained to estimate the activity properties, such as burst count or burst length, of the networks. The performances of these predictors are compared with each other. We show that the best performance in prediction of activity properties for networks with sharp in-degree distribution is obtained when the prediction is based on clustering coefficient. By contrast, for networks with broad in-degree distribution, the maximum eigenvalue of the connectivity graph gives the most accurate prediction. The results shown for small ([Formula: see text]) networks hold with few exceptions when different neuron models, different choices of neuron population and different average degrees are applied. We confirm our conclusions using larger ([Formula: see text]) networks as well. Our findings reveal the relevance of different aspects of network structure from the viewpoint of network excitability, and our integrative method could serve as a general framework for structure

  4. Structure-Dynamics Relationships in Bursting Neuronal Networks Revealed Using a Prediction Framework

    PubMed Central

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Ruohonen, Keijo; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2013-01-01

    The question of how the structure of a neuronal network affects its functionality has gained a lot of attention in neuroscience. However, the vast majority of the studies on structure-dynamics relationships consider few types of network structures and assess limited numbers of structural measures. In this in silico study, we employ a wide diversity of network topologies and search among many possibilities the aspects of structure that have the greatest effect on the network excitability. The network activity is simulated using two point-neuron models, where the neurons are activated by noisy fluctuation of the membrane potential and their connections are described by chemical synapse models, and statistics on the number and quality of the emergent network bursts are collected for each network type. We apply a prediction framework to the obtained data in order to find out the most relevant aspects of network structure. In this framework, predictors that use different sets of graph-theoretic measures are trained to estimate the activity properties, such as burst count or burst length, of the networks. The performances of these predictors are compared with each other. We show that the best performance in prediction of activity properties for networks with sharp in-degree distribution is obtained when the prediction is based on clustering coefficient. By contrast, for networks with broad in-degree distribution, the maximum eigenvalue of the connectivity graph gives the most accurate prediction. The results shown for small () networks hold with few exceptions when different neuron models, different choices of neuron population and different average degrees are applied. We confirm our conclusions using larger () networks as well. Our findings reveal the relevance of different aspects of network structure from the viewpoint of network excitability, and our integrative method could serve as a general framework for structure-dynamics studies in biosciences. PMID:23935998

  5. Phase synchronization of bursting neurons in clustered small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, C. A. S.; Lameu, E. L.; Batista, A. M.; Lopes, S. R.; Pereira, T.; Zamora-López, G.; Kurths, J.; Viana, R. L.

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the collective dynamics of bursting neurons on clustered networks. The clustered network model is composed of subnetworks, each of them presenting the so-called small-world property. This model can also be regarded as a network of networks. In each subnetwork a neuron is connected to other ones with regular as well as random connections, the latter with a given intracluster probability. Moreover, in a given subnetwork each neuron has an intercluster probability to be connected to the other subnetworks. The local neuron dynamics has two time scales (fast and slow) and is modeled by a two-dimensional map. In such small-world network the neuron parameters are chosen to be slightly different such that, if the coupling strength is large enough, there may be synchronization of the bursting (slow) activity. We give bounds for the critical coupling strength to obtain global burst synchronization in terms of the network structure, that is, the probabilities of intracluster and intercluster connections. We find that, as the heterogeneity in the network is reduced, the network global synchronizability is improved. We show that the transitions to global synchrony may be abrupt or smooth depending on the intercluster probability.

  6. Principle and verification of novel optical virtual private networks over multiprotocol label switching/optical packet switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Wang, Zhengsuan; Jin, Wei; Qiu, Kun

    2012-11-01

    A novel realization method of the optical virtual private networks (OVPN) over multiprotocol label switching/optical packet switching (MPLS/OPS) networks is proposed. In this scheme, the introduction of MPLS control plane makes OVPN over OPS networks more reliable and easier; OVPN makes use of the concept of high reconfiguration of light-paths offered by MPLS, to set up secure tunnels of high bandwidth across intelligent OPS networks. Through resource management, the signal mechanism, connection control, and the architecture of the creation and maintenance of OVPN are efficiently realized. We also present an OVPN architecture with two traffic priorities, which is used to analyze the capacity, throughput, delay time of the proposed networks, and the packet loss rate performance of the OVPN over MPLS/OPS networks based on full mesh topology. The results validate the applicability of such reliable connectivity to high quality services in the OVPN over MPLS/OPS networks. Along with the results, the feasibility of the approach as the basis for the next generation networks is demonstrated and discussed.

  7. Delay-decomposing approach to robust stability for switched interval networks with state-dependent switching.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Cao, Jinde; Hayat, Tasawar

    2014-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a class of nonlinear uncertain switched networks with discrete time-varying delays . Based on the strictly complete property of the matrices system and the delay-decomposing approach, exploiting a new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional decomposing the delays in integral terms, the switching rule depending on the state of the network is designed. Moreover, by piecewise delay method, discussing the Lyapunov functional in every different subintervals, some new delay-dependent robust stability criteria are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which lead to much less conservative results than those in the existing references and improve previous results. Finally, an illustrative example is given to demonstrate the validity of the theoretical results. PMID:25009673

  8. Control of bursting synchronization in networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons with chemical synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, C. A. S.; Viana, R. L.; Ferrari, F. A. S.; Lopes, S. R.; Batista, A. M.; Coninck, J. C. P.

    2013-04-01

    Thermally sensitive neurons present bursting activity for certain temperature ranges, characterized by fast repetitive spiking of action potential followed by a short quiescent period. Synchronization of bursting activity is possible in networks of coupled neurons, and it is sometimes an undesirable feature. Control procedures can suppress totally or partially this collective behavior, with potential applications in deep-brain stimulation techniques. We investigate the control of bursting synchronization in small-world networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type thermally sensitive neurons with chemical synapses through two different strategies. One is the application of an external time-periodic electrical signal and another consists of a time-delayed feedback signal. We consider the effectiveness of both strategies in terms of protocols of applications suitable to be applied by pacemakers.

  9. Partial synchronization in stochastic dynamical networks with switching communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi; Ho, Daniel W. C.; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the partial synchronization problem of stochastic dynamical networks (SDNs) is investigated. Unlike the existing models, the SDN considered in this paper suffers from a class of communication constraint—only part of nodes' states can be transmitted. Thus, less nodes' states can be used to synchronize the SDN, which makes the analysis of the synchronization problem much harder. A set of channel matrices are introduced to reflect such kind of constraint. Furthermore, due to unpredictable environmental changes, the channel matrices can switch among some communication modes. The switching considered here is governed by a Markov process. To overcome the difficulty, a regrouping method is employed to derive our main results. The obtained conditions guarantee that partial synchronization can be achieved for SDNs under switching communication constraint. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and how the communication constraint influences synchronization result.

  10. Adding the GLAST Burst Monitor to the 3rd Interplanetary Network

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, Kevin

    2007-07-12

    The addition of the GLAST Burst Monitor to the interplanetary network is discussed. The IPN can detect about 32% of the GBM events, and reduce the sizes of their error boxes substantially. These error boxes have a wide variety of uses.

  11. Optical networking by DLP-based switched blazed grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hoang Yan; Chung, Shuang-Chao

    2005-02-01

    All-optical modules are devices which process and transport optical signals without transforming to electronic signals. They get more attention as the optical communication network becomes more and more complicated. Among them, OADM (optical add drop module) is one of the most important devices in the optical DWDM (dense wavelength division multiplex) network. It plays the role of a node in network to upload/download signals or to route signals for optical performance monitoring. Applied broadly in projection display systems, DLP (Digital Light Processing) from Texas Instruments turns out to be a versatile device for optical signal processing. The working principle of DLP is based on so called switched-blazed-grating. Part of its micro-mirror array can be formed as a dynamic blazed grating with a period of 14 μm by tilting the micro-mirrors at an angle of +/-12 degrees. It is expected to function as either a switch or an attenuator by directing total or part of the incident light between the 2nd and -2nd diffraction orders. In this paper, we investigate the optical characteristics of a switched-blazed-grating, its application as a re-configurable OADM, and the performance of such a device. Ray tracing and optical analysis of the OADM are made by using package software ASAP from Breault Research Organization. In conclusion, as a mature and reliable MEMS device, DLP-based switched-blazed-grating provides a very versatile platform for digital optical signal processing and can be used as a dynamic optical-networking device with good performance.

  12. Switched-beam radiometer front-end network analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trew, R. J.; Bilbro, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    The noise figure performance of various delay-line networks fabricated from microstrip lines with varying number of elements was investigated using a computer simulation. The effects of resistive losses in both the transmission lines and power combiners were considered. In general, it is found that an optimum number of elements exists, depending upon the resistive losses present in the network. Small resistive losses are found to have a significant degrading effect upon the noise figure performance of the array. Extreme stability in switching characteristics is necessary to minimize the nondeterministic noise of the array. For example, it is found that a 6 percent tolerance on the delay-line lengths will produce a 0.2 db uncertainty in the noise figure which translates into a 13.67 K temperature uncertainty generated by the network. If the tolerance can be held to 2 percent, the uncertainty in noise figure and noise temperature will be 0.025 db and 1.67 K, respectively. Three phase shift networks fabricated using a commercially available PIN diode switch were investigated. Loaded-line phase shifters are found to have desirable RF and noise characteristics and are attractive components for use in phased-array networks.

  13. A second catalog of gamma ray bursts: 1978 - 1980 localizations from the interplanetary network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J. L.; Barat, C.; Evans, W. D.; Laros, J. G.; Cline, T. L.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Eighty-two gamma ray bursts were detected between 1978 September 14 and 1980 February 13 by the experiments of the interplanetary network (Prognoz 7, Venera 11 and 12 SIGNE experiments, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, International Sun-Earth Explorer 3, Helios 2, and Vela). Sixty-five of these events have been localized to annuli or error boxes by the method of arrival time analysis. The distribution of sources is consistent with isotropy, and there is no statistically convincing evidence for the detection of more than one burst from any source position. The localizations are compared with those of two previous catalogs.

  14. Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels from Acoustic Emission Amplitude Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Eric v. K.; Walker, James L., II; Rowell, Ginger H.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data were taken during hydroproof for three sets of ASTM standard 5.75 inch diameter filament wound graphite/epoxy bottles. All three sets of bottles had the same design and were wound from the same graphite fiber; the only difference was in the epoxies used. Two of the epoxies had similar mechanical properties, and because the acoustic properties of materials are a function of their stiffnesses, it was thought that the AE data from the two sets might also be similar; however, this was not the case. Therefore, the three resin types were categorized using dummy variables, which allowed the prediction of burst pressures all three sets of bottles using a single neural network. Three bottles from each set were used to train the network. The resin category, the AE amplitude distribution data taken up to 25 % of the expected burst pressure, and the actual burst pressures were used as inputs. Architecturally, the network consisted of a forty-three neuron input layer (a single categorical variable defining the resin type plus forty-two continuous variables for the AE amplitude frequencies), a fifteen neuron hidden layer for mapping, and a single output neuron for burst pressure prediction. The network trained on all three bottle sets was able to predict burst pressures in the remaining bottles with a worst case error of + 6.59%, slightly greater than the desired goal of + 5%. This larger than desired error was due to poor resolution in the amplitude data for the third bottle set. When the third set of bottles was eliminated from consideration, only four hidden layer neurons were necessary to generate a worst case prediction error of - 3.43%, well within the desired goal.

  15. HOW TO SWITCH A GAMMA-RAY BURST ON AND OFF THROUGH A MAGNETAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardini, M. G.; Campana, S.; Ghisellini, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; Covino, S.; Ghirlanda, G.; Melandri, A.; Fugazza, D.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Burlon, D.; Salvaterra, R.; Vergani, S. D.; D'Elia, V.

    2013-09-20

    One of the most elusive features of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the sporadic emission prior to the main prompt event observed in at least ∼15% of cases. These precursors have spectral and temporal properties similar to the main prompt emission, and smaller, but comparable, energetics. They are separated from the main event by a quiescent time that may be extremely long, and, in some cases, more than one precursor has been observed in the same burst. Precursors are still a puzzle: despite many attempts, none of the proposed models can account for all the observed features. Based on the complete sample of bright long GRBs observed by Swift (BAT6), we propose a new scenario for which precursors are explained by assuming that the central GRB engine is a newly born magnetar. In this model the precursor and the prompt emission arise from accretion of matter onto the surface of the magnetar. The accretion process can be halted by the centrifugal drag exerted by the rotating magnetosphere onto the infalling matter, allowing for multiple precursors and very long quiescent times.

  16. Switch-like Transitions Insulate Network Motifs to Modularize Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Atay, Oguzhan; Doncic, Andreas; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-08-01

    Cellular decisions are made by complex networks that are difficult to analyze. Although it is common to analyze smaller sub-networks known as network motifs, it is unclear whether this is valid, because these motifs are embedded in complex larger networks. Here, we address the general question of modularity by examining the S. cerevisiae pheromone response. We demonstrate that the feedforward motif controlling the cell-cycle inhibitor Far1 is insulated from cell-cycle dynamics by the positive feedback switch that drives reentry to the cell cycle. Before cells switch on positive feedback, the feedforward motif model predicts the behavior of the larger network. Conversely, after the switch, the feedforward motif is dismantled and has no discernable effect on the cell cycle. When insulation is broken, the feedforward motif no longer predicts network behavior. This work illustrates how, despite the interconnectivity of networks, the activity of motifs can be insulated by switches that generate well-defined cellular states. PMID:27453443

  17. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; Billeh, Yazan N.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics. PMID:26176664

  18. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is ahcieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  19. Suppression of bursting synchronization in clustered scale-free (rich-club) neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, E. L.; Batista, C. A. S.; Batista, A. M.; Iarosz, K.; Viana, R. L.; Lopes, S. R.; Kurths, J.

    2012-12-01

    Functional brain networks are composed of cortical areas that are anatomically and functionally connected. One of the cortical networks for which more information is available in the literature is the cat cerebral cortex. Statistical analyses of the latter suggest that its structure can be described as a clustered network, in which each cluster is a scale-free network possessing highly connected hubs. Those hubs are, on their hand, connected together in a strong fashion ("rich-club" network). We have built a clustered scale-free network inspired in the cat cortex structure so as to study their dynamical properties. In this article, we focus on the synchronization of bursting activity of the cortical areas and how it can be suppressed by means of neuron deactivation through suitably applied light pulses. We show that it is possible to effectively suppress bursting synchronization by acting on a single, yet suitably chosen neuron, as long as it is highly connected, thanks to the "rich-club" structure of the network.

  20. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Meegan, C.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; and others

    2013-08-15

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or {sup t}riangulation{sup )}. For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32 Degree-Sign , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1{sigma} GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 Degree-Sign systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3{sigma} error radius. The IPN 3{sigma} error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin{sup 2} and 110 deg{sup 2}, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  1. Networks on the Edge of Forever: Examining the Feasibility of using Meteor Burst (MB) Communication Networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charania, A.

    2002-01-01

    The envisioned future may include continuous operating outposts and networks on other worlds supporting human and robotic exploration. Given this possibility, a feasibility analysis is performed of a communications architecture based upon reflection of ion trails from meteors in planetary atmospheres. Meteor Burst (MB) communication systems use meteoritic impacts on planetary atmospheres as two-way, short burst communication nodes. MB systems consist of semi-continuous, low bandwidth networks. These systems possess both long distance capability (hundred of kilometers) and have lower susceptibility to atmospheric perturbations. Every day millions of meteors come into Earth's upper atmosphere with enough energy to ionize gas molecules suitably to reflect radio waves and facilitate communications beyond line of site. The ionized trail occurs at altitudes of 100 km with lengths reaching 30 km. The trial sustains itself long enough to support typical network distances of 1800 km. The initial step to use meteors in this fashion includes detection of a usable ionic trail. A probe signal is sent from one station to another in the network. If there is a meteor trail present, the probe signal is reflected to a receiving station. When another station receives the probe signal, it sends an acknowledgement to the originating station to proceed with transfer on that trail in a high-speed digital data burst. This probe-main signal handshaking occurs each time a burst of data is sent and can occur several times over the course of just one useable meteor trail. Given the need for non-data sending probe signals and error correcting bits; typical transmission data rates vary from a few kilobits per second to over 100 kilobits per second. On Earth, MB links open up hundreds of time per hour depending upon daily and seasonal variations. Meteor bursts were first noticed in detail in the 1930s. With the capabilities of modern computer processing, MB systems have become both technically

  2. A rapid protection switching method in carrier ethernet ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang; Ji, Meng

    2008-11-01

    Abstract: Ethernet is the most important Local Area Network (LAN) technology since more than 90% data traffic in access layer is carried on Ethernet. From 10M to 10G, the improving Ethernet technology can be not only used in LAN, but also a good choice for MAN even WAN. MAN are always constructed in ring topology because the ring network could provide resilient path protection by using less resource (fibre or cable) than other network topologies. In layer 2 data networks, spanning tree protocol (STP) is always used to protect transmit link and preventing the formation of logic loop in networks. However, STP cannot guarantee the efficiency of service convergence when link fault happened. In fact, convergent time of networks with STP is about several minutes. Though Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) and Multi-Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) improve the STP technology, they still need a couple of seconds to achieve convergence, and can not provide sub-50ms protection switching. This paper presents a novel rapid ring protection method (RRPM) for carrier Ethernet. Unlike other link-fault detection method, it adopts distributed algorithm to detect link fault rapidly (sub-50ms). When networks restore from link fault, it can revert to the original working state. RRPM can provide single ring protection and interconnected ring protection without the formation of super loop. In normal operation, the master node blocks the secondary port for all non-RRPM Ethernet frames belonging to the given RRPM Ring, thereby avoiding a loop in the ring. When link fault happens, the node on which the failure happens moves from the "ring normal" state to the "ring fault" state. It also sends "link down" frame immediately to other nodes and blocks broken port and flushes its forwarding database. Those who receive "link down" frame will flush forwarding database and master node should unblock its secondary port. When the failure restores, the whole ring will revert to the normal state. That is

  3. Synchronization in dynamical networks with unconstrained structure switching.

    PubMed

    del Genio, Charo I; Romance, Miguel; Criado, Regino; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We provide a rigorous solution to the problem of constructing a structural evolution for a network of coupled identical dynamical units that switches between specified topologies without constraints on their structure. The evolution of the structure is determined indirectly from a carefully built transformation of the eigenvector matrices of the coupling Laplacians, which are guaranteed to change smoothly in time. In turn, this allows one to extend the master stability function formalism, which can be used to assess the stability of a synchronized state. This approach is independent from the particular topologies that the network visits, and is not restricted to commuting structures. Also, it does not depend on the time scale of the evolution, which can be faster than, comparable to, or even secular with respect to the dynamics of the units. PMID:26764756

  4. Control of Stochastic and Induced Switching in Biophysical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Daniel K.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-01-01

    Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks. PMID:26451275

  5. Control of Stochastic and Induced Switching in Biophysical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Daniel K.; Kath, William L.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2015-07-01

    Noise caused by fluctuations at the molecular level is a fundamental part of intracellular processes. While the response of biological systems to noise has been studied extensively, there has been limited understanding of how to exploit it to induce a desired cell state. Here we present a scalable, quantitative method based on the Freidlin-Wentzell action to predict and control noise-induced switching between different states in genetic networks that, conveniently, can also control transitions between stable states in the absence of noise. We apply this methodology to models of cell differentiation and show how predicted manipulations of tunable factors can induce lineage changes, and further utilize it to identify new candidate strategies for cancer therapy in a cell death pathway model. This framework offers a systems approach to identifying the key factors for rationally manipulating biophysical dynamics, and should also find use in controlling other classes of noisy complex networks.

  6. Synchronization in dynamical networks with unconstrained structure switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Genio, Charo I.; Romance, Miguel; Criado, Regino; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We provide a rigorous solution to the problem of constructing a structural evolution for a network of coupled identical dynamical units that switches between specified topologies without constraints on their structure. The evolution of the structure is determined indirectly from a carefully built transformation of the eigenvector matrices of the coupling Laplacians, which are guaranteed to change smoothly in time. In turn, this allows one to extend the master stability function formalism, which can be used to assess the stability of a synchronized state. This approach is independent from the particular topologies that the network visits, and is not restricted to commuting structures. Also, it does not depend on the time scale of the evolution, which can be faster than, comparable to, or even secular with respect to the dynamics of the units.

  7. Stability analysis of switched stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaotai; Tang, Yang; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the global exponential stability of switched stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays. Firstly, the stability of switched stochastic delayed neural networks with stable subsystems is investigated by utilizing the mathematical induction method, the piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell time approach. Secondly, by utilizing the extended comparison principle from impulsive systems, the stability of stochastic switched delayed neural networks with both stable and unstable subsystems is analyzed and several easy to verify conditions are derived to ensure the exponential mean square stability of switched delayed neural networks with stochastic disturbances. The effectiveness of the proposed results is illustrated by two simulation examples. PMID:24365535

  8. Strategies to Maximize Burst Lengths in Rhythmic Anti-Phase Activity of Networks with Reciprocal Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Amitabha; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider repetitive activity patterns in which a pair of oscillators take turns becoming active, motivated by anti-phase bursting activity in neuronal networks. In our framework, when one unit is active, it inhibits the other, as occurs with inhibitory synaptic coupling of neurons; when the inhibition is strong enough, the inhibited unit is prevented from activating. We assume that the coupling resources available to each oscillator are constrained and allow each unit to select the amount of input that it provides to the other each time that it activates. In this setting, we investigate the strategies that each oscillator should utilize in order to maximize the number of spikes it can fire (or equivalently the amount of time it is active), corresponding to a burst of spikes in a neuron, before the other unit takes over. We derive a one-dimensional map whose fixed points correspond to periodic anti-phase bursting solutions. We introduce a novel numerical method to obtain the graph of this map and we extend the analysis to select solutions that achieve consistency between coupling resource use and recovery. Our analysis shows that corresponding to each fixed point of the map, there is actually an infinite number of related strategies that yield the same number of spikes per burst.

  9. Study of the precision of the gamma-ray burst source locations obtained with the Ulysses/PVO/CGRO network

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L. ); Hurley, K.C. ); Sommer, M. ); Boer, M.; Niel, M. ); Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W.S.; Wilson, R.B. ); Laros, J.G.; Klebesadel, R.W. )

    1994-07-01

    The interplanetary gamma-ray burst network of the [ital Ulysses], [ital Compton]-[ital GRO], and [ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] [ital Orbiter] missions has made source localizations with fractional-arc-minute precision for a number of events, and with auxiliary data, will provide useful annular-segment loci for many more. These studies have, thus far, yielded one possible counterpart, a [ital Rosat] x-ray association with the 92 May 1 burst. Similar to the historic 1978 November 19 burst/[ital Einstein] association, this possibility gives hope that network studies will provide a fundamental source clue for classical' bursts, just as a second supernova remnant in a network-defined source field has done for sgr events.

  10. Globin chain synthesis in single erythroid bursts from cord blood: studies on gamma leads to beta and G gamma leads to A gamma switches.

    PubMed

    Comi, P; Giglioni, B; Ottolenghi, S; Gianni, A M; Polli, E; Barba, P; Covelli, A; Migliaccio, G; Condorelli, M; Peschle, C

    1980-01-01

    Erythroid bursts from cord or adult blood were grown in methylcellulose cultures (3 international units of erythropoietin per plate). On day 13, single bursts were picked up and reincubated for 16-24 hr with [3H]leucine. Radioactive globin chains [alpha,beta,G gamma, and A gamma (Ala-136)] were analyzed by either isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide gels and fluorography or carboxymethylcellulose chromatography. In all cases, alpha to non-alpha globin radioactivity ratios were close to 1. In single cord blood bursts, the values of both gamma-to-beta and G gamma-to-A gamma ratios were spread over a large spectrum and further characterized by a continuous rather than a bimodal distribution. Morever, the G gamma-to-A gamma ratios demonstrated in single bursts appeared to be directly correlated with the respective gamma-to-beta ratios. These data suggest that both the gamma leads to beta and the G gamma leads to A gamma switches are mediated via mechanisms modulating the relative activities of the different genes in the non-alpha globin gene cluster rather than via selection of clones committed to the preferential synthesis of beta and A gamma globins. In contrast with the results obtained with cord blood, individual adult blood bursts synthesize a lower and hence relatively more uniform amount of gamma globin chains. PMID:6153796

  11. Rhythmic Oscillations of Excitatory Bursting Hodkin-Huxley Neuronal Network with Synaptic Learning

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Han, Fang; Wang, Zhijie; Li, Caiyun

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic oscillations of neuronal network are actually kind of synchronous behaviors, which play an important role in neural systems. In this paper, the properties of excitement degree and oscillation frequency of excitatory bursting Hodkin-Huxley neuronal network which incorporates a synaptic learning rule are studied. The effects of coupling strength, synaptic learning rate, and other parameters of chemical synapses, such as synaptic delay and decay time constant, are explored, respectively. It is found that the increase of the coupling strength can weaken the extent of excitement, whereas increasing the synaptic learning rate makes the network more excited in a certain range; along with the increasing of the delay time and the decay time constant, the excitement degree increases at the beginning, then decreases, and keeps stable. It is also found that, along with the increase of the synaptic learning rate, the coupling strength, the delay time, and the decay time constant, the oscillation frequency of the network decreases monotonically. PMID:27073393

  12. Stochastic stability of switched genetic regulatory networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbing; Tang, Yang; Wu, Xiaotai; Fang, Jian-An

    2014-09-01

    This paper investigates the exponential stability problem of switched stochastic genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) with time-varying delays. Two types of switched systems are studied respectively: one is the stochastic switched delayed GRNs with only stable subsystems and the other is the stochastic switched delayed GRNs with both stable and unstable subsystems. By using switching analysis techniques and the modified Halanay differential inequality, new criteria are developed for the exponential stability of switched stochastic GRNs with time-varying delays. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the main results. PMID:25265564

  13. Noise-induced coherence and network oscillations in a reduced bursting model.

    PubMed

    Reinker, Stefan; Li, Yue-Xian; Kuske, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    The dynamics of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) model of bursting thalamic neurons is reduced to a system of two linear differential equations that retains the subthreshold resonance properties of the HR model. Introducing a reset mechanism after a threshold crossing, we turn this system into a resonant integrate-and-fire (RIF) model. Using Monte-Carlo simulations and mathematical analysis, we examine the effects of noise and the subthreshold dynamic properties of the RIF model on the occurrence of coherence resonance (CR). Synchronized burst firing occurs in a network of such model neurons with excitatory pulse-coupling. The coherence level of the network oscillations shows a stochastic resonance-like dependence on the noise level. Stochastic analysis of the equations shows that the slow recovery from the spike-induced inhibition is crucial in determining the frequencies of the CR and the subthreshold resonance in the original HR model. In this particular type of CR, the oscillation frequency strongly depends on the intrinsic time scales but changes little with the noise intensity. We give analytical quantities to describe this CR mechanism and illustrate its influence on the emerging network oscillations. We discuss the profound physiological roles this kind of CR may have in information processing in neurons possessing a subthreshold resonant frequency and in generating synchronized network oscillations with a frequency that is determined by intrinsic properties of the neurons. PMID:17149822

  14. Passivity and robust synchronisation of switched interval coupled neural networks with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Cao, Jinde

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with passivity and robust synchronisation of switched coupled neural networks with uncertain parameters. First, the mathematical model of switched coupled neural networks with interval uncertain parameters is established, which consists of L modes and switches from one mode to another according to the switching rule. Second, by employing passivity theory and linear matrix inequality techniques, delay-independent and delay-dependent conditions are derived to guarantee the passivity of switched interval coupled neural networks. Moreover, based on the proposed passivity results, global synchronisation criteria can be obtained for switched coupled neural networks with or without uncertain parameters. Finally, an illustrative example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  15. 77 FR 21996 - Certain Equipment for Communications Networks, Including Switches, Routers, Gateways, Bridges...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... COMMISSION Certain Equipment for Communications Networks, Including Switches, Routers, Gateways, Bridges... States after importation of certain equipment for communications networks, including switches, routers...,633,966; and 5,841,360. 76 FR 36154-55 (June 21, 2011). The Notice of Investigation named...

  16. Integrated optical buffers for packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Emily Frances

    Routers form the backbone of the Internet, directing data to the right locations with huge throughput capacity of terabits/second) and very few errors (1 error allowed in 1012 bits). However, as the Internet continues to grow rapidly, so must the capacity of electronic routers, thereby also growing in footprint and power consumption. The energy bill alone has developers looking for an alternate solution. Today's routers can only operate with electrical signals although Internet data is transmitted optically. This requires the data to be converted from the optical domain to the electrical domain and back again. Optical routers have the potential of saving in power by omitting these conversions, but have been held back in part by the lack of a practical optical memory device. This work presents the first integrated optical buffer for next generation optical packet-switched networks. Buffering is required in a router to move packets of data in order to avoid collisions between packets heading to the same destination at the same time. The device presented here uses an InP-based two-by-two switch with a silica waveguide delay to form a recirculating buffer. Packet storage was shown with 98% packet recovery for 5 circulations. Autonomous contention resolution was demonstrated with two buffered channels to show that the technology is a realistic solution for creating multiple element buffers on multiple router ports. This thesis proposes and demonstrates the first integrated optical random access memory, thereby making a great stride toward high capacity optical routers.

  17. Holographic perfect shuffle permutation element for a miniaturized switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobolla, H.; Schmidt, J.; Gluch, E.; Schwider, J.

    1995-06-01

    A holographic perfect shuffle element with 80 channels for a miniaturized switching network is reported. An array of vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers is used as a transmitter. The whole permutation is carried out totally in glass. The 80 channels are permuted within a rectangle with a volume of 3 mm \\times 4 mm \\times 2 mm. Four planes of stacked volume holograms recorded in dichromated gelatin form this perfect shuffle element with an angular spectrum between 7 deg and 35 deg. Changes in the wavelength of the diode lasers to Delta lambda = +/-10 nm can be compensated with this setup. The overall efficiency per channel lies between 40% and 60%. When Fresnel reflections and absorption are taken into account, a transmission per hologram between 78% and 90% is achieved.

  18. RF switching network: a novel technique for IR sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechtel, Deborah M.; Jenkins, R. Brian; Joyce, Peter J.; Nelson, Charles L.

    2016-05-01

    Rapid sensing of near infrared (IR) energy on a composite structure would provide information that could mitigate damage to composite structures. This paper describes a novel technique that implements photoconductive sensors in a radio frequency (RF) switching network designed to locate in real time the position and intensity of IR radiation incident on a composite structure. In the implementation described here, photoconductive sensors act as rapid response switches in a two layer RF network embedded in an FR-4 laminate. To detect radiation, phosphorous doped silicon photoconductive sensors are inserted in GHz range RF transmission lines. Photoconductive sensors use semiconductor materials that are optically sensitive at material dependent wavelengths. Incident radiation at the appropriate wavelength produces hole-electron pairs, so that the semiconductor becomes a conductor. By permitting signal propagation only when a sensor is illuminated, the RF signals are selectively routed from the lower layer transmission lines to the upper layer lines, thereby pinpointing the location and strength of incident radiation on a structure. Simulations based on a high frequency 3D planar electromagnetics model are presented and compared to experimental results. Experimental results are described for GHz range RF signal control for 300 mW and 180 mW incident energy from 975 nm and 1060 nm wavelength lasers respectively, where upon illumination, RF transmission line signal output power doubled when compared to non-illuminated results. Experimental results are reported for 100 W incident energy from a 1060 nm laser. Test results illustrate that real-time signal processing would permit a structure or vehicle to be controlled in response to incident radiation

  19. Exact Computation of Probability Landscape of Stochastic Networks of Single Input and Coupled Toggle Switch Modules

    PubMed Central

    Terebus, Anna; Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks depict the interactions between genes, proteins, and other components of the cell. These interactions often are stochastic that can influence behavior of the cells. Discrete Chemical Master Equation (dCME) provides a general framework for understanding the stochastic nature of these networks. However solving dCME is challenging due to the enormous state space, one effective approach is to study the behavior of individual modules of the stochastic network. Here we used the finite buffer dCME method and directly calculated the exact steady state probability landscape for the two stochastic networks of Single Input and Coupled Toggle Switch Modules. The first example is a switch network consisting of three genes, and the second example is a double switching network consisting of four coupled genes. Our results show complex switching behavior of these networks can be quantified. PMID:25571172

  20. Mechanism of quasi-periodic lag jitter in bursting rhythms by a neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, R.; Rodríguez, Marcos; Serrano, S.; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    We study a heteroclinic bifurcation leading to the onset of robust phase-lag jittering in bursting rhythms generated by a neuronal circuit. We show that the jitter phenomenon is associated with the occurrence of a stable invariant curve emerging through a torus bifurcation in 2D return maps for phase lags between three constituent bursters. To study biologically plausible and phenomenological models of rhythmic neuronal networks we have further developed parallel computational techniques for parameter continuations of all possible fixed points and invariant curves of such return maps. The method is based on a “fine” brute-force analysis of the large data set generated by the computational techniques.

  1. Platonic quantum networks as coherence-assisted switches in perfect and imperfect situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaherian, C.; Twamley, J.

    2015-06-01

    The concept of coherence switches with nanoparticle platonic networks is introduced and analysed. The platonic networks store an initially injected excitation for extremely long durations via the formation of dark states. Switching is achieved by the nano-mechanical arrangements of one site or some part of the network to remove the trapping thus leading to a highly efficient transfer to the target which is irreversibly connected to one site. We present coherence switches based on controlling a cubic network both in the absence and presence of environment and manufacturing/topological noise.

  2. Delay analysis of networked control systems based on 100 M switched Ethernet.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    For the delay may degrade the performance of networked control systems, networked control systems based on 100 M switched Ethernet are proposed in this paper. According to the working principle of Ethernet switch, the formulas of the upper bound delay of the single-level switched Ethernet and the multiple-level switched Ethernet are deduced by the timing diagram method, and the values of the upper bound delay are also given. The key factors that influence the upper bound delay of switched Ethernet are analyzed; then, the characteristics of the upper bound delay are presented, which show that the delay induced by the single-level 100 M switched Ethernet has little effect on the performance of control systems, while the delay induced by the multiple-level 100 M switched Ethernet may meet the time requirements of all classes of control systems if the numbers of levels and the numbers of nodes connecting to switches are set properly. Finally, the performance of networked control systems is simulated by TrueTime, and the results further show the feasibility and superiority of 100 M switched Ethernet based networked control systems without modification of the network protocols. PMID:25003152

  3. Event-triggered synchronization strategy for complex dynamical networks with the Markovian switching topologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijuan; Dong, Tao; Liao, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    This paper concerns the synchronization problem of complex networks with the random switching topologies. By modeling the switching of network topologies as a Markov process, a novel event-triggered synchronization strategy is proposed. Unlike the existing strategies, the event detection of this strategy only works at the network topology switching time instant, which can significantly decrease the communication frequency between nodes and save the network resources. Under this strategy, the synchronization problem of complex network is equivalently converted to the stability of a class of Markovian jump systems with a time-varying delay. By using the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional method and the weak infinitesimal operation, a sufficient condition for the mean square synchronization of the complex networks subject to Markovian switching topologies is established. Finally, a numerical simulation example is provided to demonstrate the theoretical results. PMID:26650712

  4. A comparison of computational methods for detecting bursts in neuronal spike trains and their application to human stem cell-derived neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Paul; Thomas, Christopher W.; Paulsen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of bursting activity is an essential element in the characterization of neuronal network activity. Despite this, no one technique for identifying bursts in spike trains has been widely adopted. Instead, many methods have been developed for the analysis of bursting activity, often on an ad hoc basis. Here we provide an unbiased assessment of the effectiveness of eight of these methods at detecting bursts in a range of spike trains. We suggest a list of features that an ideal burst detection technique should possess and use synthetic data to assess each method in regard to these properties. We further employ each of the methods to reanalyze microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from mouse retinal ganglion cells and examine their coherence with bursts detected by a human observer. We show that several common burst detection techniques perform poorly at analyzing spike trains with a variety of properties. We identify four promising burst detection techniques, which are then applied to MEA recordings of networks of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and used to describe the ontogeny of bursting activity in these networks over several months of development. We conclude that no current method can provide “perfect” burst detection results across a range of spike trains; however, two burst detection techniques, the MaxInterval and logISI methods, outperform compared with others. We provide recommendations for the robust analysis of bursting activity in experimental recordings using current techniques. PMID:27098024

  5. A comparison of computational methods for detecting bursts in neuronal spike trains and their application to human stem cell-derived neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Cotterill, Ellese; Charlesworth, Paul; Thomas, Christopher W; Paulsen, Ole; Eglen, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Accurate identification of bursting activity is an essential element in the characterization of neuronal network activity. Despite this, no one technique for identifying bursts in spike trains has been widely adopted. Instead, many methods have been developed for the analysis of bursting activity, often on an ad hoc basis. Here we provide an unbiased assessment of the effectiveness of eight of these methods at detecting bursts in a range of spike trains. We suggest a list of features that an ideal burst detection technique should possess and use synthetic data to assess each method in regard to these properties. We further employ each of the methods to reanalyze microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from mouse retinal ganglion cells and examine their coherence with bursts detected by a human observer. We show that several common burst detection techniques perform poorly at analyzing spike trains with a variety of properties. We identify four promising burst detection techniques, which are then applied to MEA recordings of networks of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and used to describe the ontogeny of bursting activity in these networks over several months of development. We conclude that no current method can provide "perfect" burst detection results across a range of spike trains; however, two burst detection techniques, the MaxInterval and logISI methods, outperform compared with others. We provide recommendations for the robust analysis of bursting activity in experimental recordings using current techniques. PMID:27098024

  6. Electronic Power Switch for Fault-Tolerant Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volp, J.

    1987-01-01

    Power field-effect transistors reduce energy waste and simplify interconnections. Current switch containing power field-effect transistor (PFET) placed in series with each load in fault-tolerant power-distribution system. If system includes several loads and supplies, switches placed in series with adjacent loads and supplies. System of switches protects against overloads and losses of individual power sources.

