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Sample records for buruli ulcer

  1. Environmental transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans drives dynamics of Buruli ulcer in endemic regions of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Texier, Gaëtan; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara; Bonds, Matthew H.; Guégan, Jean-François; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Buruli Ulcer is a devastating skin disease caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. Emergence and distribution of Buruli ulcer cases is clearly linked to aquatic ecosystems, but the specific route of transmission of M. ulcerans to humans remains unclear. Relying on the most detailed field data in space and time on M. ulcerans and Buruli ulcer available today, we assess the relative contribution of two potential transmission routes –environmental and water bug transmission– to the dynamics of Buruli ulcer in two endemic regions of Cameroon. The temporal dynamics of Buruli ulcer incidence are explained by estimating rates of different routes of transmission in mathematical models. Independently, we also estimate statistical models of the different transmission pathways on the spatial distribution of Buruli ulcer. The results of these two independent approaches are corroborative and suggest that environmental transmission pathways explain the temporal and spatial patterns of Buruli ulcer in our endemic areas better than the water bug transmission. PMID:26658922

  2. Environmental transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans drives dynamics of Buruli ulcer in endemic regions of Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Texier, Gaëtan; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara; Bonds, Matthew H.; Guégan, Jean-François; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Buruli Ulcer is a devastating skin disease caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans. Emergence and distribution of Buruli ulcer cases is clearly linked to aquatic ecosystems, but the specific route of transmission of M. ulcerans to humans remains unclear. Relying on the most detailed field data in space and time on M. ulcerans and Buruli ulcer available today, we assess the relative contribution of two potential transmission routes -environmental and water bug transmission- to the dynamics of Buruli ulcer in two endemic regions of Cameroon. The temporal dynamics of Buruli ulcer incidence are explained by estimating rates of different routes of transmission in mathematical models. Independently, we also estimate statistical models of the different transmission pathways on the spatial distribution of Buruli ulcer. The results of these two independent approaches are corroborative and suggest that environmental transmission pathways explain the temporal and spatial patterns of Buruli ulcer in our endemic areas better than the water bug transmission.

  3. The local immune response in ulcerative lesions of Buruli disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiszewski, A E; Becerril, E; Aguilar, L D; Kader, I T A; Myers, W; Portaels, F; Hernàndez Pando, R

    2006-01-01

    Buruli disease (BU) is a progressive necrotic and ulcerative disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU is considered the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. Three clinical stages of the cutaneous lesions have been described in BU: pre-ulcerative, ulcerative and healed lesions. In this study we used immunohistochemistry and automated morphometry to determine the percentage of macrophages and of CD4/CD8 lymphocytes and their expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Expression of these cytokines was correlated with the inflammatory response evaluated by histopathology. All the studied BU ulcerative cases showed extensive necrosis and chronic inflammation. The most important feature was the presence or absence of granulomas co-existing with a mixed pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. When granulomas were present significantly higher expression of IFN-γ was seen, whereas in ulcerative lesions without granulomas there was increased expression of IL-10 and significantly higher bacillary counts. These features correlated with the chronicity of the lesions; longer-lasting lesions showed granulomas. Thus, granulomas were absent from relatively early ulcerative lesions, which contained more bacilli and little IFN-γ, suggesting that at this stage of the disease strong suppression of the protective cellular immune response facilitates proliferation of bacilli. PMID:16487243

  4. Ecology and Transmission of Buruli Ulcer Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Richard W.; Walker, Edward D.; Small, Pamela L. C.; Wallace, John R.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Benbow, M. Eric; Boakye, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a neglected emerging disease that has recently been reported in some countries as the second most frequent mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis. Cases have been reported from at least 32 countries in Africa (mainly west), Australia, Southeast Asia, China, Central and South America, and the Western Pacific. Large lesions often result in scarring, contractual deformities, amputations, and disabilities, and in Africa, most cases of the disease occur in children between the ages of 4–15 years. This environmental mycobacterium, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is found in communities associated with rivers, swamps, wetlands, and human-linked changes in the aquatic environment, particularly those created as a result of environmental disturbance such as deforestation, dam construction, and agriculture. Buruli ulcer disease is often referred to as the “mysterious disease” because the mode of transmission remains unclear, although several hypotheses have been proposed. The above review reveals that various routes of transmission may occur, varying amongst epidemiological setting and geographic region, and that there may be some role for living agents as reservoirs and as vectors of M. ulcerans, in particular aquatic insects, adult mosquitoes or other biting arthropods. We discuss traditional and non-traditional methods for indicting the roles of living agents as biologically significant reservoirs and/or vectors of pathogens, and suggest an intellectual framework for establishing criteria for transmission. The application of these criteria to the transmission of M. ulcerans presents a significant challenge. PMID:21179505

  5. Metabolomic profiles delineate mycolactone signature in Buruli ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Niang, Fatoumata; Sarfo, Fred S.; Frimpong, Michael; Guenin-Macé, Laure; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Stinear, Timothy; Phillips, Richard O.; Demangel, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Infection of human skin with Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, is associated with the systemic diffusion of a bacterial macrolide named mycolactone. Patients with progressive disease show alterations in their serum proteome, likely reflecting the inhibition of secreted protein production by mycolactone at the cellular level. Here, we used semi-quantitative metabolomics to characterize metabolic perturbations in serum samples of infected individuals, and human cells exposed to mycolactone. Among the 430 metabolites profiled across 20 patients and 20 healthy endemic controls, there were significant differences in the serum levels of hexoses, steroid hormones, acylcarnitines, purine, heme, bile acids, riboflavin and lysolipids. In parallel, analysis of 292 metabolites in human T cells treated or not with mycolactone showed alterations in hexoses, lysolipids and purine catabolites. Together, these data demonstrate that M. ulcerans infection causes systemic perturbations in the serum metabolome that can be ascribed to mycolactone. Of particular importance to Buruli ulcer pathogenesis is that changes in blood sugar homeostasis in infected patients are mirrored by alterations in hexose metabolism in mycolactone-exposed cells. PMID:26634444

  6. Land Use, Water Quality, and Incidence of Buruli Ulcer in Gold-Mining Regions of Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagarty, J.; Voegborlo, R.; Smithwick, E. A.; Singha, K.

    2011-12-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, affects populations in many equatorial countries, predominantly in western Africa. Occurring in over thirty countries worldwide, it is the third most common Mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. The disease causes ulcerative lesions and can lead to severe deformity if untreated. While methods of treatment for Buruli ulcer are well known and have a high rate of success, the mode of transmission of Buruli ulcer remains elusive. Multiple hypotheses have been put forward in the search for the vector for this disease. Studies of Buruli ulcer to date seem to conclude that water is, in some way, closely related to the transmission of this disease. In particular, changes in water quality due to changes in land use may contribute to the emergence of Buruli ulcer. We hypothesize that stagnant pools, especially those with low dissolved oxygen and high metals, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentrations, will provide a favorable environment for M. ulcerans growth and transmission. To explore how climate, land use, and soil and water quality interact to create a favorable environment for Buruli ulcer emergence, we explore seasonal and annual variability in rainfall and temperature, land use, and physical and chemical properties of soil and water at five sites within the country: four in the southern part of the country (three Buruli-endemic communities and one control) and one non-endemic community in the north. The southern control accounts for differences between endemic and non-endemic communities with similar land uses and geological setting. The northern community has experienced massive floods in recent years, and we suspect that, due to this, Buruli ulcer may start to appear in the community. Results from groundwater data indicate that aquifer rock type does not strongly correlate with groundwater chemistry and that groundwater chemistry does not relate to incidence of Buruli ulcer

  7. Aquatic Invertebrates as Unlikely Vectors of Buruli Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather; Kimbirauskas, Ryan; McIntosh, Mollie D.; Kolar, Rebecca; Quaye, Charles; Akpabey, Felix; Boakye, D.; Small, Pam; Merritt, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and associated with exposure to aquatic habitats. To assess possible transmission of M. ulcerans by aquatic biting insects, we conducted a field examination of biting water bugs (Hemiptera: Naucoridae, Belostomatidae, Nepidae) in 15 disease-endemic and 12 non–disease-endemic areas of Ghana, Africa. From collections of 22,832 invertebrates, we compared composition, abundance, and associated M. ulcerans positivity among sites. Biting hemipterans were rare and represented a small percentage (usually <2%) of invertebrate communities. No significant differences were found in hemipteran abundance or pathogen positivity between disease-endemic and non–disease-endemic sites, and between abundance of biting hemipterans and M. ulcerans positivity. Therefore, although infection through insect bites is possible, little field evidence supports the assumption that biting hemipterans are primary vectors of M. ulcerans. PMID:18680648

  8. Aquatic invertebrates as unlikely vectors of Buruli ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Benbow, M Eric; Williamson, Heather; Kimbirauskas, Ryan; McIntosh, Mollie D; Kolar, Rebecca; Quaye, Charles; Akpabey, Felix; Boakye, D; Small, Pam; Merritt, Richard W

    2008-08-01

    Buruli ulcer is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and associated with exposure to aquatic habitats. To assess possible transmission of M. ulcerans by aquatic biting insects, we conducted a field examination of biting water bugs (Hemiptera: Naucoridae, Belostomatidae, Nepidae) in 15 disease-endemic and 12 non-disease-endemic areas of Ghana, Africa. From collections of 22,832 invertebrates, we compared composition, abundance, and associated M. ulcerans positivity among sites. Biting hemipterans were rare and represented a small percentage (usually <2%) of invertebrate communities. No significant differences were found in hemipteran abundance or pathogen positivity between disease-endemic and non-disease-endemic sites, and between abundance of biting hemipterans and M. ulcerans positivity. Therefore, although infection through insect bites is possible, little field evidence supports the assumption that biting hemipterans are primary vectors of M. ulcerans. PMID:18680648

  9. [Buruli ulcer: hypothetical modes of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, François

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, has been increasingly rapidly over the past thirty years, particularly in Africa. These extensive necrotic lesions are due to mycolactone, a toxin produced by the bacterium. The mode of Mycobacterium ulcerans transmission is still controversial, and several insect species have been incriminated. Several infected mosquito species have been identified in Australia, while predatory water bugs, particularly belostomatids and naucorids, have been implicated in Africa. Indeed, the bacterium has been detected in these insects' salivary glands, and experimental transmission to mice has been demonstrated, raising the possibility of human transmission by water bug bites. Interestingly, individuals highly exposed to water bug bites tend to be less often infected, indicating that frequent bites by non infected bugs might have a protective effect. Insect-borne transmission would be a minor route of transmission compared to direct transmission via skin trauma. PMID:23472356

  10. Multifocal Buruli Ulcer Associated with Secondary Infection in HIV Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Komenan, Kassi; Elidjé, Ecra J.; Ildevert, Gbery P.; Yao, Kouassi I.; Kanga, Kouame; Kouamé, Kouassi A.; Abdoulaye, Sangaré; Hamdam, Kourouma S.; Yao, Yoboué P.; Jean-Marie, Kanga

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a chronic and infectious skin disease, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. It leads to large skin ulceration and sometimes bone infection which is responsible for deformities. Here, we report a case of multifocal form of Buruli ulcer associated with secondary infection in a 46-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive woman. The antimycobacterial drugs combined to surgery allowed curing this multifocal case and rose up two relevant issues: the susceptibility of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) occurrence and Mycobacterium dissemination. The deep immune depression, the underline biological, and clinical disorders of the patient might contribute to IRIS occurrence and Buruli ulcer dissemination. Future investigations have to be conducted on the mechanism of IRIS on set and on Mycobacterium ulcerans dissemination after ARV drugs initiation and the patient related underline clinical or biological disorders. PMID:24454398

  11. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Arens, Nathalie; Wiedemann, Franz; Piten, Ebekalisaï; Kobara, Basile; Bauer, Malkin; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Badziklou, Kossi; Banla Kere, Abiba; Löscher, Thomas; Nitschke, Jörg; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success. Methodology/Principal Findings Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5%) were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9%) had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6%) had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P<0.01). Review of all BUD related documentation revealed major shortcomings, in particular concerning medical records on adjuvant surgical and physiotherapeutic treatment. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first systematic analysis of treatment outcome of BUD patients from Togo. Median times to healing and the absence of recurrences were in line with findings reported by other investigators. The percentage of functional limitations of 11.6% was lower than in other studies, and edema, category III ulcers, healing time >180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified

  12. Genetic Susceptibility and Predictors of Paradoxical Reactions in Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roch Christian; Phillips, Richard O.; van der Veer, Eveline; van Diemen, Cleo; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buruli ulcer (BU) is the third most frequent mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent persons after tuberculosis and leprosy. During the last decade, eight weeks of antimicrobial treatment has become the standard of care. This treatment may be accompanied by transient clinical deterioration, known as paradoxical reaction. We investigate the incidence and the risks factors associated with paradoxical reaction in BU. Methods The lesion size of participants was assessed by careful palpation and recorded by serial acetate sheet tracings. For every time point, surface area was compared with the previous assessment. All patients received antimicrobial treatment for 8 weeks. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the primary indicator of vitamin D status, was determined in duplex for blood samples at baseline by a radioimmunoassay. We genotyped four polymorphisms in the SLC11A1 gene, previously associated with susceptibility to BU. For testing the association of genetic variants with paradoxical responses, we used a binary logistic regression analysis with the occurrence of a paradoxical response as the dependent variable. Results Paradoxical reaction occurred in 22% of the patients; the reaction was significantly associated with trunk localization (p = .039 by Χ2), larger lesions (p = .021 by Χ2) and genetic factors. The polymorphisms 3’UTR TGTG ins/ins (OR 7.19, p < .001) had a higher risk for developing paradoxical reaction compared to ins/del or del/del polymorphisms. Conclusions Paradoxical reactions are common in BU. They are associated with trunk localization, larger lesions and polymorphisms in the SLC11A1 gene. PMID:27097163

  13. Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Glasner, Corinna; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Kotey, Nana Konama; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Rossen, John W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present study was therefore aimed at investigating the diversity and topography of S. aureus colonizing BU patients during treatment. Methodology We investigated the presence, diversity, and spatio-temporal distribution of S. aureus in 30 confirmed BU patients from Ghana during treatment. S. aureus was isolated from nose and wound swabs, and by replica plating of wound dressings collected bi-weekly from patients. S. aureus isolates were characterized by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat fingerprinting (MLVF) and spa-typing, and antibiotic susceptibility was tested. Principal Findings Nineteen (63%) of the 30 BU patients tested positive for S. aureus at least once during the sampling period, yielding 407 S. aureus isolates. Detailed analysis of 91 isolates grouped these isolates into 13 MLVF clusters and 13 spa-types. Five (26%) S. aureus-positive BU patients carried the same S. aureus genotype in their anterior nares and wounds. S. aureus isolates from the wounds of seven (37%) patients were distributed over two different MLVF clusters. Wounds of three (16%) patients were colonized with isolates belonging to two different genotypes at the same time, and five (26%) patients were colonized with different S. aureus types over time. Five (17%) of the 30 included BU patients tested positive for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusion/Significance The present study showed that the wounds of many BU patients were contaminated with S. aureus, and that many BU patients from the different communities carried the same S. aureus genotype during treatment. This calls for improved wound care and hygiene. PMID:25658641

  14. Assessment and Treatment of Pain during Treatment of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Barogui, Yves T.; Sopoh, Ghislain; Phillips, Richard O.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Loth, Susanne; Molenbuur, Bouwe; Plantinga, Mirjam; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is described as a relatively painless condition; however clinical observations reveal that patients do experience pain during their treatment. Knowledge on current pain assessment and treatment in BU is necessary to develop and implement a future guideline on pain management in BU. Methodology A mixed methods approach was used, consisting of information retrieved from medical records on prescribed pain medication from Ghana and Benin, and semi-structured interviews with health care personnel (HCP) from Ghana on pain perceptions, assessment and treatment. Medical records (n = 149) of patients treated between 2008 and 2012 were collected between November 2012 and August 2013. Interviews (n = 11) were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analyzed. Principal Findings In 113 (84%) of the 135 included records, pain medication, mostly simple analgesics, was prescribed. In 48% of the prescriptions, an indication was not documented. HCP reported that advanced BU could be painful, especially after wound care and after a skin graft. They reported not be trained in the assessment of mild pain. Pain recognition was perceived as difficult, as patients were said to suppress or to exaggerate pain, and to have different expectations regarding acceptable pain levels. HCP reported a fear of side effects of pain medication, shortage and irregularities in the supply of pain medication, and time constraints among medical doctors for pain management. Conclusions Professionals perceived BU disease as potentially painful, and predominantly focused on severe pain. Our study suggests that pain in BU deserves attention and should be integrated in current treatment. PMID:26402069

  15. Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Buruli Ulcer Endemic and Non-Endemic Aquatic Sites in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather R.; Benbow, Mark E.; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Beachboard, Dia C.; Kimbirauskas, Ryan K.; McIntosh, Mollie D.; Quaye, Charles; Ampadu, Edwin O.; Boakye, Daniel; Merritt, Richard W.; Small, Pamela L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, is an emerging environmental bacterium in Australia and West Africa. The primary risk factor associated with Buruli ulcer is proximity to slow moving water. Environmental constraints for disease are shown by the absence of infection in arid regions of infected countries. A particularly mysterious aspect of Buruli ulcer is the fact that endemic and non-endemic villages may be only a few kilometers apart within the same watershed. Recent studies suggest that aquatic invertebrate species may serve as reservoirs for M. ulcerans, although transmission pathways remain unknown. Systematic studies of the distribution of M. ulcerans in the environment using standard ecological methods have not been reported. Here we present results from the first study based on random sampling of endemic and non-endemic sites. In this study PCR-based methods, along with biofilm collections, have been used to map the presence of M. ulcerans within 26 aquatic sites in Ghana. Results suggest that M. ulcerans is present in both endemic and non-endemic sites and that variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) profiling can be used to follow chains of transmission from the environment to humans. Our results suggesting that the distribution of M. ulcerans is far broader than the distribution of human disease is characteristic of environmental pathogens. These findings imply that focal demography, along with patterns of human water contact, may play a major role in transmission of Buruli ulcer. PMID:18365034

  16. Help-Seeking for Pre-Ulcer and Ulcer Conditions of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease (Buruli Ulcer) in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ackumey, Mercy M.; Gyapong, Margaret; Pappoe, Matilda; Weiss, Mitchell G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined sociocultural features of help-seeking for Buruli ulcer–affected persons with pre-ulcers and ulcers in a disease-endemic area in Ghana. A sample of 181 respondents were purposively selected. Fisher's exact test was used to compare help-seeking variables for pre-ulcers and ulcers. Qualitative phenomenologic analysis of narratives clarified the meaning and content of selected quantitative help-seeking variables. For pre-ulcers, herbal dressings were used to expose necrotic tissues and subsequently applied as dressings for ulcers. Analgesics and left-over antibiotics were used to ease pain and reduce inflammation. Choices for outside-help were influenced by the perceived effectiveness of the treatment, the closeness of the provider to residences, and family and friends. Health education is required to emphasize the risk of self-medication with antibiotics and the importance of medical treatment for pre-ulcers, and to caution against the use of herbs to expose necrotic tissues, which could lead to co-infections. PMID:22144453

  17. Methods used in preclinical assessment of anti-Buruli ulcer agents: A global perspective.

    PubMed

    Tsouh, Patrick Valere Fokou; Addo, Phyllis; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is the third most common chronic mycobacterial infection in humans. Approximately 5000 cases are reported annually from at least 33 countries around the globe, especially in rural African communities. Even though anti-mycobacterial therapy is often effective for early nodular or ulcerative lesions, surgery is sometimes employed for aiding wound healing and correction of deformities. The usefulness of the antibiotherapy nonetheless is challenged by huge restrictive factors such as high cost, surgical scars and loss of income due to loss of man-hours, and in some instances employment. For these reasons, more effective and safer drugs are urgently needed, and research programs into alternative therapeutics including investigation of natural products should be encouraged. There is the need for appropriate susceptibility testing methods for the evaluation of potency. A number of biological assay methodologies are in current use, ranging from the classical agar and broth dilution assay formats, to radiorespirometric, dye-based, and fluorescent/luminescence reporter assays. Mice, rats, armadillo, guinea pigs, monkeys, grass cutters and lizards have been suggested as animal models for Buruli ulcer. This review presents an overview of in vitro and in vivo susceptibility testing methods developed so far for the determination of anti-Buruli ulcer activity of natural products and derivatives. PMID:25792087

  18. Treatment and prevention of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer) in Australia: guideline update.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel P; Jenkin, Grant; Buntine, John; Steffen, Christina M; McDonald, Anthony; Horne, Simon; Friedman, N Deborah; Athan, Eugene; Hughes, Andrew; Callan, Peter P; Johnson, Paul D R

    2014-03-17

    • Guidelines reflecting contemporary clinical practice in the management of Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans infection) in Australia were published in 2007. • Management has continued to evolve, as new evidence has become available from randomised trials, case series and increasing clinical experience with oral antibiotic therapy. • Therefore, guidelines on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Buruli ulcer in Australia have been updated. They include guidance on the new role of antibiotics as first-line therapy; the shortened duration of antibiotic treatment and the use of all-oral antibiotic regimens; the continued importance, timing and role of surgery; the recognition and management of paradoxical reactions during antibiotic treatment; and updates on the prevention of disease. PMID:24641151

  19. Survey of Water Bugs in Bankim, a New Buruli Ulcer Endemic Area in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Ebong, Solange Meyin A.; Eyangoh, Sara; Marion, Estelle; Landier, Jordi; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Legall, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and document their relative abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution. Collection of aquatic bugs was realized over a period of one month by daily direct capture in different aquatic environments (streams, ponds, and rivers) and through light traps at night. Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction. PMID:22666273

  20. Survey of water bugs in bankim, a new buruli ulcer endemic area in cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ebong, Solange Meyin A; Eyangoh, Sara; Marion, Estelle; Landier, Jordi; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Legall, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a debitliating human skin disease with an unknown transmission mode although epidemiological data link it with swampy areas. Data available suggest that aquatic insects play a role in the dissemination and/or transmission of this disease. However, their biodiversity and biology remain poorly documented. We conducted an entomological survey in Bankim, Cameroon, an area recently described as endemic for Buruli ulcer in order to identify the commonly occurring aquatic bugs and document their relative abundance, diversity, and spatial distribution. Collection of aquatic bugs was realized over a period of one month by daily direct capture in different aquatic environments (streams, ponds, and rivers) and through light traps at night. Globally, the data obtained showed the presence of five families (Belostomatidae, Naucoridae, Nepidae, Notonectidae, and Gerridae), their abundance, distribution and diversity varying according to the type of aquatic environments and light attraction. PMID:22666273

