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Sample records for bursting electrical activity

  1. Identifying Crucial Parameter Correlations Maintaining Bursting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons) allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO) model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron) and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency) similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, Leak; a persistent K current, K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, P) that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of Leak, K2, and P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained. PMID:24945358

  2. Bursts of active transport in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2011-03-01

    This study of cargo motion in living cells, performed with nm resolution and an unprecedented large database, shows that the instantaneous speed of active transport deviates pervasively from the average speed yet with striking statistical regularity over several decades of time and space. The experimental approach involves single-particle tracking and special wavelet-based methods to discriminate active transport from passive diffusion, thus quantifying the instantaneous speed of endosomal and lysosomal active transport in living cells at times just longer than the motor stepping time. Pervasive bursts of acceleration stem from viscoelastic relaxation of the cytoplasm, the individual bursts displaying a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup followed by rapid release. These statistical regularities did not change in response to changing the experimental conditions, specifically to changing the cell line and motor type, or to overexpressing microtubule binding proteins, thus indicating redundancy in regulation of cellular active transport. The power law of scaling is the same as seen in driven jammed colloids, powders, and magnetic systems, and is consistent with a simple heuristic argument. The implied regulation of active transport by environmental obstruction in the cytoplasm extends the classical notion of ``molecular crowding.''

  3. Antagonism of NMDA receptors but not AMPA/kainate receptors blocks bursting in dopaminergic neurons induced by electrical stimulation of the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Tong, Z Y; Overton, P G; Clark, D

    1996-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays an important role in the burst activity of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. In particular, electrical stimulation of the PFC elicits patterns of activity in DA neurons, closely time-locked to the stimulation, which resemble natural bursts. Given that natural bursts are produced by the activity of excitatory amino acid (EAA)-ergic afferents, if PFC-induced time-locked bursts are homologues of natural bursts, EAA antagonists should attenuate them. Hence, the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) antagonist CPP (3-((+/-)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid) and the AMPA (D,L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxalone propionic acid)/kainate antagonist CNQX (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) were applied by iontophoresis to DA neurons exhibiting time-locked bursts during PFC stimulation. CPP produced a significant reduction in time-locked bursting. In contrast, CNQX (at currents which antagonised AMPA responses) did not. These effects of CPP and CNQX on time-locked bursting mirror the effects previously reported for these drugs on natural bursting. Since natural bursting and bursting induced by PFC stimulation are both blocked selectively by CPP, the present results increase the degree of analogy between the two burst phenomena, thereby adding extra support to the contention that the cortex is involved in producing the natural bursting in DA neurons. PMID:9013383

  4. Phase synchronization of bursting neural networks with electrical and delayed dynamic chemical couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megam Ngouonkadi, Elie B.; Nono, Martial Kabong; Tamba, Victor Kamdoum; Fotsin, Hilaire B.

    2015-11-01

    Diffusive electrical connections in neuronal networks are instantaneous, while excitatory or inhibitory couplings through chemical synapses contain a transmission time-delay. Moreover, chemical synapses are nonlinear dynamical systems whose behavior can be described by nonlinear differential equations. In this work, neuronal networks with diffusive electrical couplings and time-delayed dynamic chemical couplings are considered. We investigate the effects of distributed time delays on phase synchronization of bursting neurons. We observe that in both excitatory and Inhibitory chemical connections, the phase synchronization might be enhanced when time-delay is taken into account. This distributed time delay can induce a variety of phase-coherent dynamical behaviors. We also study the collective dynamics of network of bursting neurons. The network model presents the so-called Small-World property, encompassing neurons whose dynamics have two time scales (fast and slow time scales). The neuron parameters in such Small-World network, are supposed to be slightly different such that, there may be synchronization of the bursting (slow) activity if the coupling strengths are large enough. Bounds for the critical coupling strengths to obtain burst synchronization in terms of the network structure are given. Our studies show that the network synchronizability is improved, as its heterogeneity is reduced. The roles of synaptic parameters, more precisely those of the coupling strengths and the network size are also investigated.

  5. Adaptation-dependent synchronization transitions and burst generations in electrically coupled neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liang, Pei-Ji; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Qiu, Yi-Hong

    2014-12-01

    A typical feature of neurons is their ability to encode neural information dynamically through spike frequency adaptation (SFA). Previous studies of SFA on neuronal synchronization were mainly concentrated on the correlated firing between neuron pairs, while the synchronization of neuron populations in the presence of SFA is still unclear. In this study, the influence of SFA on the population synchronization of neurons was numerically explored in electrically coupled networks, with regular, small-world, and random connectivity, respectively. The simulation results indicate that cross-correlation indices decrease significantly when the neurons have adaptation compared with those of nonadapting neurons, similar to previous experimental observations. However, the synchronous activity of population neurons exhibits a rather complex adaptation-dependent manner. Specifically, synchronization strength of neuron populations changes nonmonotonically, depending on the degree of adaptation. In addition, single neurons in the networks can switch from regular spiking to bursting with the increase of adaptation degree. Furthermore, the connection probability among neurons exhibits significant influence on the population synchronous activity, but has little effect on the burst generation of single neurons. Accordingly, the results may suggest that synchronous activity and burst firing of population neurons are both adaptation-dependent. PMID:25406642

  6. Hemicholinium-3 selectively alters the rhythmically bursting activity of septo-hippocampal neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jobert, A; Bassant, M H; Lamour, Y

    1989-01-01

    The medial septal area contains neurons which project to the hippocampal formation. A sizeable proportion of these septo-hippocampal neurons (SHNs) are cholinergic. About 40% of them also display a characteristic discharge pattern in rhythmic bursts. We hypothesized that SHNs with a rhythmically bursting activity (RBA) are the cholinergic ones. To test this hypothesis we studied the effects of acetylcholine synthesis blockade by hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) on the properties of the SHNs. HC-3 (16, 32 or 64 micrograms total dose) or saline were injected in the lateral ventricles of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized with urethane. Extracellular recordings from SHNs in the medial septal area were obtained within hours after HC-3 injections (n = 24 animals). SHNs were identified by their antidromic response following electrical stimulation of the fimbria-fornix. The pharmacological properties of SHNs were studied in some animals using microiontophoretic applications from multibarreled electrodes filled with various neurotransmitters. The hippocampal rhythmic slow activity (RSA or theta) was abolished even after the lowest dose of HC-3 tested (16 micrograms). No significant change in SHNs conduction velocity or spontaneous activity was observed at any dose of HC-3. The percentage of SHNs with RBA was unchanged. In contrast the mean frequency of the RBA was decreased by HC-3 in a dose-dependent fashion. The mean frequency was lowest within the first 3 h after injection. Although the mean spontaneous activity was unchanged SHNs tended to have more spikes per burst. The effects of various neurotransmitters on SHNs were qualitatively unchanged after HC-3 injection. These results suggest that acetylcholine synthesis blockade by HC-3 leads not only to the disappearance of the hippocampal RSA in urethane-anesthetized animals, but also to a decrease in the frequency of the rhythmically bursting activity of the SHNs. Since the 4-Hz hippocampal theta is atropine-sensitive, the results provide indirect evidence that the SHNs with rhythmically bursting activity are the cholinergic SHNs. PMID:2702465

  7. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christoph A.; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S.; Bausch, Andreas R.; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system’s dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model. PMID:26261319

  8. Random bursts determine dynamics of active filaments.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Suzuki, Ryo; Schaller, Volker; Aranson, Igor S; Bausch, Andreas R; Frey, Erwin

    2015-08-25

    Constituents of living or synthetic active matter have access to a local energy supply that serves to keep the system out of thermal equilibrium. The statistical properties of such fluctuating active systems differ from those of their equilibrium counterparts. Using the actin filament gliding assay as a model, we studied how nonthermal distributions emerge in active matter. We found that the basic mechanism involves the interplay between local and random injection of energy, acting as an analog of a thermal heat bath, and nonequilibrium energy dissipation processes associated with sudden jump-like changes in the system's dynamic variables. We show here how such a mechanism leads to a nonthermal distribution of filament curvatures with a non-Gaussian shape. The experimental curvature statistics and filament relaxation dynamics are reproduced quantitatively by stochastic computer simulations and a simple kinetic model. PMID:26261319

  9. Slow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianhua; Sherman, Arthur; Bertram, Richard; Goforth, Paulette B.; Nunemaker, Craig S.; Waters, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    We used the patch clamp technique in situ to test the hypothesis that slow oscillations in metabolism mediate slow electrical oscillations in mouse pancreatic islets by causing oscillations in KATP channel activity. Total conductance was measured over the course of slow bursting oscillations in surface β-cells of islets exposed to 11.1 mM glucose by either switching from current clamp to voltage clamp at different phases of the bursting cycle or by clamping the cells to −60 mV and running two-second voltage ramps from −120 to −50 mV every 20 s. The membrane conductance, calculated from the slopes of the ramp current-voltage curves, oscillated and was larger during the silent phase than during the active phase of the burst. The ramp conductance was sensitive to diazoxide, and the oscillatory component was reduced by sulfonylureas or by lowering extracellular glucose to 2.8 mM, suggesting that the oscillatory total conductance is due to oscillatory KATP channel conductance. We demonstrate that these results are consistent with the Dual Oscillator model, in which glycolytic oscillations drive slow electrical bursting, but not with other models in which metabolic oscillations are secondary to calcium oscillations. The simulations also confirm that oscillations in membrane conductance can be well estimated from measurements of slope conductance and distinguished from gap junction conductance. Furthermore, the oscillatory conductance was blocked by tolbutamide in isolated β-cells. The data, combined with insights from mathematical models, support a mechanism of slow (∼5 min) bursting driven by oscillations in metabolism, rather than by oscillations in the intracellular free calcium concentration. PMID:23921138

  10. SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during Its Most Prolific Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderHorst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gorgone, N. M.; Kaneko, Y.; Baring, M. G.; Guiriec, S.; Gogus, E,; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Lin, L.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Chaplin, V. L.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Goldstein, A.; Gruber, D.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties.We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J15505418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E(sub peak) and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BBfits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature.We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  11. Quantifying bursting neuron activity from calcium signals using blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Park, In Jun; Bobkov, Yuriy V; Ache, Barry W; Principe, Jose C

    2013-09-15

    Advances in calcium imaging have enabled studies of the dynamic activity of both individual neurons and neuronal assemblies. However, challenges, such as unknown nonlinearities in the spike-calcium relationship, noise, and the often relatively low temporal resolution of the calcium signal compared to the time-scale of spike generation, restrict the accurate estimation of action potentials from the calcium signal. Complex neuronal discharge, such as the activity demonstrated by bursting and rhythmically active neurons, represents an even greater challenge for reconstructing spike trains based on calcium signals. We propose a method using blind calcium signal deconvolution based on an information-theoretic approach. This model is meant to maximise the output entropy of a nonlinear filter where the nonlinearity is defined by the cumulative distribution function of the spike signal. We tested our maximum entropy (ME) algorithm using bursting olfactory receptor neurons (bORNs) of the lobster olfactory organ. The advantage of the ME algorithm is that the filter can be trained online based only on the statistics of the spike signal, without any assumptions regarding the unknown transfer function characterizing the relation between the spike and calcium signal. We show that the ME method is able to more accurately reconstruct the timing of the first and last spikes of a burst compared to other methods and that it improves the temporal precision fivefold compared to direct timing resolution of calcium signal. PMID:23711821

  12. Phosphoproteins and the activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, N.; Curnutte, J.T.; Babior, B.M.

    1987-05-01

    The respiratory burst oxidase is a neutrophil enzyme that converts oxygen to O/sub 2//sup -/. It is dormant in resting cells but is activated when the cells are exposed to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA also induces the incorporation of /sup 32/P into certain neutrophil proteins. To determine whether phosphorylation of these proteins is related to oxidase activation, protein phosphorylation was studied in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (GCD), a group of inherited conditions in which oxidase activity is missing. In normals, neutrophil activation by PMA is associated with the phosphorylation inter alia of 48K proteins at pI 7.3 and 7.8. There is also inconstant phosphorylation of a 48K protein at pI 6.8. In 4 patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), phosphorylation of pp48/6.8 and pp48/7.3 was absent, while in autosomal recessive CGD, phosphorylation of all 3 of these proteins was absent in 3 patients and significantly diminished in a fourth. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of these proteins is related to the activation of the respiratory burst oxidase. By peptide mapping, these 3 proteins appear to consist of a single peptide species whose pI variability may be due to post-translational modification. The only phosphoamino acid found in pp48/7.3 was phosphoserine.

  13. A pharmacological analysis of the burst events induced in midbrain dopaminergic neurons by electrical stimulation of the prefrontal cortex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Overton, P G; Tong, Z Y; Clark, D

    1996-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the prefrontal cortex produces an inhibition-excitation (IE) activity pattern in the majority of responsive midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The excitatory phase often contains events, time-locked to the stimulation, which resemble natural bursts. The present study investigated the relationship between the inhibition and time-locked bursts by reducing the impact of the inhibition through membrane hyperpolarisation with the dopamine agonist apomorphine (i.v.) or antagonism with the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin (i.v. and iontophoretic). Apomorphine abolished or reduced time-locked bursting in all IE cells. Picrotoxin reduced the initial inhibition in the majority of IE cells, and abolished or reduced time-locked bursting at the highest intravenous dose. However, reductions in the initial inhibition were not systematically related to reductions in time-locked bursting. Hence, the phenomena do not appear to be causally related. Instead, time-locked bursts appear to be based on a straightforward excitation, which makes them closely analogous to natural bursts. PMID:8811499

  14. Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  15. A bursting potassium channel in isolated cholinergic synaptosomes of Torpedo electric organ.

    PubMed

    Edry-Schiller, J; Ginsburg, S; Rahamimoff, R

    1991-08-01

    1. Pinched-off cholinergic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) prepared from the electric organ of Torpedo ocelata were fused into large structures (greater than 20 microns) using dimethyl sulphoxide and polyethylene glycol 1500, as previously described for synaptic vesicles from the same organ. 2. The giant fused synaptosomes were easily amenable to the patch clamp technique and 293 seals with a resistance greater than 4 G omega were obtained in the 'cell-attached' configuration. In a large fraction of the experiments, an 'inside-out' patch configuration was achieved. 3. Several types of unitary ionic currents were observed. This study describes the most frequently observed single-channel activity which was found in 247 out of the 293 membrane patches (84.3%). 4. The single-channel current-voltage relation was linear between -60 and 20 mV and showed a slope conductance of 23.8 +/- 1.3 pS when the pipette contained 350-390 mM-Na+ and the bath facing the inside of the synaptosomal membrane contained 390 mM-K+. 5. From extrapolated reversal potential measurements, it was concluded that this channel has a large selectivity for K+ over Na+ (70.4 +/- 11.5, mean +/- S.E.M.). Chloride ions are not transported significantly through this potassium channel. 6. This potassium channel has a low probability of opening. The probability of being in the open state increases upon depolarization and reaches about 1% when the inside of the patch is 20 mV positive compared to the pipette side. 7. The mean channel open time increases with depolarization; thus the product current x time (= charge) also increases upon depolarization, showing properties of an outward rectifier. 8. The potassium channel in the giant synaptosome membrane has a bursting behaviour. Open-time distribution, closed-time distribution and a Poisson analysis indicate that the minimal kinetic scheme requires one open state and three closed states. PMID:1654418

  16. Core MHD activity and ELMy bursts observed on ECE diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Y.; Boivin, R. L.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; Ramos, J.; Snipes, J.

    1998-11-01

    Coherent core MHD activity, following an H to L transition, has been observed on a grating polychromator (GPC), X-ray tomography, and a fast bolometric array, as well as magnetics. The observed frequencies are in the 6 to 8 kHz range and are near those (<= 10 kHz) associated with typical sawtooth precursors, but they have much higher fluctuation amplitudes. The core MHD oscillations rotate in the ion diamagnetic drift (or equivalently the co-I_p) direction. The temperature fluctuations are located within or close to the sawtooth inversion radius. Other important observations on the ECE diagnostics are short (20 ~30 ?sec) transient signal dips (10 ~50 % fractional changes) during ELMy bursts in high ? (or density) plasmas. Since such dips, which affect many ECE channels, are more often observed during high density plasmas, they are believed to be either due to ECE cutoff or due to refraction effects from the high edge density of the plasmas. Based on edge density modelling, the corresponding ECE evanescent layers and ray trajectories are being investigated to see if the dips are associated with density fluctuations of ELMs.

  17. Synaptic feedback excitation has hypothalamic neural networks generate quasirhythmic burst activity.

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Swandulla, D

    1995-02-01

    1. Dissociated neurons from embryonic rat hypothalamus form synaptically coupled networks when cultured for several weeks. When synaptic inhibition is suppressed by the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) antagonist picrotoxin, neurons exhibit "rhythmic" burst activity that is blocked by the glutamate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). 2. We have examined whether this type of activity is generated by pacemaker cells driving follower cells synaptically or whether it is generated by a neuronal network through feedback excitation by Ca2+ imaging of Fura-2/AM-loaded neurons and single-cell recording. 3. IN the presence of the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin (20 microM), a large majority of neurons (> 85%) displayed quasirhythmic increases in intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Single-cell recording revealed that these increases in [Ca2+]i correspond to burst discharges in individual neurons. When excitatory synaptic transmission was blocked by CNQX (20 microM), none of the imaged neurons exhibited significant oscillations in [Ca2+]i. 4. Investigation of the intervals between bursts from single-cell recording revealed a random distribution over a range of 400% from the minimum interval. Poincaré maps of burst intervals, i.e., graphs of all burst intervals versus their preceding burst interval, revealed that a burst interval is unpredictable from its predecessor. 5. When synaptic coupling was attenuated by low concentrations of CNQX (50-500 nM), the mean burst interval was considerably increased without a change in the random character of burst activity. 4-Aminopyridine (1 mM), known to increase synaptic efficiency, reduced the mean burst interval.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7760139

  18. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bojak, Ingo; Stoyanov, Zhivko V.; Liley, David T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is a well-described phenomenon that occurs during deep anesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterization as a “global brain state” has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterization. Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex. PMID:25767438

  19. Gamma-ray bursts, QSOs and active galaxies.

    PubMed

    Burbidge, Geoffrey

    2007-05-15

    The similarity of the absorption spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources or afterglows with the absorption spectra of quasars (QSOs) suggests that QSOs and GRB sources are very closely related. Since most people believe that the redshifts of QSOs are of cosmological origin, it is natural to assume that GRBs or their afterglows also have cosmological redshifts. For some years a few of us have argued that there is much optical evidence suggesting a very different model for QSOs, in which their redshifts have a non-cosmological origin, and are ejected from low-redshift active galaxies. In this paper I extend these ideas to GRBs. In 2003, Burbidge (Burbidge 2003 Astrophys. J. 183, 112-120) showed that the redshift periodicity in the spectra of QSOs appears in the redshift of GRBs. This in turn means that both the QSOs and the GRB sources are similar objects ejected from comparatively low-redshift active galaxies. It is now clear that many of the GRBs of low redshift do appear in, or very near, active galaxies.A new and powerful result supporting this hypothesis has been produced by Prochter et al. (Prochter et al. 2006 Astrophys. J. Lett. 648, L93-L96). They show that in a survey for strong MgII absorption systems along the sightlines to long-duration GRBs, nearly every sightline shows at least one absorber. If the absorbers are intervening clouds or galaxies, only a small fraction should show absorption of this kind. The number found by Prochter et al. is four times higher than that normally found for the MgII absorption spectra of QSOs. They believe that this result is inconsistent with the intervening hypothesis and would require a statistical fluctuation greater than 99.1% probability. This is what we expect if the absorption is intrinsic to the GRBs and the redshifts are not associated with their distances. In this case, the absorption must be associated with gas ejected from the QSO. This in turn implies that the GRBs actually originate in comparatively low-redshift active galaxies and are ejected in the same way as are the QSOs. This relates these phenomena to a supernova origin for the GRBs. The current situation based on the latest observational data will be discussed. PMID:17301024

  20. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  1. Enhancement of spontaneous burst activity of hippocampal neuronal networks with low frequency close-loop stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanling; Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Shaoqun; Li, Xiangning; Liu, Man; Luo, Qingming

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, we study the modulation of low frequency closed-loop electric stimulation on spontaneous activity in cultured hippocampal neuronal networks. First, we plated monolayer cultures of hippocampal neurons from rat embryos (E18) on multi-electrode arrays and the experiments were performed in the networks from the second week to the sixth week continuously. During the experiments, we detected the spontaneous spikes of the networks firstly, and then stimulated the networks at low frequency (0.2 Hz or 1 Hz) stimulation respectively until a desired response was observed 20-80msec after a stimulus. The protocol was closed-loop. After that, we detected the spontaneous spikes of the networks. It is observed that the spontaneous activity in the developing networks is developing, which is oscillatory and periodic. Low frequency (0.2 Hz or 1 Hz) stimulation enhanced the spontaneous synchronous burst activity of the developing networks. These results implicated that activity-dependent mechanism in the modulation of plasticity of synaptic transmission in the cultured neuronal networks. Closed-loop stimulation will give a better view on the functional significance of networks activities. Besides, close-loop stimulation could set up the stimulus-reward system in the neuronal networks, which is of great benefit to the plasticity of synaptic transmission in the cultured neuronal networks.

  2. Electric vehicle activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmonaco, J. L.; Pandya, D. A.

    1995-02-01

    The data and information collected for the Public Service Electric and Gas Company's (PSE&G) electric vehicle demonstration program were intended to support and enhance DOE's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Site Operator Program. The DOE Site Operator Program is focused on the life cycle and reliability of Electric Vehicles (EV's). Of particular interest are vehicles currently available with features that are likely to be put into production or demonstrate new technology. PSE&G acquired eight GMC Electric G-Vans in 1991, and three TEVans in 1993, and conducted a program plan to test and assess the overall performance of these electric vehicles. To accomplish the objectives of DOE's Site Operator's test program, a manual data collection system was implemented. The manual data collection system has provided energy use and mileage data. From September 1991 to October 1994 PSE&G logged 69,368 miles on eleven test vehicles. PSE&G also demonstrated the EVs to diverse groups and associations at fifty seven various events. Included in the report are lessons learned concerning maintenance, operation, public reactions, and driver's acceptance of the electric vehicles.

  3. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit saccular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) (Colebatch & Halmagyi 1992; Colebatch et al. 1994). Some researchers have reported that airconducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects (Curthoys et al. 2009, Wackym et al., 2012). However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying the vestibular disorders related to otolith deficits. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, pre and post central gyri, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Emri et al., 2003; Schlindwein et al., 2008; Janzen et al., 2008). Here we hypothesized that the skull tap elicits the similar pattern of cortical activity as the auditory tone burst. Subjects put on a set of MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in supine position, with eyes closed. All subjects received both forms of the stimulation, however, the order of stimulation with auditory tone burst and air-conducted skull tap was counterbalanced across subjects. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular cortex, resulting in vestibular response (Halmagyi et al., 1995). Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory tone burst elicited vestibular evoked activation, indicated by eye muscle response. Our preliminary analyses showed that the skull tap elicited activation in medial frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, transverse temporal gyrus, anterior cingulate, and putamen. The auditory tone bursts elicited activation in medial frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules. In line with our hypothesis, skull taps elicited a pattern of cortical activity closely similar to one elicited by auditory tone bursts. Further analysis will determine the extent to which the skull taps can replace the auditory tone stimulation in clinical and basic science vestibular assessments.

  4. Heterogeneous electrotonic coupling and synchronization of rhythmic bursting activity in mouse Hb9 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J M; Cowan, A I; Brownstone, R M

    2007-10-01

    The neurons and mechanisms involved in mammalian spinal cord networks that produce rhythmic locomotor activity remain largely undefined. Hb9 interneurons, a small population of discretely localized interneurons in the mouse spinal cord, are conditionally bursting neurons. Here we applied potassium channel blockers with the aim of increasing neuronal excitability and observed that under these conditions, postnatal Hb9 interneurons exhibited bursts of action potentials with underlying voltage-independent spikelets. The bursts were insensitive to antagonists to fast chemical synaptic transmission, and the bursting and spikelets were blocked by tetrodotoxin. Calcium imaging studies using 2-photon excitation in spinal cord slices revealed that clustered Hb9 interneurons exhibited synchronous and occasional asynchronous, calcium transients that were also insensitive to fast synaptic transmission blockade. All transients were blocked by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. Paired whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Hb9 interneurons in the late postnatal mouse revealed common chemical synaptic inputs but no evidence of current transfer (i.e., electrotonic coupling) between the neurons. However, Hb9 and a previously defined population of non-Hb9 interneurons were electrotonically coupled. In the absence of fast chemical transmission in the whole spinal cord preparation, 2-photon excitation calcium imaging revealed bursting activity of Hb9 interneurons synchronous with rhythmic ventral root output. Thus Hb9 interneurons are both endogenous bursters and rhythmically active within a heterogeneous electrotonically coupled network. A network with these properties could produce the wide range of stable rhythms necessary for locomotor activity. PMID:17715199

  5. The 2006-2007 Active Phase Of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts, and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavril, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in >11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10(exp 3)s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx. 2 - 6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus three emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4)x10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. We discuss these events in the context of the magnetar model.

  6. Optical monitoring of progressive synchronization in dentate granule cells during population burst activities.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Masanori; Miyazaki, Kenichi; Kudo, Yoshihisa; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Masashi

    2005-06-01

    Monitoring multiple neurons is essential for understanding neuronal network activities. While calcium imaging from a population of cells is an effective method to study the network dynamics of a neural structure, it has been difficult to image from densely packed structures, such as the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, due to overlap of the cells. We have developed a novel method to label multiple granule cells with a Ca(2+) indicator in rat hippocampal slices using Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 (OGB-1) AM. Synchronized burst activities (0.3-1.4 Hz), which were induced by applying 50 microm 4-aminopyridine, were monitored extracellularly with a glass electrode placed at the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus. During the burst activities, spontaneously occurring action potential-induced Ca(2+) transients from multiple (4-12) granule cells were monitored with a cooled CCD camera with single-cell resolution. Temporal structures of firing patterns from the multiple neurons were determined from Ca(2+) transients. In each single-burst-event recorded from the extracellular electrode, each neuron fired synchronously within a 200 ms time window. The latency and its variance from the onset time of the single-burst-events to one of the Ca(2+) transients decreased over time (< 7.5 min). These results indicate that the synchrony of the action potentials within a single-burst-event was enhanced as the burst activities proceeded. This progressive synchronization may be a key feature in making self-organizing neuronal networks. PMID:16026472

  7. On-off control of burst high frequency electrical stimulation to suppress 4-AP induced seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Chu; Lin, Chou-Ching K.; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to investigate, using model simulations and animal experiments, the efficiency and the side effects of burst high frequency stimulation combined with on-off control in seizure suppression. Approach. A modified mathematical hippocampal seizure model was created to provide evidence of the eligibility of this approach. In the experimental setup, two recording electrodes were inserted into bilateral septal CA1 of the hippocampus, and a stimulation electrode was placed on the ventral hippocampal commissure of a rat. After seizures had been induced by 4-aminopyridine treatment, on-off control stimulation was used to suppress the seizures at 20 s intervals. The stimulation time, cumulative charge and post-stimulation suppression were used to assess the effects of burst duration. Main results. The results showed that burst stimulation could suppress the seizures during the control period and burst stimulation of a shorter duration could keep the seizure suppressed with less effort. By decreasing the burst duration, the cumulative stimulation time became shorter, the delivered cumulative charge became lower, and the cumulative time of post-stimulation suppression became longer. Significance. The on-off control stimulation not only prolonged the duration of suppression but also avoided the side effects of the conversion of seizure patterns. In particular, decreasing the specified burst duration increased the efficiency of the burst stimulation.

  8. Number of transients/Q-bursts in ELF-band as possible criterion for global thunderstorm activity estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondraskova, Adriena; Sevcik, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are resonant electromagnetic oscillations in extremely low frequency band (ELF, 3 Hz - 3 kHz), which arise in the Earth-ionosphere cavity due to lightning activity in planetary range. The time records in the ELF-band consist of background signals and ELF transients/Q-bursts superimposed on the background exceeding it by a factor of 5 - 10. The former are produced by the common worldwide thunderstorm activity (100 - 150 events per second), the latter origin from individual intense distant lightning discharges (100 - 120 powerful strokes per hour). A Q-burst is produced by a combination of direct and antipodal pulses and the decisive factor for its shape follows from the source-to-observer distance (SOD). Diurnal/seasonal variations of global thunderstorm activity can be deduced from spectral amplitudes of SR modes. Here we focus on diurnal/seasonal variations of the number of ELF-transients assuming that it is another way of lightning activity estimation. To search for transients, our own code was applied to the SR vertical electric component measured in October 2004 - December 2008 at the Astronomical and Geophysical Observatory of FMPI CU, Slovakia. Limits (min-max) for the width of primary spike, time difference between primary and secondary spike and the amplitude of the spike were chosen as criteria for the identification of the burst. Cumulative spectral amplitude of the first three SR modes compared with number of ELF-transients in monthly averaged diurnal variations quite successfully confirmed, that the number of transients can be a suitable criterion for the quantification of global lightning activity.

  9. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts,and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in > 11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 0.4 - 1.8 x 10(exp 3) s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx 2 - 9 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus two emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4) x 10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. Within the framework of the magnetar model, the net spin-down of the star could be explained by regions of the superfluid that rotate. slower than the rest. The bursts, flux enhancements, and pulse morphology changes can be explained as arising from crustal deformations due to stresses imposed by the highly twisted internal magnetic field. However, unlike other AXP outbursts, we cannot account for a major twist being implanted in the magnetosphere.

  10. Detection of Spectral Evolution in the Bursts Emitted During the 2008-2009 Active Episode of SGR J1550 - 5418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G.; Gogus, Ersin; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Kaneko, Yuki; Lin, Lin; Watts, Anna L.; Bhat, Narayana; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Rau, Arne

    2012-01-01

    In early October 2008, the Soft Gamma Repeater SGRJ1550 - 5418 (1E1547.0 - 5408, AXJ155052 - 5418, PSR J1550 - 5418) became active, emitting a series of bursts which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) after which a second especially intense activity period commenced in 2009 January and a third, less active period was detected in 2009 March-April. Here we analyze the GBM data of all the bursts from the first and last active episodes. We performed temporal and spectral analysis for all events and found that their temporal characteristics are very similar to the ones of other SGR bursts, as well the ones reported for the bursts of the main episode (average burst durations 170ms). In addition, we used our sample of bursts to quantify the systematic uncertainties of the GBM location algorithm for soft gamma-ray transients to less than or equal to 8 degrees. Our spectral analysis indicates significant spectral evolution between the first and last set of events. Although the 2008 October events are best fit with a single blackbody function, for the 2009 bursts an Optically Thin Thermal Bremsstrahlung (OTTB) is clearly preferred. We attribute this evolution to changes in the magnetic field topology of the source, possibly due to effects following the very energetic main bursting episode.

  11. Multirhythmic bursting.

    PubMed

    Butera, Robert J.

    1998-03-01

    A complex modeled bursting neuron [C. C. Canavier, J. W. Clark, and J. H. Byrne, J. Neurophysiol. 66, 2107-2124 (1991)] has been shown to possess seven coexisting limit cycle solutions at a given parameter set [Canavier et al., J. Neurophysiol 69, 2252-2259 (1993); 72, 872-882 (1994)]. These solutions are unique in that the limit cycles are concentric in the space of the slow variables. We examine the origin of these solutions using a minimal 4-variable bursting cell model. Poincare maps are constructed using a saddle-node bifurcation of a fast subsystem such as our Poincare section. This bifurcation defines a threshold between the active and silent phases of the burst cycle in the space of the slow variables. The maps identify parameter spaces with single limit cycles, multiple limit cycles, and two types of chaotic bursting. To investigate the dynamical features which underlie the unique shape of the maps, the maps are further decomposed into two submaps which describe the solution trajectories during the active and silent phases of a single burst. From these findings we postulate several necessary criteria for a bursting model to possess multiple stable concentric limit cycles. These criteria are demonstrated in a generalized 3-variable model. Finally, using a less direct numerical procedure, similar return maps are calculated for the original complex model [C. C. Canavier, J. W. Clark, and J. H. Byrne, J. Neurophysiol. 66, 2107-2124 (1991)], with the resulting mappings appearing qualitatively similar to those of our 4-variable model. These multistable concentric bursting solutions cannot occur in a bursting model with one slow variable. This type of multistability arises when a bursting system has two or more slow variables and is viewed as an essentially second-order system which receives discrete perturbations in a state-dependent manner. (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779730

  12. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory tone burst elicited vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, indicated by eye muscle responses. We further assessed subjects' postural control and its correlation with vestibular cortical activity. Our results provide the first evidence of using skull taps to elicit vestibular activity inside the MRI scanner. By conducting conjunction analyses we showed that skull taps elicit the same activation pattern as auditory tone bursts (superior temporal gyrus), and both modes of stimulation activate previously identified vestibular cortical regions. Additionally, we found that skull taps elicit more robust vestibular activity compared to auditory tone bursts, with less reported aversive effects. This further supports that the skull tap could replace auditory tone burst stimulation in clinical interventions and basic science research. Moreover, we observed that greater vestibular activation is associated with better balance control. We showed that not only the quality of balance (indicated by the amount of body sway) but also the ability to maintain balance for a longer time (indicated by the balance time) was associated with individuals' vestibular cortical excitability. Our findings support an association between vestibular cortical activity and individual differences in balance. In sum, we found that the skull tap stimulation results in activation of canonical vestibular cortex, suggesting an equally valid, but more tolerable stimulation method compared to auditory tone bursts. This is of high importance in longitudinal vestibular assessments, in which minimizing aversive effects may contribute to higher protocol adherence.

  13. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  14. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF THE OCCURRENCE OF CORONAL TYPE III RADIO BURSTS AND A NEW SOLAR ACTIVITY INDEX

    SciTech Connect

    Lobzin, Vasili; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.

    2011-07-20

    This Letter presents the results of studies of solar cycle variations of the occurrence rate of coronal type III radio bursts. The radio spectra are provided by the Learmonth Solar Radio Observatory (Western Australia), part of the USAF Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN). It is found that the occurrence rate of type III bursts strongly correlates with solar activity. However, the profiles for the smoothed type III burst occurrence rate differ considerably from those for the sunspot number, 10.7 cm solar radio flux, and solar flare index. The type III burst occurrence rate (T3BOR) is proposed as a new index of solar activity. T3BOR provides complementary information about solar activity and should be useful in different studies including solar cycle predictions and searches for different periodicities in solar activity. This index can be estimated from daily results of the Automated Radio Burst Identification System. Access to data from other RSTN sites will allow processing 24 hr radio spectra in near-real time and estimating true daily values of this index. It is also shown that coronal type III bursts can even occur when there are no visible sunspots on the Sun. However, no evidence is found that the bursts are not associated with active regions. It is also concluded that the type III burst productivity of active regions exhibits solar cycle variations.

  15. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    SWift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18 - 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 1038 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in IE 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  16. EMG burst presence probability: a joint time-frequency representation of muscle activity and its application to onset detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Rymer, William Zev

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this study was to quantify muscle activity in the time-frequency domain, therefore providing an alternative tool to measure muscle activity. This paper presents a novel method to measure muscle activity by utilizing EMG burst presence probability (EBPP) in the time-frequency domain. The EMG signal is grouped into several Mel-scale subbands, and the logarithmic power sequence is extracted from each subband. Each log-power sequence can be regarded as a dynamic process that transits between the states of EMG burst and non-burst. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was employed to elaborate this dynamic process since HMM is intrinsically advantageous in modeling the temporal correlation of EMG burst/non-burst presence. The EBPP was eventually yielded by HMM based on the criterion of maximum likelihood. Our approach achieved comparable performance with the Bonato method. PMID:25748222

  17. Human Islets Exhibit Electrical Activity on Microelectrode Arrays (MEA).

    PubMed

    Schönecker, S; Kraushaar, U; Guenther, E; Gerst, F; Ullrich, S; Häring, H-U; Königsrainer, A; Barthlen, W; Drews, G; Krippeit-Drews, P

    2015-05-01

    This study demonstrates for the first time that the microelectrode array (MEA) technique allows analysis of electrical activity of islets isolated from human biopsies. We have shown before that this method, i.e., measuring beta cell electrical activity with extracellular electrodes, is a powerful tool to assess glucose responsiveness of isolated murine islets. In the present study, human islets were shown to exhibit glucose-dependent oscillatory electrical activity. The glucose responsiveness could be furthermore demonstrated by an increase of insulin secretion in response to glucose. Electrical activity was increased by tolbutamide and inhibited by diazoxide. In human islets bursts of electrical activity were markedly blunted by the Na(+) channel inhibitor tetrodotoxin which does not affect electrical activity in mouse islets. Thus, the MEA technique emerges as a powerful tool to decipher online the unique features of human islets.Additionally, this technique will enable research with human islets even if only a few islets are available and it will allow a fast and easy test of metabolic integrity of islets destined for transplantation. PMID:25853706

  18. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  19. Cannabinoid receptor activation reverses kainate-induced synchronized population burst firing in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mason, Rob; Cheer, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties in whole animal models of epilepsy. The present investigation sought to examine the effects of cannabinoid receptor activation on kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform neuronal excitability. Under urethane anesthesia, acute KA treatment (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) entrained the spiking mode of simultaneously recorded neurons from random firing to synchronous bursting (% change in burst rate). Injection of the high-affinity cannabinoid agonist (-)-11-hydroxy-8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethyl-heptyl (HU210, 100 mug kg(-1), i.p.) following KA markedly reduced the burst frequency (% decrease in burst frequency) and reversed synchronized firing patterns back to baseline levels. Pre-treatment with the central cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonist N-piperidino-5-(4-clorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazole-carboxamide (rimonabant, SR141716A 3 mg kg(-1), i.p.) completely prevented the actions of HU210. The present results indicate that cannabinoids exert their antiepileptic effects by impeding pathological synchronization of neuronal networks in the hippocampus. PMID:19562087

  20. Large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels promote secretagogue-induced transition from spiking to bursting in murine anterior pituitary corticotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Peter J; Şengül, Sevgi; Tabak, Joël; Ruth, Peter; Bertram, Richard; Shipston, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Anterior pituitary corticotroph cells are a central component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis essential for the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs are excitable cells that receive input from two hypothalamic secretagogues, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) to control the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Although corticotrophs are spontaneously active and increase in excitability in response to CRH and AVP the patterns of electrical excitability and underlying ionic conductances are poorly understood. In this study, we have used electrophysiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches coupled with mathematical modelling to investigate whether CRH and AVP promote distinct patterns of electrical excitability and to interrogate the role of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels in spontaneous and secretagogue-induced activity. We reveal that BK channels do not play a significant role in the generation of spontaneous activity but are critical for the transition to bursting in response to CRH. In contrast, AVP promotes an increase in single spike frequency, a mechanism independent of BK channels but dependent on background non-selective conductances. Co-stimulation with CRH and AVP results in complex patterns of excitability including increases in both single spike frequency and bursting. The ability of corticotroph excitability to be differentially regulated by hypothalamic secretagogues provides a mechanism for differential control of corticotroph excitability in response to different stressors. Key points Corticotroph cells of the anterior pituitary are electrically excitable and are an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which governs the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs display predominantly single spike activity under basal conditions that transition to complex bursting behaviours upon stimulation by the hypothalamic secretagogues corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP); however, the underlying mechanisms controlling bursting are unknown. In this study, we show that CRH and AVP induce different patterns of corticotroph electrical activity, and we use an electrophysiological approach combined with mathematical modelling to show the ionic mechanisms for these differential effects. The data reveal that secretagogue-induced bursting is dependent on large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels and is driven primarily by CRH whereas AVP promotes an increase in single-spike frequency through BK-independent pathways involving activation of non-selective cation conductances. As corticotroph excitability is differentially regulated by CRH and AVP this may allow corticotrophs to respond appropriately to different stressors. PMID:25615909

  1. Bursting Activity of Substantia Nigra pars Reticulata Neurons in Mouse Parkinsonism in Awake and Anesthetized States

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, CJ; Jaeger, D

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological changes in basal ganglia neurons are hypothesized to underlie motor dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Previous results in head-restrained MPTP-treated non-human primates have suggested that increased bursting within the basal ganglia and related thalamic and cortical areas may be a hallmark of pathophysiological activity. In this study, we investigated whether there is increased bursting in substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) output neurons in anesthetized and awake, head-restrained unilaterally lesioned 6-OHDA mice when compared to control mice. Confirming previous studies, we show that there are significant changes in the firing rate and pattern in SNpr neuron activity under urethane anesthesia. The regular firing pattern of control urethane-anesthetized SNpr neurons was not present in the 6-OHDA-lesioned group, as the latter neurons instead became phase locked with cortical slow wave activity (SWA). Next, we examined whether such robust electrophysiological changes between groups carried over to the awake state. SNpr neurons from both groups fired at much higher frequencies in the awake state than in the anesthetized state and surprisingly showed only modest changes between awake control and 6-OHDA groups. While there were no differences in firing rate between groups in the awake state, an increase in the coefficient of variation (CV) was observed in the 6-OHDA group. Contrary to the bursting hypothesis, this increased CV was not due to changes in bursting but was instead due to a mild increase in pausing. Together, these results suggest that differences in SNpr activity between control and 6-OHDA lesioned mice may be strongly influenced by changes in network activity during different arousal and behavioral states. PMID:25576395

  2. Effects of hypocapnia on spontaneous burst activity in the piriform-amygdala complex of newborn rat brain preparations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Onimaru, H; Suganuma, M; Homma, I

    2010-01-01

    We examined effects of hypocapnia on burst activity in the piriform-amygdala complex and C(4) inspiratory activity in limbic-brainstem-spinal cord preparations from 0- to 1-day-old rats. Hypocapnia (2% CO(2)) increased the burst rate in the piriform-amygdala complex but decreased the C(4) inspiratory burst rate. Since hyperventilation induces hypocapnia, and enhanced amygdala activity may be involved in induction of a sense of anxiety, our findings might explain the neuronal mechanism of a vicious circle between hyperventilation and an increased sense of anxiety. PMID:20217377

  3. The 2001 April Burst Activation of SGR 1900-14: Pulse Properties and Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, P. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Goegues, E.; Finger, M. H.; Feroci, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Swank, J. H.; Hurley, K.; Heise, J.; Smith D.

    2003-01-01

    We report on observations of SGR 1900+14 made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and BeppoSAXduring the 2001 April burst activation of the source. Using these data, we measure the spin-down torque on the star and confirm earlier findings that the torque and burst activity are not directly correlated. We compare the X-ray pulse profile to the gamma-ray profile during the April 18 intermediate flare and show that (1) their shapes are similar and (1) the gamma-ray profile aligns closely in phase with the X-ray pulsations. The good phase alignment of the gamma-ray and X-ray profiles suggests that there was no rapid spin-down following this flare of the magnitude inferred for the August 27 giant flare. We discuss how these observations further constrain magnetic field reconfiguration models for the large flares of SGRs.

  4. Deactivation of primed respiratory burst response of goldfish macrophages by leukocyte-derived macrophage activating factor(s).

    PubMed

    Neumann, N F; Belosevic, M

    1996-01-01

    Macrophage activation factors (MAF), induced maximal priming of the respiratory burst response in GMCL after 6 h of stimulus, but by 24 or 48 h no priming effect was observed. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) also primed the respiratory burst of goldfish macrophages, but the kinetics of priming were different from that induced by MAF. LPS induced a gradual increase in priming potential over 48 h of cultivation. Co-stimulation of macrophages with MAF and LPS resulted in enhanced priming of respiratory burst activity compared to either factor alone; however, the kinetics of priming were similar to those induced by MAF only. The MAF antagonized the ability of LPS to prime the respiratory burst over extended cultivation. The priming kinetics of the respiratory burst induced by MAF and/or LPS were not unique to GMCL, but were also similar for primary cultures of IVDKM. Respiratory burst deactivated macrophages-mounted potent nitric oxide response, indicating that this deactivation event was selective for respiratory burst activity. Autocrine factors produced by MAF-activated macrophages augmented priming of the respiratory burst, suggesting that deactivation of primed respiratory burst responses was not due to cytokine mediators produced by activated macrophages, but was most likely an intracellular deactivation event. Furthermore, production of reactive intermediates by activated fish macrophages was biphasic; with maximal ROI production occurring 6 h after stimulus, and maximal RNI occurring 72 h after stimulus. Our results indicate that activated fish macrophages mount sequential antimicrobial responses that are selectively deprogrammed once maximal induction has occurred. The ability to selectively deactivate ROI production without affecting subsequent RNI production may play an important role in host defense: regulating the duration of ROI production, and thus minimizing host tissue damage in an otherwise futile attempt to eliminate ROI resistant pathogens. PMID:9040985

  5. Electrical measurements over active thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.; Vonnegut, Bernard

    1988-01-01

    During the summer of 1986, the air conductivity and the vertical electric field were measured over active thunderstorms from a high altitude U-2 airplane. The conductivity at 20 km remained relatively steady above storms with variations less than + or - 15 percent while vertical electric fields in excess of 5 kV/m were regularly observed. Estimates of the storm generator current and the C.T.R. Wilson (i.e., conduction) current can be obtained using the current densities derived from the conductivity and field measurements and integrated over area. Upward flowing currents of 0.05 to 7.7 A were observed with an average of 2.2 A. More importantly, the U-2 data show that the storm current varies linearly with flash rate, therefore, the average charge transfer per discharge should be independent of storm development or activity.

  6. Cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity are absent in familial dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley–Day syndrome) is an hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN type III), expressed at birth, that is associated with reduced pain and temperature sensibilities and absent baroreflexes, causing orthostatic hypotension as well as labile blood pressure that increases markedly during emotional excitement. Given the apparent absence of functional baroreceptor afferents, we tested the hypothesis that the normal cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are absent in patients with familial dysautonomia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into muscle or cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 12 patients with familial dysautonomia. Spontaneous bursts of MSNA were absent in all patients, but in five patients we found evidence of tonically firing sympathetic neurones, with no cardiac rhythmicity, that increased their spontaneous discharge during emotional arousal but not during a manoeuvre that unloads the baroreceptors. Conversely, skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), recorded in four patients, appeared normal. We conclude that the loss of phasic bursts of MSNA and the loss of baroreflex modulation of muscle vasoconstrictor drive contributes to the poor control of blood pressure in familial dysautonomia, and that the increase in tonic firing of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones contributes to the increase in blood pressure during emotional excitement. PMID:23165765

  7. Burst pacemaker activity of the sinoatrial node in sodium–calcium exchanger knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Angelo G.; Zhang, Rui; Zaini, Audrey; Giani, Jorge F.; Kang, Jeanney; Lamp, Scott T.; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Goldhaber, Joshua I.

    2015-01-01

    In sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, electrogenic sodium–calcium exchange (NCX) is the dominant calcium (Ca) efflux mechanism. However, the role of NCX in the generation of SAN automaticity is controversial. To investigate the contribution of NCX to pacemaking in the SAN, we performed optical voltage mapping and high-speed 2D laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) of Ca dynamics in an ex vivo intact SAN/atrial tissue preparation from atrial-specific NCX knockout (KO) mice. These mice lack P waves on electrocardiograms, and isolated NCX KO SAN cells are quiescent. Voltage mapping revealed disorganized and arrhythmic depolarizations within the NCX KO SAN that failed to propagate into the atria. LSCM revealed intermittent bursts of Ca transients. Bursts were accompanied by rising diastolic Ca, culminating in long pauses dominated by Ca waves. The L-type Ca channel agonist BayK8644 reduced the rate of Ca transients and inhibited burst generation in the NCX KO SAN whereas the Ca buffer 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA AM) did the opposite. These results suggest that cellular Ca accumulation hinders spontaneous depolarization in the NCX KO SAN, possibly by inhibiting L-type Ca currents. The funny current (If) blocker ivabradine also suppressed NCX KO SAN automaticity. We conclude that pacemaker activity is present in the NCX KO SAN, generated by a mechanism that depends upon If. However, the absence of NCX-mediated depolarization in combination with impaired Ca efflux results in intermittent bursts of pacemaker activity, reminiscent of human sinus node dysfunction and “tachy-brady” syndrome. PMID:26195795

  8. Burst pacemaker activity of the sinoatrial node in sodium-calcium exchanger knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Angelo G; Zhang, Rui; Zaini, Audrey; Giani, Jorge F; Kang, Jeanney; Lamp, Scott T; Philipson, Kenneth D; Goldhaber, Joshua I

    2015-08-01

    In sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, electrogenic sodium-calcium exchange (NCX) is the dominant calcium (Ca) efflux mechanism. However, the role of NCX in the generation of SAN automaticity is controversial. To investigate the contribution of NCX to pacemaking in the SAN, we performed optical voltage mapping and high-speed 2D laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) of Ca dynamics in an ex vivo intact SAN/atrial tissue preparation from atrial-specific NCX knockout (KO) mice. These mice lack P waves on electrocardiograms, and isolated NCX KO SAN cells are quiescent. Voltage mapping revealed disorganized and arrhythmic depolarizations within the NCX KO SAN that failed to propagate into the atria. LSCM revealed intermittent bursts of Ca transients. Bursts were accompanied by rising diastolic Ca, culminating in long pauses dominated by Ca waves. The L-type Ca channel agonist BayK8644 reduced the rate of Ca transients and inhibited burst generation in the NCX KO SAN whereas the Ca buffer 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA AM) did the opposite. These results suggest that cellular Ca accumulation hinders spontaneous depolarization in the NCX KO SAN, possibly by inhibiting L-type Ca currents. The funny current (If) blocker ivabradine also suppressed NCX KO SAN automaticity. We conclude that pacemaker activity is present in the NCX KO SAN, generated by a mechanism that depends upon If. However, the absence of NCX-mediated depolarization in combination with impaired Ca efflux results in intermittent bursts of pacemaker activity, reminiscent of human sinus node dysfunction and "tachy-brady" syndrome. PMID:26195795

  9. Role for membrane fusion in the activation of the respiratory burst in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Manara-Shediac, F.S.

    1986-01-01

    Components of the respiratory burst oxidase reside in intracellular membranes of the tertiary granules in resting cells, yet oxidase activity in the activated cells occurs at the neutrophil surface. The role of degranulation in activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst was therefore investigated. Surface labeling experiments were carried out on resting and activated neutrophils using three impermeant labeling methods. Activated neutrophils labeled with (/sup 35/S) diazobenzene sulfonic acid showed a fourfold higher specific radioactivity than resting neutrophils. Similar results were obtained with the pyridoxal phosphate/borotritide labeling method. On the other hand, little difference in labeling was seen using the periodate/borotritide method which detects the carbohydrate of glycoproteins. These results suggest that either a large amount of protein, or a highly reactive protein becomes exposed upon activation. Resting, activated, and enucleated cells were labeled using the (/sup 125/I) lactoperoxidase method, then subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiograms of these gels showed that two proteins of about 75 and 45 kD, are labeled at the external surface of enucleated and activated cells but not resting cells.

  10. Inhibition of the neutrophil oxidative burst by sphingoid long-chain bases: role of protein kinase C in the activation of the burst

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, E.; Olcott, M.C.; Bell, R.M.; Merrill, A.H.; Lambeth, J.D.

    1986-05-01

    The neutrophil oxidative burst is triggered by a variety of both particulate (opsonized zymosan) and soluble agonists (formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), arachidonate, short-chained diacylglycerols (DAG) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)). The authors show that the long-chain lipid bases sphinganine and sphingosine block activation of the burst in human neutrophils. Inhibition is reversible, does not alter cell viability, and does not affect phagocytosis. The inhibition affects the activation mechanism rather than the NADPH-oxidase enzyme. The structural requirements for inhibition include a hydrophobic carbon chain and an amino-containing headgroup, and the naturally occurring erythro sphinganine was more potent than the threo isomer. Activation of the oxidative burst by a variety of agonists was blocked by the same concentration of sphinganine indicating a common inhibited step. The authors suggest that the common step is protein kinase C, as evidenced by the following: 1) long-chain bases inhibit PKC in a micelle reconstituted system, 2) PMA-induced phophorylation is inhibited by sphinganine, and 3) sphinganine competes with (/sup 3/H)-phorbol dibutyrate for its cytosolic receptor (i.e. protein kinase C). The authors suggest that sphingoid long-chain bases play a role in the cellular regulations.

  11. Multiplex Eukaryotic Transcription (In)activation: Timing, Bursting and Cycling of a Ratchet Clock Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rybakova, Katja N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Tomaszewska, Aleksandra; Moné, Martijn J.; Carlberg, Carsten; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of eukaryotic transcription is an intricate process that relies on a multitude of regulatory proteins forming complexes on chromatin. Chromatin modifications appear to play a guiding role in protein-complex assembly on chromatin. Together, these processes give rise to stochastic, often bursting, transcriptional activity. Here we present a model of eukaryotic transcription that aims to integrate those mechanisms. We use stochastic and ordinary-differential-equation modeling frameworks to examine various possible mechanisms of gene regulation by multiple transcription factors. We find that the assembly of large transcription factor complexes on chromatin via equilibrium-binding mechanisms is highly inefficient and insensitive to concentration changes of single regulatory proteins. An alternative model that lacks these limitations is a cyclic ratchet mechanism. In this mechanism, small protein complexes assemble sequentially on the promoter. Chromatin modifications mark the completion of a protein complex assembly, and sensitize the local chromatin for the assembly of the next protein complex. In this manner, a strict order of protein complex assemblies is attained. Even though the individual assembly steps are highly stochastic in duration, a sequence of them gives rise to a remarkable precision of the transcription cycle duration. This mechanism explains how transcription activation cycles, lasting for tens of minutes, derive from regulatory proteins residing on chromatin for only tens of seconds. Transcriptional bursts are an inherent feature of such transcription activation cycles. Bursting transcription can cause individual cells to remain in synchrony transiently, offering an explanation of transcriptional cycling as observed in cell populations, both on promoter chromatin status and mRNA levels. PMID:25909187

  12. Orange Peel Extracts: Chemical Characterization, Antioxidant, Antioxidative Burst, and Phytotoxic Activities.

    PubMed

    Erukainure, Ochuko L; Ebuehi, Osaretin A T; Iqbal Chaudhary, M; Mesaik, M Ahmed; Shukralla, Ahmed; Muhammad, Aliyu; Zaruwa, Moses Z; Elemo, Gloria N

    2016-09-01

    The search for novel drugs and alternative medicine has led to increased research in medicinal plants. Among such plants is the orange fruit. Its peels have been utilized for long as an active ingredient in most traditional medicines. This study aims at investigating the chemical properties of the hexane and dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of orange peel as well as their biological potentials. Blended peels were extracted with n-hexane and n-dichloromethane, respectively. The resulting extracts were subjected to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) characterization. The extracts were also assayed for free radical scavenging ability against 1,1 -diphenyl -2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), antioxidative burst via measuring luminol -amplified chemiluminescence response in human blood, and phytotoxicity against lemna minor. GCMS analysis revealed a predominance of fatty acid methyl esters in the hexane extract, while the DCM extract had more ketone metabolites. The DCM extract had significant (p < .05) higher free radical scavenging and antioxidative burst activities compared to the hexane. Both extracts revealed a significantly (p < .05) high phytotoxicity activity. Results from this study indicated that solvent type played a vital a role in the extraction of secondary metabolites, which are responsible for the observed biological activities. The higher activities by the DCM extract can be attributed to its constituents as revealed by GCMS analysis. There is great need to explore the phytotoxicity potentials of both extracts as natural herbicides. PMID:26930349

  13. Predictive features of persistent activity emergence in regular spiking and intrinsic bursting model neurons.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2012-01-01

    Proper functioning of working memory involves the expression of stimulus-selective persistent activity in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which refers to neural activity that persists for seconds beyond the end of the stimulus. The mechanisms which PFC pyramidal neurons use to discriminate between preferred vs. neutral inputs at the cellular level are largely unknown. Moreover, the presence of pyramidal cell subtypes with different firing patterns, such as regular spiking and intrinsic bursting, raises the question as to what their distinct role might be in persistent firing in the PFC. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS) and an intrinsic bursting (IB) model neuron. We identify synaptic location within the basal dendrites as a feature of stimulus selectivity. Specifically, persistent activity-inducing stimuli consist of activated synapses that are located more distally from the soma compared to non-inducing stimuli, in both model cells. In addition, the action potential (AP) latency and the first few inter-spike-intervals of the neuronal response can be used to reliably detect inducing vs. non-inducing inputs, suggesting a potential mechanism by which downstream neurons can rapidly decode the upcoming emergence of persistent activity. While the two model neurons did not differ in the coding features of persistent activity emergence, the properties of persistent activity, such as the firing pattern and the duration of temporally-restricted persistent activity were distinct. Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given stimulus that code for its ability to induce persistent activity and predict differential roles of RS and IB neurons in persistent activity expression. PMID:22570601

  14. Electrically Elicited Muscle Torque: Comparison Between 2500-Hz Burst-Modulated Alternating Current and Monophasic Pulsed Current.