  7. Global seamless network demonstrator: carrier grade automatic switched transport network implementation in realistic telecom field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foisel, Hans-Martin; Hanik, Norbert; Braun, Ralf-Peter; Lehr, Georg; Gladisch, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    The Global Seamless Network (GSN) Demonstrator is presented, a joint effort of system vendors and Deutsche Telekom Group R&D to demonstrate network functions and management integration and enable, for the first time, experiences with a carrier grade Automatically Switched Transport Network (ASTN) implementation and the envisaged main ASTN clients, IP and Ethernet. For end-to-end monitoring capability, integrating the view on the ASTN and Ethernet-MAN configuration, an UMS (Upper Monitoring System) is being developed. Furthermore broadband application were implemented to visualise the network functions. The ASTN backbone consists of four cross connects and an ULH-WDM system with 3x 10Gbit/s channels (OCh) between Berlin and Darmstadt, whereby each OCh is treated as a virtual fibre.

  8. Bursting frequency versus phase synchronization in time-delayed neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordenfelt, Anders; Used, Javier; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of the average bursting frequency on time delay for neuron networks with randomly distributed time-delayed chemical synapses. The result is compared with the corresponding curve for the phase synchronization and it turns out that, in some intervals, these have a very similar shape and appear as almost mirror images of each other. We have analyzed both the map-based chaotic Rulkov model and the continuous Hindmarsh-Rose model, yielding the same conclusions. In order to gain further insight, we also analyzed time-delayed Kuramoto models displaying an overall behavior similar to that observed on the neuron network models. For the Kuramoto models, we were able to derive analytical formulas providing an implicit functional relationship between the mean frequency and the phase synchronization. These formulas suggest a strong dependence between those two measures, which could explain the similarities in shape between the curves.

  9. Demonstration of 720×720 optical fast circuit switch for intra-datacenter networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Koh; Mori, Yojiro; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Kiyo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Namiki, Shu; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Intra-datacenter traffic is growing more than 20% a year. In typical datacenters, many racks/pods including servers are interconnected via multi-tier electrical switches. The electrical switches necessitate power-consuming optical-to- electrical (OE) and electrical-to-optical (EO) conversion, the power consumption of which increases with traffic. To overcome this problem, optical switches that eliminate costly OE and EO conversion and enable low power consumption switching are being investigated. There are two major requirements for the optical switch. First, it must have a high port count to construct reduced tier intra-datacenter networks. Second, switching speed must be short enough that most of the traffic load can be offloaded from electrical switches. Among various optical switches, we focus on those based on arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWGs), since the AWG is a passive device with minimal power consumption. We previously proposed a high-port-count optical switch architecture that utilizes tunable lasers, route-and-combine switches, and wavelength-routing switches comprised of couplers, erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs), and AWGs. We employed conventional external cavity lasers whose wavelength-tuning speed was slower than 100 ms. In this paper, we demonstrate a large-scale optical switch that offers fast wavelength routing. We construct a 720×720 optical switch using recently developed lasers whose wavelength-tuning period is below 460 μs. We evaluate the switching time via bit-error-ratio measurements and achieve 470-μs switching time (includes 10-μs guard time to handle EDFA surge). To best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such a large-scale optical switch with practical switching time.

  10. Search for gravitational waves associated with γ-ray bursts detected by the interplanetary network.

    PubMed

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calderón Bustillo, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Dal Canton, T; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Horrom, T; Hoske, D; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, S; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, D Nanda; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, P J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Le Roux, A; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lopez, E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Ma, Y; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N M; Mansell, G; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Omar, S; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Recchia, S; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Reula, O; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S B; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schilman, M; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, J; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Tuennermann, H; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wolovick, N; Worden, J; Wu, Y; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J; Aptekar, R L; Atteia, J L; Cline, T; Connaughton, V; Frederiks, D D; Golenetskii, S V; Hurley, K; Krimm, H A; Marisaldi, M; Pal'shin, V D; Palmer, D; Svinkin, D S; Terada, Y; von Kienlin, A

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 γ-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(-2)M⊙c(2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors. PMID:25032916

  11. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with γ-ray Bursts Detected by the Interplanetary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Augustus, H.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Croce, R. P.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, W.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Horrom, T.; Hoske, D.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 γ-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10-2M⊙c2 at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  12. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected by the Interplanetary Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Blackbum, L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Slutsky, J.; Cline, T.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 gamma ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(exp-2) solar mass c(exp 2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  13. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  14. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment...

  15. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  16. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment...

  17. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment...

  18. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  19. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  20. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... network and terminal equipment. 68.110 Section 68.110 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network...

  1. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment...

  2. 47 CFR 68.201 - Connection to the public switched telephone network.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... network. 68.201 Section 68.201 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Terminal Equipment Approval Procedures § 68.201 Connection to the public switched telephone network. Terminal equipment...

  3. Packet Switching Networks: An Introduction with Some Attention to Selected Vendors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, James Joseph

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the history, development, and services of the packet switching network services that currently exist in the United States. The character of packet switching, a computerized method of transmitting data, is used as the basis for tracing the development of the industry itself. Contending that the…

  4. Clique of functional hubs orchestrates population bursts in developmentally regulated neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torcini, Alessandro; Luccioli, Stefano; Bonifazi, Paolo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari

    2015-03-01

    It has recently been discovered that single neuron stimulation can impact network dynamics in immature and adult neuronal circuits. Here we report a novel mechanism which can explain in developing neuronal circuits, typically composed of only excitatory cells, the peculiar role played by a few specific neurons in promoting/arresting the population activity. For this purpose, we consider a standard neuronal network model, with short-term synaptic plasticity, whose population activity is characterized by bursting behavior. The addition of developmentally regulated constraints on single neuron excitability and connectivity leads to the emergence of functional hub neurons, whose stimulation/deletion is critical for the network activity. Functional hubs form a clique, where a precise sequential activation of the neurons is essential to ignite collective events without any need for a specific topological architecture. Unsupervised time-lagged firings of supra-threshold cells, in connection with coordinated entrainments of near-threshold neurons, are the key ingredients to orchestrate population activity. This work is part of the activity of the Joint Italian-Israeli Laboratory on Integrative Network Neuroscience supported by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  5. An absorptive single-pole four-throw switch using multiple-contact MEMS switches and its application to a monolithic millimeter-wave beam-forming network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghyo; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Yong-Kweon; Kwon, Youngwoo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new absorptive single-pole four-throw (SP4T) switch based on multiple-contact switching is proposed and integrated with a Butler matrix to demonstrate a monolithic beam-forming network at millimeter waves (mm waves). In order to simplify the switching driving circuit and reduce the number of unit switches in an absorptive SP4T switch, the individual switches were replaced with long-span multiple-contact switches using stress-free single-crystalline-silicon MEMS technology. This approach improves the mechanical stability as well as the manufacturing yield, thereby allowing successful integration into a monolithic beam former. The fabricated absorptive SP4T MEMS switch shows insertion loss less than 1.3 dB, return losses better than 11 dB at 30 GHz and wideband isolation performance higher than 39 dB from 20 to 40 GHz. The absorptive SP4T MEMS switch is integrated with a 4 × 4 Butler matrix on a single chip to implement a monolithic beam-forming network, directing beam into four distinct angles. Array factors from the measured data show that the proposed absorptive SPnT MEMS switch can be effectively used for high-performance mm-wave beam-switching systems. This work corresponds to the first demonstration of a monolithic beam-forming network using switched beams.

  6. Pinning Synchronization of Directed Networks With Switching Topologies: A Multiple Lyapunov Functions Approach.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guanghui; Yu, Wenwu; Hu, Guoqiang; Cao, Jinde; Yu, Xinghuo

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the global pinning synchronization problem for a class of complex networks with switching directed topologies. The common assumption in the existing related literature that each possible network topology contains a directed spanning tree is removed in this paper. Using tools from M -matrix theory and stability analysis of the switched nonlinear systems, a new kind of network topology-dependent multiple Lyapunov functions is proposed for analyzing the synchronization behavior of the whole network. It is theoretically shown that the global pinning synchronization in switched complex networks can be ensured if some nodes are appropriately pinned and the coupling is carefully selected. Interesting issues of how many and which nodes should be pinned for possibly realizing global synchronization are further addressed. Finally, some numerical simulations on coupled neural networks are provided to verify the theoretical results. PMID:26595418

  7. Optically triggered high voltage switch network and method for switching a high voltage

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Andexler, George; Silberkleit, Lee I.

    1993-01-19

    An optically triggered solid state switch and method for switching a high voltage electrical current. A plurality of solid state switches (350) are connected in series for controlling electrical current flow between a compensation capacitor (112) and ground in a reactive power compensator (50, 50') that monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b and 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. An optical transmitter (100) controlled by the reactive power compensation system produces light pulses that are conveyed over optical fibers (102) to a switch driver (110') that includes a plurality of series connected optical triger circuits (288). Each of the optical trigger circuits controls a pair of the solid state switches and includes a plurality of series connected resistors (294, 326, 330, and 334) that equalize or balance the potential across the plurality of trigger circuits. The trigger circuits are connected to one of the distribution lines through a trigger capacitor (340). In each switch driver, the light signals activate a phototransistor (300) so that an electrical current flows from one of the energy reservoir capacitors through a pulse transformer (306) in the trigger circuit, producing gate signals that turn on the pair of serially connected solid state switches (350).

  8. Proton Single Event Effects (SEE) Testing of the Myrinet Crossbar Switch and Network Interface Card

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, James W., Jr.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Carts, Martin A.; Stattel, Ronald; Irwin, Timothy L.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Remote Exploration and Experimentation Project (REE), work was performed to do a proton SEE (Single Event Effect) evaluation of the Myricom network protocol system (Myrinet). This testing included the evaluation of the Myrinet crossbar switch and the Network Interface Card (NIC). To this end, two crossbar switch devices and five components in the NIC were exposed to the proton beam at the University of California at Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory (CNL).

  9. Stability of genetic regulatory networks based on switched systems and mixed time-delays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Luo, Zong-Ping; Yang, Hui-Lin; Cao, Jinde

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the switched genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) are modeled from a real biological system, based on switched systems, noise and mixed time-delays. Global asymptotical stability for the proposed switched GRNs are studied by the Lyapunov method and the matrix inequality techniques. Some new sufficient conditions are obtained to ensure the global asymptotical stability of the proposed switched GRNs. Furthermore, the proposed LMI results are computationally efficient as it can be solved numerically with standard commercial software. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate the usefulness of the results. PMID:27326659

  10. Modelling switching-time effects in high-frequency power conditioning networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, H. A.; Sloane, T. H.; Rimer, B. H.; Wilson, T. G.

    1979-01-01

    Power transistor networks which switch large currents in highly inductive environments are beginning to find application in the hundred kilohertz switching frequency range. Recent developments in the fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors in the power device category have enhanced the movement toward higher switching frequencies. Models for switching devices and of the circuits in which they are imbedded are required to properly characterize the mechanisms responsible for turning on and turning off effects. Easily interpreted results in the form of oscilloscope-like plots assist in understanding the effects of parametric studies using topology oriented computer-aided analysis methods.

  11. Exponential synchronization of coupled switched neural networks with mode-dependent impulsive effects.

    PubMed

    Wenbing Zhang; Yang Tang; Qingying Miao; Wei Du

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the synchronization problem of coupled switched neural networks (SNNs) with mode-dependent impulsive effects and time delays. The main feature of mode-dependent impulsive effects is that impulsive effects can exist not only at the instants coinciding with mode switching but also at the instants when there is no system switching. The impulses considered here include those that suppress synchronization or enhance synchronization. Based on switching analysis techniques and the comparison principle, the exponential synchronization criteria are derived for coupled delayed SNNs with mode-dependent impulsive effects. Finally, simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the results. PMID:24808570

  12. Network bursting dynamics in excitatory cortical neuron cultures results from the combination of different adaptive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Masquelier, Timothée; Deco, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    In the brain, synchronization among cells of an assembly is a common phenomenon, and thought to be functionally relevant. Here we used an in vitro experimental model of cell assemblies, cortical cultures, combined with numerical simulations of a spiking neural network (SNN) to investigate how and why spontaneous synchronization occurs. In order to deal with excitation only, we pharmacologically blocked GABAAergic transmission using bicuculline. Synchronous events in cortical cultures tend to involve almost every cell and to display relatively constant durations. We have thus named these "network spikes" (NS). The inter-NS-intervals (INSIs) proved to be a more interesting phenomenon. In most cortical cultures NSs typically come in series or bursts ("bursts of NSs", BNS), with short (~1 s) INSIs and separated by long silent intervals (tens of s), which leads to bimodal INSI distributions. This suggests that a facilitating mechanism is at work, presumably short-term synaptic facilitation, as well as two fatigue mechanisms: one with a short timescale, presumably short-term synaptic depression, and another one with a longer timescale, presumably cellular adaptation. We thus incorporated these three mechanisms into the SNN, which, indeed, produced realistic BNSs. Next, we systematically varied the recurrent excitation for various adaptation timescales. Strong excitability led to frequent, quasi-periodic BNSs (CV~0), and weak excitability led to rare BNSs, approaching a Poisson process (CV~1). Experimental cultures appear to operate within an intermediate weakly-synchronized regime (CV~0.5), with an adaptation timescale in the 2-8 s range, and well described by a Poisson-with-refractory-period model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the INSI statistics are indeed informative: they allowed us to infer the mechanisms at work, and many parameters that we cannot access experimentally. PMID:24146781

  13. Optical packet switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekel, Eyal; Ruschin, Shlomo; Majer, Daniel; Levy, Jeff; Matmon, Guy; Koenigsberg, Lisa; Vecht, Jacob; Geron, Amir; Harlavan, Rotem; Shfaram, Harel; Arbel, Arnon; McDermott, Tom; Brewer, Tony

    2005-02-01

    We report here a scalable, multichassis, 6.3 terabit core router, which utilizes our proprietary optical switch. The router is commercially available and deployed in several customer sites. Our solution combines optical switching with electronic routing. An internal optical packet switching network interconnects the router"s electronic line cards, where routing and buffering functions take place electronically. The system architecture and performance will be described. The optical switch is based on Optical Phased Array (OPA) technology. It is a 64 x 64, fully non-blocking, optical crossbar switch, capable of switching in a fraction of a nanosecond. The basic principles of operation will be explained. Loss and crosstalk results will be presented, as well as the results of BER measurements of a 160 Gbps transmission through one channel. Basic principles of operation and measured results will be presented for the burst-mode-receivers, arbitration algorithm and synchronization. Finally, we will present some of our current research work on a next-generation optical switch. The technological issues we have solved in our internal optical packet network can have broad applicability to any global optical packet network.

  14. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing. PMID:26627568

  15. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  16. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  17. Interaction between cellular voltage-sensitive conductance and network parameters in a model of neocortex can generate epileptiform bursting.

    SciTech Connect

    van Drongelen, W.; Lee, H. C.; Koch, H.; Elsen, F.; Carroll, M. S.; Hereld, M.; Stevens, R. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of both intrinsic neuronal membrane properties and network parameters on oscillatory activity in a model of neocortex. A scalable network model with six different cell types was built with the pGENESIS neural simulator. The neocortical network consisted of two types of pyramidal cells and four types of inhibitory interneurons. All cell types contained both fast sodium and delayed rectifier potassium channels for generation of action potentials. A subset of the pyramidal neurons contained an additional slow inactivating (persistent) sodium current (NaP). The neurons with the NaP current showed spontaneous bursting activity in the absence of external stimulation. The model also included a routine to calculate a simulated electroencephalogram (EEG) trace from the population activity. This revealed emergent network behavior which ranged from desynchronized activity to different types of seizure-like bursting patterns. At settings with weaker excitatory network effects, the propensity to generate seizure-like behavior increased. Strong excitatory network connectivity destroyed oscillatory behavior, whereas weak connectivity enhanced the relative importance of the spontaneously bursting cells. Our findings are in contradiction with the general opinion that strong excitatory synaptic and/or insufficient inhibition effects are associated with seizure initiation, but are in agreement with previously reported behavior in neocortex.

  18. Global exponential stability for switched memristive neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Xin, Youming; Li, Yuxia; Cheng, Zunshui; Huang, Xia

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the problem of exponential stability for switched memristive neural networks (MNNs) with time-varying delays. Different from most of the existing papers, we model a memristor as a continuous system, and view switched MNNs as switched neural networks with uncertain time-varying parameters. Based on average dwell time technique, mode-dependent average dwell time technique and multiple Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach, two conditions are derived to design the switching signal and guarantee the exponential stability of the considered neural networks, which are delay-dependent and formulated by linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated by two numerical examples. PMID:27164266

  19. Parallel access alignment network with barrel switch implementation for d-ordered vector elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An alignment network between N parallel data input ports and N parallel data outputs includes a first and a second barrel switch. The first barrel switch fed by the N parallel input ports shifts the N outputs thereof and in turn feeds the N-1 input data paths of the second barrel switch according to the relationship X=k.sup.y modulo N wherein x represents the output data path ordering of the first barrel switch, y represents the input data path ordering of the second barrel switch, and k equals a primitive root of the number N. The zero (0) ordered output data path of the first barrel switch is fed directly to the zero ordered output port. The N-1 output data paths of the second barrel switch are connected to the N output ports in the reverse ordering of the connections between the output data paths of the first barrel switch and the input data paths of the second barrel switch. The second switch is controlled by a value m, which in the preferred embodiment is produced at the output of a ROM addressed by the value d wherein d represents the incremental spacing or distance between data elements to be accessed from the N input ports, and m is generated therefrom according to the relationship d=k.sup.m modulo N.

  20. Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinska, Lena; Glick, Madeleine

    2006-04-01

    Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    Guest Editors:

    Lena Wosinska, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) / ICT Sweden Madeleine Glick, Intel Research, Cambridge, UK

    Technologies based on DWDM systems allow data transmission with bit rates of Tbit/s on a single fiber. To facilitate this enormous transmission volume, high-capacity and high-speed network nodes become inevitable in the optical network. Wideband switching, WDM switching, optical burst switching (OBS), and optical packet switching (OPS) are promising technologies for harnessing the bandwidth of WDM optical fiber networks in a highly flexible and efficient manner. As a number of key optical component technologies approach maturity, photonics in switching is becoming an increasingly attractive and practical solution for the next-generation of optical networks. The scope of this special issue is focused on the technology and architecture of optical switching nodes, including the architectural and algorithmic aspects of high-speed optical networks.

    Scope of Submission

    The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:
    • WDM node architectures
    • Novel device technologies enabling photonics in switching, such as optical switch fabrics, optical memory, and wavelength conversion
    • Routing protocols
    • WDM switching and routing
    • Quality of service
    • Performance measurement and evaluation
    • Next-generation optical networks: architecture, signaling, and control
    • Traffic measurement and field trials
    • Optical burst and packet switching
    • OBS/OPS node architectures
    • Burst/Packet scheduling and routing algorithms
    • Contention resolution/avoidance strategies
    • Services and applications for OBS/OPS (e.g., grid networks, storage-area networks, etc.)
    • Burst assembly and ingress traffic shaping

  1. Order parameter for bursting polyrhythms in multifunctional central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    We examine multistability of several coexisting bursting patterns in a central pattern generator network composed of three Hodgkin-Huxley type cells coupled reciprocally by inhibitory synapses. We establish that the control of switching between bursting polyrhythms and their bifurcations are determined by the temporal characteristics, such as the duty cycle, of networked interneurons and the coupling strength asymmetry. A computationally effective approach to the reduction of dynamics of the nine-dimensional network to two-dimensional Poincaré return mappings for phase lags between the interneurons is presented.

  2. The Energetic Transient Array ETA - A network of 'space buoys' in solar orbit for observations of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George R.

    1990-01-01

    The Energetic Transient Array (ETA) is a concept for a dedicated interplanetary network of about 40 microsatellites ('space buoys') deployed in an about 1 AU radius solar orbit for the observation of cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Such a network is essential for the determination of highly accurate (about 0.1 arcsec) error boxes for GRBs. For each of about 100 bursts which would be detectable per year of observation by such a network, high resolution spectra could be obtained through the use of passively-cooled Ge gamma-ray detectors. Stabilization of each microsatellite would be achieved by a novel technique based on the radiation pressure exerted on 'featherable' solar paddles. It should be possible to have a fully functional array of satellites in place before the end of the decade for a total cost of about $20M, exclusive of launcher fees.

  3. High-Speed Burst-Mode Clock and Data Recovery Circuits for Multiaccess Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Bhavin J.

    Optical multiaccess networks, and specifically passive optical networks (PONs) are considered to be the most promising technologies for the deployment of fiber-to-the-premises/home/user (FTTx) to solve the problem of limited bandwidth in local area networks with a low-cost solution and a guaranteed quality of service. In a PON, multiple users share the fiber infrastructure in a point-to-multipoint (P2MP) network. This topology introduce optical path delays which inherently cause the data packets to undergo amplitude variations up to 20 dB and phase variations from --2pi to +2pi rad--burst-mode traffic. Consequently, this creates new challenges for the design and test of optical receivers front-ends and clock and data recovery circuits (CDRs), in particular, burst-mode CDRs (BM-CDRs). The research presented in this thesis investigates BM-CDRs, both theoretically and experimentally. We demonstrate two novel BM-CDR architectures. These BM-CDRs achieve error-free operation [bit error rate (BER) <10e--10] while providing instantaneous (0 preamble bit) clock phase acquisition for any phase step (+/-2pi rad) between successive bursts. Instantaneous phase acquisition improves the physical efficiency of upstream PON traffic, and increases the effective throughput of the system by raising the information rate. Our eloquent, scalable BM-CDR architectures leverage the design of low complexity commercial electronics providing a cost-effective solution for PONs. The first BM-CDR (rated at 5 Gb/s) is based on phase-tracking time domain oversampling (semiblind) CDR operated at 2x the bit rate and a clock phase aligner (CPA) that makes use of a phase picking algorithm. The second BM-CDR (rate at 10 Gb/s) is based on semiblind space domain oversampling and employs a phase-tracking CDR with multiphase clocks at the bit rate and a CPA with a novel phase picking algorithm. We experimentally demonstrate these BM-CDRs in optical test beds and study the effect of channel-impairments in

  4. Coincidence and coherent data analysis methods for gravitational wave bursts in a network of interferometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-11-01

    Network data analysis methods are the only way to properly separate real gravitational wave (GW) transient events from detector noise. They can be divided into two generic classes: the coincidence method and the coherent analysis. The former uses lists of selected events provided by each interferometer belonging to the network and tries to correlate them in time to identify a physical signal. Instead of this binary treatment of detector outputs (signal present or absent), the latter method involves first the merging of the interferometer data and looks for a common pattern, consistent with an assumed GW waveform and a given source location in the sky. The thresholds are only applied later, to validate or not the hypothesis made. As coherent algorithms use more complete information than coincidence methods, they are expected to provide better detection performances, but at a higher computational cost. An efficient filter must yield a good compromise between a low false alarm rate (hence triggering on data at a manageable rate) and a high detection efficiency. Therefore, the comparison of the two approaches is achieved using so-called receiving operating characteristics (ROC), giving the relationship between the false alarm rate and the detection efficiency for a given method. This paper investigates this question via Monte Carlo simulations, using the network model developed in a previous article. Its main conclusions are the following. First, a three-interferometer network such as Virgo-LIGO is found to be too small to reach good detection efficiencies at low false alarm rates: larger configurations are suitable to reach a confidence level high enough to validate as true GW a detected event. In addition, an efficient network must contain interferometers with comparable sensitivities: studying the three-interferometer LIGO network shows that the 2-km interferometer with half sensitivity leads to a strong reduction of performances as compared to a network of three

  5. Robust stability of stochastic delayed additive neural networks with Markovian switching.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Ho, Daniel W C; Qu, Yuzhong

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of robust stability for stochastic interval delayed additive neural networks (SIDANN) with Markovian switching. The time delay is assumed to be time-varying. In such neural networks, the features of stochastic systems, interval systems, time-varying delay systems and Markovian switching are taken into account. The mathematical model of this kind of neural networks is first proposed. Secondly, the global exponential stability in the mean square is studied for the SIDANN with Markovian switching. Based on the Lyapunov method, several stability conditions are presented, which can be expressed in terms of linear matrix inequalities. As a subsequent result, the stochastic interval additive neural networks with time-varying delay are also discussed. A sufficient condition is given to determine its stability. Finally, two simulation examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the results developed. PMID:17714914

  6. Contentionless transmission in buffer-less slotted optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari, Masoud; Ghaffarpour Rahbar, Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Contention of optical packets in optical packet switched (OPS) networks is a major problem, and it is even more critical in buffer-less OPS networks. In this paper, an innovative contention avoidance technique is proposed which uses combination of special traffic shaping at ingress switches and special time slot reservation technique through the path of traffic flows in core network. This novel protocol is called contentionless transmission OPS (CLTOPS) suitable for buffer-less slotted OPS networks. Performance evaluations show that the CLTOPS can outperform the original slotted-OPS architecture in terms of packet loss rate (PLR) performance, with or without using wavelength conversion. It is shown that there is a trade-off between the amount of improvement in PLR and additional delay applied to the users' packets at the ingress switches buffers. However, appropriate parameters can be selected to make the additional delay tolerable for users' applications.

  7. Structure of the Transcriptional Network Controlling White-Opaque Switching in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hernday, Aaron D.; Lohse, Matthew B.; Fordyce, Polly M.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can switch between two phenotypic cell types, termed “white” and “opaque.” Both cell types are heritable for many generations, and the switch between the two types occurs epigenetically, that is, without a change in the primary DNA sequence of the genome. Previous work identified six key transcriptional regulators important for white-opaque switching: Wor1, Wor2, Wor3, Czf1, Efg1, and Ahr1. In this work, we describe the structure of the transcriptional network that specifies the white and opaque cell types and governs the ability to switch between them. In particular, we use a combination of genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, gene expression profiling, and microfluidics-based DNA binding experiments to determine the direct and indirect regulatory interactions that form the switch network. The six regulators are arranged together in a complex, interlocking network with many seemingly redundant and overlapping connections. We propose that the structure (or topology) of this network is responsible for the epigenetic maintenance of the white and opaque states, the switching between them, and the specialized properties of each state. PMID:23855748

  8. DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION OF OPTICAL SWITCH MATRIX PERFORMANCE IN COMPUTER NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present application of a Discrete Event Simulator (DES) for performance modeling of optical switching devices in computer networks. Network simulators are valuable tools in situations where one cannot investigate the system directly. This situation may arise if the system under study does not exist yet or the cost of studying the system directly is prohibitive. Most available network simulators are based on the paradigm of discrete-event-based simulation. As computer networks become increasingly larger and more complex, sophisticated DES tool chains have become available for both commercial and academic research. Some well-known simulators are NS2, NS3, OPNET, and OMNEST. For this research, we have applied OMNEST for the purpose of simulating multi-wavelength performance of optical switch matrices in computer interconnection networks. Our results suggest that the application of DES to computer interconnection networks provides valuable insight in device performance and aids in topology and system optimization.

  9. Demonstration of a Hitless Bypass Switch Using Nanomechanical Perturbation for High-bitrate Transparent Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, R.; Stein, A.; Yu, M.; Kwong, D.-L.; Kimerling, L.C.; Wong, C.W.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an optical hitless bypass switch based on nanomechanical proximity perturbation for high-bitrate transparent networks. Embedded in a single-level {pi}-imbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the two nanomechanical-based {Delta}{beta}-directional couplers permit broadband signal rerouting on-chip, while the selected wavelength remains unaffected at all times for optical filter reconfiguration. The optical hitless switch is implemented in the silicon nanophotonics platform, with experimental measurements matching well with numerical and theoretical modeling.

  10. A cross-stacked plasmonic nanowire network for high-contrast femtosecond optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanhai; Zhang, Xinping; Fang, Xiaohui; Liang, Shuyan

    2016-01-01

    We report an ultrafast optical switching device constructed by stacking two layers of gold nanowires into a perpendicularly crossed network, which works at a speed faster than 280 fs with an on/off modulation depth of about 22.4%. The two stacks play different roles in enhancing consistently the optical switching performance due to their different dependence on the polarization of optical electric fields. The cross-plasmon resonance based on the interaction between the perpendicularly stacked gold nanowires and its Fano-coupling with Rayleigh anomaly is the dominant mechanism for such a high-contrast optical switching device.

  11. Gamma-ray burst observations with the [ital Compton]/[ital Ulysses]/[ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] network

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L. ); Hurley, K.C. ); Sommer, M. ); Boer, M.; Niel, M. ); Fishman, G.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Wilson, R.B. ); Fenimore, E.E.; Laros, J.G.; Klebesadel, R.W. )

    1993-07-05

    The third and latest interplanetary network for the precise directional analysis of gamma ray bursts consists of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment in [ital Compton] [ital Gamma] [ital Ray] [ital Observatory] and instruments on [ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] [ital Orbiter] and the deep-space mission [ital Ulysses]. The unsurpassed resolution of the BATSE instrument, the use of refined analysis techniques, and [ital Ulysses]' distance of up to 6 AU all contribute to a potential for greater precision than had been achieved with former networks. Also, the departure of [ital Ulysses] from the ecliptic plane in 1992 avoids any positional alignment of the three instruments that would lessen the source directional accuracy.

  12. Heterogeneous waveband switching in wavelength division multiplexed networks based on autonomous clustering architecture [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengke; Ramamurthy, Byrav

    2006-09-01

    Adopting waveband switching (WBS) in backbone wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks is promising since it can reduce the network operational cost and the call blocking probability. However, upgrading the existing optical switching architecture requires time and money. Thus heterogeneous waveband switching (HeteroWBS) architecture would be desirable in such a system, where some nodes can support WBS functions and some cannot. We study the performance of HeteroWBS networks in terms of call blocking probability and cost savings under dynamically arriving traffic requests. We first investigate the effects of optical component developments on waveband switching in WDM networks. Various connection managements are then listed and analyzed. Next, to assist in the designing of efficient WBS algorithms, an autonomous clustering-based HeteroWBS (AS-HeteroWBS) architecture is proposed. The AS-HeteroWBS architecture clusters the network into multiple autonomous systems (ASs). An AS may contain some specific nodes that provide WBS functions for all the nodes in the AS. Based on the architecture, three HeteroWBS algorithms are proposed, namely, the autonomous heterogeneous WBS algorithm (AS-WBS), the autonomous source-limited heterogeneous WBS algorithm (AS-S-WBS), and the shortest-path-based heterogeneous WBS algorithm (SH-WBS). Our simulation results show that the HeteroWBS algorithms can achieve optimal cost savings while maintaining the same network throughput compared with the algorithm without WBS.

  13. Discrete-time systems with random switches: From systems stability to networks synchronization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Ho, Daniel W C

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we develop some approaches, which enable us to more accurately and analytically identify the essential patterns that guarantee the almost sure stability of discrete-time systems with random switches. We allow for the case that the elements in the switching connection matrix even obey some unbounded and continuous-valued distributions. In addition to the almost sure stability, we further investigate the almost sure synchronization in complex dynamical networks consisting of randomly connected nodes. Numerical examples illustrate that a chaotic dynamics in the synchronization manifold is preserved when statistical parameters enter some almost sure synchronization region established by the developed approach. Moreover, some delicate configurations are considered on probability space for ensuring synchronization in networks whose nodes are described by nonlinear maps. Both theoretical and numerical results on synchronization are presented by setting only a few random connections in each switch duration. More interestingly, we analytically find it possible to achieve almost sure synchronization in the randomly switching complex networks even with very large population sizes, which cannot be easily realized in non-switching but deterministically connected networks. PMID:27036191

  14. Discrete-time systems with random switches: From systems stability to networks synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yao; Lin, Wei; Ho, Daniel W. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we develop some approaches, which enable us to more accurately and analytically identify the essential patterns that guarantee the almost sure stability of discrete-time systems with random switches. We allow for the case that the elements in the switching connection matrix even obey some unbounded and continuous-valued distributions. In addition to the almost sure stability, we further investigate the almost sure synchronization in complex dynamical networks consisting of randomly connected nodes. Numerical examples illustrate that a chaotic dynamics in the synchronization manifold is preserved when statistical parameters enter some almost sure synchronization region established by the developed approach. Moreover, some delicate configurations are considered on probability space for ensuring synchronization in networks whose nodes are described by nonlinear maps. Both theoretical and numerical results on synchronization are presented by setting only a few random connections in each switch duration. More interestingly, we analytically find it possible to achieve almost sure synchronization in the randomly switching complex networks even with very large population sizes, which cannot be easily realized in non-switching but deterministically connected networks.

  15. Proposal of a multi-layer network architecture for OBS/GMPLS network interworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxiang; Tsuritani, Takehiro; Yin, Yawei; Otani, Tomohiro; Wu, Jian

    2007-11-01

    In order to enable the existing optical circuit switching (OCS) network to support both wavelength and subwavelength granularities, this paper proposes overlay-based multi-layer network architecture for interworking the generalized multi-protocol label switching (GMPLS) controlled OCS network with optical burst switching (OBS) networks. A dedicated GMPLS border controller with necessary GMPLS extensions, including group label switching path (LSP) provisioning, node capability advertisement, and standard wavelength label as well as wavelength availability advertisement, is introduced in this multi-layer network to enable a simple but flexible interworking operation. The feasibility of this proposal is experimentally confirmed by demonstrating an OBS/GMPLS testbed, in which the extended node capability advertisement and group LSP functions successfully enabled the burst header packet (BHP) and data burst (DB) to transmit over a GMPLS-controlled transparent OCS network.

  16. Finite-time boundedness and stabilization of uncertain switched neural networks with time-varying delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Cao, Jinde; Alofi, Abdulaziz; Al-Mazrooei, Abdullah; Elaiw, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the finite-time boundedness and stabilization problem for a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delay and parametric uncertainties. Based on Lyapunov-like function method and average dwell time technique, some sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the finite-time boundedness of considered uncertain switched neural networks. Furthermore, the state feedback controller is designed to solve the finite-time stabilization problem. Moreover, the proposed sufficient conditions can be simplified into the form of linear matrix equalities for conveniently using Matlab LMI toolbox. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the main results. PMID:26103615

  17. Electrooptical adaptive switching network for the hypercube computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E.; Peterson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An all-optical network design for the hyperswitch network using regular free-space interconnects between electronic processor nodes is presented. The adaptive routing model used is described, and an adaptive routing control example is presented. The design demonstrates that existing electrooptical techniques are sufficient for implementing efficient parallel architectures without the need for more complex means of implementing arbitrary interconnection schemes. The electrooptical hyperswitch network significantly improves the communication performance of the hypercube computer.

  18. Allocation of computer ports within a terminal switching network: an application of queuing theory to gandalf port contenders

    SciTech Connect

    Vahle, M.O.

    1982-03-01

    Queuing theory is applied to the problem of assigning computer ports within a terminal switching network to maximize the likelihood of instant connect. A brief background of the network is included to focus on the statement of the problem.

  19. Digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver for 10G and 1G coexistence in optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Mendinueta, José Manuel Delgado; Mitchell, John E; Bayvel, Polina; Thomsen, Benn C

    2011-07-18

    A digital dual-rate burst-mode receiver, intended to support 10 and 1 Gb/s coexistence in optical access networks, is proposed and experimentally characterized. The receiver employs a standard DC-coupled photoreceiver followed by a 20 GS/s digitizer and the detection of the packet presence and line-rate is implemented in the digital domain. A polyphase, 2 samples-per-bit digital signal processing algorithm is then used for efficient clock and data recovery of the 10/1.25 Gb/s packets. The receiver performance is characterized in terms of sensitivity and dynamic range under burst-mode operation for 10/1.25 Gb/s intensity modulated data in terms of both the packet error rate (PER) and the payload bit error rate (pBER). The impact of packet preamble lengths of 16, 32, 48, and 64 bits, at 10 Gb/s, on the receiver performance is investigated. We show that there is a trade-off between pBER and PER that is limited by electrical noise and digitizer clipping at low and high received powers, respectively, and that a 16/2-bit preamble at 10/1.25 Gb/s is sufficient to reliably detect packets at both line-rates over a burst-to-burst dynamic range of 14,5 dB with a sensitivity of -18.5 dBm at 10 Gb/s. PMID:21934767

  20. A theoretical and experimental study of neuromorphic atomic switch networks for reservoir computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillin, Henry O.; Aguilera, Renato; Shieh, Hsien-Hang; Avizienis, Audrius V.; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2013-09-01

    Atomic switch networks (ASNs) have been shown to generate network level dynamics that resemble those observed in biological neural networks. To facilitate understanding and control of these behaviors, we developed a numerical model based on the synapse-like properties of individual atomic switches and the random nature of the network wiring. We validated the model against various experimental results highlighting the possibility to functionalize the network plasticity and the differences between an atomic switch in isolation and its behaviors in a network. The effects of changing connectivity density on the nonlinear dynamics were examined as characterized by higher harmonic generation in response to AC inputs. To demonstrate their utility for computation, we subjected the simulated network to training within the framework of reservoir computing and showed initial evidence of the ASN acting as a reservoir which may be optimized for specific tasks by adjusting the input gain. The work presented represents steps in a unified approach to experimentation and theory of complex systems to make ASNs a uniquely scalable platform for neuromorphic computing.