  1. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Hale, Laura P.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  2. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Hale, Laura P; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  3. Buruli Ulcer Disease in Travelers and Differentiation of Mycobacterium ulcerans Strains from Northern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Caroline J.; Globan, Maria; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Charles, Patrick G. P.; Jenkin, Grant A.; Ghosh, Niladri; Clark, Benjamin M.; Martinello, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing infection of skin and soft tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. In Australia, most cases of BU are linked to temperate, coastal Victoria and tropical, northern Queensland, and strains from these regions are distinguishable by variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing. We present an epidemiological investigation of five patients found to have been infected during interstate travel and describe two nucleotide polymorphisms that differentiate M. ulcerans strains from northern Australia. PMID:22875890

  4. Risk Factors for Buruli Ulcer: A Case Control Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Pouillot, Régis; Matias, Gonçalo; Wondje, Christelle Mbondji; Portaels, Françoise; Valin, Nadia; Ngos, François; Njikap, Adelaïde; Marsollier, Laurent; Fontanet, Arnaud; Eyangoh, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease involving the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease is associated with areas where the water is slow-flowing or stagnant. However, the exact mechanism of transmission of the bacillus and the development of the disease through human activities is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings A case-control study to identify Buruli ulcer risk factors in Cameroon compared case-patients with community-matched controls on one hand and family-matched controls on the other hand. Risk factors identified by the community-matched study (including 163 pairs) were: having a low level of education, swamp wading, wearing short, lower-body clothing while farming, living near a cocoa plantation or woods, using adhesive bandages when hurt, and using mosquito coils. Protective factors were: using bed nets, washing clothes, and using leaves as traditional treatment or rubbing alcohol when hurt. The family-matched study (including 118 pairs) corroborated the significance of education level, use of bed nets, and treatment with leaves. Conclusions/Significance Covering limbs during farming activities is confirmed as a protective factor guarding against Buruli ulcer disease, but newly identified factors including wound treatment and use of bed nets may provide new insight into the unknown mode of transmission of M. ulcerans or the development of the disease. PMID:18160977

  5. Buruli-Ulcer Induced Disability in Ghana: A Study at Apromase in the Ashanti Region

    PubMed Central

    Agbenorku, Pius; Edusei, Anthony; Agbenorku, Margaret; Diby, Thomas; Nyador, Esenam; Nyamuame, Geoffrey; Saunderson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To describe trends and category of disabilities caused by Buruli ulcer disease. Design. This retrospective study was set up to quantify information on the disability trends caused by Buruli ulcer (BU) using data on patients attending BU and chronic ulcer clinics from 2004 to 2009, at Global Evangelical Mission Hospital, Apromase. Methods. Data was retrieved from the WHO BU1 form, case registry book, surgical theatre register, and BU patients' records book of the hospital. Disability was measured as the incapability of patients to perform one or more daily activities due to his/her state of BU disease before treatment. Results. A total of 336 positive BU cases comprising 181 males (53.9%) were recorded of which 113 (33.6%) cases of disabilities were identified. A mean age of 52.5 (±1.32) years was recorded. For the trend of disabilities, the year 2009 recorded the highest (N = 34, 31.0%). The lesions were mostly located at the lower limbs (N = 65, 57.5%) region of the patients. Lesions with diameter >15 cm were the major (59.3%) category of lesions. Conclusion. Trend of disability reveals proportional increase over the years from 2004 to 2009. Contracture at the knee and ankle joints was the commonest disability recorded. PMID:22666574

  6. A Theoretical Model for the Transmission Dynamics of the Buruli Ulcer with Saturated Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bonyah, Ebenezer; Dontwi, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The management of the Buruli ulcer (BU) in Africa is often accompanied by limited resources, delays in treatment, and macilent capacity in medical facilities. These challenges limit the number of infected individuals that access medical facilities. While most of the mathematical models with treatment assume a treatment function proportional to the number of infected individuals, in settings with such limitations, this assumption may not be valid. To capture these challenges, a mathematical model of the Buruli ulcer with a saturated treatment function is developed and studied. The model is a coupled system of two submodels for the human population and the environment. We examine the stability of the submodels and carry out numerical simulations. The model analysis is carried out in terms of the reproduction number of the submodel of environmental dynamics. The dynamics of the human population submodel, are found to occur at the steady states of the submodel of environmental dynamics. Sensitivity analysis is carried out on the model parameters and it is observed that the BU epidemic is driven by the dynamics of the environment. The model suggests that more effort should be focused on environmental management. The paper is concluded by discussing the public implications of the results. PMID:25214885

  7. Impact of Mycobacterium ulcerans Biofilm on Transmissibility to Ecological Niches and Buruli Ulcer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mary; Korduláková, Jana; Tafelmeyer, Petra; Carbonnelle, Etienne; Aubry, Jacques; Milon, Geneviève; Legras, Pierre; André, Jean-Paul Saint; Leroy, Céline; Cottin, Jane; Guillou, Marie Laure Joly; Reysset, Gilles; Cole, Stewart T

    2007-01-01

    The role of biofilms in the pathogenesis of mycobacterial diseases remains largely unknown. Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, a disfiguring disease in humans, adopts a biofilm-like structure in vitro and in vivo, displaying an abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) that harbors vesicles. The composition and structure of the ECM differs from that of the classical matrix found in other bacterial biofilms. More than 80 proteins are present within this extracellular compartment and appear to be involved in stress responses, respiration, and intermediary metabolism. In addition to a large amount of carbohydrates and lipids, ECM is the reservoir of the polyketide toxin mycolactone, the sole virulence factor of M. ulcerans identified to date, and purified vesicles extracted from ECM are highly cytotoxic. ECM confers to the mycobacterium increased resistance to antimicrobial agents, and enhances colonization of insect vectors and mammalian hosts. The results of this study support a model whereby biofilm changes confer selective advantages to M. ulcerans in colonizing various ecological niches successfully, with repercussions for Buruli ulcer pathogenesis. PMID:17480118

  8. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Aboagye, Samuel Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Early diagnosis is crucial to prevent morbid effects and misuse of drugs. We review developments in laboratory diagnosis of BU, discuss limitations of available diagnostic methods, and give a perspective on the potential of using aptamers as point-of-care. Methods. Information for this review was searched through PubMed, web of knowledge, and identified data up to December 2015. References from relevant articles and reports from WHO Annual Meeting of the Global Buruli Ulcer initiative were also used. Finally, 59 articles were used. Results. The main laboratory methods for BU diagnosis are microscopy, culture, PCR, and histopathology. Microscopy and PCR are used routinely for diagnosis. PCR targeting IS2404 is the gold standard for laboratory confirmation. Culture remains the only method that detects viable bacilli, used for diagnosing relapse and accrued isolates for epidemiological investigation as well as monitoring drug resistance. Laboratory confirmation is done at centers distant from endemic communities reducing confirmation to a quality assurance. Conclusions. Current efforts aimed at developing point-of-care diagnostics are saddled with major drawbacks; we, however, postulate that selection of aptamers against MU target can be used as point of care. PMID:27413382

  9. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sakyi, Samuel A; Aboagye, Samuel Y; Darko Otchere, Isaac; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Early diagnosis is crucial to prevent morbid effects and misuse of drugs. We review developments in laboratory diagnosis of BU, discuss limitations of available diagnostic methods, and give a perspective on the potential of using aptamers as point-of-care. Methods. Information for this review was searched through PubMed, web of knowledge, and identified data up to December 2015. References from relevant articles and reports from WHO Annual Meeting of the Global Buruli Ulcer initiative were also used. Finally, 59 articles were used. Results. The main laboratory methods for BU diagnosis are microscopy, culture, PCR, and histopathology. Microscopy and PCR are used routinely for diagnosis. PCR targeting IS2404 is the gold standard for laboratory confirmation. Culture remains the only method that detects viable bacilli, used for diagnosing relapse and accrued isolates for epidemiological investigation as well as monitoring drug resistance. Laboratory confirmation is done at centers distant from endemic communities reducing confirmation to a quality assurance. Conclusions. Current efforts aimed at developing point-of-care diagnostics are saddled with major drawbacks; we, however, postulate that selection of aptamers against MU target can be used as point of care. PMID:27413382

  10. Amoebae as Potential Environmental Hosts for Mycobacterium ulcerans and Other Mycobacteria, but Doubtful Actors in Buruli Ulcer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Gryseels, Sophie; Amissah, Diana; Durnez, Lies; Vandelannoote, Koen; Leirs, Herwig; De Jonckheere, Johan; Portaels, Françoise; Ablordey, Anthony; Eddyani, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Background The reservoir and mode of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, remain unknown. Ecological, genetic and epidemiological information nonetheless suggests that M. ulcerans may reside in aquatic protozoa. Methodology/Principal Findings We experimentally infected Acanthamoeba polyphaga with M. ulcerans and found that the bacilli were phagocytised, not digested and remained viable for the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, we collected 13 water, 90 biofilm and 45 detritus samples in both Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities in Ghana, from which we cultivated amoeboid protozoa and mycobacteria. M. ulcerans was not isolated, but other mycobacteria were as frequently isolated from intracellular as from extracellular sources, suggesting that they commonly infect amoebae in nature. We screened the samples as well as the amoeba cultures for the M. ulcerans markers IS2404, IS2606 and KR-B. IS2404 was detected in 2% of the environmental samples and in 4% of the amoeba cultures. The IS2404 positive amoeba cultures included up to 5 different protozoan species, and originated both from Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of experimental infection of amoebae with M. ulcerans and of the detection of the marker IS2404 in amoeba cultures isolated from the environment. We conclude that amoeba are potential natural hosts for M. ulcerans, yet remain sceptical about their implication in the transmission of M. ulcerans to humans and their importance in the epidemiology of Buruli ulcer. PMID:22880141

  11. The Application of Modern Dressings to Buruli Ulcers: Results from a Pilot Implementation Project in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Velding, Kristien; Klis, Sandor-Adrian; Abass, K Mohammad; van der Werf, Tjip S; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2016-07-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a tropical, infectious skin disease. The resulting ulcer can take a long time to heal, and a high standard of wound care is essential. Currently, the only dressing used for BU wound care is gauze, and its removal causes pain and bleeding. We performed a pilot implementation project using HydroTac(®) (HARTMANN, Heidenheim, Germany), a modern dressing combining foam with a hydrogel component. For future BU treatment, we recommend to use a more absorbent dressing than the HydroTac dressing used in the current project. However, we show that modern dressings can be applied to BUs and that HydroTac dressings yield clean, healing wounds, and prevent the pain and bleeding associated with gauze dressings. Wound care is a vital but to date neglected aspect of BU management. PMID:27162271

  12. A statistical model for spatial patterns of Buruli ulcer in the Amansie West district, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duker, Alfred A.; Stein, Alfred; Hale, Martin

    2006-06-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), a skin ulceration caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is the second most widespread mycobacterium infection in Ghana. Its infection pathway is possibly related to the potable and agricultural water supply. This study aims to identify environmental factors that influence infection in a part of Ghana. It examines the significance of contaminated surface drainage channels and groundwater using conditional autoregressive (CAR) statistical modelling. This type of modelling implies that the spatial pattern of BU incidence in one community depends on the influence of the environment in neighbouring communities. Covariates were included to assess the spatial relationship between environmental risk factors and BU incidence in the study area. The study reveals an association between (a) the mean As content of soil and spatial distribution of BU and (b) the distance to sites of gold mining and spatial distribution of BU. We conclude that both arsenic in the natural environment and gold mining influence BU infection.

  13. Contribution of the Community Health Volunteers in the Control of Buruli Ulcer in Bénin

    PubMed Central

    Barogui, Yves Thierry; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Johnson, Roch Christian; de Zeeuw, Janine; Dossou, Ange Dodji; Houezo, Jean Gabin; Chauty, Annick; Aguiar, Julia; Agossadou, Didier; Edorh, Patrick A.; Asiedu, Kingsley; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Usually BU begins as a painless nodule, plaque or edema, ultimately developing into an ulcer. The high number of patients presenting with ulcers in an advanced stage is striking. Such late presentation will complicate treatment and have long-term disabilities as a consequence. The disease is mainly endemic in West Africa. The primary strategy for control of this disease is early detection using community village volunteers. Methodology/Principal Findings In this retrospective, observational study, information regarding Buruli ulcer patients that reported to one of the four BU centers in Bénin between January 2008 and December 2010 was collected using the WHO/BU01 forms. Information used from these forms included general characteristics of the patient, the results of diagnostic tests, the presence of functional limitations at start of treatment, lesion size, patient delay and the referral system. The role of the different referral systems on the stage of disease at presentation in the hospital was analyzed by a logistic regression analysis. About a quarter of the patients (26.5%) were referred to the hospital by the community health volunteers. In our data set, patients referred to the hospital by community health volunteers appeared to be in an earlier stage of disease than patients referred by other methods, but after adjustment by the regression analysis for the health center, this effect could no longer be seen. The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for IS2404 positivity rate among patients referred by the community health volunteers was not systematically lower than in patients referred by other systems. Conclusions/Significance This study clarifies the role played by community health volunteers in Bénin, and shows that they play an important role in the control of BU. PMID:25275562

  14. Mycobacterium ulcerans in Mosquitoes Captured during Outbreak of Buruli Ulcer, Southeastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Azuolas, Joseph; Lavender, Caroline J.; Wishart, Elwyn; Stinear, Timothy P.; Hayman, John A.; Brown, Lynne; Jenkin, Grant A.; Fyfe, Janet A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) occurs in >30 countries. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is acquired from the environment, but the exact mode of transmission is unknown. We investigated an outbreak of BU in a small coastal town in southeastern Australia and screened by PCR mosquitoes caught there. All cases of BU were confirmed by culture or PCR. Mosquitoes were trapped in multiple locations during a 26-month period. BU developed in 48 residents of Point Lonsdale/Queenscliff and 31 visitors from January 2001 through April 2007. We tested 11,504 mosquitoes trapped at Point Lonsdale (predominantly Aedes camptorhynchus). Forty-eight pools (5 species) were positive for insertion sequence IS2404 (maximum likelihood estimate 4.3/1,000), and we confirmed the presence of M. ulcerans in a subset of pools by detection of 3 additional PCR targets. PMID:18217547

  15. Selamectin Is the Avermectin with the Best Potential for Buruli Ulcer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Nicole; Pluschke, Gerd; Thompson, Charles J.; Ramón-García, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis was done to evaluate the potential use of anti-parasitic macrocyclic lactones (including avermectins and milbemycins) for Buruli ulcer (BU) therapy. A panel containing nearly all macrocyclic lactones used in human or in veterinary medicine was analyzed for activity in vitro against clinical isolates of Mycobacterium ulcerans. Milbemycin oxime and selamectin were the most active drugs against M. ulcerans with MIC values from 2 to 8 μg/mL and 2 to 4 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, ivermectin and moxidectin, which are both in clinical use, showed no significant activity (MIC> 32 μg/mL). Time-kill kinetic assays showed bactericidal activity of selamectin and in vitro pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated exposure-dependent activity. These data together with analyses of published pharmacokinetic information strongly suggest that selamectin is the most promising macrocyclic lactone for BU treatment. PMID:26270480

  16. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Transmitted between Patients with Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Ablordey, Anthony; Sabat, Artur J.; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The wounds of most BU patients are colonized with different microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. Methodology This study investigated possible patient-to-patient transmission events of S. aureus during wound care in a health care center. S. aureus isolates from different BU patients with overlapping visits to the clinic were whole-genome sequenced and analyzed by a gene-by-gene approach using SeqSphere+ software. In addition, sequence data were screened for the presence of genes that conferred antibiotic resistance. Principal Findings SeqSphere+ analysis of whole-genome sequence data confirmed transmission of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin susceptible S. aureus among patients that took place during wound care. Interestingly, our sequence data show that the investigated MRSA isolates carry a novel allele of the fexB gene conferring chloramphenicol resistance, which had thus far not been observed in S. aureus. PMID:26360794

  17. Situated knowledge of pathogenic landscapes in Ghana: Understanding the emergence of Buruli ulcer through qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Tschakert, Petra; Ricciardi, Vincent; Smithwick, Erica; Machado, Mario; Ferring, David; Hausermann, Heidi; Bug, Leah

    2016-02-01

    Successfully addressing neglected tropical diseases requires nuanced understandings of pathogenic landscapes that incorporate situated, contexualized community knowledge. In the case of Buruli ulcer (BU), the role of social science is vital to investigate complex human-environment interactions and navigate different ways of knowing. We analyze a set of qualitative data from our interdisciplinary project on BU in Ghana, drawing from participatory mapping, focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews, and open-ended survey questions to explore how people in endemic and non-endemic areas see themselves embedded in changing environmental and social landscapes. We pay particular attention to landscape disturbance through logging and small-scale alluvial gold mining. The results from our participatory research underscore the holistic nature of BU emergence in landscapes, encapsulated in partial and incomplete local descriptions, the relevance of collective learning to distill complexity, and the potential of rich qualitative data to inform quantitative landscape-disease models. PMID:26761375

  18. Spatial Analysis of Anthropogenic Landscape Disturbance and Buruli Ulcer Disease in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lindsay P.; Finley, Andrew O.; Benbow, M. Eric; Gronseth, Jenni; Small, Pamela; Johnson, Roch Christian; Sopoh, Ghislain E.; Merritt, Richard M.; Williamson, Heather; Qi, Jiaguo

    2015-01-01

    Background Land use and land cover (LULC) change is one anthropogenic disturbance linked to infectious disease emergence. Current research has focused largely on wildlife and vector-borne zoonotic diseases, neglecting to investigate landscape disturbance and environmental bacterial infections. One example is Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, a necrotizing skin disease caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU). Empirical and anecdotal observations have linked BU incidence to landscape disturbance, but potential relationships have not been quantified as they relate to land cover configurations. Methodology/Principal Findings A landscape ecological approach utilizing Bayesian hierarchical models with spatial random effects was used to test study hypotheses that land cover configurations indicative of anthropogenic disturbance were related to Buruli ulcer (BU) disease in southern Benin, and that a spatial structure existed for drivers of BU case distribution in the region. A final objective was to generate a continuous, risk map across the study region. Results suggested that villages surrounded by naturally shaped, or undisturbed rather than disturbed, wetland patches at a distance within 1200m were at a higher risk for BU, and study outcomes supported the hypothesis that a spatial structure exists for the drivers behind BU risk in the region. The risk surface corresponded to known BU endemicity in Benin and identified moderate risk areas within the boundary of Togo. Conclusions/Significance This study was a first attempt to link land cover configurations representative of anthropogenic disturbances to BU prevalence. Study results identified several significant variables, including the presence of natural wetland areas, warranting future investigations into these factors at additional spatial and temporal scales. A major contribution of this study included the incorporation of a spatial modeling component that predicted BU rates to new locations

  19. Secondary Buruli Ulcer Skin Lesions Emerging Several Months after Completion of Chemotherapy: Paradoxical Reaction or Evidence for Immune Protection?

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Chauty, Annick; Adeye, Ambroise; Ardant, Marie-Françoise; Koussemou, Hugues; Johnson, Roch Christian; Pluschke, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Background The neglected tropical disease Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is an infection of the subcutaneous tissue leading to chronic ulcerative skin lesions. Histopathological features are progressive tissue necrosis, extracellular clusters of acid fast bacilli (AFB) and poor inflammatory responses at the site of infection. After the recommended eight weeks standard treatment with rifampicin and streptomycin, a reversal of the local immunosuppression caused by the macrolide toxin mycolactone of M. ulcerans is observed. Methodology/Principal Findings We have conducted a detailed histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of tissue specimens from two patients developing multiple new skin lesions 12 to 409 days after completion of antibiotic treatment. Lesions exhibited characteristic histopathological hallmarks of Buruli ulcer and AFB with degenerated appearance were found in several of them. However, other than in active disease, lesions contained massive leukocyte infiltrates including large B-cell clusters, as typically found in cured lesions. Conclusion/Significance Our histopathological findings demonstrate that the skin lesions emerging several months after completion of antibiotic treatment were associated with M. ulcerans infection. During antibiotic therapy of Buruli ulcer development of new skin lesions may be caused by immune response-mediated paradoxical reactions. These seem to be triggered by mycobacterial antigens and immunostimulators released from clinically unrecognized bacterial foci. However, in particular the lesions that appeared more than one year after completion of antibiotic treatment may have been associated with new infection foci resolved by immune responses primed by the successful treatment of the initial lesion. PMID:21829740

  20. Treating Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer): from surgery to antibiotics, is the pill mightier than the knife?