    PubMed

    Scott, Wayne; Adams, Cheryl; Cyr, Shantelle; Hanscom, Brianna; Hill, Kevin; Lawson, Jeffrey; Ziegenbein, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Single-blind, block-randomization crossover design. Objective To compare the knee extensor muscle torque production elicited with 2500-Hz burst-modulated alternating current (BMAC) and with a monophasic pulsed current (MPC) at the maximum tolerated stimulation intensity. Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is often used for strengthening the quadriceps following knee surgery. Strength gains are dependent on muscle torque production, which is primarily limited by discomfort. Burst-modulated alternating current stimulation is a clinically popular waveform for NMES. Prior research has established that MPC with a relatively long pulse duration is effective for high muscle torque production. Methods Participants in this study were 20 adults with no history of knee injury. A crossover design was used to randomize the order in which each participant's dominant or nondominant lower extremity received NMES and the waveform (MPC or BMAC) this limb received. Stimulation intensity was incrementally increased until participants reached their maximum tolerance. The torque produced was converted to a percentage of each participant's maximum volitional isometric contraction of the respective limb. Results A general linear model for a 2-treatment, 2-period crossover design was utilized to analyze the results. The mean SD electrically induced percent maximum volitional isometric contraction at maximal participant tolerance was 49.5% 19.6% for MPC and 29.8% 12.4% for BMAC. This difference was statistically significant (P = .002) after ccounting for treatment order and limb, which had no effect on torque production. Conclusion Neuromuscular stimulation using MPC may be more efficacious than using BMAC to achieve a high torque output in patients with quadriceps weakness. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(12):1035-1041. Epub 10 Nov 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5861. PMID:26556393

  15. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts

    PubMed Central

    Dranias, Mark R.; Westover, M. Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI. PMID:25755638

  16. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Harbort, C J; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Amulic, Borko

    2015-12-24

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  17. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Harbort, C. J.; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M.; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  18. NMDA receptor-mediated rhythmic bursting activity in rat supraoptic nucleus neurones in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, B; Bourque, C W

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were obtained from 112 supraoptic nucleus magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) in superfused explants of rat hypothalamus maintained in vitro. The effects of glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists were examined at 32-34 degrees C. 2. In control solutions, spontaneously active (> 5 Hz) phasic or continuous neurones showed interspike interval distributions slightly skewed toward short intervals, but did not feature pauses in the 0.4-2 s range. Current injection to alter the rate of cell discharge shifted the histograms according to the mean firing rate, but failed to induce intermittent pauses in the 0.4-2 s range. 3. Application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) induced a mode of firing in which bimodal interspike interval distributions reflected a high incidence of clusters of short interspike intervals (0.5-1.5 s) recurring every 1-3 s. In contrast, firing evoked by application of D,L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxalone propionic acid (AMPA) was not associated with a clustering of impulse discharge. 4. The putative endogenous excitatory amino acid transmitters L-glutamate, L-aspartate and quinolinate all mimicked the effects of NMDA. Clustered spiking responses to these agents were reversibly blocked by D,L-2-amino-5-phosphono-valerate (APV), but not by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). In contrast, the non-NMDA receptor ligands kainate and quisqualate caused CNQX-sensitive increases in firing rate, but these responses were not associated with the appearance of clustered activity. 5. When applied to cells showing negative resting potentials (< -70 mV), or to neurones hyperpolarized by current injection, responses to NMDA consisted of rhythmic (approximately 1 Hz) voltage oscillations associated with bursts of spike discharge. In the presence of TTX, NMDA could induce subthreshold voltage oscillations in the absence of action potentials. 6. Application of a voltage clamp to potentials between -75 and -55 mV during rhythmic bursting responses failed to reveal any rhythmic oscillation of the membrane current. In all cases, rhythmic bursting activity resumed upon returning to the current-clamp mode. 7. Rhythmic bursting responses to NMDA application were abolished in Mg(2+)-free solutions, suggesting that the voltage dependence of NMDA channels served to promote regenerative voltage changes throughout the cycle. The NMDA-induced current itself, however, did not appear to decrease with time, suggesting that a distinct, outward current, was necessary to initiate the repolarizing phase of each cycle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1302282

  19. Bursting characteristics of a neuron model based on a concept of potential with active areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Koji; Suenaga, Shinya

    2008-06-01

    We present various bursting wave forms that are obtained from a simple model of the Hodgkin-Huxley type. The model is a typical example whose characteristics can be discussed through the concept of potential with active areas. A potential function is able to provide a global landscape for dynamics of a model, and the dynamics are explained in relation to the disposition of the active areas on the potential. We obtain the potential functions and the active areas for the Hindmarsh-Rose model, the Morris-Lecar system, and the Hodgkin-Huxley system, and hence, we are able to discuss the common properties among these models based on the concept of potential with active areas.

  20. A codimension-2 bifurcation controlling endogenous bursting activity and pulse-triggered responses of a neuron model.

    PubMed

    Barnett, William H; Cymbalyuk, Gennady S

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of individual neurons are crucial for producing functional activity in neuronal networks. An open question is how temporal characteristics can be controlled in bursting activity and in transient neuronal responses to synaptic input. Bifurcation theory provides a framework to discover generic mechanisms addressing this question. We present a family of mechanisms organized around a global codimension-2 bifurcation. The cornerstone bifurcation is located at the intersection of the border between bursting and spiking and the border between bursting and silence. These borders correspond to the blue sky catastrophe bifurcation and the saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle (SNIC) curves, respectively. The cornerstone bifurcation satisfies the conditions for both the blue sky catastrophe and SNIC. The burst duration and interburst interval increase as the inverse of the square root of the difference between the corresponding bifurcation parameter and its bifurcation value. For a given set of burst duration and interburst interval, one can find the parameter values supporting these temporal characteristics. The cornerstone bifurcation also determines the responses of silent and spiking neurons. In a silent neuron with parameters close to the SNIC, a pulse of current triggers a single burst. In a spiking neuron with parameters close to the blue sky catastrophe, a pulse of current temporarily silences the neuron. These responses are stereotypical: the durations of the transient intervals-the duration of the burst and the duration of latency to spiking-are governed by the inverse-square-root laws. The mechanisms described here could be used to coordinate neuromuscular control in central pattern generators. As proof of principle, we construct small networks that control metachronal-wave motor pattern exhibited in locomotion. This pattern is determined by the phase relations of bursting neurons in a simple central pattern generator modeled by a chain of oscillators. PMID:24497927

  1. 76 FR 28460 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Rock Burst...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... additional information, see the related notice published in the Federal Register on January 19, 2011 (76 FR...; Rock Burst Control Plan--Pertains to Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... rock burst plan within 90 days after a rock burst has been experienced. Stress data are...

  2. The 2001 April Burst Activation of SGR 1900+14: Pulse Properties and Torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, P. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Goegues, E.; Finger, M. H.; Feroci, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Swank, J. H.; Hurley, K.; Heise, J.; Smith, D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report on observations of SGR 1900+14 made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and BeppoSAX during the April 2001 burst activation of the source. Using these data, we measure the spindown torque on the star and confirm earlier findings that the torque and burst activity are not directly correlated. We compare the X-ray pulse profile to the gamma-ray profile during the April 18 intermediate flare and show that (i) their shapes are similar and (ii) the gamma-ray profile aligns closely in phase with the X-ray pulsations. The good phase alignment of the gamma-ray and X-ray profiles suggests that there was no rapid spindown following this flare, in contrast to the August 27 giant flare. The absence of rapid spindown in the hours following the April 18 flare suggests that there was no significant outflow of material as was believed to be present following the August 27 flare. Finally, we discuss how these observations further constrain magnetic field reconfiguration models for the large flares of SGRs.

  3. Large conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ (BK) channels promote secretagogue-induced transition from spiking to bursting in murine anterior pituitary corticotrophs.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Peter J; Şengül, Sevgi; Tabak, Joël; Ruth, Peter; Bertram, Richard; Shipston, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Anterior pituitary corticotroph cells are a central component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis essential for the neuroendocrine response to stress. Corticotrophs are excitable cells that receive input from two hypothalamic secretagogues, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) to control the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Although corticotrophs are spontaneously active and increase in excitability in response to CRH and AVP the patterns of electrical excitability and underlying ionic conductances are poorly understood. In this study, we have used electrophysiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches coupled with mathematical modelling to investigate whether CRH and AVP promote distinct patterns of electrical excitability and to interrogate the role of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels in spontaneous and secretagogue-induced activity. We reveal that BK channels do not play a significant role in the generation of spontaneous activity but are critical for the transition to bursting in response to CRH. In contrast, AVP promotes an increase in single spike frequency, a mechanism independent of BK channels but dependent on background non-selective conductances. Co-stimulation with CRH and AVP results in complex patterns of excitability including increases in both single spike frequency and bursting. The ability of corticotroph excitability to be differentially regulated by hypothalamic secretagogues provides a mechanism for differential control of corticotroph excitability in response to different stressors. PMID:25615909

  4. Bursts of calving activity and controls on the terminus position of Yahtse Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; West, M. E.; Oneel, S.

    2011-12-01

    The tidewater glacier terminus is the interface that links oceanic and glaciological processes. Tidewater glaciers contribute large amounts of cold, fresh water to their fjords. Ocean heat exerts a significant control on glacier mass balance. On the Gulf of Alaska, the terminus of tidewater Yahtse Glacier has advanced slowly since its 1990 post-Little Ice Age minimum. At Yahtse's terminus, ice flowing at 18 m/d encounters water with temperatures of up to 10.5°C (measured 1.5 km from the terminus). Profiles of temperature and salinity in Icy Bay, in which Yahtse Glacier terminates, have revealed a strongly stratified, single-cell circulation pattern. Fresh, glacier outflow exits the bay atop warm, saline Gulf of Alaska water. The Alaska Coastal Current, a major source of Icy Bay water, has warmed by 1°C over the last 40 years. These observations prompt the question of how a tidewater advance may be sustained in spite of warming ocean and atmosphere temperatures. Superimposed on Yahtse Glacier's longer-term advance have been smaller-scale summer retreats and winter-spring re-advances. These smaller fluctuations indicate that factors that change on short timescales, such as ocean conditions and weather, also have an important control on terminus position. Observed bursts in calving frequency are a further reflection of the unsteady conditions at the glacier terminus. In the present study, we use seismograms recorded on bedrock within 500 m of the glacier terminus as a calving counter. The epicenters of a significant majority of glacier-generated seismic events within the St. Elias Mountains have been located to within 15 km of the terminus of Yahtse Glacier. Previous study at Yahtse Glacier has revealed that at least 75% of these seismic events originate from calving processes, most notably through the interactions between iceberg and water. Calving frequency is characterized by a relatively steady rate of background events, punctuated by bursts of calving activity. These bursts are correlated with rain-associated speed-ups that are present along at least 75% of the glacier length. Our analysis of these results considers the relative importance of three potential calving-related processes: along-glacier coupling in glacier flow that forces ice off the end of a submarine terminal moraine, submarine melt and undercutting of the terminus, and enhanced subaerial melt of serac pillars by rainwater that weakens the foundations of these pillars.

  5. Novel types of bistability in a model of a bursting pacemaker neuron RPa1 from the snail, Helix pomatia.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, T

    2013-03-01

    The RPa1 neuron identified in the snail, Helix pomatia, produced a variety of electrical activities (e.g. bursting and spiking). A previously developed mathematical model, which described these activities, revealed bistability between bursting and chaotic spiking, where chaotic spiking was transformed into bursting by a short-lasting external stimulus, and vice versa. The present study used this model to detect other types of bistability, i.e. bistability between bursting and period-2 spiking and between bursting and period-4 spiking (period-2 and -4 spiking are generated by period-doubling bifurcation). This contributes to our understanding of the electrophysiological properties of RPa1. PMID:23567837

  6. Science Activities in Energy: Electrical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 16 activities relating to electrical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined in a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  7. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to the regulation of destructive ROS production in conditions such as periodontal disease. PMID:24716188

  8. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S.; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L. Jack

    2013-01-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (−0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (−0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (−0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to the regulation of destructive ROS production in conditions such as periodontal disease. PMID:24716188

  9. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors enhances persistent sodium current and rhythmic bursting in main olfactory bulb external tufted cells

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmically bursting olfactory bulb external tufted (ET) cells are thought to play a key role in synchronizing glomerular network activity to respiratory-driven sensory input. Whereas spontaneous bursting in these cells is intrinsically generated by interplay of several voltage-dependent currents, bursting strength and frequency can be modified by local intrinsic and centrifugal synaptic input. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) engages a calcium-dependent cation current (ICAN) that increases rhythmic bursting, but mGluRs may also modulate intrinsic mechanisms involved in bursting. Here, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology in rat olfactory bulb slices to investigate whether mGluRs modulate two key intrinsic currents involved in ET cell burst initiation: persistent sodium (INaP) and hyperpolarization-activated cation (Ih) currents. Using a BAPTA-based internal solution to block ICAN, we found that the mGluR1/5 agonist DHPG enhanced INaP but did not alter Ih. INaP enhancement consisted of increased current at membrane potentials between −60 and −50 mV and a hyperpolarizing shift in activation threshold. Both effects would be predicted to shorten the interburst interval. In agreement, DHPG modestly depolarized (∼3.5 mV) ET cells and increased burst frequency without effect on other major burst parameters. This increase was inversely proportional to the basal burst rate such that slower ET cells exhibited the largest increases. This may enable ET cells with slow intrinsic burst rates to pace with faster sniff rates. Taken with other findings, these results indicate that multiple neurotransmitter mechanisms are engaged to fine-tune rhythmic ET cell bursting to context- and state-dependent changes in sniffing frequency. PMID:24225539

  10. Intermittent Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters Electrical Properties of Fast-Spiking Neocortical Interneurons in an Age-Dependent Fashion

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenrath, Kathrin; Härtig, Wolfgang; Funke, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of human cortical excitability by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) appears to be in part related to changed activity of inhibitory systems. Our own studies showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) applied via rTMS to rat cortex primarily affects the parvalbumin-expressing (PV) fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), evident via a strongly reduced PV expression. We further found the iTBS effect on PV to be age-dependent since no reduction in PV could be induced before the perineuronal nets (PNNs) of FSIs start to grow around postnatal day (PD) 30. To elucidate possible iTBS-induced changes in the electrical properties of FSIs and cortical network activity during cortical critical period, we performed ex vivo—in vitro whole-cell patch clamp recordings from pre-labeled FSIs in the current study. FSIs of verum iTBS-treated rats displayed a higher excitability than sham-treated controls at PD29–38, evident as higher rates of induced action potential firing at low current injections (100–200 pA) and a more depolarized resting membrane potential. This effect was absent in younger (PD26–28) and older animals (PD40–62). Slices of verum iTBS-treated rats further showed higher rates of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). Based on these and previous findings we conclude that FSIs are particularly sensitive to TBS during early cortical development, when FSIs show an activity-driven step of maturation which is paralleled by intense growth of the PNNs and subsequent closure of the cortical critical period. Although to be proven further, rTMS may be a possible early intervention to compensate for hypo-activity related mal-development of cortical neuronal circuits. PMID:27065812

  11. Intermittent Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Alters Electrical Properties of Fast-Spiking Neocortical Interneurons in an Age-Dependent Fashion.

    PubMed

    Hoppenrath, Kathrin; Härtig, Wolfgang; Funke, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of human cortical excitability by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) appears to be in part related to changed activity of inhibitory systems. Our own studies showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) applied via rTMS to rat cortex primarily affects the parvalbumin-expressing (PV) fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), evident via a strongly reduced PV expression. We further found the iTBS effect on PV to be age-dependent since no reduction in PV could be induced before the perineuronal nets (PNNs) of FSIs start to grow around postnatal day (PD) 30. To elucidate possible iTBS-induced changes in the electrical properties of FSIs and cortical network activity during cortical critical period, we performed ex vivo-in vitro whole-cell patch clamp recordings from pre-labeled FSIs in the current study. FSIs of verum iTBS-treated rats displayed a higher excitability than sham-treated controls at PD29-38, evident as higher rates of induced action potential firing at low current injections (100-200 pA) and a more depolarized resting membrane potential. This effect was absent in younger (PD26-28) and older animals (PD40-62). Slices of verum iTBS-treated rats further showed higher rates of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). Based on these and previous findings we conclude that FSIs are particularly sensitive to TBS during early cortical development, when FSIs show an activity-driven step of maturation which is paralleled by intense growth of the PNNs and subsequent closure of the cortical critical period. Although to be proven further, rTMS may be a possible early intervention to compensate for hypo-activity related mal-development of cortical neuronal circuits. PMID:27065812

  12. Unusual Central Engine Activity in the Double Burst GRB 110709B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Burrows, David N.; Zhang, Bing; Mészáros, Peter; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Stratta, Giulia; D'Elia, Valerio; Frederiks, Dmitry; Golenetskii, Sergey; Cummings, Jay R.; Norris, Jay P.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-04-01

    The double burst, GRB 110709B, triggered the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) twice at 21:32:39 UT and 21:43:45 UT, respectively, on 2011 July 9. This is the first time we observed a gamma-ray burst (GRB) with two BAT triggers. In this paper, we present simultaneous Swift and Konus-WIND observations of this unusual GRB and its afterglow. If the two events originated from the same physical progenitor, their different time-dependent spectral evolution suggests they must belong to different episodes of the central engine, which may be a magnetar-to-BH accretion system.

  13. UNUSUAL CENTRAL ENGINE ACTIVITY IN THE DOUBLE BURST GRB 110709B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Binbin; Burrows, David N.; Meszaros, Peter; Falcone, Abraham D.; Zhang Bing; Wang Xiangyu; Stratta, Giulia; D'Elia, Valerio; Frederiks, Dmitry; Golenetskii, Sergey; Cummings, Jay R.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil; Norris, Jay P.

    2012-04-01

    The double burst, GRB 110709B, triggered the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) twice at 21:32:39 UT and 21:43:45 UT, respectively, on 2011 July 9. This is the first time we observed a gamma-ray burst (GRB) with two BAT triggers. In this paper, we present simultaneous Swift and Konus-WIND observations of this unusual GRB and its afterglow. If the two events originated from the same physical progenitor, their different time-dependent spectral evolution suggests they must belong to different episodes of the central engine, which may be a magnetar-to-BH accretion system.

  14. Radio afterglow rebrightening: evidence for multiple active phases in gamma-ray burst central engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Biao; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Rice, Jared

    2015-09-01

    The rebrightening phenomenon is an interesting feature in some X-ray, optical, and radio afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here, we propose a possible energy-supply assumption to explain the rebrightenings of radio afterglows, in which the central engine with multiple active phases can supply at least two GRB pulses in a typical GRB duration time. Considering the case of double pulses supplied by the central engine, the double pulses have separate physical parameters, except for the number density of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Their independent radio afterglows are integrated by the ground detectors to form the rebrightening phenomenon. In this Letter, we firstly simulate diverse rebrightening light curves under consideration of different and independent physical parameters. Using this assumption, we also give our best fit to the radio afterglow of GRB 970508 at three frequencies of 1.43, 4.86, and 8.46 GHz. We suggest that the central engine may be active continuously at a timescale longer than that of a typical GRB duration time as many authors have suggested (e.g., Zhang et al., Astrophys. J. 787:66, 2014; Gao and Mészáros, Astrophys. J. 802:90, 2015), and that it may supply enough energy to cause the long-lasting rebrightenings observed in some GRB afterglows.

  15. Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical

  16. The activated SA and JA signaling pathways have an influence on flg22-triggered oxidative burst and callose deposition.

    PubMed

    Yi, So Young; Shirasu, Ken; Moon, Jae Sun; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kwon, Suk-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    The first line of defense in plants against pathogens is induced by the recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMP). Perception of bacterial flagellin (flg22) by the pattern recognition receptor flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2) is the best characterized MAMP response, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we studied the relationship between salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA) signaling and FLS2-mediated signaling by monitoring flg22-triggered responses in known SA or JA related mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. The sid2 mutant, impaired in SA biosynthesis, had less basal FLS2 mRNA accumulation than the wild type, which correlated with suppression of early flg22 responses such as ROS production and induction of marker genes, WRKY29 and FRK1. The JA-signaling mutants, jar1 and coi1, exhibited an enhanced flg22-triggered oxidative burst and more callose accumulation than the wild type, and pretreatment with SA or coronatine (COR), a structural mimic of JA-isoleucine, altered these flg22-induced responses. Nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) acted downstream of SID2 and required SA-dependent priming for the enhanced flg22-triggered oxidative burst and callose deposition. Activation of JA signaling by COR pretreatment suppressed the flg22-triggered oxidative burst and callose accumulation in a coronatine insensitive 1 (COI1) dependent manner. COR had a negative effect on flg22 responses but only the flg22-triggered oxidative burst depended on SA-JA/COR signaling antagonism. Thus the activated SA and JA signaling pathways have an influence on flg22-triggered oxidative burst and callose deposition. These results may explain how SA and JA signaling are cross talked for regulation of flg22-triggered responses. PMID:24586453

  17. Magnetotail Flow Bursts: Association to Global Magnetospheric Circulation, Relationship to Ionospheric Activity and Direct Evidence for Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelopoulos, V.; Phan, T. D.; Larson, D. E.; Mozer, F. S.; Lin, R. P.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A series of bursty bulk flow events (BBFs) were observed by GEOTAIL and WIND in the geomagnetotail. IMP8 at the solar wind showed significant energy coupling into the magnetosphere, while the UVI instrument of POALR evidenced significant energy transfer to the ionosphere during two substorms. There was good correlation between BBFs and ionospheric activity observed by UVI even when ground magnetic signatures were absent, suggesting that low ionospheric conductivity at the active sector may be responsible for this observation. During the second substorm no significant flux transport was evidenced past WIND in stark contrast to GEOTAIL and despite the small intersatellite separation ((3.54, 2.88, -0.06) Re). Throughout the intervals studied there were significant differences in the individual flow bursts at the two satellites, even during longitudinally extended ionospheric activations. We conclude that the half-scale-size of transport bearing flow bursts is less than 3 Re.

  18. Concealed expansion of immature precursors underpins acute burst of adult HSC activity in foetal liver.

    PubMed

    Rybtsov, Stanislav; Ivanovs, Andrejs; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-04-15

    One day prior to mass emergence of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the foetal liver at E12.5, the embryo contains only a few definitive HSCs. It is thought that the burst of HSC activity in the foetal liver is underpinned by rapid maturation of immature embryonic precursors of definitive HSCs, termed pre-HSCs. However, because pre-HSCs are not detectable by direct transplantations into adult irradiated recipients, the size and growth of this population, which represents the embryonic rudiment of the adult haematopoietic system, remains uncertain. Using a novel quantitative assay, we demonstrate that from E9.5 the pre-HSC pool undergoes dramatic growth in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region and by E11.5 reaches the size that matches the number of definitive HSCs in the E12.5 foetal liver. Thus, this study provides for the first time a quantitative basis for our understanding of how the large population of definitive HSCs emerges in the foetal liver. PMID:27095492

  19. Concealed expansion of immature precursors underpins acute burst of adult HSC activity in foetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovs, Andrejs; Zhao, Suling; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    One day prior to mass emergence of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the foetal liver at E12.5, the embryo contains only a few definitive HSCs. It is thought that the burst of HSC activity in the foetal liver is underpinned by rapid maturation of immature embryonic precursors of definitive HSCs, termed pre-HSCs. However, because pre-HSCs are not detectable by direct transplantations into adult irradiated recipients, the size and growth of this population, which represents the embryonic rudiment of the adult haematopoietic system, remains uncertain. Using a novel quantitative assay, we demonstrate that from E9.5 the pre-HSC pool undergoes dramatic growth in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region and by E11.5 reaches the size that matches the number of definitive HSCs in the E12.5 foetal liver. Thus, this study provides for the first time a quantitative basis for our understanding of how the large population of definitive HSCs emerges in the foetal liver. PMID:27095492

  20. Bursting and synchronization transition in the coupled modified ML neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haixia; Lu, Qishao; Wang, Qingyun

    2008-10-01

    Bursting is an important electrical behavior in neuron's firing. In this paper, based on the fast/slow dynamical bifurcation analysis and the phase plane analysis, two types of bursting are presented in the modified Morris-Lecar neuronal model, and the associated bifurcation mechanisms of switching between the active phase and the silent phase are analyzed. For two coupled bursters, it is found that the same type of coupled bursters may have different synchronization transition path from that of two different types of coupled bursters. The analysis of bursting types and the transition to synchronization may provide us with better insight into neuronal encoding and information transmission.

  1. Mathematical modeling of gap junction coupling and electrical activity in human β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Braun, Matthias; Filippi, Simonetta; Gram Pedersen, Morten

    2015-12-01

    Coordinated insulin secretion is controlled by electrical coupling of pancreatic β-cells due to connexin-36 gap junctions. Gap junction coupling not only synchronizes the heterogeneous β-cell population, but can also modify the electrical behavior of the cells. These phenomena have been widely studied with mathematical models based on data from mouse β-cells. However, it is now known that human β-cell electrophysiology shows important differences to its rodent counterpart, and although human pancreatic islets express connexin-36 and show evidence of β-cell coupling, these aspects have been little investigated in human β-cells. Here we investigate theoretically, the gap junction coupling strength required for synchronizing electrical activity in a small cluster of cells simulated with a recent mathematical model of human β-cell electrophysiology. We find a lower limit for the coupling strength of approximately 20 pS (i.e., normalized to cell size, ˜2 pS pF-1) below which spiking electrical activity is asynchronous. To confront this theoretical lower bound with data, we use our model to estimate from an experimental patch clamp recording that the coupling strength is approximately 100-200 pS (10-20 pS pF-1), similar to previous estimates in mouse β-cells. We then investigate the role of gap junction coupling in synchronizing and modifying other forms of electrical activity in human β-cell clusters. We find that electrical coupling can prolong the period of rapid bursting electrical activity, and synchronize metabolically driven slow bursting, in particular when the metabolic oscillators are in phase. Our results show that realistic coupling conductances are sufficient to promote synchrony in small clusters of human β-cells as observed experimentally, and provide motivation for further detailed studies of electrical coupling in human pancreatic islets.

  2. Mathematical modeling of gap junction coupling and electrical activity in human β-cells.

    PubMed

    Loppini, Alessandro; Braun, Matthias; Filippi, Simonetta; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2015-12-01

    Coordinated insulin secretion is controlled by electrical coupling of pancreatic β-cells due to connexin-36 gap junctions. Gap junction coupling not only synchronizes the heterogeneous β-cell population, but can also modify the electrical behavior of the cells. These phenomena have been widely studied with mathematical models based on data from mouse β-cells. However, it is now known that human β-cell electrophysiology shows important differences to its rodent counterpart, and although human pancreatic islets express connexin-36 and show evidence of β-cell coupling, these aspects have been little investigated in human β-cells. Here we investigate theoretically, the gap junction coupling strength required for synchronizing electrical activity in a small cluster of cells simulated with a recent mathematical model of human β-cell electrophysiology. We find a lower limit for the coupling strength of approximately 20 pS (i.e., normalized to cell size, ∼2 pS pF(-1)) below which spiking electrical activity is asynchronous. To confront this theoretical lower bound with data, we use our model to estimate from an experimental patch clamp recording that the coupling strength is approximately 100-200 pS (10-20 pS pF(-1)), similar to previous estimates in mouse β-cells. We then investigate the role of gap junction coupling in synchronizing and modifying other forms of electrical activity in human β-cell clusters. We find that electrical coupling can prolong the period of rapid bursting electrical activity, and synchronize metabolically driven slow bursting, in particular when the metabolic oscillators are in phase. Our results show that realistic coupling conductances are sufficient to promote synchrony in small clusters of human β-cells as observed experimentally, and provide motivation for further detailed studies of electrical coupling in human pancreatic islets. PMID:26403477

  3. Energy dependence on the electric activities of a neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xin-Lin; Jin, Wu-Yin; Ma, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A nonlinear circuit can be designed by using inductor, resistor, capacitor and other electric devices, and the electromagnetic field energy can be released from the circuit in the oscillating state. The generation of spikes or bursting states in neurons could be energetically a costly process. Based on the Helmholtz’s theorem, a Hamilton energy function is defined to detect the energy shift induced by transition of electric modes in a Hindmarsh-Rose neuron. It is found that the energy storage is dependent on the external forcing, and energy release is associated with the electric mode. As a result, the bursting state and chaotic state could be helpful to release the energy in the neuron quickly. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11372122 and 11365014).

  4. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

    PubMed

    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination. PMID:25122889

  5. How long does a burst burst?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.; Zhang, Bing; Murase, Kohta

    2014-05-20

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (∼hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (∼minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these 'ultra-long GRBs' may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t {sub burst} based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t {sub burst} can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this 'good' sample, 21.9% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 3} s and 11.5% GRBs have t {sub burst} ≳ 10{sup 4} s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t {sub burst} in this sample. However, when we consider an 'undetermined' sample (304 GRBs) with t {sub burst} possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T {sub 90} and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t {sub burst} falling into the first Swift orbital 'dead zone' due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t {sub burst} distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T {sub 90} duration and it does not even correlate with T {sub 90}. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T {sub 90} and the size of the progenitor star.

  6. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L.

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  7. Mimicking muscle activity with electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lise A.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation is a rehabilitation technology that can restore some degree of motor function in individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury or stroke. One way to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of muscle stimulation needed to elicit complex upper limb movements is to use electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from able-bodied subjects as a template for electrical stimulation. However, this requires a transfer function to convert the recorded (or predicted) EMG signals into an appropriate pattern of electrical stimulation. Here we develop a generalized transfer function that maps EMG activity into a stimulation pattern that modulates muscle output by varying both the pulse frequency and the pulse amplitude. We show that the stimulation patterns produced by this transfer function mimic the active state measured by EMG insofar as they reproduce with good fidelity the complex patterns of joint torque and joint displacement.

  8. Induction of nitric oxide and respiratory burst response in activated goldfish macrophages requires potassium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Stafford, James L; Galvez, Fernando; Goss, Gregory G; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2002-06-01

    Potassium channel activity is important for modulating mammalian macrophage antimicrobial functions. The involvement of potassium channels in mediation of immune cell function in lower vertebrates, such as teleost, has not been explored. Since relatively little is known about the types of potassium channels present in fish macrophages, pharmacological blockers with broad ranges of activity were tested: 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), quinine, and tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA). The potassium channel blockers inhibited reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) production by goldfish macrophages activated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or macrophage activating factor (MAF)-containing supernatants. Quinine was the most potent inhibitor with an IC(50) of 50 microM, while the other blockers, 4-AP and TEA, had IC(50) of 1.2 and 0.6mM, respectively. A reversible depolarization of the goldfish macrophage plasma membrane potential (Vm) was observed following treatments with potassium channel blockers, and was related to transcriptional changes in the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene (iNOS). Down-regulation of antimicrobial activities and depolarization of the goldfish macrophage plasma membrane were not a consequence of reduced cell number or viability, suggesting that potassium channels are required for generation of appropriate goldfish macrophage antimicrobial functions. PMID:11906724

  9. Aluminum induces oxidative burst, cell wall NADH peroxidase activity, and DNA damage in root cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Achary, V Mohan M; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Panda, Brahma B

    2012-08-01

    Plants under stress incur an oxidative burst that involves a rapid and transient overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS: O(2) (•-) , H(2) O(2) , (•) OH). We hypothesized that aluminum (Al), an established soil pollutant that causes plant stress, would induce an oxidative burst through the activation of cell wall-NADH peroxidase (NADH-PX) and/or plasma membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NADPH-OX), leading to DNA damage in the root cells of Allium cepa L. Growing roots of A. cepa were treated with Al(3+) (800 μM of AlCl(3) ) for 3 or 6 hr without or with the pretreatment of inhibitors specific to NADH-PX and NADPH-OX for 2 hr. At the end of the treatment, the extent of ROS generation, cell death, and DNA damage were determined. The cell wall-bound protein (CWP) fractions extracted from the untreated control and the Al-treated roots under the aforementioned experimental conditions were also subjected to in vitro studies, which measured the extent of activation of peroxidase/oxidase, generation of (•) OH, and DNA damage. Overall, the present study demonstrates that the cell wall-bound NADH-PX contributes to the Al-induced oxidative burst through the generation of ROS that lead to cell death and DNA damage in the root cells of A. cepa. Furthermore, the in vitro studies revealed that the CWP fraction by itself caused DNA damage in the presence of NADH, supporting a role for NADH-PX in the stress response. Altogether, this study underscores the crucial function of the cell wall-bound NADH-PX in the oxidative burst-mediated cell death and DNA damage in plants under Al stress. PMID:22865669

  10. Activity of long-lead burst neurons in pontine reticular formation during head-unrestrained gaze shifts

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    Primates explore a visual scene through a succession of saccades. Much of what is known about the neural circuitry that generates these movements has come from neurophysiological studies using subjects with their heads restrained. Horizontal saccades and the horizontal components of oblique saccades are associated with high-frequency bursts of spikes in medium-lead burst neurons (MLBs) and long-lead burst neurons (LLBNs) in the paramedian pontine reticular formation. For LLBNs, the high-frequency burst is preceded by a low-frequency prelude that begins 12–150 ms before saccade onset. In terms of the lead time between the onset of prelude activity and saccade onset, the anatomical projections, and the movement field characteristics, LLBNs are a heterogeneous group of neurons. Whether this heterogeneity is endemic of multiple functional subclasses is an open question. One possibility is that some may carry signals related to head movement. We recorded from LLBNs while monkeys performed head-unrestrained gaze shifts, during which the kinematics of the eye and head components were dissociable. Many cells had peak firing rates that never exceeded 200 spikes/s for gaze shifts of any vector. The activity of these low-frequency cells often persisted beyond the end of the gaze shift and was usually related to head-movement kinematics. A subset was tested during head-unrestrained pursuit and showed clear modulation in the absence of saccades. These “low-frequency” cells were intermingled with MLBs and traditional LLBNs and may represent a separate functional class carrying signals related to head movement. PMID:24174648

  11. Electric current neutralization in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmasse, Kévin; Aulanier, Guillaume; Török, Tibor; Démoulin, Pascal; Pariat, Etienne; Kliem, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    There is a recurring question in solar physics of whether or not photospheric vertical electric currents are neutralized in solar active regions, i.e., whether or not the total electric current integrated over a single magnetic polarity of an active region vanishes. While different arguments have been proposed in favor of, or against, the neutralization of electric currents, both theory and observations are still not fully conclusive. Providing the answer to this question is crucial for theoretical models of solar eruptions. Indeed, if currents are neutralized in active regions, then any eruption model based on net - i.e., non-zero - electric currents, such as the torus instability, requires further consideration. We address the question of electric current neutralization in active regions using 3D zero-beta MHD simulations of line-tied, slow photospheric driving motions imposed on an initially potential magnetic field. We compare our results to a recent study of the build-up of coronal electric currents in an MHD simulation of the emergence of a current-neutralized twisted flux tube into the solar atmosphere. Our parametric study shows that, in accordance with the flux emergence simulation, photospheric motions are associated with the formation of both direct and return currents. It further shows that both processes (flux emergence and photospheric flows) can lead to the formation of strong net currents in the solar corona, and that the non-neutralization of electric currents is related to the presence of magnetic shear at the polarity inversion line. We discuss the implications of our results for the observations and for theoretical models of solar eruptions.

  12. Respiratory burst activity of intestinal macrophages in normal and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Y R; Wu, K C; Jewell, D P

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from normal mucosa (greater than 5 cm from tumour) and inflamed mucosa (from patients with inflammatory bowel disease) of colon and ileum were studied for their ability to undergo a respiratory burst as assessed by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium to formazan. Using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonised zymosan as triggers, only a minority (median: 8% for zymosan and 9% for PMA) of macrophages isolated from normal colonic mucosa demonstrated release of oxygen radicals. In contrast, a significantly greater (median: 17% for zymosan and 45% for PMA) proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colonic mucosa were able to undergo respiratory burst. Studies with normal and inflamed ileum showed similar results. Stimulation of macrophages isolated from normal colon with interferon-gamma produced only a small increase in the proportion of cells showing release of oxygen radicals. We conclude that the respiratory burst capacity of majority of macrophages isolated from normal colon and ileum is downregulated and a greater proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colon and ileum are able to undergo a respiratory burst. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2511088

  13. FAST OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF A NAKED-EYE BURST-MANIFESTATION OF THE PERIODIC ACTIVITY OF AN INTERNAL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-08-10

    We imaged the position of the naked-eye burst, GRB080319B, before, during, and after its gamma-ray activity with sub-second temporal resolution using the TORTORA wide-field camera. The burst optical prompt emission, which reached 5.3 mag, has been detected, and its periodic optical variability has been discovered in the form of four equidistant flashes with a duration of several seconds. We also detected a strong correlation (r {approx} 0.82) between optical and gamma-ray light curves with a 2 s delay of the optical emission with respect to the gamma-ray emission. The revealed temporal structure of the optical light curve in comparison with the gamma-ray light curve can be interpreted in the framework of the model of shell collisions in the ejecta containing a significant neutron component. All observed emission features reflect the non-stationary behavior of the burst internal engine-supposedly, a hyperaccreting solar-mass black hole formed in the collapse of a massive stellar core.

  14. Burst tumulus

    A burst tumulus near Kamokuna, which is a lava delta where Puʻu ʻŌʻō flows enter the Pacific Ocean. Tumuli can burst when the influx of lava is rapid compared to the rate at which the crust is thickening by cooling. In these cases the pressure driving the lava is significant...

  15. Altered intrinsic properties and bursting activities of neurons in layer IV of somatosensory cortex from Fmr-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linming; Liang, Zhanrong; Zhu, Pingping; Li, Meng; Yi, Yong-Hong; Liao, Wei-Ping; Su, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Neuroadaptations and alterations in neuronal excitability are critical in brain maturation and many neurological diseases. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by extensive synaptic and circuit dysfunction. It is still unclear about the alterations in intrinsic excitability of individual neurons and their link to hyperexcitable circuitry. In this study, whole cell patch-clamp recordings were employed to characterize the membrane and firing properties of layer IV cells in slices of the somatosensory cortex of Fmr-1 knockout (KO) mice. These cells generally exhibited a regular spiking (RS) pattern, while there were significant increases in the number of cells that adopted intrinsic bursting (IB) compared with age-matched wild type (WT) cells. The cells subgrouped according to their firing patterns and maturation differed significantly in membrane and discharge properties between KO and WT. The changes in the intrinsic properties were consistent with highly facilitated discharges in KO cells induced by current injection. Spontaneous activities of RS neurons driven by local network were also increased in the KO cells, especially in neonate groups. Under an epileptiform condition mimicked by omission of Mg(2+) in extracellular solution, these RS neurons from KO mice were more likely to switch to burst discharges. Analysis on bursts revealed that the KO cells tended to form burst discharges and even severe events manifested as seizure-like ictal discharges. These results suggest that alterations in intrinsic properties in individual neurons are involved in the abnormal excitability of cortical circuitry and possibly account for the pathogenesis of epilepsy in FXS. PMID:27048919

  16. Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

  17. Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic activity of a protease was electrically detected using nanopore recordings. A peptide substrate was tethered to microscale beads, and cleavage by the enzyme trypsin released a soluble fragment that was electrophoretically driven through the α-hemolysin protein pore, leading to detectable blockades in the ionic current. Owing to its simplicity, this approach to sense enzymatic activity may be applied to other proteases.

  18. Differential activation of signal transduction pathways mediating oxidative burst by chicken heterophils in response to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Farnell, Morgan B; He, Haiqi; Kogut, Michael H

    2003-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been previously shown to mediate oxidative burst in chicken heterophils. This study was conducted to begin to map the molecular pathways that regulate TLR-mediated oxidative burst. Peripheral blood heterophils from neonatal chicks were isolated and exposed to known inhibitors of signal transduction pathways for either 20 min (genistein, verapamil, or chelerythrine) or 120 min (pertussis toxin) at 39 degrees C. The cells were then stimulated for 30 min at 39 degrees C with Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid (LTA). The heterophil oxidative burst was then quantitated by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (LDCL). Genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor), verapamil (a calcium channel blocker), chelerythrine (a protein kinase C inhibitor), and pertussis toxin (a G-protein inhibitor) significantly reduced LPS-stimulated oxidative burst in chicken heterophils by 34, 50, 63, and 51%, respectively. Although genistein had a statistically significant effect on reducing LPS-stimulated LDCL biologically it seems to play only a minor role within the oxidative burst pathway. Heterophils stimulated with the gram-positive TLR agonist, LTA, activated a different signal transduction pathway since chelerythrine was the only inhibitor that significantly reduced (72%) LTA-stimulated oxidative burst. These findings demonstrate that distinct signal transduction pathways differentially regulate the stimulation of oxidative burst in avian heterophils. Pertussis toxin-sensitive, protein kinase C-dependent, Ca(++)-dependent G proteins appear to regulate oxidative burst of avian heterophils stimulated with gram-negative agonist LPS; whereas, a protein kinase C-dependent signal transduction pathway plays the major role activating the oxidative burst of avian heterophils stimulated with gram-positive agonists. The distinct differences in the response of heterophils to these two agonists illustrate the specificity of TLRs to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP)s. PMID:14527175

  19. SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF ELECTRICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIAL FROM THE TONE-BURST EDDY CURRENT THERMOGRAPHY (TBET) TIME-TEMPERATURE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Biju, N.; Ganesan, N.; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, an inversion method is proposed to determine simultaneously the electrical and thermal properties of a given isotropic material from the time-temperature data obtained from the Tone-Burst Eddy current Thermography (TBET). A multi-physics forward model for computing the surface temperature data was used in a Genetic Algorithm (GA) based inversion technique to determine the material properties such as electrical conductivity (sigma), thermal conductivity (k), density (rho), and specific heat (C{sub p}) simultaneously. Different trials were carried out initially with simulated temperature data (with and without noise). A typical case of inversion of anisotropic material properties using a 2D finite element model is also discussed.

  20. Selectivity Across the Interface: A Test of Surface Activity in the Composition of Organic-Enriched Aerosols from Bubble Bursting.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Richard E; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-05-01

    Although theories have been developed that describe surface activity of organic molecules at the air-water interface, few studies have tested how surface activity impacts the selective transfer of molecules from solution phase into the aerosol phase during bubble bursting. The selective transfer of a series of organic compounds that differ in their solubility and surface activity from solution into the aerosol phase is quantified experimentally for the first time. Aerosol was produced from solutions containing salts and a series of linear carboxlyates (LCs) and dicarboxylates (LDCs) using a bubble bursting process. Surface activity of these molecules dominated the transport across the interface, with enrichment factors of the more surface-active C4-C8 LCs (55 ± 8) being greater than those of C4-C8 LDCs (5 ± 1). Trends in the estimated surface concentrations of LCs at the liquid-air interface agreed well with their relative concentrations in the aerosol phase. In addition, enrichment of LCs was followed by enrichment of calcium with respect to other inorganic cations and depletion of chloride and sulfate. PMID:27093579

  1. Effects of thalidomide on neutrophil respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and transmigration of cytokine- and endotoxin-activated endothelium.

    PubMed

    Dunzendorfer, S; Schratzberger, P; Reinisch, N; Kähler, C M; Wiedermann, C J

    1997-11-01

    Vascular endothelium activated by endotoxin and cytokines plays an important role in organ inflammation and blood leukocyte recruitment. Neutrophils, which are a homogeneous population of effector cells, are rapidly attracted in large numbers to sites of inflammation where they form an early response to infection or injury. Excessive production of various interleukins, TNF, arachidonic acid metabolites, and other substances by neutrophils and macrophages results in systemic endothelial cell injury, a fundamental problem. In the present study, we investigated in vitro the effects of thalidomide (THD) on activation of endothelial cells for enhanced transmigration of neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and interleukin-1 (IL-1). Modulation of endotoxin- and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemotaxis and respiratory burst by THD were also studied. Treatment of HUVEC with THD in combination with LPS, TNF, and IL-1, respectively, antagonized LPS-activated transmigration of neutrophils but stimulated the effects of TNF and IL-1. All of the agents used-THD, LPS, TNF, and IL-1-inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis. Addition of THD to the neutrophils had no effect on LPS-inhibited chemotaxis whereas the TNF- and IL-1-induced chemotaxis was modulated in a bimodal manner. However, THD failed to influence neutrophil respiratory burst activity. Results demonstrate that THD differentially affects mediator-induced activation of HUVEC and neutrophils. PMID:9402031

  2. Analysis of neural bursting: nonrhythmic and rhythmic activity in isolated spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Dekhuijzen, A J; Bagust, J

    1996-08-01

    Neuronal firing recorded from primary afferents and central spinal neurons in isolated mammalian spinal cord in vitro was analyzed using interspike interval histograms and Poincaré maps (Return maps). Interspike interval histograms described the time between two successive spikes. However, Poincaré maps represented the interspike interval preceding a spike against the interspike interval following the spike. The variability in firing of neurons occurring naturally in different preparations was explored. In a presumptive single central spinal neuron, the firing pattern provided a single cluster. During bursting in a presumptive single primary afferent, the Poincaré maps provided information on interburst intervals. Moreover, lengthening and or shortening of interspike intervals within bursts can be detected in the maps. The firing of a population of neurons was modulated using a pharmacological intervention with 4-aminopyridine and resulted in a complex Poincaré map. PMID:8872879

  3. Activity-based costing for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Croyle, D.R.; Schapiro, I.A.; Keglevic, P.M. )

    1992-08-01

    This EPRI report is a primer'' on Activity-Based Costing (ABC). ABC is a cost management aproach which can make an important contribution to understanding and controlling the changing costs in the electric utility industry. It is a method for attributing costs to activities, products and services by better understanding the underlying factors which drive those costs. ABC can help utility managers make better decisions through the application of more accurate process and product cost information and a fuller understanding of which activities add value and which do not. Armed with such information, utility managers are better equipped to address many of the strategic and operating decisions which they routinely face. The report introduces the ABC concept and approach to utility managers and offers insights into how ABC can be and is being used to control costs and improve strategic and operating decisions in electric utilities and other industries. The report (1) describes the ABC approach, (2) discusses the value of ABC to elecuic utilities, (3) identifies potential applications of ABC to current utility issues, (4) describes a step-by-step approach to developing and implementing ABC in the utility environment, and (5) presents a survey of more than 30 electric utilities and several detailed case studies of electric utilities and other companies who have adopted and are using ABC.

  4. Lightning and electrical activity during the eruption of Mt. Augustine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Krehbiel, P.; Rison, W.; Aulich, G.; Edens, H.; McNutt, S.; Tytgat, G.; Clark, E.

    2006-12-01

    Lightning during several of the eruptions were observed using a technique that we use to observe thunderstorms. Very high frequency radio emissions (60 MHz) emitted by electrical discharges are located by their times of arrival at several receiving stations. In a typical thunderstorm lightning flash we locate several thousand events giving a 3-D map of the lightning. In mid January we set up two stations about 100 km east of the volcano, near Homer, AK. We received and located the source of thousands of radio emissions from the vicinity of Mt Augustine during the January 28 eruption. With two stations we were able to determine the azimuthal direction to the sources, their power, the time history and relationship to other pulses. On one lightning flash we used an interferometric effect to infer altitude. We observed two distinct forms of electrical activity. The first was many short bursts (less than a milliseconds) that occurred coincident with the explosive eruption. These seemed to be short discharges (up to several hundred meters) that occur just as the material leaves the volcano. The other type was very similar to the lightning that we see in thunderstorms. Most of these lightning flashes began several minutes after the explosive eruption began. Following the largest eruption on January 28 we observed about 300 discharges in a period lasting 11 minutes. Initially these flashes lasted only a few milliseconds, but the final ones lasted more than one half second, had many branches 10's of km in length. Most or all of this lightning was in the plume. Because of the bad weather there were no visual observations. Previous detection of volcanic lightning has been visually or by low frequency radio emissions that detect only the lightning that comes to the ground. These initial observations show that this technique has great potential to detect explosive eruptions and study the details of lightning and the charge structure in the plume.

  5. Bog bursts.

    PubMed

    Tallis, J

    2001-10-01

    Variously attributed to earthquakes, lightening strikes, Acts of God, witchcraft, the wrath of the fairies, or the fertile Irish imagination, bog bursts are dramatic but poorly understood natural phenomena. This article attempts a scientific appraisal. PMID:11584136

  6. U-Shape Suppressive Effect of Phenol Red on the Epileptiform Burst Activity via Activation of Estrogen Receptors in Primary Hippocampal Culture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Ben; Chen, Lulan; Ren, Wan-Ting; Liu, Juan; Wang, Guoxiang; Fan, Wei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Phenol red is widely used in cell culture as a pH indicator. Recently, it also has been reported to have estrogen-like bioactivity and be capable of promoting cell proliferation in different cell lines. However, the effect of phenol red on primary neuronal culture has never been investigated. By using patch clamp technique, we demonstrated that hippocampal pyramidal neurons cultured in neurobasal medium containing no phenol red had large depolarization-associated epileptiform bursting activities, which were rarely seen in neurons cultured in phenol red-containing medium. Further experiment data indicate that the suppressive effect of the phenol red on the abnormal epileptiform burst neuronal activities was U-shape dose related, with the most effective concentration at 28 µM. In addition, this concentration related inhibitory effect of phenol red on the epileptiform neuronal discharges was mimicked by 17-β-estradiol, an estrogen receptor agonist, and inhibited by ICI-182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist. Our results suggest that estrogen receptor activation by phenol red in the culture medium prevents formation of abnormal, epileptiform burst activity. These studies highlight the importance of phenol red as estrogen receptor stimulator and cautions of careful use of phenol red in cell culture media. PMID:23560076

  7. The atmospheric electric global circuit. [thunderstorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasemir, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The hypothesis that world thunderstorm activity represents the generator for the atmospheric electric current flow in the earth atmosphere between ground and the ionosphere is based on a close correlation between the magnitude and the diurnal variation of the supply current (thunderstorm generator current) and the load current (fair weather air-earth current density integrated over the earth surface). The advantages of using lightning survey satellites to furnish a base for accepting or rejecting the thunderstorm generator hypothesis are discussed.

  8. A chemical genetic approach demonstrates that MPK3/MPK6 activation and NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative burst are two independent signaling events in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Xie, Jie; Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-01-01

    Plant recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 triggers rapid activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis has at least four PAMP/pathogen-responsive MAPKs: MPK3, MPK6, MPK4 and MPK11. It was speculated that these MAPKs may function downstream of ROS in plant immunity because of their activation by exogenously added H2 O2 . MPK3/MPK6 or their orthologs in other plant species have also been reported to be involved in the ROS burst from the plant respiratory burst oxidase homolog (Rboh) of the human neutrophil gp91phox. However, detailed genetic analysis is lacking. Using a chemical genetic approach, we generated a conditional loss-of-function mpk3 mpk6 double mutant. Consistent with results obtained using a conditionally rescued mpk3 mpk6 double mutant generated previously, the results obtained using the new conditional loss-of-function mpk3 mpk6 double mutant demonstrate that the flg22-triggered ROS burst is independent of MPK3/MPK6. In Arabidopsis mutants lacking a functional AtRbohD, the flg22-induced ROS burst was completely blocked. However, activation of MPK3/MPK6 was not affected. Based on these results, we conclude that the rapid ROS burst and MPK3/MPK6 activation are two independent early signaling events in plant immunity, downstream of FLS2. We also found that MPK4 negatively affects the flg22-induced ROS burst. In addition, salicylic acid pre-treatment enhances the AtRbohD-mediated ROS burst, which is again independent of MPK3/MPK6 based on analysis of the mpk3 mpk6 double mutant. The establishment of an mpk3 mpk6 double mutant system using a chemical genetic approach provides a powerful tool to investigate the function of MPK3/MPK6 in the plant defense signaling pathway. PMID:24245741

  9. Unusual Central Engine Activity in the Double Burst GRB 110709B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Burrows, David N.; Zhang, Bing; Meszaros, Peter; Stratta, Giulia; D'Elia, Valerio; Frederiks, Dmitry; Golenetskii, S.; Cummings, Jay R.; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Falcone, Abraham D.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The double burst, GRB 110709B, triggered Swift/BAT twice at 21:32:39 UT and 21:43:45 UT, respectively, on 9 July 2011. This is the first time we observed a GRB with two BAT triggers. In this paper, we present simultaneous Swift and Konus-WIND observations of this unusual GRB and its afterglow. If the two events are from the same physical origin, their different time-dependent spectral evolution suggest they must belong to different episodes of the central engine, which may be a magnetar-to-BH accretion system.

  10. Two Step Acceleration Process of Electrons in the Outer Van Allen Radiation Belt by Time Domain Electric Field Bursts and Large Amplitude Chorus Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Lejosne, S.