  1. A theoretical and experimental study of neuromorphic atomic switch networks for reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Sillin, Henry O; Aguilera, Renato; Shieh, Hsien-Hang; Avizienis, Audrius V; Aono, Masakazu; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2013-09-27

    Atomic switch networks (ASNs) have been shown to generate network level dynamics that resemble those observed in biological neural networks. To facilitate understanding and control of these behaviors, we developed a numerical model based on the synapse-like properties of individual atomic switches and the random nature of the network wiring. We validated the model against various experimental results highlighting the possibility to functionalize the network plasticity and the differences between an atomic switch in isolation and its behaviors in a network. The effects of changing connectivity density on the nonlinear dynamics were examined as characterized by higher harmonic generation in response to AC inputs. To demonstrate their utility for computation, we subjected the simulated network to training within the framework of reservoir computing and showed initial evidence of the ASN acting as a reservoir which may be optimized for specific tasks by adjusting the input gain. The work presented represents steps in a unified approach to experimentation and theory of complex systems to make ASNs a uniquely scalable platform for neuromorphic computing. PMID:23999129

  2. Recursiveness, switching, and fluctuations in a replicating catalytic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-09-01

    A protocell model consisting of mutually catalyzing molecules is studied, in order to investigate how chemical compositions are transferred recursively through cell divisions under replication errors. Depending on the numbers of molecules and species, and the path rate, three phases are found: fast switching state without recursive production, recursive production, and itinerancy between the above two states. The number distributions of the molecules in the recursive states are shown to be log-normal except for those species that form a core hypercycle, and are explained with the help of a heuristic argument.

  3. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  4. A Scheme to Optimize Flow Routing and Polling Switch Selection of Software Defined Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Li, Lemin; Ren, Jing; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yangming; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at minimizing the communication cost for collecting flow information in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Since flow-based information collecting method requires too much communication cost, and switch-based method proposed recently cannot benefit from controlling flow routing, jointly optimize flow routing and polling switch selection is proposed to reduce the communication cost. To this end, joint optimization problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) model firstly. Since the ILP model is intractable in large size network, we also design an optimal algorithm for the multi-rooted tree topology and an efficient heuristic algorithm for general topology. According to extensive simulations, it is found that our method can save up to 55.76% communication cost compared with the state-of-the-art switch-based scheme. PMID:26690571

  5. Application of Remote Power-by-Light Switching in a Simplified BOTDA Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups. PMID:24351644

  6. Theta-burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters the Functional Topography of the Cortical Motor Network

    PubMed Central

    NOH, Nor Azila; FUGGETTA, Giorgio; MANGANOTTI, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive tool that is able to modulate the electrical activity of the brain depending upon its protocol of stimulation. Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is a high-frequency TMS protocol that is able to induce prolonged plasticity changes in the brain. The induction of plasticity-like effects by TBS is useful in both experimental and therapeutic settings; however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this modulation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of continuous TBS (cTBS) on the intrahemispheric and interhemispheric functional connectivity of the resting and active brain. Methods: A total of 26 healthy humans were randomly divided into two groups that received either real cTBS or sham (control) over the left primary motor cortex. Surface electroencephalogram (EEG) was used to quantify the changes of neural oscillations after cTBS at rest and after a choice reaction time test. The cTBS-induced EEG oscillations were computed using spectral analysis of event-related coherence (ERCoh) of theta (4–7.5 Hz), low alpha (8–9.5 Hz), high alpha (10–12.5 Hz), low beta (13–19.5 Hz), and high beta (20–30 Hz) brain rhythms. Results: We observed a global decrease in functional connectivity of the brain in the cTBS group when compared to sham in the low beta brain rhythm at rest and high beta brain rhythm during the active state. In particular, EEG spectral analysis revealed that high-frequency beta, a cortically generated brain rhythm, was the most sensitive band that was modulated by cTBS. Conclusion: Overall, our findings suggest that cTBS, a TMS protocol that mimics the mechanism of long-term depression of synaptic plasticity, modulates motor network oscillations primarily at the cortical level and might interfere with cortical information coding. PMID:27006636

  7. Performance evaluation of a multi-granularity and multi-connectivity circuit switched network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Naixing; Xin, Maoqing; Sun, Weiqiang; Jin, Yaohui; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Chunlei; Hu, Weisheng; Xie, Guowu

    2007-11-01

    This paper introduces a novel notion of multi-granularity and multi-connectivity circuit switched network. Based on this notion, four routing schemes - Fixed Routing (FR), Maximum Remain (MR), Secured Maximum Remain (SMR) and Premium/Punishment Modification (PPM) are proposed. Numerical simulation results about the performance of these four schemes are also presented in this paper.

  8. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J.; Pullen, Robert H.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules.

  9. Neurons in a forebrain nucleus required for vocal plasticity rapidly switch between precise firing and variable bursting depending on social context.

    PubMed

    Kao, Mimi H; Wright, Brian D; Doupe, Allison J

    2008-12-01

    Song is a learned vocal behavior influenced by social interactions. Prior work has suggested that the anterior forebrain pathway (AFP), a specialized pallial-basal ganglia circuit critical for vocal plasticity, mediates the influence of social signals on song. Here, we investigate the signals the AFP sends to song motor areas and their dependence on social context by characterizing singing-related activity of single neurons in the AFP output nucleus LMAN (lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium). We show that interaction with females causes marked, real-time changes in firing properties of individual LMAN neurons. When males sing to females ("directed"), LMAN neurons exhibit reliable firing of single spikes precisely locked to song. In contrast, when males sing alone ("undirected"), the same LMAN neurons exhibit prominent burst firing and trial-by-trial variability. Burst structure and timing vary substantially across repeated undirected trials. Despite context-dependent differences in firing statistics, the average pattern of song-locked firing for an individual neuron is similar across behavioral contexts, suggesting a common underlying signal. Different LMAN neurons in the same bird, however, exhibit distinct firing patterns, suggesting that subsets of neurons jointly encode song features. Together, our findings demonstrate that behavioral interactions reversibly transform the signaling mode of LMAN neurons. Such changes may contribute to rapid switching of motor activity between variable and precise states. More generally, our results suggest that pallial-basal ganglia circuits contribute to motor learning and production through multiple mechanisms: patterned signals could guide changes in motor output while state-dependent variability could subserve motor exploration. PMID:19052215

  10. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  11. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  12. Transition Mechanisms of Bursting in a Two-Cell Network Model of the Pre-Bötzinger Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lixia; Yuan, Dandan; Chen, Xi; Meng, Xiangying

    Persistent sodium and calcium activated nonspecific cationic currents play important roles in the respiratory rhythm generation of the pre-Bötzinger complex. In this paper, we study the bursting patterns and their transition mechanisms in the two-parameter space of a two-cell network model of the pre-Bötzinger complex with synaptic coupling. Using the methods of fast/slow decomposition and two-parameter bifurcation analysis, we divide the two-parameter space into four different regions according to the multiphase oscillations, and reveal the possible transition mechanisms of bursting between these different regions. We also study the dynamics of the system with varying synaptic coupling strength. This work provides insights of how currents and synaptic coupling work on the respiratory rhythm generation.

  13. Analyzing Space-Based Interferometric Measurements of Stars and Network Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Since the announcement of the discovery of sources of bursts of gamma-ray radiation in 1973, hundreds more reports of such bursts have now been published. Numerous artificial satellites have been equipped with gamma-ray detectors including the very successful Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE instrument. Unfortunately, we have made no progress in identifying the source(s) of this high energy radiation. We suspected that this was a consequence of the method used to define gamma-ray burst source "error boxes." An alternative procedure to compute gamma-ray burst source positions, with a purely physical underpinning, was proposed in 1988 by Taff. Since then we have also made significant progress in understanding the analytical nature of the triangulation problem and in computing actual gamma-ray burst positions and their corresponding error boxes. For the former, we can now mathematically illustrate the crucial role of the area occupied by the detectors, while for the latter, the Atteia et al. (1987) catalog has been completely re-reduced. There are very few discrepancies in locations between our results and those of the customary "time difference of arrival" procedure. Thus, we have numerically demonstrated that the end result, for the positions, of these two very different-looking procedures is the same. Finally, for the first time, we provide a sample of realistic "error boxes" whose non-simple shapes vividly portray the difficulty of burst source localization.

  14. Adaptive role switching promotes fairness in networked ultimatum game

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Te; Fu, Feng; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Long

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, mechanisms favoring fair split in the ultimatum game have attracted growing interests because of its practical implications for international bargains. In this game, two players are randomly assigned two different roles respectively to split an offer: the proposer suggests how to split and the responder decides whether or not to accept it. Only when both agree is the offer successfully split; otherwise both get nothing. It is of importance and interest to break the symmetry in role assignment especially when the game is repeatedly played in a heterogeneous population. Here we consider an adaptive role assignment: whenever the split fails, the two players switch their roles probabilistically. The results show that this simple feedback mechanism proves much more effective at promoting fairness than other alternatives (where, for example, the role assignment is based on the number of neighbors). PMID:23528986

  15. Demonstration of dynamic point-to-multipoint LSPs in automatic switched optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiqiang; Wei, Xueqing; Zhang, Guoyin; Jin, Yaohui; Sun, Jun; Guo, Wei; Hu, Weisheng

    2005-11-01

    Automatic Switched Optical Networks, or ASON, is regarded as one promising networking technology for future optical networks. From network operators' perspective, it is well agreed that ASON should provide the following features: fast provisioning, easier network operation, higher network reliability, scalability, simpler planning and design, and multi-vendor inter-operability. Fast provisioning enables ASON to meet the requirements of more dynamic applications such as bandwidth on demand and content distribution. Protection and restoration is crucial because of the extremely high data-rate the network will carry. Mesh type network and fast provisioning capability leave more space for a more reliable and flexible network. Unlike traditional transport networks that are constructed purely for point-to-point connectivity, ASON deployed in regional or metro-area networks needs to provide high connectivity to its clients. And, as a result, the planning and designing problem becomes very complex due to the large number of devices, the variety of interface types and network protocols. It is also important that the network will be able to inter-connect devices from different vendors and provide support to different client signals such as SONET/SDH, Ethernet, IP, ATM and Frame Relay.

  16. Building new access network using reconfigurable optical grid network and wireless network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yinghui; Wu, Runze; Ji, Yuefeng; Xu, Daxiong

    2007-11-01

    Recently wireless mesh network has been gaining increasing attention and early versions are being deployed as municipal access solutions to eliminate the wired drop to every wireless router at customer premise. In this paper, we propose a novel access network using reconfigurable optical burst switching grid network and wireless mesh network. The proposed access network architecture saves network deployment cost because fiber need not penetrate to each end user. We also propose a hierarchical routing protocol to enhance the routing efficiency.

  17. Robust control of uncertain nonlinear switched genetic regulatory networks with time delays: A redesign approach.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Hojjatullah; Majd, Vahid Johari

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of robust stability of nonlinear genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) is investigated. The developed method is an integral sliding mode control based redesign for a class of perturbed dissipative switched GRNs with time delays. The control law is redesigned by modifying the dissipativity-based control law that was designed for the unperturbed GRNs with time delays. The switched GRNs are switched from one mode to another based on time, state, etc. Although, the active subsystem is known in any instance, but the switching law and the transition probabilities are not known. The model for each mode is considered affine with matched and unmatched perturbations. The redesigned control law forces the GRN to always remain on the sliding surface and the dissipativity is maintained from the initial time in the presence of the norm-bounded perturbations. The global stability of the perturbed GRNs is maintained if the unperturbed model is globally dissipative. The designed control law for the perturbed GRNs guarantees robust exponential or asymptotic stability of the closed-loop network depending on the type of stability of the unperturbed model. The results are applied to a nonlinear switched GRN, and its convergence to the origin is verified by simulation. PMID:26924600

  18. Emergent criticality in complex turing B-type atomic switch networks.

    PubMed

    Stieg, Adam Z; Avizienis, Audrius V; Sillin, Henry O; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Aono, Masakazu; Gimzewski, James K

    2012-01-10

    Recent advances in the neuromorphic operation of atomic switches as individual synapse-like devices demonstrate the ability to process information with both short-term and long-term memorization in a single two terminal junction. Here it is shown that atomic switches can be self-assembled within a highly interconnected network of silver nanowires similar in structure to Turing’s “B-Type unorganized machine”, originally proposed as a randomly connected network of NAND logic gates. In these experimental embodiments,complex networks of coupled atomic switches exhibit emergent criticality similar in nature to previously reported electrical activity of biological brains and neuron assemblies. Rapid fluctuations in electrical conductance display metastability and power law scaling of temporal correlation lengths that are attributed to dynamic reorganization of the interconnected electro-ionic network resulting from induced non-equilibrium thermodynamic instabilities. These collective properties indicate a potential utility for realtime,multi-input processing of distributed sensory data through reservoir computation. We propose these highly coupled, nonlinear electronic networks as an implementable hardware-based platform toward the creation of physically intelligent machines. PMID:22329003

  19. Formation of Polymer Networks for Fast In-Plane Switching of Liquid Crystals at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byeong-Hun; Song, Dong Han; Kim, Ki-Han; Wok Park, Byung; Choi, Sun-Wook; Park, Sung Il; Kang, Sung Gu; Yoon, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byeong Koo; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2013-09-01

    We formed a polymer structure to enable fast in-plane switching of liquid crystals at low temperatures. The problem of the inevitable slow response at low temperatures was reduced by the formation of in-cell polymer networks in in-plane switching (IPS) cells. The electro-optic characteristics of polymer-networked IPS cells were measured at temperatures ranging from -10 to 20 °C. The turn-on and turn-off times of an IPS cell were reduced by 44.5 and 47.2% at -10 °C by the formation of polymer networks. We believe that the proposed technology can be applied to emerging display devices such as mobile phones and automotive displays that may be used at low temperatures.

  20. Performance analysis for gigabit Ethernet communication network under various data rates and switching structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Shyh-Lin; Wu, Jun-Yi

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports recent work on gigabit Ethernet interconnection communication traffic analysis. We proposed and demonstrated the system concept of gigabit Ethernet communication. 1.25Gbps, 10Gpbs and 40Gpbs gigabit Ethernet interconnection networks are considered for computer communications. Various switching structures, such as crossbar, double crossbar (Dcrossbar), Modified Dilated Benes (MDB), General MDB (GMDB), Benes, Dilated Benes (Dbenes), Tree architecture, Simplified tree (Stree), Extended baseline network (Ebaseline) are analyzed for searching the optimal performance of gigabit Ethernet communication. The numerical results for computation information transferring can be applied to search a best strategy for gigabit Ethernet communication networks interconnections.

  1. Binary synaptic connections based on memory switching in a-Si:H for artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Moopenn, A.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme for nonvolatile associative electronic memory storage with high information storage density is proposed which is based on neural network models and which uses a matrix of two-terminal passive interconnections (synapses). It is noted that the massive parallelism in the architecture would require the ON state of a synaptic connection to be unusually weak (highly resistive). Memory switching using a-Si:H along with ballast resistors patterned from amorphous Ge-metal alloys is investigated for a binary programmable read only memory matrix. The fabrication of a 1600 synapse test array of uniform connection strengths and a-Si:H switching elements is discussed.

  2. An Acetylation Switch Regulates SUMO-Dependent Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Rebecca; Chien, Christopher D.; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Muller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The attachment of the SUMO modifier to proteins controls cellular signaling pathways through noncovalent binding to SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs). Canonical SIMs contain a core of hydrophobic residues that bind to a hydrophobic pocket on SUMO. Negatively charged residues of SIMs frequently contribute to binding by interacting with a basic surface on SUMO. Here we define acetylation within this basic interface as a central mechanism for the control of SUMO-mediated interactions. The acetyl-mediated neutralization of basic charges on SUMO prevents binding to SIMs in PML, Daxx, and PIAS family members but does not affect the interaction between RanBP2 and SUMO. Acetylation is controlled by HDACs and attenuates SUMO- and PIAS-mediated gene silencing. Moreover, it affects the assembly of PML nuclear bodies and restrains the recruitment of the corepressor Daxx to these structures. This acetyl-dependent switch thus expands the regulatory repertoire of SUMO signaling and determines the selectivity and dynamics of SUMO-SIM interactions. PMID:22578841

  3. Building SDN-Based Agricultural Vehicular Sensor Networks Based on Extended Open vSwitch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Yan, Siyu; Yang, Fan; Pan, Tian; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Software-defined vehicular sensor networks in agriculture, such as autonomous vehicle navigation based on wireless multi-sensor networks, can lead to more efficient precision agriculture. In SDN-based vehicle sensor networks, the data plane is simplified and becomes more efficient by introducing a centralized controller. However, in a wireless environment, the main controller node may leave the sensor network due to the dynamic topology change or the unstable wireless signal, leaving the rest of network devices without control, e.g., a sensor node as a switch may forward packets according to stale rules until the controller updates the flow table entries. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel SDN-based vehicular sensor networks architecture which can minimize the performance penalty of controller connection loss. We achieve this by designing a connection state detection and self-learning mechanism. We build prototypes based on extended Open vSwitch and Ryu. The experimental results show that the recovery time from controller connection loss is under 100 ms and it keeps rule updating in real time with a stable throughput. This architecture enhances the survivability and stability of SDN-based vehicular sensor networks in precision agriculture. PMID:26797616

  4. Building SDN-Based Agricultural Vehicular Sensor Networks Based on Extended Open vSwitch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Yan, Siyu; Yang, Fan; Pan, Tian; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Software-defined vehicular sensor networks in agriculture, such as autonomous vehicle navigation based on wireless multi-sensor networks, can lead to more efficient precision agriculture. In SDN-based vehicle sensor networks, the data plane is simplified and becomes more efficient by introducing a centralized controller. However, in a wireless environment, the main controller node may leave the sensor network due to the dynamic topology change or the unstable wireless signal, leaving the rest of network devices without control, e.g., a sensor node as a switch may forward packets according to stale rules until the controller updates the flow table entries. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a novel SDN-based vehicular sensor networks architecture which can minimize the performance penalty of controller connection loss. We achieve this by designing a connection state detection and self-learning mechanism. We build prototypes based on extended Open vSwitch and Ryu. The experimental results show that the recovery time from controller connection loss is under 100 ms and it keeps rule updating in real time with a stable throughput. This architecture enhances the survivability and stability of SDN-based vehicular sensor networks in precision agriculture. PMID:26797616

  5. Optical grooming switch with regenerative functionality for transparent interconnection of networks.

    PubMed

    Vorreau, P; Sygletos, S; Parmigiani, F; Hillerkuss, D; Bonk, R; Petropoulos, P; Richardson, D J; Zarris, G; Simeonidou, D; Klonidis, D; Tomkos, I; Weerasuriya, R; Ibrahim, S; Ellis, A D; Cotter, D; Morais, R; Monteiro, P; Ben Ezra, S; Tsadka, S; Freude, W; Leuthold, J

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate a regenerative optical grooming switch for buffer-less interconnection of metro/access and metro/core ring networks with switching functionality in time, space and wavelength domain. Key functionalities of the router are the traffic aggregation with time-slot interchanging (TSI) functionality, the WDM-to-ODTM multiplexing and the OTDM-to-WDM demultiplexing of high-speed channel into lower bit-rate tributaries as well as multi-wavelength all-optical 2R regeneration of several higher-speed signals. BER and Q-factor measurements of different switching scenarios show excellent performance with no error floor and Q-factors above 21 dB. PMID:19687996

  6. Wavelength-division-multiplexing optical Benes-type networks with simultaneous space-wavelength switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Haitham S.; Deogun, Jitender S.

    2006-11-01

    We propose new wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical interconnect architectures with simultaneous space-wavelength switching capability and reduced complexity. The proposed architectures improve over existing space-wavelength Benes networks, as these require the same number of stages and hardware components as a pure space Benes network. In addition, wavelength conversion in the proposed designs occurs only between two predefined wavelengths, eliminating the need for expensive wide-range wavelength converters used in most existing designs. We develop and characterize three families of WDM Benes networks with reduced complexity, and we present a typical architecture in each of the families. We also propose a routing strategy to establish connections over each of the proposed families. Finally, we present a comparative analysis of the properties of proposed architectures with respect to known WDM Benes networks. It is shown that the new designs require a smaller number of switching stages and space switches, and they have a smaller overall cost compared to most existing WDM Benes interconnects.

  7. Effect of ingress buffering on self-similarity of optical burst traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui; Zaruba, Gergely V.

    2003-10-01

    Recently, optical burst switching and aggregated optical packet switching have gained significant exposure as possible future mechanisms for routing aggregated IP traffic over all-optical core networks. However, the limited buffering capacity in all-optical networks presents a major challenge, as current IP traffic displays strong self-similar properties. Reducing the burst loss rate of such long-range dependent traffic can be costly requiring a significant increase in either the network bandwidth or the buffer size of optical cross connects. In this paper, we revisit the possibility of using buffers to reduce self-similarity before the traffic is routed onto the all-optical core. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the effect of packet/burst aggregation on the self-similarity measure of the traffic. In particular, we implement a simple burst assembly mechanism with two parameters, the maximum burst length L and the maximum burst delay d, so that incoming traffic is smoothed with a guaranteed delay bound. Unlike previous works, we simulate the burst assembler using more realistic input traffic sources, and analyze the results using both R/S plot and discrete wavelet analysis methods. Our detailed results show that buffering indeed reduces traffic self-similarity (an area of research controversy) when parameters L and d are set appropriately.

  8. A neural network model of individual differences in task switching abilities.

    PubMed

    Herd, Seth A; O'Reilly, Randall C; Hazy, Tom E; Chatham, Christopher H; Brant, Angela M; Friedman, Naomi P

    2014-09-01

    We use a biologically grounded neural network model to investigate the brain mechanisms underlying individual differences specific to the selection and instantiation of representations that exert cognitive control in task switching. Existing computational models of task switching do not focus on individual differences and so cannot explain why task switching abilities are separable from other executive function (EF) abilities (such as response inhibition). We explore hypotheses regarding neural mechanisms underlying the "Shifting-Specific" and "Common EF" components of EF proposed in the Unity/Diversity model (Miyake & Friedman, 2012) and similar components in related theoretical frameworks. We do so by adapting a well-developed neural network model of working memory (Prefrontal cortex, Basal ganglia Working Memory or PBWM; Hazy, Frank, & O'Reilly, 2007) to task switching and the Stroop task, and comparing its behavior on those tasks under a variety of individual difference manipulations. Results are consistent with the hypotheses that variation specific to task switching (i.e., Shifting-Specific) may be related to uncontrolled, automatic persistence of goal representations, whereas variation general to multiple EFs (i.e., Common EF) may be related to the strength of PFC representations and their effect on processing in the remainder of the cognitive system. Moreover, increasing signal to noise ratio in PFC, theoretically tied to levels of tonic dopamine and a genetic polymorphism in the COMT gene, reduced Stroop interference but increased switch costs. This stability-flexibility tradeoff provides an explanation for why these two EF components sometimes show opposing correlations with other variables such as attention problems and self-restraint. PMID:24791709

  9. Sandia`s network for supercomputing `95: Validating the progress of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, T.J.; Vahle, O.; Gossage, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Networking Integration Department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past three years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. For Supercomputing `95, Sandia elected: to demonstrate the functionality and capability of an AT&T Globeview 20Gbps Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch, which represents the core of Sandia`s corporate network, to build and utilize a three node 622 megabit per second Paragon network, and to extend the DOD`s ACTS ATM Internet from Sandia, New Mexico to the conference`s show floor in San Diego, California, for video demonstrations. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations supports Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

  10. Potential Energy Landscape and Robustness of a Gene Regulatory Network: Toggle Switch

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun-Young; Wang, Jin

    2007-01-01

    Finding a multidimensional potential landscape is the key for addressing important global issues, such as the robustness of cellular networks. We have uncovered the underlying potential energy landscape of a simple gene regulatory network: a toggle switch. This was realized by explicitly constructing the steady state probability of the gene switch in the protein concentration space in the presence of the intrinsic statistical fluctuations due to the small number of proteins in the cell. We explored the global phase space for the system. We found that the protein synthesis rate and the unbinding rate of proteins to the gene were small relative to the protein degradation rate; the gene switch is monostable with only one stable basin of attraction. When both the protein synthesis rate and the unbinding rate of proteins to the gene are large compared with the protein degradation rate, two global basins of attraction emerge for a toggle switch. These basins correspond to the biologically stable functional states. The potential energy barrier between the two basins determines the time scale of conversion from one to the other. We found as the protein synthesis rate and protein unbinding rate to the gene relative to the protein degradation rate became larger, the potential energy barrier became larger. This also corresponded to systems with less noise or the fluctuations on the protein numbers. It leads to the robustness of the biological basins of the gene switches. The technique used here is general and can be applied to explore the potential energy landscape of the gene networks. PMID:17397255

  11. Bistability in a Metabolic Network Underpins the De Novo Evolution of Colony Switching in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Jenna; Libby, Eric; Bertels, Frederic; Remigi, Philippe; Jendresen, Christian B.; Ferguson, Gayle C.; Desprat, Nicolas; Buffing, Marieke F.; Sauer, Uwe; Beaumont, Hubertus J. E.; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens; Rainey, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype switching is commonly observed in nature. This prevalence has allowed the elucidation of a number of underlying molecular mechanisms. However, little is known about how phenotypic switches arise and function in their early evolutionary stages. The first opportunity to provide empirical insight was delivered by an experiment in which populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 evolved, de novo, the ability to switch between two colony phenotypes. Here we unravel the molecular mechanism behind colony switching, revealing how a single nucleotide change in a gene enmeshed in central metabolism (carB) generates such a striking phenotype. We show that colony switching is underpinned by ON/OFF expression of capsules consisting of a colanic acid-like polymer. We use molecular genetics, biochemical analyses, and experimental evolution to establish that capsule switching results from perturbation of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. Of central importance is a bifurcation point at which uracil triphosphate is partitioned towards either nucleotide metabolism or polymer production. This bifurcation marks a cell-fate decision point whereby cells with relatively high pyrimidine levels favour nucleotide metabolism (capsule OFF), while cells with lower pyrimidine levels divert resources towards polymer biosynthesis (capsule ON). This decision point is present and functional in the wild-type strain. Finally, we present a simple mathematical model demonstrating that the molecular components of the decision point are capable of producing switching. Despite its simple mutational cause, the connection between genotype and phenotype is complex and multidimensional, offering a rare glimpse of how noise in regulatory networks can provide opportunity for evolution. PMID:25763575

  12. Delays-based protein switches in a stochastic single-gene network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Jiakui; Tian, Dong; Luo, Hongchun; Yang, Tao; Han, Qinglin; Xiang, Chao; Zeng, Chunhua; Wang, Canjun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the protein switch in a single-gene network with time delays is investigated, where the gene expression is assumed to be disturbed by multiplicative and additive noises. The impacts of time delays τd and τs in degradation and synthesis processes, time delay τg in global process and cross-correlation between two noises (λi, and i = d , s , g) on the probability distribution and switch time (ST) from low protein level (OFF state) to high one (ON state) are discussed, respectively. Our results show that (1) the increase of the cross-correlation between two noises (λi) can induce protein switches from ON state to OFF one; (2) for λi ⩾ 0, the increase of τd can induce protein switches from OFF state to ON one, while τs (or τg) can induce protein switches from the ON state to the OFF one, but for λi < 0, the τd (or τs) can induce protein switches from the OFF state to the ON one, while τg can induce protein switches from the ON state to the OFF one; (3) the ST as functions of the noise intensities exhibits a maximum, which is the signature of the noise enhanced stability (NES) of the OFF state, while the increase of τd can cause the NES phenomenon to disappear; and (4) τd and τs play opposing roles in the ST, i.e., the impacts of the time delays τd and τs on ST can be canceled each other out.

  13. IP-oriented control of unidirectional-path-switched-ring-based transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vishal; Das, Abhimanyu; Chen, Charles

    2003-03-01

    An important requirement in the IP-based control of time-division multiplexing (TDM) optical transport networks is to utilize the in-built protection capabilities of synchronous optical network (SONET) unidirectional path-switched rings (UPSRs) and to automate the UPSR-protected path setup in mixed mesh-ring networks. This requires modifications to existing IP signaling and routing protocols and new processing rules at the network nodes. Here we leverage IP routing and signaling and multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) fast-reroute techniques for accurately advertising UPSR ring topologies to remote nodes and dynamically establishing UPSR-protected paths across a transport network. Our proposal also makes a NUT1-like (nonpreemptible unprotected traffic) feature possible in UPSRs, which allows for efficient utilization of UPSR protection bandwidth. We achieve this by encoding UPSR-specific information in the open shortest-path-first (OSPF) link state advertisements and in signaling messages of the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) with TE extensions. In addition, we modify the signaling and routing state machines at the nodes to interpret and process this information to perform UPSR topology discovery and path computation. The uniqueness of our proposals is that the algorithms and the rules specified here allow for existing IP-based protocols [such as those within the generalized MPLS (GMPLS) framework, which currently applies to mesh networks] to be efficiently adapted for this context while still achieving our objective of exploiting UPSR-protection capabilities.

  14. All-optical cross-bar network architecture using TOAD based interferometric switch and designing of reconfigurable logic unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2011-12-01

    The design of all-optical 2 × 2 Terahertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexer (TOAD) based interferometric switch is proposed and described in this manuscript. Numerical simulation has been done to achieve the performance of the switch. Using this 2 × 2 TOAD based switch, cross-bar network architecture is designed. A reconfigurable logic unit is also proposed in this manuscript, which can perform 16-Boolean logical operations.

  15. Guaranteed cost control of mobile sensor networks with Markov switching topologies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Guo, Ge; Ding, Lei

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the consensus seeking problem of mobile sensor networks (MSNs) with random switching topologies. The network communication topologies are composed of a set of directed graphs (or digraph) with a spanning tree. The switching of topologies is governed by a Markov chain. The consensus seeking problem is addressed by introducing a global topology-aware linear quadratic (LQ) cost as the performance measure. By state transformation, the consensus problem is transformed to the stabilization of a Markovian jump system with guaranteed cost. A sufficient condition for global mean-square consensus is derived in the context of stochastic stability analysis of Markovian jump systems. A computational algorithm is given to synchronously calculate both the sub-optimal consensus controller gains and the sub-minimum upper bound of the cost. The effectiveness of the proposed design method is illustrated by three numerical examples. PMID:26096955

  16. Highly survivable communications: Complementary media packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, D.; Eken, F.; Karavassilis, N.

    1994-07-01

    all NATO nations/industries. These extensive results show that significant improvements in throughput of up to many times are obtained. A similar development for an OSI MB protocol has also been completed and combined with the HF protocol to obtain an OSI HF/MB link layer protocol with unique properties for HSC networks. Description of these protocols and the relevant results are presented. networks using standard COTS transceivers/modems with OSI PRO protocols can provide highly survivable connectivity, by providing the most important ingredient of survivability, media diversity.

  17. Performance evaluation of a high-speed switched network for PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Randy H.; Tao, Wenchao; Huang, Lu J.; Valentino, Daniel J.

    1998-07-01

    We have replaced our shared-media Ethernet and FDDI network with a multi-tiered, switched network using OC-12 (622 Mbps) ATM for the network backbone, OC3 (155 Mbps) connections to high-end servers and display workstations, and switched 100/10 Mbps Ethernet for workstations and desktop computers. The purpose of this research was to help PACS designers and implementers understand key performance factors in a high- speed switched network by characterizing and evaluating its image delivery performance, specifically, the performance of socket-based TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) and DICOM 3.0 communications. A test network within the UCLA Clinical RIS/PACS was constructed using Sun UltraSPARC-II machines with ATM, Fast Ethernet, and Ethernet network interfaces. To identify performance bottlenecks, we evaluated network throughput for memory to memory, memory to disk, disk to memory, and disk to disk transfers. To evaluate the effect of file size, tests involving disks were further divided using sizes of small (514 KB), medium (8 MB), and large (16 MB) files. The observed maximum throughput for various network configurations using the TCP protocol was 117 Mbps for memory to memory and 88 MBPS for memory to disk. For disk to memory, the peak throughput was 98 Mbps using small files, 114 Mbps using medium files, and 116 Mbps using large files. The peak throughput for disk to disk became 64 Mbps using small files and 96 Mbps using medium and large files. The peak throughput using the DICOM 3.0 protocol was substantially lower in all categories. The measured throughput varied significantly among the tests when TCP socket buffer was raised above the default value. The optimal buffer size was approximately 16 KB or the TCP protocol and around 256 KB for the DICOM protocol. The application message size also displayed distinctive effects on network throughput when the TCP socket buffer size was varied. The throughput results for Fast Ethernet and Ethernet were expectedly

  18. Interface-modified random circuit breaker network model applicable to both bipolar and unipolar resistance switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. B.; Lee, J. S.; Chang, S. H.; Yoo, H. K.; Kang, B. S.; Kahng, B.; Lee, M.-J.; Kim, C. J.; Noh, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    We observed reversible-type changes between bipolar (BRS) and unipolar resistance switching (URS) in one Pt/SrTiOx/Pt capacitor. To explain both BRS and URS in a unified scheme, we introduce the "interface-modified random circuit breaker network model," in which the bulk medium is represented by a percolating network of circuit breakers. To consider interface effects in BRS, we introduce circuit breakers to investigate resistance states near the interface. This percolation model explains the reversible-type changes in terms of connectivity changes in the circuit breakers and provides insights into many experimental observations of BRS which are under debate by earlier theoretical models.

  19. Bursting noise in gene expression dynamics: linking microscopic and mesoscopic models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of short-lived mRNA results in bursts of protein production in gene regulatory networks. We investigate the propagation of bursting noise between different levels of mathematical modelling and demonstrate that conventional approaches based on diffusion approximations can fail to capture bursting noise. An alternative coarse-grained model, the so-called piecewise deterministic Markov process (PDMP), is seen to outperform the diffusion approximation in biologically relevant parameter regimes. We provide a systematic embedding of the PDMP model into the landscape of existing approaches, and we present analytical methods to calculate its stationary distribution and switching frequencies. PMID:26763330

  20. IP over WDM-based high-speed switched optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Lulin; Ji, Yuefeng

    2004-04-01

    With the Internet Protocol (IP) being the dominant protocol for new optical network services, there is increasing pressure to optimize the network infrastructure and protocols for IP traffic. This paper presents a technology for constructing a novel architecture for IP over photonic systems. WDM network has been launched by the concept of wavelength routing. The principle is that high-speed data flows, which consist of many time-division multiplexed channels, are associated with specific optical wavelengths. Thus, they are routed through the optical network by means of their wavelengths. Thus, wavelength routing consents the realization of OXCs working in an efficient way. However, MPLS-based forwarding is still an electronic solution. Therefore, even though MPLS needs to establish a closed domain to utilize a new lower-layer technology, it is still useful to incorporate optical technology herein to further increase throughputs for large-scale Internet networks. Moreover, provisioning wavelength capabilities based on MPLS has emerged, that is , multi-protocol lambda switching (MPλS). This system tries to merge the functionalities of the wavelength switching, SONET mux/demux, and IP routing into one layer, and is sometimes known as the concept of optical MPLS and MPLambdaS. Its extension Generalized-MPLS(GMPLS) is also discussed.

  1. A Switching Approach to Designing Finite-Time Synchronization Controllers of Coupled Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Su, Housheng; Chen, Michael Z Q

    2016-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time synchronization issue of nonlinear coupled neural networks by designing a new switching pinning controller. For the fixed network topology and control strength, the newly designed controller could optimize the synchronization time by regulating a parameter α (0 ≤ α < 1). The control law presented in this paper covers both continuous controllers and discontinuous ones, which were studied separately in the past. Some criteria are discussed in detail on how to shorten the synchronization time for the strongly connected networks. Finally, the results are generalized to any network topologies containing a directed spanning tree, and one numerical example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:26186796

  2. Application of artificial neural network to search for gravitational-wave signals associated with short gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungmin; Harry, Ian W.; Hodge, Kari A.; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Oh, John J.; Oh, Sang Hoon; Son, Edwin J.

    2015-12-01

    We apply a machine learning algorithm, the artificial neural network, to the search for gravitational-wave signals associated with short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-dimensional samples consisting of data corresponding to the statistical and physical quantities from the coherent search pipeline are fed into the artificial neural network to distinguish simulated gravitational-wave signals from background noise artifacts. Our result shows that the data classification efficiency at a fixed false alarm probability (FAP) is improved by the artificial neural network in comparison to the conventional detection statistic. Specifically, the distance at 50% detection probability at a fixed false positive rate is increased about 8%-14% for the considered waveform models. We also evaluate a few seconds of the gravitational-wave data segment using the trained networks and obtain the FAP. We suggest that the artificial neural network can be a complementary method to the conventional detection statistic for identifying gravitational-wave signals related to the short GRBs.

  3. A second catalog of gamma-ray bursts - 1978-1980 localizations from the interplanetary network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Cline, T.; Desai, U.; Teegarden, B.

    1987-01-01

    A catalog of 84 gamma-ray bursts which occurred between September 14, 1978 and February 13, 1980 is presented. The data presented consist of earth crossing times, given to about the nearest second, and time histories, in the tens of keV to MeV range, for all 84 events, as well as localizations for 80 of the events. The localizations, derived from arrival-time analysis, are given as single error boxes, double error boxes, or annuli of location, and, where possible, have been compared to the Konus localizations. They range in size from less than a square arcminute to over 1000 square degrees. The fluences of the bursts cataloged are in the range 3 x 10 to the -7th ergs/sq cm and above.

  4. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution.