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Paul J; Nuermberger, Eric L; Almeida, Deepak V; Grosset, Jacques H

    2011-01-01

    Until 2004, the skin disease known as Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, could only be treated by surgery and skin grafting. Although this worked reasonably well on early lesions typically found in patients in Australia, the strategy was usually impractical on large lesions resulting from diagnostic delay in patients in rural West Africa. Based on promising preclinical studies, treatment trials in West Africa have shown that a combination of rifampin and streptomycin administered daily for 8 weeks can kill M. ulcerans bacilli, arrest the disease, and promote healing without relapse or reduce the extent of surgical excision. Improved treatment options are the focus of research that has increased tremendously since the WHO began its Global Buruli Ulcer Initiative in 1998. PMID:22004037

  1. Combined Inflammatory and Metabolic Defects Reflected by Reduced Serum Protein Levels in Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Jordi; Oldenburg, Reid; Frimpong, Michael; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Abass, Kabiru; Thompson, William; Forson, Mark; Fontanet, Arnaud; Niang, Fatoumata; Demangel, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is spreading in tropical countries, with major public health and economic implications in West Africa. Multi-analyte profiling of serum proteins in patients and endemic controls revealed that Buruli ulcer disease down-regulates the circulating levels of a large array of inflammatory mediators, without impacting on the leukocyte composition of peripheral blood. Notably, several proteins contributing to acute phase reaction, lipid metabolism, coagulation and tissue remodelling were also impacted. Their down-regulation was selective and persisted after the elimination of bacteria with antibiotic therapy. It involved proteins with various functions and origins, suggesting that M. ulcerans infection causes global and chronic defects in the host's protein metabolism. Accordingly, patients had reduced levels of total serum proteins and blood urea, in the absence of signs of malnutrition, or functional failure of liver or kidney. Interestingly, slow healers had deeper metabolic and coagulation defects at the start of antibiotic therapy. In addition to providing novel insight into Buruli ulcer pathogenesis, our study therefore identifies a unique proteomic signature for this disease. PMID:24722524

  2. Genetic Variation in Autophagy-Related Genes Influences the Risk and Phenotype of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Capela, Carlos; Dossou, Ange Dodji; Silva-Gomes, Rita; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Makoutode, Michel; Menino, João Filipe; Fraga, Alexandra Gabriel; Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Rodrigues, Fernando; Pedrosa, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buruli ulcer (BU) is a severe necrotizing human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Clinically, presentation is a sum of these diverse pathogenic hits subjected to critical immune-regulatory mechanisms. Among them, autophagy has been demonstrated as a cellular process of critical importance. Since microtubules and dynein are affected by mycolactone, the critical pathogenic exotoxin produced by M. ulcerans, cytoskeleton-related changes might potentially impair the autophagic process and impact the risk and progression of infection. Objective Genetic variants in the autophagy-related genes NOD2, PARK2 and ATG16L1 has been associated with susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. Here, we investigated their association with BU risk, its severe phenotypes and its progression to an ulcerative form. Methods Genetic variants were genotyped using KASPar chemistry in 208 BU patients (70.2% with an ulcerative form and 28% in severe WHO category 3 phenotype) and 300 healthy endemic controls. Results The rs1333955 SNP in PARK2 was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to BU [odds ratio (OR), 1.43; P = 0.05]. In addition, both the rs9302752 and rs2066842 SNPs in NOD2 gee significantly increased the predisposition of patients to develop category 3 (OR, 2.23; P = 0.02; and OR 12.7; P = 0.03, respectively, whereas the rs2241880 SNP in ATG16L1 was found to significantly protect patients from presenting the ulcer phenotype (OR, 0.35; P = 0.02). Conclusion Our findings indicate that specific genetic variants in autophagy-related genes influence susceptibility to the development of BU and its progression to severe phenotypes. PMID:27128681

  3. Secondary Bacterial Infections of Buruli Ulcer Lesions Before and After Chemotherapy with Streptomycin and Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Kpeli, Grace S.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Asan-Ampah, Kobina; Quenin-Fosu, Kwabena; Owusu-Mireku, Evelyn; Paintsil, Albert; Lamptey, Isaac; Anku, Benjamin; Kwakye-Maclean, Cynthia; Newman, Mercy; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a chronic necrotizing skin disease. It usually starts with a subcutaneous nodule or plaque containing large clusters of extracellular acid-fast bacilli. Surrounding tissue is destroyed by the cytotoxic macrolide toxin mycolactone produced by microcolonies of M. ulcerans. Skin covering the destroyed subcutaneous fat and soft tissue may eventually break down leading to the formation of large ulcers that progress, if untreated, over months and years. Here we have analyzed the bacterial flora of BU lesions of three different groups of patients before, during and after daily treatment with streptomycin and rifampicin for eight weeks (SR8) and determined drug resistance of the bacteria isolated from the lesions. Before SR8 treatment, more than 60% of the examined BU lesions were infected with other bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most prominent ones. During treatment, 65% of all lesions were still infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa. After completion of SR8 treatment, still more than 75% of lesions clinically suspected to be infected were microbiologically confirmed as infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa or Proteus miriabilis. Drug susceptibility tests revealed especially for S. aureus a high frequency of resistance to the first line drugs used in Ghana. Our results show that secondary infection of BU lesions is common. This could lead to delayed healing and should therefore be further investigated. PMID:23658847

  4. Enhancing Buruli ulcer control in Ghana through social interventions: a case study from the Obom sub-district

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is considered a re-emerging disease in West Africa where it has suffered neglect over the years, though children below the age of 16 years are the worst affected in most endemic regions. Due to delayed health seeking, the disease leads to disabilities resulting from amputation and loss of vital organs like the eye leading to school dropout and other social and economic consequences for the affected family. Early treatment with antibiotics is effective; however, this involves daily oral and intramuscular injection at distant health facilities for 56 days making it a challenge among poor rural folks living on daily subsistence work. The mode of transmission of Buruli ulcer is not known and there is no effective preventive vaccine for Buruli ulcer. Thus the only effective control tool is early case detection and treatment to reduce morbidity and associated disabilities that occurs as a result of late treatment. It is therefore essential to implement interventions that remove impediments that limit early case detection; access to early effective treatment and this paper reports one such effort where the feasibility of social interventions to enhance Buruli ulcer control was assessed. Methods This was a qualitative study using in-depth interviews to generate information to ascertain the benefit or otherwise of the intervention implemented. Clinical records of patients to generate data to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of social interventions in the fight against Buruli ulcer was examined. In all, 56 in-depth interviews (28 at baseline and 28 at evaluation) were conducted for this report. Results At full implementation, treatment default and dropout reduced significantly from 58.8% and 52.9% at baseline to 1.5% and 1.5% respectively. The number of early case detection went up significantly. Affected families were happy with social interventions such as provision of transportation and breakfast to patients on daily basis. Families were

  5. Spatial Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Buruli Ulcer Lesions: Implications for Laboratory Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bolz, Miriam; Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F.; Bratschi, Martin W.; Sopho, Ghislain Emmanuel; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Um Boock, Alphonse; Junghanss, Thomas; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Background Current laboratory diagnosis of Buruli ulcer (BU) is based on microscopic detection of acid fast bacilli, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), histopathology or cultivation. Insertion sequence (IS) 2404 qPCR, the most sensitive method, is usually only available at reference laboratories. The only currently available point-of-care test, microscopic detection of acid fast bacilli (AFB), has limited sensitivity and specificity. Methodology/ Principal Findings Here we analyzed AFB positive tissue samples (n = 83) for the presence, distribution and amount of AFB. AFB were nearly exclusively present in the subcutis with large extracellular clusters being most frequently (67%) found in plaque lesions. In ulcerative lesions small clusters and dispersed AFB were more common. Beside this, 151 swab samples from 37 BU patients were analyzed by IS2404 qPCR and ZN staining in parallel. The amount of M. ulcerans DNA in extracts from swabs correlated well with the probability of finding AFB in direct smear microscopy, with 56.1% of the samples being positive in both methods and 43.9% being positive only in qPCR. By analyzing three swabs per patient instead of one, the probability to have at least one positive swab increased from 80.2% to 97.1% for qPCR and from 45% to 66.1% for AFB smear examination. Conclusion / Significance Our data show that M. ulcerans bacteria are primarily located in the subcutis of BU lesions, making the retrieval of the deep subcutis mandatory for examination of tissue samples for AFB. When laboratory diagnosis is based on the recommended less invasive collection of swab samples, analysis of three swabs from different areas of ulcerative lesions instead of one increases the sensitivity of both qPCR and of smear microscopy substantially. PMID:27253422

  6. Illness meanings and experiences for pre-ulcer and ulcer conditions of Buruli ulcer in the Ga-West and Ga-South Municipalities of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ghana is a Buruli ulcer (BU) endemic country yet there is paucity of socio-cultural research on BU. Examining distinctive experiences and meanings for pre-ulcers and ulcers of BU may clarify the disease burden, illness experience and local perceptions of causes and spread, and environmental features of BU, which are useful to guide public health programmes and future research. This study aimed to explain local meanings and experiences of BU for persons with pre-ulcers and ulcers in the Ga-West and Ga-South municipalities in Accra. Methods Semi-structured interviews based on the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue framework were administered to 181 respondents comprising 15 respondents with pre-ulcers and 166 respondents with ulcers. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare categories of illness experiences (PD) and perceived causes (PC) among respondents with pre-ulcer and ulcer conditions. The Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the most troubling PD and the most important PC variables. Qualitative phenomenological analysis of respondents’ narratives clarified illness experiences and meanings with reference to PC and PD variables. Results Families of respondents with pre-ulcers and the respondents themselves were often anxious about disease progression, while families of respondents with ulcers, who had to give care, worried about income loss and disruption of school attendance. Respondents with pre-ulcers frequently reported swimming in ponds and rivers as a perceived cause and considered it as the most important PC (53.3%). Respondents with ulcers frequently attributed their BU illness to witchcraft (64.5%) and respondents who claimed they had no water contact, questioned the credibility of health messages Conclusions Affected persons with pre-ulcers are likely to delay treatment because of social and financial constraints and the absence of pain. Scepticism on the role of water in disease contagion and prolonged healing is perceived

  7. Socio-cultural determinants of timely and delayed treatment of Buruli ulcer: Implications for disease control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Public health programmes recommend timely medical treatment for Buruli ulcer (BU) infection to prevent pre-ulcer conditions from progressing to ulcers, to minimise surgery, disabilities and the socio-economic impact of BU. Clarifying the role of socio-cultural determinants of timely medical treatment may assist in guiding public health programmes to improve treatment outcomes. This study clarified the role of socio-cultural determinants and health system factors affecting timely medical treatment for BU in an endemic area in Ghana. Methods A semi-structured explanatory model interview based on the explanatory model interview catalogue (EMIC) was administered to 178 BU-affected persons. Based on research evidence, respondents were classified as timely treatment (use of medical treatment 3 months from awareness of disease) and delayed treatment (medical treatment 3 months after onset of disease and failure to use medical treatment). The outcome variable, timely treatment was analysed with cultural epidemiological variables for categories of distress, perceived causes of BU, outside-help and reasons for medical treatment in logistic regression models. The median time for the onset of symptoms to treatment was computed in days. Qualitative phenomenological analysis of respondents’ narratives clarified the meaning, context and dynamic features of the relationship of explanatory variables with timely medical treatment. Results The median time for initiating treatment was 25 days for pre-ulcers, and 204 days for ulcers. Income loss and use of herbalists showed significantly negative associations with timely treatment. Respondents’ use of herbalists was often motivated by the desire for quick recovery in order to continue with work and because herbalists were relatives and easily accessible. However, drinking unclean water was significantly associated with timely treatment and access to health services encouraged timely treatment (OR 8.5, p = 0

  8. A Genomic Approach to Resolving Relapse versus Reinfection among Four Cases of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Eddyani, Miriam; Vandelannoote, Koen; Meehan, Conor J.; Bhuju, Sabin; Porter, Jessica L.; Aguiar, Julia; Seemann, Torsten; Jarek, Michael; Singh, Mahavir; Portaels, Françoise; Stinear, Timothy P.; de Jong, Bouke C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased availability of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques allows, for the first time, to distinguish relapses from reinfections in patients with multiple Buruli ulcer (BU) episodes. Methodology We compared the number and location of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified by genomic screening between four pairs of Mycobacterium ulcerans isolates collected at the time of first diagnosis and at recurrence, derived from a collection of almost 5000 well characterized clinical samples from one BU treatment center in Benin. Principal Findings The findings suggest that after surgical treatment—without antibiotics—the second episodes were due to relapse rather than reinfection. Since specific antibiotics were introduced for the treatment of BU, the one patient with a culture available from both disease episodes had M. ulcerans isolates with a genomic distance of 20 SNPs, suggesting the patient was most likely reinfected rather than having a relapse. Conclusions To our knowledge, this study is the first to study recurrences in M. ulcerans using NGS, and to identify exogenous reinfection as causing a recurrence of BU. The occurrence of reinfection highlights the contribution of ongoing exposure to M. ulcerans to disease recurrence, and has implications for vaccine development. PMID:26618509

  9. Buruli Ulcer in Cameroon: The Development and Impact of the National Control Programme

    PubMed Central

    Tabah, Earnest Njih; Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bissek, Anne-Cécile Zoung-Kanyi; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu; Bratschi, Martin W.; Pluschke, Gerd; Um Boock, Alphonse

    2016-01-01

    Background Cameroon is endemic for Buruli ulcer (BU) and organised institutional BU control began in 2002. The objective was to describe the evolution, achievements and challenges of the national BU control programme (NBUCP) and to make suggestions for scaling up the programme. Methods We analysed collated data on BU from 2001 to 2014 and reviewed activity reports NBUCP in Cameroon. Case-detection rates and key BU control indicators were calculated and plotted on a time scale to determine trends in performance. A linear regression analysis of BU detection rate from 2005–2014 was done. The regression coefficient was tested statistically for the significance in variation of BU detection rate. Principal findings In 14 years of BU control, 3700 cases were notified. The BU detection rate dropped significantly from 3.89 to 1.45 per 100 000 inhabitants. The number of BU endemic health districts rose from two to 64. Five BU diagnostic and treatment centres are functional and two more are planned for 2015. The health system has been strengthened and BU research and education has gained more interest in Cameroon. Conclusion/Significance Although institutional BU control Cameroon only began 30 years after the first cases were reported in 1969, a number of milestones have been attained. These would serve as stepping stones for charting the way forward and improving upon control activities in the country if the major challenge of resource allocation is dealt with. PMID:26760499

  10. Landscape Fragmentation as a Risk Factor for Buruli Ulcer Disease in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyong; Smithwick, Erica A H

    2016-07-01

    Land cover and its change have been linked to Buruli ulcer (BU), a rapidly emerging tropical disease. However, it is unknown whether landscape structure affects the disease prevalence. To examine the association between landscape pattern and BU presence, we obtained land cover information for 20 villages in southwestern Ghana from high resolution satellite images, and analyzed the landscape pattern surrounding each village. Eight landscape metrics indicated that landscape patterns between BU case and reference villages were different (P < 0.05) at the broad spatial extent examined (4 km). The logistic regression models showed that landscape fragmentation and diversity indices were positively associated with BU presence in a village. Specifically, for each increase in patch density and edge density by 100 units, the likelihood of BU presence in a village increased 2.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-4.61) and 4.18 (95% CI = 1.63-10.76) times, respectively. The results suggest that increased landscape fragmentation may pose a risk to the emergence of BU. PMID:27185767

  11. Locally Confined Clonal Complexes of Mycobacterium ulcerans in Two Buruli Ulcer Endemic Regions of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, Sarah; Minyem, Jacques C.; Um Boock, Alphonse; Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre Franklin; Junghanss, Thomas; Brites, Daniela; Harris, Simon R.; Parkhill, Julian; Pluschke, Gerd; Lamelas Cabello, Araceli

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of the necrotizing skin disease Buruli ulcer (BU), which has been reported from over 30 countries worldwide. The majority of notified patients come from West African countries, such as Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Benin and Cameroon. All clinical isolates of M. ulcerans from these countries are closely related and their genomes differ only in a limited number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a molecular epidemiological study with clinical isolates from patients from two distinct BU endemic regions of Cameroon, the Nyong and the Mapé river basins. Whole genome sequencing of the M. ulcerans strains from these two BU endemic areas revealed the presence of two phylogenetically distinct clonal complexes. The strains from the Nyong river basin were genetically more diverse and less closely related to the M. ulcerans strain circulating in Ghana and Benin than the strains causing BU in the Mapé river basin. Conclusions Our comparative genomic analysis revealed that M. ulcerans clones diversify locally by the accumulation of SNPs. Case isolates coming from more recently emerging BU endemic areas, such as the Mapé river basin, may be less diverse than populations from longer standing disease foci, such as the Nyong river basin. Exchange of strains between distinct endemic areas seems to be rare and local clonal complexes can be easily distinguished by whole genome sequencing. PMID:26046531

  12. Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection (Buruli Ulcer) on the Face: A Comparative Analysis of 13 Clinically Suspected Cases from the Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Phanzu, Delphin M.; Mahema, Roger L.; Suykerbuyk, Patrick; Imposo, Désiré-Hubert B.; Lehman, Linda F.; Nduwamahoro, Elie; Meyers, Wayne M.; Boelaert, Marleen; Portaels, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    We report our experience in managing 13 consecutive clinically suspected cases of Buruli ulcer on the face treated at the hospital of the Institut Médical Evangélique at Kimpese, Democratic Republic of Congo diagnosed during 2003–2007. During specific antibiotherapy, facial edema diminished, thus minimizing the subsequent extent of surgery and severe disfigurations. The following complications were observed: 1) lagophthalmos from scarring in four patients and associated ectropion in three of them; 2) blindness in one eye in one patient; 3) disfiguring exposure of teeth and gums resulting from excision of the left labial commissure that affected speech, drinking, and eating in one patient; and 4) dissemination of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in three patients. Our study highlights the importance of this clinical presentation of Buruli ulcer, and the need for health workers in disease-endemic areas to be aware of the special challenges management of Buruli ulcer on the face presents. PMID:22144452

  13. Local Cellular Immune Responses and Pathogenesis of Buruli Ulcer Lesions in the Experimental Mycobacterium Ulcerans Pig Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Ruggli, Nicolas; Borel, Nicole; Pluschke, Gerd; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease of the skin that is caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. We recently established an experimental pig (Sus scrofa) infection model for Buruli ulcer to investigate host-pathogen interactions, the efficacy of candidate vaccines and of new treatment options. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have used the model to study pathogenesis and early host-pathogen interactions in the affected porcine skin upon infection with mycolactone-producing and non-producing M. ulcerans strains. Histopathological analyses of nodular lesions in the porcine skin revealed that six weeks after infection with wild-type M. ulcerans bacteria extracellular acid fast bacilli were surrounded by distinct layers of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Upon ulceration, the necrotic tissue containing the major bacterial burden was sloughing off, leading to the loss of most of the mycobacteria. Compared to wild-type M. ulcerans bacteria, toxin-deficient mutants caused an increased granulomatous cellular infiltration without massive tissue necrosis, and only smaller clusters of acid fast bacilli. Conclusions/Significance In summary, the present study shows that the pathogenesis and early immune response to M. ulcerans infection in the pig is very well reflecting BU disease in humans, making the pig infection model an excellent tool for the profiling of new therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. PMID:27128097

  14. Prevalence of Buruli Ulcer in Akonolinga Health District, Cameroon: Results of a Cross Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Porten, Klaudia; Sailor, Karen; Comte, Eric; Njikap, Adelaide; Sobry, Agnes; Sihom, Francois; Meva'a, Abanda; Eyangoh, Sarah; Myatt, Mark; Nackers, Fabienne; Grais, Rebecca F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a chronic, indolent necrotizing disease of the skin and underlying tissues caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which may result in functional incapacity. In 2002, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) opened a BU programme in Akonolinga Hospital, Cameroon, offering antibiotic treatment, surgery and general medical care. Six hundred patients have been treated in the project to date. However, due to the nature of the disease and its stigmatization, determining the exact prevalence and burden of disease is difficult and current estimates may not reflect the magnitude of the problem. The objectives of this survey were to estimate the prevalence of BU in the health district of Akonolinga, describe the geographic extension of the highly endemic area within the health district, and determine the programme coverage and its geographical distribution. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a cross-sectional population survey using centric systematic area sampling (CSAS). A 15×15 km grid (quadrats of 225 km2) was overlaid on a map of Akonolinga district with its position chosen to maximize the area covered by the survey. Quadrats were selected if more than 50% of the quadrat was inside of the health district. The chiefdom located closest to the centre of each quadrat was selected and Buruli cases were identified using an active case finding strategy (the sensitivity of the strategy was estimated by capture-recapture). WHO-case definitions were used for nodules, plaque, ulcer, oedema and sequelae. Out of a total population of 103,000 inhabitants, 26,679 were surveyed within the twenty quadrats. Sensitivity of the case finding strategy was estimated to be 84% (95%CI 54–97%). The overall prevalence was 0.47% (n = 105) for all cases including sequelae and 0.25% (n = 56) for active stages of the disease. Five quadrats had a high prevalence of >0.6% to 0.9%, 5 a prevalence >0.3% to 0.6% and 10 quadrats <0.3%. The quadrats with the high

  15. Landscape Diversity Related to Buruli Ulcer Disease in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Elguero, Eric; Asse, Henri; Guegan, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer disease (BU), due to the bacteria Mycobacterium ulcerans, represents an important and emerging public health problem, especially in many African countries. Few elements are known nowadays about the routes of transmission of this environmental bacterium to the human population. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have investigated the relationships between the incidence of BU in Côte d'Ivoire, western Africa, and a group of environmental variables. These environmental variables concern vegetation, crops (rice and banana), dams, and lakes. Using a geographical information system and multivariate analyses, we show a link between cases of BU and different environmental factors for the first time on a country-wide scale. As a result, irrigated rice field cultures areas, and, to a lesser extent, banana fields as well as areas in the vicinity of dams used for irrigation and aquaculture purposes, represent high-risk zones for the human population to contract BU in Côte d'Ivoire. This is much more relevant in the central part of the country. Conclusions/Significance As already suspected by several case-control studies in different African countries, we strengthen in this work the identification of high-risk areas of BU on a national spatial scale. This first study should now be followed by many others in other countries and at a multi-year temporal scale. This goal implies a strong improvement in data collection and sharing in order to achieve to a global picture of the environmental conditions that drive BU emergence and persistence in human populations. PMID:18665259

  16. Mycobacterium ulcerans persistence at a village water source of Buruli ulcer patients.

    PubMed

    Bratschi, Martin W; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Andreoli, Arianna; Minyem, Jacques C; Kerber, Sarah; Wantong, Fidèle G; Pritchard, James; Chakwera, Victoria; Beuret, Christian; Wittwer, Matthias; Noumen, Djeunga; Schürch, Nadia; Um Book, Alphonse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2014-03-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), a neglected tropical disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and is the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. While there is a strong association of the occurrence of the disease with stagnant or slow flowing water bodies, the exact mode of transmission of BU is not clear. M. ulcerans has emerged from the environmental fish pathogen M. marinum by acquisition of a virulence plasmid encoding the enzymes required for the production of the cytotoxic macrolide toxin mycolactone, which is a key factor in the pathogenesis of BU. Comparative genomic studies have further shown extensive pseudogene formation and downsizing of the M. ulcerans genome, indicative for an adaptation to a more stable ecological niche. This has raised the question whether this pathogen is still present in water-associated environmental reservoirs. Here we show persistence of M. ulcerans specific DNA sequences over a period of more than two years at a water contact location of BU patients in an endemic village of Cameroon. At defined positions in a shallow water hole used by the villagers for washing and bathing, detritus remained consistently positive for M. ulcerans DNA. The observed mean real-time PCR Ct difference of 1.45 between the insertion sequences IS2606 and IS2404 indicated that lineage 3 M. ulcerans, which cause human disease, persisted in this environment after successful treatment of all local patients. Underwater decaying organic matter may therefore represent a reservoir of M. ulcerans for direct infection of skin lesions or vector-associated transmission. PMID:24675964

  17. In the case of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans in buruli ulcer disease Acanthamoeba species stand accused.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M D; Boakye, D A; Mosi, L; Asiedu, K