    2014-12-01

    A huge number of different non-linear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc) have been observed by the electric field experiment on the Van Allen Probes in conjunction with relativistic electron acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt. These structures, found as short duration (~0.1 msec) quasi-periodic bursts of electric field in the high time resolution electric field waveform, have been called Time Domain Structures (TDS). They can quite effectively interact with radiation belt electrons. Due to the trapping of electrons into these non-linear structures, they are accelerated up to ~10 keV and their pitch angles are changed, especially for low energies (˜1 keV). Large amplitude electric field perturbations cause non-linear resonant trapping of electrons into the effective potential of the TDS and these electrons are then accelerated in the non-homogeneous magnetic field. These locally accelerated electrons create the "seed population" of several keV electrons that can be accelerated by coherent, large amplitude, upper band whistler waves to MeV energies in this two step acceleration process. All the elements of this chain acceleration mechanism have been observed by the Van Allen Probes.

  11. Scale-free bursting in human cortex following hypoxia at birth.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James A; Iyer, Kartik K; Finnigan, Simon; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Breakspear, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The human brain is fragile in the face of oxygen deprivation. Even a brief interruption of metabolic supply at birth challenges an otherwise healthy neonatal cortex, leading to a cascade of homeostatic responses. During recovery from hypoxia, cortical activity exhibits a period of highly irregular electrical fluctuations known as burst suppression. Here we show that these bursts have fractal properties, with power-law scaling of burst sizes across a remarkable 5 orders of magnitude and a scale-free relationship between burst sizes and durations. Although burst waveforms vary greatly, their average shape converges to a simple form that is asymmetric at long time scales. Using a simple computational model, we argue that this asymmetry reflects activity-dependent changes in the excitatory-inhibitory balance of cortical neurons. Bursts become more symmetric following the resumption of normal activity, with a corresponding reorganization of burst scaling relationships. These findings place burst suppression in the broad class of scale-free physical processes termed crackling noise and suggest that the resumption of healthy activity reflects a fundamental reorganization in the relationship between neuronal activity and its underlying metabolic constraints. PMID:24806681

  12. Short intense bursts in magmatic activity in the south of Siberian Platform (Angara-Taseeva depression): the paleomagnetic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, A. V.; Veselovskiy, R. V.; Ivanov, A. V.; Fetisova, A. M.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2013-11-01

    Based on the paleomagnetic study of intrusive and explosive Permian-Triassic traps in the Angara River basin, Siberian Platform, it is established that the formation of the traps was marked by three short and highly intense bursts in magmatic activity, which resulted in the intrusion of three large dolerite sills (Tolstomysovsky, Padunsky and Tulunsky) and the deposition of the tuffs of the Kapaevsky Formation. These magmatic bursts occurred against the long-lived less intense background magmatism, which caused the formation of small intrusive bodies and tuff sequences. The geochronological data and correlation of the Angara traps to the effusive trap sequences in the north of the Siberian Platform (Norilsk and Maymecha-Kotuy regions) indicate that intrusion of the Tolstomysovsky sill and eruption of its comagmatic tuffs of the Kapaevsky Formation occurred in the Early Triassic. The obtained paleomagnetic data contradict the existing idea that the Padunsky and Tulunsky sills are coeval. Moreover, these data show that the magmatic bodies of different ages were mistakenly referred to the same sill.

  13. Change and Stability in Active and Passive Social Influence Dynamics during Natural Drinking Events: A Longitudinal Measurement-Burst Study

    PubMed Central

    Cullum, Jerry; O’Grady, Megan; Armeli, Stephen; Tennen, Howard

    2011-01-01

    We examined the link between social norms and active social influences occurring during natural social drinking contexts. Across 4 yearly measurement-bursts, college students (N = 523) reported daily for 30-day periods on drinking norms, drinking offers, how many drinks they accepted, and personal drinking levels during social drinking events. In contexts where drinking norms were higher, students were more likely to both receive and comply with drinking offers. These acute social influences were highly stable throughout college, but affected men and women differently across time: Women received more drinking offers than men, especially at the beginning of college and when norms were higher, but men complied with more drinking offers per occasion. These effects were not attributable to between-person differences in social drinking motives or drinking levels, nor to within-person patterns of situation-selection. The present work suggests that context-specific drinking norms catalyze active social influence attempts, and further promote compliance drinking. PMID:22661826

  14. Complex networks in brain electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, C.; Ruffini, G.; Marco-Pallars, J.; Fuentemilla, L.; Grau, C.

    2007-08-01

    This letter reports a method to extract a functional network of the human brain from electroencephalogram measurements. A network analysis was performed on the resultant network and the statistics of the cluster coefficient, node degree, path length, and physical distance of the links, were studied. Even given the low electrode count of the experimental data the method was able to extract networks with network parameters that clearly depend on the type of stimulus presented to the subject. This type of analysis opens a door to studying the cerebral networks underlying brain electrical activity, and links the fields of complex networks and cognitive neuroscience.

  15. Connexin hemichannels contribute to spontaneous electrical activity in the human fetal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Anna R.; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Sirois, Carissa L.; Belinsky, Glenn S.; Zecevic, Nada; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2014-01-01

    Before the human cortex is able to process sensory information, young postmitotic neurons must maintain occasional bursts of action-potential firing to attract and keep synaptic contacts, to drive gene expression, and to transition to mature membrane properties. Before birth, human subplate (SP) neurons are spontaneously active, displaying bursts of electrical activity (plateau depolarizations with action potentials). Using whole-cell recordings in acute cortical slices, we investigated the source of this early activity. The spontaneous depolarizations in human SP neurons at midgestation (17–23 gestational weeks) were not completely eliminated by tetrodotoxin—a drug that blocks action potential firing and network activity—or by antagonists of glutamatergic, GABAergic, or glycinergic synaptic transmission. We then turned our focus away from standard chemical synapses to connexin-based gap junctions and hemichannels. PCR and immunohistochemical analysis identified the presence of connexins (Cx26/Cx32/Cx36) in the human fetal cortex. However, the connexin-positive cells were not found in clusters but, rather, were dispersed in the SP zone. Also, gap junction-permeable dyes did not diffuse to neighboring cells, suggesting that SP neurons were not strongly coupled to other cells at this age. Application of the gap junction and hemichannel inhibitors octanol, flufenamic acid, and carbenoxolone significantly blocked spontaneous activity. The putative hemichannel antagonist lanthanum alone was a potent inhibitor of the spontaneous activity. Together, these data suggest that connexin hemichannels contribute to spontaneous depolarizations in the human fetal cortex during the second trimester of gestation. PMID:25197082

  16. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  17. Influence of naturally acquired feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection on the phagocytic and respiratory burst activity of neutrophils and monocytes of peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Jagielska, M; Winnicka, A; Jagielski, D; Micu?, J; Zmudzka, M; Lechowski, R

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was cytometric evaluation of phagocytic and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils and monocytes in cats naturally infected with FeLV. To conduct the study, the peripheral blood was obtained from 33 cats naturally infected with FeLV. The control group consisted of 30 FeLV-, FIV-, clinically healthy cats. The percentage of phagocytizing neutrophils of peripheral blood was lower in FeLV+ than in FeLV- cats. The percentage of neutrophils and monocytes in which an oxidative burst occurred was lower in FeLV+ than in FeLV-animals. Also an oxidative product formation in neutrophils after E. coli and PMA stimulation was lower in FeLV+ than in FeLV-animals. Obtained results allow to conclude that diminished phagocytic and oxidative burst activity of peripheral blood leukocytes may cause impairment of innate immunity in cats infected with FeLV. PMID:15989127

  18. Order/disorder in brain electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, O. A.; Figliola, Y. A.

    2004-04-01

    The processing of information by the brain is reflected in dynamical changes of the electrical activity in time, frequency, and space. Therefore, the concomitant studies require methods capable of describing the quantitative variation of the signal in both time and frequency. Here we present a quantitative EEG (qEEG) analysis, based on the Orthogonal Discrete Wavelet Transform (ODWT), of generalized epileptic tonic-clonic EEG signals. Two quantifiers: the Relative Wavelet Energy (RWE) and the Normalized Total Wavelet Entropy (NTWS) have been used. The RWE gives information about the relative energy associated with the different frequency bands present in the EEG and their corresponding degree of importance. The NTWS is a measure of the order/disorder degree in the EEG signal. These two quantifiers were computing in EEG signals as provided by scalp electrodes of epileptic patients. We showed that the epileptic recruitment rhythm observed for generalized epileptic tonic-clonic seizures is accurately described by the RWE quantifier. In addition, a significant decrease in the NTWS was observed in the recruitment epoch, indicating a more rhythmic and ordered behavior in the brain electrical activity.

  19. Participation of a persistent sodium current and calcium-activated nonspecific cationic current to burst generation in trigeminal principal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruyama, Kentaro; Hsiao, Chie-Fang

    2013-01-01

    The properties of neurons participating in masticatory rhythmogenesis are not clearly understood. Neurons within the dorsal trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (dPrV) are potential candidates as components of the masticatory central pattern generator (CPG). The present study examines in detail the ionic mechanisms controlling burst generation in dPrV neurons in rat (postnatal day 8–12) brain stem slices using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp methods. Nominal extracellular Ca2+ concentration transformed tonic discharge in response to a maintained step pulse of current into rhythmical bursting in 38% of nonbursting neurons. This change in discharge mode was suppressed by riluzole, a persistent Na+ current (INaP) antagonist. Veratridine, which suppresses the Na+ channel inactivation mechanism, induced rhythmical bursting in nonbursting neurons in normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting that INaP contributes to burst generation. Nominal extracellular Ca2+ exposed a prominent afterdepolarizing potential (ADP) following a single spike induced by a 3-ms current pulse, which was suppressed, but not completely blocked, by riluzole. Application of BAPTA, a Ca2+ chelator, intracellularly, or flufenamic acid, a Ca2+-activated nonspecific cationic channel (ICAN) antagonist, extracellularly to the bath, suppressed rhythmical bursting and the postspike ADP. Application of drugs to alter Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum also suppressed bursting. Finally, voltage-clamp methods demonstrated that nominal Ca2+ facilitated INaP and induced ICAN. These data demonstrate for the first time that the previously observed induction in dPrV neurons of rhythmical bursting in nominal Ca2+ is mediated by enhancement of INaP and onset of ICAN, which are dependent on intracellular Ca2+. PMID:23883859

  20. Participation of a persistent sodium current and calcium-activated nonspecific cationic current to burst generation in trigeminal principal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Kentaro; Hsiao, Chie-Fang; Chandler, Scott H

    2013-10-01

    The properties of neurons participating in masticatory rhythmogenesis are not clearly understood. Neurons within the dorsal trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (dPrV) are potential candidates as components of the masticatory central pattern generator (CPG). The present study examines in detail the ionic mechanisms controlling burst generation in dPrV neurons in rat (postnatal day 8-12) brain stem slices using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp methods. Nominal extracellular Ca(2+) concentration transformed tonic discharge in response to a maintained step pulse of current into rhythmical bursting in 38% of nonbursting neurons. This change in discharge mode was suppressed by riluzole, a persistent Na(+) current (INaP) antagonist. Veratridine, which suppresses the Na(+) channel inactivation mechanism, induced rhythmical bursting in nonbursting neurons in normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting that INaP contributes to burst generation. Nominal extracellular Ca(2+) exposed a prominent afterdepolarizing potential (ADP) following a single spike induced by a 3-ms current pulse, which was suppressed, but not completely blocked, by riluzole. Application of BAPTA, a Ca(2+) chelator, intracellularly, or flufenamic acid, a Ca(2+)-activated nonspecific cationic channel (ICAN) antagonist, extracellularly to the bath, suppressed rhythmical bursting and the postspike ADP. Application of drugs to alter Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum also suppressed bursting. Finally, voltage-clamp methods demonstrated that nominal Ca(2+) facilitated INaP and induced ICAN. These data demonstrate for the first time that the previously observed induction in dPrV neurons of rhythmical bursting in nominal Ca(2+) is mediated by enhancement of INaP and onset of ICAN, which are dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). PMID:23883859

  1. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kapucu, Fikret E.; Tanskanen, Jarno M. A.; Mikkonen, Jarno E.; Yl-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A. K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI) histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates ISI thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average (CMA) and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA) data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays. PMID:22723778

  2. Detection of bursting activity with INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS, possibly from 1E 2259+586 or SGR 1806-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, V.; Mereghetti, S.; Ferrigno, C.; Bozzo, E.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Goetz, D.; Borkowski, J.; Kienlin, A. von; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.; Beckmann, V.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a possible detection of bursting activity (tentatively from the magnetars 1E 2259+586 or SGR 1806-20) with the SPI Anti-Coincidence System (ACS) on-board INTEGRAL. From 2012-04-19T12:03:10 to 2012-04-21 06:28:49 UTC, the ACS detected 25 short (from 50ms to 8s) bursts at a significance level of 5-10 sigma (peak count-rate of 1×104 - 1×105 counts/s on 50 ms time bin).

  3. Complicated Electrical Activities in Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Yuo-Hsien; Hsueh, Ming-Pin; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Yien, Huey-Wen

    It has become widely accepted that ventricular fibrillation, the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias, is a major cause of death in the industrialized world. Alternans and conduction block have recently been related to the progression from ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation. From the point of view in cellular electrophysiology, ventricular tachycardia is the formation of reentrant wave in cardiac tissue. And ventricular fibrillation arises from subsequent breakdown of reentrant wave into multiple drifting and meandering spiral waves. In this paper, we numerically study pulse and vortex dynamics in cardiac tissue. Our numerical results include 1:1 normal sinus rhythm, 2:1 conduction block, complete conduction block, spiral wave, and spiral breakup. All of our numerical findings can be corresponding to clinical measurements in electrocardiogram. Various electrical activities in cardiac tissue will be discussed in detail in the present manuscript.

  4. Active control of electric potential of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for controlling the potential of a spacecraft by means of devices which release appropriate charged particles from the spacecraft to the environment. Attention is given to electron emitters, ion emitters, a basic electron emitter arrangement, techniques for sensing electric field or potential, and flight experiments on active potential control. It is recommended to avoid differential charging on spacecraft surfaces because it can severely affect the efficacy of emitters. Discharging the frame of a spacecraft with dielectric surfaces involves the risk of stressing the dielectric material excessively. The spacecraft should, therefore, be provided with grounded conductive surfaces. It is pointed out that particles released by control systems can return to the spacecraft.

  5. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this

  6. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this…

  7. Activation of the oxidative burst by yeast elicitor in Catharanthus roseus cells occurs independently of the activation of genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pauw, Bea; van Duijn, Bert; Kijne, Jan W; Memelink, Johan

    2004-08-01

    In Catharanthus roseus cell suspensions, expression of several terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthetic genes, including those encoding strictosidine synthase and tryptophan decarboxylase, is coordinately induced by fungal elicitors such as yeast extract (YE). This induction is mediated by several signaling steps including the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid, and the activation of the jasmonic acid-responsive ORCA transcription factors. We investigated a possible role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a second messenger in this system. YE was shown to activate the production of ROS, which was dependent on protein phosphorylation and calcium influx. However, ROS generation was neither necessary for the induction of genes involved in TIA biosynthesis by YE nor by itself sufficient to induce these genes. Therefore, we conclude that activation of the oxidative burst by YE occurs independently of the activation of genes involved in TIA biosynthesis. PMID:15604717

  8. Inhibitory effects of N-valproyl-L-tryptophan on high potassium, low calcium and low magnesium-induced CA1 hippocampal epileptiform bursting activity in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Sardo, Pierangelo; Rizzo, Valerio; Friscia, Simonetta; Carletti, Fabio; De Caro, Viviana; Scaturro, Anna Lisa; Giandalia, Giulia; Giannola, Libero Italo; Ferraro, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    N-valproyl-L-tryptophan (VPA-Tryp), new antiepileptic drug, was tested on CA1 hippocampal epileptiform bursting activity obtained by increasing potassium and lowering calcium and magnesium concentrations in the fluid perfusing rat brain slices. Each slice was treated with a single concentration (0.2, 0.5, 1 or 2 mM) of Valproate (VPA) or VPA-Tryp. Both burst duration and interburst frequency during and after treatment were off-line compared with baseline values. For both parameters, the latency and the length of statistically significant response periods as well as the magnitude of drug-induced responses were calculated. VPA-Tryp evoked fewer and weaker early excitatory effects than VPA on bursting activity. On the contrary, VPA-Tryp induced powerful and long-lasting inhibitory effects on epileptiform discharge in a significantly higher number of slices than VPA. In fact, greater length and magnitude of VPA-Tryp-induced inhibition on both interburst frequency and burst duration were observed. Furthermore, VPA-Tryp showed antiepileptic activity at lower concentration than VPA and, when testing both drugs at analogue concentrations, VPA-Tryp evoked responses with either shorter latency or greater effect length and magnitude than VPA. PMID:22573145

  9. Integrated electric alternators/active filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towliat Abolhassani, Mehdi

    In response to energy crisis and power quality concerns, three different methodologies to integrate the concept of active filtering into the alternators are proposed. Wind energy, due to its free availability and its clean and renewable character, ranks as the most promising renewable energy resource that could play a key role in solving the worldwide energy crisis. An Integrated Doubly-fed Electric Alternator/Active filter (IDEA) for wind energy conversion systems is proposed. The proposed IDEA is capable of simultaneously capturing maximum power of wind energy and improving power quality, which are achieved by canceling the most significant and troublesome harmonics of the utility grid and power factor correction and reactive power compensation in the grid. The back-to-back current regulated power converters are employed to excite the rotor of IDEA. The control strategy of rotor-side power converter is based on position sensorless field oriented control method with higher power density. Analysis and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed IDEA. In the next step, an integrated synchronous machine/active filter is discussed. The proposed technology is essentially a rotating synchronous machine with suitable modification to its field excitation circuit to allow dc and ac excitations. It is shown that by controlling the ac excitation, the 5 th and 7th harmonics currents of the utility are compensated. The proposed method is cost effective because it can be applied to existing standby generators in commercial and industrial plants with minimal modification to the excitation circuits. To boost the gain of harmonic compensatory, an advanced electric machine is proposed. An Asymmetric Airgap Concentrated Winding Synchronous Machine (AACWSM) with ac and dc excitation was designed and employed. It is shown that the AACWSM with its unique design, in addition to power generation capability, could be used to compensate the most dominant current harmonics of the utility. The proposed AACWSM can compensate for the 5th and 7th harmonics currents in the grid by controlling the ac field excitation. In addition, the 11th and 13th harmonics currents are also significantly reduced. This system can be used at medium and low voltages for generation or motoring mode of operation.

  10. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  11. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells.

    PubMed

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  12. Dependence of synchronized bursting activity on medium stirring and the perfusion rate in a cultured network of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Ryoun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-05-01

    A cultured network of neurons coupled with a multi-electrode-array (MEA) recording system has been a useful platform for investigating various issues in neuroscience and engineering. The neural activity supported by the system can be sensitive to environmental fluctuations, for example, in the medium's nutrient composition, ph, and temperature, and to mechanical disturbances, yet this issue has not been the subject. Especially, a normal practice in maintaining neuronal cell cultures involves an intermittent sequence of medium exchanges, typically at a time interval of a few days, and one such sudden medium exchange is unavoidably accompanied by many unintended disturbances. Here, based on a quantitative time-series analysis of synchronized bursting events, we explicitly demonstrate that such a medium exchange can, indeed, bring a huge change in the existing neural activity. Subsequently, we develop a medium perfusion-stirring system and an ideal protocol that can be used in conjunction with a MEA recording system, providing long-term stability. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the effects of medium stirring and perfusion rates. Unexpectedly, even some vigorous mechanical agitations do not have any impacts on neural activity. On the other hand, too much replenishment ( e.g., 1.8 ml/day for a 1.8-ml dish) of neurobasal medium results in an excitotoxicity.

  13. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ among general anesthetics. PMID:25565990

  14. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  15. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  16. Using Brain Electrical Activity Mapping to Diagnose Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torello, Michael, W.; Duffy, Frank H.

    1985-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience assumes that measurement of brain electrical activity should relate to cognition. Brain Electrical Activity Mapping (BEAM), a non-invasive technique, is used to record changes in activity from one brain area to another and is 80 to 90 percent successful in classifying subjects as dyslexic or normal. (MT)

  17. Antioxidant activity of bisabolol: inhibitory effects on chemiluminescence of human neutrophil bursts and cell-free systems.

    PubMed

    Braga, Pier Carlo; Dal Sasso, Monica; Fonti, Elena; Culici, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory reactions are closely interrelated, and increasing attention is being given to the search for new synthetic or natural antioxidant agents, capable of reducing ROS and consequent inflammation. It has been claimed that bisabolol (a monocyclic sesquiterpene alcohol) has an antioxidant/anti-inflammatory activity, but this has almost exclusively been investigated using chemical or biochemical tests. We studied the ability of bisabolol to interfere with ROS production (luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, LACL) during human PMN respiratory bursts induced by both corpusculate(Candida albicans)and soluble stimulants (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, fMLP). LACL was also used to test cell-free systems (SIN-1 and H2O2/HOCl(-) systems) in order to investigate the presence of scavenging activity. After C. albicans stimulation, significant concentration-dependent LACL inhibition was observed at bisabolol concentrations ranging from 7.7 to 31 microg/ml; after the fMLP stimulus, significant LACL inhibition was observed at bisabolol concentrations ranging from 3.8 to 31 microg/ml. A similar effect was observed in the SIN-1 and H2O2/HOCl(-) systems. These findings draw the attention to the possible medical use of bisabolol as a means of improving the antioxidant network and restoring the redox balance by antagonising oxidative stress. PMID:19096233

  18. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Youngjun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-10-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug.

  19. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-01-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug. PMID:26511626

  20. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, YoungJun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-01-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug. PMID:26511626

  1. Activation of NF-κB and respiratory burst following Aspergillus fumigatus stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sun, He; Xu, Xiao-yong; Tian, Xiao-li; Shao, Hong-tao; Wu, Xiao-dong; Wang, Quan; Su, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-2, a C-type lectin receptor (CLR), plays an essential role in mediating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and anti-fungal immunity in response to Candida albicans infection. However, the molecular mechanisms and function of Dectin-2 signaling in response to infection by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus have not been characterized. In order to characterize Dectin-2 signaling in response to A. fumigatus infection, activation of Dectin-2 was analyzed at both transcriptional and translational levels. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) phosphorylation, NF-κB activation and cytokine production downstream of Dectin-2 activation were also investigated. In addition, Dectin-2-Syk function and its ability to mediate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and elimination of A. fumigatus conidia was examined. We demonstrate that Syk is involved in Dectin-2-induced IκBα (inhibitor of kappa B protein) phosphorylation and NF-κB activation following A. fumigatus stimulation in a time dependent manner. Silencing of Dectin-2 and Syk as well as Syk inhibition blocks NF-κB activation and cytokine secretion. Furthermore, the killing of A. fumigatus conidia and ROS production are significantly affected by Dectin-2 or Syk silencing as well as Syk inhibition. Swelling and germination of the fungus followed by hyphae formation and not the resting and heat-inactivated form of A. fumigatus mediate the activation of Dectin-2 signaling. In conclusion, Syk plays an essential role in IκBα kinase phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, and ROS production mediated by Dectin-2 activation in response to A. fumigatus infection. PMID:23886693

  2. Generation of nonlinear electric field bursts in the outer radiation belt through the parametric decay of whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.; Volokitin, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    Huge numbers of different nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, nonlinear whistlers, etc., referred to as Time Domain Structures, TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on the Van Allen Probes. Some of them are associated with whistler waves. Such TDS often emerge on the forward edges of the whistler wave packets and form chains. The parametric decay of a whistler wave into a whistler wave propagating in the opposite direction and an electron acoustic wave is studied experimentally as well as analytically, using Van Allen Probes data. The resulting electron acoustic wave is considered to be the source of electron scale TDS. The measured parameters of the three waves (two whistlers and the electron acoustic wave) are in good agreement with an assumption of their parametric interaction: ω0=ω1+ω2 and k→0 = k→1 + k→2. The bicoherence analysis shows the nonlinear nature of the observed electron-acoustic waves as well as the whistler wave and electron acoustic wave phase relation. The estimated decay instability growth rate shows that the process of three-wave interaction can develop in a characteristic time smaller than 1 s, thus, the process is rapid enough to explain the observations. This induced parametric interaction can be one of the mechanisms for quasiperiodic TDS generation in the outer Van Allen radiation belt.

  3. The generation of nonlinear Electric Field Bursts in the outer radiation belt through the parametric decay of whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Huge numbers of different non-linear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on the Van Allen Probes. They often emerge on the forward edges of the wave structures and form chains. A large part of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves. The parametric interaction of two VLF whistler waves propagating in opposite directions and an electron acoustic wave is studied analytically as well as experimentally, using Van Allen Probe data. The resulting electron acoustic wave is considered to be the source for generation of electron scale TDS. The measured three waves are in a good agreement with an assumption of their parametric interaction: f1=f2+f3 and k1=k2+k3. The bi-coherence analysis shows the non-linear nature of the observed electron-acoustic waves as well as the whistler wave and electron acoustic wave phase connection. The estimated decay instability increment shows that the three wave interaction process can develop in a characteristic time smaller than 1 second, thus the process is rapid enough to explain the observations This induced parametric interaction can be one of the mechanisms for quasi-periodic Time Domain Structure generation in the outer Van Allen radiation belt.

  4. RADIAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSFER AND MAGNETIC BARRIER FOR SHORT-TYPE GAMMA-RAY-BURST CENTRAL ENGINE ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tong; Gu Weimin; Hou Shujin; Liang Enwei; Lei Weihua; Lin Lin; Zhang Shuangnan; Dai Zigao

    2012-11-20

    Soft extended emission (EE) following initial hard spikes up to 100 s was observed with Swift/BAT for about half of known short-type gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). This challenges the conversional central engine models of SGRBs, i.e., compact star merger models. In the framework of black-hole-neutron-star merger models, we study the roles of radial angular momentum transfer in the disk and the magnetic barrier around the black hole in the activity of SGRB central engines. We show that radial angular momentum transfer may significantly prolong the lifetime of the accretion process, which may be divided into multiple episodes by the magnetic barrier. Our numerical calculations based on models of neutrino-dominated accretion flows suggest that disk mass is critical for producing the observed EE. In the case of the mass being {approx}0.8 M {sub Sun }, our model can reproduce the observed timescale and luminosity of both the main and the EE episodes in a reasonable parameter set. The predicted luminosity of the EE component is lower than the observed EE within about one order of magnitude and the timescale is shorter than 20 s if the disk mass is {approx}0.2 M {sub Sun }. Swift/BAT-like instruments may be not sensitive enough to detect the EE component in this case. We argue that the EE component could be a probe for the merger process and disk formation for compact star mergers.

  5. Phosphoantigen Burst upon Plasmodium falciparum Schizont Rupture Can Distantly Activate Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guenot, Marianne; Loizon, Séverine; Howard, Jennifer; Costa, Giulia; Baker, David A.; Mohabeer, Shaneel Y.; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Moreau, Jean-François; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Behr, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Malaria induces potent activation and expansion of the Vγ9Vδ2 subpopulation of γδT cells, which inhibit the Plasmodium falciparum blood cycle through soluble cytotoxic mediators, abrogating merozoite invasion capacity. Intraerythrocytic stages efficiently trigger Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell activation and degranulation through poorly understood mechanisms. P. falciparum blood-stage extracts are known to contain phosphoantigens able to stimulate Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, but how these are presented by intact infected red blood cells (iRBCs) remains elusive. Here we show that, unlike activation by phosphoantigen-expressing cells, Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell activation by intact iRBCs is independent of butyrophilin expression by the iRBC, and contact with an intact iRBC is not required. Moreover, blood-stage culture supernatants proved to be as potent activators of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells as iRBCs. Bioactivity in the microenvironment is attributable to phosphoantigens, as it is dependent on the parasite DOXP pathway, on Vγ9Vδ2 TCR signaling, and on butyrophilin expression by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Kinetic studies showed that the phosphoantigens were released at the end of the intraerythrocytic cycle at the time of parasite egress. We document exquisite sensitivity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, which respond to a few thousand parasites. These data unravel a novel framework, whereby release of phosphoantigens into the extracellular milieu by sequestered parasites likely promotes activation of distant Vγ9Vδ2 T cells that in turn exert remote antiparasitic functions. PMID:26169273

  6. Antioxidant activity of hyaluronic acid investigated by means of chemiluminescence of equine neutrophil bursts and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Braga, P C; Dal Sasso, M; Lattuada, N; Greco, V; Sibilia, V; Zucca, E; Stucchi, L; Ferro, E; Ferrucci, F

    2015-02-01

    Activated neutrophils (PMNs), the ROS/RNS released by PMNs and the derived inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of human inflammatory airway diseases. Similar diseases are also present in horses which suffer from recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH) and inflammatory airway diseases (IAD). Hyaluronic acid (HA) plays numerous roles in modulating inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to examine whether a preparation of HA (MW 900 000 Da) interferes with ROS/RNS during the course of equine PMN respiratory bursts, and to establish the lowest concentration at which it still has antioxidant activity by means of luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (LACL). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was also used to investigate the direct antiradical activity of HA. The hydroxyl radical was significantly scavenged in a concentration-dependent manner at HA concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 0.16 mg/mL. Superoxide anion, Tempol radical and the ABTS(•+) were significantly inhibited at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 0.62 mg/mL. The LACL of stimulated equine neutrophils showed that HA induced a statistically significant concentration-effect reduction from 5 mg/mL to 1.25 mg/mL. These findings were confirmed also when l-Arg was added to investigate the inhibition of the resulting peroxynitrite anion. Our findings indicate that, in addition to the human use, HA can also be used to antagonize the oxidative stress generated by free radicals in horses peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In order to achieve therapeutic concentrations, a direct aerosol administration to horses with horse respiratory diseases can be considered, as this route of application is also recommended in human medicine. PMID:25066541

  7. Comparative evaluation of assays for the measurement of bovine neutrophil oxidative burst activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During mastitis and other bacterial-mediated diseases of cattle, neutrophils play a critical role in the host innate immune response to infection. The bactericidal activity of neutrophils is mediated, in part, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The objectives of the current stu...

  8. Products of Submarine Fountains and Bubble-burst Eruptive Activity at 1200 m on West Mata Volcano, Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Keller, N. S.

    2009-12-01

    An eruption was observed and sampled at West Mata Volcano using ROV JASON II for 5 days in May 2009 during the NSF-NOAA eruption response cruise to this region of suspected volcanic activity. Activity was focused near the summit at the Prometheus and Hades vents. Prometheus erupted almost exclusively as low-level fountains. Activity at Hades cycled between vigorous degassing, low fountains, and bubble-bursts, building up and partially collapsing a small spatter/scoria cone and feeding short sheet-like and pillow flows. Fire fountains at Prometheus produced mostly small primary pyroclasts that include Pele's hair and fluidal fragments of highly vesicular volcanic glass. These fragments have mostly shattered and broken surfaces, although smooth spatter-like surfaces also occur. As activity wanes, glow in the vent fades, and denser, sometimes altered volcanic clasts are incorporated into the eruption. The latter are likely from the conduit walls and/or vent-rim ejecta, drawn back into the vent by inrushing seawater that replaces water entrained in the rising volcanic plume. Repeated recycling of previously erupted materials eventually produces rounded clasts resembling beach cobbles and pitted surfaces on broken phenocrysts of pyroxene and olivine. We estimate that roughly 33% of near vent ejecta are recycled. Our best sample of this ejecta type was deposited in the drawer of the JASON II ROV during a particularly large explosion that occurred during plume sampling immediately above the vent. Elemental sulfur spherules up to 5 mm in diameter are common in ejecta from both vents and occur inside some of the lava fragments Hades activity included dramatic bubble-bursts unlike anything previously observed under water. The lava bubbles, sometimes occurring in rapid-fire sequence, collapsed in the water-column, producing fragments that are quenched in less than a second to form Pele's hair, limu o Pele, spatter-like lava blobs, and scoria. All are highly vesicular, including the hairs and limu, unlike similar fragments from Loihi Seamount, Axial Seamount, and mid-ocean ridges that have <10% vesicles. The lava bubbles were observed to reach about 1 m in diameter, sometimes appearing to separate from the lava surface, suggesting that they are fed by gasses rising directly from the conduit. Slow-motion video analysis shows that the lava skin stretches to form thin regions that then separate, exposing still incandescent gas within. Bubbles collapse as the lava skin disrupts (usually at the top of the bubble), producing a shower of convex spatter-like lava fragments. Sheet-like lava flows are associated with collapse of the spatter cone and change to pillow lobe extrusion about 5 m from the vent orifice. One pillow lobe sample collected molten contains ~60% vesicles. We suggest that the erupting melt contains large coalesced slugs of magmatic gas and abundant small expanding vesicles that have yet to be incorporated into the large gas slugs. The contrast with Prometheus suggests highly localized conditions of magma devolatilization at W. Mata.

  9. Identification of the muscarinic pathway underlying cessation of sleep-related burst activity in rat thalamocortical relay neurons.

    PubMed

    Bista, Pawan; Meuth, Sven G; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Cerina, Manuela; Pawlowski, Matthias; Ehling, Petra; Landgraf, Peter; Borsotto, Marc; Heurteaux, Catherine; Pape, Hans-Christian; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Budde, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of the standing outward current (I (SO)) by muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (MAChR) stimulation is fundamental for the state-dependent change in activity mode of thalamocortical relay (TC) neurons. Here, we probe the contribution of MAChR subtypes, G proteins, phospholipase C (PLC), and two pore domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels to this signaling cascade. By the use of spadin and A293 as specific blockers, we identify TWIK-related K(+) (TREK)-1 channel as new targets and confirm TWIK-related acid-sensitve K(+) (TASK)-1 channels as known effectors of muscarinic signaling in TC neurons. These findings were confirmed using a high affinity blocker of TASK-3 and TREK-1, namely, tetrahexylammonium chloride. It was found that the effect of muscarinic stimulation was inhibited by M(1)AChR-(pirenzepine, MT-7) and M(3)AChR-specific (4-DAMP) antagonists, phosphoinositide-specific PLCβ (PI-PLC) inhibitors (U73122, ET-18-OCH(3)), but not the phosphatidylcholine-specific PLC (PC-PLC) blocker D609. By comparison, depleting guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) in the intracellular milieu nearly completely abolished the effect of MAChR stimulation. The block of TASK and TREK channels was accompanied by a reduction of the muscarinic effect on I (SO). Current-clamp recordings revealed a membrane depolarization following MAChR stimulation, which was sufficient to switch TC neurons from burst to tonic firing under control conditions but not during block of M(1)AChR/M(3)AChR and in the absence of intracellular GTP. These findings point to a critical role of G proteins and PLC as well as TASK and TREK channels in the muscarinic modulation of thalamic activity modes. PMID:22083644

  10. Evaluation of pozzolanic activity by the electric resistance measurement method

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Chuichi; Ikeda, Ko . Dept. of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering); Inoue, Yoshihiro )

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of electric resistance and amount of consumption of portlandite were carried out in accelerated curing conditions by preparing pastes of Fine Ceraments, fly ash, silica fume, kaolin, acid clay, zeolite and quartz activated with portlandite. Electric resistances of reactive pozzolans showed sharp rises except that of kaolin, whereas that of inactive material, quartz, showed no sharp rise. Electric resistances are proportional to the consumptions of portlandite except for fly ashes. The electric resistance measurement method combined with portlandite consumption measurement is useful to the rapid evaluation of pozzolanic activity.

  11. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation. PMID:24355223

  12. Cortical burst dynamics predict clinical outcome early in extremely preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Kartik K; Roberts, James A; Hellström-Westas, Lena; Wikström, Sverre; Hansen Pupp, Ingrid; Ley, David; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Intermittent bursts of electrical activity are a ubiquitous signature of very early brain activity. Previous studies have largely focused on assessing the amplitudes of these transient cortical bursts or the intervals between them. Recent advances in basic neuroscience have identified the presence of scale-free 'avalanche' processes in bursting patterns of cortical activity in other clinical contexts. Here, we hypothesize that cortical bursts in human preterm infants also exhibit scale-free properties, providing new insights into the nature, temporal evolution, and prognostic value of spontaneous brain activity in the days immediately following preterm birth. We examined electroencephalographic recordings from 43 extremely preterm infants (gestational age 22-28 weeks) and demonstrated that their cortical bursts exhibit scale-free properties as early as 12 h after birth. The scaling relationships of cortical bursts correlate significantly with later mental development-particularly within the first 12 h of life. These findings show that early preterm brain activity is characterized by scale-free dynamics which carry developmental significance, hence offering novel means for rapid and early clinical prediction of neurodevelopmental outcomes. PMID:26001723

  13. Activities in Electric Propulsion Development at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdrich, Georg; Bauder, Uwe; Bock, Dagmar; Eichhorn, Christoph; Haag, Daniel; Lau, Matthias; Schönherr, Tony; Stindl, Torsten; Fertig, Markus; Löhle, Stefan; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika; Röser, Hans-Peter

    More than three decades of experience have been gained in the field of electric propulsion at the Institute of Space Systems (Institut für Raumfahrtsysteme = IRS). Recent developments within the field of electric propulsion are summarized and foremost results are highlighted. The various types of electric propulsion systems are not considered as to be competitive. Here, system analysis shows that optimum parameter such as the required exhaust velocity or specific impulse result taking into account both the mission profile and system related sizes such as the power conditioner efficiency, the thrust efficiency and the specific mass of the corresponding power unit. Correspondingly, ion thrusters, Hall thrusters, thermal arcjets, or magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thrusters are preferable depending on the mission. Among the described electric propulsion systems are recent developments in the field of applied field MPD but also from high power hybrid thrusters. In addition, new concepts such as the hybrid systems Thermal-Inductively heated Hybrid-Thruster of the University of Stuttgart (TIHTUS) and the so-called Coupled Tether/Ion Engine Propulsion (CETEP) are analysed.

  14. A novel natural inhibitor from Candida albicans hyphae causing dissociation of the neutrophil respiratory burst response to chemotactic peptides from other post-activation events.

    PubMed

    Smail, E H; Melnick, D A; Ruggeri, R; Diamond, R D

    1988-06-01

    Previous work established that Candida albicans hyphae release several inhibitors of human neutrophil function. We now report that the crude hyphal inhibitory product (CHIP) inhibits superoxide anion (O2-) production stimulated by FMLP in a dose-related manner with an EC50 of approximately 2 micrograms/ml. CHIP also inhibited O2- production stimulated by A23187 and by opsonized zymosan, although this effect could be overcome by increasing the concentration of agonist. No inhibition of the PMA-stimulated burst was seen at any concentration of PMA tested, indicating that CHIP neither affected polymorphonuclear neutrophil viability nor quenched superoxide anion detection. A saturating dose of inhibitor had no effect on chemotaxis stimulated either by 0.1 to 100 nM FMLP or by zymosan-activated serum. Peak inositol trisphosphate levels stimulated by FMLP were not inhibited by a dose of CHIP producing maximum inhibition of FMLP-induced superoxide production. Peak changes in cytosolic free calcium levels (as measured by indo-1 fluorescence) stimulated by 50 nM or greater FMLP were unaffected by CHIP, although for subsaturating doses of FMLP a more rapid decline from peak calcium levels was seen in CHIP-exposed cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the common fungal pathogen C. albicans releases a substance that selectively impairs the neutrophil respiratory burst. It appears to do so without inhibiting the fully assembled NADPH oxidase and with minimal or no effect on events tightly coupled to FMLP-R/G protein activation, suggesting that these events may be uncoupled from activation of the burst. In addition, the absence of effect of CHIP on chemotaxis despite profound inhibition of the respiratory burst suggests these neutrophil functions may be mediated by divergent transduction pathways. PMID:2836503

  15. A brain-machine interface for control of burst suppression in medical coma.

    PubMed

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Chemali, Jessica J; Liberman, Max; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N

    2013-01-01

    Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram (EEG) marker of profound brain inactivation and unconsciousness and consists of bursts of electrical activity alternating with periods of isoelectricity called suppression. Burst suppression is the EEG pattern targeted in medical coma, a drug-induced brain state used to help recovery after brain injuries and to treat epilepsy that is refractory to conventional drug therapies. The state of coma is maintained manually by administering an intravenous infusion of an anesthetic, such as propofol, to target a pattern of burst suppression on the EEG. The coma often needs to be maintained for several hours or days, and hence an automated system would offer significant benefit for tight control. Here we present a brain-machine interface (BMI) for automatic control of burst suppression in medical coma that selects the real-time drug infusion rate based on EEG observations and can precisely control the burst suppression level in real time in rodents. We quantify the burst suppression level using the burst suppression probability (BSP), the brain's instantaneous probability of being in the suppressed state, and represent the effect of the anesthetic propofol on the BSP using a two-dimensional linear compartment model that we fit in experiments. We compute the BSP in real time from the EEG segmented into a binary time-series by deriving a two-dimensional state-space algorithm. We then derive a stochastic controller using both a linear-quadratic-regulator strategy and a model predictive control strategy. The BMI can promptly change the level of burst suppression without overshoot or undershoot and maintains precise control of time-varying target levels of burst suppression in individual rodents in real time. PMID:24110002

  16. Nanomolar Oxytocin Synergizes with Weak Electrical Afferent Stimulation to Activate the Locomotor CPG of the Rat Spinal Cord In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dose, Francesco; Zanon, Patrizia; Coslovich, Tamara; Taccola, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Synergizing the effect of afferent fibre stimulation with pharmacological interventions is a desirable goal to trigger spinal locomotor activity, especially after injury. Thus, to better understand the mechanisms to optimize this process, we studied the role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (previously shown to stimulate locomotor networks) on network and motoneuron properties using the isolated neonatal rat spinal cord. On motoneurons oxytocin (1 nM–1 μM) generated sporadic bursts with superimposed firing and dose-dependent depolarization. No desensitization was observed despite repeated applications. Tetrodotoxin completely blocked the effects of oxytocin, demonstrating the network origin of the responses. Recording motoneuron pool activity from lumbar ventral roots showed oxytocin mediated depolarization with synchronous bursts, and depression of reflex responses in a stimulus and peptide-concentration dependent fashion. Disinhibited bursting caused by strychnine and bicuculline was accelerated by oxytocin whose action was blocked by the oxytocin antagonist atosiban. Fictive locomotion appeared when subthreshold concentrations of NMDA plus 5HT were coapplied with oxytocin, an effect prevented after 24 h incubation with the inhibitor of 5HT synthesis, PCPA. When fictive locomotion was fully manifested, oxytocin did not change periodicity, although cycle amplitude became smaller. A novel protocol of electrical stimulation based on noisy waveforms and applied to one dorsal root evoked stereotypic fictive locomotion. Whenever the stimulus intensity was subthreshold, low doses of oxytocin triggered fictive locomotion although oxytocin per se did not affect primary afferent depolarization evoked by dorsal root pulses. Among the several functional targets for the action of oxytocin at lumbar spinal cord level, the present results highlight how small concentrations of this peptide could bring spinal networks to threshold for fictive locomotion in combination with other protocols, and delineate the use of oxytocin to strengthen the efficiency of electrical stimulation to activate locomotor circuits. PMID:24658101

  17. The 60 Month All-Sky Burst Alert Telescope Survey of Active Galactic Nucleus and the Anisotropy of Nearby AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Greiner, J.; Madejeski, G. M.; Gehrels, N.; Burlon, D.

    2014-01-01

    Surveys above 10 keV represent one of the best resources to provide an unbiased census of the population of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We present the results of 60 months of observation of the hard X-ray sky with Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). In this time frame, BAT-detected (in the 15-55 keV band) 720 sources in an all-sky survey of which 428 are associated with AGNs, most of which are nearby. Our sample has negligible incompleteness and statistics a factor of approx. 2 larger over similarly complete sets of AGNs. Our sample contains (at least) 15 bona fide Compton-thick AGNs and 3 likely candidates. Compton-thick AGNs represent approx. 5% of AGN samples detected above 15 keV. We use the BAT data set to refine the determination of the log N-log S of AGNs which is extremely important, now that NuSTAR prepares for launch, toward assessing the AGN contribution to the cosmic X-ray background. We show that the log N-log S of AGNs selected above 10 keV is now established to approx. 10% precision. We derive the luminosity function of Compton-thick AGNs and measure a space density of 7.9(+4.1/-2.9)× 10(exp -5)/cubic Mpc for objects with a de-absorbed luminosity larger than 2 × 10(exp 42) erg / s. As the BAT AGNs are all mostly local, they allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of AGNs in the nearby universe regardless of absorption. We find concentrations of AGNs that coincide spatially with the largest congregations of matter in the local (much < 85 Mpc) universe. There is some evidence that the fraction of Seyfert 2 objects is larger than average in the direction of these dense regions..

  18. Activities of the Electrical Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-06-01

    Research results, concerning dielectrics, circuit design methodology, and dielectric breakdown phenomena, are reported. Transformations and failures in dielectric media were studied, including discharges in gases, the nature and number of charged or excited states created by the discharge, and whether solid insulation is improved or degraded by this action. Transport phenomena in solid insulation were also investigated. The nature of charge carriers and carrier modes under the influence of an electric field were determined for materials common to electronics.

  19. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a demonstration for showing the electrical activity in nerve and muscle including action potentials, refractory period of a nerve, and fatigue. Presents instructions for constructing an amplifier, electronic stimulator, and force transducer. (GS)

  20. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the construction of an amplifier and force transducer that can be used to demonstrate electrical activity in nerve and muscle using the gastrocnemius muscle and sciatic nerve of the frog. (MLH)

  1. 16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER AT REAR; UNUSED WATER-DRIVEN EXCITER IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. Analysis of Q burst waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toshio; Komatsu, Masayuki

    2007-04-01

    The electric field changes in ELF to VLF were observed with a ball antenna in fair weather at Kochi (latitude 33.3°N, longitude 133.4°E) during 2003-2004. Some 376 Q bursts were obtained, seven examples of which are analyzed in the present study. The continuous frequency spectra of the Q bursts and the background noises from 1.0 Hz to 11 kHz are compared, and it was found that the Q bursts prevail over the background in the frequency range from 1 to 300 Hz. The surplus is 20 dB (in amplitude) near the fundamental mode frequency. The "W"-type changes found in the initial portion of the Q burst waveforms are interpreted as the combined electromagnetic waveform of direct and antipodal waves from the causative lightning strokes. From the time intervals between the two waves, the source-receiver distances are estimated as far as 19 Mm. The pulses to excite the Schumann resonances in the Q bursts are clearly identified.

  3. Overview on NASA's Advanced Electric Propulsion Concepts Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced electric propulsion research activities are currently underway that seek to addresses feasibility issues of a wide range of advanced concepts, and may result in the development of technologies that will enable exciting new missions within our solar system and beyond. Each research activity is described in terms of the present focus and potential future applications. Topics include micro-electric thrusters, electrodynamic tethers, high power plasma thrusters and related applications in materials processing, variable specific impulse plasma thrusters, pulsed inductive thrusters, computational techniques for thruster modeling, and advanced electric propulsion missions and systems studies.

  4. Heterogeneity in the properties of burst-forming units of erythroid lineage in sickle cell anemia: DNA synthesis and burst-promoting activity production is related to peripheral hemoglobin F levels

    SciTech Connect

    Croizat, H.; Billett, H.H.; Nagel, R.L. )

    1990-02-15

    Circulating 14-day erythroid progenitors (BFU-E) from 28 sickle cell anemia (SS) patients with hemoglobin F (HbF) levels ranging from 2% to 16% were studied to determine their sensitivity to ({sup 3}H) thymidine kill and burst-promoting activity (BPA)-like factor production. We find that the proportion of BFU-E sensitive to 3H-dT kill, and hence active in DNA synthesis, was inversely correlated with the percent of peripheral HbF when light density (LD) mononuclear cells were used for plating. Regression analysis showed that the correlation between HbF level and BFU-E kill was highly significant (r = .88; P less than .00003). We confirmed the BPA-like factor(s) production by LD mononuclear cells of SS patients, and found, in addition, that this phenomenon is restricted to the population of SS patients with HbF levels lower than 9%. Circulating BFU-E of patients with high HbF levels are not sensitive to 3H-dT, and their mononuclear cells do not release BPA-like factor. In summary, SS patients exhibit differences in the capacity of their mononuclear cells to produce BPA activity according to their peripheral HbF level, as well as to the DNA synthesis-state of their circulating BFU-E. We conclude that erythroid progenitors differ among SS patients in relation to their peripheral HbF level.

  5. Nanoparticles Induce Changes of the Electrical Activity of Neuronal Networks on Microelectrode Array Neurochips

    PubMed Central

    Gramowski, Alexandra; Flossdorf, Juliane; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Jonas, Ludwig; Lantow, Margareta; Rahman, Qamar; Schiffmann, Dietmar; Weiss, Dieter G.; Dopp, Elke

    2010-01-01

    Background Nanomaterials are extensively used in industry and daily life, but little is known about possible health effects. An intensified research regarding toxicity of nanomaterials is urgently needed. Several studies have demonstrated that nanoparticles (NPs; diameter < 100 nm) can be transported to the central nervous system; however, interference of NPs with the electrical activity of neurons has not yet been shown. Objectives/methods We investigated the acute electrophysiological effects of carbon black (CB), hematite (Fe2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs in primary murine cortical networks on microelectrode array (MEA) neurochips. Uptake of NPs was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was studied by flow cytometry. Results The multiparametric assessment of electrical activity changes caused by the NPs revealed an NP-specific and concentration-dependent inhibition of the firing patterns. The number of action potentials and the frequency of their patterns (spike and burst rates) showed a significant particle-dependent decrease and significant differences in potency. Further, we detected the uptake of CB, Fe2O3, and TiO2 into glial cells and neurons by TEM. Additionally, 24 hr exposure to TiO2 NPs caused intracellular formation of ROS in neuronal and glial cells, whereas exposure to CB and Fe2O3 NPs up to a concentration of 10 μg/cm2 did not induce significant changes in free radical levels. Conclusion NPs at low particle concentrations are able to exhibit a neurotoxic effect by disturbing the electrical activity of neuronal networks, but the underlying mechanisms depend on the particle type. PMID:20457553

  6. Immunomodulatory activity of diethylcarbamazine on humoral, cellular cytokine response and respiratory burst in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Medina-De la Garza, Carlos E; Guerrero-Ramírez, Graciela; García-Hernández, Marisela; Castro-Corona, M Angeles; Torres-López, Ernesto; Brattig, Norbert W; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C

    2012-06-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) is an anthelmintic piperazine derivative drug with putative immunomodulating properties, including increased platelet and granulocyte adhesion to parasites and enhanced production of cytokines. To further analyse these properties in a well-established animal model, we evaluated the effect of DEC on antibody, cellular cytokine response and respiratory burst in BALB/c mice. Animals were challenged with a thymus-dependent (tetanus toxoid, (TT)) and with a thymus-independent (lipopolysaccharide, (LPS)) antigen and treated with DEC for seven days with two different doses (50 mg/day and 500 mg/day). Serum was assessed for antibody production at 0, 4, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after stimulation and at 0, 24 and 48 h for IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-12 release. Respiratory burst of neutrophils and monocytes from peripheral blood was measured by flow cytometry. We found low-dose treatment with DEC enhanced cytokine production vs. TT and antibody production vs. LPS, whereas a higher dose enhanced significantly the respiratory burst of both polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, with a significant higher effect on the former. Our results suggest a stimulating, dose-dependent immunomodulatory effect of DEC with a higher effect on the phagocytic cells. PMID:22564175

  7. Ouabain modulation of snail Br neuron bursting activity after the exposure to 10 mT static magnetic field revealed by Higuchi fractal dimension.

    PubMed

    Kesić, Srdjan; Nikolić, Ljiljana; Savić, Aleksandar G; Petković, Branka; Spasić, Sladjana Z

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the application of normalized mean of the empirical Higuchi fractal dimension (FD) distributions, as a new approach to analyze the spontaneous bioelectrical activity of garden snail (Helix pomatia) Br neuron. The effect of ouabain on modulation of Br neuron bursting activity before and after the exposure to 10 mT static magnetic field (SMF) was observed by analyzing the following parameters: action potential (AP), interspike interval (ISI) and interbursting interval (IBI) components. Normalized mean of the empirical FD distributions were formed for the following experimental conditions: Control 1, Ouabain 1, Control 2, SMF 2, ASMF 2, Control 3, SMF 3 and Ouabain ASMF 3. Our main results have shown that ouabain without SMF induced increase in participation of AP and a decrease in participation of IBI components compared to the first control condition. However, in the presence of 10 mT SMF, ouabain-induced changes of measured parameters of Br neuron activity were less pronounced compared to the third control condition. We have shown that normalized mean of the empirical FD distributions is a useful method for detecting the changes in AP, ISI, and IBI components of complex bursting activity in altered physiological states. PMID:24968407

  8. Involvement of Na+/K+ pump in fine modulation of bursting activity of the snail Br neuron by 10 mT static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Ljiljana; Todorović, Nataša; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Stanić, Marina; Rauš, Snežana; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Janać, Branka

    2012-07-01

    The spontaneously active Br neuron from the brain-subesophageal ganglion complex of the garden snail Helix pomatia rhythmically generates regular bursts of action potentials with quiescent intervals accompanied by slow oscillations of membrane potential. We examined the involvement of the Na(+)/K(+) pump in modulating its bursting activity by applying a static magnetic field. Whole snail brains and Br neuron were exposed to the 10-mT static magnetic field for 15 min. Biochemical data showed that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity increased almost twofold after exposure of snail brains to the static magnetic field. Similarly, (31)P NMR data revealed a trend of increasing ATP consumption and increase in intracellular pH mediated by the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger in snail brains exposed to the static magnetic field. Importantly, current clamp recordings from the Br neuron confirmed the increase in activity of the Na(+)/K(+) pump after exposure to the static magnetic field, as the magnitude of ouabain's effect measured on the membrane resting potential, action potential, and interspike interval duration was higher in neurons exposed to the magnetic field. Metabolic pathways through which the magnetic field influenced the Na(+)/K(+) pump could involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, as blocking these processes abolished the effect of the static magnetic field. PMID:22534773

  9. SK Channels Gate Information Processing In Vivo by Regulating an Intrinsic Bursting Mechanism Seen In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Toporikova, Natalia; Chacron, Maurice J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanistic substrates of neural computations that lead to behavior remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. In particular, the contributions of intrinsic neural properties such as burst firing and dendritic morphology to the processing of behaviorally relevant sensory input have received much interest recently. Pyramidal cells within the electrosensory lateral line lobe of weakly electric fish display an intrinsic bursting mechanism that relies on somatodendritic interactions when recorded in vitro: backpropagating somatic action potentials trigger dendritic action potentials that lead to a depolarizing afterpotential (DAP) at the soma. We recorded intracellularly from these neurons in vivo and found firing patterns that were quite different from those seen in vitro: we found no evidence for DAPs as each somatic action potential was followed by a pronounced afterhyperpolarization (AHP). Calcium chelators injected in vivo reduced the AHP, thereby unmasking the DAP and inducing in vitro-like bursting in pyramidal cells. These bursting dynamics significantly reduced the cell’s ability to encode the detailed time course of sensory input. We performed additional in vivo pharmacological manipulations and mathematical modeling to show that calcium influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors activate dendritic small conductance (SK) calcium-activated potassium channels, which causes an AHP that counteracts the DAP and leads to early termination of the burst. Our results show that ion channels located in dendrites can have a profound influence on the processing of sensory input by neurons in vivo through the modulation of an intrinsic bursting mechanism. PMID:19675292

  10. Low voltage electrical activity preceding right atrial depolarisation in man.

    PubMed Central

    Mackintosh, A F; English, M J; Vincent, R; Woollons, D J; Chamberlain, D A

    1979-01-01

    Electrical recordings were made in the high right atrium in 28 patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation and in 3 healthy volunteers. After filtering and amplification by 3 to 10 million times, the signals were passed through a signal averaging process in a digital computer. Of the 28 subjects who had technically satisfactory recordings, 23 showed low voltage electrical activity preceding the conventionally-recorded atrial depolarisation. The low voltage activity started 50 to 200 ms before the atrial deflection and was variable in shape. These early signals may be the result of activity in the region of the sinus node. PMID:486271

  11. Gamma and Beta Bursts Underlie Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Mikael; Rose, Jonas; Herman, Pawel; Brincat, Scott L; Buschman, Timothy J; Miller, Earl K

    2016-04-01

    Working memory is thought to result from sustained neuron spiking. However, computational models suggest complex dynamics with discrete oscillatory bursts. We analyzed local field potential (LFP) and spiking from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys performing a working memory task. There were brief bursts of narrow-band gamma oscillations (45-100 Hz), varied in time and frequency, accompanying encoding and re-activation of sensory information. They appeared at a minority of recording sites associated with spiking reflecting the to-be-remembered items. Beta oscillations (20-35 Hz) also occurred in brief, variable bursts but reflected a default state interrupted by encoding and decoding. Only activity of neurons reflecting encoding/decoding correlated with changes in gamma burst rate. Thus, gamma bursts could gate access to, and prevent sensory interference with, working memory. This supports the hypothesis that working memory is manifested by discrete oscillatory dynamics and spiking, not sustained activity. PMID:26996084

  12. Electric propulsion activities at Giessen University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, K. H.; Fahrenbach, P.; Kreiling, N.; Loeb, H. W.