    PubMed

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  5. Spin filtering and switching action in a diamond network with magnetic-nonmagnetic atomic distribution

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Biplab; Dutta, Paramita

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model quantum network consisting of diamond-shaped plaquettes with deterministic distribution of magnetic and non-magnetic atoms in presence of a uniform external magnetic flux in each plaquette and predict that such a simple model can be a prospective candidate for spin filter as well as flux driven spintronic switch. The orientations and the amplitudes of the substrate magnetic moments play a crucial role in the energy band engineering of the two spin channels which essentially gives us a control over the spin transmission leading to a spin filtering effect. The externally tunable magnetic flux plays an important role in inducing a switch on-switch off effect for both the spin states indicating the behavior like a spintronic switch. Even a correlated disorder configuration in the on-site potentials and in the magnetic moments may lead to disorder-induced spin filtering phenomenon where one of the spin channel gets entirely blocked leaving the other one transmitting over the entire allowed energy regime. All these features are established by evaluating the density of states and the two terminal transmission probabilities using the transfer-matrix formalism within a tight-binding framework. Experimental realization of our theoretical study may be helpful in designing new spintronic devices. PMID:27600958

  6. Differentially-charged and sequentially-switched square-wave pulse forming network

    DOEpatents

    North, George G. [Stockton, CA; Vogilin, George E. [Livermore, CA

    1980-04-01

    A pulse forming network for delivering a high-energy square-wave pulse to a load, including a series of inductive-capacitive sections wherein the capacitors are differentially charged higher further from the load. Each charged capacitor is isolated from adjacent sections and the load by means of a normally open switch at the output of each section. The switch between the load and the closest section to the load is closed to begin discharge of the capacitor in that section into the load. During discharge of each capacitor, the voltage thereacross falls to a predetermined potential with respect to the potential across the capacitor in the next adjacent section further from the load. When this potential is reached, it is used to close the switch in the adjacent section further from the load and thereby apply the charge in that section to the load through the adjacent section toward the load. Each successive section further from the load is sequentially switched in this manner to continuously and evenly supply energy to the load over the period of the pulse, with the differentially charged capacitors providing higher potentials away from the load to compensate for the voltage drop across the resistance of each inductor. This arrangement is low in cost and yet provides a high-energy pulse in an acceptable square-wave form.

  7. Differentially-charged and sequentially-switched square-wave pulse forming network

    DOEpatents

    North, G.G.; Vogilin, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    Disclosed is a pulse forming network for delivering a high-energy square-wave pulse to a load, including a series of inductive-capacitive sections wherein the capacitors are differentially charged higher further from the load. Each charged capacitor is isolated from adjacent sections and the load by means of a normally open switch at the output of each section. The switch between the load and the closest section to the load is closed to begin discharge of the capacitor in that section into the load. During discharge of each capacitor, the voltage thereacross falls to a predetermined potential with respect to the potential across the capacitor in the next adjacent section further from the load. When this potential is reached, it is used to close the switch in the adjacent section further from the load and thereby apply the charge in that section to the load through the adjacent section toward the load. Each successive section further from the load is sequentially switched in this manner to continuously and evenly supply energy to the load over the period of the pulse, with the differentially charged capacitors providing higher potentials away from the load to compensate for the voltage drop across the resistance of each inductor. This arrangement is low in cost and yet provides a high-energy pulse in an acceptable square-wave form. 5 figs.

  8. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kersell, H.; Stefak, R.; Echeverria, J.; Iancu, V.; Perera, U. G. E.; Li, Y.; Deshpande, A.; Braun, K.-F.; Joachim, C.; Rapenne, G.; Hla, S.-W.

    2016-08-01

    A range of artificial molecular systems has been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the further development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching when applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above 1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground-state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur, resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. Analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via crosstalk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.

  9. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Kersell, H; Stefak, R; Echeverria, J; Iancu, V; Perera, U G E; Li, Y; Deshpande, A; Braun, K-F; Joachim, C; Rapenne, G; Hla, S-W

    2016-08-01

    A range of artificial molecular systems has been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the further development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching when applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above 1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground-state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur, resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. Analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via crosstalk among the rotors through dipolar interactions. PMID:27159740

  10. Ultra-stable optical amplifier technologies for dynamic optical switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Tsang, K. S.; Man, R.; Puttnam, B. J.; Awaji, Y.; Wada, N.

    2015-01-01

    High-capacity fiber-optic communications are promising technologies to satisfy people's continuously growing demands for bandwidth hungry data services. Multi-wavelength optical circuit switching (OCS) technology is already widely deployed, however, with the limited number of transceivers equipped at each optical node and other constraints, the number of lightpaths which can be established and employed simultaneously in an optical network is restricted. This reduces the utilization efficiency of wavelength resources. Comparing to OCS, dynamic optical switching systems such as optical packet switching (OPS) offer higher efficiency in terms of wavelength resource utilization and have the potential to share more of the wavelength resources on fiber-links between larger numbers of users simultaneously. In such networks, bursty input signals or changes in traffic density may cause optical power surges that can damage optical components or impose gain transients on the signals that impair signal quality. A common approach for reducing gain transients is to employ electrical automatic gain control (AGC) or optical gain-clamping by optical feedback (OFB). AGC may be limited by the speed of the feedback circuit and result in additional transients. Meanwhile OFB can clamp the gain of power varying optical signals without transient but can introduce amplitude fluctuations caused by relaxation oscillations in the lasing cavity for large input power fluctuations. We propose and demonstrate a novel scheme for suppressing the power transients and the relaxation oscillations. This scheme can be utilized in optical amplifiers even if the optical feedback is employed.

  11. Burst Packet Loss Concealment Using Multiple Codebooks and Comfort Noise for CELP-Type Speech Coders in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Nam In; Kim, Hong Kook; Jung, Min A; Lee, Seong Ro; Choi, Seung Ho

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a packet loss concealment (PLC) algorithm for CELP-type speech coders is proposed in order to improve the quality of decoded speech under burst packet loss conditions in a wireless sensor network. Conventional receiver-based PLC algorithms in the G.729 speech codec are usually based on speech correlation to reconstruct the decoded speech of lost frames by using parameter information obtained from the previous correctly received frames. However, this approach has difficulty in reconstructing voice onset signals since the parameters such as pitch, linear predictive coding coefficient, and adaptive/fixed codebooks of the previous frames are mostly related to silence frames. Thus, in order to reconstruct speech signals in the voice onset intervals, we propose a multiple codebook-based approach that includes a traditional adaptive codebook and a new random codebook composed of comfort noise. The proposed PLC algorithm is designed as a PLC algorithm for G.729 and its performance is then compared with that of the PLC algorithm currently employed in G.729 via a perceptual evaluation of speech quality, a waveform comparison, and a preference test under different random and burst packet loss conditions. It is shown from the experiments that the proposed PLC algorithm provides significantly better speech quality than the PLC algorithm employed in G.729 under all the test conditions. PMID:22163902

  12. Joint wavelet-based coding and packetization for video transport over packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hung-ju

    1996-02-01

    In recent years, wavelet theory applied to image, and audio and video compression has been extensively studied. However, only gaining compression ratio without considering the underlying networking systems is unrealistic, especially for multimedia applications over networks. In this paper, we present an integrated approach, which attempts to preserve the advantages of wavelet-based image coding scheme and to provide robustness to a certain extent for lost packets over packet-switched networks. Two different packetization schemes, called the intrablock-oriented (IAB) and interblock-oriented (IRB) schemes, in conjunction with wavelet-based coding, are presented. Our approach is evaluated under two different packet loss models with various packet loss probabilities through simulations which are driven by real video sequences.

  13. Good vibrations switch attention: an affective function for network oscillations in evolutionary simulations.

    PubMed

    Heerebout, Bram T; Phaf, R Hans

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, a new hypothesis on the neural mechanisms linking affect to attention was brought forward by evolutionary simulations on agents navigating a virtual environment while collecting food and avoiding predation. The connection strengths between nodes in the networks controlling the agents were subjected to random variation, and the fittest agents were selected for reproduction. Unexpectedly, oscillations of node activations emerged, which drastically enhanced the agent's fitness. We analyzed the mechanisms involved in the modulation of attention and found that oscillations acted on competitive networks. Response selection depended on the connection structure, but the speed and efficacy of switching between selections was modulated by oscillation frequency. The main focus of the present study was the differential emergence of stimulus-specific oscillation frequencies. Oscillations had a higher frequency in an appetitive motivational state than in an aversive state. We suggest that oscillations in biological networks also mediate the affective modulation of attention. PMID:20498346

  14. Layer-switching cost and optimality in information spreading on multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungjoon; Gwak, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Nanoom; Goh, K. -I.

    2016-01-01

    We study a model of information spreading on multiplex networks, in which agents interact through multiple interaction channels (layers), say online vs. offline communication layers, subject to layer-switching cost for transmissions across different interaction layers. The model is characterized by the layer-wise path-dependent transmissibility over a contact, that is dynamically determined dependently on both incoming and outgoing transmission layers. We formulate an analytical framework to deal with such path-dependent transmissibility and demonstrate the nontrivial interplay between the multiplexity and spreading dynamics, including optimality. It is shown that the epidemic threshold and prevalence respond to the layer-switching cost non-monotonically and that the optimal conditions can change in abrupt non-analytic ways, depending also on the densities of network layers and the type of seed infections. Our results elucidate the essential role of multiplexity that its explicit consideration should be crucial for realistic modeling and prediction of spreading phenomena on multiplex social networks in an era of ever-diversifying social interaction layers. PMID:26887527

  15. Layer-switching cost and optimality in information spreading on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Gwak, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Nanoom; Goh, K.-I.

    2016-02-01

    We study a model of information spreading on multiplex networks, in which agents interact through multiple interaction channels (layers), say online vs. offline communication layers, subject to layer-switching cost for transmissions across different interaction layers. The model is characterized by the layer-wise path-dependent transmissibility over a contact, that is dynamically determined dependently on both incoming and outgoing transmission layers. We formulate an analytical framework to deal with such path-dependent transmissibility and demonstrate the nontrivial interplay between the multiplexity and spreading dynamics, including optimality. It is shown that the epidemic threshold and prevalence respond to the layer-switching cost non-monotonically and that the optimal conditions can change in abrupt non-analytic ways, depending also on the densities of network layers and the type of seed infections. Our results elucidate the essential role of multiplexity that its explicit consideration should be crucial for realistic modeling and prediction of spreading phenomena on multiplex social networks in an era of ever-diversifying social interaction layers.

  16. Dynamics Correlation Network for Allosteric Switching of PreQ1 Riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Jinmai; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are a class of metabolism control elements mostly found in bacteria. Due to their fundamental importance in bacteria gene regulation, riboswitches have been proposed as antibacterial drug targets. Prequeuosine (preQ1) is the last free precursor in the biosynthetic pathway of queuosine that is crucial for translation efficiency and fidelity. However, the regulation mechanism for the preQ1 riboswitch remains unclear. Here we constructed fluctuation correlation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in the bound riboswitch is distinctly different from that in the apo riboswitch. The community network indicates that the information freely transfers from the binding site of preQ1 to the expression platform of the P3 helix in the bound riboswitch and the P3 helix is a bottleneck in the apo riboswitch. Thus, a hypothesis of "preQ1-binding induced allosteric switching" is proposed to link riboswitch and translation regulation. The community networks of mutants support this hypothesis. Finally, a possible allosteric pathway of A50-A51-A52-U10-A11-G12-G56 was also identified based on the shortest path algorithm and confirmed by mutations and network perturbation. The novel fluctuation network analysis method can be used as a general strategy in studies of riboswitch structure-function relationship. PMID:27484311

  17. A sweep algorithm for massively parallel simulation of circuit-switched networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaujal, Bruno; Greenberg, Albert G.; Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    A new massively parallel algorithm is presented for simulating large asymmetric circuit-switched networks, controlled by a randomized-routing policy that includes trunk-reservation. A single instruction multiple data (SIMD) implementation is described, and corresponding experiments on a 16384 processor MasPar parallel computer are reported. A multiple instruction multiple data (MIMD) implementation is also described, and corresponding experiments on an Intel IPSC/860 parallel computer, using 16 processors, are reported. By exploiting parallelism, our algorithm increases the possible execution rate of such complex simulations by as much as an order of magnitude.

  18. All-optical packet header and payload separation for un-slotted optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2005-11-01

    A novel all-optical header and payload separation technique that can be utilized in un-slotted optical packet switched networks is presented. The technique uses a modified TOAD for packet header extraction with differential modulation scheme and two SOAs that perform a simple XOR operation between the packet and its self-derived header to get the separated payload. The main virtue of this system is simple structure and need not any additional continuous pulses. Through numerical simulations, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. In addition, the parameters of the system are discussed and designed to optimize the operation performance.

  19. Lag Synchronization of Switched Neural Networks via Neural Activation Function and Applications in Image Encryption.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shiping; Zeng, Zhigang; Huang, Tingwen; Meng, Qinggang; Yao, Wei

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global exponential lag synchronization of a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delays via neural activation function and applications in image encryption. The controller is dependent on the output of the system in the case of packed circuits, since it is hard to measure the inner state of the circuits. Thus, it is critical to design the controller based on the neuron activation function. Comparing the results, in this paper, with the existing ones shows that we improve and generalize the results derived in the previous literature. Several examples are also given to illustrate the effectiveness and potential applications in image encryption. PMID:25594985

  20. Use of adaptive network burst detection methods for multielectrode array data and the generation of artificial spike patterns for method evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, G. D. C.; Morrisroe, E.; Petrou, S.; Halgamuge, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Multielectrode arrays are an informative extracellular recording technology that enables the analysis of cultured neuronal networks and network bursts (NBs) are a dominant feature observed in these recordings. This paper focuses on the validation of NB detection methods on different network activity patterns and developing a detection method that performs robustly across a wide variety of activity patterns. Approach. A firing rate based approach was used to generate artificial spike timestamps where NBs were introduced as episodes where the probability of spiking increases. Variations in firing and bursting characteristics were also included. In addition, an improved methodology of detecting NBs is proposed, based on time-binned average firing rates and time overlaps of single channel bursts. The robustness of the proposed method was compared against three existing algorithms using simulated, publicly available and newly acquired data. Main results. A range of activity patterns were generated by changing simulation variables that correspond to NB duration (40-2200 ms), intervals (0.3-16 s), firing rates (0.1-1 spikes s-1), local burst percentage (0%-90%), number of channels in local bursts (20-40) as well as the number of tonic and frequently-bursting channels. By extracting simulation parameters directly from real data, we generated synthetic data that closely resemble activity of mouse and rat cortical cultures at native and chemically perturbed states. In 50 simulated data sets with randomly selected parameter values, the improved NB detection method performed better (ascertained by the f-measure) than three existing methods (p < 0.005). The improved method was also able to detect clustered, long-tailed and short-frequent NBs on real data. Significance. This work presents an objective method of assessing the applicability of NB detection methods for different neuronal activity patterns. Furthermore, it proposes an improved NB detection method that can

  1. Convergence Properties of Posttranslationally Modified Protein-Protein Switching Networks with Fast Decay Rates.

    PubMed

    Fan, Gaoyang; Cummins, Bree; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    A significant conceptual difficulty in the use of switching systems to model regulatory networks is the presence of so-called "black walls," co-dimension 1 regions of phase space with a vector field pointing inward on both sides of the hyperplane. Black walls result from the existence of direct negative self-regulation in the system. One biologically inspired way of removing black walls is the introduction of intermediate variables that mediate the negative self-regulation. In this paper, we study such a perturbation. We replace a switching system with a higher-dimensional switching system with rapidly decaying intermediate proteins, and compare the dynamics between the two systems. We find that the while the individual solutions of the original system can be approximated for a finite time by solutions of a sufficiently close perturbed system, there are always solutions that are not well approximated for any fixed perturbation. We also study a particular example, where global basins of attraction of the perturbed system have a strikingly different form than those of the original system. We perform this analysis using techniques that are adapted to dealing with non-smooth systems. PMID:27271120

  2. High-performance flat data center network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretta, Nicola; Miao, Wang; Dorren, Harm

    2016-03-01

    Traffic in data centers networks (DCNs) is steadily growing to support various applications and virtualization technologies. Multi-tenancy enabling efficient resource utilization is considered as a key requirement for the next generation DCs resulting from the growing demands for services and applications. Virtualization mechanisms and technologies can leverage statistical multiplexing and fast switch reconfiguration to further extend the DC efficiency and agility. We present a novel high performance flat DCN employing bufferless and distributed fast (sub-microsecond) optical switches with wavelength, space, and time switching operation. The fast optical switches can enhance the performance of the DCNs by providing large-capacity switching capability and efficiently sharing the data plane resources by exploiting statistical multiplexing. Benefiting from the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) control of the optical switches, virtual DCNs can be flexibly created and reconfigured by the DCN provider. Numerical and experimental investigations of the DCN based on the fast optical switches show the successful setup of virtual network slices for intra-data center interconnections. Experimental results to assess the DCN performance in terms of latency and packet loss show less than 10^-5 packet loss and 640ns end-to-end latency with 0.4 load and 16- packet size buffer. Numerical investigation on the performance of the systems when the port number of the optical switch is scaled to 32x32 system indicate that more than 1000 ToRs each with Terabit/s interface can be interconnected providing a Petabit/s capacity. The roadmap to photonic integration of large port optical switches will be also presented.

  3. Modulus synchronization in a network of nonlinear systems with antagonistic interactions and switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shidong

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the collective behavior in a network of nonlinear systems with antagonistic interactions and switching topologies. The concept of modulus synchronization is introduced to characterize the case that the moduli of corresponding components of the agent (node) states reach a synchronization. The network topologies are modeled by a set of directed signed graphs. When all directed signed graphs are structurally balanced and the nonlinear system satisfies a one-sided Lipschitz condition, by using matrix measure and contraction theory, we show that modulus synchronization can be evaluated by the time average of some matrix measures. These matrices are about the second smallest eigenvalue of undirected graphs corresponding to directed signed graphs. Finally, we present two numerical examples to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  4. Alternatives for the introduction of optical packet switching networks in this internet world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaroni, Dominique

    2001-09-01

    With the emergence of new services mixing data, voice and video, the expected increase of the traffic volume together with the modification of its profile creates a need for a high throughput multimedia network. In addition, quality-of- service (QoS) management is currently widely debated at the convergence between ATM and IP communities. In the meantime, WDM is widely deployed, giving access to large transport capacities together with a new dimension for routing purposes. This paper present alternatives for a multi- service optical network infrastructure in this Internet world, where WDM is used not only to increase the throughput but also to differentiate the traffic, to alleviate contention issues and to provide cost-effective solutions. On the same optical infrastructure under a self-sufficient management yet, would coexist different logical sub-networks where different routing techniques are used according to QoS and client protocol requirements. The main objective is to save on the transport cost by optimizing through packet switching techniques the resource utilization according traffic characteristics, while providing enough flexibility to adapt the resources to the evolution of the demand, and maintaining a high transmission quality, as provided by SONET today. This work, capitalizes on InP-based fast optical switching technologies demonstrated within the European ACTS KEIPS project. In this paper, the network concepts, packet format considerations, preferred routing techniques and system architecture will be reported and illustrated through physical and logical analysis. Finally, t < o introduction scenario will be presented: one for the backbone and one for the metro.

  5. Destination-directed, packet-switched architecture for a geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Bobinsky, Eric A.; Soni, Nitin J.; Quintana, Jorge A.; Kim, Heechul; Wager, Paul; Vanderaar, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A major goal of the Digital Systems Technology Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to identify and develop critical digital components and technologies that either enable new commercial missions or significantly enhance the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space communications systems. NASA envisions a need for low-data-rate, interactive, direct-to-the-user communications services for data, voice, facsimile, and video conferencing. The network would provide enhanced very-small-aperture terminal (VSAT) communications services and be capable of handling data rates of 64 kbps through 2.048 Mbps in 64-kbps increments. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints. The focus of current space segment developments is a flexible, high-throughput, fault-tolerant onboard information-switching processor (ISP) for a geostationary satellite communications network. The Digital Systems Technology Branch is investigating both circuit and packet architectures for the ISP. Destination-directed, packet-switched architectures for geostationary communications satellites are addressed.

  6. Stability Switches of Arbitrary High-Order Consensus in Multiagent Networks with Time Delays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    High-order consensus seeking, in which individual high-order dynamic agents share a consistent view of the objectives and the world in a distributed manner, finds its potential broad applications in the field of cooperative control. This paper presents stability switches analysis of arbitrary high-order consensus in multiagent networks with time delays. By employing a frequency domain method, we explicitly derive analytical equations that clarify a rigorous connection between the stability of general high-order consensus and the system parameters such as the network topology, communication time-delays, and feedback gains. Particularly, our results provide a general and a fairly precise notion of how increasing communication time-delay causes the stability switches of consensus. Furthermore, under communication constraints, the stability and robustness problems of consensus algorithms up to third order are discussed in details to illustrate our central results. Numerical examples and simulation results for fourth-order consensus are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results. PMID:24109207

  7. Detection of a close supernova gravitational wave burst in a network of interferometers, neutrino and optical detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2004-05-01

    Trying to detect the gravitational wave (GW) signal emitted by a type II supernova is a main challenge for the GW community. Indeed, the corresponding waveform is not accurately modeled as the supernova physics is very complex; in addition, all the existing numerical simulations agree on the weakness of the GW emission, thus restraining the number of sources potentially detectable. Consequently, triggering the GW signal with a confidence level high enough to conclude directly to a detection is very difficult, even with the use of a network of interferometric detectors. On the other hand, one can hope to take benefit from the neutrino and optical emissions associated to the supernova explosion, in order to discover and study GW radiation in an event already detected independently. This article aims at presenting some realistic scenarios for the search of the supernova GW bursts, based on the present knowledge of the emitted signals and on the results of network data analysis simulations. Both the direct search and the confirmation of the supernova event are considered. In addition, some physical studies following the discovery of a supernova GW emission are also mentioned: from the absolute neutrino mass to the supernova physics or the black hole signature, the potential spectrum of discoveries is wide.

  8. Quasi-Optical Network Analyzers and High-Reliability RF MEMS Switched Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichener, Alexander

    The thesis first presents a 2-port quasi-optical scalar network analyzer consisting of a transmitter and receiver both built in planar technology. The network analyzer is based on a Schottky-diode mixer integrated inside a planar antenna and fed differentially by a CPW transmission line. The antenna is placed on an extended hemispherical high-resistivity silicon substrate lens. The LO signal is swept from 3-5 GHz and high-order harmonic mixing in both up- and down- conversion mode is used to realize the 15-50 GHz RF bandwidth. The network analyzer resulted in a dynamic range of greater than 40 dB and was successfully used to measure a frequency selective surface with a second-order bandpass response. Furthermore, the system was built with circuits and components for easy scaling to millimeter-wave frequencies which is the primary motivation for this work. The application areas for a millimeter and submillimeter-wave network analyzer include material characterization and art diagnostics. The second project presents several RF MEMS switched capacitors designed for high-reliability operation and suitable for tunable filters and reconfigurable networks. The first switched-capacitor resulted in a digital capacitance ratio of 5 and an analog capacitance ratio of 5-9. The analog tuning of the down-state capacitance is enhanced by a positive vertical stress gradient in the the beam, making it ideal for applications that require precision tuning. A thick electroplated beam resulted in Q greater than 100 at C to X-band frequencies, and power handling of 0.6-1.1 W. The design also minimized charging in the dielectric, resulting in excellent reliability performance even under hot-switched and high power (1 W) conditions. The second switched-capacitor was designed without any dielectric to minimize charging. The device was hot-switched at 1 W of RF power for greater than 11 billion cycles with virtually no change in the C-V curve. The final project presents a 7-channel

  9. Stochastic switching in gene networks can occur by a single-molecule event or many molecular steps.

    PubMed

    Choi, Paul J; Xie, X Sunney; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2010-02-12

    Due to regulatory feedback, biological networks can exist stably in multiple states, leading to heterogeneous phenotypes among genetically identical cells. Random fluctuations in protein numbers, tuned by specific molecular mechanisms, have been hypothesized to drive transitions between these different states. We develop a minimal theoretical framework to analyze the limits of switching in terms of simple experimental parameters. Our model identifies and distinguishes between two distinct molecular mechanisms for generating stochastic switches. In one class of switches, the stochasticity of a single-molecule event, a specific and rare molecular reaction, directly controls the macroscopic change in a cell's state. In the second class, no individual molecular event is significant, and stochasticity arises from the propagation of biochemical noise through many molecular pathways and steps. As an example, we explore switches based on protein-DNA binding fluctuations and predict relations between transcription factor kinetics, absolute switching rate, robustness, and efficiency that differentiate between switching by single-molecule events or many molecular steps. Finally, we apply our methods to recent experimental data on switching in Escherichia coli lactose metabolism, providing quantitative interpretations of a single-molecule switching mechanism. PMID:19931280

  10. Optimal design of mixed-media packet-switching networks - Routing and capacity assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, D.; Kuo, F. F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers a mixed-media packet-switched computer communication network which consists of a low-delay terrestrial store-and-forward subnet combined with a low-cost high-bandwidth satellite subnet. We show how to route traffic via ground and/or satellite links by means of static, deterministic procedures and assign capacities to channels subject to a given linear cost such that the network average delay is minimized. Two operational schemes for this network model are investigated: one is a scheme in which the satellite channel is used as a slotted ALOHA channel; the other is a new multiaccess scheme we propose in which whenever a channel collision occurs, retransmission of the involved packets will route through ground links to their destinations. The performance of both schemes is evaluated and compared in terms of cost and average packet delay tradeoffs for some examples. The results offer guidelines for the design and optimal utilization of mixed-media networks.

  11. Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  12. Parameters for burst detection

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum, Douglas J.; Radivojevic, Milos; Frey, Urs; Franke, Felix; Hierlemann, Andreas; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of action potentials within neurons and throughout networks are believed to serve roles in how neurons handle and store information, both in vivo and in vitro. Accurate detection of burst occurrences and durations are therefore crucial for many studies. A number of algorithms have been proposed to do so, but a standard method has not been adopted. This is due, in part, to many algorithms requiring the adjustment of multiple ad-hoc parameters and further post-hoc criteria in order to produce satisfactory results. Here, we broadly catalog existing approaches and present a new approach requiring the selection of only a single parameter: the number of spikes N comprising the smallest burst to consider. A burst was identified if N spikes occurred in less than T ms, where the threshold T was automatically determined from observing a probability distribution of inter-spike-intervals. Performance was compared vs. different classes of detectors on data gathered from in vitro neuronal networks grown over microelectrode arrays. Our approach offered a number of useful features including: a simple implementation, no need for ad-hoc or post-hoc criteria, and precise assignment of burst boundary time points. Unlike existing approaches, detection was not biased toward larger bursts, allowing identification and analysis of a greater range of neuronal and network dynamics. PMID:24567714

  13. Intrinsic Neuronal Properties Switch the Mode of Information Transmission in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Mease, Rebecca A.; Moody, William J.; Fairhall, Adrienne L.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse ion channels and their dynamics endow single neurons with complex biophysical properties. These properties determine the heterogeneity of cell types that make up the brain, as constituents of neural circuits tuned to perform highly specific computations. How do biophysical properties of single neurons impact network function? We study a set of biophysical properties that emerge in cortical neurons during the first week of development, eventually allowing these neurons to adaptively scale the gain of their response to the amplitude of the fluctuations they encounter. During the same time period, these same neurons participate in large-scale waves of spontaneously generated electrical activity. We investigate the potential role of experimentally observed changes in intrinsic neuronal properties in determining the ability of cortical networks to propagate waves of activity. We show that such changes can strongly affect the ability of multi-layered feedforward networks to represent and transmit information on multiple timescales. With properties modeled on those observed at early stages of development, neurons are relatively insensitive to rapid fluctuations and tend to fire synchronously in response to wave-like events of large amplitude. Following developmental changes in voltage-dependent conductances, these same neurons become efficient encoders of fast input fluctuations over few layers, but lose the ability to transmit slower, population-wide input variations across many layers. Depending on the neurons' intrinsic properties, noise plays different roles in modulating neuronal input-output curves, which can dramatically impact network transmission. The developmental change in intrinsic properties supports a transformation of a networks function from the propagation of network-wide information to one in which computations are scaled to local activity. This work underscores the significance of simple changes in conductance parameters in governing how neurons

  14. Intrinsic neuronal properties switch the mode of information transmission in networks.

    PubMed

    Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Mease, Rebecca A; Moody, William J; Fairhall, Adrienne L

    2014-12-01

    Diverse ion channels and their dynamics endow single neurons with complex biophysical properties. These properties determine the heterogeneity of cell types that make up the brain, as constituents of neural circuits tuned to perform highly specific computations. How do biophysical properties of single neurons impact network function? We study a set of biophysical properties that emerge in cortical neurons during the first week of development, eventually allowing these neurons to adaptively scale the gain of their response to the amplitude of the fluctuations they encounter. During the same time period, these same neurons participate in large-scale waves of spontaneously generated electrical activity. We investigate the potential role of experimentally observed changes in intrinsic neuronal properties in determining the ability of cortical networks to propagate waves of activity. We show that such changes can strongly affect the ability of multi-layered feedforward networks to represent and transmit information on multiple timescales. With properties modeled on those observed at early stages of development, neurons are relatively insensitive to rapid fluctuations and tend to fire synchronously in response to wave-like events of large amplitude. Following developmental changes in voltage-dependent conductances, these same neurons become efficient encoders of fast input fluctuations over few layers, but lose the ability to transmit slower, population-wide input variations across many layers. Depending on the neurons' intrinsic properties, noise plays different roles in modulating neuronal input-output curves, which can dramatically impact network transmission. The developmental change in intrinsic properties supports a transformation of a networks function from the propagation of network-wide information to one in which computations are scaled to local activity. This work underscores the significance of simple changes in conductance parameters in governing how neurons

  15. Modeling Markov Switching ARMA-GARCH Neural Networks Models and an Application to Forecasting Stock Returns

    PubMed Central

    Bildirici, Melike; Ersin, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    The study has two aims. The first aim is to propose a family of nonlinear GARCH models that incorporate fractional integration and asymmetric power properties to MS-GARCH processes. The second purpose of the study is to augment the MS-GARCH type models with artificial neural networks to benefit from the universal approximation properties to achieve improved forecasting accuracy. Therefore, the proposed Markov-switching MS-ARMA-FIGARCH, APGARCH, and FIAPGARCH processes are further augmented with MLP, Recurrent NN, and Hybrid NN type neural networks. The MS-ARMA-GARCH family and MS-ARMA-GARCH-NN family are utilized for modeling the daily stock returns in an emerging market, the Istanbul Stock Index (ISE100). Forecast accuracy is evaluated in terms of MAE, MSE, and RMSE error criteria and Diebold-Mariano equal forecast accuracy tests. The results suggest that the fractionally integrated and asymmetric power counterparts of Gray's MS-GARCH model provided promising results, while the best results are obtained for their neural network based counterparts. Further, among the models analyzed, the models based on the Hybrid-MLP and Recurrent-NN, the MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-HybridMLP, and MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-RNN provided the best forecast performances over the baseline single regime GARCH models and further, over the Gray's MS-GARCH model. Therefore, the models are promising for various economic applications. PMID:24977200

  16. Entropy Based Detection of DDoS Attacks in Packet Switching Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawniczak, Anna T.; Wu, Hao; di Stefano, Bruno

    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are network-wide attacks that cannot be detected or stopped easily. They affect “natural” spatio-temporal packet traffic patterns, i.e. “natural distributions” of packets passing through the routers. Thus, they affect “natural” information entropy profiles, a sort of “fingerprints”, of normal packet traffic. We study if by monitoring information entropy of packet traffic through selected routers one may detect DDoS attacks or anomalous packet traffic in packet switching network (PSN) models. Our simulations show that the considered DDoS attacks of “ping” type cause shifts in information entropy profiles of packet traffic monitored even at small sets of routers and that it is easier to detect these shifts if static routing is used instead of dynamic routing. Thus, network-wide monitoring of information entropy of packet traffic at properly selected routers may provide means for detecting DDoS attacks and other anomalous packet traffics.

  17. Atomic switch networks-nanoarchitectonic design of a complex system for natural computing.

    PubMed

    Demis, E C; Aguilera, R; Sillin, H O; Scharnhorst, K; Sandouk, E J; Aono, M; Stieg, A Z; Gimzewski, J K

    2015-05-22

    Self-organized complex systems are ubiquitous in nature, and the structural complexity of these natural systems can be used as a model to design new classes of functional nanotechnology based on highly interconnected networks of interacting units. Conventional fabrication methods for electronic computing devices are subject to known scaling limits, confining the diversity of possible architectures. This work explores methods of fabricating a self-organized complex device known as an atomic switch network and discusses its potential utility in computing. Through a merger of top-down and bottom-up techniques guided by mathematical and nanoarchitectonic design principles, we have produced functional devices comprising nanoscale elements whose intrinsic nonlinear dynamics and memorization capabilities produce robust patterns of distributed activity and a capacity for nonlinear transformation of input signals when configured in the appropriate network architecture. Their operational characteristics represent a unique potential for hardware implementation of natural computation, specifically in the area of reservoir computing-a burgeoning field that investigates the computational aptitude of complex biologically inspired systems. PMID:25912970

  18. Modeling Markov switching ARMA-GARCH neural networks models and an application to forecasting stock returns.

    PubMed

    Bildirici, Melike; Ersin, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    The study has two aims. The first aim is to propose a family of nonlinear GARCH models that incorporate fractional integration and asymmetric power properties to MS-GARCH processes. The second purpose of the study is to augment the MS-GARCH type models with artificial neural networks to benefit from the universal approximation properties to achieve improved forecasting accuracy. Therefore, the proposed Markov-switching MS-ARMA-FIGARCH, APGARCH, and FIAPGARCH processes are further augmented with MLP, Recurrent NN, and Hybrid NN type neural networks. The MS-ARMA-GARCH family and MS-ARMA-GARCH-NN family are utilized for modeling the daily stock returns in an emerging market, the Istanbul Stock Index (ISE100). Forecast accuracy is evaluated in terms of MAE, MSE, and RMSE error criteria and Diebold-Mariano equal forecast accuracy tests. The results suggest that the fractionally integrated and asymmetric power counterparts of Gray's MS-GARCH model provided promising results, while the best results are obtained for their neural network based counterparts. Further, among the models analyzed, the models based on the Hybrid-MLP and Recurrent-NN, the MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-HybridMLP, and MS-ARMA-FIAPGARCH-RNN provided the best forecast performances over the baseline single regime GARCH models and further, over the Gray's MS-GARCH model. Therefore, the models are promising for various economic applications. PMID:24977200

  19. An associative capacitive network based on nanoscale complementary resistive switches for memory-intensive computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehei, Omid; Linn, Eike; Nielen, Lutz; Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Skafidas, Efstratios; Valov, Ilia; Waser, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    We report on the implementation of an Associative Capacitive Network (ACN) based on the nondestructive capacitive readout of two Complementary Resistive Switches (2-CRSs). ACNs are capable of performing a fully parallel search for Hamming distances (i.e. similarity) between input and stored templates. Unlike conventional associative memories where charge retention is a key function and hence, they require frequent refresh cycles, in ACNs, information is retained in a nonvolatile resistive state and normal tasks are carried out through capacitive coupling between input and output nodes. Each device consists of two CRS cells and no selective element is needed, therefore, CMOS circuitry is only required in the periphery, for addressing and read-out. Highly parallel processing, nonvolatility, wide interconnectivity and low-energy consumption are significant advantages of ACNs over conventional and emerging associative memories. These characteristics make ACNs one of the promising candidates for applications in memory-intensive and cognitive computing, switches and routers as binary and ternary Content Addressable Memories (CAMs) and intelligent data processing.

  20. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2−/− B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2−/− mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs. PMID:20953163

  1. Dependence of synchronized bursting activity on medium stirring and the perfusion rate in a cultured network of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Ryoun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-05-01

    A cultured network of neurons coupled with a multi-electrode-array (MEA) recording system has been a useful platform for investigating various issues in neuroscience and engineering. The neural activity supported by the system can be sensitive to environmental fluctuations, for example, in the medium's nutrient composition, ph, and temperature, and to mechanical disturbances, yet this issue has not been the subject. Especially, a normal practice in maintaining neuronal cell cultures involves an intermittent sequence of medium exchanges, typically at a time interval of a few days, and one such sudden medium exchange is unavoidably accompanied by many unintended disturbances. Here, based on a quantitative time-series analysis of synchronized bursting events, we explicitly demonstrate that such a medium exchange can, indeed, bring a huge change in the existing neural activity. Subsequently, we develop a medium perfusion-stirring system and an ideal protocol that can be used in conjunction with a MEA recording system, providing long-term stability. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the effects of medium stirring and perfusion rates. Unexpectedly, even some vigorous mechanical agitations do not have any impacts on neural activity. On the other hand, too much replenishment ( e.g., 1.8 ml/day for a 1.8-ml dish) of neurobasal medium results in an excitotoxicity.

  2. Finite-time stabilization control for discontinuous time-delayed networks: New switching design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Huang, Li-Hong; Cai, Zuo-Wei

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the finite-time stabilization problem for time-varying delayed neural networks (DNNs) with discontinuous activation functions. By using fixed point theory and set-valued analysis, we establish the existence theorem of equilibrium point. In order to stabilize the states of this class of discontinuous DNNs in finite time, we design two different kinds of switching controllers which are described by discontinuous functions. Under the framework of Filippov solutions, several new and effective criteria are derived to realize finite-time stabilization of discontinuous DNNs based on the famous finite-time stability theory. Besides, the upper bounds of the settling time of stabilization are estimated. Numerical examples are finally provided to illustrate the correctness of the proposed design method and theoretical results. PMID:26752437

  3. High-speed testing of tandem-Banyan network switch component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, Hirotaka; Kameda, Yoshio; Yorozu, Shinichi; Kawakami, Akira; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Wang, Zhen

    2003-10-01

    We present the high-speed test results of a tandem-Banyan network switch (TBNS) component based on superconductor single-flux-quantum technology. The tested circuit is called a transmission checker (TMC) and is one component of the TBNS. The circuit was designed by using the CONNECT SFQ cell library developed for NEC standard fabrication technology. To perform the high-speed test, an on-chip test system composed of shift resisters and a high-speed clock generator were integrated together with the TMC circuit. The total number of Josephson junctions, including the on-chip test system, was 1545. We observed correct output waveforms at up to 40 GHz. The bias margin of the TMC circuit was ±6.1% up to 27 GHz and ±1.7% at 40 GHz.