    2011-03-01

    Buruli ulcer disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans results in extensive destruction of skin and soft tissue and long-term functional disabilities that ultimately require surgery and rehabilitation. The disease is associated with aquatic and swampy environments with the mycobacterium occurring in biofilms, soil, aquatic insects, fish and wildlife however, the mode of transmission to humans remains an enigma. Current transmission ideas including bites from predatory water bugs and mosquitoes, do not explain satisfactorily the spasmodic disease distribution in human populations. Here we argue that Acanthamoeba species are the natural hosts of M. ulcerans and are mainly responsible for disease transmission because; (i) Acanthamoebae are known natural hosts of several microbial pathogens including M. marinum, M. avium and Legionella pneumophila, (ii) culture of slow-to-grow microbial pathogens hosted in nature by Acanthamoeba spp is enhanced when the media is seeded with the protozoa, (iii) acanthamoebae and M. ulcerans share similar bio-ecological and epidemiological settings, (iv) documented evidence that prior growth of L. pneumophila and M. avium in acanthamoebae influences entry mechanisms, intracellular growth and virulence in human monocytes, (v) Acanthamoeba spp also infect humans and cause diseases via routes of openings including broken skin and sites of trauma similar to M. ulcerans and (vi) M. ulcerans is rather a fastidious intracellular organism as recent analysis of the genome indicate. We argue further that temperature plays a significant role in transmission determining the fate of either the intracellular microbe or the host cells. Also, Acanthamoeba-pathogen association has a long evolutionary history because the same set of bacterial genes and gene products e.g. in L. pneumophila are required for survival in both mammalian and protozoan host cells. We suggest that the involvement of Acanthamoeba in the transmission of M. ulcerans to humans better

  18. Buruli Ulcer Disease and Its Association with Land Cover in Southwestern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Tschakert, Petra; Klutse, Erasmus; Ferring, David; Ricciardi, Vincent; Hausermann, Heidi; Oppong, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU), one of 17 neglected tropical diseases, is a debilitating skin and soft tissue infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. In tropical Africa, changes in land use and proximity to water have been associated with the disease. This study presents the first analysis of BU at the village level in southwestern Ghana, where prevalence rates are among the highest globally, and explores fine and medium-scale associations with land cover by comparing patterns both within BU clusters and surrounding landscapes. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained 339 hospital-confirmed BU cases in southwestern Ghana between 2007 and 2010. The clusters of BU were identified using spatial scan statistics and the percentages of six land cover classes were calculated based on Landsat and Rapid Eye imagery for each of 154 villages/towns. The association between BU prevalence and each land cover class was calculated using negative binomial regression models. We found that older people had a significantly higher risk for BU after considering population age structure. BU cases were positively associated with the higher percentage of water and grassland surrounding each village, but negatively associated with the percent of urban. The results also showed that BU was clustered in areas with high percentage of mining activity, suggesting that water and mining play an important and potentially interactive role in BU occurrence. Conclusions/Significance Our study highlights the importance of multiple land use changes along the Offin River, particularly mining and agriculture, which might be associated with BU disease in southwestern Ghana. Our study is the first to use both medium- and high-resolution imagery to assess these changes. We also show that older populations (≥ 60 y) appear to be at higher risk of BU disease than children, once BU data were weighted by population age structures. PMID:26091265

  19. Mycobacterium ulcerans Persistence at a Village Water Source of Buruli Ulcer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bratschi, Martin W.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Andreoli, Arianna; Minyem, Jacques C.; Kerber, Sarah; Wantong, Fidèle G.; Pritchard, James; Chakwera, Victoria; Beuret, Christian; Wittwer, Matthias; Noumen, Djeunga; Schürch, Nadia; Um Book, Alphonse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), a neglected tropical disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and is the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. While there is a strong association of the occurrence of the disease with stagnant or slow flowing water bodies, the exact mode of transmission of BU is not clear. M. ulcerans has emerged from the environmental fish pathogen M. marinum by acquisition of a virulence plasmid encoding the enzymes required for the production of the cytotoxic macrolide toxin mycolactone, which is a key factor in the pathogenesis of BU. Comparative genomic studies have further shown extensive pseudogene formation and downsizing of the M. ulcerans genome, indicative for an adaptation to a more stable ecological niche. This has raised the question whether this pathogen is still present in water-associated environmental reservoirs. Here we show persistence of M. ulcerans specific DNA sequences over a period of more than two years at a water contact location of BU patients in an endemic village of Cameroon. At defined positions in a shallow water hole used by the villagers for washing and bathing, detritus remained consistently positive for M. ulcerans DNA. The observed mean real-time PCR Ct difference of 1.45 between the insertion sequences IS2606 and IS2404 indicated that lineage 3 M. ulcerans, which cause human disease, persisted in this environment after successful treatment of all local patients. Underwater decaying organic matter may therefore represent a reservoir of M. ulcerans for direct infection of skin lesions or vector-associated transmission. PMID:24675964

  20. Reductive evolution and niche adaptation inferred from the genome of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Seemann, Torsten; Pidot, Sacha; Frigui, Wafa; Reysset, Gilles; Garnier, Thierry; Meurice, Guillaume; Simon, David; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Tichit, Magali; Porter, Jessica L.; Ryan, Janine; Johnson, Paul D.R.; Davies, John K.; Jenkin, Grant A.; Small, Pamela L.C.; Jones, Louis M.; Tekaia, Fredj; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Parkhill, Julian; Cole, Stewart T.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans is found in aquatic ecosystems and causes Buruli ulcer in humans, a neglected but devastating necrotic disease of subcutaneous tissue that is rampant throughout West and Central Africa. Here, we report the complete 5.8-Mb genome sequence of M. ulcerans and show that it comprises two circular replicons, a chromosome of 5632 kb and a virulence plasmid of 174 kb. The plasmid is required for production of the polyketide toxin mycolactone, which provokes necrosis. Comparisons with the recently completed 6.6-Mb genome of Mycobacterium marinum revealed >98% nucleotide sequence identity and genome-wide synteny. However, as well as the plasmid, M. ulcerans has accumulated 213 copies of the insertion sequence IS2404, 91 copies of IS2606, 771 pseudogenes, two bacteriophages, and multiple DNA deletions and rearrangements. These data indicate that M. ulcerans has recently evolved via lateral gene transfer and reductive evolution from the generalist, more rapid-growing environmental species M. marinum to become a niche-adapted specialist. Predictions based on genome inspection for the production of modified mycobacterial virulence factors, such as the highly abundant phthiodiolone lipids, were confirmed by structural analyses. Similarly, 11 protein-coding sequences identified as M. ulcerans-specific by comparative genomics were verified as such by PCR screening a diverse collection of 33 strains of M. ulcerans and M. marinum. This work offers significant insight into the biology and evolution of mycobacterial pathogens and is an important component of international efforts to counter Buruli ulcer. PMID:17210928

  1. Spatio-temporal Patterns and Landscape-Associated Risk of Buruli Ulcer in Akonolinga, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Jordi; Gaudart, Jean; Carolan, Kevin; Lo Seen, Danny; Guégan, Jean-François; Eyangoh, Sara; Fontanet, Arnaud; Texier, Gaëtan

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is an extensively damaging skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, whose transmission mode is still unknown. The focal distribution of BU and the absence of interpersonal transmission suggest a major role of environmental factors, which remain unidentified. This study provides the first description of the spatio-temporal variations of BU in an endemic African region, in Akonolinga, Cameroon. We quantify landscape-associated risk of BU, and reveal local patterns of endemicity. Methodology/Principal Findings From January 2002 to May 2012, 787 new BU cases were recorded in 154 villages of the district of Akonolinga. Incidence per village ranged from 0 (n = 59 villages) to 10.4 cases/1000 person.years (py); median incidence was 0.4 cases/1,000py. Villages neighbouring the Nyong River flood plain near Akonolinga town were identified as the highest risk zone using the SPODT algorithm. We found a decreasing risk with increasing distance to the Nyong and identified 4 time phases with changes in spatial distribution. We classified the villages into 8 groups according to landscape characteristics using principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering. We estimated the incidence ratio (IR) associated with each landscape using a generalised linear model. BU risk was highest in landscapes with abundant wetlands, especially cultivated ones (IR = 15.7, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 15.7[4.2–59.2]), and lowest in reference landscape where primary and secondary forest cover was abundant. In intermediate-risk landscapes, risk decreased with agriculture pressure (from IR[95%CI] = 7.9[2.2–28.8] to 2.0[0.6–6.6]). We identified landscapes where endemicity was stable and landscapes where incidence increased with time. Conclusion/Significance Our study on the largest series of BU cases recorded in a single endemic region illustrates the local evolution of BU and identifies the Nyong River as the major driver of BU

  2. Application of geographical information system (GIS) technology in the control of Buruli ulcer in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) disease is a chronic debilitating skin disease caused by Mycobacteriumulcerans. It is associated with areas where the water is slow-flowing or stagnant. Policy makers take the necessary strategic and policy decisions especially where to target interventions based on available evidence including spatial distribution of the disease. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the spatial distribution of BU in Ghana. The aim of the study was to use Geographical Information System (GIS) technology to show the spatial distribution and hot spots of BU in Greater Accra and Eastern Regions in Ghana. The information could then be used by decision makers to make the necessary strategic and policy decisions, especially where to target intervention. Methods We conducted a community case search and spatial mapping in two districts in Eastern region (Akuapem South and Suhum- Kraboa-Coaltar) and two districts in Greater Accra region (Ga West and Ga South Municipalities) of Ghana to identify the spatial distribution of BU cases in the communities along the Densu River. These municipalities are already known to the Ministry of Health as having high case load of BU. Structured questionnaires on demographic characteristics, environmental factors and general practices were administered to the cases. Using the E-trex Garmin Geographical Positioning System (GPS), the location of the case patient was marked along with any important attributes of the community. ArcGIS was used to generate maps showing BU distribution and hot spots. Results Two hundred and fifty-seven (257) probable BU patients were enrolled in the study after the case search. These cases and their houses (or homes) were located with the GPS. The GIS maps generated showed a varying distribution of BU in the various communities. We observed clustering of BU patients downstream of the Densu River which had hitherto not been observed. Conclusions There is clustering of BU in areas where the

  3. Histopathological Changes and Clinical Responses of Buruli Ulcer Plaque Lesions during Chemotherapy: A Role for Surgical Removal of Necrotic Tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Luc Valère; Dossou, Ange Dodji; Barogui, Yves Thierry; Johnson, Roch Christian; Pluschke, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a necrotizing skin disease usually starting with a subcutaneous nodule or plaque, which may ulcerate and progress, if untreated, over months and years. During the currently recommended antibiotic treatment with rifampicin/streptomycin plaque lesions tend to ulcerate, often associated with retarded wound healing and prolonged hospital stays. Methodology/Principal Findings Included in this study were twelve laboratory reconfirmed, HIV negative BU patients presenting with plaque lesions at the CDTUB in Allada, Benin. Punch biopsies for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis were taken before start of treatment and after four to five weeks of treatment. Where excision or wound debridement was clinically indicated, the removed tissue was also analyzed. Based on clinical judgment, nine of the twelve patients enrolled in this study received limited surgical excision seven to 39 days after completion of chemotherapy, followed by skin grafting. Lesions of three patients healed without further intervention. Before treatment, plaque lesions were characterized by a destroyed subcutis with extensive necrosis without major signs of infiltration. After completion of antibiotic treatment partial infiltration of the affected tissue was observed, but large necrotic areas remained unchanged. Conclusion/Significance Our histopathological analyses show that ulceration of plaque lesions during antibiotic treatment do not represent a failure to respond to antimycobacterial treatment. Based on our results we suggest formal testing in a controlled clinical trial setting whether limited surgical excision of necrotic tissue favours wound healing and can reduce the duration of hospital stays. PMID:21980547

  4. Buruli Ulcer Control in a Highly Endemic District in Ghana: Role of Community-Based Surveillance Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Abass, Kabiru Mohammed; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Phillips, Richard O.; Sarfo, Fred S.; Abotsi, Justice; Mireku, Samuel Osei; Thompson, William N.; Asiedu, Kingsley; Stienstra, Ymkje; Klis, Sandor-Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is an infectious skin disease that occurs mainly in West and Central Africa. It can lead to severe disability and stigma because of scarring and contractures. Effective treatment with antibiotics is available, but patients often report to the hospital too late to prevent surgery and the disabling consequences of the disease. In a highly endemic district in Ghana, intensified public health efforts, mainly revolving around training and motivating community-based surveillance volunteers (CBSVs), were implemented. As a result, 70% of cases were reported in the earliest—World Health Organization category I—stage of the disease, potentially minimizing the need for surgery. CBSVs referred more cases in total and more cases in the early stages of the disease than any other source. CBSVs are an important resource in the early detection of BU. PMID:25331802

  5. Recent advances: role of mycolactone in the pathogenesis and monitoring of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection/Buruli ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Phillips, Richard; Wansbrough‐Jones, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Infection of subcutaneous tissue with Mycobacterium ulcerans can lead to chronic skin ulceration known as Buruli ulcer. The pathogenesis of this neglected tropical disease is dependent on a lipid‐like toxin, mycolactone, which diffuses through tissue away from the infecting organisms. Since its identification in 1999, this molecule has been intensely studied to elucidate its cytotoxic and immunosuppressive properties. Two recent major advances identifying the underlying molecular targets for mycolactone have been described. First, it can target scaffolding proteins (such as Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein), which control actin dynamics in adherent cells and therefore lead to detachment and cell death by anoikis. Second, it prevents the co‐translational translocation (and therefore production) of many proteins that pass through the endoplasmic reticulum for secretion or placement in cell membranes. These pleiotropic effects underpin the range of cell‐specific functional defects in immune and other cells that contact mycolactone during infection. The dose and duration of mycolactone exposure for these different cells explains tissue necrosis and the paucity of immune cells in the ulcers. This review discusses recent advances in the field, revisits older findings in this context and highlights current developments in structure‐function studies as well as methodology that make mycolactone a promising diagnostic biomarker. PMID:26572803

  6. Recent advances: role of mycolactone in the pathogenesis and monitoring of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection/Buruli ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Phillips, Richard; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Simmonds, Rachel E

    2016-01-01

    Infection of subcutaneous tissue with Mycobacterium ulcerans can lead to chronic skin ulceration known as Buruli ulcer. The pathogenesis of this neglected tropical disease is dependent on a lipid-like toxin, mycolactone, which diffuses through tissue away from the infecting organisms. Since its identification in 1999, this molecule has been intensely studied to elucidate its cytotoxic and immunosuppressive properties. Two recent major advances identifying the underlying molecular targets for mycolactone have been described. First, it can target scaffolding proteins (such as Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein), which control actin dynamics in adherent cells and therefore lead to detachment and cell death by anoikis. Second, it prevents the co-translational translocation (and therefore production) of many proteins that pass through the endoplasmic reticulum for secretion or placement in cell membranes. These pleiotropic effects underpin the range of cell-specific functional defects in immune and other cells that contact mycolactone during infection. The dose and duration of mycolactone exposure for these different cells explains tissue necrosis and the paucity of immune cells in the ulcers. This review discusses recent advances in the field, revisits older findings in this context and highlights current developments in structure-function studies as well as methodology that make mycolactone a promising diagnostic biomarker. PMID:26572803

  7. Cultural Understanding of Wounds, Buruli Ulcers and Their Management at the Obom Sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Eric; Okyere, Daniel; Adongo, Philip Baba; Ahorlu, Collins K.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was conducted with the aim to understand some of the cultural belief systems in the management of wounds and patients practices that could contaminate wounds at the Obom sub-district of the Ga South Municipality of Ghana. Methods This was an ethnographic study using in-depth interviews, Focus Group Discussions and participant observation techniques for data collection. Observations were done on Buruli ulcer patients to document how they integrate local and modern wound management practices in the day-to-day handling of their wounds. Content analysis was done after the data were subjected to thematic coding and representative narratives selected for presentation. Results It was usually believed that wounds were caused by charms or spirits and, therefore, required the attention of a native healer. In instances where some patients’ wounds were dressed in the hospital by clinicians whose condition/age/sex contradict the belief of the patient, the affected often redress the wounds later at home. Some of the materials often used for such wound dressing include urine and concoctions made of charcoal and gunpowder with the belief of driving out evil spirits from the wounds. Conclusion Clinicians must therefore be aware of these cultural beliefs and take them into consideration when managing Buruli ulcer wounds to prevent redressing at home after clinical treatment. This may go a long way to reduce secondary infections that have been observed in Buruli ulcer wounds. PMID:27438292

  8. Experimental Infection of the Pig with Mycobacterium ulcerans: A Novel Model for Studying the Pathogenesis of Buruli Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Ricklin, Meret E.; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a slowly progressing, necrotising disease of the skin caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. Non-ulcerative manifestations are nodules, plaques and oedema, which may progress to ulceration of large parts of the skin. Histopathologically, BU is characterized by coagulative necrosis, fat cell ghosts, epidermal hyperplasia, clusters of extracellular acid fast bacilli (AFB) in the subcutaneous tissue and lack of major inflammatory infiltration. The mode of transmission of BU is not clear and there is only limited information on the early pathogenesis of the disease available. Methodology/Principal Findings For evaluating the potential of the pig as experimental infection model for BU, we infected pigs subcutaneously with different doses of M. ulcerans. The infected skin sites were excised 2.5 or 6.5 weeks after infection and processed for histopathological analysis. With doses of 2×107 and 2×106 colony forming units (CFU) we observed the development of nodular lesions that subsequently progressed to ulcerative or plaque-like lesions. At lower inoculation doses signs of infection found after 2.5 weeks had spontaneously resolved at 6.5 weeks. The observed macroscopic and histopathological changes closely resembled those found in M. ulcerans disease in humans. Conclusion/Significance Our results demonstrate that the pig can be infected with M. ulcerans. Productive infection leads to the development of lesions that closely resemble human BU lesions. The pig infection model therefore has great potential for studying the early pathogenesis of BU and for the development of new therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. PMID:25010421

  9. The “Buruli Score”: Development of a Multivariable Prediction Model for Diagnosis of Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Individuals with Ulcerative Skin Lesions, Akonolinga, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Yolanda K.; Bastard, Mathieu; Nkemenang, Patrick; Comte, Eric; Ehounou, Geneviève; Eyangoh, Sara; Rusch, Barbara; Tabah, Earnest Njih; Trellu, Laurence Toutous; Etard, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to laboratory diagnosis can be a challenge for individuals suspected of Buruli Ulcer (BU). Our objective was to develop a clinical score to assist clinicians working in resource-limited settings for BU diagnosis. Methododology/Principal Findings Between 2011 and 2013, individuals presenting at Akonolinga District Hospital, Cameroon, were enrolled consecutively. Clinical data were collected prospectively. Based on a latent class model using laboratory test results (ZN, PCR, culture), patients were categorized into high, or low BU likelihood. Variables associated with a high BU likelihood in a multivariate logistic model were included in the Buruli score. Score cut-offs were chosen based on calculated predictive values. Of 325 patients with an ulcerative lesion, 51 (15.7%) had a high BU likelihood. The variables identified for the Buruli score were: characteristic smell (+3 points), yellow color (+2), female gender (+2), undermining (+1), green color (+1), lesion hyposensitivity (+1), pain at rest (-1), size >5cm (-1), locoregional adenopathy (-2), age above 20 up to 40 years (-3), or above 40 (-5). This score had AUC of 0.86 (95%CI 0.82–0.89), indicating good discrimination between infected and non-infected individuals. The cut-off to reasonably exclude BU was set at scores <0 (NPV 96.5%; 95%CI 93.0–98.6). The treatment threshold was set at a cut-off ≥4 (PPV 69.0%; 95%CI 49.2–84.7). Patients with intermediate BU probability needed to be tested by PCR. Conclusions/Significance We developed a decisional algorithm based on a clinical score assessing BU probability. The Buruli score still requires further validation before it can be recommended for wide use. PMID:27045293

  10. The puzzle of Buruli ulcer transmission, ethno-ecological history and the end of "love" in the Akonolinga district, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Giles-Vernick, Tamara; Owona-Ntsama, Joseph; Landier, Jordi; Eyangoh, Sara

    2015-03-01

    The "One World One Health Initiative" has attended little to the priorities, concepts and practices of resource-poor communities confronting disease and the implications of these concerns for its biomedical, ecological and institutional approach to disease surveillance and control. Using the example of Buruli ulcer (BU) and its bacterial etiology, Mycobacterium ulcerans, in south-central Cameroon, we build on debates about the contributions of "local knowledge" and "alternative models" to biomedical knowledge of disease transmission. BU's mode of transmission remains poorly understood. Our approach employs ethno-ecological histories - local understandings of the putative emergence and expansion of a locally important, neglected disease. We develop these histories from 52 individual and small group interviews, group discussions, and participant-observation of daily and seasonal activities, conducted in 2013-2013. These histories offer important clues about past environmental and social change that should guide further ecological, epidemiological research. They highlight a key historical moment (the late 1980s and 1990s); specific ecological transformations; new cultivation practices in unexploited zones that potentially increased exposure to M. ulcerans; and ecological degradation that may have lowered nutritional standards and heightened susceptibility to BU. They also recast transmission, broadening insight into BU and its local analog, atom, by emphasizing the role of social change and economic crisis in its emergence and expansion. PMID:24673887

  11. Burden and Historical Trend of Buruli Ulcer Prevalence in Selected Communities along the Offin River of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ampah, Kobina Assan; Asare, Prince; Binnah, Daniel De-Graft; Maccaulley, Samuel; Opare, William; Röltgen, Katharina; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2016-04-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans with more than two thirds of the global cases reported in West Africa. A nationwide active BU case search conducted in 1999 identified two health districts along the Offin River as two of the three most endemic districts in Ghana. Based on recent anecdotal accounts that transmission is unstable along the Offin River, we conducted from March to June 2013 an exhaustive household survey and active case search in 13 selected communities within a five-kilometer radius along the Offin River. The overall prevalence of BU was 2.3% among the surveyed population of 20,390 inhabitants and 477 of the total 480 cases detected (99.4%) were historical (healed) cases. By estimating the year of occurrence for each case per community and taking into account available passive surveillance records of health facilities and the District Health Directorate, we observed a general trend of continuous emergence of cases in communities located midstream the Offin River whereas downstream communities showed more sporadic patterns. We monitored the incidence of cases after the survey and recorded a cumulative incidence rate of 0.04% for the 13 communities over a 17-month active surveillance period from August 2013 to December 2014. Our data reveal an overall decline in BU incidence along the Offin River similar to the general decline in BU incidence in recent years reported by the World Health Organization for West Africa. PMID:27078028