    1992-07-01

    The paper summarizes the research, development, and qualification activities carried out in the alst 30 years at the University of Giessen on radiofrequency ion thrusters (RITs) for space applications. At present, the first motor, RIT 10, enters a space test onboard the European Retrievable Carrier, and the RIT-10 motors are selected for the ion propulsion package of the European technology satellite Artemis. Extensive ion beam diagnostics was performed for the RIT-10 motor and the more powerful RIT-15 engine. The work on the primary engine RIT-35 is pending.

  13. The effect of sugars and free amino acids from the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemolymph on lectin activity and on oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Soria, Frida; Sierra, Claudia; Bouquelet, Stephane; Brassart, Colette; Agundis, Concepción; Zenteno, Edgar; Vázquez, Lorena

    2006-01-01

    We determined the effect of low molecular weight components (LMWC) from healthy juvenile and adult Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemolymph on lectin activity and oxidative burst (OB) in hemocytes. In an attempt to identify the LMWC that affect the lectin's hemagglutinating activity or oxidative burst, we determined the hemolymph carbohydrates and free amino acids (FAA) concentration. The LMWC (<2000 Da) were obtained after dialysis of the hemolymph. Our results showed that LMWC from juveniles exerted a greater inhibition on lectin than LMWC from adult hemolymph. Production of superoxide radicals by hemocytes was lower in the presence of juvenile (p<0.05) as compared to adult LMWC. FAA composition of the hemolymph and of LMWC from adults showed higher proportion of alanine (which corresponded to 25% of total FAA) and proline (>20%); whereas, in juveniles, the main FAA identified were glycine (>40%) and alanine (26%). N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) was the main sugar residue in the hemolymph and LMWC from juveniles; its concentration was 2.4 times higher than glucose (Glc), whereas, in adults, Glc was the main free sugar residue. Our results suggest that the proportion of FAA and carbohydrates in the hemolymph of M. rosenbergii seems to be correlated with the maturation process; furthermore, the high proportion of free GlcNAc and glycine regulate, in the juvenile stage, lectin activity and cellular oxidative mechanisms, respectively. PMID:16290085

  14. Electrical stimulation of cardiomyocytes activates mitochondrial matrix metalloproteinase causing electrical remodeling*

    PubMed Central

    Vacek, Thomas. P; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Neetu; Vacek, Jonathan C.; Pagni, Sebastian; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias, instigated by mechanical and electrical remodeling, are associated with activation of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). However, the connection between intracellular MMPs activation and arrhythmogenesis is not well established. Previously, we determined localization of MMP in the mitochondria using confocal microscopy. We tested the hypothesis that electrical pacing induces the activation of mitochondrial MMP (mtMMP) and is associated with myocyte mechanical dysfunction. Myocytes were isolated and field stimulated at 1 and 4 Hz. Myocyte mechanics and calcium transient was studied using Ion-Optix system. Mitochondrial MMP-9 activation was evaluated using zymography. There was a 25% increase in 1Hz and 40% increase in 4Hz stimulation. We observed an increase in mtMMP activation with increase in electrical pacing compared to 0 Hz with a significant increase (p<0.05, n=3). Field stimulation at 4 Hz decreased cell re-lengthening. The levels of calcium transient were reduced with increase in contraction frequency. We conclude that electrical stimulation activates mtMMP-9 that is associated with myocyte mechanical dysfunction. PMID:21167815

  15. In vivo conditions influence the coding of stimulus features by bursts of action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Akerberg, Oscar Avila

    2015-01-01

    The functional role of burst firing (i.e. the firing of packets of action potentials followed by quiescence) in sensory processing is still under debate. Should bursts be considered as unitary events that signal the presence of a particular feature in the sensory environment or is information about stimulus attributes contained within their temporal structure? We compared the coding of stimulus attributes by bursts in vivo and in vitro of electrosensory pyramidal neurons in weakly electric fish by computing correlations between burst and stimulus attributes. Our results show that, while these correlations were strong in magnitude and significant in vitro, they were actually much weaker in magnitude if at all significant in vivo. We used a mathematical model of pyramidal neuron activity in vivo and showed that such a model could reproduce the correlations seen in vitro, thereby suggesting that differences in burst coding were not due to differences in bursting seen in vivo and in vitro. We next tested whether variability in the baseline (i.e. without stimulation) activity of ELL pyramidal neurons could account for these differences. To do so, we injected noise into our model whose intensity was calibrated to mimic baseline activity variability as quantified by the coefficient of variation. We found that this noise caused significant decreases in the magnitude of correlations between burst and stimulus attributes and could account for differences between in vitro and in vivo conditions. We then tested this prediction experimentally by directly injecting noise in vitro through the recording electrode. Our results show that this caused a lowering in magnitude of the correlations between burst and stimulus attributes in vitro and gave rise to values that were quantitatively similar to those seen under in vivo conditions. While it is expected that noise in the form of baseline activity variability will lower correlations between burst and stimulus attributes, our results show that such variability can account for differences seen in vivo. Thus, the high variability seen under in vivo conditions has profound consequences on the coding of information by bursts in ELL pyramidal neurons. In particular, our results support the viewpoint that bursts serve as a detector of particular stimulus features but do not carry detailed information about such features in their structure. PMID:21271354

  16. ANL's electric vehicle battery activities for USABC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Electrochemical Technology Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides advanced battery R&D technology transfer to industry; technical analyses, assessments, modeling, and databases; and independent testing and post-test analyses of advanced batteries. These capabilities and services are being offered to the US Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) are being negotiated for USABC-sponsored work at ANL. A small portion of DOE's cost share for USABC projects has been provided to ANL to continue R&D and testing activities on key technologies that were previously supported directly by DOE. This report summarizes progress on these USABC projects during the period of April 1 through September 30, 1992. In this report, the objective, background, technical progress, and status are described for each task. The work is organized into the following task areas: 1.0 Lithium/Sulfide Batteries; 2.0 Nickel/Metal Hydride Support 3.0 EV Battery Performance; and Life Evaluation.

  17. Electrically Active Storms in the Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffines, G. R.; Orville, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    There is less lightning activity in the Appalachian Mountains than in other surrounding areas as indicated by several flash density studies. Some storms have demonstrated a characteristic coined as the Appalachian Lightning Jump where the lightning ends as it approaches the mountain range or continues on following the valleys in between the mountains instead of the mountain peaks as in other regions such as the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. In certain storms, the lightning diverts around the higher elevations as if the storm may be experiencing some sort of a blocking effect such as cold air damming or the loss of low level convergence with the surface elevation changes. In this follow-on study to the Appalachian Lightning Jump presentation at the 2003 Annual AGU Meeting, the storms exhibiting this jumping characteristic are examined by including lightning data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and measurements from the WSR-88D radars in the area to determine if there is a change in the structure of these storms. Comparisons with storms similar in nature, from a lightning perspective, are also examined to determine if the lightning jump is unique to more shallow systems that may lose their support when approaching the mountains or that may experience cold air damming.

  18. A 12-week supplementation with quercetin does not affect natural killer cell activity, granulocyte oxidative burst activity or granulocyte phagocytosis in female human subjects.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Serena A; Henson, Dru A; Nieman, David C; Austin, Melanie D; Jin, Fuxia

    2010-09-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, is a strong antioxidant with anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and immune-modulating properties. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of long-term quercetin supplementation on innate immune function and inflammation in human subjects. Female subjects (n 120; aged 30-79 years) were recruited from the community and randomised to one of three groups, with supplements administered using double-blinded procedures: 500 mg quercetin/d (n 38), 1000 mg quercetin/d (n 40) or placebo (n 42). Subjects ingested two soft chew supplements twice daily during the 12-week study period. Fasting blood samples were obtained pre- and post-study and were analysed for plasma quercetin, IL-6, TNF-alpha and leucocyte subset cell counts. Natural killer cell activity (NKCA) and lymphocyte subsets were assessed in a subset of seventy-four subjects. Granulocyte oxidative burst activity (GOBA) and phagocytosis were assessed in sixty-four subjects. Eighteen subjects had overlapping data. Quercetin supplementation at two doses compared with placebo increased plasma quercetin (interaction effect; P < 0.001) but had no significant influence on blood leucocyte subsets, plasma IL-6 or TNF-alpha concentration, NKCA, GOBA or phagocytosis. NKCA was inversely correlated with BMI (r - 0.25; P = 0.035) and body fat percentage (r - 0.38; P = 0.001), and positively correlated with self-reported physical fitness level (r 0.24; P = 0.032). In summary, results from the present double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised trial indicated that quercetin supplementation at 500 and 1000 mg/d for 12 weeks significantly increased plasma quercetin levels but had no influence on measures of innate immune function or inflammation in community-dwelling adult females. PMID:20500927

  19. Mechanism for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. E.; del Valle, M. V.; Vieyro, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarized and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The time scale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of the order of 1 0-3 s . The mechanism we present here can explain the main features of fast radio bursts and is plausible in different astrophysical sources, such as gamma-ray bursts and some active galactic nuclei.

  20. Parabolic bursting revisited.

    PubMed

    Soto-Trevio, C; Kopell, N; Watson, D

    1996-11-01

    Many excitable membrane systems display bursting oscillations, in which the membrane potential switches periodically between an active phase of rapid spiking and a silent phase of slow, quasi steady-state behavior. A burster is called parabolic when the spike frequency is lower both at the beginning and end of the active phase. We show that classes of voltage-gated conductance equations can be reduced to the mathematical mechanism previously analyzed by Ermentrout and Kopell in [7]. The reduction uses a series of coordinate changes and shows that the mechanism in [7] applies more generally than previously believed. The key hypothesis for the more general theory is that a certain slow periodic orbit must stay close to a curve of degenerate homoclinic points for the fast system, at least during the active phase. We do not require that the slow system have a periodic orbit when the voltage is held constant. PMID:9002243

  1. Bursts in discontinuous Aeolian saltation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, M. V.; Rasmussen, K. R.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of discontinuous flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the fluid threshold Shields number θc. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain discontinuous flux even below the fluid threshold. PMID:26073305

  2. Bursts in discontinuous Aeolian saltation.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, M V; Rasmussen, K R; Herrmann, H J

    2015-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of discontinuous flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the fluid threshold Shields number θc. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain discontinuous flux even below the fluid threshold. PMID:26073305

  3. Knockout of the BK β2 subunit abolishes inactivation of BK currents in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells and results in slow-wave burst activity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Espinosa, Pedro L.; Yang, Chengtao; Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Xia, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Rat and mouse adrenal medullary chromaffin cells (CCs) express an inactivating BK current. This inactivation is thought to arise from the assembly of up to four β2 auxiliary subunits (encoded by the kcnmb2 gene) with a tetramer of pore-forming Slo1 α subunits. Although the physiological consequences of inactivation remain unclear, differences in depolarization-evoked firing among CCs have been proposed to arise from the ability of β2 subunits to shift the range of BK channel activation. To investigate the role of BK channels containing β2 subunits, we generated mice in which the gene encoding β2 was deleted (β2 knockout [KO]). Comparison of proteins from wild-type (WT) and β2 KO mice allowed unambiguous demonstration of the presence of β2 subunit in various tissues and its coassembly with the Slo1 α subunit. We compared current properties and cell firing properties of WT and β2 KO CCs in slices and found that β2 KO abolished inactivation, slowed action potential (AP) repolarization, and, during constant current injection, decreased AP firing. These results support the idea that the β2-mediated shift of the BK channel activation range affects repetitive firing and AP properties. Unexpectedly, CCs from β2 KO mice show an increased tendency toward spontaneous burst firing, suggesting that the particular properties of BK channels in the absence of β2 subunits may predispose to burst firing. PMID:25267913

  4. Intracellular shunting of O2− contributes to charge compensation and preservation of neutrophil respiratory burst in the absence of voltage-gated proton channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Decleva, Eva; Menegazzi, Renzo; Fasolo, Alba; Defendi, Federica; Sebastianutto, Michele; Dri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Proton efflux via voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is considered to mediate the charge compensation necessary to preserve NADPH oxidase activity during the respiratory burst. Using the Hv1 inhibitor Zn2+, we found that the PMA-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils is inhibited when assessed as extracellular production of O2− and H2O2, in accordance with literature studies, but, surprisingly, unaffected when measured as oxygen consumption or total (extracellular plus intracellular) H2O2 production. Furthermore, we show that inhibiting Hv1 with Zn2+ results in an increased production of intracellular ROS. Similar results, i.e. decreased extracellular and increased intracellular ROS production, were obtained using a human granulocyte-like cell line with severely impaired Hv1 expression. Acidic extracellular pH, which dampens proton efflux, also augmented intracellular production of H2O2. Zinc caused an increase in the rate but not in the extent of depolarization and cytosolic acidification indicating that mechanisms other than proton efflux take part in charge compensation. Our results suggest a hitherto unpredicted mechanism of charge compensation whereby, in the absence of proton efflux, part of O2− generated within gp91phox in the plasma membrane is shunted intracellularly down electrochemical gradient to dampen excessive depolarization. This would preserve NADPH oxidase activity under conditions such as the inflammatory exudate in which the acidic pH hinders charge compensation by proton efflux. PMID:23578765

  5. Electrical-power-system data base for consumables analysis. Volume 1: Electrical equipment list, activity blocks, and time lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipher, M. D.; Green, P. A.; Wolfgram, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    A standardized data base is described which consists of a space shuttle electrical equipment list, activity blocks defining electrical equipment utilization, and activity-block time lines for specific mission analyses. Information is presented to facilitate utilization of the data base, to provide the basis for the electrical equipment utilization to enable interpretation of analyses based on the data contained herein.

  6. Control of bursting synchronization in networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons with chemical synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, C. A. S.; Viana, R. L.; Ferrari, F. A. S.; Lopes, S. R.; Batista, A. M.; Coninck, J. C. P.

    2013-04-01

    Thermally sensitive neurons present bursting activity for certain temperature ranges, characterized by fast repetitive spiking of action potential followed by a short quiescent period. Synchronization of bursting activity is possible in networks of coupled neurons, and it is sometimes an undesirable feature. Control procedures can suppress totally or partially this collective behavior, with potential applications in deep-brain stimulation techniques. We investigate the control of bursting synchronization in small-world networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type thermally sensitive neurons with chemical synapses through two different strategies. One is the application of an external time-periodic electrical signal and another consists of a time-delayed feedback signal. We consider the effectiveness of both strategies in terms of protocols of applications suitable to be applied by pacemakers.

  7. Multiple Bifurcations in a Polynomial Model of Bursting Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, G.

    1998-06-01

    Bursting oscillations are commonly seen to be the primary mode of electrical behaviour in a variety of nerve and endocrine cells, and have also been observed in some biochemical and chemical systems. There are many models of bursting. This paper addresses the issue of being able to predict the type of bursting oscillation that can be produced by a model. A simplified model capable of exhibiting a wide variety of bursting oscillations is examined. By considering the codimension-2 bifurcations associated with Hopf, homoclinic, and saddle-node of periodics bifurcations, a bifurcation map in two-dimensional parameter space is created. Each region on the map is characterized by a qualitatively distinct bifurcation diagram and, hence, represents one type of bursting oscillation. The map elucidates the relationship between the various types of bursting oscillations. In addition, the map provides a different and broader view of the current classification scheme of bursting oscillations.

  8. PERSPECTIVE: Electrical activity enhances neuronal survival and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Raul G.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2009-10-01

    The failure of regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) remains an enormous scientific and clinical challenge. After injury or in degenerative diseases, neurons in the adult mammalian CNS fail to regrow their axons and reconnect with their normal targets, and furthermore the neurons frequently die and are not normally replaced. While significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis for this lack of regenerative ability, a second approach has gained momentum: replacing lost neurons or lost connections with artificial electrical circuits that interface with the nervous system. In the visual system, gene therapy-based 'optogenetics' prostheses represent a competing technology. Now, the two approaches are converging, as recent data suggest that electrical activity itself, via the molecular signaling pathways such activity stimulates, is sufficient to induce neuronal survival and regeneration, particularly in retinal ganglion cells. Here, we review these data, discuss the effects of electrical activity on neurons' molecular signaling pathways and propose specific mechanisms by which exogenous electrical activity may be acting to enhance survival and regeneration.

  9. Disturbances in the US electric grid associated with geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Mitchell, Sarah D.

    2013-05-01

    Large solar explosions are responsible for space weather that can impact technological infrastructure on and around Earth. Here, we apply a retrospective cohort exposure analysis to quantify the impacts of geomagnetic activity on the US electric power grid for the period from 1992 through 2010. We find, with more than 3? significance, that approximately 4% of the disturbances in the US power grid reported to the US Department of Energy are attributable to strong geomagnetic activity and its associated geomagnetically induced currents.

  10. [Study on dewatering of activated sludge under applied electric field].

    PubMed

    Ji, Xue-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Li; Feng, Jing

    2012-12-01

    For an electro-dewatering process of activated sludge (AS), the effect of pH and conductivity of AS, flocculation conditioning and operation factors of horizontal electric field (voltage magnitude, method of applying electric field and distance between plates) were investigated, and the corresponding optimum electro-dewatering conditions were also obtained. The results showed that the best electro-dewatering effect was achieved for AS without change of its pH value (6.93) and conductivity (1.46 mS x cm(-1)). CPAM conditioning could lead to the increase of 30%-40% in the dewatering rate and accelerate the dewatering process, whereas a slight increase in the electro-dewatering rate. The electro-dewatering rate for conditioned AS reached 83.12% during an electric field applied period of 60 minutes, while this rate for original AS could be 75.31% even the electric field applied period extended to 120 minutes. The delay of applying the electric field had an inhibition effect on the AS electro-dewatering rate. Moreover, the optimum conditions for AS electro-dewatering were followed: CPAM dose of 9 g x kg(-1), electric field strength of 600 V x m(-1), distance between the two plates of 40 mm, dehydration time of 60 minutes. Under above optimum conditions the AS electro-dewatering rate could approach to 85.33% and the moisture content in AS decreased from 99.30% to 95.15% accordingly. PMID:23379170

  11. Remote monitoring of biodynamic activity using electric potential sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harl, C. J.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.

    2008-12-01

    Previous work in applying the electric potential sensor to the monitoring of body electrophysiological signals has shown that it is now possible to monitor these signals without needing to make any electrical contact with the body. Conventional electrophysiology makes use of electrodes which are placed in direct electrical contact with the skin. The electric potential sensor requires no cutaneous electrical contact, it operates by sensing the displacement current using a capacitive coupling. When high resolution body electrophysiology is required a strong (capacitive) coupling is used to maximise the collected signal. However, in remote applications where there is typically an air-gap between the body and the sensor only a weak coupling can be achieved. In this paper we demonstrate that the electric potential sensor can be successfully used for the remote sensing and monitoring of bioelectric activity. We show examples of heart-rate measurements taken from a seated subject using sensors mounted in the chair. We also show that it is possible to monitor body movements on the opposite side of a wall to the sensor. These sensing techniques have biomedical applications for non-contact monitoring of electrophysiological conditions and can be applied to passive through-the-wall surveillance systems for security applications.

  12. An Overview of Electric Propulsion Activities at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John W., Jr.; Hamley, John A.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Oleson, Steven R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of NASA s activities in the area of electric propulsion with an emphasis on project directions, recent progress, and a view of future project directions. The goals of the electric propulsion programs are to develop key technologies to enable new and ambitious science missions and to transfer these technologies to industry. Activities include the development of gridded ion thruster technology, Hall thruster technology, pulsed plasma thruster technology, and very high power electric propulsion technology, as well as systems technology that supports practical implementation of these advanced concepts. The performance of clusters of ion and Hall thrusters is being revisited. Mission analyses, based on science requirements and preliminary mission specifications, guide the technology projects and introduce mission planners to new capabilities. Significant in-house activity, with strong industrial/academia participation via contracts and grants, is maintained to address these development efforts. NASA has initiated a program covering nuclear powered spacecraft that includes both reactor and radioisotope power sources. This has provided an impetus to investigate higher power and higher specific impulse thruster systems. NASA continues to work closely with both supplier and user communities to maximize the understanding and acceptance of new technology in a timely and cost-effective manner. NASA s electric propulsion efforts are closely coordinated with Department of Defense and other national programs to assure the most effective use of available resources. Several NASA Centers are actively involved in these electric propulsion activities, including, the Glenn Research Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Johnson Space Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  13. Modeling direct activation of corticospinal axons using transcranial electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Suihko, V

    1998-06-01

    Corticospinal axons can be directly activated using anodal transcranial electrical stimulation. The purpose of this work was to find the location of the direct activation. The response to stimulation was modeled with a spherical head model and an active model of a corticospinal nerve. The nerve model had a deep bend at a location corresponding to a corticospinal fiber entering the midbrain. The threshold activation initiated close to brain surface; the exact location depended on whether the cell body located in the surface layers of the brain or in the bank of the central sulcus. The stimulation time constant was 44 micros. When the stimulus amplitude was increased, the site of activation shifted gradually to deeper level, until the activation initiated directly at the bend causing a half millisecond latency jump at spinal level. These results support the theory that the corticospinal axons can be directly activated at deep locations using anodal transcranial electrical stimulation. However, the high amplitude needed for the direct activation suggests that not only the bends on the fibers, but also the shape of surrounding volume conductor (intracranial cavity) favor activation at this location. PMID:9741790

  14. Q-Burst Origins in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldi, R.; Hobara, Y.; Yamashita, K.; Hayakawa, M.; Satori, G.; Bor, J.; Lyons, W. A.; Nelson, T.; Russell, B.; Williams, E.

    2006-12-01

    The generation of electromagnetic transient signatures in the SR frequency range (Q-bursts) from the energetic lightning originating in Africa were intensively studied during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) field program centered on Niamey, Niger in 2006. During this wet season many active westward- moving MCSs were observed by the MIT C-band Doppler radar. The MCSs exhibited a gust front, a leading squall line and a large spatially-extended (100-200 km) stratiform region that often passed over the observation site. Many transient events were recorded in association with local lightning both with a slow antenna and a DC electric field mill installed near the radar. During the gust front and squall line traverse, the majority of lightning exhibited normal polarity. A remarkable transition of polarity is observed once the radar site is under the stratiform region and a pronounced radar bright band has had time to develop. The majority of the ground flashes then exhibit a positive polarity (positive ground flash). In particular, very intense positive ground flashes (often topped with spider lightning structure) are registered when the radar "hbright band"h is most strongly developed. These positive flashes exhibit a large DC field change in comparison to ones observed during the earlier squall line passage. Video observations of nighttime events support the existence of the lateral extensive spider lightning. Daytime events exhibit thunder durations of a few minutes. ELF Q-bursts were recorded at MIT's Schumann resonance station in Rhode Island U.S.A. (about 8 Mm distance from Niamey) associated with several large well-established positive ground flashes observed locally near Niamey. The event identification is made by accurate GPS timing and arrival direction of the waves. The onset times of the Q-burst are in good agreement with the electric field measurement near Niamey. The arrival directions of the waves are also in good agreement assuming the lightning source near Niamey. Those Q- bursts were generated when the radar observed the bright band in the stratiform region. Africa stands out among the three tropical chimneys in its production of large and energetic positive ground flashes in several independently produced maps of global lightning activity. Comparison of the morphology of convection in radar field programs in Niamey and in Brazil (LBA Program, 1999) have shown far more squall line activity with accompanying stratiform regions in Africa. A large ratio of positive to negative ground flashes in Africa has been documented by the global mapping of Q-bursts, and is consistent with production of positive lightning in the prevalent stratiform regions behind active squall lines. In contrast, a predominance of large negative ground flashes is observed in the Maritime Continent where many lightning sources are located close to (or over) the ocean, and where vigorous continental-style squall lines are relatively scarce. The global maps from Rhode Island U.S. and Moshiri Japan show similar tendency in the distribution of lightning polarity.

  15. Activity-based costing for electric utilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Croyle, D.R.; Schapiro, I.A.; Keglevic, P.M.

    1992-08-01

    This EPRI report is a ``primer`` on Activity-Based Costing (ABC). ABC is a cost management aproach which can make an important contribution to understanding and controlling the changing costs in the electric utility industry. It is a method for attributing costs to activities, products and services by better understanding the underlying factors which drive those costs. ABC can help utility managers make better decisions through the application of more accurate process and product cost information and a fuller understanding of which activities add value and which do not. Armed with such information, utility managers are better equipped to address many of the strategic and operating decisions which they routinely face. The report introduces the ABC concept and approach to utility managers and offers insights into how ABC can be and is being used to control costs and improve strategic and operating decisions in electric utilities and other industries. The report (1) describes the ABC approach, (2) discusses the value of ABC to elecuic utilities, (3) identifies potential applications of ABC to current utility issues, (4) describes a step-by-step approach to developing and implementing ABC in the utility environment, and (5) presents a survey of more than 30 electric utilities and several detailed case studies of electric utilities and other companies who have adopted and are using ABC.

  16. Wireless integrated microsystems for monitoring brain chemical and electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roham, Masoud; Garris, Paul A.; Mohseni, Pedram

    2008-08-01

    A 16-channel chip for wireless in vivo recording of chemical and electrical neural activity is described. The 7.83-mm2 IC is fabricated using a 0.5-μm CMOS process and incorporates a 71-μW, 3rd-order, reconfigurable, ΔΣ modulator per channel, achieving an input-referred noise of 4.69 μVrms in 4-kHz BW and 94.1 pArms in 5-kHz BW for electrical and fast-scan voltammetric chemical neurosensing, respectively. The chip has been externally interfaced with carbon-fiber microelectrodes implanted acutely in the caudate-putamen of an anesthetized rat, and, for the first time, extracellular levels of dopamine elicited by electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle have been successfully recorded wirelessly across multiple channels using 300-V/s fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

  17. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    PubMed Central

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  18. The role of the anterior intralaminar nuclei and N-methyl D-aspartate receptors in the generation of spontaneous bursts in rat neocortical neurones.

    PubMed

    Fox, K; Armstrong-James, M

    1986-01-01

    The nature of spontaneous unitary activity of rat neocortex was investigated during slow wave sleep and urethane anaesthesia. Neurones in layer IV and V locations fired in a burst-pause pattern at a low burst repetition rate (0.5-4 per second) during both stage 3/4 sleep and urethane anaesthesia. Occasionally an alternative mode of firing (spindle clusters), associated with focal spindle wave activity, was also found to occur in both states. Using dual microelectrode implants it was found that the onset times of bursts (but not spindle clusters), coincided in the same and opposing cortices, whether in functionally similar or disparate areas. The highest probability was that burst onsets occurred simultaneously (resolution = 2.56 ms, interquartile range = 40 ms). Spontaneous unitary activity was investigated in the thalamus for temporal correlation with spontaneous unitary activity in neocortex under urethane anaesthesia. Neurones of the anterior intralaminar group (aIL) consistently fired in a burst-pause pattern such that each aIL burst showed a strong tendency to precede a cortical burst. Unilateral electrical stimulation of the aIL nuclei evoked widespread bilateral entrainment of cortical bursts. In contrast stimulation of VPl, or cutaneous sites, evoked only short duration spike responses together with burst abolition in the appropriate restricted Sml area. Ionophoresis of NMDA (N-Methyl D-Aspartate) onto Sm1 neurones increased the probability of cortical burst responses to aIL stimulation in addition to decreasing the latency by 20-40 ms (n = 11). Ionophoresis of 2APV (2-amino 5-phosphono valeric acid) caused simultaneous abolition of spontaneous cortical bursts and bursts evoked by aIL stimulation. Short latency responses to cutaneous and VPl stimulation were unaffected by ionophoresis of 2APV sufficient to cause burst elimination, suggesting that this pathway does not operate via a 2APV sensitive receptor mechanism. Anatomical features of the aIL nuclei and their overall cortical projection pattern are discussed in relationship to these findings. The activation of cortical NMDA/APV sensitive receptors by aIL afferents in the "spontaneous" generation of bursts in cortical cells is discussed. PMID:3019750

  19. Todd, Faraday, and the electrical basis of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H

    2004-09-01

    Robert Bentley Todd (1809-60) was the UK's first eminent neurologist and neuroscientist. An anatomist, physiologist, and clinical scientist with an interest in the nervous system, he was the first to confirm the electrical basis of brain activity in the 1840s. He was influenced by his contemporary, Michael Faraday at the Royal Institution, and by two colleagues at King's College, John Daniell and Charles Wheatstone, who were also working at the cutting edge of electrical science. Todd conceived of nervous polarity (force) generated in nervous centres and compared this with the polar force of voltaic electricity developed in the galvanic battery. He brilliantly foresaw each nerve vesicle (cell) and its related fibres (ie, neuron) as a distinct apparatus for the development and transmission of nervous polarity. Epilepsy was the result of periodic unnatural development of nervous force leading to the "disruptive discharge" described by Faraday. Faraday, who studied animal electricity in the Gymnotus (electric eel), and Todd saw nervous polarity as a higher form of interchangeable energy. PMID:15324724

  20. Active RF Pulse Compression Using An Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    First we review the theory of active pulse compression systems using resonant delay lines. Then we describe the design of an electrically controlled semiconductor active switch. The switch comprises an active window and an overmoded waveguide three-port network. The active window is based on a four-inch silicon wafer which has 960 PIN diodes. These are spatially combined in an overmoded waveguide. We describe the philosophy and design methodology for the three-port network and the active window. We then present the results of using this device to compress 11.4 GHz RF signals with high compression ratios. We show how the system can be used with amplifier like sources, in which one can change the phase of the source by manipulating the input to the source. We also show how the active switch can be used to compress a pulse from an oscillator like sources, which is not possible with passive pulse compression systems.

  1. Electrically active nanomaterials as improved neural tissue regeneration scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Seil, Justin T; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Numerous biomaterials have provided promising results toward improving the function of injured nervous system tissue. However, significant hurdles, such as delayed or incomplete tissue regeneration, remain toward full functional recovery of nervous system tissue. Because of this continual need for better nervous system biomaterials, more recent approaches to design the next generation of tissue engineering scaffolds for the nervous system have incorporated nanotechnology, or more specifically, nanoscale surface feature dimensions which mimic natural neural tissue. Compared to conventional materials with micron-scale surface dimensions, nanomaterials have exhibited an ability to enhance desirable neural cell activity while minimizing unwanted cell activity, such as reactive astrocyte activity in the central nervous system. The complexity of neural tissue injury and the presence of inhibitory cues as well as the absence of stimulatory cues may require multifaceted treatment approaches with customized biomaterials that nanotechnology can provide. Combinations of stimulatory cues may be used to incorporate nanoscale topographical and chemical or electrical cues in the same scaffold to provide an environment for tissue regeneration that is superior to inert scaffolds. Ongoing research in the field of electrically active nanomaterials includes the fabrication of composite materials with nanoscale, piezoelectric zinc oxide particles embedded into a polymer matrix. Zinc oxide, when mechanically deformed through ultrasound, for example, can theoretically provide an electrical stimulus, a known stimulatory cue for neural tissue regeneration. The combination of nanoscale surface dimensions and electrical activity may provide an enhanced neural tissue regeneration environment; such multifaceted nanotechnology approaches deserve further attention in the neural tissue regeneration field. PMID:20730786

  2. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  3. Using electric field to enhance the activity of anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin; Qiao, Sen; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-08-01

    Electric field was applied to enhance the activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria for nitrogen removal in this study. The effect of different distributive modes with the total electric field time of 6 h/24 h (R2) and 18 h/24 h (R3) at 2 V/cm was determined through long-term tests. With the continuous application time increasing from 3 to 9 h in R3 (1 to 3 h in R2), the total nitrogen removal rate (NRR) showed an acceleration trend. When the electric field was applied continuously for 9 h (R3, mode 3, application-rest time: 9 h-3 h), the NRR dramatically increased 38.7 % over that of control on day 160. Besides, it was demonstrated that the increase of crude enzyme activities and the cell quantities were the main reasons for the enhancement of nitrogen removal performance of the anammox process. Additionally, transmission electron microscope observation proved the morphological change of anammox biomass under electric field application. PMID:25947249

  4. E region electric field dependence of the solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, C. M.; Moro, J.; Resende, L. C. A.; Chen, S. S.; Schuch, N. J.; Costa, J. E. R.

    2015-10-01

    We have being studying the zonal and vertical E region electric field components inferred from the Doppler shifts of type 2 echoes (gradient drift irregularities) detected with the 50 MHz backscatter coherent radar set at São Luis, Brazil (SLZ, 2.3°S, 44.2°W) during the solar cycle 24. In this report we present the dependence of the vertical and zonal components of this electric field with the solar activity, based on the solar flux F10.7. For this study we consider the geomagnetically quiet days only (Kp ≤ 3+). A magnetic field-aligned-integrated conductivity model was developed for proving the conductivities, using the IRI-2007, the MISIS-2000, and the IGRF-11 models as input parameters for ionosphere, neutral atmosphere, and Earth magnetic field, respectively. The ion-neutron collision frequencies of all the species are combined through the momentum transfer collision frequency equation. The mean zonal component of the electric field, which normally ranged from 0.19 to 0.35 mV/m between the 8 and 18 h (LT) in the Brazilian sector, show a small dependency with the solar activity. Whereas the mean vertical component of the electric field, which normally ranges from 4.65 to 10.12 mV/m, highlights the more pronounced dependency of the solar flux.

  5. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1991-09-10

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch. 11 figures.

  6. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1991-01-01

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch.

  7. Modification of the degree of branching of a beta-(1,3)-glucan affects aggregation behavior and activity in an oxidative burst assay.

    PubMed

    Magee, Andrew S; Langeslay, Ryan R; Will, Paul M; Danielson, Michael E; Wurst, Lindsay R; Iiams, Vanessa A

    2015-12-01

    Scleroglucan is a β-(1,3)-glucan which is highly branched at the 6-position with a single glucose residue. Acid hydrolysis of a high molecular weight scleroglucan gave a medium molecular weight, freely soluble material. Linkage analysis by the partially methylated alditol acetate method showed that the solubilized material had 30% branching. When the material was subjected to partial Smith degradations, the percent branching was reduced accordingly to 12% or 17%. After the percent branching was reduced, the average molecular weight of the samples increased considerably, indicating the assembly of higher ordered aggregate structures. An aggregate number distribution analysis was applied to confirm the higher aggregated structures. These aggregated structures gave the material significantly enhanced activity in an in vitro oxidative burst assay compared to the highly branched material. PMID:26015027

  8. Neutrino bursts from gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan; Xu, Guohong

    1994-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursts originate at cosmological distances, as strongly indicated by the results from Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), then ultrarelativistic ejecta are the likely consequence of the highly super-Eddington luminosity of the sources. If the energy injection rate varies with time, then the Lorentz factor of the wind also varies, and the shells of ejected matter collide with each other. The collisions between baryons produce pions which decay into high-energy photons, electrons, electron positron pairs, and neutrino pairs. The bulk Lorentz factor of approximately 300 is required if our model is to be compatible with the observed millisecond variability. The strongest gamma-ray bursts are observed to deliver approximately 10(exp -4) ergs/sq cm in 100-200 keV photons. In our scenario more energy may be delivered in a neutrino burst. Typical neutrinos may be approximately 30 GeV if the protons have a Maxwellian energy distribution, and up to approximately TeV if the protons have a power-law distribution. Such neutrino bursts are close to the detection limit of the DUMAND II experiment.

  9. Electrical Activation of Dark Excitonic States in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uda, Takushi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Ishii, Akihiro; Kato, Yuichiro K.

    Electrical activation of optical transitions to parity-forbidden dark excitonic states in individual carbon nanotubes is reported. We examine electric field effects on various excitonic states by simultaneously measuring both photocurrent and photoluminescence. As the applied field increases, we observe an emergence of new absorption peaks in the excitation spectra. From the diameter dependence of the energy separation between the new peaks and the ground state of E11 excitons, we attribute the peaks to the dark excited states which became optically active due to the applied field. A simple field-induced exciton dissociation model is introduced to explain the photocurrent threshold fields, and the edge of the E11 continuum states have been identified using this model. Work supported by JSPS (KAKENHI 24340066, 26610080), MEXT (Photon Frontier Network Program, Nanotechnology Platform), Canon Foundation, and Asahi Glass Foundation.

  10. Electric currents and coronal heating in NOAA active region 6952

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, T. R.; Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Wulser, J. -P.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tsuneta, S.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal relationship between coronal structures observed with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft and the vertical electric current density derived from photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the Stokes Polarimeter at the Mees Solar Observatory. We focus on a single active region: AR 6952 which we observed on 7 days during 1991 December. For 11 independent maps of the vertical electric current density co-aligned with non-flaring X-ray images, we search for a morphological relationship between sites of high vertical current density in the photosphere and enhanced X-ray emission in the overlying corona. We find no compelling spatial or temporal correlation between the sites of vertical current and the bright X-ray structures in this active region.

  11. Active Electric Imaging: Body-Object Interplay and Object's Electric Texture

    PubMed Central

    Caputi, ngel A.; Aguilera, Pedro A.; Pereira, Ana Carolina

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with the role of fish's body and object's geometry on determining the image spatial shape in pulse Gymnotiforms. This problem was explored by measuring local electric fields along a line on the skin in the presence and absence of objects. We depicted object's electric images at different regions of the electrosensory mosaic, paying particular attention to the perioral region where a fovea has been described. When sensory surface curvature increases relative to the object's curvature, the image details depending on object's shape are blurred and finally disappear. The remaining effect of the object on the stimulus profile depends on the strength of its global polarization. This depends on the length of the object's axis aligned with the field, in turn depending on fish body geometry. Thus, fish's body and self-generated electric field geometries are embodied in this global effect of the object. The presence of edges or local changes in impedance at the nearest surface of closely located objects adds peaks to the image profiles (local effect or object's electric texture). It is concluded that two cues for object recognition may be used by active electroreceptive animals: global effects (informing on object's dimension along the field lines, conductance, and position) and local effects (informing on object's surface). Since the field has fish's centered coordinates, and electrosensory fovea is used for exploration of surfaces, fish fine movements are essential to perform electric perception. We conclude that fish may explore adjacent objects combining active movements and electrogenesis to represent them using electrosensory information. PMID:21876730

  12. Type III Radio Burst Duration and SEP Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-duration (>15 min), low-frequency (<14 MHz) type III radio bursts have been reported to be indicative of solar energetic particle events. We measured the durations of type III bursts associated with large SEP events of solar cycle 23. The Type III durations are distributed symmetrically at 1 MHz yielding a mean value of approximately 33 min (median = 32 min) for the large SEP events. When the SEP events with ground level enhancement (GLE,) are considered, the distribution is essentially unchanged (mean = 32 min, median = 30 min). To test the importance of type III bursts in indicating SEP events, we considered a set of six type III bursts from the same active region (AR 10588) whose durations fit the "long duration" criterion. We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type II radio bursts associated with the type III bursts. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type II burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type II burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 rein) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event, consistent with the statistical study of Cliver and Ling (2009, ApJ ).

  13. Burst suppression electroencephalogram with mushroom poisoning, Amanita pantherina

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yuka; Sato, Hiromasa; Yamamoto, Motoyoshi; Tada, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We report on a patient with Amanita pantherina poisoning who showed a burst suppression pattern on electroencephalography during a comatose state. The patient recovered without sequelae a week after ingestion. Burst suppression pattern is defined as alternating bursts and periods of electrical silence, and it is associated with comatose states of various causes. The major toxins contained in A. pantherina are ibotenic acid, an excitatory amino acid at the glutamate receptors, and muscimol, an agonist of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors. Alteration of the synaptic transmission in the central nervous system by these toxins may lead to a burst suppression pattern. PMID:26543811

  14. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Mikić, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Archontis, V.; Linton, M. G.; Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Kliem, B.

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  15. Section of Burst Tumulus

    A section of burst tumulus that has fallen away from the larger structure. Tumuli can burst when the influx of lava is rapid compared to the rate at which the crust is thickening by cooling. In these cases the pressure driving the lava is significantly greater than the weight of the overlying crust....

  16. Active Removal of Large Debris: Electrical Propulsion Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billot Soccodato, Carole; Lorand, Anthony; Perrin, Veronique; Couzin, Patrice; FontdecabaBaig, Jordi

    2013-08-01

    The risk for current operational spacecraft or future market induced by large space debris, dead satellites or rocket bodies, in Low Earth Orbit has been identified several years ago. Many potential solutions and architectures are traded with a main objective of reducing cost per debris. Based on cost consideration, specially driven by launch cost, solutions constructed on multi debris capture capacities seem to be much affordable The recent technologic evolutions in electric propulsion and solar power generation can be used to combine high potential vehicles for debris removal. The present paper reports the first results of a study funded by CNES that addresses full electric solutions for large debris removal. Some analysis are currently in progress as the study will end in August. It compares the efficiency of in-orbit Active Removal of typical debris using electric propulsion The electric engine performances used in this analysis are demonstrated through a 2012/2013 PPS 5000 on-ground tests campaign. The traded missions are based on a launch in LEO, the possible vehicle architectures with capture means or contact less, the selection of deorbiting or reorbiting strategy. For contact less strategy, the ion-beam shepherd effect towards the debris problematic will be addressed. Vehicle architecture and performance of the overall system will be stated, showing the adequacy and the limits of each solution.

  17. Versatile LDV burst simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngbluth, O., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A device for generating burst signals is reported that can be used to determine whether or not a laser Doppler velocimeter is operating properly. A high frequency signal which corresponds to the information frequency of the laser Doppler velocimeter is modulated by a low frequency signal to provide an envelope for the high frequency signal. The high frequency signal is modulated by any modulator means such as, for example, an analog multiplier. The low frequency signal is added to the modulated signal to provide pedestals for the resulting series of burst pulses. The means are provided for selecting different combinations of these burst signals. Also means are provided for making the burst signals asymmetrical as desired. In addition, means are provided for varying the frequencies, and amplitudes of the information, envelope and pedestal frequency signals in the burst signals.

  18. SHEBA prompt burst dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kimpland, R.

    1997-12-31

    The Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA), located at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility, is a homogeneous liquid-fueled reactor that is being prepared for prompt burst operation. As part of the preparations, a reactor safety study was performed in support of the new SHEBA experiment plan. This study looked at the maximum power, total energy yield, and maximum transient pressures that may occur in the reactor during prompt burst operation. The goal of this study is to analyze the neutronic and hydrodynamic behavior of the reactor during burst operation, and to ensure that prompt burst operation does not damage the reactor or exceed the safety envelope of the facility`s Safety Analysis Report (SAR).

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  20. Glucose-induced electrical activities and insulin secretion in pancreatic islet β-cells are modulated by CFTR.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing Hui; Chen, Hui; Ruan, Ye Chun; Zhang, Xue Lian; Zhang, Xiao Hu; Fok, Kin Lam; Tsang, Lai Ling; Yu, Mei Kuen; Huang, Wen Qing; Sun, Xiao; Chung, Yiu Wa; Jiang, Xiaohua; Sohma, Yoshiro; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2014-01-01

    The cause of insulin insufficiency remains unknown in many diabetic cases. Up to 50% adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), develop CF-related diabetes (CFRD) with most patients exhibiting insulin insufficiency. Here we show that CFTR is a regulator of glucose-dependent electrical acitivities and insulin secretion in β-cells. We demonstrate that glucose elicited whole-cell currents, membrane depolarization, electrical bursts or action potentials, Ca(2+) oscillations and insulin secretion are abolished or reduced by inhibitors or knockdown of CFTR in primary mouse β-cells or RINm5F β-cell line, or significantly attenuated in CFTR mutant (DF508) mice compared with wild-type mice. VX-809, a newly discovered corrector of DF508 mutation, successfully rescues the defects in DF508 β-cells. Our results reveal a role of CFTR in glucose-induced electrical activities and insulin secretion in β-cells, shed light on the pathogenesis of CFRD and possibly other idiopathic diabetes, and present a potential treatment strategy. PMID:25025956

  1. In vitro interferon γ improves the oxidative burst activity of neutrophils in patients with chronic granulomatous disease with a subtype of gp91phox deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Uygun, Dilara F. Kocacik; Köksoy, Sadi; Şahin, Emel; Yeğin, Olcay

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a genetically heterogeneous primary immunodeficiency caused by a defect in phagocyte production of oxygen metabolites, and resulting in infections produced by catalase-positive microorganisms and fungi. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) has a multitude of effects on the immune system. Although preliminary studies with CGD patients on treatment with IFN-γ showed that it enhanced phagocytosis and superoxide production, ongoing studies did not reveal a significant increase of this function. Here we investigated the oxidative capacity of phagocytes in different subtypes of CGD patients on treatment with IFN-γ in vitro. Material and methods Fifty-seven patients with CGD from 14 immunology centres were enrolled to our multi-centre study. Twenty-one patients were studied as controls. Oxidative burst assay with dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) was used and the stimulation index (SI) was calculated with respect to CGD subtypes in both neutrophils and monocytes before, and then one and 24 hours after adding IFN-γ. Results Upon comparison of the SIs of the patients’ neutrophils before in vitro IFN-γ at hour 0, and after adding IFN-γ at hour 1 and 24 were compared, and the differences were determined between hours 0-24 and hours 1-24. This difference was especially apparent between hours 1-24. In CGD subtypes, particularly in gp91phox subtype, it was seen that, following in vitro IFN-γ, SIs of neutrophils began to increase after hour 1, and that increase became more apparent at hour 24. Conclusions Our study showed that IFN-γ treatment may increase the oxidative bursting activity by increasing the superoxide production in neutrophils, particularly in gp91phox subtype. PMID:26155184

  2. Structure-activity relationships among 9-N-alkyl derivatives of erythromycylamine and their effect on the oxidative burst of human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abdelghaffar, H; Kirst, H; Soukri, A; Babin-Chevaye, C; Labro, M T

    2002-04-01

    Macrolide antibiotics have recently triggered much interest owing to the immunomodulatory potential of some derivatives, particularly in the field of inflammatory diseases. Among the possible mechanisms underlying these anti-inflammatory effects, macrolide-induced inhibition of oxidant production by phagocytes has attracted much attention. We and others have previously reported that erythromycin A-derived macrolides impair the phagocyte oxidative burst, a property linked to the presence of L-cladinose. However, we have also demonstrated that other substituents can be involved in the modulation of phagocyte function. Here we have extended the analysis of structure-activity relationships by studying the effects of five 9-N-alkyl derivatives of erythromycylamine on oxidant production by human neutrophils in vitro. LY211397 (2-methoxyethyl derivative) neither altered cell viability nor superoxide anion production. LY281389 (n-propyl derivative) did not alter cell viability and was slightly more inhibitory than erythromycylamine for the production of superoxide anion; its IC50 (concentration that inhibits 50% of the neutrophil response) was about 18 and 24 microM (versus 72 and 74 pM for erythromycylamine) after 60 min of incubation following fMLP and PMA stimulation, respectively. LY80576 (N-phenyl-3-indolylmethyl derivative), LY281981 (3-phenyl-n-propyl derivative) and LY57843 (benzyl derivative) all displayed cellular toxicity at high pharmacological concentrations after 30 to 60 min of incubation. Interestingly, these latter three drugs exhibited a rapid (5 min incubation) and strong inhibitory effect on the neutrophil oxidative burst from either stimulus, with IC50 values of 3 to 10 pM. Further in-vitro and in-vivo investigations are required to analyze the anti-inflammatory potential of these three derivatives. PMID:12017367

  3. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS MEDIATING OXIDATIVE BURST BY CHICKEN HETEROPHILS IN RESPONSE TO STIMULATION WITH SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS LIPOTEICHOIC ACID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been previously shown to mediate oxidative burst in chicken heterophils. This study was conducted to determine which molecular pathways are involved in TLR mediated oxidative burst. Peripheral blood heterophils from neonatal chicks were isolated and exposed to known...

  4. Sawtooth bursts: observations and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Bárta, M.; Klassen, A.; Aurass, H.; Mann, G.

    2002-12-01

    An example of the sawtooth burst observed during the November 3, 1997 flare is shown. Basic parameters of the sawtooth bursts are summarized and compared with those of fibers, fiber chains, zebras, EEL bursts and lace bursts. The sawtooth bursts are found to be most similar to the lace bursts, therefore the lace bursts model is proposed also for them. Then using this model the dynamic spectrum with the sawtooth burst is modelled. The model considers accelerated electrons with an unstable distribution function on the double resonance frequency and quasi-periodic variations of the electron plasma density and/or magnetic field in the radio source.

  5. Burst synchronization transitions in a neuronal network of subnetworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Lei, Jinzhi; Perc, Matjaž; Kurths, Jürgen; Chen, Guanrong

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the transitions of burst synchronization are explored in a neuronal network consisting of subnetworks. The studied network is composed of electrically coupled bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. Numerical results show that two types of burst synchronization transitions can be induced not only by the variations of intra- and intercoupling strengths but also by changing the probability of random links between different subnetworks and the number of subnetworks. Furthermore, we find that the underlying mechanisms for these two bursting synchronization transitions are different: one is due to the change of spike numbers per burst, while the other is caused by the change of the bursting type. Considering that changes in the coupling strengths and neuronal connections are closely interlaced with brain plasticity, the presented results could have important implications for the role of the brain plasticity in some functional behavior that are associated with synchronization.

  6. Variation of middle atmospheric electrical conductivity with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. P.

    The electrical conductivity is an important parameter of stratosphere and mesosphere. It plays a vital role in global electric circuit. The stratospheric conductivity is mainly due to cosmic rays produced ionisation while in mesosphere the solar U.V. radiation, 1216Å produces ionisation. It is well known that both cosmic rays and solar U.V. radiation intensity show solar cycle effect. In order to investigate solar cycle effect on stratospheric and mesospheric conductivity we have conducted balloon and rocket borne measurements of conductivity from Indian zone. The rocket experiments were conducted from Thumba (dip = 0) from 1966-1986 to measure electron/ion density from 50 km to 100 km region. Three different techniques were used namely Gerdein condenser, propagation experiment and Langmuir probe to measure ionisation density. Results of noon time measurements for low and high solar activity period were compared. The electron/ion density was more during high solar activity period compared to low solar activity period. Balloon experiments were conducted for stratospheric studies from Hyderabad during 1984-1994 to measure conductivity in altitude region 20km to 35 km. Three different techniques were used to measure stratospheric conductivity namely relaxation probe, long were antenna probe and Langumir probe. Even in stratosphere conductivity values show positive correlation with solar activity. These results will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation

    DOEpatents

    Bunshah, R.; Nath, P.

    1982-06-22

    Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation is disclosed. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment. 1 fig.

  8. Electric field activated nonlinear anisotropic charge transport in doped polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varade, Vaibhav; Anjaneyulu, P.; Suchand Sangeeth, C. S.; Ramesh, K. P.; Menon, R.

    2013-12-01

    Electric field activated nonlinear transport is investigated in polypyrrole thin film in both in-plane and out-of-plane geometries down to 5 K and strong anisotropy is observed. A morphological model is suggested to explain the anisotropy through inter-chain and intra-chain transport. The deviation from the variable range hopping at low temperature is accounted by fluctuation assisted transport. From Zabrodaskii plots, it is found that electric field can tune the transport from insulating to metallic regime. Glazman-Matveev model is used to describe the nonlinear conduction. Field scaling analysis shows that conductance data at different temperature falls on to a single curve. Nonlinearity exponent, mT and characteristic length, LE are estimated to characterize the transport in both the geometries.

  9. Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation

    DOEpatents

    Bunshah, Rointan; Nath, Prem

    1982-01-01

    Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment.

  10. Extracellular potassium and neuronal bursting properties

    PubMed Central

    Bacak, Bartholomew J.; Segaran, Joshua; Rybak, Ilya A.; Molkov, Yaroslav I.