  4. Local conformational switching of supramolecular networks at the solid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Cometto, Fernando P; Kern, Klaus; Lingenfelder, Magalí

    2015-05-26

    We use the electric field in a scanning tunneling microscope to manipulate the transition between open and close packed 2D supramolecular networks of neutral molecules in nonpolar media. We found that while the magnitude of the applied field is not decisive, it is the sign of the polarization that needs to be maintained to select one particular polymorph. Moreover, the switching is independent of the solvent used and fully reversible. We propose that the orientation of the surface dipole determined by the electric field might favor different conformation-depended charge transfer mechanisms of the adsorbates to the surface, inducing open (closed) structures for negative (positive) potentials. Our results show the use of local fields to select the polymorphic outcome of supramolecular assemblies at the solid/liquid interface. The effect has potential to locally control the capture and release of analytes in host-guest systems and the 2D morphology in multicomponent layers. PMID:25857528

  5. Multiple-mode reconfigurable electro-optic switching network for optical fiber sensor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ray T.; Wang, Michael R.; Jannson, Tomasz; Baumbick, Robert

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the first switching network compatible with multimode fibers. A one-to-many cascaded reconfigurable interconnection was built. A thin glass substrate was used as the guiding medium which provides not only higher coupling efficiency from multimode fiber to waveguide but also better tolerance of phase-matching conditions. Involvement of a total-internal-reflection hologram and multimode waveguide eliminates interface problems between fibers and waveguides. The DCG polymer graft has proven to be reliable from -180 C to +200 C. Survivability of such an electrooptic system in harsh environments is further ensured. LiNbO3 was chosen as the E-O material because of its stability at high temperatures (phase-transition temperature of more than 1000 C) and maturity of E-O device technology. Further theoretical calculation was conducted to provide the optimal interaction length and device capacitance.

  6. Earthquke-related variation in Schumann Resonance (SR) spectra and Q-bursts as simulated with a global TDTE Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Williams, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    The monitoring of earthquakes with SR has been reported by Nickolaenko and Hayakawa (Nickolaenko and Hayakawa 2014, 2006, Hayakawa 2005). Despite the presence of many SR observatories globally, the observation of SR anomalies caused by earthquakes is rare. And the physical mechanism for the SR anomaly is not clear. Further attention to methods for observing SR anomalies caused by earthquakes is needed. A simulation approach based on Nelson's 2DTelegraph Equation (TDTE) Network (Nelson, MIT doctoral thesis, 1967) is developed. The Earth-ionosphere cavity is discretized into 24×24 tesserae. This network approach is more flexible than an analytical model, especially for a model with day-night asymmetry. The relation of the magnitude of the anomaly and the geometrical arrangement among source, receiver and disturbed zone is discussed for the uniform model. The perturbed zone size is computed according to the estimated size of the earthquake preparation zone. For example, the radius of the perturbed zone is about 1000km when the earthquake magnitude is about Ms=7.0. The intensity variations for the first four SR modes are compared between perturbed and unperturbed models. In addition, the spectral characteristics at different distances between source and disturbed zone are analysed. Interestingly, the electric field shows different variation than the magnetic field in response to the localized perturbation. For the uniform model with single Q-burst source, when the height of the local ionosphere is decreased, the electric field is increased and reaches nearly 50% in intensity in the perturbed zone in the uniform model. However, in contrast, the magnetic response is far less pronounced. It shows almost no variation. But for multisource excitation, the electric field and magnetic field both show dramatic response which reaches nearly 100% variation for some special modes. And the big variation is not restricted to the perturbed zone. The variations show complicated

  7. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1991-01-01

    Emphasis is on a destination directed packet switching architecture for a 30/20 GHz frequency division multiplex access/time division multiplex (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communication network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  8. Destination-directed, packet-switching architecture for 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO

    1992-01-01

    A destination-directed packet switching architecture for a 30/20-GHz frequency division multiple access/time division multiplexed (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network is discussed. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Efforts have concentrated heavily on the space segment; however, the ground segment has been considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  9. Circuit-switch architecture for a 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary satellite communications network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A circuit-switching architecture is described for a 30/20-GHz frequency-division, multiple-access uplink/time-division-multiplexed downlink (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Work was concentrated primarily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  10. Circuit-switch architecture for a 30/20-GHz FDMA/TDM geostationary satellite communications network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A circuit switching architecture is described for a 30/20 GHz frequency division, multiple access uplink/time division multiplexed downlink (FDMA/TDM) geostationary satellite communications network. Critical subsystems and problem areas are identified and addressed. Work was concentrated primarily on the space segment; however, the ground segment was considered concurrently to ensure cost efficiency and realistic operational constraints.

  11. Rapid, Precise Gamma-Ray Burst Localizations with the 3rd Interplanetary Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, K.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Mazets, E.; Golenetskii, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.

    2000-05-01

    The interplanetary network now has the Ulysses and Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft as its most distant points, and Konus-Wind, BATSE, and the BeppoSAX GRBM as near-Earth points. In this configuration, the IPN triangulates about one GRB per week. The error box sizes are 20 square arcminutes and larger, and the delays are in the 10 hours and longer range. As of March 2000, 14 GRB error boxes have been circulated, resulting in 3 counterpart detections and two spectroscopic redshift determinations. By the time this paper is presented, we expect these numbers to roughly double. We discuss the IPN operations and introduce a service for notifying people via pager and cell phone of an impending GRB localization, prior to the actual issuance of a Global Coordinates Network message. We also compare the IPN detection rate, delay, and error box size with those of other missions, both in operation today (e.g. BeppoSAX) and to be launched in the near future (e.g. HETE-II). We are grateful for support under JPL Contract 958056, NASA grants NAG 5-7810 and NAG 5-3585, and under the NEAR participating scientist program.

  12. Wireless Relay Selection in Pocket Switched Networks Based on Spatial Regularity of Human Mobility †

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiuzhen; Bi, Jingping; Chen, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Pocket switched networks (PSNs) take advantage of human mobility to deliver data. Investigations on real-world trace data indicate that human mobility shows an obvious spatial regularity: a human being usually visits a few places at high frequencies. These most frequently visited places form the home of a node, which is exploited in this paper to design two HomE based Relay selectiOn (HERO) algorithms. Both algorithms input single data copy into the network at any time. In the basic HERO, only the first node encountered by the source and whose home overlaps a destination’s home is selected as a relay while the enhanced HERO keeps finding more optimal relay that visits the destination’s home with higher probability. The two proposed algorithms only require the relays to exchange the information of their home and/or the visiting frequencies to their home when two nodes meet. As a result, the information update is reduced and there is no global status information that needs to be maintained. This causes light loads on relays because of the low communication cost and storage requirements. Additionally, only simple operations are needed in the two proposed algorithms, resulting in little computation overhead at relays. At last, a theoretical analysis is performed on some key metrics and then the real-world based simulations indicate that the two HERO algorithms are efficient and effective through employing only one or a few relays. PMID:26797609

  13. A network flow model for load balancing in circuit-switched multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    In multicomputers that utilize circuit switching or wormhole routing, communication overhead depends largely on link contention - the variation due to distance between nodes is negligible. This has a major impact on the load balancing problem. In this case, there are some nodes with excess load (sources) and others with deficit load (sinks) and it is required to find a matching of sources to sinks that avoids contention. The problem is made complex by the hardwired routing on currently available machines: the user can control only which nodes communicate but not how the messages are routed. Network flow models of message flow in the mesh and the hypercube were developed to solve this problem. The crucial property of these models is the correspondence between minimum cost flows and correctly routed messages. To solve a given load balancing problem, a minimum cost flow algorithm is applied to the network. This permits one to determine efficiently a maximum contention free matching of sources to sinks which, in turn, tells one how much of the given imbalance can be eliminated without contention.

  14. A network flow model for load balancing in circuit-switched multicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1990-01-01

    In multicomputers that utilize circuit switching or wormhole routing, communication overhead depends largely on link contention - the variation due to distance between nodes is negligible. This has a major impact on the load balancing problem. In this case, there are some nodes with excess load (sources) and others with deficit load (sinks) and it is required to find a matching of sources to sinks that avoids contention. The problem is made complex by the hardwired routing on currently available machines: the user can control only which nodes communicate but not how the messages are routed. Network flow models of message flow in the mesh and the hypercube were developed to solve this problem. The crucial property of these models is the correspondence between minimum cost flows and correctly routed messages. To solve a given load balancing problem, a minimum cost flow algorithm is applied to the network. This permits one to determine efficiently a maximum contention free matching of sources to sinks which, in turn, tells one how much of the given imbalance can be eliminated without contention.

  15. Wireless Relay Selection in Pocket Switched Networks Based on Spatial Regularity of Human Mobility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiuzhen; Bi, Jingping; Chen, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Pocket switched networks (PSNs) take advantage of human mobility to deliver data. Investigations on real-world trace data indicate that human mobility shows an obvious spatial regularity: a human being usually visits a few places at high frequencies. These most frequently visited places form the home of a node, which is exploited in this paper to design two HomE based Relay selectiOn (HERO) algorithms. Both algorithms input single data copy into the network at any time. In the basic HERO, only the first node encountered by the source and whose home overlaps a destination's home is selected as a relay while the enhanced HERO keeps finding more optimal relay that visits the destination's home with higher probability. The two proposed algorithms only require the relays to exchange the information of their home and/or the visiting frequencies to their home when two nodes meet. As a result, the information update is reduced and there is no global status information that needs to be maintained. This causes light loads on relays because of the low communication cost and storage requirements. Additionally, only simple operations are needed in the two proposed algorithms, resulting in little computation overhead at relays. At last, a theoretical analysis is performed on some key metrics and then the real-world based simulations indicate that the two HERO algorithms are efficient and effective through employing only one or a few relays. PMID:26797609

  16. Miniaturized fiber optical switches with nonmoving polymeric mirrors for tele- and data-communication networks fabricated using the LIGA technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeier, Michel; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Jaeger, Jutta; Picard, Antoni; Schulze, Jens

    1998-03-01

    Fiber optical switches for telecom and datacom purposes become more and more important with the growth of fiber- based networks. This paper proposes a new principle for manipulating optical light paths through switchable, but non-moving polymeric mirrors in free-space optical interconnects. To achieve this a polymeric body and a thin liquid film are moved within a cavity. By moving the body up and down perpendicular to the light path the cavity wall can be switched from total reflective to transmissive state while the liquid film remains between body and wall due to capillary forces. The body can be moved with integrated electro-magnetic actuators and so the whole concept allows the realization of very compact switching elements. The coupling of single mode optical fibers requires a lateral and angular alignment precision in the micron and millirad range for both direct coupling and expanded beam coupling concepts. To meet these requirements, the LIGA technology provides a promising approach with respect to the high precision and also low-cost fabrication by mass replication processes. The combination of LIGA technology with other precision machining technologies allows the fabrication of miniaturized systems with both micro-optic and micromechanic components which fulfill the required tolerances for optical coupling. First demonstrators of 1 X 2 and 2 X 2 switches with bistable electro-magnetic actuators have been fabricated to show the feasibility of the proposed principle. The measured insertion loss is less than 2 dB at 1300 nm with -40 dB crosstalk. The switching time was measured 100 ms. The capabilities of the proposed non-moving mirror principle can be applied to 1 X 2 repair switches for the access area as well as to FDDI-switching-nodes up to compact N X M cross-connect switches for reconfiguration purposes or parallel interconnects to optical backplanes for the office area.

  17. WDM Network and Multicasting Protocol Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zaim, Abdul Halim

    2014-01-01

    Optical technology gains extensive attention and ever increasing improvement because of the huge amount of network traffic caused by the growing number of internet users and their rising demands. However, with wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), it is easier to take the advantage of optical networks and optical burst switching (OBS) and to construct WDM networks with low delay rates and better data transparency these technologies are the best choices. Furthermore, multicasting in WDM is an urgent solution for bandwidth-intensive applications. In the paper, a new multicasting protocol with OBS is proposed. The protocol depends on a leaf initiated structure. The network is composed of source, ingress switches, intermediate switches, edge switches, and client nodes. The performance of the protocol is examined with Just Enough Time (JET) and Just In Time (JIT) reservation protocols. Also, the paper involves most of the recent advances about WDM multicasting in optical networks. WDM multicasting in optical networks is given as three common subtitles: Broadcast and-select networks, wavelength-routed networks, and OBS networks. Also, in the paper, multicast routing protocols are briefly summarized and optical burst switched WDM networks are investigated with the proposed multicast schemes. PMID:24744683

  18. WDM network and multicasting protocol strategies.

    PubMed

    Kirci, Pinar; Zaim, Abdul Halim

    2014-01-01

    Optical technology gains extensive attention and ever increasing improvement because of the huge amount of network traffic caused by the growing number of internet users and their rising demands. However, with wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), it is easier to take the advantage of optical networks and optical burst switching (OBS) and to construct WDM networks with low delay rates and better data transparency these technologies are the best choices. Furthermore, multicasting in WDM is an urgent solution for bandwidth-intensive applications. In the paper, a new multicasting protocol with OBS is proposed. The protocol depends on a leaf initiated structure. The network is composed of source, ingress switches, intermediate switches, edge switches, and client nodes. The performance of the protocol is examined with Just Enough Time (JET) and Just In Time (JIT) reservation protocols. Also, the paper involves most of the recent advances about WDM multicasting in optical networks. WDM multicasting in optical networks is given as three common subtitles: Broadcast and-select networks, wavelength-routed networks, and OBS networks. Also, in the paper, multicast routing protocols are briefly summarized and optical burst switched WDM networks are investigated with the proposed multicast schemes. PMID:24744683

  19. An efficient Quality of Service (QoS) scheme for all optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Amit Kumar; Kaler, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of providing Quality of Service (QoS) for optical burst switching (OBS) systems. In this paper, an efficient QoS oriented integrated scheme based on Optical Burst/Circuit Switching network architecture has been proposed. The proposed scheme utilizes the modified Just-Enough-Time (JET) protocol and advanced reservation based on Linear Predictive Filter (LPF), which can provide differentiated services for optical burst switching (OBS) network. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme is reasonably better than a First Come First Served (FCFS) protocol in guaranteeing QoS of real-time traffic. Also, the results yield significant delay reduction for time-critical traffic, while maintaining the bandwidth overhead within limits. As a result, the proposed scheme has achieved QoS differentiation in terms of burst loss rate in comparison to conventional schemes.

  20. Methylxanthines do not affect rhythmogenic preBötC inspiratory network activity but impair bursting of preBötC-driven motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Panaitescu, B; Kuribayashi, J; Ruangkittisakul, A; Leung, V; Iizuka, M; Ballanyi, K

    2013-01-01

    Clinical stimulation of preterm infant breathing with methylxanthines like caffeine and theophylline can evoke seizures. It is unknown whether underlying neuronal hyperexcitability involves the rhythmogenic inspiratory active pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) in the brainstem or preBötC-driven motor networks. Inspiratory-related preBötC interneuronal plus spinal (cervical/phrenic) or cranial hypoglossal (XII) motoneuronal bursting was studied in newborn rat en bloc brainstem-spinal cords and brainstem slices, respectively. Non-respiratory bursting perturbed inspiratory cervical nerve activity in en bloc models at >0.25mM theophylline or caffeine. Rhythm in the exposed preBötC of transected en bloc preparations was less perturbed by 10mM theophylline than cervical root bursting which was more affected than phrenic nerve activity. In the preBötC of slices, even 10mM methylxanthine did not evoke seizure-like bursting whereas >1mM masked XII rhythm via large amplitude 1-10Hz oscillations. Blocking A-type γ-aminobutyric (GABAA) receptors evoked seizure-like cervical activity whereas in slices neither XII nor preBötC rhythm was disrupted. Methylxanthines (2.5-10mM), but not blockade of adenosine receptors, phosphodiesterase-4 or the sarcoplasmatic/endoplasmatic reticulum ATPase countered inspiratory depression by muscimol-evoked GABAA receptor activation that was associated with a hyperpolarization and input resistance decrease silencing preBötC neurons in slices. The latter blockers did neither affect preBötC or cranial/spinal motor network bursting nor evoke seizure-like activity or mask corresponding methylxanthine-evoked discharges. Our findings show that methylxanthine-evoked hyperexcitability originates from motor networks, leaving preBötC activity largely unaffected, and suggest that GABAA receptors contribute to methylxanthine-evoked seizure-like perturbation of spinal motoneurons whereas non-respiratory XII motoneuron oscillations are of different

  1. Artificial neural network based torque calculation of switched reluctance motor without locking the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Fuat; Goto, Hiroki; Guo, Hai-Jiao; Ichinokura, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Feedback of motor torque is required in most of switched reluctance (SR) motor applications in order to control torque and its ripple. An SR motor shows highly nonlinear property which does not allow calculating torque analytically. Torque can be directly measured by torque sensor, but it inevitably increases the cost and has to be properly mounted on the motor shaft. Instead of torque sensor, finite element analysis (FEA) may be employed for torque calculation. However, motor modeling and calculation takes relatively long time. The results of FEA may also differ from the actual results. The most convenient way seems to calculate torque from the measured values of rotor position, current, and flux linkage while locking the rotor at definite positions. However, this method needs an extra assembly to lock the rotor. In this study, a novel torque calculation based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) is presented. Magnetizing data are collected while a 6/4 SR motor is running. They need to be interpolated for torque calculation. ANN is very strong tool for data interpolation. ANN based torque estimation is verified on the 6/4 SR motor and is compared by FEA based torque estimation to show its validity.

  2. Validation of a new multiple osteochondromas classification through Switching Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Mordenti, Marina; Ferrari, Enrico; Pedrini, Elena; Fabbri, Nicola; Campanacci, Laura; Muselli, Marco; Sangiorgi, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Multiple osteochondromas (MO), previously known as hereditary multiple exostoses (HME), is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the formation of several benign cartilage-capped bone growth defined osteochondromas or exostoses. Various clinical classifications have been proposed but a consensus has not been reached. The aim of this study was to validate (using a machine learning approach) an "easy to use" tool to characterize MO patients in three classes according to the number of bone segments affected, the presence of skeletal deformities and/or functional limitations. The proposed classification has been validated (with a highly satisfactory mean accuracy) by analyzing 150 different variables on 289 MO patients through a Switching Neural Network approach (a novel classification technique capable of deriving models described by intelligible rules in if-then form). This approach allowed us to identify ankle valgism, Madelung deformity and limitation of the hip extra-rotation as "tags" of the three clinical classes. In conclusion, the proposed classification provides an efficient system to characterize this rare disease and is able to define homogeneous cohorts of patients to investigate MO pathogenesis. PMID:23401177

  3. Exponential H∞ filtering for discrete-time switched neural networks with random delays.

    PubMed

    Mathiyalagan, Kalidass; Su, Hongye; Shi, Peng; Sakthivel, Rathinasamy

    2015-04-01

    This paper addresses the exponential H∞ filtering problem for a class of discrete-time switched neural networks with random time-varying delays. The involved delays are assumed to be randomly time-varying which are characterized by introducing a Bernoulli stochastic variable. Effects of both variation range and distribution probability of the time delays are considered. The nonlinear activation functions are assumed to satisfy the sector conditions. Our aim is to estimate the state by designing a full order filter such that the filter error system is globally exponentially stable with an expected decay rate and a H∞ performance attenuation level. The filter is designed by using a piecewise Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional together with linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach and average dwell time method. First, a set of sufficient LMI conditions are established to guarantee the exponential mean-square stability of the augmented system and then the parameters of full-order filter are expressed in terms of solutions to a set of LMI conditions. The proposed LMI conditions can be easily solved by using standard software packages. Finally, numerical examples by means of practical problems are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed filter design. PMID:25020225

  4. Universal method for constructing N-port non-blocking optical router based on 2 × 2 optical switch for photonic networks-on-chip.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiaoshan; Zhang, Fanfan; Ji, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Lin

    2014-05-19

    We propose a universal method for constructing N-port non-blocking optical router for photonic networks-on-chip, in which all microring (MR) optical switches or Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) optical switches behave as 2 × 2 optical switches. The optical router constructed by the proposed method has minimum optical switches, in which the number of the optical switches is reduced about 50% compared to the reported optical routers based on MR optical switches and more than 30% compared to the reported optical routers based on M-Z optical switches, and therefore is more compact in footprint and more power-efficient. We also present a strict mathematical proof of the non-blocking routing of the proposed N-port optical router. PMID:24921378

  5. Stability and synchronization of discrete-time neural networks with switching parameters and time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ligang; Feng, Zhiguang; Lam, James

    2013-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the problems of exponential stability analysis and synchronization of discrete-time switched delayed neural networks. Using the average dwell time approach together with the piecewise Lyapunov function technique, sufficient conditions are proposed to guarantee the exponential stability for the switched neural networks with time-delays. Benefitting from the delay partitioning method and the free-weighting matrix technique, the conservatism of the obtained results is reduced. In addition, the decay estimates are explicitly given and the synchronization problem is solved. The results reported in this paper not only depend upon the delay, but also depend upon the partitioning, which aims at reducing the conservatism. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the derived theoretical results. PMID:24805215

  6. Switching auditory attention using spatial and non-spatial features recruits different cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric; Lee, Adrian KC

    2013-01-01

    Switching attention between different stimuli of interest based on particular task demands is important in many everyday settings. In audition in particular, switching attention between different speakers of interest that are talking concurrently is often necessary for effective communication. Recently, it has been shown by multiple studies that auditory selective attention suppresses the representation of unwanted streams in auditory cortical areas in favor of the target stream of interest. However, the neural processing that guides this selective attention process is not well understood. Here we investigated the cortical mechanisms involved in switching attention based on two different types of auditory features. By combining magneto- and electroencephalography (M-EEG) with an anatomical MRI constraint, we examined the cortical dynamics involved in switching auditory attention based on either spatial or pitch features. We designed a paradigm where listeners were cued in the beginning of each trial to switch or maintain attention halfway through the presentation of concurrent target and masker streams. By allowing listeners time to switch during a gap in the continuous target and masker stimuli, we were able to isolate the mechanisms involved in endogenous, top-down attention switching. Our results show a double dissociation between the involvement of right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ) and the left inferior parietal supramarginal part (LIPSP) in tasks requiring listeners to switch attention based on space and pitch features, respectively, suggesting that switching attention based on these features involves at least partially separate processes or behavioral strategies. PMID:24096028

  7. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  8. Including 10-Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Network under End-to-End Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching Provisioned Quality of Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewka, Lukasz; Gavler, Anders; Wessing, Henrik; Dittmann, Lars

    2012-04-01

    End-to-end quality of service provisioning is still a challenging task despite many years of research and development in this area. Considering a generalized multi-protocol label switching based core/metro network and resource reservation protocol capable home gateways, it is the access part of the network where quality of service signaling is bridged. This article proposes strategies for generalized multi-protocol label switching control over next emerging passive optical network standard, i.e., the 10-gigabit-capable passive optical network. Node management and resource allocation approaches are discussed, and possible issues are raised. The analysis shows that consideration of a 10-gigabit-capable passive optical network as a generalized multi-protocol label switching controlled domain is valid and may advance end-to-end quality of service provisioning for passive optical network based customers.

  9. Percolation network in resistive switching devices with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Ping; Bi, Kaifeng; Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xuening; Xu, Hongxia

    2014-01-27

    Conducting pathway of percolation network was identified in resistive switching devices (RSDs) with the structure of silver/amorphous silicon/p-type silicon (Ag/a-Si/p-Si) based on its gradual RESET-process and the stochastic complex impedance spectroscopy characteristics (CIS). The formation of the percolation network is attributed to amounts of nanocrystalline Si particles as well as defect sites embedded in a-Si layer, in which the defect sites supply positions for Ag ions to nucleate and grow. The similar percolation network has been only observed in Ag-Ge-Se based RSD before. This report provides a better understanding for electric properties of RSD based on the percolation network.

  10. A Study of Quality of Service Communication for High-Speed Packet-Switching Computer Sub-Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Zhenqian

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyze various factors that affect quality of service (QoS) communication in high-speed, packet-switching sub-networks. We hypothesize that sub-network-wide bandwidth reservation and guaranteed CPU processing power at endpoint systems for handling data traffic are indispensable to achieving hard end-to-end quality of service. Different bandwidth reservation strategies, traffic characterization schemes, and scheduling algorithms affect the network resources and CPU usage as well as the extent that QoS can be achieved. In order to analyze those factors, we design and implement a communication layer. Our experimental analysis supports our research hypothesis. The Resource ReSerVation Protocol (RSVP) is designed to realize resource reservation. Our analysis of RSVP shows that using RSVP solely is insufficient to provide hard end-to-end quality of service in a high-speed sub-network. Analysis of the IEEE 802.lp protocol also supports the research hypothesis.

  11. Biochemical switching device: biomimetic approach and application to neural network study.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M

    1992-06-01

    There are many examples of enzymes that share substrates or cofactors in a cyclic manner. Techniques have been developed that use cyclic enzyme systems to assay quantitatively small amounts of biochemical substances (cofactor, substrate), however, only a few studies of the control of these systems have been published. The author previously showed with computer simulations that cyclic enzyme systems have the reliability of ON-OFF types of operation (McCulloch-Pitts' neuronic equation) capable of storing short-memory, and the applicability for a switching circuit in a biocomputer. This paper introduces a unique switching mechanism of cyclic enzyme system (basic switching element), and next, building the integrated biochemical switching system being composed of the basic switching element, shows the physiological phenomenon termed 'selective elimination of synapses' generally produced as a result of low-frequency train of electrical stimuli to the synapses (Kuroda, Y. 1989) Neurochem. Int. 14, 309-319). PMID:1368350

  12. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  13. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  14. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  15. Bistability in the Rac1, PAK, and RhoA Signaling Network Drives Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cell Motility Switches

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Kate M.; Monsefi, Naser; Dawson, John C.; Degasperi, Andrea; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Volinsky, Natalia; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Tsyganov, Mikhail A.; Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Kida, Katarzyna; Finch, Andrew J.; Carragher, Neil O.; Kolch, Walter; Nguyen, Lan K.; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dynamic interactions between RhoA and Rac1, members of the Rho small GTPase family, play a vital role in the control of cell migration. Using predictive mathematical modeling, mass spectrometry-based quantitation of network components, and experimental validation in MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal breast cancer cells, we show that a network containing Rac1, RhoA, and PAK family kinases can produce bistable, switch-like responses to a graded PAK inhibition. Using a small chemical inhibitor of PAK, we demonstrate that cellular RhoA and Rac1 activation levels respond in a history-dependent, bistable manner to PAK inhibition. Consequently, we show that downstream signaling, actin dynamics, and cell migration also behave in a bistable fashion, displaying switches and hysteresis in response to PAK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that PAK is a critical component in the Rac1-RhoA inhibitory crosstalk that governs bistable GTPase activity, cell morphology, and cell migration switches. PMID:27136688

  16. Bistability in the Rac1, PAK, and RhoA Signaling Network Drives Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cell Motility Switches.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Kate M; Monsefi, Naser; Dawson, John C; Degasperi, Andrea; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Volinsky, Natalia; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Birtwistle, Marc R; Tsyganov, Mikhail A; Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Kida, Katarzyna; Finch, Andrew J; Carragher, Neil O; Kolch, Walter; Nguyen, Lan K; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Kholodenko, Boris N

    2016-01-27

    Dynamic interactions between RhoA and Rac1, members of the Rho small GTPase family, play a vital role in the control of cell migration. Using predictive mathematical modeling, mass spectrometry-based quantitation of network components, and experimental validation in MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal breast cancer cells, we show that a network containing Rac1, RhoA, and PAK family kinases can produce bistable, switch-like responses to a graded PAK inhibition. Using a small chemical inhibitor of PAK, we demonstrate that cellular RhoA and Rac1 activation levels respond in a history-dependent, bistable manner to PAK inhibition. Consequently, we show that downstream signaling, actin dynamics, and cell migration also behave in a bistable fashion, displaying switches and hysteresis in response to PAK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that PAK is a critical component in the Rac1-RhoA inhibitory crosstalk that governs bistable GTPase activity, cell morphology, and cell migration switches. PMID:27136688

  17. Delivery of very high bandwidth with ATM switches and SONET. [Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), Synchronous Optical NETwork (SONET)

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, S.A.

    1992-10-01

    The choice of technologies for the delivery of very high bandwidth throughout a facility capable of ultimately achieving gigabits per second performance, is a crucial one for any high technology facility. The components of a high bandwidth delivery system include high performance sources and sinks in the form of central facilities (major mainframes, large file storage and specialized peripherals) and powerful, full bandwidth distributed local area networks (LANs). In order to deliver bandwidth among the sources and sinks, a ubiquitous inter-/intra-building cable plant consisting of single mode and multimode fiber as well as twisted pair copper is required. The selection of the glue'' to transport and interconnect the LANs with the central facility over the pervasive cable plant is the focus of this paper. A design philosophy for high performance communications systems is proposed. A description of the traditional problems that must be overcome to provide very high bandwidth beyond the narrow confines of a computer center is given. The advantages of ATM switching and SONET physical transport are explored in the structured design presentation. The applicability of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching (interconnection) and Synchronous Optical NETwork (SONET) (transport) for high bandwidth delivery is described using the environment and requirements of Sandia National Laboratories as a context to examine the suitability of those technologies. The synergy and utility of ATM and SONET in the campus network are explored. Other methods for distributing high data rates are compared and contrasted to ATM and SONET with respect to cable plant impact, reliability/availability, maintainability, and capacity. Sandia is implementing a standards based foundation utilizing a pervasive single mode fiber cable plant, SONET transport, and ATM switching to meet the goals of gigabit networking.

  18. A novel all-optical label processing based on multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences for optical packet switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Qiu, Kun; Xu, Bo; Ling, Yun

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes an all-optical label processing scheme that uses the multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences (MOOCS)-based optical label for optical packet switching (OPS) (MOOCS-OPS) networks. In this scheme, each MOOCS is a permutation or combination of the multiple optical orthogonal codes (MOOC) selected from the multiple-groups optical orthogonal codes (MGOOC). Following a comparison of different optical label processing (OLP) schemes, the principles of MOOCS-OPS network are given and analyzed. Firstly, theoretical analyses are used to prove that MOOCS is able to greatly enlarge the number of available optical labels when compared to the previous single optical orthogonal code (SOOC) for OPS (SOOC-OPS) network. Then, the key units of the MOOCS-based optical label packets, including optical packet generation, optical label erasing, optical label extraction and optical label rewriting etc., are given and studied. These results are used to verify that the proposed MOOCS-OPS scheme is feasible.

  19. Wireless electro-optic switching network for optical fiber sensor array using MEMS-IDT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1999-09-01

    Optical fiber arrays have been proposed for signal paths in various civilian and military controls as a means of offering advanced sensing functions not available in electronic systems. To implement optic fiber sensors on various control systems, a proper electro-optic architecture (EOA) with a bar- coded electro-optical switch needs to be studied. In this paper, a design of such EO switch is proposed which can be operated remotely. Lithium Niobate is chosen as the EO material. The MEMS-IDT device is designed with Lithium Niobate as a substrate with IDT and a set of floating reflectors. The reflectors can be programmable and thus a bar-coded switch can be fabricated. The electrostatic field between the reflectors and the Lithium Niobate serves as the fast acting switch in this application.

  20. Microring resonator-based diamond optothermal switch: a building block for a quantum computing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihong; Faraon, Andrei; Santori, Charles; Acosta, Victor; Beausoleil, Raymond G.

    2013-03-01

    The negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond has motivated many groups building scalable quantum information processors based on diamond photonics. This is owning to the long-lived electronic spin coherence and the capability for spin manipulation and readout of NV centers.1-4 The primitive operation is to create entanglement between two NV centers, based on schemes such as 'atom-photon entanglement' proposed by Cabrillo et al.5To scale this type of scheme beyond two qubits, one important component is an optical switch that allows light emitted from a particular device to be routed to multiple locations. With such a switch, one has choices of routing photons to specified paths and has the benefit of improving the entanglement speed by entangling multiple qubits at the same time. Yield of the existing diamond cavities coupled with NV centers are inevitably low, due to the nature of randomness for NV placement and orientation, variation of spectral stability, and variation of cavity resonance frequency and quality factor. An optical switch provides the capability to tolerate a large fraction of defective devices by routing only to the working devices. Many type of switching devices were built on conventional semiconductor materials with mechanisms from mechanical, thermal switching to carrier injection, photonics crystal, and polymer refractive index tuning .6-8 In this paper, we build an optical-thermal switch on diamond with micro-ring waveguides, mainly for the simplicity of the diamond fabrication. The the switching function was realized by locally tuning the temperature of the diamond waveguides. Switching efficiency of 31% at 'drop' port and 73% at 'through' port were obtained.

  1. Mode-selective optical packet switching in mode-division multiplexing networks.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulos, N P; Hayashi, M; Yoshida, Y; Maruta, A; Maruyama, R; Kuwaki, N; Takenaga, K; Uemura, H; Matsuo, S; Kitayama, K

    2015-09-01

    A novel mode-selective optical packet switching, based on mode-multiplexers/demultiplexers and multi-port optical micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) switches, has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The experimental demonstration was performed using the LP(01), LP(11a) and LP(11b) modes of a 30-km long mode-division multiplexed few-mode fiber link, utilizing 40 Gb/s, 16-QAM signals. PMID:26368463

  2. An RWA algorithm for OBS networks based on iterative local optimization of total blocking probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Nagashima, Hidetaka; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Ken-ichi

    2007-11-01

    We propose a routing and wavelength assignment algorithm for Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks that utilizes centralized control. First, a method that can estimate the expected total blocking time in the network is presented. Then the proposed algorithm minimizes the estimated blocking time by simple iterative local optimization in terms of the traffic demand between each pair of nodes. We demonstrate that the proposed algorithm attains much smaller blocking probability than conventional distributed control algorithms. It is also shown that with introduction of optical buffers and burst retransmission, the proposed method realizes low burst loss rates (<10 -6) acceptable for most applications.

  3. Automatic Laser Shutdown Implications for All Optical Data Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, Kerry; Farrell, Peter; Zalesky, Andrew; Andrew, Lachlan; Zukerman, Moshe

    2006-02-01

    Generalized multiprotocol label switching (GMPLS), optical packet, and burst-switched networks in which the synchronous digital hierarchy/synchronous optical network (SDH/SONET) layer is removed may be rendered nonfunctional because the current standard for triggering Automatic Power Reduction (APR) cannot distinguish between a fiber that has been de-energized and a fiber failure. If this standard is applied, without modification, the likelihood of unnecessary amplifier shutdown in optical networks is significant. These shutdown events may impact large regions of the network and render optical links inoperable. To avoid unnecessary amplifier shutdown, amendments to the current operation of APR are suggested.

  4. All-optical packet header and payload separation based on two TOADs for optical packet switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Min; Ye, Peida

    2006-09-01

    We present a novel all-optical header and payload separation technique that can be utilized in Un-Slotted optical packet switched networks. The technique uses two modified TOADs, one is for packet header extraction with differential modulation scheme and the other performs a simple XOR operation between the packet and its self-derived header to get the separated payload. The main virtue of this system is simple structure and low power consumption. Through numerical simulations, the operating characteristics of the scheme are illustrated. In addition, the system parameters are discussed and designed to optimize the performance of the proposed scheme.

  5. New results on anti-synchronization of switched neural networks with time-varying delays and lag signals.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuting; Wen, Shiping; Chen, Michael Z Q; Huang, Tingwen; Zeng, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global exponential anti-synchronization of a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delays and lag signals. Considering the packed circuits, the controller is dependent on the output of the system as the inner states are very hard to measure. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the controller based on the output of the neuron cell. Through theoretical analysis, it is obvious that the obtained ones improve and generalize the results derived in the previous literature. To illustrate the effectiveness, a simulation example with applications in image encryptions is also presented in the paper. PMID:27295505

  6. Self-Induced Switchings between Multiple Space-Time Patterns on Complex Networks of Excitable Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansmann, Gerrit; Lehnertz, Klaus; Feudel, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    We report on self-induced switchings between multiple distinct space-time patterns in the dynamics of a spatially extended excitable system. These switchings between low-amplitude oscillations, nonlinear waves, and extreme events strongly resemble a random process, although the system is deterministic. We show that a chaotic saddle—which contains all the patterns as well as channel-like structures that mediate the transitions between them—is the backbone of such a pattern-switching dynamics. Our analyses indicate that essential ingredients for the observed phenomena are that the system behaves like an inhomogeneous oscillatory medium that is capable of self-generating spatially localized excitations and that is dominated by short-range connections but also features long-range connections. With our findings, we present an alternative to the well-known ways to obtain self-induced pattern switching, namely, noise-induced attractor hopping, heteroclinic orbits, and adaptation to an external signal. This alternative way can be expected to improve our understanding of pattern switchings in spatially extended natural dynamical systems like the brain and the heart.

  7. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  8. Observations of optical components of gamma-bursts by means of the network of MASTER robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, E. S.

    2012-05-01

    We present results of the prompt, early, and afterglow optical observations of five gamma-ray bursts, GRBs 100901A, 100902A, 100905A, 100906A, and 101020A, made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory, and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB100901A and GRB100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before cessation of gamma-ray emission, at 113 s and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB100906A were conducted in two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. More detailed analysis of GRB100901A and GRB100906A supplemented by Swift data provides the following results and indicates a different origin of the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light curves patterns and spectral distributions suggest a common production site of the prompt optical and high-energy emission in GRB100901A. Results of spectral fits for GRB100901A in the range from the optical to X-rays favor power law energy distributions and a consistent value of the optical extinction in the host galaxy. GRB100906A produced a smoothly peaking optical light curve suggesting that the prompt optical radiation in this GRB originated in a front shock. This is supported by a spectral analysis.We have found that the Amati and Ghirlanda relations are satisfied for GRB100906A. An upper limit on the value of the optical extinction on the host of GRB100906A is obtained.