  12. Burden and Historical Trend of Buruli Ulcer Prevalence in Selected Communities along the Offin River of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ampah, Kobina Assan; Asare, Prince; Binnah, Daniel De-Graft; Maccaulley, Samuel; Opare, William; Röltgen, Katharina; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans with more than two thirds of the global cases reported in West Africa. A nationwide active BU case search conducted in 1999 identified two health districts along the Offin River as two of the three most endemic districts in Ghana. Based on recent anecdotal accounts that transmission is unstable along the Offin River, we conducted from March to June 2013 an exhaustive household survey and active case search in 13 selected communities within a five-kilometer radius along the Offin River. The overall prevalence of BU was 2.3% among the surveyed population of 20,390 inhabitants and 477 of the total 480 cases detected (99.4%) were historical (healed) cases. By estimating the year of occurrence for each case per community and taking into account available passive surveillance records of health facilities and the District Health Directorate, we observed a general trend of continuous emergence of cases in communities located midstream the Offin River whereas downstream communities showed more sporadic patterns. We monitored the incidence of cases after the survey and recorded a cumulative incidence rate of 0.04% for the 13 communities over a 17-month active surveillance period from August 2013 to December 2014. Our data reveal an overall decline in BU incidence along the Offin River similar to the general decline in BU incidence in recent years reported by the World Health Organization for West Africa. PMID:27078028

  13. Whole Genome Comparisons Suggest Random Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans Genotypes in a Buruli Ulcer Endemic Region of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ablordey, Anthony S.; Vandelannoote, Koen; Frimpong, Isaac A.; Ahortor, Evans K.; Amissah, Nana Ama; Eddyani, Miriam; Durnez, Lies; Portaels, Françoise; de Jong, Bouke C.; Leirs, Herwig; Porter, Jessica L.; Mangas, Kirstie M.; Lam, Margaret M. C.; Buultjens, Andrew; Seemann, Torsten; Tobias, Nicholas J.; Stinear, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to control the spread of Buruli ulcer – an emerging ulcerative skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans - have been hampered by our poor understanding of reservoirs and transmission. To help address this issue, we compared whole genomes from 18 clinical M. ulcerans isolates from a 30km2 region within the Asante Akim North District, Ashanti region, Ghana, with 15 other M. ulcerans isolates from elsewhere in Ghana and the surrounding countries of Ivory Coast, Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Contrary to our expectations of finding minor DNA sequence variations among isolates representing a single M. ulcerans circulating genotype, we found instead two distinct genotypes. One genotype was closely related to isolates from neighbouring regions of Amansie West and Densu, consistent with the predicted local endemic clone, but the second genotype (separated by 138 single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] from other Ghanaian strains) most closely matched M. ulcerans from Nigeria, suggesting another introduction of M. ulcerans to Ghana, perhaps from that country. Both the exotic genotype and the local Ghanaian genotype displayed highly restricted intra-strain genetic variation, with less than 50 SNP differences across a 5.2Mbp core genome within each genotype. Interestingly, there was no discernible spatial clustering of genotypes at the local village scale. Interviews revealed no obvious epidemiological links among BU patients who had been infected with identical M. ulcerans genotypes but lived in geographically separate villages. We conclude that M. ulcerans is spread widely across the region, with multiple genotypes present in any one area. These data give us new perspectives on the behaviour of possible reservoirs and subsequent transmission mechanisms of M. ulcerans. These observations also show for the first time that M. ulcerans can be mobilized, introduced to a new area and then spread within a population. Potential reservoirs of M. ulcerans thus might include

  14. Mycolactone-Dependent Depletion of Endothelial Cell Thrombomodulin Is Strongly Associated with Fibrin Deposition in Buruli Ulcer Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ogbechi, Joy; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Hall, Belinda S.; Bodman-Smith, Katherine; Vogel, Moritz; Wu, Hua-Lin; Stainer, Alexander; Esmon, Charles T.; Ahnström, Josefin; Pluschke, Gerd; Simmonds, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known histopathological feature of diseased skin in Buruli ulcer (BU) is coagulative necrosis caused by the Mycobacterium ulcerans macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Since the underlying mechanism is not known, we have investigated the effect of mycolactone on endothelial cells, focussing on the expression of surface anticoagulant molecules involved in the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Congenital deficiencies in this natural anticoagulant pathway are known to induce thrombotic complications such as purpura fulimans and spontaneous necrosis. Mycolactone profoundly decreased thrombomodulin (TM) expression on the surface of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC) at doses as low as 2ng/ml and as early as 8hrs after exposure. TM activates protein C by altering thrombin’s substrate specificity, and exposure of HDMVEC to mycolactone for 24 hours resulted in an almost complete loss of the cells’ ability to produce activated protein C. Loss of TM was shown to be due to a previously described mechanism involving mycolactone-dependent blockade of Sec61 translocation that results in proteasome-dependent degradation of newly synthesised ER-transiting proteins. Indeed, depletion from cells determined by live-cell imaging of cells stably expressing a recombinant TM-GFP fusion protein occurred at the known turnover rate. In order to determine the relevance of these findings to BU disease, immunohistochemistry of punch biopsies from 40 BU lesions (31 ulcers, nine plaques) was performed. TM abundance was profoundly reduced in the subcutis of 78% of biopsies. Furthermore, it was confirmed that fibrin deposition is a common feature of BU lesions, particularly in the necrotic areas. These findings indicate that there is decreased ability to control thrombin generation in BU skin. Mycolactone’s effects on normal endothelial cell function, including its ability to activate the protein C anticoagulant pathway are strongly associated with this. Fibrin

  15. Potential wildlife sentinels for monitoring the endemic spread of human buruli ulcer in South-East australia.

    PubMed

    Carson, Connor; Lavender, Caroline J; Handasyde, Kathrine A; O'Brien, Carolyn R; Hewitt, Nick; Johnson, Paul D R; Fyfe, Janet A M

    2014-01-01

    The last 20 years has seen a significant series of outbreaks of Buruli/Bairnsdale Ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, in temperate south-eastern Australia (state of Victoria). Here, the prevailing view of M. ulcerans as an aquatic pathogen has been questioned by recent research identifying native wildlife as potential terrestrial reservoirs of infection; specifically, tree-dwelling common ringtail and brushtail possums. In that previous work, sampling of environmental possum faeces detected a high prevalence of M. ulcerans DNA in established endemic areas for human BU on the Bellarine Peninsula, compared with non-endemic areas. Here, we report research from an emergent BU focus recently identified on the Mornington Peninsula, confirming associations between human BU and the presence of the aetiological agent in possum faeces, detected by real-time PCR targeting M. ulcerans IS2404, IS2606 and KR. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA was detected in 20/216 (9.3%) ground collected ringtail possum faecal samples and 4/6 (66.6%) brushtail possum faecal samples. The distribution of the PCR positive possum faecal samples and human BU cases was highly focal: there was a significant non-random cluster of 16 M. ulcerans positive possum faecal sample points detected by spatial scan statistics (P<0.0001) within a circle of radius 0.42 km, within which were located the addresses of 6/12 human cases reported from the area to date; moreover, the highest sample PCR signal strength (equivalent to ≥10(6) organisms per gram of faeces) was found in a sample point located within this cluster radius. Corresponding faecal samples collected from closely adjacent BU-free areas were predominantly negative. Possums may be useful sentinels to predict endemic spread of human BU in Victoria, for public health planning. Further research is needed to establish whether spatial associations represent evidence of direct or indirect transmission between possums and humans, and the mechanism by

  16. Potential Wildlife Sentinels for Monitoring the Endemic Spread of Human Buruli Ulcer in South-East Australia

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Connor; Lavender, Caroline J.; Handasyde, Kathrine A.; O'Brien, Carolyn R.; Hewitt, Nick; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The last 20 years has seen a significant series of outbreaks of Buruli/Bairnsdale Ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, in temperate south-eastern Australia (state of Victoria). Here, the prevailing view of M. ulcerans as an aquatic pathogen has been questioned by recent research identifying native wildlife as potential terrestrial reservoirs of infection; specifically, tree-dwelling common ringtail and brushtail possums. In that previous work, sampling of environmental possum faeces detected a high prevalence of M. ulcerans DNA in established endemic areas for human BU on the Bellarine Peninsula, compared with non-endemic areas. Here, we report research from an emergent BU focus recently identified on the Mornington Peninsula, confirming associations between human BU and the presence of the aetiological agent in possum faeces, detected by real-time PCR targeting M. ulcerans IS2404, IS2606 and KR. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA was detected in 20/216 (9.3%) ground collected ringtail possum faecal samples and 4/6 (66.6%) brushtail possum faecal samples. The distribution of the PCR positive possum faecal samples and human BU cases was highly focal: there was a significant non-random cluster of 16 M. ulcerans positive possum faecal sample points detected by spatial scan statistics (P<0.0001) within a circle of radius 0.42 km, within which were located the addresses of 6/12 human cases reported from the area to date; moreover, the highest sample PCR signal strength (equivalent to ≥106 organisms per gram of faeces) was found in a sample point located within this cluster radius. Corresponding faecal samples collected from closely adjacent BU-free areas were predominantly negative. Possums may be useful sentinels to predict endemic spread of human BU in Victoria, for public health planning. Further research is needed to establish whether spatial associations represent evidence of direct or indirect transmission between possums and humans, and the mechanism by which

  17. Vaccination with the Surface Proteins MUL_2232 and MUL_3720 of Mycobacterium ulcerans Induces Antibodies but Fails to Provide Protection against Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Bénard, Angèle; Dreyer, Anita M.; Kerber, Sarah; Vettiger, Andrea; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic ulcerative neglected tropical disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that is most prevalent in West African countries. M. ulcerans produces a cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin called mycolactone, which causes extensive necrosis of infected subcutaneous tissue and the development of characteristic ulcerative lesions with undermined edges. While cellular immune responses are expected to play a key role against early intracellular stages of M. ulcerans in macrophages, antibody mediated protection might be of major relevance against advanced stages, where bacilli are predominantly found as extracellular clusters. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess whether vaccine induced antibodies against surface antigens of M. ulcerans can protect against Buruli ulcer we formulated two surface vaccine candidate antigens, MUL_2232 and MUL_3720, as recombinant proteins with the synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion. The candidate vaccines elicited strong antibody responses without a strong bias towards a TH1 type cellular response, as indicated by the IgG2a to IgG1 ratio. Despite the cross-reactivity of the induced antibodies with the native antigens, no significant protection was observed against progression of an experimental M. ulcerans infection in a mouse footpad challenge model. Conclusions Even though vaccine-induced antibodies have the potential to opsonise the extracellular bacilli they do not have a protective effect since infiltrating phagocytes might be killed by mycolactone before reaching the bacteria, as indicated by lack of viable infiltrates in the necrotic infection foci. PMID:26849213

  18. Steps Toward Creating A Therapeutic Community for Inpatients Suffering from Chronic Ulcers: Lessons from Allada Buruli Ulcer Treatment Hospital in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Amoussouhoui, Arnaud Setondji; Johnson, Roch Christian; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Agbo, Ines Elvire; Aoulou, Paulin; Houezo, Jean-Gabin; Tingbe-Azalou, Albert; Boyer, Micah; Nichter, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing social distance between hospital staff and patients and establishing clear lines of communication is a major challenge when providing in-patient care for people afflicted by Buruli ulcer (BU) and chronic ulcers. Research on hospitals as therapeutic communities is virtually non-existent in Africa and is currently being called for by medical anthropologists working in the field of health service and policy planning. This paper describes a pioneering attempt to establish a therapeutic community for patients suffering from BU and other chronic ulcers requiring long term hospital care in Benin. Methods A six-month pilot project was undertaken with the objectives of establishing a therapeutic community and evaluating its impact on practitioner and patient relations. The project was designed and implemented by a team of social scientists working in concert with the current and previous director of a hospital serving patients suffering from advanced stage BU and other chronic ulcers. Qualitative research initially investigated patients’ understanding of their illness and its treatment, identified questions patients had about their hospitalization, and ascertained their level of social support. Newly designed question–answer health education sessions were developed. Following these hospital wide education sessions, open forums were held each week to provide an opportunity for patients and hospital staff to express concerns and render sources of discontent transparent. Patient group representatives then met with hospital staff to problem solve issues in a non-confrontational manner. Psychosocial support for individual patients was provided in a second intervention which took the form of drop-in counseling sessions with social scientists trained to serve as therapy facilitators and culture brokers. Results Interviews with patients revealed that most patients had very little information about the identity of their illness and the duration of their

  19. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Laboratory Confirmation of Buruli Ulcer Disease—Towards a Point-of-Care Test

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Phillips, Richard Odame; Battke, Florian; Bauer, Malkin; Badziklou, Kossi; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Maman, Issaka; Rhomberg, Agata; Piten, Ebekalisai; Frimpong, Michael; Huber, Kristina Lydia; Symank, Dominik; Jansson, Moritz; Wiedemann, Franz Xaver; Banla Kere, Abiba; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Löscher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background As the major burden of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD) occurs in remote rural areas, development of point-of-care (POC) tests is considered a research priority to bring diagnostic services closer to the patients. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), a simple, robust and cost-effective technology, has been selected as a promising POC test candidate. Three BUD-specific LAMP assays are available to date, but various technical challenges still hamper decentralized application. To overcome the requirement of cold-chains for transport and storage of reagents, the aim of this study was to establish a dry-reagent-based LAMP assay (DRB-LAMP) employing lyophilized reagents. Methodology/Principal Findings Following the design of an IS2404 based conventional LAMP (cLAMP) assay suitable to apply lyophilized reagents, a lyophylization protocol for the DRB-LAMP format was developed. Clinical performance of cLAMP was validated through testing of 140 clinical samples from 91 suspected BUD cases by routine assays, i.e. IS2404 dry-reagent-based (DRB) PCR, conventional IS2404 PCR (cPCR), IS2404 qPCR, compared to cLAMP. Whereas qPCR rendered an additional 10% of confirmed cases and samples respectively, case confirmation and positivity rates of DRB-PCR or cPCR (64.84% and 56.43%; 100% concordant results in both assays) and cLAMP (62.64% and 52.86%) were comparable and there was no significant difference between the sensitivity of the assays (DRB PCR and cPCR, 86.76%; cLAMP, 83.82%). Likewise, sensitivity of cLAMP (95.83%) and DRB-LAMP (91.67%) were comparable as determined on a set of 24 samples tested positive in all routine assays. Conclusions/Significance Both LAMP formats constitute equivalent alternatives to conventional PCR techniques. Provided the envisaged availability of field friendly DNA extraction formats, both assays are suitable for decentralized laboratory confirmation of BUD, whereby DRB-LAMP scores with the additional advantage of not requiring cold

  20. Buruli ulcer disease prevalence in Benin, West Africa: Associations with land use/cover and the identification of disease clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, T.; Benbow, M.E.; Brenden, T.O.; Qi, J.; Johnson, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, caused by infection with the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans, is an emerging infectious disease in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Although vectors and modes of transmission remain unknown, it is hypothesized that the transmission of BU disease is associated with human activities in or around aquatic environments, and that characteristics of the landscape (e.g., land use/cover) play a role in mediating BU disease. Several studies performed at relatively small spatial scales (e.g., within a single village or region of a country) support these hypotheses; however, if BU disease is associated with land use/cover characteristics, either through spatial constraints on vector-host dynamics or by mediating human activities, then large-scale (i.e., country-wide) associations should also emerge. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate associations between BU disease prevalence in villages in Benin, West Africa and surrounding land use/cover patterns and other map-based characteristics, and (2) identify areas with greater and lower than expected prevalence rates (i.e., disease clusters) to assist with the development of prevention and control programs. Results: Our landscape-based models identified low elevation, rural villages surrounded by forest land cover, and located in drainage basins with variable wetness patterns as being associated with higher BU disease prevalence rates. We also identified five spatial disease clusters. Three of the five clusters contained villages with greater than expected prevalence rates and two clusters contained villages with lower than expected prevalence rates. Those villages with greater than expected BU disease prevalence rates spanned a fairly narrow region of south-central Benin. Conclusion: Our analyses suggest that interactions between natural land cover and human alterations to the landscape likely play a role in the dynamics of BU disease. For example

  1. Good Quality of Life in Former Buruli Ulcer Patients with Small Lesions: Long-Term Follow-up of the BURULICO Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klis, Sandor; Ranchor, Adelita; Phillips, Richard O.; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Loth, Susanne; Velding, Kristien; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli Ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which, due to scarring and contractures can lead to stigma and functional limitations. However, recent advances in treatment, combined with increased public health efforts have the potential to significantly improve disease outcome. Objectives To study the Quality of Life (QoL) of former Buruli Ulcer patients who, in the context of a randomized controlled trial, reported early with small lesions (cross-sectional diameter <10 cm), and received a full course of antibiotic treatment. Methods 127 Participants of the BURULICO drug trial in Ghana were revisited. All former patients aged 16 or older completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF). The WHOQOL-BREF was also administered to 82 matched healthy controls. Those younger than 16 completed the Childrens' Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) only. Results The median (Inter Quartile Range) score on the DLQI was 0 (0–4), indicating good QoL. 85% of former patients indicated no effect, or only a small effect of the disease on their current life. Former patients also indicated good QoL on the physical and psychological domains of the WHOQOL-BREF, and scored significantly higher than healthy controls on these domains. There was a weak correlation between the DLQI and scar size (ρ = 0.32; p<0.001). Conclusions BU patients who report early with small lesions and receive 8 weeks of antimicrobial therapy have a good QoL at long-term follow-up. These findings contrast with the debilitating sequelae often reported in BU, and highlight the importance of early case detection. PMID:25010061

  2. [Micronecta sp (Corixidae) and Diplonychus sp (Belostomatidae), two aquatic Hemiptera hosts and/or potential vectors of Mycobacterium ulcerans (pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer) in Cote d'Ivoire].

    PubMed

    Doannio, J M C; Konan, K L; Dosso, F N; Koné, A B; Konan, Y L; Sankaré, Y; Ekaza, E; Coulibaly, N D; Odéhouri, K P; Dosso, M; Sess, E D; Marsollier, L; Aubry, J

    2011-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is currently a major public health problem in Côte d'Ivoire. It is a neglected tropical disease closely associated with aquatic environments. Aquatic insects of the Hemiptera order have been implicated in human transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the pathogenic agent of Buruli ulcer. The purpose of this preliminary study using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was to evaluate aquatic insects in Sokrogbo, a village in the Tiassalé sanitary district where Buruli ulcer is endemic. Findings identified two water bugs hosting Mycobacterium ulcerans, i.e., one of the Micronecta genus in the Corixidae family and another of the Diplonychus genus in the Belostomatidae family. The PCR technique used revealed the molecular signatures of M. ulcerans in tissue from these two insects. Based on these findings, these two water bugs can be considered as potential hosts and/or vectors of M. ulcerans in the study zone. Unlike Diplonychus sp., this is the first report to describe Micronecta sp as a host of M. ulcerans. Further investigation will be needed to assess the role of these two water bugs in human transmission of M. ulcerans in Côte d'Ivoire. PMID:21585092

  3. Identification of the Mycobacterium ulcerans Protein MUL_3720 as a Promising Target for the Development of a Diagnostic Test for Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Anita; Röltgen, Katharina; Dangy, Jean Pierre; Ruf, Marie Thérèse; Scherr, Nicole; Bolz, Miriam; Tobias, Nicholas Jay; Moes, Charles; Vettiger, Andrea; Stinear, Timothy Paul; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a devastating skin disease, occurring mainly in remote West African communities with poor access to health care. Early case detection and subsequent antibiotic treatment are essential to counteract the progression of the characteristic chronic ulcerative lesions. Since the accuracy of clinical BU diagnosis is limited, laboratory reconfirmation is crucial. However, currently available diagnostic techniques with sufficient sensitivity and specificity require infrastructure and resources only accessible at a few reference centres in the African endemic countries. Hence, the development of a simple, rapid, sensitive and specific point-of-care diagnostic tool is one of the major research priorities for BU. In this study, we have identified a previously unknown M. ulcerans protein, MUL_3720, as a promising target for antigen capture-based detection assays. We show that MUL_3720 is highly expressed by M. ulcerans and has no orthologs in other prevalent pathogenic mycobacteria. We generated a panel of anti-MUL_3720 antibodies and used them to confirm a cell wall location for MUL_3720. These antibodies could also specifically detect M. ulcerans in infected human tissue samples as well as in lysates of infected mouse footpads. A bacterial 2-hybrid screen suggested a potential role for MUL_3720 in cell wall biosynthesis pathways. Finally, we demonstrate that a combination of MUL_3720 specific antibody reagents in a sandwich-ELISA format has sufficient sensitivity to make them suitable for the development of antigen capture-based diagnostic tests for BU. PMID:25668636

  4. Spatial dependency of Buruli ulcer prevalence on arsenic-enriched domains in Amansie West District, Ghana: implications for arsenic mediation in Mycobacterium ulcerans infection

    PubMed Central

    Duker, Alfred A; Carranza, Emmanuel JM; Hale, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Background In 1998, the World Health Organization recognized Buruli ulcer (BU), a human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), as the third most prevalent mycobacterial disease. In Ghana, there have been more than 2000 reported cases in the last ten years; outbreaks have occurred in at least 90 of its 110 administrative districts. In one of the worst affected districts, Amansie West, there are arsenic-enriched surface environments resulting from the oxidation of arsenic-bearing minerals, occurring naturally in mineral deposits. Results Proximity analysis, carried out to determine spatial relationships between BU-affected areas and arsenic-enriched farmlands and arsenic-enriched drainage channels in the Amansie West District, showed that mean BU prevalence in settlements along arsenic-enriched drainages and within arsenic-enriched farmlands is greater than elsewhere. Furthermore, mean BU prevalence is greater along arsenic-enriched drainages than within arsenic-enriched farmlands. Conclusion The results suggest that arsenic in the environment may play a contributory role in MU infection. PMID:15369592

  5. Economic inequality caused by feedbacks between poverty and the dynamics of a rare tropical disease: the case of Buruli ulcer in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N; Guegan, Jean-Francois; Texier, Gaëtan; Bellanger, Martine; Bonds, Matthew; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have received increasing attention in recent years by the global heath community, as they cumulatively constitute substantial burdens of disease as well as barriers for economic development. A number of common tropical diseases such as malaria, hookworm or schistosomiasis have well-documented economic impacts. However, much less is known about the population-level impacts of diseases that are rare but associated with high disability burden, which represent a great number of tropical diseases. Using an individual-based model of Buruli ulcer (BU), we demonstrate that, through feedbacks between health and economic status, such NTDs can have a significant impact on the economic structure of human populations even at low incidence levels. While average wealth is only marginally affected by BU, the economic conditions of certain subpopulations are impacted sufficiently to create changes in measurable population-level inequality. A reduction of the disability burden caused by BU can thus maximize the economic growth of the poorest subpopulations and reduce significantly the economic inequalities introduced by the disease in endemic regions. PMID:26538592

  6. Sensitivity of PCR Targeting the IS2404 Insertion Sequence of Mycobacterium ulcerans in an Assay Using Punch Biopsy Specimens for Diagnosis of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R.; Horsfield, C.; Kuijper, S.; Lartey, A.; Tetteh, I.; Etuaful, S.; Nyamekye, B.; Awuah, P.; Nyarko, K. M.; Osei-Sarpong, F.; Lucas, S.; Kolk, A. H. J.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.