    2015-01-01

    There are many types of neurons in the brain that can intrinsically generate rhythmic bursting activity. These neurons are putatively responsible for specific rhythmic behaviors like breathing and locomotion. In many cases, for rhythmic bursting to occur, the excitability of these neurons needs to be elevated to a certain level. In vivo, this elevation is usually provided by external excitatory drives. In vitro (e.g. in slices), rhythmic bursting is often induced by elevation of extracellular potassium concentration (Kout). It is known that increased Kout shifts the reversal potentials for potassium and leakage currents to higher values. However, how an increase in Kout, and the resultant changes in potassium currents, induce bursting activity, have yet to be established. Our modeling study has been performed to elucidate the interplay between these currents and their roles in the onset of rhythmic bursting. A conductance-based model of a neuron from the medullary pre-Bötzinger Complex (pre-BötC) was used as a basis. A potassium ion component was incorporated into the leak current, and model behaviors were investigated at varying concentrations of Kout, taking into account its effect on both the delayed rectifier potassium and leakage currents. Model parameters were constrained to match experimental characteristics of bursting in pre-BötC neurons in neonatal rats in vitro. Our simulations show that rhythmic bursting activity, evoked in vitro by elevation of Kout, is the result of a specific relationship between the leakage and voltage-dependent, delayed rectifier potassium currents, which may not be observed at physiological levels of extracellular potassium. Our results provide important insight into the critical role of Kout in generation of neuronal rhythmic bursting activity. PMID:26899961

  11. Oligochitosan stimulated phagocytic activity of macrophages from blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) associated with respiratory burst coupled with nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lichun; Zhou, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoheng; Wang, Hong; Wang, Li; Yuan, Gailing; Asim, Muhammad; Wang, Weimin; Zeng, Lingbing; Liu, Xiaoling; Lin, Li

    2014-11-01

    The immunostimulating effects of oligochitosan have been proven in several fish, however, the mechanisms underlying the stimulation are not characterized. In the present study, the effects of oligochitosan were investigated using macrophages isolated from blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala). The results showed that the phagocytic activity of the macrophages was enhanced by the addition of oligochitosan in vitro and in vivo. The two of the most important antimicrobial pathways of macrophages, NADPH oxidase and iNOS pathways were included for further studies. The amounts of superoxide anion and the mRNAs of the five subunits of NADPH oxidase genes were significantly enhanced in the oligochitosan-treated macrophages and macrophages isolated from fish fed with feed containing oligochitosan. In addition, the NO production, iNOS activity and iNOS gene expression were all significantly increased in the presence of oligochitosan. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of the TNF-α and IL-1β were also significantly increased in the macrophages derived from fish fed with oligochitosan. In conclusion, the stimulation effects of oligochitosan on the phagocytic activity of the fish macrophages were associated with respiratory burst coupled with nitric oxide production. PMID:24968077

  12. Pharmacological block of the electrogenic sodium pump disrupts rhythmic bursting induced by strychnine and bicuculline in the neonatal rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, L; Bracci, E; Nistri, A

    1997-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying rhythmic bursts induced in the isolated neonatal rat spinal cord by bath application of strychnine and bicuculline (which block glycine- and gamma-aminobutyric acid-A-receptor-mediated inhibition, respectively) were probed with pharmacological tools. Such spontaneous bursts were recorded either intracellularly from lumbar motoneurons or extracellularly from ventral roots. As previously described, these network-driven events consisted of large-amplitude depolarizations arising abruptly from baseline with a highly regular period (on average 28 s). Burst episodes (lasting on average 7 s) comprised several oscillations and appeared synchronously on flexor and extensor motoneuron pools of both sides of the spinal cord. Their diffuse location made convenient to use bath-applied substances in the attempt to selectively block distinct membrane processes operating through the network. Application of apamin (0.4 microM) shortened both cycle period and burst duration without changing their regular rhythmicity. Similar results were obtained with carbachol (10 microM). Cs+ (4 mM) reversibly hyperpolarized the motoneuron membrane potential and largely increased burst duration, which was characterized by a long series of repetitive oscillatory waves. Cycle period and rhythmicity remained unaltered. Ouabain (10 microM), strophanthidin (4 microM), or K(+)-free solutions disrupted rhythmic bursting, which was fragmented into irregularly occurring paroxysmal activity mixed with short depolarizing events, still developing simultaneously on both sides of the spinal cord. Bursting activity eventually ceased after approximately 30-40 min of application of ouabain or strophanthidin. Prolonged washout of strophanthidin or K(+)-free solutions reestablished regular bursting patterns, whereas no recovery from ouabain was observed. At the time of strong depression of bursting, it was still possible to evoke bursts by single electrical pulses applied to the segmental dorsal root. Antidromic spikes of motoneurons could still be evoked by ventral root stimulation. These results demonstrate that, in a spinal bursting network mainly made up by excitatory processes, blockers of slow Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents, such as apamin or carbachol, or of the slow inward rectifier, such as Cs+, did not suppress rhythmicity, suggesting that these conductances simply contributed to control cycle period and/or burst duration. Conversely, pharmacological blockers of the electrogenic Na+ pump such as ouabain, strophanthidin, or K(+)-free solutions severely disrupted all characteristics of rhythmic bursting. It is proposed that the operation of the electrogenic Na+ pump of premotoneurons was a crucial element for rhythmic bursting. PMID:9120558

  13. A Nontriggered Burst Supplement to the BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kommers, Jefferson M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    2001-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a real-time burst detection (or "trigger") system running onboard the spacecraft. Under some circumstances, however, a GRB may not activate the on-board burst trigger. For example, the burst may be too faint to exceed the on-board detection threshold, or it may occur while the on-board burst trigger is disabled for technical reasons. This paper describes a catalog of 873 "nontriggered" GRBs that were detected in a search of the archival continuous data from BATSE recorded between 1991 December 9.0 and 1997 December 17.0. For each burst, the catalog gives an estimated source direction, duration, peak flux, and fluence. Similar data are presented for 50 additional bursts of unknown origin that were detected in the 25-50 keV range; these events may represent the low-energy "tail" of the GRB spectral distribution. This catalog increases the number of GRBs detected with BATSE by 48% during the time period covered by the search.

  14. The role of oblique whistler waves in the development of bursts of localized parallel electric fields in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Drake, James; Mozer, Forrest; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Huge numbers of different types of nonlinear structures (double layers, electron holes, non-linear whistlers, etc. referred to as Time Domain Structures - TDS) have been observed by the electric field experiment on the Van Allen Probes. They often emerge on the forward edges of the wave structures and form temporal chains. Many of the observed non-linear structures are associated with whistler waves and some of them can be directly driven by whistlers. The parameters favorable for the generation of TDS were studied experimentally as well as through use of 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is shown that an outward propagating front of whistlers and hot electrons amplifies oblique whistlers which collapse into regions of intense parallel electric field with properties consistent with recent observations of TDS from the Van Allen Probe satellites. Oblique whistlers seed the parallel electric fields that are driven by the beams. The resulting parallel electric fields trap and heat the precipitating electrons. These electrons drive spikes of intense parallel electric field with characteristics similar to the TDSs seen in the VAP data. The precipitating hot electrons propagate away from the source region in intense bunches rather than as a smooth flux.

  15. Zero electric field activation energy in molecularly doped polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Lémus, Simón J.; Yartsev, Vyacheslav M.

    1995-02-01

    The Poole-Frenkel approach has been applied to two charged centers separated by a distance R. The reduction of the potential barrier due to a finite R and the presence of an externally applied electric field E is calculated. In the limiting case E → 0 the activation energy is found to be Δɛ( E = 0, R) = Δɛ0 - e2/ ɛ0ɛR, where Δɛ0 denotes the potential barrier height for an isolated center. Experimental results on drift mobility measurements in N-isopropylcarbazole dispersed into amorphous polycarbonate are in agreement with this relation.

  16. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical activity influence neuronal survival

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, D.E.; Eiden, L.E.

    1986-02-01

    Blockage of electrical activity in dissociated spinal cord cultures results in a significant loss of neurons during a critical period in development. Decreases in neuronal cell numbers and SVI-labeled tetanus toxin fixation produced by electrical blockage with tetrodotoxin (TTX) were prevented by addition of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the nutrient medium. The most effective concentration of VIP was 0.1 nM. At higher concentrations, the survival-enhancing effect of VIP on TTX-treated cultures was attenuated. Addition of the peptide alone had no significant effect on neuronal cell counts or tetanus toxin fixation. With the same experimental conditions, two closely related peptides, PHI-27 (peptide, histidyl-isoleucine amide) and secretin, were found not to increase the number of neurons in TTX-treated cultures. Interference with VIP action by VIP antiserum resulted in neuronal losses that were not significantly different from those observed after TTX treatment. These data indicate that under conditions of electrical blockade a neurotrophic action of VIP on neuronal survival can be demonstrated.

  17. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  18. Gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, E. P.; Petrosian, V.

    The physics of gamma bursts and neutron stars is examined in chapters based on papers presented at an AIP Workshop held at Stanford University on July 30-August 3, 1984. Astronomical observations and statistics concerned with the temporal structure of gamma-ray bursts, the log N-log S relation, error boxes and spatial distribution, deep searches for bursters, optical flashes, and burster recurrence time scales are discussed. Emphasis is given to accretion models, the thermonuclear model, winds in gamma-ray bursts, the magnetic flare model, and the starquake model.

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Paciesas, W.S. ); Fishman, G.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings represents the works presented at the Gamma-Ray Bursts Workshop -- 1991 which was held on the campus of theUniversity of Alabama in Huntsville, October 16-18. The emphasis ofthe Workshop was to present and discuss new observations of gamma-ray bursts made recently by experiments on the Compton Gamma-RayObservatory (CGRO), Granat, Ginga, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Prognozand Phobos. These presentations were complemented by some groundbased observations, reanalysis of older data, descriptions offuture gamma-ray burst experiments and a wide-ranging list oftheoretical discussions. Over seventy papers are included in theproceedings. Eleven of them are abstracted for the database. (AIP)

  20. Predicting rock bursts in mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1979-01-01

    The microseismic method relies on observational data, amply demonstrated in laboratory experiments, that acoustic noise occurs in rocks subjected to high differential stresses. Acoustic emission becomes most pronounced as the breaking strength of the rock is reached. Laboratory studies have shown that the acoustic emission is linked with the release of stored strain energy as the rock mass undergoes small-scale adjustments such as the formation of cracks. Studies in actual mines have shown that acoustic noises often precede failure of rock masses in rock bursts or in coal bumps. Seismologists are, therefore, very interested in whether these results can be applied to large-scale failures; that is, earthquakes. An active research program in predicting rock bursts in mines is being conducted by Brian T. Brady and his colleagues at the U.S Bureau of Mines, Denver Colo.  

  1. Optical Mapping of Electrical Activation in the Developing Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedmera, David; Reckova, Maria; Rosengarten, Carlin; Torres, Maria I.; Gourdie, Robert G.; Thompson, Robert P.

    2005-06-01

    Specialized conduction tissues mediate coordinated propagation of electrical activity through the adult vertebrate heart. Following activation of the atria, the activation wave is slowed down in the atrioventricular canal or node, after which it spreads rapidly into the left and right ventricles via the His-Purkinje system (HPS). This results in the ventricles being activated from the apex toward the base, which is a hallmark of HPS function. The development of mature HPS function follows significant phases of cardiac morphogenesis. Initially, the cardiac impulse propagates in a slow, linear, and isotropic fashion from the sinus venosus at the most caudal portion of the tubular heart. Although the speed of impulse propagation gradually increases as it travels toward the anterior regions of the heart tube, the actual sequence of ventricular activation in the looped heart proceeds in the same direction as blood flow. Eventually, the immature base-to-apex sequence of ventricular activation undergoes an apparent reversal, changing to the mature apex-to-base pattern. Using an optical mapping approach, we demonstrate that the timing of this last transition shows striking dependence on hemodynamic loading of the ventricle, being accelerated by pressure overload and delayed in left ventricular hypoplasia. Comparison of chick and mammalian hearts revealed some striking similarities as well as key differences in the timing of such events during cardiac organogenesis.

  2. Burst generation mediated by cholinergic input in terminal nerve-gonadotrophin releasing hormone neurones of the goldfish

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takafumi; Abe, Hideki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    Peptidergic neurones play a pivotal role in the neuromodulation of widespread areas in the nervous system. Generally, it has been accepted that the peptide release from these neurones is regulated by their firing activities. The terminal nerve (TN)-gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones, which are one of the well-studied peptidergic neurones in vertebrate brains, are characterised by their spontaneous regular pacemaker activities, and GnRH has been suggested to modulate the sensory responsiveness of animals. Although many peptidergic neurones are known to exhibit burst firing activities when they release the peptides, TN-GnRH neurones show spontaneous burst firing activities only infrequently. Thus, it remains to be elucidated whether the TN-GnRH neurones show burst activities and, if so, how the mode switching between the regular pacemaking and bursting modes is regulated in these neurones. In this study, we found that only a single pulse electrical stimulation of the neuropil surrounding the TN-GnRH neurones reproducibly induces transient burst activities in TN-GnRH neurones. Our combined physiological and morphological data suggest that this phenomenon occurs following slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials mediated by cholinergic terminals surrounding the TN-GnRH neurones. We also found that the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors induces persistent opening of potassium channels, resulting in a long-lasting hyperpolarisation. This long hyperpolarisation induces sustained rebound depolarisation that has been suggested to be generated by a combination of persistent voltage-gated Na+ channels and low-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. These new findings suggest a novel type of cholinergic regulation of burst activities in peptidergic neurones, which should contribute to the release of neuropeptides. PMID:23959678

  3. Jovian S burst sources

    SciTech Connect

    Leblanc, Y.; Genova, F.

    1981-09-30

    By using the high resolution observation of Nancay observatory, we have been able to identify the S burst emission on the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) records of Voyager. It is shown that the S bursts occur in two regions of the Phi/sub 10/-CML plane (S-IoB and S-IoA'C regions). In these regions the S burst emission is arranged into a pattern of repetitive features, drifting negatively. These features could be incomplete vertex late arcs. We show that the S burst pattern is distinct from the pattern of the Io-controlled emission. These results are discussed in the frame of Goldstein and Thieman's arc model.

  4. INTEGRAL burst alert service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H.; Jennings, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    The detection, accurate positioning, and spectral analysis of cosmic gamma ray bursts is an objective of the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission. Due to their unpredictable nature, gamma ray bursts can only be observed in serendipity mode. In order to allow and promote multiwavelength follow-up observations of such events, it is desirable to make the information available to the astrophysics community with a minimum delay through the use of Internet. Ideally, the data dissemination should occur within a few seconds of the start of the burst event so that follow up observations can proceed while gamma rays are still being emitted. The technical feasibility of building such a system to disseminate INTEGRAL burst alerts in real time is currently under consideration, the preliminary results of which are presented. It is concluded that such an alert service is technically feasible.

  5. Aberrant Activity in Degenerated Retinas Revealed by Electrical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zeck, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In this review, I present and discuss the current understanding of aberrant electrical activity found in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of rod-degenerated (rd) mouse retinas. The reported electrophysiological properties revealed by electrical imaging using high-density microelectrode arrays can be subdivided between spiking activity originating from retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and local field potentials (LFPs) reflecting strong trans-membrane currents within the GCL. RGCs in rd retinas show increased and rhythmic spiking compared to age-matched wild-type retinas. Fundamental spiking frequencies range from 5 to 15 Hz in various mouse models. The rhythmic RGC spiking is driven by a presynaptic network comprising AII amacrine and bipolar cells. In the healthy retina this rhythm-generating circuit is inhibited by photoreceptor input. A unique physiological feature of rd retinas is rhythmic LFP manifested as spatially-restricted low-frequency (5–15 Hz) voltage changes. Their spatiotemporal characterization revealed propagation and correlation with RGC spiking. LFPs rely on gap-junctional coupling and are shaped by glycinergic and by GABAergic transmission. The aberrant RGC spiking and LFPs provide a simple readout of the functionality of the remaining retinal circuitry which can be used in the development of improved vision restoration strategies. PMID:26903810

  6. Aberrant Activity in Degenerated Retinas Revealed by Electrical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeck, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In this review, I present and discuss the current understanding of aberrant electrical activity found in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of rod-degenerated (rd) mouse retinas. The reported electrophysiological properties revealed by electrical imaging using high-density microelectrode arrays can be subdivided between spiking activity originating from retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and local field potentials (LFPs) reflecting strong trans-membrane currents within the GCL. RGCs in rd retinas show increased and rhythmic spiking compared to age-matched wild-type retinas. Fundamental spiking frequencies range from 5 to 15 Hz in various mouse models. The rhythmic RGC spiking is driven by a presynaptic network comprising AII amacrine and bipolar cells. In the healthy retina this rhythm-generating circuit is inhibited by photoreceptor input. A unique physiological feature of rd retinas is rhythmic LFP manifested as spatially-restricted low-frequency (5-15 Hz) voltage changes. Their spatiotemporal characterization revealed propagation and correlation with RGC spiking. LFPs rely on gap-junctional coupling and are shaped by glycinergic and by GABAergic transmission. The aberrant RGC spiking and LFPs provide a simple readout of the functionality of the remaining retinal circuitry which can be used in the development of improved vision restoration strategies. PMID:26903810

  7. Trigeminal activation using chemical, electrical, and mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Iannilli, E; Del Gratta, C; Gerber, J C; Romani, G L; Hummel, T

    2008-10-15

    Tactile, proprioceptive, and nociceptive information, including also chemosensory functions are expressed in the trigeminal nerve sensory response. To study differences in the processing of different stimulus qualities, we performed a study based on functional magnetic resonance imaging. The first trigeminal branch (ophthalmic nerve) was activated by (a) intranasal chemical stimulation with gaseous CO2 which produces stinging and burning sensations, but is virtually odorless, (b) painful, but not nociceptive specific cutaneous electrical stimulation, and (c) cutaneous mechanical stimulation using air puffs. Eighteen healthy subjects participated (eight men, 10 women, mean age 31 years). Painful stimuli produced patterns of activation similar to what has been reported for other noxious stimuli, namely activation in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, anterior cingulate cortex, insular cortex, and thalamus. In addition, analyses indicated intensity-related activation in the prefrontal cortex which was specifically involved in the evaluation of stimulus intensity. Importantly, the results also indicated similarities between activation patterns after intranasal chemosensory trigeminal stimulation and patterns usually found following intranasal odorous stimulation, indicating the intimate connection between these two systems in the processing of sensory information. PMID:18583050

  8. Diagnostic Thresholds for Quantitative REM Sleep Phasic Burst Duration, Phasic and Tonic Muscle Activity, and REM Atonia Index in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder with and without Comorbid Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, Stuart J.; St. Louis, Erik K.; Duwell, Ethan J.; Timm, Paul C.; Sandness, David J.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Silber, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to determine whether phasic burst duration and conventional REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) methods could accurately diagnose REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) patients with comorbid OSA. Design: We visually analyzed RSWA phasic burst durations, phasic, “any,” and tonic muscle activity by 3-s mini-epochs, phasic activity by 30-s (AASM rules) epochs, and conducted automated REM atonia index (RAI) analysis. Group RSWA metrics were analyzed and regression models fit, with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves determining the best diagnostic cutoff thresholds for RBD. Both split-night and full-night polysomnographic studies were analyzed. Setting: N/A. Participants: Parkinson disease (PD)-RBD (n = 20) and matched controls with (n = 20) and without (n = 20) OSA. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: All mean RSWA phasic burst durations and muscle activities were higher in PD-RBD patients than controls (P < 0.0001), and RSWA associations with PD-RBD remained significant when adjusting for age, gender, and REM AHI (P < 0.0001). RSWA muscle activity (phasic, “any”) cutoffs for 3-s mini-epoch scorings were submentalis (SM) (15.5%, 21.6%), anterior tibialis (AT) (30.2%, 30.2%), and combined SM/AT (37.9%, 43.4%). Diagnostic cutoffs for 30-s epochs (AASM criteria) were SM 2.8%, AT 11.3%, and combined SM/AT 34.7%. Tonic muscle activity cutoff of 1.2% was 100% sensitive and specific, while RAI (SM) cutoff was 0.88. Phasic muscle burst duration cutoffs were: SM (0.65) and AT (0.79) seconds. Combining phasic burst durations with RSWA muscle activity improved sensitivity and specificity of RBD diagnosis. Conclusions: This study provides evidence for REM sleep without atonia diagnostic thresholds applicable in Parkinson disease-REM sleep behavior disorder (PD-RBD) patient populations with comorbid OSA that may be useful toward distinguishing PD-RBD in typical outpatient populations. Citation: McCarter SJ, St. Louis EK, Duwell EJ, Timm PC, Sandness DJ, Boeve BF, Silber MH. Diagnostic thresholds for quantitative REM sleep phasic burst duration, phasic and tonic muscle activity, and REM atonia index in REM sleep behavior disorder with and without comorbid obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2014;37(10):1649-1662. PMID:25197816

  9. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  10. Burst diaphragm sequence valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisneskie, Bradley D.; Hyman, Sheldon; Hallum, Charles E.

    1991-11-01

    A burst diaphragm sequence valve which effectively combines the structure of a burst diaphragm with that of an ordinary swing check valve, the pivot of the ordinary swing check valve being replaced by an integral flexural hinge. The sequence valve provides a way to sequentially burn solid propellant hot gas generators which exit into a common gas manifold, thereby enabling gas-powered devices to operate for a longer time than the duration of one gas generator burn.

  11. Visual Stimuli Induce Waves of Electrical Activity in Turtle Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prechtl, J. C.; Cohen, L. B.; Pesaran, B.; Mitra, P. P.; Kleinfeld, D.

    1997-07-01

    The computations involved in the processing of a visual scene invariably involve the interactions among neurons throughout all of visual cortex. One hypothesis is that the timing of neuronal activity, as well as the amplitude of activity, provides a means to encode features of objects. The experimental data from studies on cat [Gray, C. M., Konig, P., Engel, A. K. & Singer, W. (1989) Nature (London) 338, 334-337] support a view in which only synchronous (no phase lags) activity carries information about the visual scene. In contrast, theoretical studies suggest, on the one hand, the utility of multiple phases within a population of neurons as a means to encode independent visual features and, on the other hand, the likely existence of timing differences solely on the basis of network dynamics. Here we use widefield imaging in conjunction with voltage-sensitive dyes to record electrical activity from the virtually intact, unanesthetized turtle brain. Our data consist of single-trial measurements. We analyze our data in the frequency domain to isolate coherent events that lie in different frequency bands. Low frequency oscillations (<5 Hz) are seen in both ongoing activity and activity induced by visual stimuli. These oscillations propagate parallel to the afferent input. Higher frequency activity, with spectral peaks near 10 and 20 Hz, is seen solely in response to stimulation. This activity consists of plane waves and spiral-like waves, as well as more complex patterns. The plane waves have an average phase gradient of ≈ π /2 radians/mm and propagate orthogonally to the low frequency waves. Our results show that large-scale differences in neuronal timing are present and persistent during visual processing.

  12. Recent Electric Propulsion Development Activities for NASA Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    (The primary source of electric propulsion development throughout NASA is managed by the In-Space Propulsion Technology Project at the NASA Glenn Research Center for the Science Mission Directorate. The objective of the Electric Propulsion project area is to develop near-term electric propulsion technology to enhance or enable science missions while minimizing risk and cost to the end user. Major hardware tasks include developing NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT), developing a long-life High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HIVHAC), developing an advanced feed system, and developing cross-platform components. The objective of the NEXT task is to advance next generation ion propulsion technology readiness. The baseline NEXT system consists of a high-performance, 7-kW ion thruster; a high-efficiency, 7-kW power processor unit (PPU); a highly flexible advanced xenon propellant management system (PMS); a lightweight engine gimbal; and key elements of a digital control interface unit (DCIU) including software algorithms. This design approach was selected to provide future NASA science missions with the greatest value in mission performance benefit at a low total development cost. The objective of the HIVHAC task is to advance the Hall thruster technology readiness for science mission applications. The task seeks to increase specific impulse, throttle-ability and lifetime to make Hall propulsion systems applicable to deep space science missions. The primary application focus for the resulting Hall propulsion system would be cost-capped missions, such as competitively selected, Discovery-class missions. The objective of the advanced xenon feed system task is to demonstrate novel manufacturing techniques that will significantly reduce mass, volume, and footprint size of xenon feed systems over conventional feed systems. This task has focused on the development of a flow control module, which consists of a three-channel flow system based on a piezo-electrically actuated valve concept, as well as a pressure control module, which will regulate pressure from the propellant tank. Cross-platform component standardization and simplification are being investigated through the Standard Architecture task to reduce first user costs for implementing electric propulsion systems. Progress on current hardware development, recent test activities and future plans are discussed.

  13. Bursting Reverberation as a Multiscale Neuronal Network Process Driven by Synaptic Depression-Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Dao Duc, K.; Lee, C.Y.; Parutto, Pierre; Cohen, Dror; Segal, Menahem; Rouach, Nathalie; Holcman, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal networks can generate complex patterns of activity that depend on membrane properties of individual neurons as well as on functional synapses. To decipher the impact of synaptic properties and connectivity on neuronal network behavior, we investigate the responses of neuronal ensembles from small (5–30 cells in a restricted sphere) and large (acute hippocampal slice) networks to single electrical stimulation: in both cases, a single stimulus generated a synchronous long-lasting bursting activity. While an initial spike triggered a reverberating network activity that lasted 2–5 seconds for small networks, we found here that it lasted only up to 300 milliseconds in slices. To explain this phenomena present at different scales, we generalize the depression-facilitation model and extracted the network time constants. The model predicts that the reverberation time has a bell shaped relation with the synaptic density, revealing that the bursting time cannot exceed a maximum value. Furthermore, before reaching its maximum, the reverberation time increases sub-linearly with the synaptic density of the network. We conclude that synaptic dynamics and connectivity shape the mean burst duration, a property present at various scales of the networks. Thus bursting reverberation is a property of sufficiently connected neural networks, and can be generated by collective depression and facilitation of underlying functional synapses. PMID:26017681

  14. Electrical impedance tomography system based on active electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gaggero, Pascal Olivier; Adler, Andy; Brunner, Josef; Seitz, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can image the distribution of ventilated lung tissue, and is thus a promising technology to help monitor patient breathing to help selection of mechanical ventilation parameters. Two key difficulties in EIT instrumentation make such monitoring difficult: (1) EIT data quality depends on good electrode contact and is sensitive to changes in contact quality, and (2) EIT electrodes are difficult and time consuming to place on patients. This paper presents the design and initial tests of an active electrode-based system to address these difficulties. Our active electrode EIT system incorporates an active electrode belt, a central voltage-driven current source, central analog to digital converters and digital to analog converters, a central FPGA-based demodulator and controller. The electrode belt is designed incorporating 32 active electrodes, each of which contains the electronic amplifiers, switches and associated logic. Tests show stable device performance with a convenient ease of use and good imaging ability in volunteer tests. PMID:22531225

  15. Synchronous and asynchronous electrically evoked motor activities during wind-up stimulation are differentially modulated following an acute spinal transection.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Hurteau, Marie-France; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J; Telonio, Alessandro; Thibaudier, Yann

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we used a novel technique to study reflex wind-up when the spinal cord is intact and following an acute spinal transection. Specifically, we evaluated reflex responses evoked by a series of 10 electrical pulses to the tibial or superficial peroneal nerves in 9 decerebrate adult cats, before and after an acute spinal transection. Electromyograms were recorded in four hindlimb muscles (lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, semitendinosus, and sartorius) to evaluate reflex amplitude, duration, and the temporal summation of reflex responses, so-called wind-up. We identified two distinct reflex responses evoked by electrical stimulation of the tibial or superficial peroneal nerves on the basis of their pattern of change following acute spinal transection, a short-latency (∼10 ms) compound action potential (CAP) that was followed by a burst of sustained activity (SA). Wind-up of CAP and SA amplitudes was clearly present when the spinal cord was intact but was drastically reduced after acute spinalization in some muscles. Moreover, CAP and SA reflex responses were differentially modified by the acute spinalization. When the effects of acute spinal transection were significant, CAP responses were increased after acute spinalization, whereas SA responses were reduced, suggesting that the two signals are regulated by different neuronal mechanisms. The present results provide the first assessment of reflex wind-up before and after an acute spinal transection in the same animals and indicate that different reflex components must be considered separately when evaluating changes in neuronal excitability following SCI. PMID:22993264

  16. Can Neural Activity Propagate by Endogenous Electrical Field?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Shivacharan, Rajat S; Zhang, Mingming; Durand, Dominique M

    2015-12-01

    It is widely accepted that synaptic transmissions and gap junctions are the major governing mechanisms for signal traveling in the neural system. Yet, a group of neural waves, either physiological or pathological, share the same speed of ∼0.1 m/s without synaptic transmission or gap junctions, and this speed is not consistent with axonal conduction or ionic diffusion. The only explanation left is an electrical field effect. We tested the hypothesis that endogenous electric fields are sufficient to explain the propagation with in silico and in vitro experiments. Simulation results show that field effects alone can indeed mediate propagation across layers of neurons with speeds of 0.12 ± 0.09 m/s with pathological kinetics, and 0.11 ± 0.03 m/s with physiologic kinetics, both generating weak field amplitudes of ∼2-6 mV/mm. Further, the model predicted that propagation speed values are inversely proportional to the cell-to-cell distances, but do not significantly change with extracellular resistivity, membrane capacitance, or membrane resistance. In vitro recordings in mice hippocampi produced similar speeds (0.10 ± 0.03 m/s) and field amplitudes (2.5-5 mV/mm), and by applying a blocking field, the propagation speed was greatly reduced. Finally, osmolarity experiments confirmed the model's prediction that cell-to-cell distance inversely affects propagation speed. Together, these results show that despite their weak amplitude, electric fields can be solely responsible for spike propagation at ∼0.1 m/s. This phenomenon could be important to explain the slow propagation of epileptic activity and other normal propagations at similar speeds. PMID:26631463

  17. Bursts of Gravitational Waves Emitted During Ejection of Jet Superluminal Components in Active Galactic Nuclei Dynamically Dominated by Bardeen-Petterson Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J.; Caproni, Anderson; Abraham, Zulema

    2009-09-01

    Superluminal jet components are recurrently ejected from the core of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The mechanism driving this powerful phenomenon is not properly understood yet. Here we suggest that the components ejection from AGNs may be related to the astrophysical process known as Bardeen-Petterson (B-P) effect, a general relativistic effect which forces a tilt (precessing) accretion disk orbiting a Kerr black hole (KBH) to break apart at the B-P radius. This transition region hereby builds up a magneto-centrifugal barrier which precludes incoming matter to penetrate the AGN inner disk or torus, and creates a sort of force-free bridge or Lagrange internal point in a force-free magnetosphere. (Inwardly pointing forces are counterbalanced by outwardly pointing forces). The material trapped in such a region will eventually find a condition of orbital resonance (beating) with the warps traveling along the torus due to its differential rotation. At resonance the mass blobs can be expelled from the B-P radius in virtue of either the vertical (to the disk) linear momentum carried by the torus warps, or the Aschenbach effect in a nearly maximal KBH, or some other orbital resonances like the well known resonance 3:1. The launching of such superluminal components should produce powerful gravitational wave (GW) bursts during its early acceleration phase. These are GW signals that the LISA space-borne GW observatory can detect for distances upto nearly the Hubble radius.

  18. Convolutional Virtual Electric Field for Image Segmentation Using Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanquan; Zhu, Ce; Zhang, Jiawan; Jian, Yuden

    2014-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF) is an effective external force for active contours; however, it suffers from heavy computation load. The virtual electric field (VEF) model, which can be implemented in real time using fast Fourier transform (FFT), has been proposed later as a remedy for the GVF model. In this work, we present an extension of the VEF model, which is referred to as CONvolutional Virtual Electric Field, CONVEF for short. This proposed CONVEF model takes the VEF model as a convolution operation and employs a modified distance in the convolution kernel. The CONVEF model is also closely related to the vector field convolution (VFC) model. Compared with the GVF, VEF and VFC models, the CONVEF model possesses not only some desirable properties of these models, such as enlarged capture range, u-shape concavity convergence, subject contour convergence and initialization insensitivity, but also some other interesting properties such as G-shape concavity convergence, neighboring objects separation, and noise suppression and simultaneously weak edge preserving. Meanwhile, the CONVEF model can also be implemented in real-time by using FFT. Experimental results illustrate these advantages of the CONVEF model on both synthetic and natural images. PMID:25360586

  19. Effective release rates at single rat Schaffer collateral–CA1 synapses during sustained theta-burst activity revealed by optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Awatramani, G B; Boyd, J D; Delaney, K R; Murphy, T H

    2007-01-01

    To understand how information is coded at single hippocampal synapses during high-frequency activity, we imaged NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ responses in spines of CA1 neurons using two-photon microscopy. Although discrete quantal events were not readily apparent during continuous theta-burst stimulation (TBS), we found that the steady-state dendritic Ca2+ response was spatially restricted (half-width < 1 μm), voltage dependent and sensitive to MK-801, indicating that that it was mediated by activation of NMDA receptors at single synapses. Partial antagonism of NMDA receptors caused a similar reduction of NMDA EPSCs (measured at the soma) and local dendritic Ca2+ signals, suggesting that, like EPSCs, the steady-state Ca2+ signal was made up of a linear addition of quantal events. Statistical analyses of the steady-response suggested that the quantal size did not change dramatically during TBS. Deconvolution of TBS-evoked Ca2+ responses revealed a heterogeneous population of synapses differing in their capacity to signal high-frequency information, with an average effective steady-state release rate of ∼2.6 vesicles synapse−1 s−1. To assess how the optically determined release rates compare with population measures we analysed the rate of decay of peak EPSCs during train stimulation. From these studies, we estimated a unitary vesicular replenishment rate of 0.02 s−1, which corresponds to an average release rate of ∼0.8–2 vesicles s−1 at individual synapses. Additionally, extracellular recordings from single Schaffer collaterals revealed that spikes propagate reliably during TBS. Hence, during high-frequency activity, Schaffer collaterals conduct spikes with high fidelity, but release quanta with relatively lower efficiency, leaving NMDA receptor function largely intact and synapse specific. Heterogeneity in release rates between synapses suggests that similar patterns of presynaptic action potentials could trigger different forms of plasticity at individual synapses. PMID:17463045

  20. Statistical Properties of SGR 1900+14 Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Briggs, Michael S.; Duncan, Robert C.; Thompson, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    We study the statistics of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts, using a data base of 187 events detected with BATSE and 837 events detected with RXTE PCA, all from SGR 1900+14 during its 1998-1999 active phase. we find that the fluence or energy distribution of bursts is consistent with a power law of index 1.66, over 4 orders of magnitude. This scale-free distribution resembles the Gutenberg-Richter Law for earthquakes, and gives evidence for self-organized criticality in SGRS. The distribution of time intervals between successive bursts from SGR 1900+14 is consistent with a log-normal distribution. There is no correlation between burst intensity and the waiting times till the next burst, but there is some evidence for a correlation between burst intensity and the time elapsed since the previous burst. We also find a correlation between the duration and the energy of the bursts, but with significant scatter. In all these statistical properties, SGR bursts resemble earthquakes and solar flares more closely than they resemble any known accretion-powered or nuclear-powered phenomena. Thus our analysis lends support to the hypothesis that the energy source for SGR bursts is internal to the neutron star, and plausibly magnetic.

  1. Statistical Properties of SGR 1900+14 Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; VanParadijs, Jan

    1999-01-01

    We study the statistics of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts using a database of 187 events detected with BATSE and 837 events detected with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array: all events are from SGR 1900+14 during its 1998-1999 active phase. We find that the fluence or energy distribution of bursts is consistent with a power law of index 1.66, over 4 orders of magnitude. This scale-free distribution resembles the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes and gives evidence for self-organized criticality in SGRS. The distribution of time intervals between successive bursts from SGR 1900+14 is consistent with a lognormal distribution. There is no correlation between burst intensity and the waiting times till the next burst, but there is some evidence for a correlation between burst intensity and the time elapsed since the previous burst. We also find a correlation between the duration and the energy of the bursts, but with significant scatter. In all these statistical properties, SGR bursts resemble earthquakes and solar flares more closely than they resemble any known accretion-powered or nuclear-powered phenomena. Thus, our analysis lends support to the hypothesis that the energy source for SGR bursts is internal to the neutron star and plausibly magnetic.

  2. Statistical Properties of SGR 1900+14 Bursts.

    PubMed

    Göğüş; Woods; Kouveliotou; van Paradijs J; Briggs; Duncan; Thompson

    1999-12-01

    We study the statistics of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts using a database of 187 events detected with BATSE and 837 events detected with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array; all events are from SGR 1900+14 during its 1998-1999 active phase. We find that the fluence or energy distribution of bursts is consistent with a power law of index 1.66, over 4 orders of magnitude. This scale-free distribution resembles the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes and gives evidence for self-organized criticality in SGRs. The distribution of time intervals between successive bursts from SGR 1900+14 is consistent with a lognormal distribution. There is no correlation between burst intensity and the waiting times till the next burst, but there is some evidence for a correlation between burst intensity and the time elapsed since the previous burst. We also find a correlation between the duration and the energy of the bursts, but with significant scatter. In all these statistical properties, SGR bursts resemble earthquakes and solar flares more closely than they resemble any known accretion-powered or nuclear-powered phenomena. Thus, our analysis lends support to the hypothesis that the energy source for SGR bursts is internal to the neutron star and plausibly magnetic. PMID:10550286

  3. Conjugated polymer based active electric-controlled terahertz device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Liang; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; Lv, Longfeng; Hou, Yanbing; Shen, Jingling

    2016-03-01

    A modulation of terahertz response in a highly efficient, electric-controlled conjugated polymer-silicon hybrid device with low photo-excitation was investigated. The polymer-silicon forms a hybrid structure, where the active depletion region modifies the semiconductor conductivity in real time by applying an external bias voltage. The THz transmission was efficiently modulated by effective controlling. In a THz-TDS system, the modulation depth reached nearly 100% when the applied voltage was 3.8 V at an external laser intensity of 0.3 W/cm2. The saturation voltage decreased with increasing photo-excited intensity. In a THz-CW system, a significant decline in THz transmission was also observed with increasing applied bias voltage. This reduction in THz transmission is induced by the enhancement of carrier density.

  4. Electrically Conductive and Optically Active Porous Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yongquan; Liao, Lei; Li, Yujing; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2009-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vertical silicon nanowire array through a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching of highly doped n-type silicon (100) wafers in a solution of hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The morphology of the as-grown silicon nanowires is tunable from solid nonporous nanowires, nonporous/nanoporous core/shell nanowires, and entirely nanoporous nanowires by controlling the hydrogen peroxide concentration in the etching solution. The porous silicon nanowires retain the single crystalline structure and crystallographic orientation of the starting silicon wafer, and are electrically conductive and optically active with visible photoluminescence. The combination of electronic and optical properties in the porous silicon nanowires may provide a platform for the novel optoelectronic devices for energy harvesting, conversion and biosensing. PMID:19807130

  5. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  6. Neuron matters: electric activation of neuronal tissue is dependent on the interaction between the neuron and the electric field.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Steiger, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    In laboratory research and clinical practice, externally-applied electric fields have been widely used to control neuronal activity. It is generally accepted that neuronal excitability is controlled by electric current that depolarizes or hyperpolarizes the excitable cell membrane. What determines the amount of polarization? Research on the mechanisms of electric stimulation focus on the optimal control of the field properties (frequency, amplitude, and direction of the electric currents) to improve stimulation outcomes. Emerging evidence from modeling and experimental studies support the existence of interactions between the targeted neurons and the externally-applied electric fields. With cell-field interaction, we suggest a two-way process. When a neuron is positioned inside an electric field, the electric field will induce a change in the resting membrane potential by superimposing an electrically-induced transmembrane potential (ITP). At the same time, the electric field can be perturbed and re-distributed by the cell. This cell-field interaction may play a significant role in the overall effects of stimulation. The redistributed field can cause secondary effects to neighboring cells by altering their geometrical pattern and amount of membrane polarization. Neurons excited by the externally-applied electric field can also affect neighboring cells by ephaptic interaction. Both aspects of the cell-field interaction depend on the biophysical properties of the neuronal tissue, including geometric (i.e., size, shape, orientation to the field) and electric (i.e., conductivity and dielectricity) attributes of the cells. The biophysical basis of the cell-field interaction can be explained by the electromagnetism theory. Further experimental and simulation studies on electric stimulation of neuronal tissue should consider the prospect of a cell-field interaction, and a better understanding of tissue inhomogeneity and anisotropy is needed to fully appreciate the neural basis of cell-field interaction as well as the biological effects of electric stimulation. PMID:26265444

  7. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  8. Decametric and hectometric Solar Type III bursts at Saturn's orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Sawas, Sami; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Maksimovic, Milan

    2015-04-01

    We report on solar radio bursts observed by RPWS experiment onboard Cassini spacecraft. We consider Type III solar bursts observed in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 16 MHz. Those bursts are probably generated in the solar corona and the interplanetary medium. We show that the Type III burst occurrence is depending on the solar activity. We attempt to localize the regions where the Type III burst is probably emitted. We consider that the electrons at the origin of the Solar Type III bursts follow the interplanetary magnetic field. The trajectory is an Archimedean spiral contained in the ecliptic plane. We discuss our results taking into consideration on the one hand the spacecraft positions with regards to the source location, and on the other hand the temporal and spectral radio beam variation when combining Cassini and Wind observations.

  9. An Intrinsic Neuronal Oscillator Underlies Dopaminergic Neuron Bursting

    PubMed Central

    Deister, Christopher A.; Teagarden, Mark A.; Wilson, Charles J.; Paladini, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons of the ventral midbrain fire high frequency bursts when animals are presented with unexpected rewards, or stimuli that predict reward. To identify the afferents that can initiate bursting and establish therapeutic strategies for diseases affected by altered bursting, a mechanistic understanding of bursting is essential. Our results show that bursting is initiated by a specific interaction between the voltage sensitivity of NMDA receptors and voltage-gated ion channels, which result in the activation of an intrinsic, action potential-independent, high-frequency membrane potential oscillation. We further show that the NMDA receptor is uniquely suited for this because of the rapid kinetics and voltage dependence imparted to it by Mg2+ ion block and unblock. This mechanism explains the discrete nature of bursting in dopaminergic cells, and demonstrates how synaptic signals may be reshaped by local intrinsic properties of a neuron before influencing action potential generation. PMID:20016105

  10. Herschel Far-infrared Photometry of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope Active Galactic Nuclei Sample of the Local Universe. I. PACS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melndez, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Shimizu, T. T.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    Far-Infrared (FIR) photometry from the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer on the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 313 nearby, hard X-ray selected galaxies from the 58 month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Active Galactic Nuclei catalog. The present data do not distinguish between the FIR luminosity distributions at 70 and 160 ?m for Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies. This result suggests that if the FIR emission is from the nuclear obscuring material surrounding the accretion disk, then it emits isotropically, independent of orientation. Alternatively, a significant fraction of the 70 and 160 ?m luminosity could be from star formation, independent of active galactic nucleus (AGN) type. Using a non-parametric test for partial correlation with censored data, we find a statistically significant correlation between the AGN intrinsic power (in the 14-195 keV band) and the FIR emission at 70 and 160 ?m for Seyfert 1 galaxies. We find no correlation between the 14-195 keV and FIR luminosities in Seyfert 2 galaxies. The observed correlations suggest two possible scenarios: (1) if we assume that the FIR luminosity is a good tracer of star formation, then there is a connection between star formation and the AGN at sub-kiloparsec scales, or (2) dust heated by the AGN has a statistically significant contribution to the FIR emission. Using a Spearman rank-order analysis, the 14-195 keV luminosities for the Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies are weakly statistically correlated with the F 70/F 160 ratios. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. Herschel far-infrared photometry of the swift burst alert telescope active galactic nuclei sample of the local universe. I. PACS observations

    SciTech Connect

    Meléndez, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Shimizu, T. T.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-20

    Far-Infrared (FIR) photometry from the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer on the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 313 nearby, hard X-ray selected galaxies from the 58 month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Active Galactic Nuclei catalog. The present data do not distinguish between the FIR luminosity distributions at 70 and 160 μm for Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies. This result suggests that if the FIR emission is from the nuclear obscuring material surrounding the accretion disk, then it emits isotropically, independent of orientation. Alternatively, a significant fraction of the 70 and 160 μm luminosity could be from star formation, independent of active galactic nucleus (AGN) type. Using a non-parametric test for partial correlation with censored data, we find a statistically significant correlation between the AGN intrinsic power (in the 14-195 keV band) and the FIR emission at 70 and 160 μm for Seyfert 1 galaxies. We find no correlation between the 14-195 keV and FIR luminosities in Seyfert 2 galaxies. The observed correlations suggest two possible scenarios: (1) if we assume that the FIR luminosity is a good tracer of star formation, then there is a connection between star formation and the AGN at sub-kiloparsec scales, or (2) dust heated by the AGN has a statistically significant contribution to the FIR emission. Using a Spearman rank-order analysis, the 14-195 keV luminosities for the Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies are weakly statistically correlated with the F {sub 70}/F {sub 160} ratios.

  12. Imaging fast electrical activity in the brain with electrical impedance tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aristovich, Kirill Y.; Packham, Brett C.; Koo, Hwan; Santos, Gustavo Sato dos; McEvoy, Andy; Holder, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of neuronal depolarization in the brain is a major goal in neuroscience, but no technique currently exists that could image neural activity over milliseconds throughout the whole brain. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an emerging medical imaging technique which can produce tomographic images of impedance changes with non-invasive surface electrodes. We report EIT imaging of impedance changes in rat somatosensory cerebral cortex with a resolution of 2 ms and < 200 μm during evoked potentials using epicortical arrays with 30 electrodes. Images were validated with local field potential recordings and current source-sink density analysis. Our results demonstrate that EIT can image neural activity in a volume 7 × 5 × 2 mm in somatosensory cerebral cortex with reduced invasiveness, greater resolution and imaging volume than other methods. Modeling indicates similar resolutions are feasible throughout the entire brain so this technique, uniquely, has the potential to image functional connectivity of cortical and subcortical structures. PMID:26348559

  13. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported protocol is of general validity and can be straightforwardly extended to other biological preparations. PMID:26863148

  14. Observations of the bursting pulsar and magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Peter Matthew

    2000-10-01

    Following the discovery that some (and possibly all) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) come from cosmological distances, it is now apparent that active Galactic sources of high- energy (>25 keV) bursts are rare. The rarity of these sources warrants a detailed study of their observed properties in order to better understand their nature. Observations of two different types of magnetized neutron stars which produce super-Eddington bursts are presented in this dissertation. The Bursting Pulsar (GRO J1744-28) is a transient low- mass X-ray binary (LMXB) near the Galactic center that emits both Type II bursts and periodic pulsations. It is unique in that it is the only known binary to exhibit this behavior. GRO J1744-28 has gone into outburst twice since its discovery and we show the second outburst is nearly identical to the first with the exception of a decrease in intensity by a factor ~1.7 of both the burst and persistent emission. During the bursts of the first outburst, the pulsations are observed to lag behind their expected arrival times based upon the persistent emission pulsar ephemeris. The magnitude of the pulse time lags during and after bursts are quantified with greater precision than before for a large subset of events from the first and second outbursts. The pulse time delay during bursts of the first outburst is found to be correlated with the peak intensity of the bursts. Soft gamma repeaters (SGIRs) are transient sources of brief, intense hard X-rays and low-energy γ-rays, very likely neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields of order 1014-1015 G, i.e., magnetars. This dissertation presents the discovery of one of the four known SGRs, 1627-41. We have discovered the probable persistent X-ray counterpart to this SGR whose characteristics are consistent with the other SGR counterparts. Observations of the persistent X-ray emission from SGR 1900+14 show that the spectrum is best fit with a two-component model (blackbody + power law) during quiescence. This two-component model is a common trait of anomalous X-ray pulsars, a group of isolated X- ray sources (i.e., no companion) that also show strong evidence for a magnetar origin. The persistent flux is found to increase during a burst active interval for this source, and we find this increase lies exclusively in the non-thermal component of the spectrum. Next, we study the spin history of SGR 1900+14 over 2.5 yrs and find significant deviations from a constant spin down both during quiescence and a burst active interval. We find circumstantial evidence for a discrete spin-down event, i.e., a `braking' glitch, possibly associated with a giant flare recorded on 27 August 1998. Finally, we report the detection of two unusually hard bursts from SGR 1900+14. These events are distinctly different from typical bursts both temporally and spectrally. In fact, aside from their spectral evolution, they more closely resemble GRBs.

  15. Buckling of Dielectric Elastomeric Plates for Electrically Active Microfludic Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Douglas; Tavakol, Behrouz; Bozlar, Michael; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Stone, Howard; Aksay, Ilhan

    2013-11-01

    Fluid flow can be directed and controlled by a variety of mechanisms within industrial and biological environments. Advances in microfluidic technology have required innovative ways to control fluid flow on a small scale, and the ability to actively control fluid flow within microfluidic devices is crucial for advancements in nanofluidics, biomedical fluidic devices, and digital microfluidics. In this work, we present a means for microfluidic control via the electrical actuation of thin, flexible valves within microfluidic channels. These structures consist of a dielectric elastomer confined between two compliant electrodes that can be actively and reversibly buckle out of plane to pump fluids from an applied voltage. The out-of-plane deformation can be quantified using two parameters: net change in surface area and the shape of deformation. Change in surface area depends on the voltage, while the deformation shape, which significantly affects the flow rate, is a function of voltage, and the pressure and volume of the chambers on each side of the thin plate. The use of solid electrodes enables a robust and reversible pumping mechanism that will have will enable advancements in rapid microfluidic diagnostics, adaptive materials, and artificial muscles.

  16. A meshfree method for simulating myocardial electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heye; Ye, Huajun; Huang, Wenhua

    2012-01-01

    An element-free Galerkin method (EFGM) is proposed to simulate the propagation of myocardial electrical activation without explicit mesh constraints using a monodomain model. In our framework the geometry of myocardium is first defined by a meshfree particle representation that is, a sufficient number of sample nodes without explicit connectivities are placed in and inside the surface of myocardium. Fiber orientations and other material properties of myocardium are then attached to sample nodes according to their geometrical locations, and over the meshfree particle representation spatial variation of these properties is approximated using the shape function of EFGM. After the monodomain equations are converted to their Galerkin weak form and solved using EFGM, the propagation of myocardial activation can be simulated over the meshfree particle representation. The derivation of this solution technique is presented along a series of numerical experiments and a solution of monodomain model using a FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) membrane model in a canine ventricular model and a human-heart model which is constructed from digitized virtual Chinese dataset. PMID:22997540

  17. Neuronal responses in vestibular nuclei to dorsal raphe electrical activation.

    PubMed

    Licata, F; Li Volsi, G; Maugeri, G; Santangelo, F

    1995-01-01

    The effects of dorsal raphe (DR) electrical stimulation on the neuronal activity of vestibular nuclei were studied in anaesthetized rats. The aim was to establish whether the central systems classically involved in nociceptive functions are able to influence vestibular secondary neurons. DR activation induced modifications of the firing in 70% of the tested neurons, the percentage being similar in the lateral (LVN), superior (SVN), and spinal (SpVN) vestibular nuclei. Three different types of responses were recorded: long-lasting modifications (generally enhancements) of the mean firing rate (43%), short-latency response patterns (14%), both (43%). Short-latency response patterns were more numerous in LVN than in SVN. Iontophoretic applications of 5-HT antagonists Methysergide and Ketanserin blocked long-lasting effects but were scarcely effective on the short-latency response patterns evoked by DR stimulation. It is concluded that DR exerts a double control on secondary vestibular neurons: a generalised excitatory influence by serotoninergic fibers and a specific action mostly targeted on LVN, by nonserotoninergic pathways. PMID:7743003

  18. A Meshfree Method for Simulating Myocardial Electrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heye; Ye, Huajun; Huang, Wenhua

    2012-01-01

    An element-free Galerkin method (EFGM) is proposed to simulate the propagation of myocardial electrical activation without explicit mesh constraints using a monodomain model. In our framework the geometry of myocardium is first defined by a meshfree particle representation that is, a sufficient number of sample nodes without explicit connectivities are placed in and inside the surface of myocardium. Fiber orientations and other material properties of myocardium are then attached to sample nodes according to their geometrical locations, and over the meshfree particle representation spatial variation of these properties is approximated using the shape function of EFGM. After the monodomain equations are converted to their Galerkin weak form and solved using EFGM, the propagation of myocardial activation can be simulated over the meshfree particle representation. The derivation of this solution technique is presented along a series of numerical experiments and a solution of monodomain model using a FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) membrane model in a canine ventricular model and a human-heart model which is constructed from digitized virtual Chinese dataset. PMID:22997540

  19. Theta-burst stimulation of hippocampal slices induces network-level calcium oscillations and activates analogous gene transcription to spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Graham K; Moeendarbary, Emad; Pickering, Mark; O'Connor, John J; Murphy, Keith J

    2014-01-01

    Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3-12 Hz) hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS) to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to spatial learning and that TBS-triggered [Ca2+]i oscillations could activate memory-associated gene expression. PMID:24950243

  20. Theta-Burst Stimulation of Hippocampal Slices Induces Network-Level Calcium Oscillations and Activates Analogous Gene Transcription to Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, John J.; Murphy, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3–12 Hz) hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS) to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to spatial learning and that TBS-triggered [Ca2+]i oscillations could activate memory-associated gene expression. PMID:24950243

  1. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES. PMID:27110556

  2. Local cortical dynamics of burst suppression in the anaesthetized brain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Laura D; Ching, Shinung; Weiner, Veronica S; Peterfreund, Robert A; Eskandar, Emad N; Cash, Sydney S; Brown, Emery N; Purdon, Patrick L

    2013-09-01

    Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern that consists of a quasi-periodic alternation between isoelectric 'suppressions' lasting seconds or minutes, and high-voltage 'bursts'. It is characteristic of a profoundly inactivated brain, occurring in conditions including hypothermia, deep general anaesthesia, infant encephalopathy and coma. It is also used in neurology as an electrophysiological endpoint in pharmacologically induced coma for brain protection after traumatic injury and during status epilepticus. Classically, burst suppression has been regarded as a 'global' state with synchronous activity throughout cortex. This assumption has influenced the clinical use of burst suppression as a way to broadly reduce neural activity. However, the extent of spatial homogeneity has not been fully explored due to the challenges in recording from multiple cortical sites simultaneously. The neurophysiological dynamics of large-scale cortical circuits during burst suppression are therefore not well understood. To address this question, we recorded intracranial electrocorticograms from patients who entered burst suppression while receiving propofol general anaesthesia. The electrodes were broadly distributed across cortex, enabling us to examine both the dynamics of burst suppression within local cortical regions and larger-scale network interactions. We found that in contrast to previous characterizations, bursts could be substantially asynchronous across the cortex. Furthermore, the state of burst suppression itself could occur in a limited cortical region while other areas exhibited ongoing continuous activity. In addition, we found a complex temporal structure within bursts, which recapitulated the spectral dynamics of the state preceding burst suppression, and evolved throughout the course of a single burst. Our observations imply that local cortical dynamics are not homogeneous, even during significant brain inactivation. Instead, cortical and, implicitly, subcortical circuits express seemingly different sensitivities to high doses of anaesthetics that suggest a hierarchy governing how the brain enters burst suppression, and emphasize the role of local dynamics in what has previously been regarded as a global state. These findings suggest a conceptual shift in how neurologists could assess the brain function of patients undergoing burst suppression. First, analysing spatial variation in burst suppression could provide insight into the circuit dysfunction underlying a given pathology, and could improve monitoring of medically-induced coma. Second, analysing the temporal dynamics within a burst could help assess the underlying brain state. This approach could be explored as a prognostic tool for recovery from coma, and for guiding treatment of status epilepticus. Overall, these results suggest new research directions and methods that could improve patient monitoring in clinical practice. PMID:23887187

  3. A continuum model of transcriptional bursting

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Adam M; Tunnacliffe, Edward; Cannon, Danielle; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Transcription occurs in stochastic bursts. Early models based upon RNA hybridisation studies suggest bursting dynamics arise from alternating inactive and permissive states. Here we investigate bursting mechanism in live cells by quantitative imaging of actin gene transcription, combined with molecular genetics, stochastic simulation and probabilistic modelling. In contrast to early models, our data indicate a continuum of transcriptional states, with a slowly fluctuating initiation rate converting the gene between different levels of activity, interspersed with extended periods of inactivity. We place an upper limit of 40 s on the lifetime of fluctuations in elongation rate, with initiation rate variations persisting an order of magnitude longer. TATA mutations reduce the accessibility of high activity states, leaving the lifetime of on- and off-states unchanged. A continuum or spectrum of gene states potentially enables a wide dynamic range for cell responses to stimuli. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13051.001 PMID:26896676

  4. A continuum model of transcriptional bursting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Adam M; Tunnacliffe, Edward; Cannon, Danielle; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Transcription occurs in stochastic bursts. Early models based upon RNA hybridisation studies suggest bursting dynamics arise from alternating inactive and permissive states. Here we investigate bursting mechanism in live cells by quantitative imaging of actin gene transcription, combined with molecular genetics, stochastic simulation and probabilistic modelling. In contrast to early models, our data indicate a continuum of transcriptional states, with a slowly fluctuating initiation rate converting the gene between different levels of activity, interspersed with extended periods of inactivity. We place an upper limit of 40 s on the lifetime of fluctuations in elongation rate, with initiation rate variations persisting an order of magnitude longer. TATA mutations reduce the accessibility of high activity states, leaving the lifetime of on- and off-states unchanged. A continuum or spectrum of gene states potentially enables a wide dynamic range for cell responses to stimuli. PMID:26896676

  5. The Mesoscopic Modeling of Burst Suppression during Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Liley, David T. J.; Walsh, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The burst-suppression pattern is well recognized as a distinct feature of the mammalian electroencephalogram (EEG) waveform. Consisting of alternating periods of high amplitude oscillatory and isoelectric activity, it can be induced in health by deep anesthesia as well as being evoked by a range of pathophysiological processes that include coma and anoxia. While the electroencephalographic phenomenon and clinical implications of burst suppression have been studied extensively, the physiological mechanisms underlying its emergence remain unresolved and obscure. Because electroencephalographic bursting phenomenologically resembles the bursting observed in single neurons, it would be reasonable to assume that the theoretical insights developed to understand bursting at the cellular (“microscopic”) level would enable insights into the dynamical genesis of bursting at the level of the whole brain (“macroscopic”). In general action potential bursting is the result of the interplay of two time scales: a fast time scale responsible for spiking, and a slow time scale that modulates such activity. We therefore hypothesize that such fast-slow systems dynamically underpin electroencephalographic bursting. Here we show that a well-known mean field dynamical model of the electroencephalogram, the Liley model, while unable to produce burst suppression unmodified, is able to give rise to a wide variety of burst-like activity by the addition of one or more slow systems modulating model parameters speculated to be major “targets” for anesthetic action. The development of a physiologically plausible theoretical framework to account for burst suppression will lead to a more complete physiological understanding of the EEG and the mechanisms that serve to modify ongoing brain activity necessary for purposeful behavior and consciousness. PMID:23641211

  6. A closed-loop anesthetic delivery system for real-time control of burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, Max Y.; Ching, ShiNung; Chemali, Jessica; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. There is growing interest in using closed-loop anesthetic delivery (CLAD) systems to automate control of brain states (sedation, unconsciousness and antinociception) in patients receiving anesthesia care. The accuracy and reliability of these systems can be improved by using as control signals electroencephalogram (EEG) markers for which the neurophysiological links to the anesthetic-induced brain states are well established. Burst suppression, in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with periods of quiescence or suppression, is a well-known, readily discernible EEG marker of profound brain inactivation and unconsciousness. This pattern is commonly maintained when anesthetics are administered to produce a medically-induced coma for cerebral protection in patients suffering from brain injuries or to arrest brain activity in patients having uncontrollable seizures. Although the coma may be required for several hours or days, drug infusion rates are managed inefficiently by manual adjustment. Our objective is to design a CLAD system for burst suppression control to automate management of medically-induced coma. Approach. We establish a CLAD system to control burst suppression consisting of: a two-dimensional linear system model relating the anesthetic brain level to the EEG dynamics; a new control signal, the burst suppression probability (BSP) defining the instantaneous probability of suppression; the BSP filter, a state-space algorithm to estimate the BSP from EEG recordings; a proportional-integral controller; and a system identification procedure to estimate the model and controller parameters. Main results. We demonstrate reliable performance of our system in simulation studies of burst suppression control using both propofol and etomidate in rodent experiments based on Vijn and Sneyd, and in human experiments based on the Schnider pharmacokinetic model for propofol. Using propofol, we further demonstrate that our control system reliably tracks changing target levels of burst suppression in simulated human subjects across different epidemiological profiles. Significance. Our results give new insights into CLAD system design and suggest a control-theory framework to automate second-to-second control of burst suppression for management of medically-induced coma.