  9. Hierarchical multiobjective routing model in Multiprotocol Label Switching networks with two service classes - a Pareto archive strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girão-Silva, Rita; Craveirinha, José; Clímaco, João

    2012-05-01

    The article begins by reviewing a two-level hierarchical multicriteria routing model for Multiprotocol Label Switching networks with two service classes (QoS, i.e. with Quality of Service requirements, and Best Effort services) and alternative routing, as well as the foundations of a heuristic resolution approach, previously proposed by the authors. Afterwards a new variant of this heuristic approach, which includes a Pareto archive strategy, is described. In this archive, non-dominated solutions obtained throughout the heuristic are kept. At the end of the main procedure of the heuristic, these solutions are evaluated and a final solution for the routing problem is chosen using a reference point-based approach. The application of this procedure to two test networks will show, with analytic and discrete-event simulation models, that, in certain initial conditions, this approach provides improvements in the final results concerning the top-level objective functions, especially in more 'difficult' situations detected through sensitivity analysis.

  10. Delay-dependent passivity criteria for uncertain switched neural networks of neutral type with interval time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamani, G.; Balasubramaniam, P.

    2012-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the robust passivity analysis of uncertain switched neural networks of neutral type with interval time-varying delay. We first discuss the passivity conditions for the addressed model with norm bounded uncertainties and then extend this result to the case of interval uncertainties. For the neural networks under study, a generalized activation function is considered, where the traditional assumptions on the boundedness, monotonicity and differentiability of the activation functions are removed. Constructing a new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional with triple integral terms and using a minimal number of free-weighting matrices, some passivity criteria are proposed in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which are dependent on the size of the time delay. Finally, some numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and merits of the developed techniques.

  11. A programming environment to control switching networks based on STC104 packet routing chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, I. C.; Schwendicke, U.; Leich, H.; Medinnis, M.; Koehler, A.; Wegner, P.; Sulanke, K.; Dippel, R.; Gellrich, A.

    1997-02-01

    The software environment used to control a large switching architecture based on SGS-Thomson STC104 (an asynchronous 32-way dynamic packet routing chip) is presented. We are evaluating this switching technology for large scale, real-time parallel systems. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) written as a multi-thread application in Java allows to set the switch configuration and to continuously monitor the state of each link. This GUI connects to a multi-thread server via TCP/IP sockets. The server is running on a PC-Linux system and implements the virtual channel protocol in communicating with the STC104 switching units using the Data Strobe link or the VME bus. Linux I/O drivers to control the Data Strobe link parallel adaptor (STC101) were developed. For each client the server creates a new thread and allocates a new socket for communications. The Java code of the GUI may be transferred to any client using the http protocol providing a user friendly interface to the system with real-time monitoring which is also platform independent.

  12. Status of photonic network research in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yong Hyub

    2004-10-01

    Korea is small country but has recently dramatic growth in broadband internet subscribers. At the present of December in 2003, about 73% of total households are internet subscribers. The country is now pursuing new internet highway with faster speed and broadband services for future intelligent internet. The viable research targets are the switching technologies, the access network and convergence network technologies. The optical burst switching will be discussed as the intermediate solution before the coming sophisticated optical packet switching technologies. Another important issue is how we accept diverse service types in future network. There are always dilemmas to choose "optical" or "electrical" for the network in both cost and technology views. The WDM PON-based FTTH and the broadband convergence network (BcN) plans in Korea will also be discussed.

  13. Single-chip MEMS 5 × 5 and 20 × 20 double-pole single-throw switch arrays for automating telecommunication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S.; Oberhammer, J.; Stemme, G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on microelectromechanical (MEMS) switch arrays with 5 × 5 and 20 × 20 double-pole single-throw (DPST) switches embedded and packaged on a single chip, which are intended for automating main distribution frames in copper-wire telecommunication networks. Whenever a customer requests a change in his telecommunication services, the copper-wire network has to be reconfigured which is currently done manually by a costly physical re-routing of the connections in the main distribution frames. To reduce the costs, new methods for automating the network reconfiguration are sought after by the network providers. The presented devices comprise 5 × 5 or 20 × 20 double switches, which allow us to interconnect any of the 5 or 20 input lines to any of the 5 or 20 output lines. The switches are based on an electrostatic S-shaped film actuator with the switch contact on a flexible membrane, moving between a top and a bottom electrode. The devices are fabricated in two parts which are designed to be assembled using selective adhesive wafer bonding, resulting in a wafer-scale package of the switch array. The on-chip routing network consists of thick metal lines for low resistance and is embedded in bencocyclobutene (BCB) polymer layers. The packaged 5 × 5 switch arrays have a size of 6.7 × 6.4 mm2 and the 20 × 20 arrays are 14 × 10 mm2 large. The switch actuation voltages for closing/opening the switches averaged over an array were measured to be 21.2 V/15.3 V for the 5 × 5 array and 93.2 V/37.3 V for the 20 × 20 array, respectively. The total signal line resistances vary depending on the switch position within the array between 0.13 Ω and 0.56 Ω for the 5 × 5 array and between 0.08 Ω to 2.33 Ω for the 20 × 20 array, respectively. The average resistance of the switch contacts was determined to be 0.22 Ω with a standard deviation of 0.05 Ω.

  14. Spatial-spectral flexible optical networking: enabling switching solutions for a simplified and efficient SDM network platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkos, I.; Zakynthinos, P.; Klonidis, D.; Marom, D.; Sygletos, S.; Ellis, A.; Salvadori, E.; Siracusa, D.; Angelou, M.; Papastergiou, G.; Psaila, N.; Ferran, J. F.; Ben-Ezra, S.; Jimenez, F.; Fernández-Palacios, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The traffic carried by core optical networks grows at a steady but remarkable pace of 30-40% year-over-year. Optical transmissions and networking advancements continue to satisfy the traffic requirements by delivering the content over the network infrastructure in a cost and energy efficient manner. Such core optical networks serve the information traffic demands in a dynamic way, in response to requirements for shifting of traffics demands, both temporally (day/night) and spatially (business district/residential). However as we are approaching fundamental spectral efficiency limits of singlemode fibers, the scientific community is pursuing recently the development of an innovative, all-optical network architecture introducing the spatial degree of freedom when designing/operating future transport networks. Spacedivision- multiplexing through the use of bundled single mode fibers, and/or multi-core fibers and/or few-mode fibers can offer up to 100-fold capacity increase in future optical networks. The EU INSPACE project is working on the development of a complete spatial-spectral flexible optical networking solution, offering the network ultra-high capacity, flexibility and energy efficiency required to meet the challenges of delivering exponentially growing traffic demands in the internet over the next twenty years. In this paper we will present the motivation and main research activities of the INSPACE consortium towards the realization of the overall project solution.

  15. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-08-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  16. Destination directed packet switch architecture for a geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, W. D.; Shalkhauser, M. J.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Soni, N. J.; Quintana, J. A.; Kim, H.; Wagner, P.; Vanderaar, M.

    1992-01-01

    A major effort at NASA/Lewis is to identify and develop critical digital technologies and components that enable new commercial missions or significantly improve the performance, cost efficiency, and/or reliability of existing and planned space comunications systems. NASA envisions the need for low data rate, direct to the user communications services, for data, facsimile, voice, and video conferencing. A report that focuses on destination directed packet switching architectures for geostationary communication satellites is presented.

  17. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  18. Design of a Multicast Optical Packet Switch Based on Fiber Bragg Grating Technology for Future Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jiuh; Yeh, Tzuoh-Chyau; Cheng, Shyr-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a non-blocking multicast optical packet switch based on fiber Bragg grating technology with optical output buffers is proposed. Only the header of optical packets is converted to electronic signals to control the fiber Bragg grating array of input ports and the packet payloads should be transparently destined to their output ports so that the proposed switch can reduce electronic interfaces as well as the bit rate. The modulation and the format of packet payloads may be non-standard where packet payloads could also include different wavelengths for increasing the volume of traffic. The advantage is obvious: the proposed switch could transport various types of traffic. An easily implemented architecture which can provide multicast services is also presented. An optical output buffer is designed to queue the packets if more than one incoming packet should reach to the same destination output port or including any waiting packets in optical output buffer that will be sent to the output port at a time slot. For preserving service-packet sequencing and fairness of routing sequence, a priority scheme and a round-robin algorithm are adopted at the optical output buffer. The fiber Bragg grating arrays for both input ports and output ports are designed for routing incoming packets using optical code division multiple access technology.

  19. Optical search for gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Ceplecha, Z.; Ehrlich, J.; Borovicka, J.; Hurley, K.; Ateia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Estulin, I. V.

    Preliminary results from an optical search for light pulses associated with gamma-ray bursts by means of the Czechoslovak Fireball Network plate collection at the Ondřejov Observatory are given. Optical monitoring represents more than 7700 hours, but no real optical counterpart was found. Problems associated with the optical search for gamma-ray bursts are discussed.

  20. Design and Demonstration of a 4×4 SFQ Network Switch Prototype System and 10-Gbps Bit-Error-Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Yoshihito; Yorozu, Shinichi

    We developed a 4×4 SFQ network switch prototype system and demonstrated its operation at 10Gbps. The system's core is composed of two SFQ chips: a 4×4 switch and a 6-channel voltage driver. The 4×4 switch chip contained both a switch fabric (i. e. a data path) and a switch scheduler (i. e. a controller). Both chips were attached to a multichip-module (MCM) carrier, which was then installed in a cryocooled system with 32 10-Gbps ports. Each chip contained about 2100 Josephson junctions on a 5-mm×5-mm die. An NEC standard 2.5-kA/cm2 fabrication process was used for the switch chip. We increased the critical current density to 10kA/cm2 for the driver chip to improve speed while maintaining wide bias margins. MCM implementation enabled us to use a hybrid critical current density technology. Voltage pulses were transferred between two chips through passive transmission lines on the MCM carrier. The cryocooled system was cooled down to about 4K using a two-stage 1-W cryocooler. We correctly operated the whole system at 10Gbps. The switch scheduler, which is driven by an on-chip clock generator, operated at 40GHz. The speed gap between SFQ and room temperature devices was filled by on-chip SFQ FIFO buffers or shift registers. We measured the bit error rate at 10Gbps and found that it was on the order of 10-13 for the 4×4 SFQ switch fabric. In addition, using semiconductor interface circuitry, we built a four-port SFQ Ethernet switch. All the components except for a compressor were installed in a standard 19-inch rack, filling a space 21 U (933.5mm or 36.75 inches) in height. After four personal computers (PCs) were connected to the switch, we have successfully transferred video data between them.

  1. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  2. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic strings

    PubMed

    Damour; Vilenkin

    2000-10-30

    Cusps of cosmic strings emit strong beams of high-frequency gravitational waves (GW). As a consequence of these beams, the stochastic ensemble of gravitational waves generated by a cosmological network of oscillating loops is strongly non-Gaussian, and includes occasional sharp bursts that stand above the rms GW background. These bursts might be detectable by the planned GW detectors LIGO/VIRGO and LISA for string tensions as small as G&mgr; approximately 10(-13). The GW bursts discussed here might be accompanied by gamma ray bursts. PMID:11041921

  3. Reversible Local and Global Switching in Multicomponent Supramolecular Networks: Controlled Guest Release and Capture at the Solution/Solid Interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shern-Long; Fang, Yuan; Velpula, Gangamallaiah; Cometto, Fernando P; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Müllen, Klaus; Mali, Kunal S; De Feyter, Steven

    2015-12-22

    Dynamically switchable supramolecular systems offer exciting possibilities in building smart surfaces, the structure and thus the function of which can be controlled by using external stimuli. Here we demonstrate an elegant approach where the guest binding ability of a supramolecular surface can be controlled by inducing structural transitions in it. A physisorbed self-assembled network of a simple hydrogen bonding building block is used as a switching platform. We illustrate that the reversible transition between porous and nonporous networks can be accomplished using an electric field or applying a thermal stimulus. These transitions are used to achieve controlled guest release or capture at the solution-solid interface. The electric field and the temperature-mediated methods of guest release are operative at different length scales. While the former triggers the transition and thus guest release at the nanometer scale, the latter is effective over a much larger scale. The flexibility associated with physisorbed self-assembled networks renders this approach an attractive alternative to conventional switchable systems. PMID:26550765

  4. Restraint Method of Voltage Total Harmonic Distortion in Distribution Network by Power Conditioner Systems using Measured Data from IT Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shoji; Shimoda, Kazuki; Tanaka, Motohiro; Taoka, Hisao; Matsuki, Junya; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    Recently, the amount of distributed generation (DG) such as photovoltaic system and wind power generator system installed in a distribution system has been increasing because of reduction of the effects on the environment. However, the harmonic troubles in the distribution system are apprehended in the background of the increase of connection of DGs through the inverters and the spread of power electronics equipment. In this paper, the authors propose a restraint method of voltage total harmonic distortion (THD) in a whole distribution network by active filter (AF) operation of plural power conditioner systems (PCS). Moreover, the authors propose a determination method of the optimal gain of AF operation so as to minimize the maximum value of voltage THD in the distribution network by the real-time feedback control with measured data from the information technology (IT) switches. In order to verify the validity of the proposed method, the numerical calculations are carried out by using an analytical model of distribution network interconnected DGs with PCS.

  5. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-11-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ(70)-dependent and the contrasting σ(54)-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ(54)-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ(70)-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ(54)-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ(54) Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  6. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ70-dependent and the contrasting σ54-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ54-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ70-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ54-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ54 Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  7. Costs for switching partners reduce network dynamics but not cooperative behaviour.

    PubMed

    Bednarik, Peter; Fehl, Katrin; Semmann, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Social networks represent the structuring of interactions between group members. Above all, many interactions are profoundly cooperative in humans and other animals. In accordance with this natural observation, theoretical work demonstrates that certain network structures favour the evolution of cooperation. Yet, recent experimental evidence suggests that static networks do not enhance cooperative behaviour in humans. By contrast, dynamic networks do foster cooperation. However, costs associated with dynamism such as time or resource investments in finding and establishing new partnerships have been neglected so far. Here, we show that human participants are much less likely to break links when costs arise for building new links. Especially, when costs were high, the network was nearly static. Surprisingly, cooperation levels in Prisoner's Dilemma games were not affected by reduced dynamism in social networks. We conclude that the mere potential to quit collaborations is sufficient in humans to reach high levels of cooperative behaviour. Effects of self-structuring processes or assortment on the network played a minor role: participants simply adjusted their cooperative behaviour in response to the threats of losing a partner or of being expelled. PMID:25122233

  8. Costs for switching partners reduce network dynamics but not cooperative behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bednarik, Peter; Fehl, Katrin; Semmann, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Social networks represent the structuring of interactions between group members. Above all, many interactions are profoundly cooperative in humans and other animals. In accordance with this natural observation, theoretical work demonstrates that certain network structures favour the evolution of cooperation. Yet, recent experimental evidence suggests that static networks do not enhance cooperative behaviour in humans. By contrast, dynamic networks do foster cooperation. However, costs associated with dynamism such as time or resource investments in finding and establishing new partnerships have been neglected so far. Here, we show that human participants are much less likely to break links when costs arise for building new links. Especially, when costs were high, the network was nearly static. Surprisingly, cooperation levels in Prisoner's Dilemma games were not affected by reduced dynamism in social networks. We conclude that the mere potential to quit collaborations is sufficient in humans to reach high levels of cooperative behaviour. Effects of self-structuring processes or assortment on the network played a minor role: participants simply adjusted their cooperative behaviour in response to the threats of losing a partner or of being expelled. PMID:25122233

  9. All-optical encryption based on interleaved waveband switching modulation for optical network security.

    PubMed

    Fok, Mable P; Prucnal, Paul R

    2009-05-01

    All-optical encryption for optical code-division multiple-access systems with interleaved waveband-switching modulation is experimentally demonstrated. The scheme explores dual-pump four-wave mixing in a 35 cm highly nonlinear bismuth oxide fiber to achieve XOR operation of the plaintext and the encryption key. Bit 0 and bit 1 of the encrypted data are represented by two different wavebands. Unlike on-off keying encryption methods, the encrypted data in this approach has the same intensity for both bit 0 and bit 1. Thus no plaintext or ciphertext signatures are observed. PMID:19412257

  10. Switching mechanism of sensor-motor coordination through an oscillator network model.

    PubMed

    Funato, Tetsuro; Kurabayashi, Daisuke; Nara, Masahito; Aonuma, Hitoshi

    2008-06-01

    Insects have small brains, but their behavior is highly adaptive; this leads us to conclude that their brains possess a simple adaptation mechanism. This paper focuses on the pheromone processing of crickets, varying their aggression depending on their global neural connection, and proposes a behavior selection mechanism that can be controlled by network transformation. The controller is composed of an oscillator network, and its behavior is decided by the synchrony of organic oscillations. Furthermore, every network component corresponds to a certain brain module. A model is realized by using an analog circuit, and it is applied to a simple robot that displays the behavior of a real insect. PMID:18558540

  11. Alternative packet switch architectures for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDMA geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehle, Roy; Ogier, Richard G.

    1995-06-01

    This study has investigated alternatives for realizing a packet-based network switch for deployment on a communication satellite. The emphasis was on the avoidance of contention problems that can occur due to the simultaneous arrival of an excessive number of packets destined for the same downlink dwell. The study was to look ahead, beyond the current Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) capability, to the next generation of satellites. The study has not been limited by currently available technology, but has used university and commercial research efforts as a basis for designs that can be readily constructed and launched within the next five years. Tradeoffs in memory requirement, power requirement, and architecture have been considered as a part of our study.

  12. On-chip test of the shift register for high-end network switch based on cell-based design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Sekiya, A.; Akahori, A.; Akaike, H.; Fujimaki, A.; Hayakawa, H.; Kameda, Y.; Yorozu, S.; Terai, H.

    2001-12-01

    We have demonstrated the high-speed operation up to 55 GHz with a bias margin of +/-5.5% for a shift register based on the single-flux-quantum logic circuit. The shift register is employed in the rate transfer circuit in high-end network switches that are made up with the cell-based design technique. The on-chip test system was used for measuring the operation frequencies, and the test system itself was built by combining the cells to satisfy the boundary conditions between the test system and the circuit-under-test. As a result, the on-chip test system developed in this study has high flexibility.

  13. Alternative packet switch architectures for a 30/20 GHz FDMA/TDMA geostationary communication satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stehle, Roy; Ogier, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    This study has investigated alternatives for realizing a packet-based network switch for deployment on a communication satellite. The emphasis was on the avoidance of contention problems that can occur due to the simultaneous arrival of an excessive number of packets destined for the same downlink dwell. The study was to look ahead, beyond the current Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) capability, to the next generation of satellites. The study has not been limited by currently available technology, but has used university and commercial research efforts as a basis for designs that can be readily constructed and launched within the next five years. Tradeoffs in memory requirement, power requirement, and architecture have been considered as a part of our study.

  14. Localised polymer networks in chiral nematic liquid crystals for high speed photonic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartan, Chloe C.; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Morris, Stephen M.; Elston, Steve J.

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembled periodic structures based upon chiral liquid crystalline materials have significant potential in the field of photonics ranging from fast-switching optoelectronic devices to low-threshold lasers. The flexoelectro-optic effect, which is observed in chiral nematic liquid crystals (LCs) when an electric field is applied perpendicular to the helical axis, has significant potential as it exhibits analogue switching in 10-100 μs. However, the major technological barrier that prohibits the commercial realisation of this electro-optic effect is the requirement of a uniform, in-plane alignment of the helix axis between glass substrates. Here, it is shown that periodic polymer structures engineered in the nematic phase of a chiral nematic LC device using direct laser writing can result in the spontaneous formation of the necessary uniform lying helix (ULH) state. Specifically, two-photon polymerization is used in conjunction with a spatial light modulator so as to correct for aberrations introduced by the bounding glass substrates enabling the polymer structures to be fabricated directly into the device. The ULH state appears to be stable in the absence of an externally applied electric field, and the optimum contrast between the bright and dark states is obtained using polymer structures that have periodicities of the order of the device thickness.

  15. Dynamics Correlation Network for Allosteric Switching of PreQ1 Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Jinmai; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are a class of metabolism control elements mostly found in bacteria. Due to their fundamental importance in bacteria gene regulation, riboswitches have been proposed as antibacterial drug targets. Prequeuosine (preQ1) is the last free precursor in the biosynthetic pathway of queuosine that is crucial for translation efficiency and fidelity. However, the regulation mechanism for the preQ1 riboswitch remains unclear. Here we constructed fluctuation correlation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in the bound riboswitch is distinctly different from that in the apo riboswitch. The community network indicates that the information freely transfers from the binding site of preQ1 to the expression platform of the P3 helix in the bound riboswitch and the P3 helix is a bottleneck in the apo riboswitch. Thus, a hypothesis of “preQ1-binding induced allosteric switching” is proposed to link riboswitch and translation regulation. The community networks of mutants support this hypothesis. Finally, a possible allosteric pathway of A50-A51-A52-U10-A11-G12-G56 was also identified based on the shortest path algorithm and confirmed by mutations and network perturbation. The novel fluctuation network analysis method can be used as a general strategy in studies of riboswitch structure-function relationship. PMID:27484311

  16. Interconnection of private land mobile radio systems with the public switched telephone network in certain MHz bands--Federal Communications Commission. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1982-04-23

    This document adopts new rules to enable private radio communication systems licensed under Part 90 in the 800 MHz bands to interconnect with the facilities of the public switched telephone network. These rules are necessary to enable private licensees to better utilize their radio systems by allowing interconnected operation under certain conditions. An accompanying petition for rulemaking is dismissed as moot. PMID:10255452

  17. Integrated network analysis identifies fight-club nodes as a class of hubs encompassing key putative switch genes that induce major transcriptome reprogramming during grapevine development.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-12-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named "fight-club hubs" characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named "switch genes" was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops. PMID:25490918

  18. A Neuronal Network Switch for Approach-Avoidance Toggled by Appetitive State

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Keiko; Gillette, Rhanor

    2011-01-01

    Summary Concrete examples of computation and implementation of cost-benefit decisions at the level of neuronal circuits are largely lacking. Such decisions are based on appetitive state, which is the integration of sensation, internal state and memory. Value-based decisions are accessible in neuronal circuitry of simple systems [1]. In one such, the predatory sea-slug Pleurobranchaea, appetite is readily quantified in behavior [2] and related to approach-avoidance decision [3]. Moreover, motor aspects of feeding and turning can be observed as fictive motor output in the isolated CNS [4,5]. Here we found that the excitation state of the feeding motor network both manifested appetitive state and controlled expression of orienting vs. avoidance. In isolated CNS’s spontaneous feeding network activity varied proportionally to donor feeding thresholds. CNS’s from low and high feeding threshold donors expressed fictive orienting or avoidance, respectively, in response to brief stimulation of sensory nerves. Artificially exciting the feeding network converted fictive avoidance to orienting. Thus, the feeding network embodied appetitive state and toggled approach-avoidance decision by configuring response symmetry of the premotor turn network. A resulting model suggests a basic cost-benefit decision module from which to consider evolutionary elaboration of the circuitry to serve more intricate valuation processes in complex animals. PMID:22197246

  19. Competition of two distinct actin networks for actin defines a bistable switch for cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Alexis J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J.; Bui, D A.; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype upon relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin-II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. At low contractility regimes epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner due to emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin-II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally “locks” actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  20. Integrated Fabry-Perot optical space switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Michael

    As information technologies are adopted by more people to accomplish a greater variety of tasks, the need for optical telecommunication networks with higher capacity and flexibility grows. In addition to improving throughput by increasing transmission rates and the number of wavelength channels, novel network architectures using optical burst or packet based switching are investigated because they allow a more efficient use of transmission capacity and they enable the reorganisation of wavelength connections according to traffic demands. The implementation of such networks requires fast, broadband, transparent, and scalable optical space switches. Although research on optical space switches has been on going for decades, no solution that meets all of the above requirements has been reported yet. The work presented in this thesis introduces a novel optical space switch configuration based on tunable integrated Fabry-Perot filters working at oblique incidence and investigates their performance. A design method to implement this new switch concept is described and demonstrated with the fabrication and characterisation of optical prototypes. The prototypes are implemented in GaAs/AlGaAs planar waveguides and they are designed to be operated using the electro-optic effect. Deep etching is used to create the switch features and a comprehensive optimization of the waveguide structure is conducted to minimize radiation losses. To maximize the number of wavelength channels that can be controlled with a small refractive index modulation, the switches have a 200 GHz comb frequency response that transmits/reflects one out of every two channels on the ITU 100 GHz grid. Thus, shifting their frequency response by one channel spacing is sufficient to change the state of every channel. Furthermore, four Fabry-Perot cavities are coupled to obtain a flat and wide theoretical passband of more than 50 GHz. A Gaussian beam propagation analysis is performed to determine the minimum beam

  1. On-board closed-loop congestion control for satellite based packet switching networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Pong P.; Ivancic, William D.; Kim, Heechul

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is currently investigating a satellite architecture that incorporates on-board packet switching capability. Because of the statistical nature of packet switching, arrival traffic may fluctuate and thus it is necessary to integrate congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing unit. This study focuses on the closed-loop reactive control. We investigate the impact of the long propagation delay on the performance and propose a scheme to overcome the problem. The scheme uses a global feedback signal to regulate the packet arrival rate of ground stations. In this scheme, the satellite continuously broadcasts the status of its output buffer and the ground stations respond by selectively discarding packets or by tagging the excessive packets as low-priority. The two schemes are evaluated by theoretical queuing analysis and simulation. The former is used to analyze the simplified model and to determine the basic trends and bounds, and the later is used to assess the performance of a more realistic system and to evaluate the effectiveness of more sophisticated control schemes. The results show that the long propagation delay makes the closed-loop congestion control less responsive. The broadcasted information can only be used to extract statistical information. The discarding scheme needs carefully-chosen status information and reduction function, and normally requires a significant amount of ground discarding to reduce the on-board packet loss probability. The tagging scheme is more effective since it tolerates more uncertainties and allows a larger margin of error in status information. It can protect the high-priority packets from excessive loss and fully utilize the downlink bandwidth at the same time.

  2. On-board closed-loop congestion control for satellite based packet switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Pong P.; Ivancic, William D.; Kim, Heechul

    1993-12-01

    NASA LeRC is currently investigating a satellite architecture that incorporates on-board packet switching capability. Because of the statistical nature of packet switching, arrival traffic may fluctuate and thus it is necessary to integrate congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing unit. This study focuses on the closed-loop reactive control. We investigate the impact of the long propagation delay on the performance and propose a scheme to overcome the problem. The scheme uses a global feedback signal to regulate the packet arrival rate of ground stations. In this scheme, the satellite continuously broadcasts the status of its output buffer and the ground stations respond by selectively discarding packets or by tagging the excessive packets as low-priority. The two schemes are evaluated by theoretical queuing analysis and simulation. The former is used to analyze the simplified model and to determine the basic trends and bounds, and the later is used to assess the performance of a more realistic system and to evaluate the effectiveness of more sophisticated control schemes. The results show that the long propagation delay makes the closed-loop congestion control less responsive. The broadcasted information can only be used to extract statistical information. The discarding scheme needs carefully-chosen status information and reduction function, and normally requires a significant amount of ground discarding to reduce the on-board packet loss probability. The tagging scheme is more effective since it tolerates more uncertainties and allows a larger margin of error in status information. It can protect the high-priority packets from excessive loss and fully utilize the downlink bandwidth at the same time.

  3. Reaching a consensus in networks of high-order integral agents under switching directed topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Long; Wang, Hanlei; Hou, Zeng-Guang; Tan, Min

    2016-06-01

    Consensus problem of high-order integral multi-agent systems under switching directed topology is considered in this study. Depending on whether the agent's full state is available or not, two distributed protocols are proposed to ensure that states of all agents can be convergent to a same stationary value. In the proposed protocols, the gain vector associated with the agent's (estimated) state and the gain vector associated with the relative (estimated) states between agents are designed in a sophisticated way. By this particular design, the high-order integral multi-agent system can be transformed into a first-order integral multi-agent system. Also, the convergence of the transformed first-order integral agent's state indicates the convergence of the original high-order integral agent's state, if and only if all roots of the polynomial, whose coefficients are the entries of the gain vector associated with the relative (estimated) states between agents, are in the open left-half complex plane. Therefore, many analysis techniques in the first-order integral multi-agent system can be directly borrowed to solve the problems in the high-order integral multi-agent system. Due to this property, it is proved that to reach a consensus, the switching directed topology of multi-agent system is only required to be 'uniformly jointly quasi-strongly connected', which seems the mildest connectivity condition in the literature. In addition, the consensus problem of discrete-time high-order integral multi-agent systems is studied. The corresponding consensus protocol and performance analysis are presented. Finally, three simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Transcript degradation and noise of small RNA-controlled genes in a switch activated network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Tal, Asaf; Parasar, Bibudha; Dym, Alvah; Costantino, Nina; Muñoz-García, Javier; Court, Donald L; Stavans, Joel

    2016-08-19

    Post-transcriptional regulatory processes may change transcript levels and affect cell-to-cell variability or noise. We study small-RNA downregulation to elucidate its effects on noise in the iron homeostasis network of Escherichia coli In this network, the small-RNA RyhB undergoes stoichiometric degradation with the transcripts of target genes in response to iron stress. Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we measured transcript numbers of the RyhB-regulated genes sodB and fumA in individual cells as a function of iron deprivation. We observed a monotonic increase of noise with iron stress but no evidence of theoretically predicted, enhanced stoichiometric fluctuations in transcript numbers, nor of bistable behavior in transcript distributions. Direct detection of RyhB in individual cells shows that its noise is much smaller than that of these two targets, when RyhB production is significant. A generalized two-state model of bursty transcription that neglects RyhB fluctuations describes quantitatively the dependence of noise and transcript distributions on iron deprivation, enabling extraction of in vivo RyhB-mediated transcript degradation rates. The transcripts' threshold-linear behavior indicates that the effective in vivo interaction strength between RyhB and its two target transcripts is comparable. Strikingly, the bacterial cell response exhibits Fur-dependent, switch-like activation instead of a graded response to iron deprivation. PMID:27085802

  5. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  6. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  7. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  8. A hybrid optical switch architecture to integrate IP into optical networks to provide flexible and intelligent bandwidth on demand for cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Hall, Trevor J.

    2013-12-01

    The Internet is entering an era of cloud computing to provide more cost effective, eco-friendly and reliable services to consumer and business users. As a consequence, the nature of the Internet traffic has been fundamentally transformed from a pure packet-based pattern to today's predominantly flow-based pattern. Cloud computing has also brought about an unprecedented growth in the Internet traffic. In this paper, a hybrid optical switch architecture is presented to deal with the flow-based Internet traffic, aiming to offer flexible and intelligent bandwidth on demand to improve fiber capacity utilization. The hybrid optical switch is capable of integrating IP into optical networks for cloud-based traffic with predictable performance, for which the delay performance of the electronic module in the hybrid optical switch architecture is evaluated through simulation.

  9. Sandia`s network for Supercomputing `94: Linking the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National Laboratories using switched multimegabit data service

    SciTech Connect

    Vahle, M.O.; Gossage, S.A.; Brenkosh, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Supercomputing `94, a high-performance computing and communications conference, was held November 14th through 18th, 1994 in Washington DC. For the past four years, Sandia National Laboratories has used this conference to showcase and focus its communications and networking endeavors. At the 1994 conference, Sandia built a Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) network running at 44.736 megabits per second linking its private SMDS network between its facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Livermore, California to the convention center in Washington, D.C. For the show, the network was also extended from Sandia, New Mexico to Los Alamos National Laboratory and from Sandia, California to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This paper documents and describes this network and how it was used at the conference.

  10. Packet switching for mobile earth stations via low-orbit satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayer, K.

    1984-11-01

    An autonomous adaptive protocol for spaceborne computer communication in a self-configuring network is presented. The key concept is survivability, which could be achieved with a satellite ring located at orbits of 1000-4000 mi altitude. Each spacecraft would carry an on-board computer with algorithms which would guide automated reconfiguring of nodes should one satellite fail or be destroyed. Transmissions would then be uninterrupted for link between land and mobile stations. It is recommended that the orbits be at 50-60 deg inclinations. The spacecraft, boosted from the Orbiter, would be three-axis stabilized and would carry antennas pointing forward and backward along the ring and downward to earth. Message routing schemes based on ARPANET confirm that acceptable routes are attainable. The associated algorithm has been validated by experiments with routing data between six computers.

  11. Striatal development involves a switch in gene expression networks, followed by a myelination event: implications for neuropsychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Gabriela; Fan, Theresa; O’Dowd, Brian F.; George, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    Because abnormal development of striatal neurons is thought to be part of pathology underlying major psychiatric illnesses, we studied the expression pattern of genes involved in striatal development and of genes comprising key striatal-specific pathways, during an active striatal maturation period, the first two postnatal weeks in rat. This period parallels human striatal development during the second trimester, when prenatal stress is though to lead to increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. In order to identify genes involved in this developmental process, we used subtractive hybridization, followed by quantitative real-time PCR, which allowed us to characterize the developmental expression of over 60 genes, many not previously known to play a role in neuromaturation. Of these 12 were novel transcripts, which did not match known genes, but which showed strict developmental expression and may play a role in striatal neurodevelopment. We show that during the first two postnatal weeks in rat, an early gene expression network, still lacking key striatal-specific signaling pathways, is downregulated and replaced by a mature gene expression network, containing key striatal-specific genes including the dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, conferring to these neurons their functional identity. Therefore, before this developmental switch, striatal neurons lack many of their key phenotypic characteristics. This maturation process is followed by a striking rise in expression of myelination genes, indicating a striatal-specific myelination event. Such strictly controlled developmental program has the potential to be a point of susceptibility to disruption by external factors. Indeed, this period is known to be a susceptibility period in both humans and rats. PMID:23184870

  12. On the performance of a scalable optical switching architecture for flat intercluster data center network with centralized control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Qian; Huang, Shanguo; Zhou, Yu; Guo, Bingli; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Jie; Gu, Wanyi

    2014-07-01

    Data centers have to sustain the rapid growth of data traffic due to the increasing demand of bandwidth-hungry Internet services. The current fat tree topology causes communication bottlenecks in the server interaction process, resulting in power-hungry O-E-O conversions that limit the minimum latency and the power efficiency of these systems. As a result, recent efforts have advocated that all optical data center networks (DCNs) have the capability to adapt to traffic requirements on demand. We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of a cascaded microelectromechanical systems switches-based DCN architecture which dynamically changes its topology and link capacities, thereby achieving unprecedented flexibility to adapt to dynamic traffic patterns. We analyze it under a data center traffic model to determine its suitability for this type of environment. The proposed architecture can be scaled to 3300 input/output ports by available experimental components with low blocking probability and latency. The blocking probability and latency are about 0.03 and 72 ms at a moderate traffic load for 32 input/output ports based on our numerical results, which are much smaller than the results for 4 input/output ports which are 0.13 and 235 ms, respectively.

  13. Identification and validation of effective connectivity networks in functional magnetic resonance imaging using switching linear dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason F; Pillai, Ajay; Chen, Kewei; Horwitz, Barry

    2010-09-01

    Dynamic connectivity networks identify directed interregional interactions between modeled brain regions in neuroimaging. However, problems arise when the regions involved in a task and their interconnections are not fully known a priori. Objective measures of model adequacy are necessary to validate such models. We present a connectivity formalism, the Switching Linear Dynamic System (SLDS), that is capable of identifying both Granger-Geweke and instantaneous connectivity that vary according to experimental conditions. SLDS explicitly models the task condition as a Markov random variable. The series of task conditions can be estimated from new data given an identified model providing a means to validate connectivity patterns. We use SLDS to model functional magnetic resonance imaging data from five regions during a finger alternation task. Using interregional connectivity alone, the identified model predicted the task condition vector from a different subject with a different task ordering with high accuracy. In addition, important regions excluded from a model can be identified by augmenting the model state space. A motor task model excluding primary motor cortices was augmented with a new neural state constrained by its connectivity with the included regions. The augmented variable time series, convolved with a hemodynamic kernel, was compared to all brain voxels. The right primary motor cortex was identified as the best region to add to the model. Our results suggest that the SLDS model framework is an effective means to address several problems with modeling connectivity including measuring overall model adequacy and identifying important regions missing from models. PMID:19969092

  14. Fully-elastic multi-granular network with space/frequency/time switching using multi-core fibres and programmable optical nodes.

    PubMed

    Amaya, N; Irfan, M; Zervas, G; Nejabati, R; Simeonidou, D; Sakaguchi, J; Klaus, W; Puttnam, B J; Miyazawa, T; Awaji, Y; Wada, N; Henning, I

    2013-04-01

    We present the first elastic, space division multiplexing, and multi-granular network based on two 7-core MCF links and four programmable optical nodes able to switch traffic utilising the space, frequency and time dimensions with over 6000-fold bandwidth granularity. Results show good end-to-end performance on all channels with power penalties between 0.75 dB and 3.7 dB. PMID:23571976

  15. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst.

    PubMed

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10-15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches-and their associated spindle bursts-occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  16. Condition known to be sufficient for rearrangeability of the benes class of interconnection networks with 2*2 switches is also necessary

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, S.C.; Lakshmivarahan, S.

    1983-01-01

    An n*n (n inputs and outputs) multistage interconnection network is said to be rearrangeable if it can realise all the possible connections of the n input terminals to the n output terminals in a one-to-one fashion. Starting with the pioneering works of Clos (1953) and Benes (1968) to this date a variety of sufficient conditions for rearrangeability are known in the literature. It is shown that the well known sufficient condition due to Benes on the link permutation is also necessary for rearrangeability if the network is made up of 2*2 switches. 15 references.

  17. Eddy current technique for predicting burst pressure

    DOEpatents

    Petri, Mark C.; Kupperman, David S.; Morman, James A.; Reifman, Jaques; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2003-01-01

    A signal processing technique which correlates eddy current inspection data from a tube having a critical tubing defect with a range of predicted burst pressures for the tube is provided. The method can directly correlate the raw eddy current inspection data representing the critical tubing defect with the range of burst pressures using a regression technique, preferably an artificial neural network. Alternatively, the technique deconvolves the raw eddy current inspection data into a set of undistorted signals, each of which represents a separate defect of the tube. The undistorted defect signal which represents the critical tubing defect is related to a range of burst pressures utilizing a regression technique.