    2005-01-01

    Punch biopsy specimens from Mycobacterium ulcerans disease lesions were used to compare the sensitivities and specificities of direct smear, culture, PCR, and histopathology in making a diagnosis of M. ulcerans disease in a field setting. PCR for the insertion element IS2404 was modified to include uracil-N-glycosylase and deoxyuridine triphosphate instead of deoxythymidine triphosphate to reduce the risk of cross contamination. The “gold standard” for confirmation of clinically diagnosed Buruli ulcer was a definite histological diagnosis, a positive culture for M. ulcerans, or a smear positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB), together with a possible histological diagnosis. For 70 clinically diagnosed cases of M. ulcerans disease, the modified PCR was 98% sensitive and gave a rapid result. The sensitivities of microscopy, culture, and histology were 42%, 49%, and 82%, respectively. The use of a 4-mm punch biopsy specimen was preferred to a 6-mm punch biopsy specimen since the wound was less likely to bleed and to need stitching. Given adequate technical expertise and the use of controls, the PCR was viable in a teaching hospital setting in Ghana; and in routine practice, we would recommend the use of Ziehl-Neelsen staining of biopsy specimens to detect AFB, followed by PCR, in AFB-negative cases only, in order to minimize costs. Histology and culture remain important as quality control tests, particularly in studies of treatment efficacy. PMID:16081892

  7. Local Heat Application for the Treatment of Buruli Ulcer: Results of a Phase II Open Label Single Center Non Comparative Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Moritz; Bayi, Pierre F.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Bratschi, Martin W.; Bolz, Miriam; Um Boock, Alphonse; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pluschke, Gerd; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease most prevalent among West African children. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, is sensitive to temperatures above 37°C. We investigated the safety and efficacy of a local heat application device based on phase change material. Methods. In a phase II open label single center noncomparative clinical trial (ISRCTN 72102977) under GCP standards in Cameroon, laboratory confirmed BU patients received up to 8 weeks of heat treatment. We assessed efficacy based on the endpoints ‘absence of clinical BU specific features’ or ‘wound closure’ within 6 months (“primary cure”), and ‘absence of clinical recurrence within 24 month’ (“definite cure”). Results. Of 53 patients 51 (96%) had ulcerative disease. 62% were classified as World Health Organization category II, 19% each as category I and III. The average lesion size was 45 cm2. Within 6 months after completion of heat treatment 92.4% (49 of 53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 81.8% to 98.0%) achieved cure of their primary lesion. At 24 months follow-up 83.7% (41 of 49, 95% CI, 70.3% to 92.7%) of patients with primary cure remained free of recurrence. Heat treatment was well tolerated; adverse effects were occasional mild local skin reactions. Conclusions. Local thermotherapy is a highly effective, simple, cheap and safe treatment for M. ulcerans disease. It has in particular potential as home-based remedy for BU suspicious lesions at community level where laboratory confirmation is not available. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRCT 72102977. PMID:26486698

  8. A Community Based Study on the Mode of Transmission, Prevention and Treatment of Buruli Ulcers in Southwest Cameroon: Knowledge, Attitude and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Akoachere, Jane-Francis K. T.; Nsai, Frankline S.; Ndip, Roland N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease affecting the skin, tissues and in some cases the bones, caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans). Its mode of transmission is still elusive. Delayed treatment may cause irreversible disabilities with consequent social and economic impacts on the victim. Socio-cultural beliefs, practices and attitudes in endemic communities have been shown to influence timely treatment causing disease management, prevention and control a great challenge. An assessment of these factors in endemic localities is important in designing successful intervention strategies. Considering this, we assessed the knowledge, attitude and practices regarding BU in three endemic localities in the South West region, Cameroon to highlight existing misconceptions that need to be addressed to enhance prompt treatment and facilitate effective prevention and control. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional study was executed in three BU endemic health districts. Using qualitative and quantitative approaches we surveyed 320 randomly selected household heads, interviewed BU patients and conducted three focus group discussions (FGDs) to obtain information on awareness, beliefs, treatment, and attitudes towards victims. The influence of socio-demographic factors on these variables was investigated. Results Respondents (84.4%) had a good knowledge of BU though only 65% considered it a health problem while 49.4% believed it is contagious. Socio-demographic factors significantly (P<0.05) influenced awareness of BU, knowledge and practice on treatment and attitudes towards victims. Although the majority of respondents stated the hospital as the place for appropriate treatment, FGDs and some BU victims preferred witchdoctors/herbalists and prayers, and considered the hospital as the last option. We documented beliefs about the disease which could delay treatment. Conclusion Though we are reporting a high level of

  9. Geographic distribution, age pattern and sites of lesions in a cohort of Buruli ulcer patients from the Mapé Basin of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Bratschi, Martin W; Bolz, Miriam; Minyem, Jacques C; Grize, Leticia; Wantong, Fidèle G; Kerber, Sarah; Njih Tabah, Earnest; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Mou, Ferdinand; Noumen, Djeunga; Um Boock, Alphonse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), a neglected tropical disease of the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, occurs most frequently in children in West Africa. Risk factors for BU include proximity to slow flowing water, poor wound care and not wearing protective clothing. Man-made alterations of the environment have been suggested to lead to increased BU incidence. M. ulcerans DNA has been detected in the environment, water bugs and recently also in mosquitoes. Despite these findings, the mode of transmission of BU remains poorly understood and both transmission by insects or direct inoculation from contaminated environment have been suggested. Here, we investigated the BU epidemiology in the Mapé basin of Cameroon where the damming of the Mapé River since 1988 is believed to have increased the incidence of BU. Through a house-by-house survey in spring 2010, which also examined the local population for leprosy and yaws, and continued surveillance thereafter, we identified, till June 2012, altogether 88 RT-PCR positive cases of BU. We found that the age adjusted cumulative incidence of BU was highest in young teenagers and in individuals above the age of 50 and that very young children (<5) were underrepresented among cases. BU lesions clustered around the ankles and at the back of the elbows. This pattern neither matches any of the published mosquito biting site patterns, nor the published distribution of small skin injuries in children, where lesions on the knees are much more frequent. The option of multiple modes of transmission should thus be considered. Analyzing the geographic distribution of cases in the Mapé Dam area revealed a closer association with the Mbam River than with the artificial lake. PMID:23785529

  10. Geographic Distribution, Age Pattern and Sites of Lesions in a Cohort of Buruli Ulcer Patients from the Mapé Basin of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Bratschi, Martin W.; Bolz, Miriam; Minyem, Jacques C.; Grize, Leticia; Wantong, Fidèle G.; Kerber, Sarah; Njih Tabah, Earnest; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Mou, Ferdinand; Noumen, Djeunga; Um Boock, Alphonse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), a neglected tropical disease of the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, occurs most frequently in children in West Africa. Risk factors for BU include proximity to slow flowing water, poor wound care and not wearing protective clothing. Man-made alterations of the environment have been suggested to lead to increased BU incidence. M. ulcerans DNA has been detected in the environment, water bugs and recently also in mosquitoes. Despite these findings, the mode of transmission of BU remains poorly understood and both transmission by insects or direct inoculation from contaminated environment have been suggested. Here, we investigated the BU epidemiology in the Mapé basin of Cameroon where the damming of the Mapé River since 1988 is believed to have increased the incidence of BU. Through a house-by-house survey in spring 2010, which also examined the local population for leprosy and yaws, and continued surveillance thereafter, we identified, till June 2012, altogether 88 RT-PCR positive cases of BU. We found that the age adjusted cumulative incidence of BU was highest in young teenagers and in individuals above the age of 50 and that very young children (<5) were underrepresented among cases. BU lesions clustered around the ankles and at the back of the elbows. This pattern neither matches any of the published mosquito biting site patterns, nor the published distribution of small skin injuries in children, where lesions on the knees are much more frequent. The option of multiple modes of transmission should thus be considered. Analyzing the geographic distribution of cases in the Mapé Dam area revealed a closer association with the Mbam River than with the artificial lake. PMID:23785529

  11. What Role Do Traditional Beliefs Play in Treatment Seeking and Delay for Buruli Ulcer Disease?–Insights from a Mixed Methods Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Peeters Grietens, Koen; Toomer, Elizabeth; Um Boock, Alphonse; Hausmann-Muela, Susanna; Peeters, Hans; Kanobana, Kirezi; Gryseels, Charlotte; Ribera, Joan Muela

    2012-01-01

    Background Victims of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD) frequently report to specialized units at a late stage of the disease. This delay has been associated with local beliefs and a preference for traditional healing linked to a reportedly mystical origin of the disease. We assessed the role beliefs play in determining BUD sufferers’ choice between traditional and biomedical treatments. Methods Anthropological fieldwork was conducted in community and clinical settings in the region of Ayos and Akonolinga in Central Cameroon. The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, triangulating a qualitative strand based on ethnographic research and quantitative data obtained through a survey presented to all patients at the Ayos and Akonolinga hospitals (N = 79) at the time of study and in four endemic communities (N = 73) belonging to the hospitals’ catchment area. Results The analysis of BUD sufferers’ health-seeking behaviour showed extremely complex therapeutic itineraries, including various attempts and failures both in the biomedical and traditional fields. Contrary to expectations, nearly half of all hospital patients attributed their illness to mystical causes, while traditional healers admitted patients they perceived to be infected by natural causes. Moreover, both patients in hospitals and in communities often combined elements of both types of treatments. Ultimately, perceptions regarding the effectiveness of the treatment, the option for local treatment as a cost prevention strategy and the characteristics of the doctor-patient relationship were more determinant for treatment choice than beliefs. Discussion The ascription of delay and treatment choice to beliefs constitutes an over-simplification of BUD health-seeking behaviour and places the responsibility directly on the shoulders of BUD sufferers while potentially neglecting other structural elements. While more efficacious treatment in the biomedical sector is likely to reduce perceived

  12. Household cost of out-patient treatment of Buruli ulcer in Ghana: a case study of Obom in Ga South Municipality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The economic burden of diseases has become increasingly relevant to policy makers as healthcare expenditure keep rising in the face of limited and competing resources. Buruli ulcer (BU), a neglected but treatable tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, the only known environmental mycobacterium is capable of causing long term disability when left untreated. However, most BU studies have tended to focused on its bacteriology, epidemiology, entomology and other social determinants to the neglect of its economic evaluation. This paper reports estimated the household economic costs of BU and describe the intangible cost suffered by BU patients in an endemic area. Methods Retrospective one year cost data was used. A total of 63 confirmed BU cases were randomly sampled for the study. Economic cost and cost burden of BU were estimated. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to test the robustness of the cost estimates. Intangible cost measured stigmatization, pain, functional limitation and social isolation of children. Results The annual total household economic cost was US$35,915.98, of which about 65% was cost incurred by children with a mean cost of US$521.04. The mean annual household cost was US$570.09. The direct cost was 96% of the total cost. Non-medical cost accounts for about 97% of the direct cost with a mean cost of US$529.27. The mean medical cost was US$18.94. The main cost drivers of the household costs were transportation (78%) and food (12%). Caregivers and adult patients lost a total of 535 productive days seeking care, which gives an indirect cost valued at US$1,378.67 with a mean of US$21.88. A total of 365 school days (about 1 year) were lost by 19 BU patients (mean, 19.2 days). Functional loss and pain were low, and stigma rated moderate. Most children suffering from BU (84%) were socially isolated. Conclusion Household cost burden of out-patient BU ulcer treatment was high. Household cost of BU is therefore essential in the

  13. Socio-Environmental Factors Associated with the Risk of Contracting Buruli Ulcer in Tiassalé, South Côte d’Ivoire: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    N’krumah, Raymond T. A. S.; Koné, Brama; Tiembre, Issaka; Cissé, Guéladio; Pluschke, Gerd; Tanner, Marcel; Utzinger, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a cutaneous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The exact mode of transmission remains elusive; yet, some studies identified environmental, socio-sanitary, and behavioral risk factors. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of such factors to contracting BU in Tiassalé, south Côte d’Ivoire. Methodology A case-control study was conducted in 2012. Cases were BU patients diagnosed according to clinical definition put forth by the World Health Organization, readily confirmed by IS2404 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis prior to our study and recruited at one of the health centers of the district. Two controls were matched for each control, by age group (to the nearest 5 years), sex, and living community. Participants were interviewed after providing oral witnessed consent, assessing behavioral, environmental, and socio-sanitary factors. Principal Findings A total of 51 incident and prevalent cases and 102 controls were enrolled. Sex ratio (male:female) was 0.9. Median age was 25 years (range: 5–70 years). Regular contact with unprotected surface water (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 6.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.1–19.7) and absence of protective equipment during agricultural activities (aOR = 18.5, 95% CI = 5.2–66.7) were identified as the main factors associated with the risk of contracting BU. Etiologic fractions among exposed to both factors were 84.9% and 94.6%, respectively. Good knowledge about the risks that may result in BU (aOR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1–0.8) and perception about the disease causes (aOR = 0.1, 95% CI = 0.02–0.3) showed protection against BU with a respective preventive fraction of 70% and 90%. Conclusions/Significance Main risk factors identified in this study were the contact with unprotected water bodies through daily activities and the absence of protective equipment during agricultural activities. An effective strategy to reduce the incidence of BU should

  14. Buruli Ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection)

    MedlinePlus

    ... its effectiveness has not been proven by a randomized trial. Since streptomycin is contraindicated in pregnancy, the ... though its effectiveness has not been proven by randomized trial. Morbidity management, disability prevention and rehabilitation Interventions ...

  15. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one. Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medicines. Although most people take these medicines without ... may damage the stomach lining and cause ulcers. Anti-inflammatory drugs include aspirin, ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin), ...

  16. [Gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shigenaga; Kashida, Hiroshi; Asakuma, Yutaka; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the acid secretion amount is increased by westernization of foods and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected patient's decrease in Japanese. Therefore, the recent tendencies are decrease of peptic ulcer diseases by H. pylori infection and increase of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) ulcers. The endoscopic hemostasis should be performed for upper gastrointestinal bleeding from peptic ulcers in the first choice. A surgery or interventional radiology (IVR) should be performed in the unsuccessfulness of endoscopic hemostasis. H. pylori eradication therapy is effective for healing and prevention of recurrence from peptic ulcers. For prevention of recurrence of NSAIDs ulcers, therapy with proton pump inhibitor is effective. PMID:26165067

  17. [Leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Unger, L; Stelzner, C; Machetanz, J; Schellong, S

    2013-11-01

    The lower leg is in particular prone to the development of ulceration. Many different causes may lead to ulceration. Thus, a thorough diagnosis is mandatory, and a biopsy is often required. By far the most common type is the classical venous ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency, located at the medial ankle. A more complicated-and more difficult to treat-type of venous ulcer is arthrogenic congestion syndrome with its extreme variant of a "legging" ulcer. In cases with severe peripheral arterial disease, an arterial ulcer may develop. The hypertensive ulcer Martorell is associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes; the underlying pathology is occlusion of arteriolar vessels. A typical diabetic ulceration is the necrobiosis lipoidica. Important differential diagnoses of leg ulceration include pyoderma gangrenosum and the calciphylactic ulcer. Due to a long-standing course, an ulceration may turn malignant. Vice versa, ulceration may occur as sign of a primary malignant lesion. PMID:24005788

  18. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  19. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates...), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer

  20. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients with ulcer bleeding. Am J Gastroenterol . 2012 Mar;107(3):345-60. PMID: 22310222 www.ncbi. ... NSAID-related ulcer complications. Am J Gastroenterol . 2009 Mar;104(3):728-38. McColl KEL. Helicobacter pylori ...

  1. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at ...

  2. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  3. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... health conditions. Other medicines used for ulcers are: Misoprostol, a drug that may help prevent ulcers in ... acid blocker Have you take a drug called misoprostol The following lifestyle changes may help prevent peptic ...

  4. Pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Deborah

    2016-04-13

    My nursing experience is in acute care. Acute medical nurses are well placed to assess skin integrity, identify patients at risk of pressure ulcer development, and commence appropriate interventions to prevent or treat pressure ulcers. PMID:27073966

  5. [Martorell ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas; Koljonen, Virve; Senet, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Martorell ulcer (also called hypertensive leg ulcer) is an unusual, but not rare, cause of leg ulcers. It represents up to 15% of the leg ulcers hospitalized in a dermatology ward. It affects patients, aged from 40 to 85 years old, with a past long history of poorly controlled hypertension and sometimes diabetes. Clinical presentation is highly characteristic with an extremely painful, slowly extensive, superficial necrotic ulcer with a purpuric rim. Delay of healing is usually slow. Skin biopsies of the wound border, are warranted for differential diagnosis only in atypical cases. Management includes active pain control, wound debridement, skin grafting and hypertension control. PMID:23767134

  6. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  7. Palatal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Bansal, Shuchi

    2014-01-01

    Palatal ulcers are a common presentation and can be conveniently divided into developmental and acquired causes, the latter of which is subdivided into acute and chronic causes. Most commonly seen dermatologic causes have associated skin manifestations. Acute and multiple ulcers are usually infectious or drug induced in origin. Recurrent ulcers are largely dominated by aphthosis, while chronic ulcers are seen in immunocompromised patients and can occasionally be malignant. It is essential to involve the oral and maxillofacial surgeons early in the therapeutic management to tackle the inevitable complications that may ensue in the chronic cases. PMID:25441477

  8. Martorell's ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Shutler, S. D.; Baragwanath, P.; Harding, K. G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports a rare form of ulceration of the lower leg and, as a result of subsequent investigations and literature review, readdresses a recent debate regarding the legitimate classification of these ulcers as a separate disease entity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8552533

  9. Venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Reichenberg, Jason; Davis, Mark

    2005-12-01

    Veneous ulcers are extremely common, accounting for a large proportin of all lower extremity ulcers. Due to their chronicity and relatively high prevalence, their impact on the cost of healthcare and the lives of the patients affected is quite significant. There has been progress in understanding the pathophysiology, clinical features, and diagnosis of these ulcers, but the basic principles of care have remained consistent for almost a half century. To allow for optimal healing, it is important to maintain a clean moist wound bed, treat any clinically significant infection, and decrease surrounding edema. PMID:16387266

  10. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... are absorbed in the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into ... wall of the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are ...

  11. Mouth ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Canker sores Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore ... bacterial infection of ulcers Dental infections ( tooth abscesses ) Oral cancer Spread of contagious disorders to other people When ...

  12. Mouth ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by many disorders. These include: Canker sores Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may also appear as a mouth ulcer.

  13. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into simple substances. The ... the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are caused when ...

  14. Vasculitic Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Papi, Massimo; Papi, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic ulcers are an emerging problem in wound care that needs to be well defined and adequately approached by caregivers. Cutaneous vasculitis includes several inflammatory disorders that compromise microvessels and specifically the cutaneous vascular system: arterioles, capillaries, postcapillary venules. The pathogenetic role of circulating immunocomplexes and autoantibodies (antineutrophil antibodies) in these diseases has been widely demonstrated in animal models and in humans. Vasculitis can be limited to the skin or represent the cutaneous signs in case of systemic vasculitis with visceral involvement. The injury of cutaneous microvessels may result in impairment of blood flow and consequent focal ischemia and formation of skin ulcers. The ulcers are often multiple and localized on the lower leg and foot where the microcirculatory anatomy and rheologic dynamics are predisposing factors. Approximately 3% to 5% of skin ulcers may be caused by a vasculitic disorder. PMID:26657344

  15. Ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of nonhospitalized ulcerative colitis: the Toronto consensus. Gastroenterology . 2015;148(5):1035-58. PMID: 25747596 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25747596 . Burger D, Travis S. Conventional medical management of inflammatory bowel ...

  16. [Ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract resulting from dysregulated immune responses toward environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. This review focus on what is the state of the art of UC pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment and how any future findings could drive our clinical practice. PMID:27362722

  17. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  18. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  19. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries. PMID:26939278

  20. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations. PMID:26650697

  1. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  2. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcer has healed. These devices will take the pressure off of the ulcer area. This will help speed healing. Be sure to wear shoes that do not put a lot of pressure on only one part of your foot. Wear ...

  3. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  4. Compression and venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Stücker, M; Link, K; Reich-Schupke, S; Altmeyer, P; Doerler, M

    2013-03-01

    Compression therapy is considered to be the most important conservative treatment of venous leg ulcers. Until a few years ago, compression bandages were regarded as first-line therapy of venous leg ulcers. However, to date medical compression stockings are the first choice of treatment. With respect to compression therapy of venous leg ulcers the following statements are widely accepted: 1. Compression improves the healing of ulcers when compared with no compression; 2. Multicomponent compression systems are more effective than single-component compression systems; 3. High compression is more effective than lower compression; 4. Medical compression stockings are more effective than compression with short stretch bandages. Healed venous leg ulcers show a high relapse rate without ongoing treatment. The use of medical stockings significantly reduces the amount of recurrent ulcers. Furthermore, the relapse rate of venous leg ulcers can be significantly reduced by a combination of compression therapy and surgery of varicose veins compared with compression therapy alone. PMID:23482538

  5. 'Kissing' duodenal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Stabile, B E; Hardy, H J; Passaro, E

    1979-10-01

    Among 70 cases of perforated duodenal ulcers treated by plication, eight were complicated by massive postoperative hemorrhage from a syncronous posterior "kissing" duodenal ulcer. Critical analysis revealed that only signs of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding preoperatively had predictive value for postoperative hemorrhage. Twenty-four patients had one or more predictive signs, and eight actually bled postoperatively. There was a 50% mortality and 75% additional complication rate for the bleeders. In contrast, the nonbleeders had a mortality and a complication rate of only 18% and 35%, respectively. There was no observed superiority of either surgical or medical treatment for postoperative hemorrhage. In perforated duodenal ulcer with evidence of GI blood loss, an intraoperative search for a posterior kissing ulcer is recommended. If a kissing ulcer is found, an acid-reducing operation and suture ligation of the ulcer is indicated. PMID:485825

  6. Venous ulcers -- self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000744.htm Venous ulcers - self-care To use the sharing features on this ... slow to heal. Alternative names Venous leg ulcers - self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers - self-care; Stasis leg ...