  7. Relationship between the Kinetic Power and Bolometric Luminosity of Jets: Limitation from Black Hole X-Ray Binaries, Active Galactic Nuclei, and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renyi; Xie, Fu-Guo; Hou, Shujin

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P jet and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L jet of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P jet and L jet being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ~1031 erg s-1 to ~1052 erg s-1, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P jet-L jet correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  8. RADIATION MECHANISM AND JET COMPOSITION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND GeV-TeV-SELECTED RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jin; Lu Ye; Zhang Shuangnan; Liang Enwei; Sun Xiaona; Zhang Bing

    2013-09-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and GeV-TeV-selected radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are compared based on our systematic modeling of the observed spectral energy distributions of a sample of AGNs with a single-zone leptonic model. We show that the correlation between the jet power (P{sub jet}) and the prompt gamma-ray luminosity (L{sub jet}) of GRBs is consistent, within the uncertainties, with the correlation between jet power and the synchrotron peak luminosity (L{sub s,jet}) of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Their radiation efficiencies ({epsilon}) are also comparable (>10% for most sources), which increase with the bolometric jet luminosity (L{sub bol,jet}) for FSRQs and with the L{sub jet} for GRBs with similar power-law indices. BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) do not follow the P{sub jet}-L{sub s,jet} relation of FSRQs. They have lower {epsilon} and L{sub bol,jet} values than FSRQs, and a tentative L{sub bol,jet}-{epsilon} relation is also found, with a power-law index different from that of the FSRQs. The magnetization parameters ({sigma}) of FSRQs are on average larger than that of BL Lacs. They are anti-correlated with {epsilon} for the FSRQs, but positively correlated with {epsilon} for the BL Lacs. GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies potentially share similar properties with FSRQs. Based on the analogy between GRBs and FSRQs, we suggest that the prompt gamma-ray emission of GRBs is likely produced by the synchrotron process in a magnetized jet with high radiation efficiency, similar to FSRQs. The jets of BL Lacs, on the other hand, are less efficient and are likely more matter-dominated.

  9. Herschel far-infrared photometry of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope active galactic nuclei sample of the local universe - II. SPIRE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Koss, Michael J.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory's Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) for 313 nearby (z < 0.05) active galactic nuclei (AGN). We selected AGN from the 58 month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue, the result of an all-sky survey in the 14-195 keV energy band, allowing for a reduction in AGN selection effects due to obscuration and host galaxy contamination. We find 46 per cent (143/313) of our sample is detected at all three wavebands and combined with our Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations represents the most complete FIR spectral energy distributions of local, moderate-luminosity AGN. We find no correlation among the 250, 350, and 500 μm luminosities with 14-195 keV luminosity, indicating the bulk of the FIR emission is not related to the AGN. However, Seyfert 1s do show a very weak correlation with X-ray luminosity compared to Seyfert 2s and we discuss possible explanations. We compare the SPIRE colours (F250/F350 and F350/F500) to a sample of normal star-forming galaxies, finding the two samples are statistically similar, especially after matching in stellar mass. But a colour-colour plot reveals a fraction of the Herschel-BAT AGN are displaced from the normal star-forming galaxies due to excess 500 μm emission (E500). Our analysis shows E500 is strongly correlated with the 14-195 keV luminosity and 3.4/4.6 μm flux ratio, evidence the excess is related to the AGN. We speculate these sources are experiencing millimetre excess emission originating in the corona of the accretion disc.

  10. Upconversion nanoparticle-mediated photodynamic therapy induces THP-1 macrophage apoptosis via ROS bursts and activation of the mitochondrial caspase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xing; Wang, Hao; Zheng, Longbin; Zhong, Zhaoyu; Li, Xuesong; Zhao, Jing; Kou, Jiayuan; Jiang, Yueqing; Zheng, Xiufeng; Liu, Zhongni; Li, Hongxia; Cao, Wenwu; Tian, Ye; Wang, You; Yang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is the most vital cardiovascular disease, which poses a great threat to human health. Macrophages play an important role in the progression of AS. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has emerged as a useful therapeutic modality not only in the treatment of cancer but also in the treatment of AS. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the activity of PDT, using mesoporous-silica-coated upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles encapsulating chlorin e6 (UCNPs-Ce6) in the induction of apoptosis in THP-1 macrophages. Here, we investigated the ability of UCNPs-Ce6-mediated PDT to induce THP-1 macrophage apoptosis by facilitating the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) to depolarize mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Both Bax translocation and the release of cytochrome C were examined using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Our results indicated that the levels of ROS were significantly increased in the PDT group, resulting in both MPTP opening and MMP depolarization, which led to apoptosis. In addition, immunofluorescence and Western blotting revealed that PDT induced both Bax translocation and the release of cytochrome C, as well as upregulation of cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Therefore, we demonstrated that UCNPs-Ce6-mediated PDT induces apoptosis in THP-1 macrophages via ROS bursts. The proapoptotic factor Bax subsequently translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondria, resulting in the MPTP opening and cytochrome C release. This study demonstrated the great potential of UCNPs-Ce6-mediated PDT in the treatment of AS. PMID:26045663

  11. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KINETIC POWER AND BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY OF JETS: LIMITATION FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI, AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Renyi; Hou, Shujin; Xie, Fu-Guo E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P {sub jet} and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L {sub jet} of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P {sub jet} and L {sub jet} being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ∼10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} to ∼10{sup 52} erg s{sup –1}, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P {sub jet}-L {sub jet} correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  12. Search for optical bursts from the gamma ray burst source GBS 0526-66

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seetha, S.; Sreenivasaiah, K. V.; Marar, T. M. K.; Kasturirangan, K.; Rao, U. R.; Bhattacharyya, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Attempts were made to detect optical bursts from the gamma-ray burst source GBS 0526-66 during Dec. 31, 1984 to Jan. 2, 1985 and Feb. 23 to Feb. 24, 1985, using the one meter reflector of the Kavalur Observatory. Jan. 1, 1985 coincided with the zero phase of the predicted 164 day period of burst activity from the source (Rothschild and Lingenfelter, 1984). A new optical burst photon counting system with adjustable trigger threshold was used in parallel with a high speed photometer for the observations. The best time resolution was 1 ms and maximum count rate capability was 255,000 counts s(-1). Details of the instrumentation and observational results are presented.

  13. Q-bursts from various distances on the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Toshio; Komatsu, Masayuki

    2009-02-01

    The mechanism of the Q-burst is investigated in the time and frequency domains. Electric fields in the ELF (extremely low frequency) to VLF (very low frequency) range have been observed with a ball antenna since 2003 in Kochi City, Japan (latitude 33.3°north, longitude 133.4°east). Source-to-observer distances (SODs) of Q-bursts are estimated by analyzing the waveforms. It is found as a result that the Q-burst is produced by combination of direct and antipodal pulses from a source lightning stroke occurring all over the world.

  14. On the Modeling of Electrical Effects Experienced by Space Explorers During Extra Vehicular Activities: Intracorporal Currents, Resistances, and Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cela, Carlos J.; Loizos, Kyle; Lazzi, Gianluca; Hamilton, Douglas; Lee, Raphael C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has shown that space explorers engaged in Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs) may be exposed, under certain conditions, to undesired electrical currents. This work focuses on determining whether these undesired induced electrical currents could be responsible for involuntary neuromuscular activity in the subjects, possibly caused by either large diameter peripheral nerve activation or reflex activity from cutaneous afferent stimulation. An efficient multiresolution variant of the admittance method along with a millimeter-resolution model of a male human body were used to calculate induced electric fields, resistance between contact electrodes used to simulate the potential exposure condition, and currents induced in the human body model. Results show that, under realistic exposure conditions using a 15V source, current density magnitudes and total current injected are well above previously reported startle reaction thresholds. This indicates that, under the considered conditions, the subjects could experience involuntary motor response.

  15. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Sari, R.; Bloom, J. S.; Galama, T. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Price, P. A.; Fox, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Yost, S.; Berger, E.; Diercks, A.; Goodrich, R.; Chaffee, F.

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic γ-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean γ-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 1051 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ( ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host galaxies span a range of luminosities and morphologies, but appear to be broadly typical for the normal, actively star-forming galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes. Some of the challenges for the future include: the nature of the short bursts and possibly other types of bursts and transients; use of GRBs to probe the obscured star formation in the universe, and possibly as probes of the very early universe; and their detection as sources of high-energy particles and gravitational waves.

  16. T & I--Electric Motors. Kit No. 621. Instructor's Manual and Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bomar, William

    This instructor's manual and student learning activity guide comprise a kit for trade and industrial education (T & I) activities on electric motors. Purpose stated for the activities is to teach the student the four basic types of electric motors, the advantages and disadvantages of each, the types of jobs each can perform, and how to disassemble

  17. T & I--Electric Motors. Kit No. 621. Instructor's Manual and Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bomar, William

    This instructor's manual and student learning activity guide comprise a kit for trade and industrial education (T & I) activities on electric motors. Purpose stated for the activities is to teach the student the four basic types of electric motors, the advantages and disadvantages of each, the types of jobs each can perform, and how to disassemble…

  18. Gamma-ray burst systematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebesadel, R. W.; Fenimore, E. E.; Laros, J. G.; Terrell, J.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic classification of gamma-ray bursts is considered on the basis of temporal and spectral burst features. Three categories of bursts are proposed, and the category of classical (or normal) bursts is subdivided into three classes: very brief, doublet/quasi-periodic, and long irregular. Apparent correlations are discussed between emission lines and the doublet/quasi-periodic class and between absorption lines and the long irregular class.

  19. Leader neurons in population bursts of 2D living neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, J.-P.; Jacobi, Shimshon; Marom, Shimon; Moses, Elisha; Zbinden, Cyrille

    2008-01-01

    Eytan and Marom (2006 J. Neurosci. 26 8465 76) recently showed that the spontaneous bursting activity of rat neuron cultures includes 'first-to-fire' cells that consistently fire earlier than others. Here, we analyze the behavior of these neurons in long-term recordings of spontaneous activity of rat hippocampal and rat cortical neuron cultures from three different laboratories. We identify precursor events that may either subside ('aborted bursts') or can lead to a full-blown burst ('pre-bursts'). We find that the activation in the pre-burst typically has a first neuron ('leader'), followed by a localized response in its neighborhood. Locality is diminished in the bursts themselves. The long-term dynamics of the leaders is relatively robust, evolving with a half-life of 23 34 h. Stimulation of the culture alters the leader distribution, but the distribution stabilizes within about 1 h. We show that the leaders carry information about the identity of the burst, as measured by the signature of the number of spikes per neuron in a burst. The number of spikes from leaders in the first few spikes of a precursor event is furthermore shown to be predictive with regard to the transition into a burst (pre-burst versus aborted burst). We conclude that the leaders play a role in the development of the bursts and conjecture that they are part of an underlying sub-network that is excited first and then acts as a nucleation center for the burst.

  20. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Hattori, Junya; Laakso, Ilkka; Takagi, Airi; Shimada, Takuo

    2013-11-01

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat.

  1. LOFAR antenna development and initial observations of solar bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, K. P.; Hicks, B.; Erickson, W. C.; Kassim, N. E.; Lazio, T. J.; Crane, P. C.; Cohen, A.; Lane, W.

    2003-04-01

    We are developing and testing active baluns and electrically short dipoles for possible use as the primary wideband receiving elements in the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), an instrument intended primarily for long wavelength radio astronomy. Two dipoles with dimensions scaled approximately by a factor of three have been built and tested. Their useful spectral range occurs when the dipole arms are approximately 1/8 to 1/2 wavelength long. The antenna temperatures vary from about 25 % to 100 % of the average brightness temperature of the Galactic background. With these parameters it is easy to make the amplifier noise levels low enough that final system temperature is dominated by the Galactic background. We present spectra of solar bursts observed with active antenna prototypes.

  2. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  3. Active current gating in electrically biased conical nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearden, Samuel; Simpanen, Erik; Zhang, Guigen

    2015-05-01

    We observed that the ionic current through a gold/silicon nitride (Si3N4) nanopore could be modulated and gated by electrically biasing the gold layer. Rather than employing chemical modification to alter device behavior, we achieved control of conductance directly by electrically biasing the gold portion of the nanopore. By stepping through a range of bias potentials under a constant trans-pore electric field, we observed a gating phenomenon in the trans-pore current response in a variety of solutions including potassium chloride (KCl), sodium chloride (NaCl), and potassium iodide (KI). A computational model with a conical nanopore was developed to examine the effect of the Gouy-Chapman-Stern electrical double layer along with nanopore geometry, work function potentials, and applied electrical bias on the ionic current. The numerical results indicated that the observed modulation and gating behavior was due to dynamic reorganization of the electrical double layer in response to changes in the electrical bias. Specifically, in the conducting state, the nanopore conductance (both numerical and experimental) is linearly proportional to the applied bias due to accumulation of charge in the diffuse layer. The gating effect occurs due to the asymmetric charge distribution in the fluid induced by the distribution of potentials at the nanopore surface. Time dependent changes in current due to restructuring of the electrical double layer occur when the electrostatic bias is instantaneously changed. The nanopore device demonstrates direct external control over nanopore behavior via modulation of the electrical double layer by electrostatic biasing.

  4. Phagocytic activity, respiratory burst, cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) concentration and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon under acute copper stress.

    PubMed

    Xian, Jian-An; Wang, An-Li; Ye, Chao-Xia; Chen, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular toxicity of copper-induced injury to the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. The 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h LC(50) (median lethal concentration) of Cu(2+) on P. monodon (11.63+/-1.14g) were found to be 3.49, 1.54, 0.73 and 0.40mgL(-1), respectively. Total haemocyte count (THC), phagocytic activity, respiratory burst (RB), cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) (cf-Ca(2+)) concentration and apoptotic cell ratio of shrimp were determined after exposure to different concentrations of Cu(2+) (0, 0.05, 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1)) for 0, 6, 12, 24 and 48h. There was no significant effect on the analytic indicator of shrimp exposed to 0.05mgL(-1) Cu(2+). THC decreased after Cu-exposure to 0.5mgL(-1) for 48h, 1.5mgL(-1) for 24h and 3.5mgL(-1) for 12h. Phagocytic activity decreased in P. monodon following 48h exposure to 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). RB was induced after 6h exposure to 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). cf-Ca(2+) concentration increased after 48h exposure to 0.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+), and 12h exposure to 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). The percentage of apoptotic cells increased to 9.5%, 16.3% and 18.6% respectively following 48h exposure to 0.5, 1.5 and 3.5mgL(-1) Cu(2+). These results indicate that Cu can induce oxidative stress, elevation of cf-Ca(2+) and cell apoptosis, and inhibit phagocytic activity in the shrimp P. monodon, and the lethal injury of Cu(2+) to P. monodon may be mainly due to the sharp reduction of THC caused by ROS-induced apoptosis. PMID:20398793

  5. Insulin modulates the electrical activity of subfornical organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Lakhi, Suman; Snow, Wanda; Fry, Mark

    2013-04-17

    Insulin plays a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance. Within the central nervous system, hypothalamic nuclei such as the arcuate and ventromedial nuclei are targets of insulin; however, insulin may only access these nuclei after transport across the blood-brain barrier. Neurons of the subfornical organ are not protected by the blood-brain barrier and can rapidly detect and respond to circulating hormones such as leptin and ghrelin. Moreover, subfornical organ neurons form synaptic connections with hypothalamic control centers that regulate energy balance, including the arcuate and dorsomedial nuclei. However, it is unknown whether subfornical organ neurons respond to insulin. Using whole-cell current clamp, we examined the electrophysiological effects of insulin on rat subfornical organ neurons. Upon insulin application, 70% of neurons tested were responsive, with 33% of neurons tested (9/27) exhibiting hyperpolarization of membrane potential (-8.7 ± 1.7 mV) and 37% (10/27) exhibiting depolarization (10.5 ± 2.8 mV). Using pharmacological blockade, our data further indicate that the hyperpolarization was mediated by opening of KATP channels, whereas depolarization resulted from opening of Ih channels. These data are the first to show that insulin exerts a direct effect on the electrical activity of subfornical organ neurons and support the notion that the subfornical organ may act to communicate information on circulating satiety signals to homeostatic control centers. PMID:23481267

  6. The Origin of Net Electric Currents in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Démoulin, P.; Kliem, B.; Török, T.; Pariat, E.

    2015-09-01

    There is a recurring question in solar physics regarding whether or not electric currents are neutralized in active regions (ARs). This question was recently revisited using three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence into the solar atmosphere. Such simulations showed that flux emergence can generate a substantial net current in ARs. Other sources of AR currents are photospheric horizontal flows. Our aim is to determine the conditions for the occurrence of net versus neutralized currents with this second mechanism. Using 3D MHD simulations, we systematically impose line-tied, quasi-static, photospheric twisting and shearing motions to a bipolar potential magnetic field. We find that such flows: (1) produce both direct and return currents, (2) induce very weak compression currents—not observed in 2.5D—in the ambient field present in the close vicinity of the current-carrying field, and (3) can generate force-free magnetic fields with a net current. We demonstrate that neutralized currents are in general produced only in the absence of magnetic shear at the photospheric polarity inversion line—a special condition that is rarely observed. We conclude that photospheric flows, as magnetic flux emergence, can build up net currents in the solar atmosphere, in agreement with recent observations. These results thus provide support for eruption models based on pre-eruption magnetic fields that possess a net coronal current.

  7. Fiber optical measurements of electrical activity in canine ventricular preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Amgad; Luther, Gisa E.; Enyeart, Michael; Gilmour, Robert F.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Luther, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is a cardiac arrhythmia that kills over 300,000 people every year in the US alone, yet efforts at finding a cure have been stymied by our incomplete information about patterns of electrical activity in the whole heart. As an excitable medium, the heart is a pattern forming system; but only a very limited subset of patterns is compatible with life. In particular, spiral waves have been associated with both tachycardia and VF, but their origin and spatial and temporal dynamics is not fully understood. We propose a novel measurement technique that combines optical mapping of the epicardial surface with data from intramural fiber optical probe arrays. The data obtained from the fiber optical probes is sparse in space but dense in time. The data processing is based on sequential data assimilation using an ensemble Kalman filter. The ensemble Kalman filter provides a numerically efficient (sub-) optimum state space estimate based on the available spatial and temporal observations. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated with numerical data and arterially perfused canine heart preparations.

  8. Active magnetic suspension in main magnetic field of electric motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urusov, I. D.; Galkin, V. I.; Likhoshvay, I. P.

    1985-10-01

    An active magnetic suspension for the rotor of an electric motor is considered, especially in small or miniature high-speed devices such as gyros, microturbomachines, and machine-tool spindle drives where it would eliminate the need for extra bearings and contribute to size and weight reduction. A disk-type rotor made of a ferromagnetic material is located horizontally inside the bore of a vertical stator so that weight and external loads compensate the magnetic pull upward. This pull is generated by the magnetic field in the air gap and can be automatically controlled by an electronic feedback circuit which regulates the stator input voltage depending on the rotor position along the stator bore, with a displacement transducer on the rotor indicating the position. The performance of such a suspension with automatic control in a 3-phase induction motor is analyzed on the basis of the system of differential equations describing the behavior of the electromechanical system during axial oscillations of the rotor, assuming a constant rotor speed during the transient periods.

  9. Emergence of organized bursting in clusters of pancreatic beta-cells by channel sharing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, A; Rinzel, J; Keizer, J

    1988-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells in an intact Islet of Langerhans exhibit bursting electrical behavior. The Chay-Keizer model describes this using a calcium-activated potassium (K-Ca) channel, but cannot account for the irregular spiking of isolated beta-cells. Atwater I., L. Rosario, and E. Rojas, Cell Calcium. 4:451-461, proposed that the K-Ca channels, which are rarely open, are shared by several cells. This suggests that the chaotic behavior of isolated cells is stochastic. We have revised the Chay-Keizer model to incorporate voltage clamp data of Rorsman and Trube and extended it to include stochastic K-Ca channels. This model can describe the behavior of single cells, as well as that of clusters of cells tightly coupled by gap junctions. As the size of the clusters is increased, the electrical activity shows a transition from chaotic spiking to regular bursting. Although the model of coupling is over-simplified, the simulations lend support to the hypothesis that bursting is the result of channel sharing. PMID:2850029

  10. Reciprocal inhibitory coupling: Measure and control of chaos on a biophysically motivated model of bursting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2009-06-01

    Bursting activity is an interesting feature of the temporal organization in many cell firing patterns. This complex behavior is characterized by clusters of spikes (action potentials) interspersed with phases of quiescence. As shown in experimental recordings, concerning the electrical activity of real neurons, the analysis of bursting models reveals not only patterned periodic activity but also irregular behavior 1,2]. The interpretation of experimental results, particularly the study of the influence of coupling on chaotic bursting oscillations, is of great interest from physiological and physical perspectives. The inability to predict the behavior of dynamical systems in presence of chaos suggests the application of chaos control methods, when we are more interested in obtaining regular behavior. In the present article, we focus our attention on a specific class of biophysically motivated maps, proposed in the literature to describe the chaotic activity of spiking-bursting cells [Cazelles B, Courbage M, Rabinovich M. Anti-phase regularization of coupled chaotic maps modelling bursting neurons. Europhys Lett 2001;56:504-9]. More precisely, we study a map that reproduces the behavior of a single cell and a map used to examine the role of reciprocal inhibitory coupling, specially on two symmetrically coupled bursting neurons. Firstly, using results of symbolic dynamics, we characterize the topological entropy associated to the maps, which allows us to quantify and to distinguish different chaotic regimes. In particular, we exhibit numerical results about the effect of the coupling strength on the variation of the topological entropy. Finally, we show that complicated behavior arising from the chaotic coupled maps can be controlled, without changing of its original properties, and turned into a desired attracting time periodic motion (a regular cycle). The control is illustrated by an application of a feedback control technique developed by Romeiras et al. [Romeiras FJ, Grebogi C, Ott E, Dayawansa WP. Controlling chaotic dynamical systems. Physica D 1992;58:165-92]. This work provides an illustration of how our understanding of chaotic bursting models can be enhanced by the theory of dynamical systems.

  11. Physical Constraints on Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 103 pc cm-3. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ~5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period.

  12. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2014-04-20

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10{sup 3} pc cm{sup –3}. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period.

  13. Statistical Properties of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorgone, Nicholas M.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetars are slowly rotating neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields, over 10(exp 15) Gauss. Only few have been discovered in the last 30 years. These sources are dormant most of their lifetimes and become randomly active emitting multiple soft gamma-ray bursts. We present here our results on the temporal analysis of 300 bursts from Soft Gamma Repeater SGR J1550-5418 recorded with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Observatory during its activation on January 22-29, 2009. We employed an un-triggered burst search in the energy range 8-100keV to collect all events from the source, besides the ones that triggered GBM. For the entire sample of bursts we determined their durations, rise and decay times. We study here the statistical properties of these characteristics and discuss how these may help us better understand the physical characteristics of the magnetar model.

  14. Frequency drift rates of powerful decameter Type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, A. I.; Mel'Nik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Lecacheux, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observations of powerful (fluxes are larger than 10^{-19} W m^{-2} Hz^{-1}) solar Type III bursts at frequencies 10 - 30 MHz. Recordings of 163 bursts, observed in July 2002 and of 231 bursts observed in August 2002 are investigated. The main properties of these Type III bursts (frequency drift rate, duration, flux, frequency bandwidth) are analyzed. In present report we pay more attention to consideration of frequency drift rate. A great difference between the observed and the well-known empirical frequency dependencies of Type III bursts drift rate is determined. A linear approximation for the drift rate versus frequency is found. It indicates, that solar corona above active regions has exponential density distribution. We consider that drift rate value depends on the position of an active region on the solar disc.

  15. Coding movement direction by burst firing in electrosensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi-Hashemi, Navid; Fortune, Eric S.; Chacron, Maurice J.

    2016-01-01

    Directional selectivity, in which neurons respond strongly to an object moving in a given direction (“preferred”) but respond weakly or not at all to an object moving in the opposite direction (“null”), is a critical computation achieved in brain circuits. Previous measures of direction selectivity have compared the numbers of action potentials elicited by each direction of movement, but most sensory neurons display patterning, such as bursting, in their spike trains. To examine the contribution of patterned responses to direction selectivity, we recorded from midbrain neurons in weakly electric fish and found that most neurons responded with a combination of both bursts and isolated spikes to moving object stimuli. In these neurons, we separated bursts and isolated spikes using an interspike interval (ISI) threshold. The directional bias of bursts was significantly higher than that of either the full spike train or the isolated spike train. To examine the encoding and decoding of bursts, we built biologically plausible models that examine 1) the upstream mechanisms that generate these spiking patterns and 2) downstream decoders of bursts. Our model of upstream mechanisms uses an interaction between afferent input and subthreshold calcium channels to give rise to burst firing that occurs preferentially for one direction of movement. We tested this model in vivo by application of calcium antagonists, which reduced burst firing and eliminated the differences in direction selectivity between bursts, isolated spikes, and the full spike train. Our model of downstream decoders used strong synaptic facilitation to achieve qualitatively similar results to those obtained using the ISI threshold criterion. This model shows that direction selective information carried by bursts can be decoded by downstream neurons using biophysically plausible mechanisms. PMID:21775723

  16. l-Tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles increase the antitumoral activity of direct electric current in a metastatic melanoma cell model

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Vânia Emerich Bucco; Teixeira, Cesar Augusto Antunes; da Veiga, Venicio Feo; Júnior, Eduardo Ricci; Holandino, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of tumor growth induced by treatment with direct electric current (DC) has been reported in several models. One of the mechanisms responsible for the antitumoral activity of DC is the generation of oxidative species, known as chloramines. With the aim of increasing chloramine production in the electrolytic medium and optimizing the antitumoral effects of DC, poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with the amino acid tyrosine were obtained. The physical–chemical characterization showed that the NPs presented size in nanometric range and monomodal distribution. A slightly negative electrokinetic potential was also found in both blank NPs and l-tyrosine-loaded PCL NPs. The yield of the loading process was approximately 50%. Within 3 h of dissolution assay, a burst release of about 80% l-tyrosine was obtained. The in vitro cytotoxicity of DC was significantly increased when associated with l-tyrosine-loaded NPs, using a murine multidrug-resistant melanoma cell line model. This study showed that the use of the combination of nanotechnology and DC has a promising antineoplastic potential and opens a new perspective in cancer therapy. PMID:21187948

  17. Final report on electric vehicle activities, September 1991--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Del Monaco, J.L.; Pandya, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The data and information collected for the Public Service Electric and Gas Company`s (PSE&G) electric vehicle demonstration program were intended to support and enhance DOE`s Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Site Operator Program. The DOE Site Operator Program is focused on the life cycle and reliability of Electric Vehicles (EVs). Of particular interest are vehicles currently available with features that are likely to be put into production or demonstrate new technology. PSE&G acquired eight GMC Electric G-Vans in 1991, and three TEVans in 1993, and conducted a program plan to test and assess the overall performance of these electric vehicles. To accomplish the objectives of DOE`s Site Operator`s test program, a manual data collection system was implemented. The manual data collection system has provided energy use and mileage data. From September 1991 to October 1994 PSE&G logged 69,368 miles on eleven test vehicles. PSE&G also demonstrated the EVs to diverse groups and associations at fifty seven various events. Included in the report are lessons learned concerning maintenance, operation, public reactions, and driver`s acceptance of the electric vehicles.

  18. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  19. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  20. Active RF Pulse Compression using Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2008-01-30

    In this paper, we will present our recent results on the research of the ultra-fast high power RF switches based on silicon. We have developed a switch module at X-band which can use a silicon window as the switch. The switching is realized by generation of carriers in the bulk silicon. The carriers can be generated electrically or/and optically. The electrically controlled switches use PIN diodes to inject carrier. We have built the PIN diode switches at X-band, with <300ns switching time. The optically controlled switches use powerful lasers to excite carriers. By combining the laser excitation and electrical carrier generation, significant reduction in the required power of both the laser and the electrical driver is expected. High power test is under going.

  1. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section B--Electrical Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Six learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of electrical systems in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these six units: (1) basic electrical theory, (2) battery service, (3) starting system, (4)…

  2. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section B--Electrical Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Six learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of electrical systems in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these six units: (1) basic electrical theory, (2) battery service, (3) starting system, (4)

  3. On Risk Forecast and Risk Reduction of Tectonic Rock Bursts and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazhibaev, Kushbakali

    2015-04-01

    Avershin, Shrepp, Kvochkin, Bojarkin and others observed that before strong rock bursts, considered as weak earthquakes, for several hours, sometimes for 2-5 days, there occurred spasmodic and sign-variable changes in deformations of rock massif adjacent areas. The works of seismologists Rikitaki, Asada, Isibasi, Matsuda, Saverensky, etc. describe a number of cases of an earthquake before which spasmodic and sign-variable deformations of earth's crust have been observed. The results of our own experimental research conducted during last decades show that abnormal spasmodic and sign-variable deformations are observed only in rocks having residual stresses. As a rule, these rocks at test after such abnormal deformations collapse dynamically, like explosions, and as a rule, such rocks represent dangerous rock bursts in deposits, located in seismically active areas (Tazhibaev K. Conditions of dynamic destruction of rocks and causes of rock bursts, Frunze 1989). It is necessary to notice that these spasmodic deformations are accompanied by formation and movement of internal discontinuities: dislocations, micro-cracks, and, hence, by redistribution of electric charges in a crystal lattice, and also in the rock as a whole. Redistribution and change in position of electric charges lead to the change of the natural electric potential and intensity of the magnetic field in the rocks massif. Before tectonic rock bursts and earthquakes together with abnormal changes of deformation, the same spasmodic and sign-variable changes of the natural electric and magnetic fields intensity occur. Based on the above-stated experimental findings, for solution of the problem of tectonic earthquakes forecast, we suggest placing the deformation measuring tool, the magnetic field intensity measuring tool and the device for measurement of natural electric potential along with seismic measurement into the seismic stations. Using abnormal, simultaneous changes of indications of all above listed three devices, based on different physical principles, is a comprehensive approach, which provides a high reliability for forecast of seismic events. We offer substantiation for solution of the problem of prevention of tectonic earthquakes (Tazhibaev K., Tazhibaev D. Technological measures for prevention of tectonic rock bursts and earthquakes, Bishkek 2007). It consists in definition of experimentally measured stresses and strength of the rocks located in the seismically dangerous zones; in definition of the maximum and minimum values of specific energy of unloading; in stage-by-stage unloading of the stresses, discretely increasing (from a minimum to a maximum) on energy impulses of seismic waves of explosions, consistently and repeatedly made in a dangerous zone through certain time intervals.

  4. Bubble bursting mediated aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2009-11-01

    Wave breaking over the ocean in the surf zone is responsible for a substantial amount of atmospheric aerosols production. The objects mediating their formation are bubbles entrained below breaking waves, and bursting at the sea surface. We describe the mechanisms by which the liquid shell constitutive of a bubble ultimately results into small drops, also called film drops. A bubble bursts when a hole nucleates through the liquid shell. The hole grows at the Culick velocity balancing inertia with surface tension and is bordered by a rim collecting the shell liquid. This initially smooth toroidal rim corrugates when the centripetal acceleration caused by the recession motion is strong enough to trigger a Rayleigh-Taylor destabilization. Ligaments then emerge from corrugations crests and resolve by a Plateau-Rayleigh mechanism into droplets. The final myst properties are thus solely determined by the shell geometry at the bursting onset. It depends on the ratio of the bubble radius to the capillary length, and on the slow gravity drainage of the liquid on which are superimposed rearrangements due to the marginal regeneration at the bubble foot. Our findings will be discussed in connexion with know facts in that context.

  5. Advantages of burst stimulation for inducing sympathetic salivary secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L C; Garrett, J R; Proctor, G B

    1988-11-01

    Electrical stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve trunk delivered at 50 Hz in bursts of 1 s every 10 s, evoked a more copious, uniform and reproducible flow of saliva than when delivered at 10 Hz continuously. This advantage of burst stimulation occurred with parotid secretion and was especially evident with secretion from submandibular glands, where the oedema, commonly seen after stimulating the sympathetic nerve continuously, was avoided. Therefore stimulation in bursts is recommended for obtaining sympathetic salivary responses in rats. PMID:3237982

  6. Coherence resonance in bursting neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, June Hoan; Lee, Ho Jun; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2015-10-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are one of the most noticeable dynamic features of neural networks, being essential for various phenomena in neuroscience, yet their complex dynamics are not well understood. With extrinsic electrical and optical manipulations on cultured neural networks, we demonstrate that the regularity (or randomness) of burst sequences is in many cases determined by a (few) low-dimensional attractor(s) working under strong neural noise. Moreover, there is an optimal level of noise strength at which the regularity of the interburst interval sequence becomes maximal—a phenomenon of coherence resonance. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced through computer simulations on a well-established neural network model, suggesting that the same phenomena may occur in many in vivo as well as in vitro neural networks.

  7. Periodic Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  8. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission

    PubMed Central

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period ≈1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ∼25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  9. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, M; Rucker, H O; Farrell, W M

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period [Formula: see text] longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every [Formula: see text] days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  10. Electrospun nanofiber membranes for electrically activated shape memory nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-06-01

    A novel shape memory nanocomposite system, consisting of a thermoplastic Nafion polymer and ultrathin electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbonization nanofiber membranes, is successfully synthesized. PAN-based carbonization nanofiber networks that offer responses to deformations are considered to be an excellent actuation source. Significant improvement in the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber membranes is found by adjusting the applied voltage power in the electrospinning PAN process varying from 7.85 to 12.30 S cm-1. The porous structure of the carbon nanofiber membranes provides a large specific surface area and interfacial contact area when combined with the polymer matrix. Shape memory Nafion nanocomposites filled with interpenetrating non-woven electrospun PAN carbonization membranes can be actuated by applying 14 V electrical voltage within 5 s. The results, as demonstrated through morphology, electrical and thermal measurements and a shape recovery test, suggest a valuable route to producing soft nanocomposites.

  11. K+ channels and the microglial respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Khanna, R; Roy, L; Zhu, X; Schlichter, L C

    2001-04-01

    Microglial activation following central nervous system damage or disease often culminates in a respiratory burst that is necessary for antimicrobial function, but, paradoxically, can damage bystander cells. We show that several K+ channels are expressed and play a role in the respiratory burst of cultured rat microglia. Three pharmacologically separable K+ currents had properties of Kv1.3 and the Ca2+/calmodulin-gated channels, SK2, SK3, and SK4. mRNA was detected for Kv1.3, Kv1.5, SK2, and/or SK3, and SK4. Protein was detected for Kv1.3, Kv1.5, and SK3 (selective SK2 and SK4 antibodies not available). No Kv1.5-like current was detected, and confocal immunofluorescence showed the protein to be subcellular, in contrast to the robust membrane localization of Kv1.3. To determine whether any of these channels play a role in microglial activation, a respiratory burst was stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and measured using a single cell, fluorescence-based dihydrorhodamine 123 assay. The respiratory burst was markedly inhibited by blockers of SK2 (apamin) and SK4 channels (clotrimazole and charybdotoxin), and to a lesser extent, by the potent Kv1.3 blocker agitoxin-2. PMID:11245596

  12. Low-Frequency Type III Bursts and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Makela, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type 11 radio bursts associated with a set of six low frequency (<14 MHz) extended type III bursts from active region 10588. The durations were measured at 1 and 14 MHz using high resolution data from Wind/WAVES and were within the range (>15 min) normally used to define these bursts. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type 11 burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type 11 burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 min) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event.

  13. Generation of Locomotor-Like Activity in the Isolated Rat Spinal Cord Using Intraspinal Electrical Microstimulation Driven by a Digital Neuromorphic CPG

    PubMed Central

    Joucla, Sébastien; Ambroise, Matthieu; Levi, Timothée; Lafon, Thierry; Chauvet, Philippe; Saïghi, Sylvain; Bornat, Yannick; Lewis, Noëlle; Renaud, Sylvie; Yvert, Blaise

    2016-01-01

    Neural prostheses based on electrical microstimulation offer promising perspectives to restore functions following lesions of the central nervous system (CNS). They require the identification of appropriate stimulation sites and the coordination of their activation to achieve the restoration of functional activity. On the long term, a challenging perspective is to control microstimulation by artificial neural networks hybridized to the living tissue. Regarding the use of this strategy to restore locomotor activity in the spinal cord, to date, there has been no proof of principle of such hybrid approach driving intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). Here, we address a first step toward this goal in the neonatal rat spinal cord isolated ex vivo, which can display locomotor-like activity while offering an easy access to intraspinal circuitry. Microelectrode arrays were inserted in the lumbar region to determine appropriate stimulation sites to elicit elementary bursting patterns on bilateral L2/L5 ventral roots. Two intraspinal sites were identified at L1 level, one on each side of the spinal cord laterally from the midline and approximately at a median position dorso-ventrally. An artificial CPG implemented on digital integrated circuit (FPGA) was built to generate alternating activity and was hybridized to the living spinal cord to drive electrical microstimulation on these two identified sites. Using this strategy, sustained left-right and flexor-extensor alternating activity on bilateral L2/L5 ventral roots could be generated in either whole or thoracically transected spinal cords. These results are a first step toward hybrid artificial/biological solutions based on electrical microstimulation for the restoration of lost function in the injured CNS. PMID:27013936

  14. Generation of Locomotor-Like Activity in the Isolated Rat Spinal Cord Using Intraspinal Electrical Microstimulation Driven by a Digital Neuromorphic CPG.

    PubMed

    Joucla, Sébastien; Ambroise, Matthieu; Levi, Timothée; Lafon, Thierry; Chauvet, Philippe; Saïghi, Sylvain; Bornat, Yannick; Lewis, Noëlle; Renaud, Sylvie; Yvert, Blaise

    2016-01-01

    Neural prostheses based on electrical microstimulation offer promising perspectives to restore functions following lesions of the central nervous system (CNS). They require the identification of appropriate stimulation sites and the coordination of their activation to achieve the restoration of functional activity. On the long term, a challenging perspective is to control microstimulation by artificial neural networks hybridized to the living tissue. Regarding the use of this strategy to restore locomotor activity in the spinal cord, to date, there has been no proof of principle of such hybrid approach driving intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). Here, we address a first step toward this goal in the neonatal rat spinal cord isolated ex vivo, which can display locomotor-like activity while offering an easy access to intraspinal circuitry. Microelectrode arrays were inserted in the lumbar region to determine appropriate stimulation sites to elicit elementary bursting patterns on bilateral L2/L5 ventral roots. Two intraspinal sites were identified at L1 level, one on each side of the spinal cord laterally from the midline and approximately at a median position dorso-ventrally. An artificial CPG implemented on digital integrated circuit (FPGA) was built to generate alternating activity and was hybridized to the living spinal cord to drive electrical microstimulation on these two identified sites. Using this strategy, sustained left-right and flexor-extensor alternating activity on bilateral L2/L5 ventral roots could be generated in either whole or thoracically transected spinal cords. These results are a first step toward hybrid artificial/biological solutions based on electrical microstimulation for the restoration of lost function in the injured CNS. PMID:27013936

  15. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators.

  16. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    DOEpatents

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Vigars, Mark L.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  17. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  18. Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  19. Todd, Faraday and the electrical basis of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward

    2007-10-01

    The origins of our understanding of brain electricity and electrical discharges in epilepsy can be traced to Robert Bentley Todd (1809-60). Todd was influenced by his contemporary in London, Michael Faraday (1791-1867), who in the 1830 s and 1840 s was laying the foundations of our modern understanding of electromagnetism. Todd's concept of nervous polarity, generated in nerve vesicles and transmitted in nerve fibres (neurons in later terminology), was confirmed a century later by the Nobel Prize-winning work of Hodgkin and Huxley, who demonstrated the ionic basis of neuro-transmission, involving the same ions which had had been discovered by Faraday's mentor, Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829). PMID:17885273

  20. The Electrical Activity of a Denervated Ear 1

    PubMed Central

    Rawdon-Smith, A. F.; Hawkins, J. E.

    1939-01-01

    The electrical response from the cochlea of a cat which had previously been denervated by intracranial crushing of the auditory nerve was submitted to a lengthy study, the results of which may be summarized as follows:- The responses to acoustical stimulation derived from electrodes placed on the round window margin and in the chin muscles were studied by means of an amplifier and cathode ray oscillograph, in the usual way. Transient stimuli whose polarity could be reversed were employed to demonstrate the absence of any electrical component of neural origin such as is invariably present in a normal ear. In all other respects, however, the responses were unaffected, and both threshold contours (the so-called “electrical audiogram”) and equal response contours for approximately pure-tone stimuli demonstrated close comparability with those for normal ears. Harmonic analysis of the cochlear response yielded results departing from the normal only in such respects as would be expected in view of the complete absence of nervous component in the analysed wave. From these data, it is argued that this animal presented a case in which normal electrical responses were obtained from the peripheral organ, despite virtually complete degeneration of the auditory nerve, and, it follows, complete unilateral deafness. Subsequent histological examination confirmed these observations, and it is urged, therefore, that the validity of the view that the cochlear response provides an index of the hearing ability of an animal, as is sometimes stated, is open to question. Additionally, this experiment finally discredits the hypothesis that the cochlear response itself is, in any sense, neural in origin; it further indicates the necessity for caution in the interpretation of results obtained from normal ears, where the cochlear response, however derived, is in some degree adulterated by the simultaneous presence of an action potential component. ImagesFig. 8 PMID:19991849

  1. Effect of Instruction Based on Conceptual Change Activities on Students' Understanding of Static Electricity Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baser, Mustafa; Geban, Omer

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of learning activities based on conceptual change conditions and traditionally designed physics instruction on tenth-grade students' understanding of static electricity concepts and their attitudes toward physics as a school subject. Misconceptions related to static electricity concepts…

  2. Effect of Instruction Based on Conceptual Change Activities on Students' Understanding of Static Electricity Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baser, Mustafa; Geban, Omer

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of learning activities based on conceptual change conditions and traditionally designed physics instruction on tenth-grade students' understanding of static electricity concepts and their attitudes toward physics as a school subject. Misconceptions related to static electricity concepts

  3. Optimal Burst Duration During a Facilitated Quadriceps Femoris Contraction

    PubMed Central

    McLoda, Todd A.; Carmack, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine the most efficient burst duty cycle for eliciting an involuntary quadriceps femoris contraction in healthy subjects. This information will allow clinicians to make an informed decision about the optimal burst duty cycle based upon a specific treatment goal. The logical goal for such a treatment choice is to enhance motor unit recruitment in an effort to maintain postoperative or postinjury strength, when voluntary contractions may be less effective. Design and Setting: Single-group and 5-measures design. All tests were performed in a university laboratory. Subjects: Forty-eight healthy subjects (27 men and 21 women; mean age, 26.4 ± 8.5 years) performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) on an isokinetic device and received neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) at 5 different burst duty cycles. Measurements: Subjects first performed an MVIC for knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60° of knee flexion. NMES surface electrodes were applied to the quadriceps muscle of each subject's dominant leg. The values for the NMES were 2500-Hz carrier frequency, 50-bursts-per-second treatment frequency, amplitude increased to maximum tolerance, and burst duty cycle set to each of the 5 comparison values. The peak isometric force generated by each of the 5 nonvolitional contractions was recorded, along with the maximal charge per burst tolerated by each subject. Force generated was described as percentage of MVIC. Efficiency was the amount of force per burst charge. Results: The mean MVIC achieved by the subjects was 553.8 newtons (N). The average force per burst charge generated at 10% burst duty cycle was 132.9 N; at 30%, 104.2 N; at 50%, 93.1 N; at 70%, 52.9 N; and at 90%, 41.3 N. The average efficiency (force per millicoulombs [mC]) at 10% burst duty cycle was the highest at 6.49 N/mC and at 90% was the lowest at 1.05 N/mC. Conclusions: A burst duty cycle of 10% was the most efficient ratio of burst duration to interburst interval duration for eliciting the strongest muscle contraction. Use of this preferred duty cycle enabled only 8 of 48 subjects (16.6%) to achieve 60% MVIC within 1 trial in 1 session of NMES. Twenty-five subjects (52.0%) were able to achieve at least 10% of the MVIC in the same trial period. PMID:16558623

  4. A Different Cone: Bursting Drops in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2013-03-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  5. An interacting loop model of solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the strong heating produced at chromospheric levels during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in certain regions. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, nonflaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  6. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant. "It was a bit of luck that the survey included some observations of the sky surrounding the clouds," Narkevic said. It was from those "flanking" observations that the mysterious radio burst appeared in the data. The burst of radio waves was strong by astronomical standards, but lasted less than five milliseconds. The signal was spread out, with higher frequencies arriving at the telescope before the lower frequencies. This effect, called dispersion, is caused by the signal passing through ionized gas in interstellar and intergalactic space. The amount of this dispersion, the astronomers said, indicates that the signal likely originated about three billion light-years from Earth. No previously-detected cosmic radio burst has the same set of characteristics. "This burst represents an entirely new astronomical phenomenon," Bailes said. The astronomers estimate on the basis of their results that hundreds of similar events should occur over the sky each day. "Few radio surveys have the necessary sensitivity to such short-duration bursts, which makes them notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments," added Crawford. The next generation of radio telescopes currently under development should be able to detect many of these bursts across the sky. Although the nature of the mysterious new object is unclear, the astronomers have some ideas of what may cause such a burst. One idea is that it may be part of the energy released when a pair of superdense neutron stars collide and merge. Such an event is thought by some scientists to be the cause of one type of gamma-ray burst, but the only radio emission seen so far from these has been from the long-lived "afterglow" that follows the original burst. Another, more exotic, candidate is a burst of energy from an evaporating black hole. Black holes, concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravity, can lose mass and energy through a process proposed by famed British physicist Stephen Hawking. The newly-discovered radio burst, the researchers said, might be the "last gasp" of a black hole as it finally evaporates completely. "We're actively looking for more of these powerful, short bursts, in other archival pulsar surveys, and hope to resolve the mystery of their origin," said McLaughlin. "In addition, if we can associate these events with galaxies of known distance, the radio dispersion we measure can be used as a powerful new way to determine the amount of material in intergalactic space," she added. The Parkes radio telescope is part of the Australia Telescope, which is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  7. Inverse period-doubling bifurcations determine complex structure of bursting in a one-dimensional non-autonomous map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiujing; Chen, Zhenyang; Bi, Qinsheng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a simple one-dimensional non-autonomous map, in which some novel bursting patterns (e.g., "fold/double inverse flip" bursting, "fold/multiple inverse flip" bursting, and "fold/a cascade of inverse flip" bursting) can be observed. Typically, these bursting patterns exhibit complex structures containing a chain of inverse period-doubling bifurcations. The active states related to these bursting can be period-2n (n = 1, 2, 3,…) attractors or chaotic attractors, which may evolve to quiescence by a chain of inverse period-doubling bifurcations when the slow excitation decreases through period-doubling bifurcation points of the map. This accounts for the complex inverse period-doubling bifurcation structures observed in bursting patterns. Our findings enrich the possible routes to bursting as well as the underlying mechanisms of bursting.