  18. Multiserver switch scheduling for high speed optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, Prasad; Blanton, John; Damm, Gerard

    2003-10-01

    A switch matrix implemented as an optical crossbar using semiconductor optical amplifiers is able to accommodate extreme concentrations of data traffic. Due to the need to reduce optical guard band overhead it is beneficial to switch fixed size bursts of data cells on a time slot basis. The high capacity of the optical matrix supports multiple optical ports per burst card, and the implementation of multiple queue servers per burst card helps make better use of the multiplicity of ports. Problems associated with arbitrating multiple ports and multiple servers per burst card have been resolved by extending the operation of existing iterative, single server scheduling algorithms. The multiserver arbitration time will be in proportion to the number of servers -- corresponding to the channels of DWDM link -- unless a reconciliation stage is used after each iteration when an arbiter per server is used. The reconciliation stage sets the problem of broken data dependencies between server arbitrations in this case. Further, to address the time limitations for computing the scheduling solution, parallel arbiter implementations have been developed and tested against single arbiter designs. Again, the broken dependencies between iterations of an arbitration are addressed through the use of a grant reconciliation stage. The use of multiple queue servers per burst card also resolves some of the data loss problems related to polarized traffic. Simulations of the multiple server and parallel arbiter implementations have demonstrated their efficiency compared to previous implementations. Compounded to this problem is maintaining high throughput of the switch matrix while observing data transit time limits. This involves balancing two contradictory requirements; switch or line card efficiency and data transit times. To improve efficiency it is desirable to transmit only full packets. However, to prevent loss of data due to timeout it will be necessary to transmit some incomplete

  19. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  20. High-speed switching characteristics of integrated optoelectronic crossbar switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, Francois L.; Almeida, Carlos; Callender, Claire L.; Robitaille, Lucie; Noad, Julian P.

    1999-04-01

    Optoelectronic (OE) switching is a promising approach for routing signals in fiber optic networks. Recently, the integration of a 4 X 4 MSM array with optical surface waveguides has been reported. This technique greatly simplifies the packaging of an OE switch. The on-chip polyimide optical waveguides perform the optical signal distribution to a matrix of MSMs which are responsible for the switching operation itself. Photoresponse bandwidths exceeding 4 GHz have been demonstrated. Another important characteristic of a switch is the switching speed since it determines the reconfiguration time. Mechanical and thermal optical waveguide switches offer switching speeds of the order of milliseconds which is sufficient for network traffic management but too slow for packet switching. We report measurements on the switching characteristics of a 4 X 4 optoelectronic switch performed in both the frequency and time domain. In the time domain, the individual crosspoints exhibit a rise time of 3 ns. However, a sizeable overshoot and ringing settles only after 35 ns. This constitutes the reconfiguration time at present. This is confirmed by measurements in the frequency domain of the electrical transmission from control line to output line. The 3-dB switching bandwidth is a few hundred megahertz. The 35 ns reconfiguration time indicates that it is already suitable for packet switching in a 10 Mb/s network. Switching speed measurements on individual MSMs suggests that modifications to the switch circuit could improve the switching time. The switch could also find application as a component in the wavelength conversion circuit of a WDM fiber optic network.

  1. The limiting dynamics of a bistable molecular switch with and without noise.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Michael C; Tyran-Kamińska, Marta

    2016-08-01

    We consider the dynamics of a population of organisms containing two mutually inhibitory gene regulatory networks, that can result in a bistable switch-like behaviour. We completely characterize their local and global dynamics in the absence of any noise, and then go on to consider the effects of either noise coming from bursting (transcription or translation), or Gaussian noise in molecular degradation rates when there is a dominant slow variable in the system. We show analytically how the steady state distribution in the population can range from a single unimodal distribution through a bimodal distribution and give the explicit analytic form for the invariant stationary density which is globally asymptotically stable. Rather remarkably, the behaviour of the stationary density with respect to the parameters characterizing the molecular behaviour of the bistable switch is qualitatively identical in the presence of noise coming from bursting as well as in the presence of Gaussian noise in the degradation rate. This implies that one cannot distinguish between either the dominant source or nature of noise based on the stationary molecular distribution in a population of cells. We finally show that the switch model with bursting but two dominant slow genes has an asymptotically stable stationary density. PMID:26692266

  2. A Pulse-Burst Laser System for Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, D. J.; Borchardt, M. T.; Yang, Y. M.; Ambuel, J. R.; Holly, D. J.; Mattison, H. E.; Robl, P. E.

    2008-11-01

    A ``pulse-burst'' laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the MST reversed-field pinch. This laser will produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition rates 5--250 kHz. The laser will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier (MOPA) system. Variable pulse-width drive (0.1--20 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. In the near term, these flashlamp power supplies will be adapted to drive the flashlamps in the two existing commercial Nd:YAG lasers used for Thomson scattering on the MST RFP. This will enable these lasers to produce a burst of up to 40 pulses at repetition frequencies <= 1 kHz. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of Te and ne dynamics in a single MST shot.

  3. Low-power, 2 x 2 silicon electro-optic switch with 110-nm bandwidth for broadband reconfigurable optical networks.

    PubMed

    Van Campenhout, Joris; Green, William M J; Assefa, Solomon; Vlasov, Yurii A

    2009-12-21

    We present an ultra-broadband Mach-Zehnder based optical switch in silicon, electrically driven through carrier injection. Crosstalk levels lower than -17 dB are obtained for both the 'on' and 'off' switching states over an optical bandwidth of 110 nm, owing to the implementation of broadband 50% couplers. Full 2 x 2 switching functionality is demonstrated, with low power consumption (approximately 3 mW) and a fast switching time (< 4 ns). The utilization of standard CMOS metallization results in a low drive voltage (approximately 1 V) and a record-low V(pi)L (approximately 0.06 V x mm). The wide optical bandwidth is maintained for temperature variations up to 30 K. PMID:20052114

  4. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    PubMed Central

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  5. Burst-by-burst laser frequency monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esproles, Carlos (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a system for real-time frequency monitoring and display of an RF burst where the burst frequency is analyzed and displayed on a burst-by-burst basis in order to allow for frequency control. Although the invention was made for monitoring the laser frequency of a LIDAR system, it has other applications where realtime monitoring is required. The novelty of the invention resides in the use of a counter that is reset at the beginning of each unit time of monitoring and then gated for a unit of time. The invention also has an LED bar graph for displaying the measure of frequency at the end of each unit time in either a bar length mode or a moving dot mode. In the latter mode, the operator makes necessary adjustments to maintain the dot at the center of the bar graph.

  6. Economic Modelling Of Backhauling Versus New Switch Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulenwider, John; Killinger, George

    1986-01-01

    New high-density Fiber optic trunk carrier systems are drastically lowering the TRANSMISSION/SWITCHING COST RATIO. Reducing the number of switches in an existing toll network may reduce the cost of the network. Overflow growth traffic from an exhausted switch in a toll network can be hauled to a distant location to be switched, which can defer replacement of the exhausted switch, and reduce the cost of the network.

  7. How long does a burst burst?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.; Zhang, Bing; Murase, Kohta

    2014-05-20

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (∼hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (∼minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these 'ultra-long GRBs' may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t {sub burst} based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t {sub burst} can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this 'good' sample, 21.9% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 3} s and 11.5% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 4} s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t {sub burst} in this sample. However, when we consider an 'undetermined' sample (304 GRBs) with t {sub burst} possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T {sub 90} and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t {sub burst} falling into the first Swift orbital 'dead zone' due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t {sub burst} distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T {sub 90} duration and it does not even correlate with T {sub 90}. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T {sub 90} and the size of the progenitor star.

  8. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Kienlin, Andreas von; Lichti, Giselher; Steinle, Helmut; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  9. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  10. Observer-based consensus in networks of discrete-time switched linear dynamics under a fixed topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Youming; Li, Yuxia

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the consensus problem of discrete-time switched linear multi-agent systems under a fixed communication topology. An observer-based protocol with sampled data is proposed for solving such a problem. Assume that the digraph has a directed spanning tree and that all switched subsystem of each agent are stabilisable and detectable. It is shown that the proposed protocol solves the consensus problem when the sampling period is sufficiently small and the average dwell time of the switching signal is sufficiently large. Moreover, to reduce the conservatism, a sufficient condition for consensus is obtained to design the feedback gain matrices and the observer gain matrices by linear matrix inequalities, which guarantee that consensus can be achieved when the sampling period and the average dwell time are in the general case. Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated through an example.

  11. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  12. Artificial neural networks for control of a grid-connected rectifier/inverter under disturbance, dynamic and power converter switching conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Fairbank, Michael; Johnson, Cameron; Wunsch, Donald C; Alonso, Eduardo; Proaño, Julio L

    2014-04-01

    Three-phase grid-connected converters are widely used in renewable and electric power system applications. Traditionally, grid-connected converters are controlled with standard decoupled d-q vector control mechanisms. However, recent studies indicate that such mechanisms show limitations in their applicability to dynamic systems. This paper investigates how to mitigate such restrictions using a neural network to control a grid-connected rectifier/inverter. The neural network implements a dynamic programming algorithm and is trained by using back-propagation through time. To enhance performance and stability under disturbance, additional strategies are adopted, including the use of integrals of error signals to the network inputs and the introduction of grid disturbance voltage to the outputs of a well-trained network. The performance of the neural-network controller is studied under typical vector control conditions and compared against conventional vector control methods, which demonstrates that the neural vector control strategy proposed in this paper is effective. Even in dynamic and power converter switching environments, the neural vector controller shows strong ability to trace rapidly changing reference commands, tolerate system disturbances, and satisfy control requirements for a faulted power system. PMID:24807951

  13. A Study of Quality of Service Communication for High-Speed Packet-Switching Computer Sub-Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Zhenqian

    1999-01-01

    With the development of high-speed networking technology, computer networks, including local-area networks (LANs), wide-area networks (WANs) and the Internet, are extending their traditional roles of carrying computer data. They are being used for Internet telephony, multimedia applications such as conferencing and video on demand, distributed simulations, and other real-time applications. LANs are even used for distributed real-time process control and computing as a cost-effective approach. Differing from traditional data transfer, these new classes of high-speed network applications (video, audio, real-time process control, and others) are delay sensitive. The usefulness of data depends not only on the correctness of received data, but also the time that data are received. In other words, these new classes of applications require networks to provide guaranteed services or quality of service (QoS). Quality of service can be defined by a set of parameters and reflects a user's expectation about the underlying network's behavior. Traditionally, distinct services are provided by different kinds of networks. Voice services are provided by telephone networks, video services are provided by cable networks, and data transfer services are provided by computer networks. A single network providing different services is called an integrated-services network.

  14. Progress in system design using integrated multi-element interferometric switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayas, E.; Kanellos, G. T.; Stampoulidis, L.; Theophilopoulos, G.; Avramopoulos, H.

    2007-11-01

    In the present communication we discuss recent advances in the development of Semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based interferometric optical gates and their use through the implementation of functional high-speed optical systems. SOA Mach-Zehnder interferometers (SOA-MZI) show great potential for being used as fundamental building blocks in developing intelligent high speed all-optical sub-systems. In this context we discuss the development of optical systems that perform diverse and non-trivial network functionalities that find application in Optical Packet/Burst Switching networks (OPS/OBS). The use of generic building blocks to develop a variety of optical sub-systems is essential, as this avoids the requirement for custom-made technological solutions and allows for a common fabrication procedure for all subsystems. In this context, we discuss latest research on integration of arrays of such optical switches onto the same photonic chip using hybrid integration technology. The development of such arrays reduces the cost of photonic devices by sharing the packaging and pigtailing costs. By using an integrated quadruple array of SOA-MZI switches we demonstrate the front-end unit of an All-optical Label Switched node that performs clock recovery, data recovery and label/payload separation, and a scalable Time Slot Interchanger (TSI), proving the multi-functionality and processing power of such device. Both functional systems exhibit comparable performance compared to implementations using single switches with significantly lower device costs. The cost reduction offered by the integration of multiple switches on the same chip is also evident in high-speed WDM networks, where multi-wavelength regeneration can be achieved with the use of several integrated switch arrays.

  15. Comparative Study of Solar Bursts at Sub-THz Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, L. O. T.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Marun, A.; Pereyra, P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a large set of 17 solar radio bursts observed at sub-THz (0.2 and 0.4 THz) in 2012-2014 together with the new solar patrol radio telescopes (45 and 90 GHz), operated at El Leoncito, in the Argentinean Andes, allowing the derivation of complete burst spectra in this unexplored range of frequencies. We discuss the uncertainties in sub-THz flux estimates caused by calibration techniques and the corrections for atmospheric transmission. The burst spectra were completed with microwave bursts data obtained by the Radio Solar Telescope Network - RSTN. The events selection was based on GOES soft X-rays burst reported for classes stronger then C. Nearly 50 percent of the bursts exhibited a frequency increasing sub-THz spectral component. The results suggest that the THz component might be always present, with the minimum turn-over frequencies shifting to higher frequencies for larger energies of the electrons producing the emissions.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  17. Sawtooth bursts: observations and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Bárta, M.; Klassen, A.; Aurass, H.; Mann, G.

    2002-12-01

    An example of the sawtooth burst observed during the November 3, 1997 flare is shown. Basic parameters of the sawtooth bursts are summarized and compared with those of fibers, fiber chains, zebras, EEL bursts and lace bursts. The sawtooth bursts are found to be most similar to the lace bursts, therefore the lace bursts model is proposed also for them. Then using this model the dynamic spectrum with the sawtooth burst is modelled. The model considers accelerated electrons with an unstable distribution function on the double resonance frequency and quasi-periodic variations of the electron plasma density and/or magnetic field in the radio source.

  18. Secure videoconferencing equipment switching system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Michael E.

    2009-01-13

    A switching system and method are provided to facilitate use of videoconference facilities over a plurality of security levels. The system includes a switch coupled to a plurality of codecs and communication networks. Audio/Visual peripheral components are connected to the switch. The switch couples control and data signals between the Audio/Visual peripheral components and one but nor both of the plurality of codecs. The switch additionally couples communication networks of the appropriate security level to each of the codecs. In this manner, a videoconferencing facility is provided for use on both secure and non-secure networks.

  19. Performance enhancements of the CMCC"s national mesh network using the intelligent optical cross-connect switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Qian; Xu, Rong; Lin, JinTong L.

    2004-04-01

    In the last five years, the traffic growth rate in China has been extremely fast. By 2005, the number of wired telephone customers is estimated to reach 220 to 260 million, while the number of expected cellular customers will reach 260 to 290 million. To meet these challenges, we will continue evolving with more wavelengths and higher speed. By evolving point-to-point WDM systems to OTN/ASON systems, we can eliminate the throughput bottleneck of network nodes caused by electronics, provide optical-layer bandwidth- management capability, provide scalability (which allows continuous traffic growth and network expansion), and provide reconfigurability (which allows semi-dynamic and dynamic optical networking). We can also simplify and speed up provisioning of high-speed circuits and services and offer fast network protection and restoration on the order of tens or hundreds of milliseconds to guarantee excellent network and service survivability. The CMCC (China Mobile Communication Company) will build its OTN network towards the ASON. The CMCC"s long-haul national network utilizing OXC has clearly becomes an intelligent network. It offers end-to-end point-and-click provisioning, shared mesh restoration with a few tens to a couple of hundred msec restoration times, re-provisioning of connections in the event of double failures and network capacity that is not optimally used. In this paper, first we present the CMCC network situation, The network planning tool will be introduced, Then we compare ring with mesh solution in terms of the cost, network performance, protection and restoration, network re-optimization. At last we derive a desired conclusion.

  20. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  1. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  2. Inter-layer traffic engineering with hierarchical-PCE in MPLS-TP over wavelength switched optical networks.

    PubMed

    Casellas, R; Martinez, R; Muñoz, R; Liu, L; Tsuritani, T; Morita, I

    2012-12-31

    We present the implementation and validation of an Inter-layer Traffic Engineering (TE) architecture based on a hierarchical path computation element (PCE), where the parent PCE is notified of established optical layer Label Switched Paths that induce packet traffic engineering (TE) links, thus not requiring full topology visibility. We summarize the architecture, the control plane extensions and its experimental evaluation in a control plane testbed. PMID:23388738

  3. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  4. Pulse-burst laser systems for fast Thomson scattering (invited).

    PubMed

    Den Hartog, D J; Ambuel, J R; Borchardt, M T; Falkowski, A F; Harris, W S; Holly, D J; Parke, E; Reusch, J A; Robl, P E; Stephens, H D; Yang, Y M

    2010-10-01

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) lasers have been upgraded to "pulse-burst" capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to 15 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates of 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to record the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature profile and temperature fluctuations. To further these investigations, a custom pulse-burst laser system with a maximum pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is now being commissioned. PMID:21033868

  5. Pulse-burst laser systems for fast Thomson scattering (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Holly, D. J.; Robl, P. E.; Borchardt, M. T.; Falkowski, A. F.; Harris, W. S.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Stephens, H. D.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-10-15

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) lasers have been upgraded to ''pulse-burst'' capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to 15 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates of 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to record the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature profile and temperature fluctuations. To further these investigations, a custom pulse-burst laser system with a maximum pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is now being commissioned.

  6. On vortex bursting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, H.

    1984-01-01

    Vortex bursting is studied by means of visualization. The physical behavior of the phenomenon is emphasized, and its similarity with boundary layer separation or wake bursting becomes apparent. The essential influence of an increasing pressure gradient on the initiation, the position and the type of bursting is clearly confirmed. The evolution of the phenomena as a function of several parameters is analyzed in the case of delta wings, alone or installed on aircraft models, and compared with the results of similar wind tunnel or flight tests.

  7. INTEGRAL burst alert service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H.; Jennings, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    The detection, accurate positioning, and spectral analysis of cosmic gamma ray bursts is an objective of the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission. Due to their unpredictable nature, gamma ray bursts can only be observed in serendipity mode. In order to allow and promote multiwavelength follow-up observations of such events, it is desirable to make the information available to the astrophysics community with a minimum delay through the use of Internet. Ideally, the data dissemination should occur within a few seconds of the start of the burst event so that follow up observations can proceed while gamma rays are still being emitted. The technical feasibility of building such a system to disseminate INTEGRAL burst alerts in real time is currently under consideration, the preliminary results of which are presented. It is concluded that such an alert service is technically feasible.

  8. Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailes, Matthew; Johnston, Simon; Bhat, Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Barnes, David; van Straten, Willem

    2008-04-01

    We propose a sky monitoring survey that will piggy-back multibeam observations of other scientific programmes; the intent of our search is to intercept and analyse millisecond-duration, single, impulsive bursts from transient events in the extragalactic sky.

  9. Extragalactic Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Johnston, Simon; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Barnes, David; van Straten, Willem

    2008-10-01

    We propose a sky monitoring survey that will piggy-back multibeam observations of other scientific programmes; the intent of our search is to intercept and analyse millisecond-duration, single, impulsive bursts from transient events in the extragalactic sky.

  10. Packet switching in 1990's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybczynski, A.

    The author assesses wide-area networking end-user needs as they evolve into the 1990s. He then turns to the network operator environment, both public and private, by examining service evolution trends. The author concludes with an assessment of how packet switching services and technologies are evolving to continue to match the identified market requirements, with specific emphasis on Northern Telecom's DPN Data Networking System. Key evolving DPN capabilities include the introduction of the high-end DPN100 30-kb/s switch, a variety of access options including ISDN (integrated services digital network) packet mode services, higher throughput virtual circuits, megabit trunking for improved network throughput and end-user transit delay, and SNA session switching, the latter being an example of adding value to packet networking through communication processing.

  11. A CMOS vision chip for a contrast-enhanced image using a logarithmic APS and a switch-selective resistive network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jae-Sung; Kim, Sang-Heon; Sung, Dong-Kyu; Seo, Sang-Ho; Shin, Jang-Kyoo

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, a vision chip for a contrast-enhanced image based on a structure of a biological retina is introduced. The key advantage of this structure is high speed of signal processing. In a conventional active pixel sensor (APS), the charge accumulation time limits its operation speed. In order to enhance the speed, a logarithmic APS was applied to the vision chip. By applying a MOS-type photodetector to the logarithmic APS, we could achieve sufficient output swing for the vision chip in natural illumination condition. In addition, a CMOS buffer circuit, a common drain amplifier, is commonly used for both raw and smoothed images by using additional switches. By using the switch-selective resistive network, the total number of MOSFETs for a unit pixel and the fixed-pattern noise were reduced. A vision chip with a 160×120 pixel array was fabricated using a 0.35 μm double-poly four-metal CMOS technology, and its operation was experimentally investigated.

  12. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  13. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  14. Burst diaphragm sequence valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisneskie, Bradley D.; Hyman, Sheldon; Hallum, Charles E.

    1991-11-01

    A burst diaphragm sequence valve which effectively combines the structure of a burst diaphragm with that of an ordinary swing check valve, the pivot of the ordinary swing check valve being replaced by an integral flexural hinge. The sequence valve provides a way to sequentially burn solid propellant hot gas generators which exit into a common gas manifold, thereby enabling gas-powered devices to operate for a longer time than the duration of one gas generator burn.

  15. The effect of learning on bursting.

    PubMed

    Stegenga, Jan; Le Feber, Joost; Marani, Enrico; Rutten, Wim L C

    2009-04-01

    We have studied the effect that learning a new stimulus-response (SR) relationship had within a neuronal network cultured on a multielectrode array. For training, we applied repetitive focal electrical stimulation delivered at a low rate (<1/s). Stimulation was withdrawn when a desired SR success ratio was achieved. It has been shown elsewhere, and we verified that this training algorithm, named conditional repetitive stimulation (CRS), can be used to strengthen an initially weak SR. So far, it remained unclear what the role of the rest of the network during learning was. We therefore studied the effect of CRS on spontaneously occurring network bursts. To this end, we made profiles of the firing rates within network bursts. We have earlier shown that these profiles change shape on a time base of several hours during spontaneous development. We show here that profiles of summed activity, called burst profiles, changed shape at an increased rate during CRS. This suggests that the whole network was involved in making the changes necessary to incorporate the desired SR relationship. However, a local (path-specific) component to learning was also found by analyzing profiles of single-electrode-activity phase profiles. Phase profiles that were not part of the SR relationship changed far less during CRS than the phase profiles of the electrodes that were part of the SR relationship. Finally, the manner in which phase profiles changed shape varied and could not be linked to the SR relationship. PMID:19272893

  16. Experimental demonstration of software defined data center optical networks with Tbps end-to-end tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Li, Hui; Wang, Huitao; Ge, Chao

    2015-10-01

    The end-to-end tunability is important to provision elastic channel for the burst traffic of data center optical networks. Then, how to complete the end-to-end tunability based on elastic optical networks? Software defined networking (SDN) based end-to-end tunability solution is proposed for software defined data center optical networks, and the protocol extension and implementation procedure are designed accordingly. For the first time, the flexible grid all optical networks with Tbps end-to-end tunable transport and switch system have been online demonstrated for data center interconnection, which are controlled by OpenDayLight (ODL) based controller. The performance of the end-to-end tunable transport and switch system has been evaluated with wavelength number tuning, bit rate tuning, and transmit power tuning procedure.

  17. The LOFT burst alert system and its burst onboard trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanne, Stéphane; Götz, Diego; Le Provost, Hervé; Château, Frédéric; Bozzo, Enrico; Brandt, Søren

    2014-07-01

    The ESA M3 candidate mission LOFT (Large Observatory For x-ray Timing) has been designed to study strong gravitational fields by observing compact objects, such as black-hole binaries or neutron-star systems and supermassive black-holes, based on the temporal analysis of photons collected by the primary instrument LAD (Large Area Detector), sensitive to X-rays from 2 to 50 keV, offering a very large effective area (>10 m2), but a small field of view (ø<1°). Simultaneously the second instrument WFM (Wide Field Monitor), composed of 5 coded-mask camera pairs (2-50 keV), monitors a large part of the sky, in order to detect and localize eruptive sources, to be observed with the LAD after ground-commanded satellite repointing. With its large field of view (>π sr), the WFM actually detects all types of transient sources, including Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), which are of primary interest for a world-wide observers community. However, observing the quickly decaying GRB afterglows with ground-based telescopes needs the rapid knowledge of their precise localization. The task of the Loft Burst Alert System (LBAS) is therefore to detect in near-real- time GRBs (about 120 detections expected per year) and other transient sources, and to deliver their localization in less than 30 seconds to the observers, via a VHF antenna network. Real-time full resolution data download to ground being impossible, the real-time data processing is performed onboard by the LBOT (LOFT Burst On-board Trigger system). In this article we present the LBAS and its components, the LBOT and the associated ground-segment.

  18. Pre-dispositions and epigenetic inheritance in the Escherichia coli lactose operon bistable switch.

    PubMed

    Robert, Lydia; Paul, Gregory; Chen, Yong; Taddei, François; Baigl, Damien; Lindner, Ariel B

    2010-04-13

    The lactose operon regulation in Escherichia coli is a primary model of phenotypic switching, reminiscent of cell fate determination in higher organisms. Under conditions of bistability, an isogenic cell population partitions into two subpopulations, with the operon's genes turned on or remaining off. It is generally hypothesized that the final state of a cell depends solely on stochastic fluctuations of the network's protein concentrations, particularly on bursts of lactose permease expression. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the cell switching decision are not fully understood. We designed a microfluidic system to follow the formation of a transiently bimodal population within growing microcolonies. The analysis of genealogy and cell history revealed the existence of pre-disposing factors for switching that are epigenetically inherited. Both the pre-induction expression stochasticity of the lactose operon repressor LacI and the cellular growth rate are predictive factors of the cell's response upon induction, with low LacI concentration and slow growth correlating with higher switching probability. Thus, stochasticity at the local level of the network and global physiology are synergistically involved in cell response determination. PMID:20393577

  19. Integrated Network Analysis Identifies Fight-Club Nodes as a Class of Hubs Encompassing Key Putative Switch Genes That Induce Major Transcriptome Reprogramming during Grapevine Development[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-01-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named “fight-club hubs” characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named “switch genes” was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops. PMID:25490918

  20. Discrete Pattern of Burst Stimulation in the Ventrobasal Thalamus for Anti-Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus has been proposed to play a role in sensory modulation via switching between tonic and burst dual firing of individual neurons. Of the two firing modes, altered burst firing has been repeatedly implicated with pathological pain conditions, which suggests that maintaining a certain form of thalamic burst could be crucial for controlling pain. However, specific elements of burst firing that may contribute to pain control have not yet been actively investigated. Utilizing the deep brain stimulation (DBS) technique, we explored the effects of bursting properties in pain control by electrically stimulating the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus in forms of burst patterned to test different aspects of bursts during the formalin induced nociception in mice. Our results demonstrated that electrical stimulations mimicking specific burst firing properties are important in producing an anti-nociceptive effect and found that the ≤3 ms interval between burst pluses (intra-burst-interval: IntraBI) and ≥3 pulses per burst were required to reliably reduce formalin induced nociceptive responses in mice. Periodicity of IntraBI was also suggested to contribute to anti-nociception to a limited extent. PMID:23950787

  1. Competition for actin between two distinct F-actin networks defines a bistable switch for cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Lomakin, Alexis J; Lee, Kun-Chun; Han, Sangyoon J; Bui, Duyen A; Davidson, Michael; Mogilner, Alex; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-11-01

    Symmetry-breaking polarization enables functional plasticity of cells and tissues and is yet not well understood. Here we show that epithelial cells, hard-wired to maintain a static morphology and to preserve tissue organization, can spontaneously switch to a migratory polarized phenotype after relaxation of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. We find that myosin II engages actin in the formation of cortical actomyosin bundles and thus makes it unavailable for deployment in the process of dendritic growth normally driving cell motility. Under low-contractility regimes, epithelial cells polarize in a front-back manner owing to the emergence of actin retrograde flows powered by dendritic polymerization of actin. Coupled to cell movement, the flows transport myosin II from the front to the back of the cell, where the motor locally 'locks' actin in contractile bundles. This polarization mechanism could be employed by embryonic and cancer epithelial cells in microenvironments where high-contractility-driven cell motion is inefficient. PMID:26414403

  2. The antigenic switching network of Plasmodium falciparum and its implications for the immuno-epidemiology of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Robert; Christodoulou, Zóe; Kyes, Sue; Pinches, Robert; Newbold, Chris I; Recker, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Antigenic variation in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum involves sequential and mutually exclusive expression of members of the var multi-gene family and appears to follow a non-random pattern. In this study, using a detailed in vitro gene transcription analysis of the culture-adapted HB3 strain of P. falciparum, we show that antigenic switching is governed by a global activation hierarchy favouring short and highly diverse genes in central chromosomal location. Longer and more conserved genes, which have previously been associated with severe infection in immunologically naive hosts, are rarely activated, however, implying an in vivo fitness advantage possibly through adhesion-dependent survival rates. We further show that a gene’s activation rate is positively associated sequence diversity, which could offer important new insights into the evolution and maintenance of antigenic diversity in P. falciparum malaria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01074.001 PMID:24062941

  3. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Switch Technology and Vendor Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Noemi

    1995-01-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and software features are described and compared in order to make switch comparisons meaningful. An ATM switch's performance cannot be measured solely based on its claimed switching capacity; traffic management and congestion control are emerging as the determining factors in an ATM network's ultimate throughput. Non-switch ATM products and experiences with actual installations of ATM networks are described. A compilation of select vendor offerings as of October 1994 is provided in chart form.

  4. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  5. Biological switches and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Albert, Reka; Goldbeter, Albert; Ruoff, Peter; Sible, Jill

    2008-01-01

    To introduce this special issue on biological switches and clocks, we review the historical development of mathematical models of bistability and oscillations in chemical reaction networks. In the 1960s and 1970s, these models were limited to well-studied biochemical examples, such as glycolytic oscillations and cyclic AMP signalling. After the molecular genetics revolution of the 1980s, the field of molecular cell biology was thrown wide open to mathematical modellers. We review recent advances in modelling the gene–protein interaction networks that control circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression, signal processing and the design of synthetic gene networks. PMID:18522926

  6. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  7. Pulse-Burst Laser Systems for Thomson Scattering on MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, D. J.; Borchardt, M. T.; Harris, W. S.; Reusch, J. A.; Yang, Y. M.

    2009-11-01

    A new purpose-built ``pulse-burst'' laser system is being constructed for the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the MST reversed-field pinch. This new laser will produce a burst of 1--2 J Q-switched pulses at repetition rates 5--250 kHz. It will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier (MOPA) system. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15--20 ms) of the flashlamps in this laser will be accomplished by IGBT switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. A subset of these power supplies has already been constructed and is currently being used to drive the flashlamps in the two existing commercial Nd:YAG lasers used for Thomson scattering on MST. Each of these upgraded lasers now produces a burst of up to fifteen 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates 1--12.5 kHz. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are currently being used to study the dynamic evolution of electron temperature in MST. The new purpose-built ``pulse-burst'' laser system will further expand this capability.

  8. An inter-segmental network model and its use in elucidating gait-switches in the stick insect.

    PubMed

    Daun-Gruhn, Silvia; Tóth, Tibor Istvan

    2011-08-01

    Animal locomotion requires highly coordinated working of the segmental neuronal networks that control the limb movements. Experiments have shown that sensory signals originating from the extremities play a pivotal role in controlling locomotion patterns by acting on central networks. Based on the results from stick insect locomotion, we constructed an inter-segmental model comprising local networks for all three legs, i.e. for the pro-, meso- and meta-thorax, their inter-connections and the main sensory inputs modifying their activities. In the model, the local networks are uniform, and each of them consists of a central pattern generator (CPG) providing the rhythmic oscillation for the protractor-retractor motor systems, the corresponding motoneurons (MNs), and local inhibitory interneurons (IINs) between the CPGs and the MNs. Between segments, the CPGs are connected cyclically by both excitatory and inhibitory pathways that are modulated by the aforementioned sensory inputs. Simulations done with our network model showed that it was capable of reproducing basic patterns of locomotion such as those occurring during tri- and tetrapod gaits. The model further revealed a number of elementary neuronal processes (e.g. synaptic inhibition, or changing the synaptic drive at specific neurons) that in the simulations were necessary, and in their entirety sufficient, to bring about a transition from one type of gait to another. The main result of this simulation study is that exactly the same mechanism underlies the transition between the two types of gait irrespective of the direction of the change. Moreover, the model suggests that the majority of these processes can be attributed to direct sensory influences, and changes are required only in centrally controlled synaptic drives to the CPGs. PMID:21165687

  9. Feasibility study of an integrated optic switching center. [satellite tracking application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design of a high data rate switching center for a satellite tracking station is discussed. The feasibility of a switching network using an integrated switching matrix is assessed. The preferred integrated optical switching scheme was found to be an electro-optic Bragg diffraction switch. To ascertain the advantages of the integrated optics switching center, its properties are compared to those of opto-electronic and to electronics switching networks.

  10. Spikes matter for phase-locked bursting in inhibitory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil, Sajiya; Belykh, Igor; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2012-03-01

    We show that inhibitory networks composed of two endogenously bursting neurons can robustly display several coexistent phase-locked states in addition to stable antiphase and in-phase bursting. This work complements and enhances our recent result [Jalil, Belykh, and Shilnikov, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.81.045201 81, 045201(R) (2010)] that fast reciprocal inhibition can synchronize bursting neurons due to spike interactions. We reveal the role of spikes in generating multiple phase-locked states and demonstrate that this multistability is generic by analyzing diverse models of bursting networks with various fast inhibitory synapses; the individual cell models include the reduced leech heart interneuron, the Sherman model for pancreatic beta cells, and the Purkinje neuron model.

  11. The Locations of Gamma-Ray Bursts Measured by Comptel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kippen, R. Marc; Ryan, James M.; Connors, Alanna; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Winkler, Christoph; Kuiper, Lucien; Varendorff, Martin; McConnell, Mark L.; Hurley, Kevin; Hermsen, Wim; Schoenfelder, Volker

    1998-01-01

    The COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is used to measure the locations of gamma-ray bursts through direct imaging of MeV photons. In a comprehensive search, we have detected and localized 29 bursts observed between 1991 April 19 and 1995 May 31. The average location accuracy of these events is 1.25 deg (1 sigma), including a systematic error of approx. 0.5 deg, which is verified through comparison with Interplanetary Network (IPN) timing annuli. The combination of COMPTEL and IPN measurements results in locations for 26 of the bursts with an average "error box" area of only approx. 0.3 deg (1 sigma). We find that the angular distribution of COMPTEL burst locations is consistent with large-scale isotropy and that there is no statistically significant evidence of small-angle autocorrelations. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence for burst repetition since no more than two of the events (or approx. 7% of the 29 bursts) could possibly have come from the same source. We also find that there is no significant correlation between the burst locations and either Abell clusters of galaxies or radio-quiet quasars. Agreement between individual COMPTEL locations and IPN annuli places a lower limit of approx. 100 AU (95% confidence) on the distance to the stronger bursts.

  12. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  13. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  14. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  15. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  16. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  17. Network topology mapper

    DOEpatents

    Quist, Daniel A.; Gavrilov, Eugene M.; Fisk, Michael E.

    2008-01-15

    A method enables the topology of an acyclic fully propagated network to be discovered. A list of switches that comprise the network is formed and the MAC address cache for each one of the switches is determined. For each pair of switches, from the MAC address caches the remaining switches that see the pair of switches are located. For each pair of switches the remaining switches are determined that see one of the pair of switches on a first port and the second one of the pair of switches on a second port. A list of insiders is formed for every pair of switches. It is determined whether the insider for each pair of switches is a graph edge and adjacent ones of the graph edges are determined. A symmetric adjacency matrix is formed from the graph edges to represent the topology of the data link network.

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF BURSTING WATER MASER FEATURES IN ORION KL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Tomoya; Honma, Mareki; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Tsuboi, Masato; Fujisawa, Kenta; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Yonekura, Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    In 2011 February, a burst event of the H{sub 2}O maser in Orion KL (Kleinmann-Low object) has started after a 13 year silence. This is the third time such phenomena has been detected in Orion KL, followed by the events in 1979-1985 and 1998. We have carried out astrometric observations of the bursting H{sub 2}O maser features in Orion KL with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA), a Japanese very long baseline interferometry network dedicated for astrometry. The total flux of the bursting feature at the local standard of rest (LSR) velocity of 7.58 km s{sup -1} reaches 4.4 x 10{sup 4} Jy in 2011 March. The intensity of the bursting feature is three orders of magnitude larger than that of the same velocity feature in the quiescent phase in 2006. Two months later, another new feature appears at the LSR velocity of 6.95 km s{sup -1} in 2011 May, separated by 12 mas north of the 7.58 km s{sup -1} feature. Thus, the current burst occurs at two spatially different features. The bursting masers are elongated along the northwest-southeast direction as reported in the previous burst in 1998. We determine the absolute positions of the bursting features for the first time ever with a submilliarcsecond (mas) accuracy. Their positions are coincident with the shocked molecular gas called the Orion Compact Ridge. We tentatively detect the absolute proper motions of the bursting features toward the southwest direction. It is most likely that the outflow from the radio source I or another young stellar object interacting with the Compact Ridge is a possible origin of the H{sub 2}O maser burst.