  7. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described. PMID:26803094

  8. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  9. Epidemiology of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Kurata, J H; Haile, B M

    1984-05-01

    In the United States about four million people have active peptic ulcers and about 350,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Four times as many duodenal ulcers as gastric ulcers are diagnosed. Approximately 3000 deaths per year in the United States are due to duodenal ulcer and 3000 to gastric ulcer. There has been a marked decrease in reported hospitalization and mortality rates for peptic ulcer in the United States. Changes in criteria for selecting the underlying cause of death might account for some of the apparent decrease in ulcer mortality rates. Hospitalization rates for duodenal ulcers decreased nearly 50 per cent from 1970 to 1978, but hospitalization rates for gastric ulcers did not decrease. Although this decrease in hospitalization rates may reflect a decrease in duodenal ulcer disease incidence, it appears that changes in coding practices, hospitalization criteria, and diagnostic procedures have contributed to the reported declines in peptic ulcer hospitalization and mortality rates. There is no good evidence to support the popular belief that peptic ulcer is most common in the spring and autumn. The most consistent pattern appears to be low ulcer rates in the summer. There is strong evidence that cigarette smoking, regular use of aspirin, and prolonged use of steroids are associated with the development of peptic ulcer. There is some evidence that coffee and aspirin substitutes may affect ulcers, but most studies do not implicate alcohol, food, or psychological stress as causes of ulcer disease. Genetic factors play a role in both duodenal and gastric ulcer. The first-degree relatives of patients with duodenal ulcer have a two- to threefold increase in risk of getting duodenal ulcer and relatives of gastric ulcer patients have a similarly increased risk of getting a gastric ulcer. About half of the patients with duodenal ulcer have elevated plasma pepsinogen I. A small increase in risk of duodenal ulcer is found in persons with blood group O and in

  10. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  11. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. PMID:27343961

  12. UNUSUAL CAUSES OF CUTANEOUS ULCERATION

    PubMed Central

    Panuncialman, Jaymie; Falanga, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Skin ulceration is a major source of morbidity and is often difficult to manage. Ulcers due to an inflammatory etiology or microvascular occlusion are particularly challenging in terms of diagnosis and treatment. The management of such ulcers requires careful assessment of associated systemic conditions and a thorough analysis of the ulcer's clinical and histologic findings. In this report, we discuss several examples of inflammatory ulcers and the approach to their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21074034

  13. Differential diagnosis of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pannier, F; Rabe, E

    2013-03-01

    Leg and foot ulcers are symptoms of very different diseases. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers. The majority of leg ulcers occur in the lower leg or foot. In non-venous ulcers the localization in the foot area is more frequent. The most frequent underlying disease is chronic venous disease. In 354 leg ulcers, Koerber found 75.25% venous leg ulcers, 3.66% arterial leg ulcers, 14.66% ulcers of mixed venous and arterial origin and 13.5% vasculitic ulcers. In the Swedish population of Skaraborg, Nelzen found a venous origin in 54% of the ulcer patients. Each leg ulcer needs a clinical and anamnestic evaluation. Duplex ultrasound is the basic diagnostic tool to exclude vascular anomalies especially chronic venous and arterial occlusive disease. Skin biopsies help to find a correct diagnosis in unclear or non-healing cases. In conclusion, chronic venous disease is the most frequent cause of leg ulcerations. Because 25% of the population have varicose veins or other chronic venous disease the coincidence of pathological venous findings and ulceration is very frequent even in non-venous ulcerations. Leg ulcers without the symptoms of chronic venous disease should be considered as non-venous. PMID:23482536

  14. Homicide by decubitus ulcers.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Vincent J M; Di Maio, Theresa G

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, the only penalties for poor treatment of nursing home patients have been civil lawsuits against nursing homes and their employees by families, or fines and license suspension by government organizations. Recently, government agencies have become much more aggressive in citing institutions for the development of decubitus ulcers (pressure sores) in their patients. A few government institutions have concluded that in some cases, the development of ulcers with resultant death is so grievous that there should be criminal prosecution of the individuals and/or institutions providing care. A leader in this concept has been the State of Hawaii. In November 2000, the State of Hawaii convicted an individual of manslaughter in the death of a patient at an adult residential care home (a form of nursing home) for permitting the progression of decubitus ulcers without seeking medical help, and for not bringing the patient back to a physician for treatment of the ulcers. PMID:11953485

  15. Ulcerated Hemangioma - Surveillance Only.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca; Chiriac, Anca Eduard; Pinteala, Tudor; Foia, Liliana; Brzezinski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas are reported in 10-12% of children less than 1 year of age, with ulceration in about 5-13% of cases. Little is known about the mechanism of this disease and explanations are still being looked for. We present a 4-month-old female infant with haemangioma on the left buttock; the hemangioma was noticed at 2 weeks of age, progressively enlarging and ulcerated. PMID:26431099

  16. Cushing's ulcer: Further reflections

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, William J.; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors, traumatic head injury, and other intracranial processes including infections, can cause increased intracranial pressure and lead to overstimulation of the vagus nerve. As a result, increased secretion of gastric acid may occur which leads to gastro-duodenal ulcer formation known as Cushing's ulcer. Methods: A review of original records of Dr. Harvey Cushing's patients suffering from gastro-duodenal ulcers was performed followed by a discussion of the available literature. We also reviewed the clinical records of the patients never reported by Cushing to gain his perspective in describing this phenomenon. Dr. Cushing was intrigued to investigate gastro-duodenal ulcers as he lost patients to acute gastrointestinal perforations following successful brain tumor operations. It is indeed ironic that Harvey Cushing developed a gastro-duodenal ulcer in his later years with failing health. Results: Clinically shown by Cushing's Yale Registry, a tumor or lesion can disrupt this circuitry, leading to gastroduodenal ulceration. Cushing said that it was “reasonable to believe that the perforations following posterior fossa cerebellar operations were produced in like fashion by an irritative disturbance either of fiber tracts or vagal centers in the brain stem.” Conclusion: Harvey Cushing's pioneering work depicted in his Yale registry serves as a milestone for continuing research that can further discern this pathway. PMID:25972936

  17. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  18. A case of HIV ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated ulcers must be distinguished from idiopathic anal fissures in HIV-positive patients and from other sexually transmitted diseases that cause anogenital ulcers as the treatments differ. PMID:26266040

  19. Understanding non ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Loh, K Y; Siang, T K

    2008-06-01

    Non ulcer dyspepsia is one of the most common problems encountered in primary care practice. The underlying pathophysiology of non ulcer dyspepsia is not fully understood, but it is known that this condition is associated with H. pylori infection and motility disorder. The presenting abdominal symptoms are non specific: they include bloating, belching, flatulence, excessive fullness after eating and nausea. Psychological condition such as anxiety, depression and stress do play a role in the recurrence of symptoms. Upper GI endoscopy is necessary in patients who presents with alarm symptoms suggestive of possible underlying organic condition before one makes the diagnosis of non ulcer dyspepsia. Pharmacological therapy using H2 receptor antagonist and proton pump inhibitors are effective for symptom relief. Patient's education and supportive care should be part of the management strategy in recurrent chronic dyspepsia. PMID:18942314

  20. Investigation of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kokkosis, Angela A; Labropoulos, Nicos; Gasparis, Antonios P

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of patients with venous ulceration primarily includes noninvasive methods to elucidate the distribution and extent of pathology. Duplex ultrasound is the first line of investigation, as it provides assessment of both reflux and obstruction conditions. In patients with iliofemoral pathology, axial imaging with computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging should be performed. If the treatment of iliofemoral vein obstruction is warranted, then invasive assessment using venography and/or intravascular ultrasound should be used to guide the interventional procedure. Venous valve reflux can be identified and accurately characterized by duplex ultrasound, whereas the ultrasound assessment of functional abnormality associated with obstruction is less reliable. In patients with ulceration, the evaluation for and treatment of proximal venous obstruction has resulted in improved ulcer healing. PMID:26358305

  1. Ulcerated tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Filanovsky, Michelle Gita; Sukhdeo, Kumar; McNamara, Megan Cunnane

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterised by hyperuricemia, which, if poorly controlled, can lead to the development of tophi. We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man with poorly controlled polyarticular tophaceous gout with multiple comorbidities (including renal failure) who presented with tophaceous ulcers of the upper extremity. These ulcers caused extreme pain, requiring chronic opiate medications, and were associated with decreased sensation and reduced ability to move the extremity. His hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury, haemolytic anaemia and Clostridium difficile infection. He required 1 month of antibiotics and intensive wound care for his ulcers. This case highlights the diagnosis, natural history and management of an unusual complication of hyperuricemia. PMID:26240104

  2. Venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of advice about self-help interventions in people receiving usual care for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 101 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids

  3. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  4. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  5. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  6. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  7. Management of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fell, John M; Muhammed, Rafeeq; Spray, Chris; Crook, Kay; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) in children is increasing. The range of treatments available has also increased too but around 1 in 4 children still require surgery to control their disease. An up-to-date understanding of treatments is essential for all clinicians involved in the care of UC patients to ensure appropriate and timely treatment while minimising the risk of complications and side effects. PMID:26553909

  8. Venous Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Alejandra; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-08-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of venous leg ulcers, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27479227

  9. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  10. [Neuropathy and diabetic foot ulcers].

    PubMed

    Lobmann, R

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature. Polyneuropathy plays an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the high rates of major amputations. PMID:25903093

  11. Marginal ulcer in achlorhydric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tauxe, R V; Wright, L F; Hirschowitz, B I

    1975-01-01

    Recurrent gastrojejunal ulceration is reported in three patients with histamine-fast achlorhydria. In none of these patients was extruding suture material responsible for the ulceration. However, all three patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and one abused aspirin as well. These cases demonstrate that achlorhydria does not protect against anastomotic ulceration. It is suggested that surgical manipulation produces an increased susceptibility to mucosal damage, and that it is erroneous to consider all anastomotic ulceration as a continuation or recurrence of acid peptic disease. PMID:1130864

  12. Nasal septal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Goel, Khushbu

    2014-01-01

    Nasal septal ulceration can have multiple etiologies. Determining the exact cause depends on who the consulting specialist is, who could either be the ENT surgeon or the dermatologist. The common causes are infections (tuberculosis, leprosy, leishmaniasis), vasculitis (Wegener's granulomatosis and Churg-Strauss syndrome), and lupus erythematosus. Traumatic causes and malignancy can also be seen in tertiary referral centers. The diagnosis often requires thorough investigations and multiple tissue specimens from various sites, and in chronic cases, a suspicion of lymphoma should be considered. Apart from disease-specific therapy, a multidisciplinary approach is required in most cases to tackle the cosmetic disfigurement. PMID:25441476

  13. Tofacitinib in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Archer, Thomas P; Moran, Gordon W; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-05-01

    Cytokines orchestrate immune and inflammatory responses involved in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC). Protein kinases are essential for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of protein tyrosine kinases that play a pivotal role in cytokine receptor signaling. Indeed, a major subgroup of cytokines use Type I and II cytokine receptors which signal via the activation of JAKs. Tofacitinib is an oral JAK inhibitor that has been studied in autoimmune pathologies, including UC and rheumatoid arthritis with good overall efficacy and acceptable safety profile. This literature review was performed with the goal of summarizing the knowledge on JAK inhibitors in UC treatment. PMID:27140405

  14. Foscarnet-induced penile ulceration.

    PubMed

    Torres, T; Fernandes, I; Sanches, M; Selores, M

    2011-01-01

    Foscarnet is used to treat herpes viruses, including drug-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). There are some reports of intravenous foscarnet-induced penile and vulvar ulceration. The authors report a case of the development of severe penile ulcers after the initiation of intravenous foscarnet therapy. PMID:21879205

  15. Pyoderma gangrenosum in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, S P; Singh, S K; Chari, S T; Sarin, S K; Anand, B S

    1991-07-01

    We present a patient with pyoderma gangrenosum, a rare complication of ulcerative colitis. The patient's disease was limited to the distal colon, was clinically mild and responded quickly to treatment, and yet it was associated with pyoderma gangrenosum and arthritis, complications generally associated with more severe and extensive ulcerative colitis. PMID:1839305

  16. Wound care in venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, G

    2013-03-01

    Wound dressings: ulcer dressings should create and maintain a moist environment on the ulcer surface. It has been shown that in an ulcer with a hard crust and desiccated bed, the healing process is significantly slowed and sometimes completely blocked so favouring infection, inflammation and pain. In contrast a moist environment promotes autolytic debridement, angiogenesis and the more rapid formation of granulation tissue, favours keratinocytes migration and accelerates healing of wounds. Apart from these common characteristics, wound dressings are completely different in other aspects and must be used according to the ulcer stage. In necrotic ulcers, autolytic debridement by means of hydrogel and hydrocolloids or with enzymatic paste is preferred. In case of largely exuding wounds alginate or hydrofibre are indicated. When bleeding occurs alginate is indicated due to its haemostatic power. Where ulcers are covered by granulation tissue, polyurethane foams are preferred. When infection coexists antiseptics are necessary: dressing containing silver or iodine with large antibacterial spectrum have proved to be very effective. In the epithelization stage polyurethane films or membranes, thin hydrocolloids or collagen based dressings are very useful to favour advancement of the healing wound edge. Despite these considerations, a Cochrane review failed to find advantages for any dressing type compared with low-adherent dressings applied beneath compression. Surgical debridement and grafting of wounds, negative wound pressure treatment: surgical and hydrosurgical debridement are indicated in large, necrotic and infected wounds as these treatments are able to get rid of necrotic, infected tissue very quickly in a single surgical session, thereby significantly accelerating wound bed preparation and healing time. Negative wound pressure treatment creating a negative pressure on ulcer bed is able to favour granulation tissue and shorten healing time. In case of hard

  17. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan. PMID:26554282

  18. [Mixed leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Torsten

    2011-03-01

    Coexisting peripheral arterial disease is not uncommon (15 - 21 %) in patients with ulcera cruris primarily based on a venous etiology. Patient's history, clinical examination and detection of ABI as well as duplex scan will establish diagnosis of mixed arterial-venous ulcera. Clinical significance of coexisting arterial disease is often difficult to define and should be evaluated by a vascular specialist. The concept of treatment of mixed ulcers should always include the arterial component. Frequently peripheral arterial perfusion and healing can be improved by minimal invasive, endovascular revascularization. Compression therapy is the corner stone in treatment of venous disease and should be complemented by contemporary two piece graduated compression systems if ulcera are present. According to circumstances ablation of varicose veins must be considered. PMID:21360460

  19. Ulcerative Colitis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Andre

    1990-01-01

    Idiopathic ulcerative colitis primarily affects young adults. Colonic symptoms are the most annoying. In severe colitis, systemic and extraintestinal inflammatory manifestations can be disabling. Proximal extension of colitis is demonstrated by double-contrast barium enema and total colonoscopy. Bacterial and parasitic colitis must be excluded by appropriate microbiological studies. Colonoscopy is recommended to screen for high-grade dysplasia or neoplasia in cases of chronic diffuse colitis (after seven years). Severe colitis can benefit from hospitalization, parenteral nutritional support, and high doses of corticosteroids that are progressively tapered. Mild or moderate cases or severe cases in remission respond well to rest, low-irritant diets, mild symptomatic medication, oral sulfasalazine, or more recent 5-acetylsalicylic derivatives. Long-term maintenance with reduced dosages will control more than 80% of cases. PMID:21234051

  20. Clinical management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R

    2013-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are chronic and difficult to heal. Pressure-reducing devices are clearly superior to a standard hospital mattress in preventing pressure ulcers, but only limited evidence and clinical intuition supports pressure-reducing devices in improving the healing rate of pressure ulcers. Local wound treatment should aim at maintaining a moist wound environment. The choice of a particular dressing depends on wound characteristics, such as the amount of exudate, dead space, or wound location. Nutritional status should be addressed as a process of good care. Debridement may improve time to a clean wound bed, but no clearly superior approach has been demonstrated. PMID:23571035

  1. Current management of venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nima P; Labropoulos, Nicos; Pappas, Peter J

    2006-06-01

    It has been estimated that chronic venous insufficiency affects 10 to 35 percent of the entire U.S. population and that 4 percent of people older than 65 have active venous ulcers. The high prevalence of the disease results in an annual expenditure of more than 1 billion dollars a year to the U.S. health care system. To have a rational approach toward patients with venous ulcers, it is important to understand the pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of the disease process, in order to initiate appropriate treatment and prevent venous ulcer recurrence. PMID:16799394

  2. Differential Diagnosis of Skin Ulcers in a Mycobacterium ulcerans Endemic Area: Data from a Prospective Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Nkemenang, Patrick; Comte, Eric; Ehounou, Geneviève; Atangana, Paul; Rusch, Barbara; Njih Tabah, Earnest; Etard, Jean-François; Mueller, Yolanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of Buruli ulcer (BU) due to Mycobacterium ulcerans can be challenging. We aimed to specify the differential diagnosis of skin lesions in a BU endemic area. Method We conducted a prospective diagnostic study in Akonolinga, Cameroon. Patients presenting with a skin ulcer suspect of BU were included. M. ulcerans was detected using swabs for Ziehl-Neelsen staining, PCR and culture. Skin punch biopsies were taken and reviewed by two histopathologists. Photographs of the lesions were taken and independently reviewed by two dermatologists. Final diagnosis was based on consensus, combining the results of laboratory tests and expert opinion. Results/ Discussion Between October 2011 and December 2013, 327 patients with ulcerative lesions were included. Median age was 37 years (0 to 87), 65% were males, and 19% HIV-positive. BU was considered the final diagnosis for 27% of the lesions, 85% of which had at least one positive laboratory test. Differential diagnoses were vascular lesions (22%), bacterial infections (21%), post-traumatic (8%), fistulated osteomyelitis (6%), neoplasia (5%), inflammatory lesions (3%), hemopathies and other systemic diseases (2%) and others (2%). The proportion of BU was similar between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients (27.0% vs. 26.5%; p = 0.940). Half of children below 15 years of age were diagnosed with BU, compared to 26.8% and 13.9% among individuals 15 to 44 years of age and above, respectively (chi2 p<0.001). Children had more superficial bacterial infections (24.3%) and osteomyelitis (11.4%). Conclusion We described differential diagnosis of skin lesions in a BU endemic area, stratifying results by age and HIV-status. PMID:27074157

  3. Ischemic ulcers - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... restrict blood flow. Certain lifestyle changes can help prevent ischemic ulcers. If you have a wound, taking these steps can improve blood flow and aid healing. Quit smoking. Smoking can lead to clogged arteries. ...

  4. Nutrition management of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Doley, Jennifer

    2010-02-01

    Despite our knowledge of how to prevent pressure ulcers, and improvements in treatment, pressure ulcers remain prevalent and impose a significant burden on financial and labor resources in the healthcare industry. Although there is no known role for specific nutrients in the prevention of pressure ulcers, undernutrition is a risk factor, and nutrition therapy plays a crucial role in pressure ulcer treatment. Limitations in research make it difficult to develop evidence-based nutrition guidelines, so it is important that clinicians conduct a comprehensive assessment that includes weight and intake history, biochemical data, and comorbidities as well as symptoms that may affect the intake, absorption, or excretion of nutrients. These data, combined with clinical judgment, must be used to estimate energy and protein needs, considering the size and severity of the pressure ulcer. Micronutriture is difficult to assess; usual intake, comorbidities and disease symptoms must be considered in addition to biochemical data. Micronutrients should be replaced if depleted, but routine supplementation of vitamins and minerals in all pressure ulcer patients is not warranted. PMID:20130157

  5. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  6. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. PMID:26358306

  7. Helicobacter pylori in oral ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, T; Horie, N; Kato, T; Kaneko, T; Komiyama, K

    2000-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen involved in the development of gastrointestinal ulcers, but its involvement in oral ulcerous lesions is unclear. As culture is generally recognized as the gold standard for diagnosis of H. pylori infection, we employed this approach to assess the association of H. pylori with oral mucosal ulcerations. Samples were collected from patients with oral mucosal ulcerative disorders: 12 cases of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), 7 cases of herpes simplex virus (HSV) stomatitis, and 3 cases of erosive lichen planus (LP). Serum IgG antibodies against H. pylori were examined in all cases. All of the RAS and erosive LP cases were culture-negative for H. pylori, while two cases of HSV stomatitis were positive. The two culture-positive cases were also seropositve for the H. pylori antigen. It is suggested that H. pylori might not have a direct association with oral ulcerations. However, H. pylori in the oral cavity might exist in a non-culturable coccoid state without productive infection, and might form colonies only under special conditions such as HSV infection. PMID:11269381

  8. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  9. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  10. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  11. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27272316

  12. Facial ulcer treated with olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Lowry, C L; Bewley, A; Taylor, R

    2013-07-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with a nonhealing ulcer on her right cheek. On histological examination of a biopsy, no evidence of granuloma formation or malignancy was found, and the overall picture was felt to be consistent with dermatitis artefacta (DA). The patient was referred to a joint psychodermatology clinic, where treatment with risperidone was started. However, at follow-up the ulcer remained unchanged, and treatment was changed to olanzapine 2.5 mg twice daily. Within 10 months, the large facial ulcer, which had been refractory to treatment for several years, had completely healed. Anxiolytics, antidepressants and low-dose antipsychotics have been shown to be helpful in the management of DA. Successful treatment with olanzapine has been described. The good clinical response to olanzapine may be attributed to its anti-impulsive effect, antihistaminic properties and low risk of parkinsonian side-effects. PMID:23611260

  13. Pressure ulcers. Local wound care.

    PubMed

    Goode, P S; Thomas, D R

    1997-08-01

    Local care of pressure ulcers includes wound cleansing, débridement, and dressings. Wound cleansing should remove loose debris and exudate but should not damage viable tissue. Saline irrigation is the standard. Débridement is often necessary for Stage III and IV pressure ulcers and can be performed autolytically, mechanically, enzymatically, or sharply. Prompt débridement is essential for infected wounds. Dressings should keep the wound bed continuously moist, should not be toxic to granulation tissue, and should keep the surrounding intact skin dry. Randomized, controlled clinical trials are necessary to define optimal local wound care further. PMID:9227943

  14. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  15. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  16. Acute Pancreatitis Due to a Duodenal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Sung Ik; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Ban Seok; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Nam; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Oh, Kong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal ulcers and acute pancreatitis are two of the most commonly encountered gastrointestinal diseases among the general population. However, duodenal ulcer-induced pancreatitis is very rarely reported worldwide. This report elaborates on a distinct medical treatment that contributes to partial or complete treatment of acute pancreatitis induced by a duodenal ulcer scar. PMID:25505728