  8. Inverse period-doubling bifurcations determine complex structure of bursting in a one-dimensional non-autonomous map.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiujing; Chen, Zhenyang; Bi, Qinsheng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a simple one-dimensional non-autonomous map, in which some novel bursting patterns (e.g., "fold/double inverse flip" bursting, "fold/multiple inverse flip" bursting, and "fold/a cascade of inverse flip" bursting) can be observed. Typically, these bursting patterns exhibit complex structures containing a chain of inverse period-doubling bifurcations. The active states related to these bursting can be period-2(n) (n = 1, 2, 3,…) attractors or chaotic attractors, which may evolve to quiescence by a chain of inverse period-doubling bifurcations when the slow excitation decreases through period-doubling bifurcation points of the map. This accounts for the complex inverse period-doubling bifurcation structures observed in bursting patterns. Our findings enrich the possible routes to bursting as well as the underlying mechanisms of bursting. PMID:26931598

  9. An Improved Ivermectin-activated Chloride Channel Receptor for Inhibiting Electrical Activity in Defined Neuronal Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Lynagh, Timothy; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to silence the electrical activity of defined neuronal populations in vivo is dramatically advancing our understanding of brain function. This technology may eventually be useful clinically for treating a variety of neuropathological disorders caused by excessive neuronal activity. Several neuronal silencing methods have been developed, with the bacterial light-activated halorhodopsin and the invertebrate allatostatin-activated G protein-coupled receptor proving the most successful to date. However, both techniques may be difficult to implement clinically due to their requirement for surgically implanted stimulus delivery methods and their use of nonhuman receptors. A third silencing method, an invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channel receptor (GluClR) activated by ivermectin, solves the stimulus delivery problem as ivermectin is a safe, well tolerated drug that reaches the brain following systemic administration. However, the limitations of this method include poor functional expression, possibly due to the requirement to coexpress two different subunits in individual neurons, and the nonhuman origin of GluClR. Here, we describe the development of a modified human α1 glycine receptor as an improved ivermectin-gated silencing receptor. The crucial development was the identification of a mutation, A288G, which increased ivermectin sensitivity almost 100-fold, rendering it similar to that of GluClR. Glycine sensitivity was eliminated via the F207A mutation. Its large unitary conductance, homomeric expression, and human origin may render the F207A/A288G α1 glycine receptor an improved silencing receptor for neuroscientific and clinical purposes. As all known highly ivermectin-sensitive GluClRs contain an endogenous glycine residue at the corresponding location, this residue appears essential for exquisite ivermectin sensitivity. PMID:20308070

  10. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the polarisation properties of the afterglow of GRB 030329 as it developed after the explosion. Hypernovae, the source of GRBs, are indeed so far away that they can only be seen as unresolved points of light. To probe their spatial structure, astronomers have thus to rely on a trick: polarimetry (see ESO PR 23/03). Polarimetry works as follows: light is composed of electromagnetic waves which oscillate in certain directions (planes). Reflection or scattering of light favours certain orientations of the electric and magnetic fields over others. This is why polarising sunglasses can filter out the glint of sunlight reflecting off a pond. The radiation in a gamma-ray burst is generated in an ordered magnetic field, as so-called synchrotron radiation [3]. If the hypernova is spherically symmetric, all orientations of the electromagnetic waves will be present equally and will average out, so there will be no net polarisation. If, however, the gas is not ejected symmetrically, but into a jet, a slight net polarisation will be imprinted on the light. This net polarisation will change with time since the opening angle of the jet widens with time, and we see a different fraction of the emission cone. Studying the polarisation properties of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst thus allows to gain knowledge about the underlying spatial structures and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the region where the radiation is generated. " And doing this over a long period of time, as the afterglow fades and evolves, provides us with a unique diagnostic tool for gamma-ray burst studies ", says Jochen Greiner . Although previous single measurements of the polarisation of GRB's optical afterglow exist, no detailed study has ever been done of the evolution of polarisation with time. This is indeed a very demanding task, only possible with an extremely stable instrument on the largest telescope... and a sufficient bright optical afterglow. As soon as GRB 030329 was detected, the team of astronomers therefore turned to the powerful multi-mode FORS1 instrument on the VLT ANTU telescope. They obtained 31 polarimetric observations over a period of 38 days, enabling them to measure, for the first time , the changes of the polarisation of an optical gamma-ray burst afterglow with time. This unique set of observational data documents the physical changes in the remote object in unsurpassed detail. Their data show the presence of polarisation at the level of 0.3 to 2.5 % throughout the 38-day period with significant variability in strength and orientation on timescales down to hours. This particular behaviour has not been predicted by any of the major theories. Unfortunately, the very complex light curve of this GRB afterglow, in itself not understood, prevents a straightforward application of existing polarisation models. " It turns out that deriving the direction of the jet and the magnetic field structure is not as simple as we thought originally ", notes Olaf Reimer , another member of the team. " But the rapid changes of the polarisation properties, even during smooth phases of the afterglow light curve, provide a challenge to afterglow theory ". " Possibly ", adds Jochen Greiner , " the overall low level of polarisation indicates that the strength of the magnetic field in the parallel and perpendicular directions do not differ by more than 10%, thus suggesting a field strongly coupled with the moving material. This is different from the large-scale field which is left-over from the exploding star and which is thought to produce the high-level of polarisation in the gamma-rays. " More Information The research described in this Press Release will appear under the title " The evolution of the polarisation of the afterglow of GRB 030329 " by Jochen Greiner et al. in the November 13, 2003 issue of the science journal "Nature". A German translation of the information of this page can be found at Astronomie.de. Notes [1]: In astronomy, the "redshift" denotes the factor by which the lines in the spectrum of an object are shifted towards longer wavelengths. Since the redshift of a cosmological object increases with distance, the observed redshift of a remote galaxy also provides an estimate of its distance. [2]: Members of the team include Jochen Greiner, Arne Rau (Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany), Sylvio Klose, Bringfried Stecklum (Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Germany), Klaus Reinsch (Universitätssternwarte Göttingen, Germany), Hans Martin Schmid (Institut für Astronomie Zürich, Switzerland ), Re'em Sari (California Institute of Technology, USA), Dieter H. Hartmann (Clemson University, USA), Chryssa Kouveliotou (NSSTC, Huntsville, Alabama, USA), Eliana Palazzi (Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Bologna, Italy), Christian Straubmeier (Physikalisches Institut Köln, Germany), Sergej Zharikov, Gaghik Tovmassian (Instituto de Astronomia Ensenada, Mexico), Otto Bärnbantner, Christop Ries (Wendelstein-Observatorium München, Germany), Emmanuel Jehin, Andreas Kaufer (European Southern Observatory, Chile), Arne Henden (USNO Flagstaff, USA), Anlaug A. Kaas (NOT, La Palma, Spain), Tommy Grav (University of Oslo, N), Jens Hjorth, Holger Pedersen (Astronomical Observatory Copenhagen, Denmark), Ralph A.M.J. Wijers (Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Hye-Sook Park (Lawrence Livermore Nat. Laboratory, USA), Grant Williams (MMT Observatory, Tucson, USA), Olaf Reimer (Theoretische Weltraum- und Astrophysik Universität Bochum, Germany) [3]: When electrons - which are electrically charged - move through a magnetic field, they spiral around an axis defined by the local magnetic field. Electrons of high energy spiral very rapidly, at speeds near the speed of light. Under such conditions, the electrons emit highly polarised electromagnetic radiation. The intensity of this radiation is related to the strength of the magnetic field and the number and energy distribution of the electrons caught in this field. Many cosmic radio sources have been found to emit synchrotron radiation - one of the best examples is the famous Crab Nebula, depicted in ESO PR Photo 40f/99.

  11. Young Scientists Explore Electricity & Magnetism. Book 7--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of electricity and magnetism. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for…

  12. Active tuning of mid-infrared metamaterials by electrical control of carrier densities.

    PubMed

    Jun, Young Chul; Gonzales, Edward; Reno, John L; Shaner, Eric A; Gabbay, Alon; Brener, Igal

    2012-01-16

    We demonstrate electrically-controlled active tuning of mid-infrared metamaterial resonances using depletion-type devices. The depletion width in an n-doped GaAs epilayer changes with an electric bias, inducing a change of the permittivity of the substrate and leading to frequency tuning of the resonance. We first present our detailed theoretical analysis and then explain experimental data of bias-dependent metamaterial transmission spectra. This electrical tuning is generally applicable to a variety of infrared metamaterials and plasmonic structures, which can find novel applications in chip-scale active infrared devices. PMID:22274535

  13. Development of a Remote Monitoring System Using Meteor Burst Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ewanic, M.A.; Dunstan, M.T.; Reichhardt, D.K.

    2006-07-01

    Monitoring the cleanup and closure of contaminated sites requires extensive data acquisition, processing, and storage. At remote sites, the task of monitoring often becomes problematical due to the lack of site infrastructure (i.e., electrical power lines, telephone lines, etc.). MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) has designed an economical and efficient remote monitoring system that will handle large amounts of data; process the data, if necessary; and transmit this data over long distances. Design criteria MSE considered during the development of the remote monitoring system included: the ability to handle multiple, remote sampling points with independent sampling frequencies; robust (i.e., less susceptible to moisture, heat, and cold extremes); independent of infrastructure; user friendly; economical; and easy to expand system capabilities. MSE installed and tested a prototype system at the Mike Mansfield Advanced Technology Center (MMATC), Butte, Montana, in June 2005. The system MSE designed and installed consisted of a 'master' control station and two remote 'slave' stations. Data acquired at the two slave stations were transmitted to the master control station, which then transmits a complete data package to a ground station using meteor burst technology. The meteor burst technology has no need for hardwired land-lines or man-made satellites. Instead, it uses ionized particles in the Earth's atmosphere to propagate a radio signal. One major advantage of the system is that it can be configured to accept data from virtually any type of device, so long as the signal from the device can be read and recorded by a standard data-logger. In fact, MSE has designed and built an electrical resistivity monitoring system that will be powered and controlled by the meteor burst system components. As sites move through the process of remediation and eventual closure, monitoring provides data vital to the successful long term management of the site. The remote monitoring system developed by MSE is cost effective, robust, and can easily be integrated into a site monitoring plan yet remains independent of other site activities/infrastructure and is expandable to meet future site monitoring requirements. (authors)

  14. Bursting as a source of non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of nigral dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaeseung; Shi, Wei-Xing; Hoffman, Ralph; Oh, Jihoon; Gore, John C.; Bunney, Benjamin S.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Nigral dopamine (DA) neurons in vivo exhibit complex firing patterns consisting of tonic single-spikes and phasic bursts that encode information for certain types of reward-related learning and behavior. Non-linear dynamical analysis has previously demonstrated the presence of a non-linear deterministic structure in complex firing patterns of DA neurons, yet the origin of this non-linear determinism remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that bursting activity is the primary source of non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of DA neurons. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the dimension complexity of inter-spike interval data recorded in vivo from bursting and non-bursting DA neurons in the chloral hydrate-anesthetized rat substantia nigra. We found that bursting DA neurons exhibited non-linear determinism in their firing patterns, whereas non-bursting DA neurons showed truly stochastic firing patterns. Determinism was also detected in the isolated burst and inter-burst interval data extracted from firing patterns of bursting neurons. Moreover, less bursting DA neurons in halothane-anesthetized rats exhibited higher dimensional spiking dynamics than do more bursting DA neurons in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats. These results strongly indicate that bursting activity is the main source of low-dimensional, non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of DA neurons. This finding furthermore suggests that bursts are the likely carriers of meaningful information in the firing activities of DA neurons. PMID:22831464

  15. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  16. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  17. [The restructuring of the efferent activity of the generator of scratching during the electrical activation of the descending systems].

    PubMed

    Degtiarenko, A M; Baev, K V; Zavadskaia, T V

    1990-01-01

    Rearrangement of the scratching generator activity evoked by phasic electrical stimulation of different descending systems has been investigated on decerebrated immobilized cats. This rearrangement heavily depends on the stimulation phase. Maximal increase of the scratching cycle duration by electrical stimulation of Deiters' nucleus, red nucleus and pyramidal tract takes place in the first half of an aiming phase. The electrical stimulation of structures mentioned above does not practically change duration of the scratching cycle in the second half of the aiming phase and at the beginning of the scratching phase. A maximal increase of the scratching cycle duration by electrical stimulation of reticular gigantocellular nucleus occurs in the second half of the aiming phase. The electrical activation of descending pathways during the aiming phase increases intensity of this phase and decreases intensity of the scratching phase. The electrical activation of descending pathways during the scratching phase increases its intensity and does not change practically the intensity of the aiming phase. Possible principles of the suprasegmental correction of the scratching generator activity are discussed. PMID:2398928

  18. Inhibition of SK and M channel-mediated currents by 5-HT enables parallel processing by bursts and isolated spikes

    PubMed Central

    Deemyad, Tara; Maler, Leonard; Chacron, Maurice J.

    2016-01-01

    Although serotonergic innervation of sensory brain areas is ubiquitous, its effects on sensory information processing remain poorly understood. We investigated these effects in pyramidal neurons within the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of weakly electric fish. Surprisingly, we found that 5-HT is present at different levels across the different ELL maps; the presence of 5-HT fibers was highest in the map that processes intraspecies communication signals. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that 5-HT increased excitability and burst firing through a decreased medium after hyperpolarization resulting from reduced small-conductance calcium-activated (SK) currents as well as currents mediated by an M-type potassium channel. We next investigated how 5-HT alters responses to sensory input. 5-HT application decreased the rheobase current, increased the gain, and decreased first spike latency. Moreover, it reduced discriminability between different stimuli, as quantified by the mutual information rate. We hypothesized that 5-HT shifts pyramidal neurons into a burst-firing mode where bursts, when considered as events, can detect the presence of particular stimulus features. We verified this hypothesis using signal detection theory. Our results indeed show that serotonin-induced bursts of action potentials, when considered as events, could detect specific stimulus features that were distinct from those detected by isolated spikes. Moreover, we show the novel result that isolated spikes transmit more information after 5-HT application. Our results suggest a novel function for 5-HT in that it enables differential processing by action potential patterns in response to current injection. PMID:21209357

  19. Bursts de raios gama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  20. Power quality at electricity de France: Overview of research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gambier, G.

    1995-06-01

    For a few years now, Electricite De France (EDF) has made the electricity quality one of its main stock arguments. This report describes a few concrete realizations and R&D projects currently in progress. The first part of the paper describes the QUALMETRE{trademark} device and the QUALISCOPE software aimed to measure the quality of voltage. Then emphasis is put on the QUALIMAT project which purpose is to assess the target levels of the quality of supply from physical measurements and subjective factors like the customer`s opinion. To tackle the worrying problem of harmonics upon the public networks, EDF has also engaged an important program described in the third part. Lastly, the paper depicts the EMERAUDE and RESEAU PLUS contracts which guarantee customers a level of quality of supply.

  1. A brief review of JPL's electric propulsion technology activities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.W.; Chopra, A.; Deininger, W.D.; Garner, C.E.; Pivirotto, T.J.; Sercel, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Near-term objectives and recent technological progress of JPL's electric propulsion program are discussed. Particular attention is given to accomplishments for ion, magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD), electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR), and arcjet thrusters. Xenon ion thruster erosion tests indicate a 15-fold reduction in tantalum baffle erosion when nitrogen is added to the xenon propellant and steady-state cylindrical MPD thruster tests at powers up to 72 kW show distinct self-constricted and diffuse discharge modes. An ECR thruster was operated at up to 7 kW with plasma acceleration at energies up to 7 kW; there was plasma acceleration at energies approaching 100 electron volts. 8 refs.

  2. Chemical Events in Conducting and Synaptic Membrances during Electrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nachmansohn, David

    1971-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent years for the central role of proteins and enzymes in the function of cell membranes. In the chemical theory proposed for the generation of bioelectricity, i.e., for the control of the ion permeability changes of excitable membranes, the protein assembly associated with the action of acetylcholine plays an essential role. Support of the theory by recent protein studies in which the excitable membranes of the highly specialized electric tissue were used will be discussed. A scheme is presented indicating the possible sequence of chemical reactions that change ion permeability after excitation. A sequence of chemical events within the excitable membranes of the synaptic junctions, i.e., within the pre- and postsynaptic membranes, similar to that proposed for the conducting membranes, is presented in a second scheme as an alternative to the hypothesis of the role of acetylcholine as a transmitter between two cells. Images PMID:4332011

  3. Comets, X-ray bursts, and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1986-01-01

    The proposal, revived by Tremaine and Zytkow (1985), that accretion of comets by neutron stars may be the origin of gamma-ray bursts is considered. This mechanism has difficulty accounting for the observed gamma-ray spectrum and optical counterparts of the bursts. The survival of comets near supernovae is investigated. Ablation rates and the thermal structure of an ablating surface layer are calculated. In some circumstances, mechanical disruption will erode a comet more rapidly than evaporation. The accretion of comets by neutron stars may produce a class of X-ray burst sources with novel properties.

  4. Enhanced electrical activation in In-implanted Ge by C co-doping

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R. Kremer, F.; Mirzaei, S.; Medling, S. A.; Ridgway, M. C.; Sprouster, D. J.; Decoster, S.; Pereira, L. M. C.; Glover, C. J.; Russo, S. P.

    2015-11-23

    At high dopant concentrations in Ge, electrically activating all implanted dopants is a major obstacle in the fulfillment of high-performance Ge-channel complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices. In this letter, we demonstrate a significant increase in the electrically-active dopant fraction in In-implanted Ge by co-doping with the isovalent element C. Electrical measurements have been correlated with x-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy results in addition to density functional theory simulations. With C + In co-doping, the electrically active fraction was doubled and tripled at In concentrations of 0.2 and 0.7 at. %, respectively. This marked improvement was the result of C-In pair formation such that In-induced strain in the Ge lattice was reduced while the precipitation of In and the formation of In-V clusters were both suppressed.

  5. Effective electrode length enhances electrical activation of nanowire networks: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Jessamyn A; Ritter, Carlos; Bellew, Allen T; McCarthy, Eoin K; Ferreira, Mauro S; Boland, John J

    2014-09-23

    Networks comprised of randomly oriented overlapping nanowires offer the possibility of simple fabrication on a variety of substrates, in contrast with the precise placement required for devices with single or aligned nanowires. Metal nanowires typically have a coating of surfactant or oxide that prevents aggregation, but also prevents electrical connection. Prohibitively high voltages can be required to electrically activate nanowire networks, and even after activation many nanowire junctions remain nonconducting. Nonelectrical activation methods can enhance conductivity but destroy the memristive behavior of the junctions that comprise the network. We show through both simulation and experiment that electrical stimulation, microstructured electrode geometry, and feature scaling can all be used to manipulate the connectivity and thus electrical conductivity of networks of silver nanowires with a nonconducting polymer coating. More generally, these results describe a strategy to integrate nanomaterials into controllable, adaptive macroscale materials. PMID:25153920

  6. Dihydroxyoctadecamonoenoate esters inhibit the neutrophil respiratory burst

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David Alan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2007-01-01

    The leukotoxins [9(10)- and 12(13)-EpOME] are produced by activated inflammatory leukocytes such as neutrophils. High EpOME levels are observed in disorders such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and in patients with extensive burns. Although the physiological significance of the EpOMEs remains poorly understood, in some systems, the EpOMEs act as a protoxin, with their corresponding epoxide hydrolase metabolites, 9,10- and 12,13-DiHOME, specifically exerting toxicity. Both the EpOMEs and the DiHOMEs were also recently shown to have neutrophil chemotactic activity. We evaluated whether the neutrophil respiratory burst, a surge of oxidant production thought to play an important role in limiting certain bacterial and fungal infections, is modulated by members of the EpOME metabolic pathway. We present evidence that the DiHOMEs suppress the neutrophil respiratory burst by a mechanism distinct from that of respiratory burst inhibitors such as cyclosporin H or lipoxin A4, which inhibit multiple aspects of neutrophil activation. PMID:17435320

  7. Effect of Direct-Current Electric Field on Enzymatic Activity and the Concentration of Laccase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxing; Zhang, Huiling; Ren, Dajun; Li, Qian; Zhang, Shuqin; Feng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    This work investigates the effect of direct-current electric field on the extracellular enzymatic activity, concentration and other experimental parameters of laccase from Trametes versicolor. The results showed that laccase could significantly contribute to the change of pH at the end of graphite electrode. In addition, it increased the electrical conductivity of the water. In the experiment, the optimum pH and catalytic pH range for laccase activity were 3.0 and pH 2.5-4.0. The application of 6 V direct current showed significant effects on the laccase enzyme activity. The activity of laccase was enhanced in the anodic region, but at the same time was strongly inhibited at the cathode. The electric charge characteristics of laccase were changed when exposed to electric field, and some laccases molecules moved to the anode, which produced a slight migration phenomenon. This study is the basis of combination of laccase and electrical technology, at the same time, providing a new direction of enhancing laccase activity. Compared to immobilization, using electric field is simple, no chemical additives, and great potential. PMID:26063937

  8. Ground-based observations of EUV flare emissions. [interrelation of ultraviolet radiation, X-ray bursts, and optical flares in solar activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Ground-based observations have established that impulsive extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) flashes occur during solar flares, in close association with hard X-ray bursts and certain impulsive portions of the optical flare. The energy flux radiated in the 10 to 1030 Angstroms wavelength range exceeds that in hard X-rays (greater than or equal to 10 keV) by about 100,000, and is roughly comparable to the energy flux radiated at all optical wavelengths. In this paper our current knowledge of EUV flare radiation and ground-based observations of the radiations are reviewed. Several hypotheses are proposed about the interrelation between impulsive EUV emissions and other flare radiations, their spatial location, and association with magnetic fields.

  9. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Baring, Matthew G.; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L.; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  10. BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Baring, Matthew G.; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  11. Sulfur activation in electric pole insulators in Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V. III; Kerr, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The scalar neutron fluences at Hiroshima were folded with directional S(n,p)P responses to obtain a more precise prediction of the sulfur activation. The weapon detonated over Hiroshima had a twelve to fifteen degree tilt relative to the vertical. The effect of the tilt on sulfur activation was accounted for by making a two-dimensional, cylindrical, semi-infinite air calculation. Results showed that the directional S(n,p)P responses varied by five to fifteen percent from the top of the insulation to the side for different energy groups. 4 references. (ACR)

  12. A method to measure the strength of multi-unit bursts of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mulloney, Brian

    2005-07-15

    Both the numbers of neurons that are active during multi-unit bursts of spikes and the frequencies with which individual neurons fire in these bursts can vary in response to changes in excitation. Here is a digital-filtering method that measures the strength of a burst of spikes by calculating the area of a polygon derived from the squared voltages that record the burst, and dividing this area by the burst's duration. The method was developed in the SigmaPlot environment, and makes use of the Fast-Fourier Transform functions provided in the SigmaPlot transform language. To test the method's performance, I constructed multi-unit bursts of spikes with known structure and calculated the strengths of these known bursts. To demonstrate the method's usefulness, I applied it to a train of 23 bursts of spikes in motor axons recorded during a spontaneous bout of patterned motor output. The measured strengths of these bursts varied 30-fold, and were well-correlated with the differences in the original recording. The results demonstrate that the method effectively measures burst strength independent of burst duration. PMID:15935226

  13. Self-Organization on Social Media: Endo-Exo Bursts and Baseline Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Mizuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A salient dynamic property of social media is bursting behavior. In this paper, we study bursting behavior in terms of the temporal relation between a preceding baseline fluctuation and the successive burst response using a frequency time series of 3,000 keywords on Twitter. We found that there is a fluctuation threshold up to which the burst size increases as the fluctuation increases and that above the threshold, there appears a variety of burst sizes. We call this threshold the critical threshold. Investigating this threshold in relation to endogenous bursts and exogenous bursts based on peak ratio and burst size reveals that the bursts below this threshold are endogenously caused and above this threshold, exogenous bursts emerge. Analysis of the 3,000 keywords shows that all the nouns have both endogenous and exogenous origins of bursts and that each keyword has a critical threshold in the baseline fluctuation value to distinguish between the two. Having a threshold for an input value for activating the system implies that Twitter is an excitable medium. These findings are useful for characterizing how excitable a keyword is on Twitter and could be used, for example, to predict the response to particular information on social media. PMID:25329610

  14. Antibiofilm Activity of Electrical Current in a Catheter Model.

    PubMed

    Voegele, Paul; Badiola, Jon; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-associated infections are difficult to treat with available antimicrobial agents because of their biofilm etiology. We examined the effect of low-amperage direct electrical current (DC) exposure on established bacterial and fungal biofilms in a novel experimental in vitro catheter model. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida parapsilosis biofilms were grown on the inside surfaces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) catheters, after which 0, 100, 200, or 500 μA of DC was delivered via intraluminally placed platinum electrodes. Catheter biofilms and intraluminal fluid were quantitatively cultured after 24 h and 4 days of DC exposure. Time- and dose-dependent biofilm killing was observed with all amperages and durations of DC administration. Twenty-four hours of 500 μA of DC sterilized the intraluminal fluid for all bacterial species studied; no viable bacteria were detected after treatment of S. epidermidis and S. aureus biofilms with 500 μA of DC for 4 days. PMID:26711752

  15. Rapid tissue dissolution efficiency of electrically-activated sodium hypochlorite on bovine muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ertugrul, Ihsan Furkan; Maden, Murat; Orhan, Ekim Onur; Ozkorucuklu, Sabriye Percin; Aglarca, Ali Vasfi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is a common antimicrobial and tissue-dissolving irrigant. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate and compare dissolution capacities of sodium hypochlorite solutions after electrically activation (E-NaOCl) on bovine muscle specimens at various time periods and concentrations. Materials and Methods: Three sodium hypochlorite solutions of 1.25%, 2.5%, and 5% were tested at 3-min. and 5-min. with and without activation by electrically. Distilled water and NaOCl solutions without electrically activation were used as controls. Pieces of bovine muscle tissue (34 ± 2 mg) were placed in 10 mL of each solution at room temperature. In the group of E-NaOCl, electrically activation was performed through the potentiostat. The tissue specimens were weighed before and after treatment, and the percentage of weight loss was calculated. Results: Weight loss of the tissue increased with the concentration of E-NaOCl and NaOCl. Higher concentration and electrically activation considerably enhanced the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite. The effect of electrically activation on tissue dissolution was much greater than that of same concentrations in the groups of NaOCl (P < 0.001). Tissue weight loss was significantly higher in 2.5% and 5% E-NaOCl at 3 min. than in 2.5% and 5% NaOCl at 5 min. (P < 0.05). There were not any significant differences between the 2.5% E-NaOCl and 5% NaOCl at 5 min. (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Electrically activation can improve the tissue-dissolving effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite. PMID:25512725

  16. Cosmography by gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; Izzo, L.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Relations connecting gamma ray burst quantities can be used to constrain cosmographic parameters of the Hubble law at medium-high redshifts. Methods: We consider a sample of 27 gamma ray bursts to construct the luminosity distance to redshift relation and derive the values of the parameters q_0, j_0, and s_0. The analysis is compared with other methods in the literature. Results: Gamma gay bursts, if calibrated by SNeIa, seem reliable as distance indicators and give cosmographic parameters in agreement with the ΛCDM model.

  17. Inferred flows of electric currents in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Y. J.; Hong, Q. F.; Hagyard, M. J.; Deloach, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to identify sources of major current systems in active regions and their channels of flow are explored. Measured photospheric vector magnetic fields together with high resolution white light and H-alpha photographs provide the data base to derive the current systems in the photosphere and chromosphere of a solar active region. Simple mathematical constructions of active region fields and currents are used to interpret these data under the assumptions that the fields in the lower atmosphere (below 200 km) may not be force free but those in the chromosphere and higher are. The results obtained for the complex active region AR 2372 are: (1) Spots exhibiting significant spiral structure in the penumbral filaments were the source of vertical currents at the photospheric surface; (2) Magnetic neutral lines where the transverse magnetic field was strongly sheared were channels along which a strong current system flowed; (3) The inferred current systems produced a neutral sheet and oppositely-flowing currents in the area of the magnetic delta configuration that was the site of flaring.

  18. Activation energies and temperature effects from electrical spectra of soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent permittivity often has soil-specific temperature responses as well as soil water responses. These variations affect dielectric sensors, often requiring site-specific calibrations. Variations of permittivity as a function of frequency and temperature can be used to calculate activation energ...

  19. Activation energies and temperature effects from electrical spectra of soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent permittivity often has soil-specific temperature responses as well as soil water responses. Variations of permittivity as a function of frequency and temperature can be used to calculate activation energies. The purpose of this study was to examine permittivity-temperature responses for six...

  20. Investigation of a Bubble Detector based on Active Electrolocation of Weakly Electric Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, M.; Mayekar, K.; Zhou, R.; von der Emde, G.; Bousack, H.

    2013-04-01

    Weakly electric fish employ active electrolocation for navigation and object detection. They emit an electric signal with their electric organ in the tail and sense the electric field with electroreceptors that are distributed over their skin. We adopted this principle to design a bubble detector that can detect gas bubbles in a fluid or, in principle, objects with different electric conductivity than the surrounding fluid. The evaluation of the influence of electrode diameter on detecting a given bubble size showed that the signal increases with electrode diameter. Therefore it appears that this detector will be more appropriate for large sized applications such as bubble columns than small sized applications such as bubble detectors in dialysis.

  1. Plasma Instabilities in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, Robert C.

    2008-12-24

    Magnetic fields are important in a variety of astrophysical scenarios, ranging from possible creation mechanisms of cosmological magnetic fields through relativistic jets such as that from Active Galactic Nuclei and gamma-ray bursts to local phenomena in the solar system. Here, the outstanding importance of plasma instabilities to astrophysics is illustrated by applying the so-called neutral point method to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are assumed to have a homogeneous background magnetic field. It is shown how magnetic turbulence, which is a prerequisite for the creation of dissipation and, subsequently, radiation, is created by the highly relativistic particles in the GRB jet. Using the fact that different particle compositions lead to different instability conditions, conclusions can be drawn about the particle composition of the jet, showing that it is more likely of baryonic nature.

  2. Fast drift kilometric radio bursts and solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Kahler, S. W.; Cane, H. V.; Mcguire, R. E.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Stone, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Initial results of a comparative study of major fast drift kilometric bursts and solar proton events from Sep. 1978 to Feb. 1983 are presented. It was found that only about half of all intense, long duration ( 40 min above 500 sfu) 1 MHz bursts can be associated with F 20 MeV proton events. However, for the subset of such fast drift bursts accompanied by metric Type 2 and/or 4 activity (approximately 40% of the total), the degree of association with 20 MeV events is 80%. For the reverse association, it was found that proton events with J( 20 MeV) 0.01 1 pr cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1)MeV(-1) were typically (approximately 80% of the time) preceded by intense 1 MHz bursts that exceeded the 500 sfu level for times 20 min (median duration approximately 35 min).

  3. Alternative temporal classification of long Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Vasquez, Nicolas; Baquero, Andres; Andrade, David

    2015-08-01

    In order to increase the understanding on Gamma Ray Bursts, many attempts of classification have been proposed. Starting with the canonical classification into long and short GRBs, alternative classifications taking into account the cosmological origin of GRBs have been analyzed. In the present work we propose an alternative classification based on two temporal estimators, the Auto Correlation Function (ACF) of the light curves and the emission time which considered the time where the bursts engine is active. The time estimators chosen reflects the internal evolution of the GRB and the internal structure. Using a sample of 61 bright GRBs detected by SWIFT satellite with known redshift, we proposed a bimodal distribution of long bursts. The two types of bursts have different internal structure suggesting different progenitors.

  4. Fostering Elementary School Students' Understanding of Simple Electricity by Combining Simulation and Laboratory Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaakkola, T.; Nurmi, S.

    2008-01-01

    Computer simulations and laboratory activities have been traditionally treated as substitute or competing methods in science teaching. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate if it would be more beneficial to combine simulation and laboratory activities than to use them separately in teaching the concepts of simple electricity. Based…

  5. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  6. Industrial testing and analysis of activated carbons derived from electric arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyantuev, S.; Kondratenko, A.; Starinsky, I.; Khmelev, A.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the results of study of activated carbon produced by thermal destruction in electric arc plasma. There are measurement methods such as density measuring, measuring of total and summary porosity, porous surface microscopy, laboratory methods and industrial testing of sorption activity.

  7. Patterns of Brain-Electrical Activity during Declarative Memory Performance in 10-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morasch, Katherine C.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study of infant declarative memory concurrently examined brain-electrical activity and deferred imitation performance in 10-month-old infants. Continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) measures were collected throughout the activity-matched baseline, encoding (modeling) and retrieval (delayed test) phases of a within-subjects deferred imitation…

  8. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Electric Power Generation and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tully, Randolph R., Jr., Ed.

    This guide was developed by teachers involved in a workshop on "Electric Power Generation and the Environment." Activity topics are: (1) Energy and the Consumer; (2) Energy and Water Pollution; and (3) Energy and Air Pollution. Within these topics, the activities are classified as awareness level, transitional level, or operational level. Each…

  9. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  10. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  11. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  12. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  13. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  14. Lightning and the evolution of electrical activity during the explosions of Mt. Redoubt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, S. A.; Thomas, R. J.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    In January 2009 a 4-station VHF Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was deployed along the west coast of the Kenai Peninsula, with hopes of capturing electrical activity from an eruption of Mt. Redoubt. For the first time, we were able to record the electrical activity from an entire eruptive sequence. The 4-station LMA data has enabled us to locate the plan-position of the lightning discharges, and shows that the eruptions produced exceptionally prolific lightning over and downwind of the volcano. A limited amount of electrical activity and lightning also occurred between explosive events. Studies of the 2006 Augustine eruption showed that the electrical activity had two distinct phases: an explosive phase consisting of a myriad of small, unresolved discharges and some simple lightning, followed after a delay by more conventional discrete lightning in the volcanic plume over and downwind of the volcano. The more energetic Redoubt eruptions exhibit similar phases, except that they appear to overlap in time, and the total duration of the electrical activity was longer. Generally, the explosions began with continuous and amorphous electrical activity localized over the volcano that gradually evolved to more discrete and structured discharges both over and downwind of the volcano. The continuous activity was well correlated in time with seismic and infrasound observations of the explosions, similar to the Augustine observations. We infer that the material ejected during the explosions was highly charged upon exiting the vent, giving rise to numerous and essentially continuous discharges over the volcano. In addition, in-situ charging occurred in the plume that was responsible for vigorous lightning downwind of the volcano. Infrasound data for the eruption at 23:30 UTC on 28 March indicated that although the explosion lasted only 2 to 3 minutes, the lightning activity quickly detached from the volcano after the explosion and continued in the downwind plume for another 27 minutes, extending 80-90 km eastward across Cook Inlet.

  15. An Analysis of Burst Disc Pressure Instability

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Robinson; B. C. Odegard, Jr.; N. r. Moody; S. H. Goods

    2000-06-01

    During the development stage of the 1X Acorn burst disc, burst pressure test results exhibited an unexpected increase of 8 to 14% over times of 90--100 days from initial fabrication. This increase is a concern where design constraints require stability. The disc material, 316L stainless steel sheet, is formed to a dome-like geometry and scored to produce a thin-walled, high-strength ligament. The fracture events controlling burst occur in that ligament. Thus it has been characterized both for tensile properties and microstructure through nanoindentation, magnetic measurements, optical and transmission electron microscopy. These results compare favorably with finite element simulation of the properties of the ligament. The ligament exhibits a highly heterogeneous microstructure; its small volume and microstructural heterogeneity make it difficult to identify which microstructural feature controls fracture and hence burst pressure. Bulk mechanical test specimens were fabricated to emulate mid-ligament properties, and aged at both room and elevated temperatures to characterize and accelerate the temporal behavior of the burst disc. Property changes included yield and ultimate tensile strength increases, and fracture strain decreases with aging. Specimens were subjected to a reversion anneal identical to that given the burst disc to eliminate the martensite phase formed during rolling. Reversion-annealed samples exhibited no change in properties in room temperature or accelerated aging, showing that the reversion-anneal eliminated the aging phenomenon. Aging was analyzed in terms of diffusion controlled precipitate growth kinetics, showing that carbon migration to dislocations is consistent with the strength increases. A vacancy-assisted diffusion mechanism for carbon transport is proposed, giving rise to rapid aging, which replaces interstitial carbon diffusion until excess vacancies from deformation are consumed. Mechanical activation parameters in stress relaxation were measured, indicating that the deformation structures formed at high strains typical of the score ligament are resistant to annealing, and mimic the behavior of a thermal obstacles. This model also qualitatively explains the different rates of aging resulting from a range of levels of cold work.

  16. Diagnostics from three rising submillimeter bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Li, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts that occurred sequentially in Super Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu GHz-1 (corresponding to spectral index α of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of the 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, but it attained values of 235 sfu GHz-1 (α = 4.8) in the 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of highly relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV, but it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than in the microwave (MW) source. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20%-50% during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW source increased by 28% for the 2003 November 2 event. In the paper we will present a formula that can be used to calculate the energy released by ultrarelativistic electrons, taking the relativistic correction into account for the first time. We find that the energy released by energetic electrons in the THz source exceeds that in the MW source due to the strong GS radiation loss in the THz range, although the modeled THz source area is 3-4 orders smaller than the modeled MW source one. The total energies released by energetic electrons via the GS radiation in radio sources are estimated, respectively, to be 5.2 × 1033, 3.9 × 1033 and 3.7 × 1032 erg for the October 28, November 2 and 4 bursts, which are 131, 76 and 4 times as large as the thermal energies of 2.9 × 1031, 2.1 × 1031 and 5.2 × 1031 erg estimated from soft X-ray GOES observations.

  17. Store-operated Ca2+ entry and depolarization explain the anomalous behaviour of myometrial SR: Effects of SERCA inhibition on electrical activity, Ca2+ and force

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Debbie; Borysova, Lyudmyla; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, Theodor

    2014-01-01

    In the myometrium SR Ca2+ depletion promotes an increase in force but unlike several other smooth muscles, there is no Ca2+ sparks-STOCs coupling mechanism to explain this. Given the importance of the control of contractility for successful parturition, we have examined, in pregnant rat myometrium, the effects of SR Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) inhibition on the temporal relationship between action potentials, Ca2+ transients and force. Simultaneous recording of electrical activity, calcium and force showed that SERCA inhibition, by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA 20 μM), caused time-dependent changes in excitability, most noticeably depolarization and elevations of baseline [Ca2+]i and force. At the onset of these changes there was a prolongation of the bursts of action potentials and a corresponding series of Ca2+ spikes, which increased the amplitude and duration of contractions. As the rise of baseline Ca2+ and depolarization continued a point was reached when electrical and Ca2+ spikes and phasic contractions ceased, and a maintained, tonic force and Ca2+ was produced. Lanthanum, a non-selective blocker of store-operated Ca2+ entry, but not the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (1–10 μM), could abolish the maintained force and calcium. Application of the agonist, carbachol, produced similar effects to CPA, i.e. depolarization, elevation of force and calcium. A brief, high concentration of carbachol, to cause SR Ca2+ depletion without eliciting receptor-operated channel opening, also produced these results. The data obtained suggest that in pregnant rats SR Ca2+ release is coupled to marked Ca2+ entry, via store operated Ca2+ channels, leading to depolarization and enhanced electrical and mechanical activity. PMID:25084623

  18. Pressure vessel burst test study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Maurice R.; Hall, Robert J.

    1994-08-01

    A progress report is provided on a program developed to study through test and analysis, the characteristics of blast waves and fragmentation generated by ruptured gas filled pressure vessels. Prior papers on this USAF/NASA program have been presented to AIAA, to JANNAF, to the NASA Pressure Systems Seminar and to a DOD Explosives Safety Board subcommittee meeting. One Vessel has been burst with water pressure and eighteen with pneumatic pressure. All of the planned testing has been completed with the last test series having been completed in November 1993. The tests were designed to have a predetermined burst geometry and pressure level to study burst characteristics in an instrumented arena. Data trends for experiments are presented. The paper presents results from the last test series which were not available earlier and compares all the pneumatic burst test results.

  19. Intracellular shunting of O{sub 2}{sup −} contributes to charge compensation and preservation of neutrophil respiratory burst in the absence of voltage-gated proton channel activity

    SciTech Connect

    Decleva, Eva; Menegazzi, Renzo; Fasolo, Alba; Defendi, Federica

    2013-07-15

    Proton efflux via voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is considered to mediate the charge compensation necessary to preserve NADPH oxidase activity during the respiratory burst. Using the Hv1 inhibitor Zn{sup 2+}, we found that the PMA-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils is inhibited when assessed as extracellular production of O{sub 2}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in accordance with literature studies, but, surprisingly, unaffected when measured as oxygen consumption or total (extracellular plus intracellular) H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Furthermore, we show that inhibiting Hv1 with Zn{sup 2+} results in an increased production of intracellular ROS. Similar results, i.e. decreased extracellular and increased intracellular ROS production, were obtained using a human granulocyte-like cell line with severely impaired Hv1 expression. Acidic extracellular pH, which dampens proton efflux, also augmented intracellular production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Zinc caused an increase in the rate but not in the extent of depolarization and cytosolic acidification indicating that mechanisms other than proton efflux take part in charge compensation. Our results suggest a hitherto unpredicted mechanism of charge compensation whereby, in the absence of proton efflux, part of O{sub 2}{sup −} generated within gp91{sup phox} in the plasma membrane is shunted intracellularly down electrochemical gradient to dampen excessive depolarization. This would preserve NADPH oxidase activity under conditions such as the inflammatory exudate in which the acidic pH hinders charge compensation by proton efflux. Highlights: • Neutrophils’ respiratory burst is not inhibited by the H{sup +} channel inhibitor Zn{sup 2+}. • Intracellular production of O{sub 2}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is increased in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}. • Intracellular H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production is increased in H{sup +} channels knock-down cells. • Zn{sup 2+} increases the rate but not the extent of depolarization and pH{sub i} decrease. • Intracellular shunting of O{sub 2}{sup −} contributes to charge compensation in neutrophils.

  20. Burst predicting neurons survive an in vitro glutamate injury model of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuebler, Eric S.; Tauskela, Joseph S.; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity in vitro exhibits network bursts characterized by brief periods of increased spike rates. Recent work shows that a subpopulation of neurons reliably predicts the occurrence of network bursts. Here, we examined the role of burst predictors in cultures undergoing an in vitro model of cerebral ischemia. Dissociated primary cortical neurons were plated on multielectrode arrays and spontaneous activity was recorded at 17 days in vitro (DIV). This activity was characterized by neuronal avalanches where burst statistics followed a power law. We identified burst predictors as channels that consistently fired immediately prior to network bursts. The timing of these predictors relative to bursts followed a skewed distribution that differed sharply from a null model based on branching ratio. A portion of cultures were subjected to an excitotoxic insult (DIV 18). Propidium iodine and fluorescence imaging confirmed cell death in these cultures. While the insult did not alter the distribution of avalanches, it resulted in alterations in overall spike rates. Burst predictors, however, maintained baseline levels of activity. The resilience of burst predictors following excitotoxic insult suggests a key role of these units in maintaining network activity following injury, with implications for the selective effects of ischemia in the brain. PMID:26648112

  1. Burst predicting neurons survive an in vitro glutamate injury model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Eric S; Tauskela, Joseph S; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity in vitro exhibits network bursts characterized by brief periods of increased spike rates. Recent work shows that a subpopulation of neurons reliably predicts the occurrence of network bursts. Here, we examined the role of burst predictors in cultures undergoing an in vitro model of cerebral ischemia. Dissociated primary cortical neurons were plated on multielectrode arrays and spontaneous activity was recorded at 17 days in vitro (DIV). This activity was characterized by neuronal avalanches where burst statistics followed a power law. We identified burst predictors as channels that consistently fired immediately prior to network bursts. The timing of these predictors relative to bursts followed a skewed distribution that differed sharply from a null model based on branching ratio. A portion of cultures were subjected to an excitotoxic insult (DIV 18). Propidium iodine and fluorescence imaging confirmed cell death in these cultures. While the insult did not alter the distribution of avalanches, it resulted in alterations in overall spike rates. Burst predictors, however, maintained baseline levels of activity. The resilience of burst predictors following excitotoxic insult suggests a key role of these units in maintaining network activity following injury, with implications for the selective effects of ischemia in the brain. PMID:26648112

  2. Manganese-enhanced MR imaging of brain activation evoked by noxious peripheral electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Myeounghoon; Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Chulhyun; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Cheong, Chaejoon; Sohn, Jin-Hun; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2016-02-01

    As imaging technology develops, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has furthered our understanding of brain function by clarifying the anatomical structure and generating functional imaging data related to information processing in pain conditions. Recent studies have reported that manganese (Mn(2+))-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides valuable information about the functions of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to identify specific brain regions activated during noxious electric stimulation using high-resolution MEMRI. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups: naïve, sham electrical stimulation, and noxious electric stimulation. Under urethane with α-chloralose mixture anesthesia, a catheter was placed in the external carotid artery to administrate 20% mannitol and manganese chloride (25mM MnCl2). Noxious electric stimulation (2Hz, 10V) was applied to the hind paw with a needle electrode. Stimulation-induced neuronal activation was detected using 4.7-T MRI. In response to noxious electrical stimulation, remarkable Mn(2+)-enhanced signals were observed in the agranular insular cortex, auditory cortex, primary somatosensory cortex of the hind limb, and granular and dysgranular insular cortex, which correspond to sensory tactile electric stimulus to the hindpaws. These results indicate that the combination of MEMRI with activity-induced Mn(2+)-dependent contrast can delineate functional areas in the rat brain. PMID:26733299

  3. Primordial rhythmic bursting in embryonic cochlear ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, T A; Jones, S M; Paggett, K C

    2001-10-15

    This study examined the nature of spontaneous discharge patterns in cochlear ganglion cells in embryonic day 13 (E13) to early E17 chicken embryos (stages 39-43). Neural recordings were made with glass micropipettes. No sound-driven activity was seen for the youngest embryos (maximum intensity 107 dB sound pressure level). Ganglion cells were labeled with biotinylated dextran amine in four embryos. In two animals, primary afferents projected to hair cells in the middle region along the length of the basilar papilla in which, in one cell, the terminals occupied a neural transverse position and, in the other, a more abneural location. Statoacoustic ganglion cells showing no spontaneous activity were seen for the first time in the chicken. The proportion of "silent" cells was largest at the youngest stages (stage 39, 67%). In active cells, mean spontaneous discharge rates [9.4 +/- 10.4 spikes (Sp)/sec; n = 44] were lower than rates for older embryos (19 +/- 17 Sp/sec) (Jones and Jones, 2000). Embryos at stages 39-41 evidenced even lower rates (4.2 +/- 5.0 Sp/sec). The most salient feature of spontaneous activity for stages 39-43 was a bursting discharge pattern in >75% of active neurons (33 of 44). Moreover, in 55% of these cells, there was a clear, slow, rhythmic bursting pattern. The proportion of cells showing rhythmic bursting was greatest at the youngest stages (39-42) and decreased to <30% at stage 43. Rate of bursting ranged from 1 to 54 bursts per minute. The presence of rhythmic bursting in cochlear ganglion cells at E13-E17 provides an explanation for the existence of such patterns in central auditory relays. The bursting patterns may serve as a patterning signal for central synaptic refinements in the auditory system during development. PMID:11588185

  4. Active RF Pulse Compression using Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami

    2006-11-27

    In this paper, we present the recent results of our research on the ultra-high power fast silicon RF switch and its application on active X-Band RF pulse compression systems. This switch is composed of a group of PIN diodes on a high purity silicon wafer and has achieved a switching time of 300ns. The wafer is inserted into a cylindrical waveguide operating in the TE01 mode. Switching is performed by injecting carriers into the bulk silicon through a high current pulse. The RF energy is stored in a room-temperature, high-Q 375 ns delay line; it is then extracted out of the line in a short time using the switch. The pulse compression system has achieved a gain of 8, which is the ratio between output and input power.

  5. Active RF Pulse Compression Using Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    In this paper, we present the recent results of our research on the ultra-high power fast silicon RF switch and its application on active X-Band RF pulse compression systems. This switch is composed of a group of PIN diodes on a high purity silicon wafer and has achieved a switching time of 300ns. The wafer is inserted into a cylindrical waveguide operating in the TE01 mode. Switching is performed by injecting carriers into the bulk silicon through a high current pulse. The RF energy is stored in a room-temperature, high-Q 375 ns delay line; it is then extracted out of the line in a short time using the switch. The pulse compression system has achieved a gain of 8, which is the ratio between output and input power.

  6. X-ray bursts: Observation versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Results of various observations of common type I X-ray bursts are discussed with respect to the theory of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. Topics covered include burst profiles; irregular burst intervals; rise and decay times and the role of hydrogen; the accuracy of source distances; accuracy in radii determination; radius increase early in the burst; the super Eddington limit; temperatures at burst maximum; and the role of the magnetic field.

  7. Steady advance of coal and gas bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanbing, Yu

    1988-02-01

    This paper establishes a one-dimensional model to analyse the mechanism of coal and gas bursts. It is found that the intrinsic factor governing bursts is the coupling of the initiation of the moving of coal fragments with the gas seepage. A typical (strong) burst can be treated as a steady advance process. The significant dimensionless parameters concerning bursts and an approximate burst criterion are given, and they are in good agreement with the statistics of field data.

  8. The Effect of Post-Burst Energy on Exploding Bridgewire Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Elizabeth; Bowden, Mike

    2015-06-01

    For an EBW detonator, as the fireset energy is increased from threshold to all-fire level the post-burst energy delivered to the detonator increases, and the function times decrease. To gain an understanding of the processes through which the post-burst electrical energy influences the function times the effect of the post-burst energy on the explosion of bridgewires was studied. A fireset was developed which enabled the post-burst energy to be varied independent of the burst energy by terminating the current flow at pre-selected times. The effect of this on the bridgewires was characterised at a range of firing voltages and a range of termination times. The response of the bridgewire was characterised using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry. The velocimetry trace detected two families of velocities. The first family had initial velocities in the range 1-2 km.s-1 and the second family had velocities in the range 0-0.5 km.s-1. The relative position of the two families depended on the post burst energy. The results show that a reduction in the post-burst energy and therefore the total delivered energy, but for a constant energy delivered to burst, corresponds to a decrease in the acceleration and peak velocity of the bridgewire / plasma at burst.

  9. Robust statistical properties of the size of large burst events in AE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hush, P.; Chapman, S. C.; Dunlop, M. W.; Watkins, N. W.

    2015-11-01

    Geomagnetic indices provide a comprehensive data set with which to quantify space climate, that is, how the statistical likelihood of activity varies with the solar cycle. We characterize space climate by the AE index burst distribution. Burst sizes are constructed by thresholding the AE time series; a burst is the sum of the excess in the time series for each time interval over which the threshold is exceeded. The distribution of burst sizes is two component with a crossover in behavior at thresholds ≈1000 nT. Above this threshold, we find a range over which the mean burst size varies weakly with threshold for both solar maxima and minima. The burst size distribution of the largest events is exponential. The relative likelihood of these large events varies from one solar maximum and minimum to the next. Given the relative overall activity of a solar maximum/minimum, these results constrain the likelihood of extreme events of a given size.

  10. Direct detection of optogenetically evoked oscillatory neuronal electrical activity in rats using SLOE sequence.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yuhui; Bi, Guoqiang; Wang, Liping; Xu, Fuqiang; Wu, Ruiqi; Zhou, Xin; Qiu, Bensheng; Lei, Hao; Zhang, Yaoyu; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2016-01-15

    The direct detection of neuronal electrical activity is one of the most challenging goals in non-BOLD fMRI research. Previous work has demonstrated its feasibility in phantom and cell culture studies, but attempts in in vivo studies remain few and far between. Most recent in vivo studies used T2*-weighted sequences to directly detect neuronal electrical activity evoked by sensory stimulus. As neuronal electrical signal is usually comprised of a series of spectrally distributed oscillatory waveforms rather than being a direct current, it is most likely to be detected using oscillatory current sensitive sequences. In this study, we explored the potential of using the spin-lock oscillatory excitation (SLOE) sequence with spiral readout to directly detect optogenetically evoked oscillatory neuronal electrical activity, whose main spectral component can be manipulated artificially to match the resonance frequency of spin-lock RF field. In addition, experiments using the stimulus-induced rotary saturation (SIRS) sequence with spiral readout were also performed. Electrophysiological recording and MRI data acquisition were conducted on separate animals. Robust optogenetically evoked oscillatory LFP signals were observed and significant BOLD signals were acquired with the GE-EPI sequence before and after the whole SLOE and SIRS acquisitions, but no significant neuronal current MRI (ncMRI) signal changes were detected. These results indicate that the sensitivity of oscillatory current sensitive sequences needs to be further improved for direct detection of neuronal electrical activity. PMID:26518631

  11. On the haptic nature of the active electric sense of fish.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Angel A; Aguilera, Pedro A; Carolina Pereira, Ana; Rodríguez-Cattáneo, Alejo

    2013-11-01

    Electroreception is a sensory modality present in chondrichthyes, actinopterygii, amphibians, and mammalian monotremes. The study of this non-intuitive sensory modality has provided insights for better understanding of sensory systems in general and inspired the development of innovative artificial devices. Here we review evidence obtained from the analysis of electrosensory images, neurophysiological data from the recording of unitary activity in the electrosensory lobe, and psychophysical data from analysis of novelty responses provoked in well-defined stimulus conditions, which all confirm that active electroreception has a short range, and that the influence of exploratory movements on object identification is strong. In active electric images two components can be identified: a "global" image profile depending on the volume, shape and global impedance of an object and a "texture" component depending on its surface attributes. There is a short range of the active electric sense and the progressive "blurring" of object image with distance. Consequently, the lack of precision regarding object location, considered together, challenge the current view of this sense as serving long range electrolocation and the commonly used metaphor of "electric vision". In fact, the active electric sense shares more commonalities with human active touch than with teleceptive senses as vision or audition. Taking into account that other skin exteroceptors and proprioception may be congruently stimulated during fish exploratory movements we propose that electric, mechanoceptive and proprioceptive sensory modalities found in electric fish could be considered together as a single haptic sensory system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012. PMID:23727613

  12. Correlated bursts and the role of memory range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Perotti, Juan I.; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2015-08-01

    Inhomogeneous temporal processes in natural and social phenomena have been described by bursts that are rapidly occurring events within short time periods alternating with long periods of low activity. In addition to the analysis of heavy-tailed interevent time distributions, higher-order correlations between interevent times, called correlated bursts, have been studied only recently. As the underlying mechanism behind such correlated bursts is far from being fully understood, we devise a simple model for correlated bursts using a self-exciting point process with a variable range of memory. Whether a new event occurs is stochastically determined by a memory function that is the sum of decaying memories of past events. In order to incorporate the noise and/or limited memory capacity of systems, we apply two memory loss mechanisms: a fixed number or a variable number of memories. By analysis and numerical simulations, we find that too much memory effect may lead to a Poissonian process, implying that there exists an intermediate range of memory effect to generate correlated bursts comparable to empirical findings. Our conclusions provide a deeper understanding of how long-range memory affects correlated bursts.

  13. EMISSION PATTERNS OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS: STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; Bergamo, M.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: mbergamo@umd.edu

    2012-02-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft R{sub j} = I{sub j} /{Sigma}I{sub j} (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of {approx}2 Degree-Sign and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from {approx} - 100 Degree-Sign to {approx}100 Degree-Sign . The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  14. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  15. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  16. Localization of brain electrical activity via linearly constrained minimum variance spatial filtering.

    PubMed

    Van Veen, B D; van Drongelen, W; Yuchtman, M; Suzuki, A

    1997-09-01

    A spatial filtering method for localizing sources of brain electrical activity from surface recordings is described and analyzed. The spatial filters are implemented as a weighted sum of the data recorded at different sites. The weights are chosen to minimize the filter output power subject to a linear constraint. The linear constraint forces the filter to pass brain electrical activity from a specified location, while the power minimization attenuates activity originating at other locations. The estimated output power as a function of location is normalized by the estimated noise power as a function of location to obtain a neural activity index map. Locations of source activity correspond to maxima in the neural activity index map. The method does not require any prior assumptions about the number of active sources of their geometry because it exploits the spatial covariance of the source electrical activity. This paper presents a development and analysis of the method and explores its sensitivity to deviations between actual and assumed data models. The effect on the algorithm of covariance matrix estimation, correlation between sources, and choice of reference is discussed. Simulated and measured data is used to illustrate the efficacy of the approach. PMID:9282479

  17. Modelling the Effects of Electrical Coupling between Unmyelinated Axons of Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity.