  19. Burst predicting neurons survive an in vitro glutamate injury model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Eric S; Tauskela, Joseph S; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity in vitro exhibits network bursts characterized by brief periods of increased spike rates. Recent work shows that a subpopulation of neurons reliably predicts the occurrence of network bursts. Here, we examined the role of burst predictors in cultures undergoing an in vitro model of cerebral ischemia. Dissociated primary cortical neurons were plated on multielectrode arrays and spontaneous activity was recorded at 17 days in vitro (DIV). This activity was characterized by neuronal avalanches where burst statistics followed a power law. We identified burst predictors as channels that consistently fired immediately prior to network bursts. The timing of these predictors relative to bursts followed a skewed distribution that differed sharply from a null model based on branching ratio. A portion of cultures were subjected to an excitotoxic insult (DIV 18). Propidium iodine and fluorescence imaging confirmed cell death in these cultures. While the insult did not alter the distribution of avalanches, it resulted in alterations in overall spike rates. Burst predictors, however, maintained baseline levels of activity. The resilience of burst predictors following excitotoxic insult suggests a key role of these units in maintaining network activity following injury, with implications for the selective effects of ischemia in the brain. PMID:26648112

  20. Burst predicting neurons survive an in vitro glutamate injury model of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuebler, Eric S.; Tauskela, Joseph S.; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity in vitro exhibits network bursts characterized by brief periods of increased spike rates. Recent work shows that a subpopulation of neurons reliably predicts the occurrence of network bursts. Here, we examined the role of burst predictors in cultures undergoing an in vitro model of cerebral ischemia. Dissociated primary cortical neurons were plated on multielectrode arrays and spontaneous activity was recorded at 17 days in vitro (DIV). This activity was characterized by neuronal avalanches where burst statistics followed a power law. We identified burst predictors as channels that consistently fired immediately prior to network bursts. The timing of these predictors relative to bursts followed a skewed distribution that differed sharply from a null model based on branching ratio. A portion of cultures were subjected to an excitotoxic insult (DIV 18). Propidium iodine and fluorescence imaging confirmed cell death in these cultures. While the insult did not alter the distribution of avalanches, it resulted in alterations in overall spike rates. Burst predictors, however, maintained baseline levels of activity. The resilience of burst predictors following excitotoxic insult suggests a key role of these units in maintaining network activity following injury, with implications for the selective effects of ischemia in the brain. PMID:26648112

  1. Demonstration of 20Gb/s polarization-insensitive wavelength switching system for high-speed free-space optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng-chen; Ye, Ya-lin; Wen, Yu; Duan, Tao; Feng, Huan

    2015-10-01

    A 20Gb/s polarization-insensitive all-optical wavelength switching system for high-speed free-space optical communication (FSO) network is experimentally demonstrated All-optical wavelength conversion (AOWC) is implemented using four-wave mixing (FWM) by highly-nonlinear fiber (HNLF). In the experimental setup, a simple actively mode-locked fiber ring laser (AML-FRL) with repetition frequency from 1 to 15 GHz is used to generate eight 2.5Gb/s tributary signals, which are multiplexed into one 20Gb/s optical data stream. At the receiver, the 20 Gb/s OTDM data stream is demultiplexed down to 2.5 Gb/s via a polarization-insensitive FWM scheme. The whole space communication distance is over 10 meters in building hallway. The experimental results show that this system can stably run over 24 hours at 10-9 BER level, thus the proposed architecture can work at higher rate with wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and high order modulation schemes.

  2. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  3. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  4. Pulse-burst operation of standard Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Borchardt, M. T.; Reusch, J. A.; Robl, P. E.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-05-01

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers have been upgraded to "pulse-burst" capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to fifteen 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to study the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature.

  5. Ten years of quests for radio bursts from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiratori, Y.; Yokoo, H.; Saso, T.; Kameya, O.; Iwadate, K.; Asari, K.

    2006-02-01

    We searched for radio bursts towards 51 Peg, τ Boo, ν And and 55 Cancri, which were found to have "hot Jupiter" companions. The star 51 Peg has a planet with 0.5 M_{Jup} (lower limit) and 4.23 day period. The star τ Boo has a planet of 3.7 M_{Jup} and 3.31 day period. Such planets are called "Hot Jupiter". We made a non-thermal radio emission model of magneto-electric environment between the stars and their planets. Since a detection of signals is expected, we made observations at 8.6 GHz with Mizusawa 10-m telescope. From 1996 to 2000, we observed with a detection limit of 10 Jy using a position-switching method. Since 2001, we changed to beam-switching method, and achieved a detection limit of 1 Jy. No radio burst signals were detected.

  6. Optical switches based on semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, Robert F.; Dias, Antonio R.; Chau, Kelvin K.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber-optic switching systems typically exhibit large losses associated with splitting and combining of the optical power, and with excess component losses. These losses increase quickly with switch size. To obtain acceptable signal-to-noise performance through large optical switching, optical amplifiers can be used. In applications requiring optical switching, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are preferred over erbium-doped fiber amplifiers due to their fast switching speeds and the possibility of their integration in monolithic structures with passive waveguides and electronics. We present a general analysis of optical switching systems utilizing SOAs. These systems, in which the gain provided by SOAs is distributed throughout the optical system, are referred to as distributed optical gain (DOG) systems. Our model predicts the performance and achievable sizes of switches based on the matrix-vector multiplier crossbar and Benes network. It is found that for realistic SOA parameters optical switches accommodating extremely large numbers of nodes are, in principle, achievable.

  7. Quantification of bursting and synchrony in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, Lawrence N; Emnett, Christine M; Mohan, Jayaram; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-08-01

    It is widely appreciated that neuronal networks exhibit patterns of bursting and synchrony that are not captured by simple measures such as average spike rate. These patterns can encode information or represent pathological behavior such as seizures. However, methods for quantifying bursting and synchrony are not agreed upon and can be confounded with spike rate measures. Previous validation has largely relied on in silico networks and single experimental conditions. How published measures of bursting and synchrony perform when applied to biological networks of varied average spike rate and subjected to varied experimental challenges is unclear. In multielectrode array recordings of network activity, we found that two mechanistically distinct drugs, cyclothiazide and bicuculline, produced equivalent increases in average spike rate but differed in bursting and synchrony. We applied several measures of bursting to the recordings (2 threshold interval methods and a surprise-based method) and found that a measure based on an average critical interval, adjusted for the array-wide spike rate, performed best in quantifying differential drug effects. To quantify synchrony, we compared a coefficient of variation-based measure, the recently proposed spike time tiling coefficient, the SPIKE-distance measure, and a global synchrony index. The spike time tiling coefficient, the SPIKE-distance measure, and the global synchrony index all captured a difference between drugs with the best performance exhibited by the global synchrony index. In summary, our exploration should aid other investigators by highlighting strengths and limitations of current methods. PMID:26041823

  8. Altered intrinsic properties and bursting activities of neurons in layer IV of somatosensory cortex from Fmr-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linming; Liang, Zhanrong; Zhu, Pingping; Li, Meng; Yi, Yong-Hong; Liao, Wei-Ping; Su, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Neuroadaptations and alterations in neuronal excitability are critical in brain maturation and many neurological diseases. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by extensive synaptic and circuit dysfunction. It is still unclear about the alterations in intrinsic excitability of individual neurons and their link to hyperexcitable circuitry. In this study, whole cell patch-clamp recordings were employed to characterize the membrane and firing properties of layer IV cells in slices of the somatosensory cortex of Fmr-1 knockout (KO) mice. These cells generally exhibited a regular spiking (RS) pattern, while there were significant increases in the number of cells that adopted intrinsic bursting (IB) compared with age-matched wild type (WT) cells. The cells subgrouped according to their firing patterns and maturation differed significantly in membrane and discharge properties between KO and WT. The changes in the intrinsic properties were consistent with highly facilitated discharges in KO cells induced by current injection. Spontaneous activities of RS neurons driven by local network were also increased in the KO cells, especially in neonate groups. Under an epileptiform condition mimicked by omission of Mg(2+) in extracellular solution, these RS neurons from KO mice were more likely to switch to burst discharges. Analysis on bursts revealed that the KO cells tended to form burst discharges and even severe events manifested as seizure-like ictal discharges. These results suggest that alterations in intrinsic properties in individual neurons are involved in the abnormal excitability of cortical circuitry and possibly account for the pathogenesis of epilepsy in FXS. PMID:27048919

  9. Computer-aided planning of SS/TDMA network operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuike, Takeshi; Nguyen, Lan N.; Ito, Yasuhiko; Maeda, Eijiro

    1991-01-01

    A computer-aided approach to the planning of SS/TDMA network operation is proposed. SS/TDMA is a sophisticated satellite communication network based on an onboard switch matrix, whose operation planning is formulated as a large-scale scheduling problem. An overall planning and scheduling model is presented to deal with practical SS/TDMA systems, such as a two-frequency channel network and nondisjoint beam coverage. For systematic planning suitable for a computer-aided approach, the entire scheduling process is divided into several steps, for each of which an efficient mathematical model is proposed. A linear programming model is used for distribution of traffic on a beam-to-beam basis and the generated switching sequence is further refined by a model using the traveling salesman problem. Burst scheduling is carried out by the Bin packing algorithm and scheduling models for practical networks allowing transponder hopping and multidestination bursts. An algorithm called enhanced rescheduling is presented to further improve the scheduling capability of the existing methods. The performance of the proposed methods is demonstrated by simulation results.

  10. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.N.; Briggs, M.S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Meegan, C.A.; Fishman, G.J.; Wilson, R.B.; Lichti, G.G.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Kienlin, A. von; Kippen, R.M.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2004-09-28

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission is a followup to the successful EGRET experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It will provide a high-sensitivity survey of the sky in high-energy {gamma}-rays, and will perform detailed observations of persistent and transient sources. There are two experiments onboard the GLAST - the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM).The primary mission of the GBM instrument is to support the LAT in observing {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs) by providing low-energy measurements with high time resolution and rapid burst locations over a large field-of-view ({>=} 8 sr). The GBM will complement the LAT measurements by observing GRBs in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV, the region of the spectral turnover in most GRBs. An important objective of the GBM is to compute the locations of GRB sources on-board the spacecraft and quickly communicate them to the LAT and to the ground to allow rapid followup observations. This information may be used to re-point the LAT towards particularly interesting burst sources that occurred outside its field-of-view. The GBM consists of 14 uncollimated scintillation detectors coupled to phototubes to measure {gamma}-ray energies and time profiles. Two types of detectors are used to obtain spectral information over a wide energy range: 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV), and 2 BGO detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV). The detectors are distributed around the GLAST spacecraft to provide a large, unobstructed field of view. The 12 NaI(Tl) detectors are mounted with different orientations for use in locating GRB sources.

  11. Offset time decision (OTD) algorithm for guaranteeing the requested QoS of high priority traffic in OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Won-Ho; Cha, Yun-Ho; Roh, Sun-Sik; Kim, Young-Chon

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we propose the Offset Time Decision (OTD) algorithm for supporting the QoS in optical networks based on Optical Burst Switching (OBS), which is the new switching paradigm, and evaluate the performance of the OTD algorithm. The proposed algorithm can decide a reasonable offset time to guarantee the Burst Loss Rate (BLR) of high priority traffic by considering traffic load of network and the number of wavelengths. In order to design this effective OTD algorithm, firstly we illustrate the new burst loss formula, which includes the effect of offset time of high priority class. As the decision of offset time corresponding to the requested BLR, however, should use the reversed formula of new one, we are not able to use it without any changes. Thus, we define the Heuristic Loss Formula (HLF) that is based on the new burst loss formula and the proportional equation considering its characteristics. Finally we show the OTD algorithm to decide the reasonable offset time by using HLF. The simulation result shows that the requested BLR of high priority traffic is guaranteed under various traffic load.

  12. Searches for Gravitational Waves Bursts in the first joint run of LIGO, GEO600 and Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was, M.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    Gravitational wave burst analysis targets short (< 1 unite{sec}), generic or poorly modeled gravitational wave events. Such events could be caused by a wide range of sources like core-collapse of massive stars, neutron star excitations, black-hole mergers or gamma-ray bursts. We present the status of the searches for gravitational wave bursts in the first joint data from the global network of LIGO, GEO600 and Virgo interferometers, and the prospects for the upcoming data taking run.

  13. Fast reconfigurable optical image switching/routing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Eung Gi; Hong, John H.; Chang, Tallis Y.; Pletcher, David

    1995-09-01

    A novel system that is capable of switching/routing two-dimensional images in arbitrary configurations is described. The switching network can be reconfigured in a few microseconds with high light efficiency.

  14. Improving short-term forecasting during ramp events by means of Regime-Switching Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, C.; Costa, A.; Cuerva, A.

    2010-09-01

    Since nowadays wind energy can't be neither scheduled nor large-scale storaged, wind power forecasting has been useful to minimize the impact of wind fluctuations. In particular, short-term forecasting (characterised by prediction horizons from minutes to a few days) is currently required by energy producers (in a daily electricity market context) and the TSO's (in order to keep the stability/balance of an electrical system). Within the short-term background, time-series based models (i.e., statistical models) have shown a better performance than NWP models for horizons up to few hours. These models try to learn and replicate the dynamic shown by the time series of a certain variable. When considering the power output of wind farms, ramp events are usually observed, being characterized by a large positive gradient in the time series (ramp-up) or negative (ramp-down) during relatively short time periods (few hours). Ramp events may be motivated by many different causes, involving generally several spatial scales, since the large scale (fronts, low pressure systems) up to the local scale (wind turbine shut-down due to high wind speed, yaw misalignment due to fast changes of wind direction). Hence, the output power may show unexpected dynamics during ramp events depending on the underlying processes; consequently, traditional statistical models considering only one dynamic for the hole power time series may be inappropriate. This work proposes a Regime Switching (RS) model based on Artificial Neural Nets (ANN). The RS-ANN model gathers as many ANN's as different dynamics considered (called regimes); a certain ANN is selected so as to predict the output power, depending on the current regime. The current regime is on-line updated based on a gradient criteria, regarding the past two values of the output power. 3 Regimes are established, concerning ramp events: ramp-up, ramp-down and no-ramp regime. In order to assess the skillness of the proposed RS-ANN model, a single

  15. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  16. A network control concept for the 30/20 GHz communication system baseband processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabourin, D. J.; Hay, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The architecture and system design for a satellite-switched TDMA communication system employing on-board processing was developed by Motorola for NASA's Lewis Research Center. The system design is based on distributed processing techniques that provide extreme flexibility in the selection of a network control protocol without impacting the satellite or ground terminal hardware. A network control concept that includes system synchronization and allows burst synchronization to occur within the system operational requirement is described. This concept integrates the tracking and control links with the communication links via the baseband processor, resulting in an autonomous system operational approach.

  17. Phase-locked cluster oscillations in periodically forced integrate-and-fire-or-burst neuronal populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Angela J.; Breakspear, Michael; Coombes, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    The minimal integrate-and-fire-or-burst neuron model succinctly describes both tonic firing and postinhibitory rebound bursting of thalamocortical cells in the sensory relay. Networks of integrate-and-fire-or-burst (IFB) neurons with slow inhibitory synaptic interactions have been shown to support stable rhythmic states, including globally synchronous and cluster oscillations, in which network-mediated inhibition cyclically generates bursting in coherent subgroups of neurons. In this paper, we introduce a reduced IFB neuronal population model to study synchronization of inhibition-mediated oscillatory bursting states to periodic excitatory input. Using numeric methods, we demonstrate the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked bursting oscillations in the sinusoidally forced IFB neuronal population model. Phase locking is shown to arise when periodic excitation is sufficient to pace the onset of bursting in an IFB cluster without counteracting the inhibitory interactions necessary for burst generation. Phase-locked bursting states are thus found to destabilize when periodic excitation increases in strength or frequency. Further study of the IFB neuronal population model with pulse-like periodic excitatory input illustrates that this synchronization mechanism generalizes to a broad range of n:m phase-locked bursting states across both globally synchronous and clustered oscillatory regimes.

  18. Time-delay effect on the bursting of the synchronized state of coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. G.; Wang, Z. H.

    2012-12-01

    The time-delay effect on the bursting of the synchronized state of coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neurons is investigated in this paper. The time-delay influence on the structure of the slow manifold is first studied by using the method of stability switch. And then on the basis of the geometric singular perturbation theory, case studies are given to show that the time delay can suppress the bursting oscillation or lead to more complex dynamics. In particular, the mechanism of the transition from bursting oscillation to relaxation oscillation and to chaotic bursting is stated. Numerical results are given to demonstrate the validity of the analytical results.

  19. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Frederick; Bonnell, Jerry; Hughes, Richard; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; /Ohio State U.

    2007-10-15

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the onground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  20. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Frederick; Hughes, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; Bonnell, Jerry; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James

    2007-07-12

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the on-ground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  1. Improvement of burst-mode control of piezoelectric transformer based DC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasic, Dejan; Liu, Yuan-Ping; Schwander, Denis; Costa, François; Wu, Wen-Jong

    2013-05-01

    Burst-mode operation is adopted sometimes in piezoelectric transformer based converters for two major purposes: (1) to achieve voltage regulation in DC/DC converters and (2) to achieve dimming control in backlight inverters. Burst-mode control enables the converter to operate at a constant switching frequency as well as to maintain good efficiency at light load conditions. However, in practice, the piezoelectric transformer cannot instantly stop vibrating in the burst-mode due to its high quality factor. The delay in the output voltage change resulting from this behavior influences the accuracy of the regulation. This paper proposes a control strategy to make the piezoelectric transformer stop more quickly so as to enhance the accuracy of burst-mode control. The proposed method only modifies the control signal of the burst-mode driving circuit. The proposed control strategy is verified by experiments in a step-down 9 W DC/DC converter.

  2. Network Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vietzke, Robert; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This special section explains the latest developments in networking technologies, profiles school districts benefiting from successful implementations, and reviews new products for building networks. Highlights include ATM (asynchronous transfer mode), cable modems, networking switches, Internet screening software, file servers, network management…

  3. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  4. Switched steerable multiple beam antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Richard S.

    1988-09-01

    A steerable multibeam five element cross-feed cluster antenna system is described. The feed power is divided into five branches. Each branch includes a switching network comprised of a plurality of time delay elements each individually controlled by a respective electromagnetic latching switch. Frequency independent individual two-dimensional beam steering at intermediate (IF) scanning frequencies is thereby provided wherein discrete incremental time delays are introduced by the switching networks into each branch and the signals recombined thereafter to form each beam. The electromagnetic latched switching reduces power consumption and permits higher power switching and reciprocal coincident tranmsit and receive operation. Frequency independence due to incremental time delay switching permits coincident reciprocal operation and steering for transmit-receive signal paths carrying different transmit-receive frequencies. Diagonal quarter wave plates in the waveguides alter polarization from the circular to orthogonal linear to provide transmitter-receiver isolation.

  5. A unified model for two modes of bursting in GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Moran, Spencer; Moenter, Suzanne M; Khadra, Anmar

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons exhibit at least two intrinsic modes of action potential burst firing, referred to as parabolic and irregular bursting. Parabolic bursting is characterized by a slow wave in membrane potential that can underlie periodic clusters of action potentials with increased interspike interval at the beginning and at the end of each cluster. Irregular bursting is characterized by clusters of action potentials that are separated by varying durations of interburst intervals and a relatively stable baseline potential. Based on recent studies of isolated ionic currents, a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH)-like model for the GnRH neuron is developed to reproduce each mode of burst firing with an appropriate set of conductances. Model outcomes for bursting are in agreement with the experimental recordings in terms of interburst interval, interspike interval, active phase duration, and other quantitative properties specific to each mode of bursting. The model also shows similar outcomes in membrane potential to those seen experimentally when tetrodotoxin (TTX) is used to block action potentials during bursting, and when estradiol transitions cells exhibiting slow oscillations to irregular bursting mode in vitro. Based on the parameter values used to reproduce each mode of bursting, the model suggests that GnRH neurons can switch between the two through changes in the maximum conductance of certain ionic currents, notably the slow inward Ca(2+) current I s, and the Ca(2+) -activated K(+) current I KCa. Bifurcation analysis of the model shows that both modes of bursting are similar from a dynamical systems perspective despite differences in burst characteristics. PMID:26975615

  6. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    SciTech Connect

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Vigars, Mark L.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  7. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  8. Controlled Photon Switch Assisted by Coupled Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Ma, Song-Ya; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Wang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Quantum switch is a primitive element in quantum network communication. In contrast to previous switch schemes on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we consider controlled switches of photon system with two DOFs. These controlled photon switches are constructed by exploring the optical selection rules derived from the quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. Several double controlled-NOT gate on different joint systems are greatly simplified with an auxiliary DOF of the controlling photon. The photon switches show that two DOFs of photons can be independently transmitted in quantum networks. This result reduces the quantum resources for quantum network communication. PMID:26095049

  9. Gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

  10. Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  11. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  12. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, Kristian

    1983-01-01

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  13. The Ulysses Supplement to the BATSE 3B Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.

    1998-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network Localization information for 219 gamma-ray burst of the 3rd BATSE catalog, obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts at the Ulysses and Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) spacecraft. For any given burst observed by these two spacecraft, arrival time analysis (triangulation) results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose width varies between 7 arcseconds and 32 arcminutes, depending on the intensity and time history of the burst, and the distance of the Ulysses spacecraft from Earth. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in an average reduction of the error box area by a factor of 30.

  14. Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

  15. Burst Firing Enhances Neural Output Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ho Ka; Yang, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Changsong; Nowotny, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Neurons communicate and transmit information predominantly through spikes. Given that experimentally observed neural spike trains in a variety of brain areas can be highly correlated, it is important to investigate how neurons process correlated inputs. Most previous work in this area studied the problem of correlation transfer analytically by making significant simplifications on neural dynamics. Temporal correlation between inputs that arises from synaptic filtering, for instance, is often ignored when assuming that an input spike can at most generate one output spike. Through numerical simulations of a pair of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons receiving correlated inputs, we demonstrate that neurons in the presence of synaptic filtering by slow synapses exhibit strong output correlations. We then show that burst firing plays a central role in enhancing output correlations, which can explain the above-mentioned observation because synaptic filtering induces bursting. The observed changes of correlations are mostly on a long time scale. Our results suggest that other features affecting the prevalence of neural burst firing in biological neurons, e.g., adaptive spiking mechanisms, may play an important role in modulating the overall level of correlations in neural networks. PMID:27242499

  16. The Structure of Evolution LOCBURST: The BATSE Burst Location Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Kippen, R. March; Paciesas, William S.; Stollberg, Mark; Woods, Pete; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; McCollough, M. L.; Connaughton, V.

    1998-01-01

    The gamma-ray bursts (GRB) location algorithm used to produce the BATSE GRB locations is described. The general flow of control of the current location algorithm is presented and the significant properties of the various physical inputs required are identified. The development of the burst location algorithm during the releases of the BATSE 1B, 2B, and 3B gamma-ray burst catalogs is presented so that the reasons for the differences in the positions and error estimates between the catalogs can be understood. In particular, differences between the 2B and 3B locations are discussed for events that have moved significantly and the reasons for the changes explained. The locations of bursts located independently by the interplanetary network are used to illustrate the effect on burst location accuracy of various components of the algorithm. IPN data as well as locations from other gamma-ray instruments are used to calculate estimates of the systematic errors on BATSE burst locations.

  17. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  18. Integrated photonic switches for nanosecond packet-switched optical wavelength conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidaner, Onur; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sabnis, Vijit A.; Zheng, Jun-Fei; Harris, James S., Jr.; Miller, David A. B.

    2006-01-01

    We present a multifunctional photonic switch that monolithically integrates an InGaAsP/InP quantum well electroabsorption modulator and an InGaAs photodiode as a part of an on-chip, InP optoelectronic circuit. The optical multifunctionality of the switch offers many configurations to allow for different optical network functions on a single chip. Here we experimentally demonstrate GHz-range optical wavelength-converting switching with only ~10 mW of absorbed input optical power, electronically controlled packet switching with a reconfiguration time of <2.5 ns, and optically controlled packet switching in <300 ps.

  19. Integrated photonic switches for nanosecond packet-switched optical wavelength conversion.

    PubMed

    Fidaner, Onur; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sabnis, Vijit A; Zheng, Jun-Fei; Harris, James S; Miller, David A B

    2006-01-01

    We present a multifunctional photonic switch that monolithically integrates an InGaAsP/InP quantum well electroabsorption modulator and an InGaAs photodiode as a part of an on-chip, InP optoelectronic circuit. The optical multifunctionality of the switch offers many configurations to allow for different optical network functions on a single chip. Here we experimentally demonstrate GHz-range optical wavelength-converting switching with only ~10 mW of absorbed input optical power, electronically controlled packet switching with a reconfiguration time of <2.5 ns, and optically controlled packet switching in <300 ps. PMID:19503349

  20. Gravitational waves and short gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi, Valeriu

    2012-07-01

    Short hard gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are believed to be produced by compact binary coalescences (CBC) { either double neutron stars or neutron star{black hole binaries. The same source is expected to emit strong gravitational radiation, detectable with existing and planned gravitational wave observatories. The focus of this work is to describe a series of searches for gravitational waves (GW) from compact binary coalescence (CBC) events triggered by short gamma-ray burst detections. Specifically, we will present the motivation, frameworks, implementations and results of searches for GW associated with short gamma-ray bursts detected by Swift, Fermi{GBM and the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) gamma-ray detectors. We will begin by presenting the main concepts that lay the foundation of gravitational waves emission, as they are formulated in the theory of General Relativity; we will also brie y describe the operational principles of GW detectors, together with explaining the main challenges that the GW detection process is faced with. Further, we will motivate the use of observations in the electromagnetic (EM) band as triggers for GW searches, with an emphasis on possible EM signals from CBC events. We will briefly present the data analysis techniques including concepts as matched{filtering through a collection of theoretical GW waveforms, signal{to{ noise ratio, coincident and coherent analysis approaches, signal{based veto tests and detection candidates' ranking. We will use two different GW{GRB search examples to illustrate the use of the existing coincident and coherent analysis methods. We will also present a series of techniques meant to improve the sensitivity of existing GW triggered searches. These include shifting background data in time in order to obtain extended coincident data and setting a prior on the GRB inclination angle, in accordance with astrophysical observations, in order to restrict the searched parameter space. We will describe the GW data analysis

  1. Script for Monitoring Infiniband Switch Links

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, Jesse Alonzo

    2015-09-08

    This script ingests a configuration file and parses it to determine an Infiniband network topology, specifically the port information for switches. It then loops over the fabric to determine which, if any, ports do not meet their desired configuration.

  2. Identifying Crucial Parameter Correlations Maintaining Bursting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons) allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO) model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron) and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency) similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, Leak; a persistent K current, K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, P) that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of Leak, K2, and P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained. PMID:24945358

  3. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-08-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical Burst Switching - Support of Multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  4. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-10-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical burst switching - Support of multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule - Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 - Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 - Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 - Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  5. Next-Generation WDM Network Design and Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Danny H. K.; Bensaou, Brahim

    2003-09-01

    Call for Papers The Editors of JON are soliciting papers on WDM Network Design and Routing. The aim in this focus issue is to publish original research on topics including - but not limited to - the following: - WDM network architectures and protocols - GMPLS network architectures - Wavelength converter placement in WDM networks - Routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) in WDM networks - Protection and restoration strategies and algorithms in WDM networks - Traffic grooming in WDM networks - Dynamic routing strategies and algorithms - Optical burst switching - Support of multicast - Protection and restoration in WDM networks - Performance analysis and optimization in WDM networks Manuscript Submission To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "WDM Network Design" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions relating to this focus issue, please send an e-mail to jon@osa.org, subject line "WDM Network Design." Additional information can be found on the JON website: http://www.osa-jon.org/submission/. Schedule - Paper Submission Deadline: November 1, 2003 - Notification to Authors: January 15, 2004 - Final Manuscripts to Publisher: February 15, 2004 - Publication of Focus Issue: February/March 2004

  6. Key Bifurcations of Bursting Polyrhythms in 3-Cell Central Pattern Generators

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Schwabedal, Justus; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey L.

    2014-01-01

    We identify and describe the key qualitative rhythmic states in various 3-cell network motifs of a multifunctional central pattern generator (CPG). Such CPGs are neural microcircuits of cells whose synergetic interactions produce multiple states with distinct phase-locked patterns of bursting activity. To study biologically plausible CPG models, we develop a suite of computational tools that reduce the problem of stability and existence of rhythmic patterns in networks to the bifurcation analysis of fixed points and invariant curves of a Poincaré return maps for phase lags between cells. We explore different functional possibilities for motifs involving symmetry breaking and heterogeneity. This is achieved by varying coupling properties of the synapses between the cells and studying the qualitative changes in the structure of the corresponding return maps. Our findings provide a systematic basis for understanding plausible biophysical mechanisms for the regulation of rhythmic patterns generated by various CPGs in the context of motor control such as gait-switching in locomotion. Our analysis does not require knowledge of the equations modeling the system and provides a powerful qualitative approach to studying detailed models of rhythmic behavior. Thus, our approach is applicable to a wide range of biological phenomena beyond motor control. PMID:24739943

  7. Architecture Design and Experimental Platform Demonstration of Optical Network based on OpenFlow Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fangyuan; Wang, Honghuan; Yin, Hongxi; Li, Ming; Luo, Shenzi; Wu, Chenguang

    2016-02-01

    With the extensive application of cloud computing and data centres, as well as the constantly emerging services, the big data with the burst characteristic has brought huge challenges to optical networks. Consequently, the software defined optical network (SDON) that combines optical networks with software defined network (SDN), has attracted much attention. In this paper, an OpenFlow-enabled optical node employed in optical cross-connect (OXC) and reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM), is proposed. An open source OpenFlow controller is extended on routing strategies. In addition, the experiment platform based on OpenFlow protocol for software defined optical network, is designed. The feasibility and availability of the OpenFlow-enabled optical nodes and the extended OpenFlow controller are validated by the connectivity test, protection switching and load balancing experiments in this test platform.

  8. Comets, X-ray bursts, and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1986-01-01

    The proposal, revived by Tremaine and Zytkow (1985), that accretion of comets by neutron stars may be the origin of gamma-ray bursts is considered. This mechanism has difficulty accounting for the observed gamma-ray spectrum and optical counterparts of the bursts. The survival of comets near supernovae is investigated. Ablation rates and the thermal structure of an ablating surface layer are calculated. In some circumstances, mechanical disruption will erode a comet more rapidly than evaporation. The accretion of comets by neutron stars may produce a class of X-ray burst sources with novel properties.

  9. Traffic routing in a switched regenerative satellite. Volume 2, task 4: Review (executive summary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberis, G.

    1982-12-01

    A communications satellite design for 1990's European use is proposed. Time plan assignment is discussed. The satellite system should be interfaced with the terrestrial telephone network at several nodes per nation (rather than at one node per nation as for ECS). A 64 Kbit/sec ISDN service and a specialized 2.048 Mbit/sec service on reservation basis are suggested. Wide use of the 12/14 and 20/30 GHz bands is advocated. A procedure to achieve a switching plan with high efficiency, taking into account all system constraints such as no bursts breaking and two transmission rates harmonization is proposed. Algorithms to be implemented are: the Hungarian method; branch and bound; the INSERT heuristic; and the HOLE heuristic.

  10. Digital switching noise as a stochastic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, Giorgio; Trucco, Gabriella; Liberali, Valentino

    2007-06-01

    Switching activity of logic gates in a digital system is a deterministic process, depending on both circuit parameters and input signals. However, the huge number of logic blocks in a digital system makes digital switching a cognitively stochastic process. Switching activity is the source of the so-called "digital noise", which can be analyzed using a stochastic approach. For an asynchronous digital network, we can model digital switching currents as a shot noise process, deriving both its amplitude distribution and its power spectral density. From spectral distribution of digital currents, we can also calculate the spectral distribution and the power of disturbances injected into the on-chip power supply lines.

  11. Gamma-ray burst populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgili, Francisco Javier

    Over the last fifty years the field of gamma-ray bursts has shown incredible growth, but the amassing of data has also left observers and theorists alike wondering about some of the basic questions surrounding these phenomena. Additionally, these events show remarkable individuality and extrema, ranging in redshift throughout the observable universe and over ten orders of magnitude in energy. This work focuses on analyzing groups of bursts that are different from the general trend and trying to understand whether these bursts are from different intrinsic populations and if so, what can be said about their progenitors. This is achieved through numerical Monte Carlo simulations and statistical inference in conjunction with current GRB observations. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction of gamma-ray burst theory and observations in a semi-historical context. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the theory and practical issues surrounding the numerical simulations and statistics. Chapters 3--5 are each dedicated to a specific problem relating to a different type of GRB population: high-luminosity v. low-luminosity bursts, constraints from high-redshift bursts, and Type I v. Type II bursts. Chapter 6 follows with concluding remarks.

  12. Cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    The distribution in angle and flux of gamma-ray bursts indicates that the majority of gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, i.e., at z of about 1. The rate is then about 10 exp -8/yr in a galaxy like the Milky Way, i.e., orders of magnitude lower than the estimated rate for collisions between neutron stars in close binary systems. The energy per burst is about 10 exp 51 ergs, assuming isotropic emission. The events appear to be less energetic and more frequent if their emission is strongly beamed. Some tests for the distance scale are discussed: a correlation between the burst's strength and its spectrum; the absorption by the Galactic gas below about 2 keV; the X-ray tails caused by forward scattering by the Galactic dust; about 1 month recurrence of some bursts caused by gravitational lensing by foreground galaxies; and a search for gamma-ray bursts in M31. The bursts appear to be a manifestation of something exotic, but conventional compact objects can provide an explanation. The best possibility is offered by a decay of a bindary composed of a spinning-stellar-mass black-hole primary and a neutron or a strange-quark star secondary. In the final phase the secondary is tidally disrupted, forms an accretion disk, and up to 10 exp 54 ergs are released. A very small fraction of this energy powers the gamma-ray burst.

  13. Pulse-burst laser systems for fast Thomson scattering (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Borchardt, M. T.; Falkowski, A. F.; Harris, W. S.; Holly, D. J.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Robl, P. E.; Stephens, H. D.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-10-01

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) lasers have been upgraded to "pulse-burst" capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to 15 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates of 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to record the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature profile and temperature fluctuations. To further these investigations, a custom pulse-burst laser system with a maximum pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is now being commissioned.

  14. Three precise gamma-ray burst source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The precise source regions of three moderately intense gamma ray bursts are derived. These events were observed with the first interplanetary burst sensor network. The optimum locations of the detectors, widely separated throughout the inner solar system, allowed for high accuracy, over-determined source fields of size 0.7 to 7.0 arc-min(2). All three locations are at fairly high galactic latitude in regions of low source confusion; none can be identified with a steady source object. Archived photographs were searched for optical transients that are able to be associated with these source fields; one such association was made.

  15. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  16. Features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Paczynski, Bohdan; Goodman, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Gravitational lensing of cosmological gamma-ray bursts by objects in the mass range about 10 exp 17 to 10 exp 20 g (femtolensing) may introduce complicated interference patterns that might be interpreted as absorption or emission lines in the bursts' spectra. This phenomenon, if detected, may be used as a unique probe of dark matter in the universe. The BATSE spectral data should allow one to detect such spectral features or to put significant upper limits on the cosmic density of a dark matter component that may be in the femtolensing range. Software to generate theoretical spectra has been developed, and it is accessible over the computer network with anonymous ftp.

  17. Nanoelectromechanical contact switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Owen Y.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2012-05-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches are similar to conventional semiconductor switches in that they can be used as relays, transistors, logic devices and sensors. However, the operating principles of NEM switches and semiconductor switches are fundamentally different. These differences give NEM switches an advantage over semiconductor switches in some applications -- for example, NEM switches perform much better in extreme environments -- but semiconductor switches benefit from a much superior manufacturing infrastructure. Here we review the potential of NEM-switch technologies to complement or selectively replace conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology, and identify the challenges involved in the large-scale manufacture of a representative set of NEM-based devices.

  18. Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Li, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Reversible operation of a high current superconductor switch based on the quench of high-resistance second generation high temperature superconducting wire is demonstrated. The quench is induced by a burst of an ac field generated by an inductively coupled radio-frequency coil. The switch makes a superconducting-to-normal transition within 5 ms and also has a rapid recovery to the superconducting state. The device has potential applications as an active current limiter or as a storage switch for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Operation in a full flux penetration/flow regime can effectively minimize the detrimental effects of the intrinsic conductor non-uniformity.

  19. Brain Activation of Identity Switching in Multiple Identity Tracking Task

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Chuang; Hu, Siyuan; Wei, Liuqing; Zhang, Xuemin; Talhelm, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    When different objects switch identities in the multiple identity tracking (MIT) task, viewers need to rebind objects’ identity and location, which requires attention. This rebinding helps people identify the regions targets are in (where they need to focus their attention) and inhibit unimportant regions (where distractors are). This study investigated the processing of attentional tracking after identity switching in an adapted MIT task. This experiment used three identity-switching conditions: a target-switching condition (where the target objects switched identities), a distractor-switching condition (where the distractor objects switched identities), and a no-switching condition. Compared to the distractor-switching condition, the target-switching condition elicited greater activation in the frontal eye fields (FEF), intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and visual cortex. Compared to the no-switching condition, the target-switching condition elicited greater activation in the FEF, inferior frontal gyrus (pars orbitalis) (IFG-Orb), IPS, visual cortex, middle temporal lobule, and anterior cingulate cortex. Finally, the distractor-switching condition showed greater activation in the IFG-Orb compared to the no-switching condition. These results suggest that, in the target-switching condition, the FEF and IPS (the dorsal attention network) might be involved in goal-driven attention to targets during attentional tracking. In addition, in the distractor-switching condition, the activation of the IFG-Orb may indicate salient change that pulls attention away automatically. PMID:26699865

  20. Intelligent deflection routing in buffer-less networks.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Soroush; Trajković, Ljiljana

    2015-02-01

    Deflection routing is employed to ameliorate packet loss caused by contention in buffer-less architectures such as optical burst-switched networks. The main goal of deflection routing is to successfully deflect a packet based only on a limited knowledge that network nodes possess about their environment. In this paper, we present a framework that introduces intelligence to deflection routing (iDef). iDef decouples the design of the signaling infrastructure from the underlying learning algorithm. It consists of a signaling and a decision-making module. Signaling module implements a feedback management protocol while the decision-making module implements a reinforcement learning algorithm. We also propose several learning-based deflection routing protocols, implement them in iDef using the ns-3 network simulator, and compare their performance. PMID:25532199