    PubMed

    Hull, Michael J; Soffe, Stephen R; Willshaw, David J; Roberts, Alan

    2015-05-01

    Gap junctions between fine unmyelinated axons can electrically couple groups of brain neurons to synchronise firing and contribute to rhythmic activity. To explore the distribution and significance of electrical coupling, we modelled a well analysed, small population of brainstem neurons which drive swimming in young frog tadpoles. A passive network of 30 multicompartmental neurons with unmyelinated axons was used to infer that: axon-axon gap junctions close to the soma gave the best match to experimentally measured coupling coefficients; axon diameter had a strong influence on coupling; most neurons were coupled indirectly via the axons of other neurons. When active channels were added, gap junctions could make action potential propagation along the thin axons unreliable. Increased sodium and decreased potassium channel densities in the initial axon segment improved action potential propagation. Modelling suggested that the single spike firing to step current injection observed in whole-cell recordings is not a cellular property but a dynamic consequence of shunting resulting from electrical coupling. Without electrical coupling, firing of the population during depolarising current was unsynchronised; with coupling, the population showed synchronous recruitment and rhythmic firing. When activated instead by increasing levels of modelled sensory pathway input, the population without electrical coupling was recruited incrementally to unpatterned activity. However, when coupled, the population was recruited all-or-none at threshold into a rhythmic swimming pattern: the tadpole "decided" to swim. Modelling emphasises uncertainties about fine unmyelinated axon physiology but, when informed by biological data, makes general predictions about gap junctions: locations close to the soma; relatively small numbers; many indirect connections between neurons; cause of action potential propagation failure in fine axons; misleading alteration of intrinsic firing properties. Modelling also indicates that electrical coupling within a population can synchronize recruitment of neurons and their pacemaker firing during rhythmic activity. PMID:25954930

  18. Modelling the Effects of Electrical Coupling between Unmyelinated Axons of Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Gap junctions between fine unmyelinated axons can electrically couple groups of brain neurons to synchronise firing and contribute to rhythmic activity. To explore the distribution and significance of electrical coupling, we modelled a well analysed, small population of brainstem neurons which drive swimming in young frog tadpoles. A passive network of 30 multicompartmental neurons with unmyelinated axons was used to infer that: axon-axon gap junctions close to the soma gave the best match to experimentally measured coupling coefficients; axon diameter had a strong influence on coupling; most neurons were coupled indirectly via the axons of other neurons. When active channels were added, gap junctions could make action potential propagation along the thin axons unreliable. Increased sodium and decreased potassium channel densities in the initial axon segment improved action potential propagation. Modelling suggested that the single spike firing to step current injection observed in whole-cell recordings is not a cellular property but a dynamic consequence of shunting resulting from electrical coupling. Without electrical coupling, firing of the population during depolarising current was unsynchronised; with coupling, the population showed synchronous recruitment and rhythmic firing. When activated instead by increasing levels of modelled sensory pathway input, the population without electrical coupling was recruited incrementally to unpatterned activity. However, when coupled, the population was recruited all-or-none at threshold into a rhythmic swimming pattern: the tadpole “decided” to swim. Modelling emphasises uncertainties about fine unmyelinated axon physiology but, when informed by biological data, makes general predictions about gap junctions: locations close to the soma; relatively small numbers; many indirect connections between neurons; cause of action potential propagation failure in fine axons; misleading alteration of intrinsic firing properties. Modelling also indicates that electrical coupling within a population can synchronize recruitment of neurons and their pacemaker firing during rhythmic activity. PMID:25954930

  19. Network bursts in hippocampal microcultures are terminated by exhaustion of vesicle pools.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Dror; Segal, Menahem

    2011-11-01

    Synchronized network activity is an essential attribute of the brain. Yet the cellular mechanisms that determine the duration of network bursts are not fully understood. In the present study, synchronized network bursts were evoked by triggering an action potential in a single neuron in otherwise silent microcultures consisting of 4-30 hippocampal neurons. The evoked burst duration, ∼2 s, depended on the recovery time after a previous burst. While interburst intervals of 35 s enabled full-length bursts, they were shortened by half at 5-s intervals. This reduction in burst duration could not be attributed to postsynaptic parameters such as glutamate receptor desensitization, accumulating afterhyperpolarization, inhibitory tone, or sodium channel inactivation. Reducing extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](o)) relieved the effect of short intervals on burst duration, while depletion of synaptic vesicles with α-latrotoxin gradually eliminated network bursts. Finally, a transient exposure to high [K(+)](o) slowed down the recovery time following a burst discharge. We conclude that the limiting factor regulating burst duration is most likely the depletion of presynaptic resources. PMID:21832037

  20. Electric fields at the active site of an enzyme: direct comparison of experiment with theory.

    PubMed

    Suydam, Ian T; Snow, Christopher D; Pande, Vijay S; Boxer, Steven G

    2006-07-14

    The electric fields produced in folded proteins influence nearly every aspect of protein function. We present a vibrational spectroscopy technique that measures changes in electric field at a specific site of a protein as shifts in frequency (Stark shifts) of a calibrated nitrile vibration. A nitrile-containing inhibitor is used to deliver a unique probe vibration to the active site of human aldose reductase, and the response of the nitrile stretch frequency is measured for a series of mutations in the enzyme active site. These shifts yield quantitative information on electric fields that can be directly compared with electrostatics calculations. We show that extensive molecular dynamics simulations and ensemble averaging are required to reproduce the observed changes in field. PMID:16840693

  1. Extreme electric fields power catalysis in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Stephen D.; Bagchi, Sayan; Boxer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes use protein architecture to impose specific electrostatic fields onto their bound substrates, but the magnitude and catalytic effect of these electric fields have proven difficult to quantify with standard experimental approaches. Using vibrational Stark effect spectroscopy, we found that the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) exerts an extremely large electric field onto the C=O chemical bond that undergoes a charge rearrangement in KSI’s rate-determining step. Moreover, we found that the magnitude of the electric field exerted by the active site strongly correlates with the enzyme’s catalytic rate enhancement, enabling us to quantify the fraction of the catalytic effect that is electrostatic in origin. The measurements described here may help explain the role of electrostatics in many other enzymes and biomolecular systems. PMID:25525245

  2. Extreme electric fields power catalysis in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Fried, Stephen D; Bagchi, Sayan; Boxer, Steven G

    2014-12-19

    Enzymes use protein architecture to impose specific electrostatic fields onto their bound substrates, but the magnitude and catalytic effect of these electric fields have proven difficult to quantify with standard experimental approaches. Using vibrational Stark effect spectroscopy, we found that the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) exerts an extremely large electric field onto the C=O chemical bond that undergoes a charge rearrangement in KSI's rate-determining step. Moreover, we found that the magnitude of the electric field exerted by the active site strongly correlates with the enzyme's catalytic rate enhancement, enabling us to quantify the fraction of the catalytic effect that is electrostatic in origin. The measurements described here may help explain the role of electrostatics in many other enzymes and biomolecular systems. PMID:25525245

  3. Mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of low amperage electric current (DC).

    PubMed

    Liu, W K; Brown, M R; Elliott, T S

    1997-06-01

    The mechanisms whereby low amperage (10-100 microA) electric current (DC) is bactericidal were investigated with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus. A zone of inhibition test involving the insertion of an anode and cathode into an agar plate inoculated with a lawn of bacteria was used to study the antimicrobial activity of electric current. A zone of inhibition was produced around the cathode when 10 microA (DC) was applied for 16 h. The diameter of the zone was greatly reduced in the presence of catalase. There was no zone around the cathode when the test was carried out under anaerobic conditions. H2O2 was produced at the cathode surface under aerobic conditions but not in the absence of oxygen. A salt-bridge apparatus was used to confirm that H2O2 was produced at the cathode and chlorine at the anode. The antimicrobial activity of low amperage electric current under anaerobic conditions and in the absence of chloride ions against bacteria attached to the surface of a current carrying electrode was also investigated. Antibacterial activity was reduced under anaerobic conditions, which is compatible with the role of H2O2 as a primary bactericidal agent of electricity associated with the cathode. A reduction in chloride ions did not significantly reduce the antibacterial activity suggesting that chlorine plays only a minor role in the bactericidal activity towards organisms attached to anodal electrode surfaces. The localized production of H2O2 and chlorine and the intrinsic activity due to electric current may offer a useful method for eradicating bacteria from catheter surfaces. PMID:9222036

  4. Pulseless electrical activity in a pediatric patient: a case report and review of causative factors and treatment.

    PubMed

    Newman, Johanna

    2013-12-01

    Pulseless electrical activity, an arrhythmia that leads to cardiac arrest, is defined as the presence of organized electrical activity without a palpable pulse or arterial blood pressure. When this arrhythmia presents during anesthesia, it has become routine practice to initiate advanced cardiac life support according to the American Heart Association guidelines. This arrhythmia is usually associated with a poor prognosis unless a reversible cause is investigated and treated immediately. The purpose of this article is to summarize the causative factors of pulseless electrical activity and its treatment modalities. This case report describes the successful resuscitation of a pediatric patient who presented with pulseless electrical activity during anesthesia for a rigid bronchoscopy. PMID:24597008

  5. Cascade model of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Harding, A. K.; Daugherty, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    If, in a neutron star magnetosphere, an electron is accelerated to an energy of 10 to the 11th or 12th power eV by an electric field parallel to the magnetic field, motion of the electron along the curved field line leads to a cascade of gamma rays and electron-positron pairs. This process is believed to occur in radio pulsars and gamma ray burst sources. Results are presented from numerical simulations of the radiation and photon annihilation pair production processes, using a computer code previously developed for the study of radio pulsars. A range of values of initial energy of a primary electron was considered along with initial injection position, and magnetic dipole moment of the neutron star. The resulting spectra was found to exhibit complex forms that are typically power law over a substantial range of photon energy, and typically include a dip in the spectrum near the electron gyro-frequency at the injection point. The results of a number of models are compared with data for the 5 Mar., 1979 gamma ray burst. A good fit was found to the gamma ray part of the spectrum, including the equivalent width of the annihilation line.

  6. Engineering support activities for the Apollo 17 Surface Electrical Properties Experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubley, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the engineering support activities which were required to ensure fulfillment of objectives specified for the Apollo 17 SEP (Surface Electrical Properties) Experiment. Attention is given to procedural steps involving verification of hardware acceptability to the astronauts, computer simulation of the experiment hardware, field trials, receiver antenna pattern measurements, and the qualification test program.

  7. Video: Animals; Electric Current; Force; Science Activities. Learning in Science Project. Working Papers 51-54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Beverley; And Others

    Four papers to be used in conjunction with video-tapes developed by the Learning in Science Project are presented. Topic areas of the papers focus on: (1) animals; (2) electric current; (3) force; and (4) science activities. The first paper presents transcripts of class discussions focusing on the scientific meaning of the word animal. The second…

  8. T & I--Electricity. Power. Kit No. 52. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phillip

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on electrical power are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  9. Electrically Activated Primary Human Fibroblasts Improve In Vitro and In Vivo Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Park, Hyun Jin; Zhang, Ze

    2016-08-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) changes cellular behaviors and thus constitutes a potential strategy to promote wound healing. However, well-controlled in vitro findings have yet to be translated to in vivo trials. This study was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of transplanting electrically activated cells (E-Cells) to help wound healing. Primary human skin fibroblasts were activated through well defined ES and cultured with keratinocytes to generate engineered human skin (EHS), which were transplanted to nu/nu mice. The electrically activated EHS grafts were analyzed at 20 and 30 days post-grafting, showing faster wound closure, thick epidermis, vasculature, and functional basement membrane containing laminin and type IV collagen that were totally produced by the implanted human cells. Because a variety of cells can be electrically activated, E-Cells may become a new cell source and the transplantation of E-Cells may represent a new strategy in wound healing and tissue engineering. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1814-1821, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661681

  10. Agriculture--Agricultural Mechanics, Electric Motors. Kit No. 56. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bomar, William

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on agricultural mechanics (electric motors) are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of agriculture. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings:…

  11. Active and Collaborative Learning in an Introductory Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotru, Sushma; Burkett, Susan L.; Jackson, David Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Active and collaborative learning instruments were introduced into an introductory electrical and computer engineering course. These instruments were designed to assess specific learning objectives and program outcomes. Results show that students developed an understanding comparable to that of more advanced students assessed later in the…

  12. Active and Collaborative Learning in an Introductory Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotru, Sushma; Burkett, Susan L.; Jackson, David Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Active and collaborative learning instruments were introduced into an introductory electrical and computer engineering course. These instruments were designed to assess specific learning objectives and program outcomes. Results show that students developed an understanding comparable to that of more advanced students assessed later in the

  13. ALTERATION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY BY WATER-LEACHABLE COMPONENTS OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of cardiac electrical activity by water-leachable components
    of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)

    Desuo Wang, Yuh-Chin T. Huang*, An Xie, Ting Wang

    *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA
    104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
    Department of Basic ...

  14. Dynamic Variation in Pleasure in Children Predicts Nonlinear Change in Lateral Frontal Brain Electrical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Sharee N.; Coan, James A.; Frye, Corrina; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Davidson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Individual variation in the experience and expression of pleasure may relate to differential patterns of lateral frontal activity. Brain electrical measures have been used to study the asymmetric involvement of lateral frontal cortex in positive emotion, but the excellent time resolution of these measures has not been used to capture…

  15. Application of brain electric activity mapping for analysis of discharge propagation in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Miszczak, J; Achimowicz, J

    1986-01-01

    The brain electric activity mapping (BEAM) method was used for diagnostic purposes in patients who revealed the episodic paroxysmal activity in electroencephalographic records. The spectral features of brain spontaneous activity in the absence of the seizures demonstrated the topography similar to the seizure wave front propagation pathways observed in dynamic potential mapping. The cortical areas characterized by the increased ability to generate slow waves at certain frequencies revealed at the same time tendency for epileptic activity generation. The neuronal mechanism involved seems to be of resonance character as this correspondence is not observed when the power density distribution averaged in classical EEG frequency bands is analysed. PMID:3618260

  16. Effect of electric current frequency on the activation kinetics of raw charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.O.; Ivakhnyuk, G.K.; Fedorov, N.F.

    1993-12-10

    The effect of electric current frequency on the kinetics of raw charcoal activation with water vapor has been investigated. It was established that under the effect of alternating current the rate constant increases under otherwise equal conditions. A dependence of the reaction rate on the current frequency was found. It was discovered that under the effect of alternating current the activation energy of interaction with water vapor diminishes.

  17. TECHNICAL NOTE: Electrically aligned cellulose film for electro-active paper and its piezoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Jang, Sangdong; Yun, Gyu-Young; Kim, Jaehwan

    2009-11-01

    Electrically aligned regenerated cellulose films were fabricated and the effect of applied electric field was investigated for the piezoelectricity of electro-active paper (EAPap). The EAPap was fabricated by coating gold electrodes on both sides of regenerated cellulose film. The cellulose film was prepared by dissolving cotton pulp in LiCl/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution followed by a cellulose chain regeneration process. During the regeneration process an external electric field was applied in the direction of mechanical stretching. Alignment of cellulose fiber chains was investigated as a function of applied electric field. The material characteristics of the cellulose films were analyzed by using an x-ray diffractometer, a field emission scanning electron microscope and a high voltage electron microscope. The application of external electric fields was found to induce formation of nanofibers in the cellulose, resulting in an increase in the crystallinity index (CI) values. It was also found that samples with higher CI values showed higher in-plane piezoelectric constant, d31, values. The piezoelectricity of the current EAPap films was measured to be equivalent or better than that of ordinary PVDF films. Therefore, an external electric field applied to a cellulose film along with a mechanical stretching during the regeneration process can enhance the piezoelectricity.

  18. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  19. MBE growth of active regions for electrically pumped, cw-operating GaSb-based VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani-Shirazi, K.; Bachmann, A.; Boehm, G.; Ziegler, S.; Amann, M.-C.

    2009-03-01

    Electrically pumped, cw-operating, single-mode GaSb-based VCSELs are attractive light sources for trace-gas sensing systems using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) [A. Vicet, D.A. Yarekha, A. Pérona, Y. Rouillard, S. Gaillard, Spectrochimica Acta Part A 58 (2002) 2405-2412]. Only recently, the first electrically pumped (EP) devices emitting at 2.325 μm in cw-mode at room temperature have been reported [A. Bachmann, T. Lim, K. Kashani-Shirazi, O. Dier, C. Lauer, M.-C. Amann, Electronics Letters 44(3) (2008) 202-203]. The fabrication of these devices employs the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of GaSb/AlAsSb-distributed Bragg mirrors, a multi-quantum-well active region made of AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb and an InAsSb/GaSb-buried-tunnel junction. As VCSELs are usually driven under high injection rates, an optimum electrical design of active regions is essential for high-performance devices. In this paper we present an enhanced simulation of current flow in the active region under operation conditions. The calculation includes carrier transport by drift, diffusion and tunneling. We discuss different design criteria and material compositions for active regions. Active regions with various barrier materials were incorporated into edge emitter samples to evaluate their performance. Aluminum-containing barriers show better internal efficiency compared to active regions with GaSb as the barrier material.

  20. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  1. A unified model for two modes of bursting in GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Moran, Spencer; Moenter, Suzanne M; Khadra, Anmar

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons exhibit at least two intrinsic modes of action potential burst firing, referred to as parabolic and irregular bursting. Parabolic bursting is characterized by a slow wave in membrane potential that can underlie periodic clusters of action potentials with increased interspike interval at the beginning and at the end of each cluster. Irregular bursting is characterized by clusters of action potentials that are separated by varying durations of interburst intervals and a relatively stable baseline potential. Based on recent studies of isolated ionic currents, a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH)-like model for the GnRH neuron is developed to reproduce each mode of burst firing with an appropriate set of conductances. Model outcomes for bursting are in agreement with the experimental recordings in terms of interburst interval, interspike interval, active phase duration, and other quantitative properties specific to each mode of bursting. The model also shows similar outcomes in membrane potential to those seen experimentally when tetrodotoxin (TTX) is used to block action potentials during bursting, and when estradiol transitions cells exhibiting slow oscillations to irregular bursting mode in vitro. Based on the parameter values used to reproduce each mode of bursting, the model suggests that GnRH neurons can switch between the two through changes in the maximum conductance of certain ionic currents, notably the slow inward Ca(2+) current I s, and the Ca(2+) -activated K(+) current I KCa. Bifurcation analysis of the model shows that both modes of bursting are similar from a dynamical systems perspective despite differences in burst characteristics. PMID:26975615

  2. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. This shell model code can be used to constrain broadband observations of GRB 090926A, which showed two flares in both the Swift UVOT and XRT bands. Using the prompt emission fluence to constrain the total energy contained in the blastwave, the internal shock model requires that Lorentz factors of the shells causing flares must be less than the Lorentz factor of the blastwave when the shells are ejected. Recent observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) revealed a power law decay feature of the high energy emission (above 100 MeV), which led to the suggestion that it originates from an external shock. We analyze four GRBs (080916C, 090510, 090902B and 090926A) jointly detected by Fermi LAT and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), which have high quality lightcurves in both instrument energy bands. Using the MeV prompt emission (GBM) data, we can record the energy output from the central engine as a function of time. Assuming a constant radiative efficiency, we are able to track energy accumulation in the external shock using our internal/external shell model code and show that the late time lightcurves fit well within the external shock model, but the early time lightcurves are dominated by the internal shock component which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave.

  3. Bursting in Cellular Automata and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Gil; Shrier, Alvin; Glass, Leon

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the initiation and continuation of abnormal cardiac arrhythmias are incompletely understood. In this chapter, we summarize work that shows how simple cellular automata models of excitable media can display a range of interesting dynamical behavior including spontaneous bursts of reentrant spiral activity. Since the model incorporates basic physiological properties of excitability, heterogeneity, localized pacemakers, and fatigue in a schematic way, the model captures generic physiological dynamics that should be broadly observed in experimental and clinical settings as well as in more realistic mathematical models.

  4. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  5. Vortex shedding as a precursor of turbulent electrical activity in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cabo, C; Pertsov, A M; Davidenko, J M; Baxter, W T; Gray, R A; Jalife, J

    1996-01-01

    In cardiac tissue, during partial blockade of the membrane sodium channels, or at high frequencies of excitation, inexcitable obstacles with sharp edges may destabilize the propagation of electrical excitation waves, causing the formation of self-sustained vortices and turbulent cardiac electrical activity. The formation of such vortices, which visually resembles vortex shedding in hydrodynamic turbulent flows, was observed in sheep epicardial tissue using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with video-imaging techniques. Vortex shedding is a potential mechanism leading to the spontaneous initiation of uncontrolled high-frequency excitation of the heart. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785270

  6. Changes of electric cochlea activity of guinea pigs during argon laser stapedotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Wojciech; Pres, Krzysztof; Dziewiszek, Wojciech; Pospiech, Lucyna

    2000-11-01

    Small electric signals appear on surface of a cochlea when the ear is stimulated by sound. A level of the signals can be measured of the electric activity of cochlea. The aim of the experiments was recording of changes of the cochlear potentials during argon laser stapedotomy. On the base of the recording the limits of the safe argon laser stapedotomy have been preliminary estimated. The series of argon laser pulses lasting 0.2-0.5 s and of 16 s interval between the pulses are preferable for safety of argon laser stapedotomy. The pulse peak power should be below 1 W.

  7. Macroscopic bursting in physiological networks: node or network property?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Fabiano A. S.; Viana, Ricardo L.; Gomez, Florian; Lorimer, Tom; Stoop, Ruedi

    2015-05-01

    Activity pattern modalities of neuronal ensembles are determined by node properties as well as network structure. For many purposes, it is of interest to be able to relate activity patterns to either node properties or to network properties (or to a combination of both). When in physiological neural networks we observe bursting on a coarse-grained time and space scale, a proper decision on whether bursts are the consequence of individual neurons with an inherent bursting property or whether we are dealing with a genuine network effect has generally not been possible because of the noise in these systems. Here, by linking different orders of time and space scales, we provide a simple coarse-grained criterion for deciding this question.

  8. Direct activation of sparse, distributed populations of cortical neurons by electrical microstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Histed, Mark H.; Bonin, Vincent; Reid, R. Clay

    2010-01-01

    Summary For over a century, electrical microstimulation has been the most direct method for causally linking brain function with behavior. Despite this long history, it is still unclear how the activity of neural populations is affected by stimulation. For example, there is still no consensus on where activated cells lie, or on the extent to which neural processes such as passing axons near the electrode are also activated. Past studies of this question have proven difficult because microstimulation interferes with electrophysiological recordings, which in any case provide only coarse information about the location of activated cells. We used two-photon calcium imaging, an optical method, to circumvent these hurdles. We found that microstimulation sparsely activates neurons around the electrode, sometimes as far as millimeters away, even at low currents. The pattern of activated neurons likely arises from the direct activation of axons in a volume with a diameter of tens of microns. PMID:19709632

  9. The Central Italy Electromagnetic Network and the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake: Observed Electric Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidani, Cristiano

    2011-12-01

    A network of low frequency electromagnetic detectors has been operating in Central Italy for more than three years, consisting of identical instruments that continuously record the electrical components of the electromagnetic field, ranging from a few Hz to tens of kHz. These signals are analyzed in real time and their power spectrum contents and time/frequency data are available online. To date, specific interest has been devoted to searching for any possible electromagnetic features which correlate with seismic activity in the same region. In this study, spectral analysis has evidenced very distinct power spectrum signatures that increased in intensity when strong seismic activity occurred near the stations of the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. These signatures have revealed horizontally oriented electric fields, between 20 Hz to 400 Hz, lasting from several minutes to up to two hours. Their power intensities have been found to be about 1 μV/m. Moreover, a large number of man-made signals and meteorologic electric perturbations were recorded. Anthropogenic signatures have come from power line disturbances at 50 Hz and higher harmonics up to several kHz, while radio transmissions have influenced the higher kHz spectrum. Reception from low frequency transmitters is also provided in relation to seismic activity. Meteorologic signatures cover the lower frequency band through phenomena such as spherics, Schumann resonances and rain electrical perturbations. All of these phenomena are useful teaching tools for introducing students to this invisible electromagnetic world

  10. Active sensing associated with spatial learning reveals memory-based attention in an electric fish.

    PubMed

    Jun, James J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Active sensing behaviors reveal what an animal is attending to and how it changes with learning. Gymnotus sp, a gymnotiform weakly electric fish, generates an electric organ discharge (EOD) as discrete pulses to actively sense its surroundings. We monitored freely behaving gymnotid fish in a large dark "maze" and extracted their trajectories and EOD pulse pattern and rate while they learned to find food with electrically detectable landmarks as cues. After training, they more rapidly found food using shorter, more stereotyped trajectories and spent more time near the food location. We observed three forms of active sensing: sustained high EOD rates per unit distance (sampling density), transient large increases in EOD rate (E-scans) and stereotyped scanning movements (B-scans) were initially strong at landmarks and food, but, after learning, intensified only at the food location. During probe (no food) trials, after learning, the fish's search area and intense active sampling was still centered on the missing food location, but now also increased near landmarks. We hypothesize that active sensing is a behavioral manifestation of attention and essential for spatial learning; the fish use spatial memory of landmarks and path integration to reach the expected food location and confine their attention to this region. PMID:26961107

  11. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Are Different

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. P.; Scargle, J. D.; Bonnell, J. T.

    We analyze BATSE time-tagged event (TTE) data for short gamma-ray bursts (T 90 duration < 2.6 s), studying spectral lag vs. peak flux and duration, as well as the number of distinct pulse structures per burst. Performing the cross-correlation between two energy bands, we measure an average lag 20-40 x shorter than for long bursts, and a lag distribution close to symmetric about zero - unlike long bursts. Using a "Bayesian Block" method to identify significantly distinct pulse peaks, we find an order of magnitude fewer pulses than found in studies of long bursts. The disparity in lag magnitude is discontinuous across the 2-s valley between long and short bursts. Thus, short bursts do not appear to be representable as a continuation of long bursts' temporalc haracteristics.

  12. Cosmology: Home of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of fast radio bursts -- intense pulses of radio waves -- and their use as cosmic probes promises to be transformed now that one burst has been associated with a galaxy of known distance from Earth. See Letter p.453

  13. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  14. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity.

    PubMed

    Hull, Michael J; Soffe, Stephen R; Willshaw, David J; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  15. Large plasmaspheric electric fields at L approximately 2 measured by the S3-3 satellite during strong geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Pinto, O., Jr.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Mozer, F. S.

    1986-01-01

    Large plasmaspheric electric fields at L is approximately 2 measured by the S3-3 satellite during strong geomagnetic activity are reported. Since these measurements have amplitudes comparable to those of the local corotation electric field, during such events the plasmasphere is expected to get strongly altered event at such low L-values. Furthermore, those measurements could contribute to the understanding of the physics of the convection/electric field penetration to the low latitude plasmaphere as well as the disturbed dynamo, during strong geomagnetic activity. For this purpose, critical parameters related to geomagnetic activity are also presented for the reported electric field events.

  16. Progress in Written Language Bursts, Pauses, Transcription, and Written Composition across Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alves, Rui A.; Limpo, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Research on adult writers has shown that writing proceeds through bursts of transcription activity interspersed by long pauses. Yet few studies have examined how these writing behaviors unfold during early and middle childhood. This study traces the progress of bursts, pauses, transcription, and written composition in Portuguese students from…

  17. Active control of thermoacoustic amplification in a thermo-acousto-electric engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Come; Penelet, Guillaume; Poignand, Gaelle; Lotton, Pierrick

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a new approach is proposed to control the operation of a thermoacoustic Stirling electricity generator. This control basically consists in adding an additional acoustic source to the device, connected through a feedback loop to a reference microphone, a phase-shifter, and an audio amplifier. Experiments are performed to characterize the impact of the feedback loop (and especially that of the controlled phase-shift) on the overall efficiency of the thermal to electric energy conversion performed by the engine. It is demonstrated that this external forcing of thermoacoustic self-sustained oscillations strongly impacts the performance of the engine, and that it is possible under some circumstances to improve the efficiency of the thermo-electric transduction, compared to the one reached without active control. Applicability and further directions of investigation are also discussed.

  18. Application of electrical methods to measure microbial activity in soils: Preliminary microcosm results

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L. Sweet, A.; Majer, E.

    1997-12-01

    The application of the geophysical technique known as self-potential to the measurement of microbial activity was tested on laboratory microcosms containing ferric iron and iron-reducing bacteria Shewanella alga BrY. Measurements of the electrical response of silver-coated copper electrodes distributed along a Teflon probe inserted into sterile and inoculated layers containing either ferric chloride, ferric citrate, or ferric oxide rich soil were recorded over hours or days. Strong electrical signals reached values more negative than {minus}400 mV for all types of inoculated ferric iron layers. Electric signals in sterile control layers, by contrast, rarely reached values more negative than {minus}150 mV. These preliminary experiments indicate that it may be possible to apply the self-potential geophysical method to monitor bioremediation in the field.

  19. Electro-Active Device Using Radial Electric Field Piezo-Diaphragm for Control of Fluid Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fluid-control electro-active device includes a piezo-diaphragm made from a ferroelectric material sandwiched by first and second electrode patterns configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when voltage is applied thereto. The electric field originates at a region of the ferroelectric material between the first and second electrode patterns, and extends radially outward from this region of the ferroelectric material and substantially parallel to the plane of the ferroelectric material. The piezo-diaphragm deflects symmetrically about this region in a direction substantially perpendicular to the electric field. An annular region coupled to and extending radially outward from the piezo-diaphragm perimetrically borders the piezo-diaphragm, A housing is connected to the region and at least one fluid flow path with piezo-diaphragm disposed therein.

  20. Neuronal Networks during Burst Suppression as Revealed by Source Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reinicke, Christine; Moeller, Friederike; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Pressler, Ronit; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burst-suppression (BS) is an electroencephalography (EEG) pattern consisting of alternant periods of slow waves of high amplitude (burst) and periods of so called flat EEG (suppression). It is generally associated with coma of various etiologies (hypoxia, drug-related intoxication, hypothermia, and childhood encephalopathies, but also anesthesia). Animal studies suggest that both the cortex and the thalamus are involved in the generation of BS. However, very little is known about mechanisms of BS in humans. The aim of this study was to identify the neuronal network underlying both burst and suppression phases using source reconstruction and analysis of functional and effective connectivity in EEG. Material/Methods Dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) was applied to EEG segments of 13 neonates and infants with burst and suppression EEG pattern. The brain area with the strongest power in the analyzed frequency (1–4 Hz) range was defined as the reference region. DICS was used to compute the coherence between this reference region and the entire brain. The renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) was used to describe the informational flow between the identified sources. Results/Conclusion Delta activity during the burst phases was associated with coherent sources in the thalamus and brainstem as well as bilateral sources in cortical regions mainly frontal and parietal, whereas suppression phases were associated with coherent sources only in cortical regions. Results of the RPDC analyses showed an upwards informational flow from the brainstem towards the thalamus and from the thalamus to cortical regions, which was absent during the suppression phases. These findings may support the theory that a “cortical deafferentiation” between the cortex and sub-cortical structures exists especially in suppression phases compared to burst phases in burst suppression EEGs. Such a deafferentiation may play a role in the poor neurological outcome of children with these encephalopathies. PMID:25927439

  1. Fermi/GBM Observations of SGRJ0501 + 4516 Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas; Chaplin, Vandiver; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Bhat, Narayan; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels. Neil; Harding, Alice; Kaper, Lex; Kaspi, Victoria; Mcenery, Julie; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGRJ0501+4516, detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the 13 days of the source activation in 2008 (August 22 to September 3). We find that the T(sub 90) durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T(sub 90)s estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two black body functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E(sub peak) decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of approx. 30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10(exp -6)erg/sq cm/s, increasing steadily afterwards. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550 - 5418 and 1806 - 20. The isotropic luminosity, L(sub iso), corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4 - l.5 x 10(exp 40) erg/s.

  2. [Photon burst mass spectrometry technique.] Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank, W.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    The basic tools have been developed and demonstrated for selective detection of Kr isotopes in the Photon Burst Mass Spectrometry technique. The effort is divided into: photon burst measurements on Mg{sup +} demonstrating high isotopic selectivity, charge exchange of Kr{sup +} with Cs and Rb to produce metastable Kr atoms, development of a diode laser system for photon burst detection of Kr{sup +}, and measurements of photon bursts detection of Kr.

  3. The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    1998-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts remain on of the greatest mysteries in astrophysics in spite of recent observational advances and intense theoretical work. Although some of the basic properties of bursts were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory in the past five years. Recent observations of bursts and some proposed models will be discussed.

  4. Computationally efficient simulation of electrical activity at cell membranes interacting with self-generated and externally imposed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Toro, Andres; Neef, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Objective. We present a computational method that implements a reduced set of Maxwell's equations to allow simulation of cells under realistic conditions: sub-micron cell morphology, a conductive non-homogeneous space and various ion channel properties and distributions. Approach. While a reduced set of Maxwell's equations can be used to couple membrane currents to extra- and intracellular potentials, this approach is rarely taken, most likely because adequate computational tools are missing. By using these equations, and introducing an implicit solver, numerical stability is attained even with large time steps. The time steps are limited only by the time development of the membrane potentials. Main results. This method allows simulation times of tens of minutes instead of weeks, even for complex problems. The extracellular fields are accurately represented, including secondary fields, which originate at inhomogeneities of the extracellular space and can reach several millivolts. We present a set of instructive examples that show how this method can be used to obtain reference solutions for problems, which might not be accurately captured by the traditional approaches. This includes the simulation of realistic magnitudes of extracellular action potential signals in restricted extracellular space. Significance. The electric activity of neurons creates extracellular potentials. Recent findings show that these endogenous fields act back onto the neurons, contributing to the synchronization of population activity. The influence of endogenous fields is also relevant for understanding therapeutic approaches such as transcranial direct current, transcranial magnetic and deep brain stimulation. The mutual interaction between fields and membrane currents is not captured by today's concepts of cellular electrophysiology, including the commonly used activation function, as those concepts are based on isolated membranes in an infinite, isopotential extracellular space. The presented tool makes simulations with detailed morphology and implicit interactions of currents and fields available to the electrophysiology community.

  5. Initial Observations of Lightning and Electrical Activity from the 2008 Chaiten Eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rison, W.; Johnson, J. B.; Behnke, S. A.; Krehbiel, P. R.; McNutt, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    Spectacular photos of lightning during Chaiten's original paroxysm inspired us to install a local ground-based electrical monitoring array. Geography was especially well-suited to lightning detection from the island of Chiloe, where four stations were safely situated 70-110 km from the erupting volcano. All sites possessed line-of-sight view to the erupting vent and used precise signal arrival times to locate sources. At these distances we map electrical discharge with a horizontal resolution of tens to hundreds of meters and a vertical resolution of several kilometers. It provides a picture of electrical discharges from the charged particles (e.g., ash and volatiles) produced during the eruption. Our array is capable of providing continuous monitoring of electrical activity, and will be analyzed in conjunction with other monitoring tools (i.e., seismic and infrasound) to develop remote electrical activity monitoring as a proxy tool for monitoring eruption intensity. In addition to a time lapse camera, seismic, infrasound, and an electric field change detector were deployed and logged to IRIS PASSCAL dataloggers at our closest array site. Analysis of data from May 24 to July 3 shows discharges close to the volcanic vent lasting from a few to 20 ms. 3-D inversions were possible for about 55 hours of data and show horizontal lightning channels up to 8 km in length occasionally with branches. These flashes are much shorter then typical thunderstorm lightning, but form at a similar velocity, about 105 m/s. During these measurements the plume heights were about 4 km.

  6. Evidence of electrical activity on Titan drawn from the Schumann resonances sent by Huygens probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morente, Juan A.; Portí, Jorge A.; Salinas, Alfonso; Navarro, Enrique A.

    2008-06-01

    A procedure is shown for extracting weak resonances from the responses of electromagnetic systems excited by electric discharges. The procedure, based on analysis of the late-time system response, is first checked using an analytical function and later with the data for the electric field generated by the computational simulation of Titan's atmosphere using the Transmission Line Matrix (TLM) method. Finally, the low frequency spectrum of the natural electric field in Titan's atmosphere sent by the mutual impedance sensor (MIP) included in the Huygens probe is analyzed employing this technique. The MIP sensor was initially designed to measure the horizontal component of the electric field during a quiet descent. Fortunately, the swinging that occurred during the descent allowed the MIP to measure the radial component of the electric field mixed with the horizontal one. Application of the late-time analysis technique shown in this paper confirms the signature of lightning reported by preliminary data observations, bringing out the expected eigenfrequencies of the Titan-ionosphere electromagnetic cavity, known as Schumann resonances. These resonances are the resonant frequencies of the lower TM r (transverse magnetic to r) modes, which are quasi-transverse electromagnetic modes because they present vertical or radial components of the electric field two orders of magnitude higher than the associated horizontal, azimuthal and zenithal, components. The sequence of Schumann resonances is unique for each celestial body with an ionosphere, since these resonances are fully determined by the dimensions of the planet or satellite and the corresponding atmospheric conductivity profile. Detecting these frequencies in an atmosphere is clear proof of electrical activity, since it implies the existence of an electromagnetic-energy source, which is essential to create and maintain them.

  7. Light scattering and birefringence changes during activity in the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, L. B.; Hille, B.; Keynes, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    1. In an attempt to obtain information about structural changes related to electrical activity in Electrophorus electroplates, we have determined the size and time course of the changes in light scattering and in bire-fringence that occur during and after the discharge of the electric organ. 2. The changes in light intensity detected with a photomultiplier were never greater than 0·2% for a single discharge, and were often much smaller than this, but records with an acceptable ratio of signal to noise could be obtained by signal-averaging techniques. 3. A single stimulus led to a decrease, then an increase, and finally another decrease in the light scattered by slices of the main electric organ. These three phases were designated E1, E2 and E3. 4. E1 started at the beginning of the action potential, and its peak was reached at the same time as the completion of repolarization, even when the repolarization was delayed by cooling or hastened by drawing larger currents from the tissue. 5. E2 was proportional to the integral of the current flowing through the slice of electric organ, and may arise from the swelling and shrinking of the tubules that stud the faces of the electroplates. It developed within a millisecond or two of the start of an applied current, and lasted for about 100 msec. 6. E3 was a variable decrease in scattering that lasted for some seconds. 7. A stimulus also led to a transient increase in the birefringence of the electric organ. The optical change followed the change in electrical potential across the innervated faces of the electroplates with a delay of somewhat under 50 μsec. 8. This voltage-dependent change in birefringence may arise from a Kerr effect (electric birefringence) in the membrane or from compression of the membrane. PMID:5796473

  8. Active electrolocation of polarized objects by a pulse-discharging electric fish, Gnathonemus petersii.

    PubMed

    Avril, Alexis; Graff, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Weakly electric fish react to resistance and capacitance of objects that locally amplify and distort their self-generated Electric Organ Discharge (EOD) received by their skin receptors. The successive-layer structure of tissues gives certain biological materials a kind of electrical anisotropy. A polarized object, for instance, will conduct current differently in one versus the other direction. This diode-like electric anisotropy should make a significant difference to a Mormyrid who emits a directional, biphasic EOD and whose receptors are sensitive to EOD amplitude and distortion changes. The ability of Gnathonemus petersii (Mormyridae) to discriminate polarity was investigated on a virtual object by manipulating changes in a circuit comprised of diodes combined in various ways. The "novelty response," an increase in the discharge rate in response to perceived changes, was used to assess the fish's sensitivity. Indeed, G. petersii detects polarized objects and discriminates between polarity directions. However, the diode-like anisotropy entails a voltage threshold. Because voltage decreases with distance, and the EOD comprises opposite phases of different amplitudes, the active spaces of detection and discrimination are different and depend on the object orientation. Electric polarity thus extends the "palette" of dielectric properties used by this fish to evaluate object quality, direction, and distance. PMID:17968555

  9. Nighttime observations of thunderstorm electrical activity from a high altitude airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brook, M.; Vonnegut, B.; Orville, R. E.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Nocturnal thunderstorms were observed from above and features of cloud structure and lightning which are not generally visible from the ground are discussed. Most, lightning activity seems to be associated with clouds with strong convective cauliflower tops. In both of the storms lightning channels were visible in the clear air above the cloud. It is shown that substances produced by thunderstorm electrical discharges can be introduced directly into the stratosphere. The cause and nature of the discharges above the cloud are not clear. They may be produced by accumulations of space charge in the clear air above the cloud. The discharges may arise solely because of the intense electric fields produced by charges within the cloud. In the latter case the ions introduced by these discharges will increase the electrical conductivity of the air above the cloud and increase the conduction current that flows from the cloud to the electrosphere. More quantitative data at higher resolution may show significant spectral differences between cloud to ground and intracloud strokes. It is shown that electric field change data taken with an electric field change meter mounted in an airplane provide data on lightning discharges from above that are quite similar to those obtained from the ground in the past. The optical signals from dart leaders, from return strokes, and from continuing currents are recognizable, can be used to provide information on the fine structure of lightning, and can be used to distinguish between cloud to ground and intracloud flashes.

  10. Evaluation of precision estimates for fiber-dimensional and electrical hygrometers for water activity determinations.

    PubMed

    Stroup, W H; Peeler, J T; Smith, K

    1987-01-01

    The precision of instruments used in 3 collaborative studies conducted within the Food and Drug Administration over a 4-year period (1981, 1982, 1984) for water activity (aw) determinations according to the official AOAC method is evaluated. Calibration responses of the instruments were tested for linearity over the aw range from 0.75 to 0.97. Average absolute percent difference between predicted and assigned aw values for the linear model ranged from 0.3 to 0.7% for a fiber-dimensional hygrometer (Abbeon) and 3 electrical hygrometers (Beckman, Rotronics, and Weather Measure). The calibration responses for another electrical hygrometer (Hygrodynamics) were nonlinear. The fiber-dimensional hygrometer yielded mean aw values and precision estimates that did not differ significantly from those obtained with the electrical hygrometers for (NH4)2SO4slush, KNO3 slush, sweetened condensed milk, pancake syrup, and cheese spread. However, the mean aw value for a soy sauce was 0.838 for the electrical hygrometers compared with 0.911 for the fiber-dimensional hygrometer. The fiber-dimensional hygrometer was affected by a volatile component(s) in the soy sauce that caused an erroneously high aw value. Pooled estimates of reproducibility (Sx) in the 3 studies were 0.008 for the fiber-dimensional hygrometer and 0.010 for the electrical hygrometers; these values were not significantly different from those reported in the study that verified the current official AOAC method. PMID:3436906

  11. Simultaneous monitoring of electrical capacitance and water uptake activity of plant root system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseresnyés, Imre; Takács, Tünde; Füzy, Anna; Rajkai, Kálmán

    2014-10-01

    Pot experiments were designed to test the applicability of root electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of root water uptake activity by growing cucumber and bean cultivars in a growth chamber. Half of the plants were inoculated with Funneliformis mosseae arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, while the other half served as non-infected controls. Root electrical capacitance and daily transpiration were monitored during the whole plant ontogeny. Phenology-dependent changes of daily transpiration (related to root water uptake) and root electrical capacitance proved to be similar as they showed upward trends from seedling emergence to the beginning of flowering stage, and thereafter decreased continuously during fruit setting. A few days after arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-colonization, daily transpiration and root electrical capacitance of infected plants became significantly higher than those of non-infected counterparts, and the relative increment of the measured parameters was greater for the more highly mycorrhizal-dependent bean cultivar compared to that of cucumber. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization caused 29 and 69% relative increment in shoot dry mass for cucumbers and beans, respectively. Mycorrhization resulted in 37% increase in root dry mass for beans, but no significant difference was observed for cucumbers. Results indicate the potential of root electrical capacitance measurements for monitoring the changes and differences of root water uptake rate.

  12. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation

    PubMed Central

    Elijah, Daniel H.; Samengo, Inés; Montemurro, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here, we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of thalamic neurons. PMID:26441623

  13. Quantitative end qualitative analysis of the electrical activity of rectus abdominis muscle portions.

    PubMed

    Negrão Filho, R de Faria; Bérzin, F; Souza, G da Cunha

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the electrical behavior pattern of the Rectus abdominis muscle by qualitative and quantitative analysis of the electromyographic signal obtained from its superior, medium and inferior portions during dynamic and static activities. Ten voluntaries (aged X = 17.8 years, SD = 1.6) athletic males were studied without history of muscle skeletal disfunction. For the quantitative analysis the RMS (Root Mean Square) values obtained in the electromyographic signal during the isometric exercises were normalized and expressed in maximum voluntary isometric contraction percentages. For the qualitative analysis of the dynamic activity the electromyographic signal was processed by full-wave rectification, linear envelope and normalization (amplitude and time), so that the resulting curve of the processed signal was submitted to descriptive graphic analysis. The results of the quantitative study show that there is not a statistically significant difference among the portions of the muscle. Qualitative analysis demonstrated two aspects: the presence of a common activation electric pattern in the portions of Rectus abdominis muscle and the absence of significant difference in the inclination angles in the electrical activity curve during the isotonic exercises. PMID:12964259

  14. Sensing and control of electrical activity of neural networks in-situ grown on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veliev, Farida; Briançon-Marjollet, Anne; Kalita, Dipankar; Bourrier, Antoine; Bouchiat, Vincent; Delacour, Cécile

    2015-03-01

    Due to its outstanding properties graphene offers an ideal platform for sensing and culturing neural networks. Its biocompatible, soft, and chemically inert nature associated to the lack of dangling bonds offers novel perspectives for direct integration in bioelectronic probes. Moreover, the presence of readily accessible surface charges gives the unprecedented possibility to realize a strong electrical coupling with cells. However this intimate interfacing is in turn expected to induce a significant back-action on neural growth and activity. Here we show, the implementation of batches of liquid-gated graphene transistors integrated on silicon and glass, on which hippocampal neurons are directly grown, enabling the time-resolved recording of electrical activity emitted from the cells. Graphene detects neural signals with polarity and amplitude in accordance with tunable gain at given transistor working points. Time recordings reveal also that the neural activity is strongly influenced by the graphene transistor operation. The neuronal firing rates are shown to depend linearly with the AC transconductance of the sensing transistor. This study shows the impact of graphene on cells electrical activity and suggests that graphene can be used both to detect and excite the neurons.

  15. Reduction, Analysis, and Properties of Electric Current Systems in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Demoulin, Pascal

    1995-01-01

    The specific attraction and, in large part, the significance of solar vector magnetograms lie in the fact that they give the most important data on the electric currents and the nonpotentiality of active regions. Using the vector magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), we employ a unique technique in the area of data analysis for resolving the 180 degree ambiguity in order to calculate the spatial structure of the vertical electric current density. The 180 degree ambiguity is resolved by applying concepts from the nonlinear multivariable optimization theory. The technique is shown to be of particular importance in very nonpotential active regions. The characterization of the vertical electric current density for a set of vector magnetograms using this method then gives the spatial scale, locations, and magnitude of these current systems. The method, which employs an intermediate parametric function which covers the magnetogram and which defines the local "preferred" direction, minimizes a specific functional of the observed transverse magnetic field. The specific functional that is successful is the integral of the square of the vertical current density. We find that the vertical electric current densities have common characteristics for the extended bipolar beta gamma delta-regions studied. The largest current systems have j(sub z)'s which maximizes around 30 mA per square meter and have a linear decreasing distribution to a diameter of 30 Mm.

  16. Reduction, analysis, and properties of electric current systems in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Demoulin, Pascal

    1995-01-01

    The specific attraction and, in large part, the significance of solar magnetograms lie in the fact that they give the most important data on the electric currents and the nonpotentiality of active regions. Using the vector magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), we employ a unique technique in the area of data analysis for resolving the 180 deg ambiguity in order to calculate the spatial structure of the vertical electric current density. The 180 deg ambiguity is resolved by applying concepts from the nonlinear multivariable optimization theory. The technique is shown to be of particular importance in very nonpotential active regions. The characterization of the vertical electric current density for a set of vector magnetograms using this method then gives the spatial scale, locations, and magnitude of these current systems. The method, which employs an intermediate parametric function which covers the magnetogram and which defines the local `preferred' direction, minimizes a specific functional of the observed transverse magnetic field. The specific functional that is successful is the integral of the square of the vertical current density. We find that the vertical electric current densities have common characteristics for the extended bipolar (beta) (gamma) (delta)-regions studied. The largest current systems have j(sub z)'s which maximizes around 30 mA/sq m and have a linear decreasing distribution to a diameter of 30 Mn.

  17. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-04-01

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light-matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene-light interaction.

  18. System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasachar, Srivats; Benson, Steven; Crocker, Charlene; Mackenzie, Jill

    2011-07-19

    A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

  19. Mathematical model of the glucose-insulin regulatory system: From the bursting electrical activity in pancreatic β-cells to the glucose dynamics in the whole body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyungreem; Kang, Hyuk; Choi, M. Y.; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-10-01

    A theoretical approach to the glucose-insulin regulatory system is presented. By means of integrated mathematical modeling and extensive numerical simulations, we probe the cell-level dynamics of the membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells, together with the whole-body level glucose-insulin dynamics in the liver, brain, muscle, and adipose tissues. In particular, the three oscillatory modes of insulin secretion are reproduced successfully. Such comprehensive mathematical modeling may provide a theoretical basis for the simultaneous assessment of the β-cell function and insulin resistance in clinical examination.

  20. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total cardiac muscle activity was observed. The NURSE ECG seems to be a promising supplementary method in medical diagnosis. In particular it can be applied for qualification of patients for CABG operation and for verification of the operation effects.

  1. Analysis of bursting in a thalamic neuron model.

    PubMed

    Rush, M E; Rinzel, J

    1994-01-01

    We extend a quantitative model for low-voltage, slow-wave excitability based on the T-type calcium current (Wang et al. 1991) by juxtaposing it with a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model for fast sodium spiking in the high voltage regime to account for the distinct firing modes of thalamic neurons. We employ bifurcation analysis to illustrate the stimulus-response behavior of the full model under both voltage regimes. The model neuron shows continuous sodium spiking when depolarized sufficiently from rest. Depending on the parameters of calcium current inactivation, there are two types of low-voltage responses to a hyperpolarizing current step: a single rebound low threshold spike (LTS) upon release of the step and periodic LTSs. Bursting is seen as sodium spikes ride the LTS crest. In both cases, we analyze the LTS burst response by projecting its trajectory into a fast/slow phase plane. We also use phase plane methods to show that a potassium A-current shifts the threshold for sodium spikes, reducing the number of fast sodium spikes in an LTS burst. It can also annihilate periodic bursting. We extend the previous work of Rose and Hindmarsh (1989a-c) for a thalamic neuron and propose a simpler model for thalamic activity. We consider burst modulation by using a neuromodulator-dependent potassium leakage conductance as a control parameter. These results correspond with experiments showing that the application of certain neurotransmitters can switch firing modes. PMID:7948220

  2. Quantification of bursting and synchrony in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, Lawrence N; Emnett, Christine M; Mohan, Jayaram; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-08-01

    It is widely appreciated that neuronal networks exhibit patterns of bursting and synchrony that are not captured by simple measures such as average spike rate. These patterns can encode information or represent pathological behavior such as seizures. However, methods for quantifying bursting and synchrony are not agreed upon and can be confounded with spike rate measures. Previous validation has largely relied on in silico networks and single experimental conditions. How published measures of bursting and synchrony perform when applied to biological networks of varied average spike rate and subjected to varied experimental challenges is unclear. In multielectrode array recordings of network activity, we found that two mechanistically distinct drugs, cyclothiazide and bicuculline, produced equivalent increases in average spike rate but differed in bursting and synchrony. We applied several measures of bursting to the recordings (2 threshold interval methods and a surprise-based method) and found that a measure based on an average critical interval, adjusted for the array-wide spike rate, performed best in quantifying differential drug effects. To quantify synchrony, we compared a coefficient of variation-based measure, the recently proposed spike time tiling coefficient, the SPIKE-distance measure, and a global synchrony index. The spike time tiling coefficient, the SPIKE-distance measure, and the global synchrony index all captured a difference between drugs with the best performance exhibited by the global synchrony index. In summary, our exploration should aid other investigators by highlighting strengths and limitations of current methods. PMID:26041823

  3. An investigation of mechanisms other than lightning to explain certain wideband plasma wave bursts detected in the Venusian nightside ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Several related topics are briefly discussed. Reviewed here is work on an investigation of plasma wave phenomena associated with the question of lightning on Venus. The work supported the contention that lightning is at least a candidate explanation for many of the 100 Hz-only Pioneer Venus orbital electric field detector (OEFD) signals. A review of the work on the investigation of mechanisms other than lightning to explain certain wideband plasma wave bursts detected in the Venusian nightside ionosphere is given. A summary is given of our analysis of data from 23 OEFD observing periods as well as a discussion of the properties of specifically multifrequency events. Our opportunity to work on this topic was not sufficient to draw any firm conclusions about the origins of the multifrequency bursts, but we call attention to what we consider to be several candidate sources. Also discussed are case studies to test for evidence of whistler mode propagation from subionospheric sources, results of a search for dispersive effects in the OEFD data, the results for a search for simultaneous 100 Hz and 730 Hz observations at altitudes below 150 km, changes with altitude in dispersive broadening effects in the time signatures of 100 Hz bursts, and a survey of activity at altitudes above 1000 km.

  4. Anti-inflammatory properties of clovamide and Theobroma cacao phenolic extracts in human monocytes: evaluation of respiratory burst, cytokine release, NF-κB activation, and PPARγ modulation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawu; Locatelli, Monica; Bardelli, Claudio; Amoruso, Angela; Coisson, Jean Daniel; Travaglia, Fabiano; Arlorio, Marco; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2011-05-25

    There is a great interest in the potential health benefits of biologically active phenolic compounds in cocoa (Theobroma cacao) and dark chocolate. We investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of clovamide (a N-phenylpropenoyl-L-amino acid amide present in cocoa beans) and two phenolic extracts from unroasted and roasted cocoa beans, by evaluating superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production, cytokine release, and NF-κB activation in human monocytes stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The effects of rosmarinic acid are shown for comparison. Clovamide and rosmarinic acid inhibited PMA-induced O(2)(-) production and cytokine release (with a bell-shaped curve and maximal inhibition at 10-100 nM), as well as PMA-induced NF-κB activation; the two cocoa extracts were less effective. In all tests, clovamide was the most potent compound and also enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activity, which may exert anti-inflammatory effects. These findings indicate clovamide as a possible bioactive compound with anti-inflammatory activity in human cells. PMID:21486087

  5. Microstructural and electrical changes in nickel manganite powder induced by mechanical activation

    SciTech Connect

    Savic, S.M.; Mancic, L.; Stojanovic, G.; Brankovic, Z.; Aleksic, O.S.; Brankovic, G.

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} The influence of mechanical activation on microstructure evolution in the nickel manganite powder was investigated as well as electrical properties of the sintered samples. {yields} Structural refinement obtained by Topas-Academic software based on Rietveld analysis showed that the milling process remarkably changed the powder morphology and microstructure. {yields} SEM studies of sintered samples also revealed the strong influence of milling time on ceramics density (increases with milling time). {yields} The electrical properties of ceramic samples are clearly conditioned by terms of synthesis, in our case the time of mechanical activation. {yields} The highest density and higher values of dielectric constant were achieved at the sample activated for 45 min. -- Abstract: Nickel manganite powder synthesized by calcination of a stoichiometric mixture of manganese and nickel oxide was additionally mechanically activated in a high energy planetary ball mill for 5-60 min in order to obtain a pure NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase. The as-prepared powders were uniaxially pressed into disc shape pellets and then sintered for 60 min at 1200 {sup o}C. Changes in the particle morphology induced by mechanical activation were monitored using scanning electron microscopy, while changes in powder structural characteristics were followed using X-ray powder diffraction. The ac impedance spectroscopy was performed on sintered nickel m