  17. Treatment of experimental ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Lychkova, A E; Knyazev, O V

    2012-10-01

    The effects of infliximab, an anticytokine drug, on the course of inflammatory process was studied on the model of ulcerative colitis induced by injection of picrylsulfonic acid. Infliximab prevented the development of toxic dilatation and a drop of bioelectric activity of smooth muscles via maintenance of activity of the intramural nervous system neurons. PMID:23113311

  18. Contact lens related corneal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ky; Agarwal, P

    2010-01-01

    A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are: overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. The presenting symptoms of contact lens related corneal ulcers include eye discomfort, foreign body sensation and lacrimation. More serious symptoms are redness (especially circum-corneal injection), severe pain, photophobia, eye discharge and blurring of vision. The diagnosis is established by a thorough slit lamp microscopic examination with fluorescein staining and corneal scraping for Gram stain and culture of the infective organism. Delay in diagnosing and treatment can cause permanent blindness, therefore an early referral to ophthalmologist and commencing of antimicrobial therapy can prevent visual loss. PMID:25606178

  19. Colonic motility in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Elisabetta; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldoni, Monia; Dore, Maria Pina

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory conditions affecting the gut may cause motility disturbances, and ulcerative colitis – one of the main disorders among the inflammatory bowel diseases – may display abnormal colonic motility. Aim To review the abnormalities of the large bowel in ulcerative colitis, by considering the motility, laboratory (in vitro) and pathological studies dealing with this topic. Methods A comprehensive online search of Medline and the Science Citation Index was carried out. Results Patients with ulcerative colitis frequently display colonic motor abnormalities, including lack of contractility, an increase of propulsive contractile waves, an excessive production of nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide nerves, interleukin 1 beta, neurotensin, tachykinins levels and the weaker action of substance P, likely related to a neuromuscular dysfunction due to the inflammatory process. Conclusions A better understanding of the pathophysiological grounds of altered colonic motility in ulcerative colitis may lead to a more in-depth knowledge of the accompanying symptoms and to better and more targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25452840

  20. Pressure ulcer prevention in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    Pressure ulcers are associated with reduced quality of life, affecting individuals physically, socially and emotionally. The financial cost to the NHS of preventing and treating such ulcers is substantial. Although largely preventable, pressure ulcers are still common. The Department of Health is committed to eliminating all avoidable pressure ulcers in NHS-provided care. This article explores methods of preventing pressure ulcers, with particular focus on risk assessment, skin inspection, pressure-relieving measures, nutrition and hydration, and patient and carer education. PMID:24044860

  1. Drug therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ching, C K; Lam, S K

    Healing of peptic ulcers can be achieved by using a variety of anti-ulcer medications. The most commonly used agents include the histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and the proton pump inhibitors. They are also efficacious in preventing ulcer recurrence providing maintenance treatment is given. The ideal treatment for peptic ulcers today is aiming at eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection. Successful elimination of the latter not only heals the ulcers but also provides a cure for the disease, so that the patients will no longer require lifelong maintenance medical therapy. PMID:7551483

  2. Experimental ulcerative disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1975-01-01

    The oral administration to guinea-pigs of an aqueous solution of carrageenan derived from the red seaweed, Eucheuma spinosum, provides a useful, readily available experimental model for the study of ulcerative disease of the colon. Two types of ulcerative disease can be produced within a 4-6 week period, viz., ulceration localised mainly to the caecum by using 1% undegraded carrageenan in the drinking fluid, and extensive ulceration involving caecum, colon, and rectum by using 5% degraded carrageenan. Ulceration is probably due to the local action of carrageenan in the bowel. PMID:1202321

  3. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    PubMed

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-19

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates. PMID:24843102

  4. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  5. [Diagnostic guideline of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Hwan; Jung, Sung Ae; Lee, Bo In; Lee, Kang Moon; Kim, Joo Sung; Han, Dong Soo

    2009-03-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder causing mucosal inflammation of the colorectum with crypt abnormality on biopsy. It affects the rectum and a variable extent of the colon in continuity. Ulcerative colitis is characterized by a relapsing and remitting course. It arises from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors, but the precise etiology is unknown. The incidence and prevalence in Korea are still low compared with those of Western countries, but have increased in recent years. There are many challenging issues on the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, and sometimes these lead to differences in practice between clinicians. Therefore, IBD Study Group of KASID set out the Korean diagnostic guideline of ulcerative colitis. The diagnosis is based on clinical, endoscopic, radiologic, and histologic criteria. The symptoms are dependent upon the extent and severity of disease and most commonly include bloody diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and/or urgency. The systemic symptoms of malaise, tachycardia, fever, or weight loss are features of a severe attack. The laboratory findings may reveal leucocytosis, thrombocytosis, iron deficiency anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein indicating severe disease activity or chronicity. For the elimination of infectious causes, microbial investigation with stool specimens should be performed for common enteric pathogens including assays for Clostridium difficile toxin, and sometimes for amoeba or other parasites. The most typical endoscopic features are continuous, confluent, and concentric colonic involvement proximal to the anal verge. Endoscopic severity may be best well reflected by the presence of mucosal friability, spontaneous bleeding, and deep ulcerations. Typical pathologic findings are composed of widespread crypt architectural distortion (cryptitis, crypt abscess, and crypt atrophy), heavy, diffuse lamina propria cell infiltration, and basal

  6. Selective treatment of duodenal ulcer with perforation.

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, A J; Vinson, T L; Maulsby, G O; Gewin, J R

    1979-01-01

    Selective treatment of duodenal ulcer with perforation has been based on several premises: 1) The natural history of the ulcer following closure of a perforation is generally favorable with an acute and unfavorable with a chronic ulcer. 2) An upper gastrointestinal series with water soluble contrast media can reliably document a spontaneously sealed perforation. 3) With a spontaneous seal, nonsurgical therapy is an acceptable option and is preferable for an acute ulcer or a chronic ulcer with poor surgical risk. 4) The treatment of choice for an unsealed perforation of an acute ulcer is simple surgical closure. 5) The treatment of choice of perforation of a chronic ulcer with acceptable surgical risk is an ulcer definitive operation. Sixty cases of perforation of duodenal ulcer have been treated. Nonsurgical therapy was employed without complication in eight cases with radiologically documented spontaneous seal. Truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty in 36 cases and truncal vagotomy and antrectomy in two cases were each without mortality. Four fatalities occurred among 13 cases of closure and omental patch, each a case with severe associated disease. The mortality was 6.7% among the 60 cases; 2.4% for chronic ulcer and 16% for acute ulcer. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:443915

  7. Prevention and management of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Turns, Martin

    2015-03-01

    As part of an annual foot review, trained and competent personnel should examine patients' feet to detect risk factors for ulceration. Foot examination with shoes and stockings removed should include: palpation of foot pulses; testing foot sensations using 10g monofilament or vibration; inspection for significant callus or deformed nails; inspection for any structural deformity; asking about any previous ulceration; checking for signs of ulceration; asking about any pain; and inspecting footwear. Following assessment, a foot risk classification score should be given. The person with diabetes should then be informed of their risk score, with education offered regarding future foot-care management. Diabetic foot complications include ulceration, Charcot foot, painful neuropathy, gangrene and amputation. Risk factors for ulceration include non-palpable pulses, insensate foot, significant callus, deformed nails, history of previous ulcer or amputation, tissue damage or signs of ulceration, foot pain and unsuitable footwear. PMID:25757381

  8. Approach to skin ulcers in older patients.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with an approach to managing skin ulcers in older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Clinical practice guidelines and best practice guidelines were summarized to describe an evidence-based approach. MAIN MESSAGE; Preventing ulcers is important in frail older patients. Using guidelines can help prevent ulcers in institutions. Clarifying the cause and contributing factors is the first step in management. Pressure and venous ulcers are common in elderly people. Poor nutrition, edema, arterial insufficiency, and anemia often impair wound healing. Adequate debridement is important to decrease risk of infection and to promote healing. There are guidelines for cleaning ulcers. Choice of dressings depends on the circumstances of each wound, but dressings should provide a moist environment. Options for dressings are summarized. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can manage skin ulcers effectively by applying basic principles and using readily available guidelines. PMID:15648380

  9. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-01

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals. PMID:25942988

  10. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur. PMID:27514084

  11. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork. PMID:26669407

  12. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  13. Practice recommendations for preventing heel pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Evonne; Scott-Williams, Suzy; McGuire, James B

    2008-10-01

    Heels are the second most common anatomical location for pressure ulcers. A combination of risk factors, including pressure, may cause ulceration. Heel pressure ulcers are a particular concern for surgical patients. A review of the literature, including poster presentations, shows that controlled clinical studies to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of available interventions are not available. Case series (with or without historical controls) as well as pressure ulcer guideline recommendations suggest the most important aspect of heel ulcer prevention is pressure relief (offloading). It also has been documented that the incidence of heel ulcers can be reduced using a total-patient care approach and heel offloading devices. Guidelines, observational studies, and expert opinion intimate that reducing heel ulceration rates can be expected to improve patient outcomes, decrease costs associated with their care, and avoid costs related to hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The heel pressure ulcer prevention strategies reviewed should be implemented until the results of prospective, randomized controlled studies to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these strategies are available. PMID:18927483

  14. Refractory leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yabuno, Yuto; Tosa, Mamiko; Iwakiri, Itaru; Nomoto, Shunichi; Kaneko, Mayuko; Kuwahara, Kousuke; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Murakami, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a man with refractory leg ulcers, bilateral varicosis of the lower extremities, and Buerger disease. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed Klinefelter syndrome (48 XXY). Ulcerative lesions of the lower extremities are a complication of Klinefelter syndrome. To date, the pathogenesis of ulcers in Klinefelter syndrome has not been clarified, but several factors, such as abnormalities of fibrinolysis and prothrombotic states, might be involved. Our present case emphasizes the importance of considering Klinefelter syndrome in the differential diagnosis of a male patient with nonhealing ulcers of the lower extremities. PMID:25797879

  15. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  16. Pressure ulcer classification: defining early skin damage.

    PubMed

    Russell, Linda

    2002-09-01

    This article is the second of a two-part series. The first part (Russell, 2002) looked at various systems and pitfalls of pressure ulcer classification systems. This article focuses on the difficulties of defining early skin damage. Patients' quality of life suffers significantly with a pressure ulcer. The smell of the exudate may be an embarrassment to the patient. The pain and the distress the patient will experience will not easily be forgotten, i.e. the number of dressings required for a deep pressure ulcer, even after the pressure ulcer has healed, will be a memorable intrusion to the patient's daily routine. Early detection of pressure ulcers and timely intervention are essential in the management of patients with pressure ulcers. Controversy exists over the definition of the first three stages of pressure ulcers, but there is consensus on the definition of deep tissue damage. If the pressure ulcer is covered with black necrotic tissue it is difficult to establish depth of the tissue damage. Intact skin can cause problems, as a sacrum may be purple but intact. There is still considerable debate with regard to reactive hyperaemia, as the exact time parameters for persistent erythema to occur are unknown. Little is understood with regard to the exact pathophysiology of reactive hyperaemia and this area requires further investigation. Blistered skin and skin tone also cause confusion in grading of pressure ulcers. The problems associated with classification of pressure ulcers, using colour classification systems, are discussed and the implications for practice are considered. The confusion surrounding early classification of pressure ulcers is discussed and it is hoped that such confusion can be addressed by standardizing training using one national classification system. PMID:12362151

  17. Peculiar Presentation of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Amany; Ahmed, Ayman; Abohamad, Samar; Elgendy, Hala

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory and recurrent disorder that is characterized by bowel inflammation. Among the extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) that associate UC are the joints and renal manifestations. Joint affection in the form of arthritis can precede the intestinal manifestations of UC. However, renal affection with amyloidosis does not precede the UC diagnosis. Herein, we report a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with UC after having peripheral arthritis for long time in addition to spondylitis and kidney amyloidosis. PMID:27042365

  18. Scleritis and Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    Scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) can present as isolated conditions or as part of a systemic inflammatory or infectious disorder. Both are serious ocular conditions that can result in vision loss and therefore require early diagnosis and treatment. Nearly two-thirds of patients with non-infectious scleritis require systemic glucocorticoid therapy, and one fourth need a glucocorticoid-sparing agent, as well. Essentially all patients with non-infectious PUK require systemic glucocorticoids. Detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, and thoughtful laboratory evaluations are all important in the exclusion of underlying disorders and extraocular involvement. PMID:18037120

  19. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking. PMID:27193988

  20. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-09-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  1. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  2. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  3. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  4. The prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath

    2007-05-01

    Pressure ulcers remain a significant secondary complication for many individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Technological advances have the potential to affect both the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. The focus of this article is hi-tech devices and methodologies. The current state-of-the-art methods are discussed and conceptual approaches are presented. PMID:17543771

  5. Hypostatic ulcers in 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verp, Marion S; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Martin, Alice O

    1983-01-01

    Hypostatic leg ulcers, probably secondary to vascular insufficiency, were observed in two adult men with 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome. The association between leg ulcers and 47,XXY Klinefelter's syndrome deserves increased attention because knowledge of the association may alert clinicians to an otherwise unsuspected chromosome abnormality. PMID:6842542

  6. Prevention, Assessment and Treatment Of Decubitus Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Morden, Patricia; Bayne, Ronald

    1976-01-01

    Decubitus ulcers are not uncommon in chronically ill and disabled people who are bedridden. Prevention is better than cure, but the chief ingredient in both is avoidance of excess pressure on the tissues, especially over bony prominences. If an ulcer does occur, it requires scrutiny, appropriate therapy with the agents listed and repeated re-examination. PMID:21308073

  7. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific...

  8. Abomasal ulceration and tympany of calves.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tessa S

    2009-03-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of abomasal ulcer formation and abomasal tympany in calves. The development of ulcers and bloat has been attributed to many factors, including coarse feed, environmental stress, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and bacterial infections. This article discusses various factors thought to play a role in the development of these abomasal conditions in calves. PMID:19174290

  9. Pressure ulcers: Back to the basics

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon; Chauhan, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer in an otherwise sick patient is a matter of concern for the care givers as well as the medical personnel. A lot has been done to understand the disease process. So much so that USA and European countries have established advisory panels in their respective continents. Since the establishment of these organizations, the understanding of the pressure ulcer has improved significantly. The authors feel that the well documented and well publicized definition of pressure ulcer is somewhat lacking in the correct description of the disease process. Hence, a modified definition has been presented. This disease is here to stay. In the process of managing these ulcers the basic pathology needs to be understood well. Pressure ischemia is the main reason behind the occurrence of ulceration. Different extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been described in detail with review of literature. There are a large number of risk factors causing ulceration. The risk assessment scales have eluded the surgical literature and mostly remained in nursing books and websites. These scales have been reproduced for completion of the basics on decubitus ulcer. The classification of the pressure sores has been given in a comparative form to elucidate that most of the classifications are the same except for minor variations. The management of these ulcers is ever evolving but the age old saying of “prevention is better than cure” suits this condition the most. PMID:23162223

  10. The microbiological flora of penile ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Chapel, T; Brown, W J; Jeffries, C; Stewart, J A

    1978-01-01

    The penile ulcerations of 100 consecutive men were tested for microorganisms. A polymicrobial flora was identified in the ulcers of 97 men. The microorganisms recovered from these ulcers included combinations of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria (including Mycoplasma), herpes simplex virus, yeasts, and filamentous fungi. Fifty-three study entrants had microorganisms, identified by culture or serologic tests, that were considered primary in ulcer pathogenesis. Herpes simplex virus was the most prevalent and Treponema pallidum was the next most prevalent pathogen identified. Of our patients, 5% had two recognized pathogens confirmed by laboratory tests, and only one of these was suspected at clinical examination. In addition, the study suggests that microorganisms other than Haemophilus ducreyi can produce ulcers with a morphology mimicking chancroid. PMID:203634

  11. Comorbid Depression and Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Maydick, Diane R; Acee, Anna M

    2016-02-01

    In the United States, 9.3% of the population, or 29.1 million people have diabetes, and depression affects 20% to 40% of these individuals. Diabetic foot ulcers are a common and serious complication of diabetes and one of the most costly. It is estimated that 2% to 3% of persons with diabetes will develop diabetic foot ulcers each year. There is an association between depression and the development of diabetic foot ulcers. The estimated costs associated with managing diabetes, depression, and diabetic foot ulcers place a substantial burden on the U.S. healthcare system and society. Patients should be screened and evaluated by professionals qualified in the diagnosis and management of depression and diabetic foot ulcers. To be effective, an interprofessional approach that includes the patient and significant others should be used. PMID:26835804

  12. Diagnosis and management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Carr, Sandra C

    2008-03-01

    Venous ulceration of the lower extremities is a common and often disabling condition. Venous ulcers are the result of a chronic inflammatory condition caused by persistent venous hypertension. Therapy is directed at counteracting the chronic inflammation in the tissues and at decreasing ambulatory venous hypertension in the area. Compression therapy helps decrease the venous hypertension and aids healing. Topical agents may be used to help decrease the bacterial load in the wound, provide a moist healing environment for dry wounds, or absorb the exudate in wounds with a lot of drainage. Pharmacological adjuncts, such as pentoxifylline or flavanoids, may help counteract the chronic inflammation in the ulcerated area. Interventions to decrease the ambulatory venous hypertension can help patients with either active or healed ulcers. Ablation of incompetent superficial truncal veins and/or perforating veins using radiofrequency ablation, endovenous laser ablation, or foam sclerotherapy can speed ulcer healing and prevent recurrence. PMID:18388013

  13. Lower-extremity ulcers: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, R S; Vivas, A C

    2015-08-01

    Chronic wounds of the lower extremities are occurring with increasing prevalence. They affect millions of individuals annually, representing both a significant health risk and a large economic burden. Chronic wounds are associated with increased mortality and substantial morbidity due to infection, pain, limitation of daily activities, and psychosocial consequences. To manage these wounds effectively, clinicians must be able to diagnose and manage their aetiology. Diagnosis starts with determining whether the wound is one of the four most common chronic wounds: venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and arterial ulcers. Moreover, despite many recent advances in wound care, the challenge of managing chronic wounds is complicated by the lack of consistently accepted diagnostic methods and wound-care standards. We present a comprehensive yet condensed approach to managing lower-extremity ulcers, from diagnosis to basic management. PMID:26257052

  14. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Dieleman, Levinus A; Hoentjen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients have been performed. Most of these studies evaluated VSL#3 or E. Coli Nissle 1917 and in general there is evidence for efficacy of these agents for induction and maintenance of remission. However, studies are frequently underpowered, lack a control group, and are very heterogeneous investigating different probiotic strains in different study populations. The absence of well-powered robust randomized placebo-controlled trials impedes the widespread use of probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. However, given the promising results that are currently available, probiotics and prebiotics may find their way to the treatment algorithm for ulcerative colitis in the near future. PMID:27048897

  15. Method of healing diabetic forefoot ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, J P; Le Quesne, L P

    1983-01-01

    Six diabetic patients with neuropathic ulceration of the sole of the foot (seven feet, eight ulcers) were treated by the application of a below knee walking plaster with a rubber rocker. All the ulcers healed with this treatment, greatly reducing the usual period of hospital inpatient stay. After healing, study of the forces acting on the sole of the foot showed that these ulcers occur at the site of maximal horizontal shear force and confirmed that they occur at the site of maximal vertical force. This treatment is highly effective for neuropathic ulcers of the sole not affecting bone or complicated by deep sepsis. There may be a high rate of recurrence, however, reflecting inadequacy of methods of protecting damaged neuropathic feet. PMID:6401552

  16. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach is empty. Eating something or taking an antacid medication sometimes makes the pain go away for ... are taken every day for about 2 weeks. Antacids — acid blockers or proton pump inhibitors — are given ...

  17. Rabbit gastric ulcer models: comparison and evaluation of acetic acid-induced ulcer and mucosectomy-induced ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Jin Hee; Lee, Eunhye

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined rabbit gastric ulcer models that can serve as more clinically relevant models. Two types of ulcer model were studied: acetic acid-induced ulcers (AAU) and mucosal resection-induced ulcers (MRU). For AAU, rabbit gastric mucosa was exposed by median laparotomy and treated with bottled acetic acid. MRU was examined as a model for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Normal saline was injected into the submucosal layer and the swollen mucosa was resected with scissors. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is frequently performed for treatment of early gastric cancers. This procedure inevitably leads to ulcers and bleeding. Bleeding control is the major concern in endoscopic mucosectomy, and some endoscopic hemostatic agents are currently under clinical and preclinical studies. MRU was developed as a model for these induced ulcers and the evaluation of the healing process. The clinical relevancy of those models was compared with that of rat models. Progressive healing was observed for 7 days based on histology. Rabbit models demonstrate round, deep ulcers with clear margins and well-defined healing stages that were difficult to define in rat models. PMID:23825482

  18. Omeprazole maintenance therapy prevents recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Demertzis, Konstantinos; Polymeros, Dimitrios; Emmanuel, Theodoros; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Tassios, Pericles; Ladas, Spiros D

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the omeprazole maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer. METHODS: We studied 15 consecutive patients with recurrent ulcer bleeding after surgery for duodenal ulcer. Omeprazole (20 mg/d) maintenance therapy was given after ulcer healing. In addition to clinical follow-up, ambulatory 24-h gastric pH assay was performed before and during omeprazole therapy in those patients and controls with previous duodenal ulcer surgery but no ulcer recurrence. RESULTS: All the 15 ulcers were healed after being treated with omeprazole (40 mg/d) for 2 mo. Eleven patients with two (1-9) episodes of recurrent ulcer bleeding completed the follow-up (43, 12-72 mo). None of them had a bleeding episode while on omeprazole. One patient discontinued the therapy and had recurrent bleeding. The median 24-h fraction time of gastric pH <4 in patients was 80, 46-95%, and was reduced to 32, 13-70% by omeprazole (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Long-term maintenance therapy with omeprazole (20 mg/day) is effective in preventing recurrent ulcer bleeding. PMID:16521197

  19. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  20. Exsanguination due to gastric ulceration in a foal.

    PubMed

    Traub-Dagartz, J; Bayly, W; Riggs, M; Thomas, N; Pankowski, R

    1985-02-01

    An Arabian foal with a congenital heart disease died due to hemorrhage secondary to a large gastric ulcer. Previously, death of foals with gastric ulcers has been due to diffuse peritonitis resulting from gastric ulcer perforation. The foal in this case report died due to hemorrhage secondary to a large gastric ulcer. PMID:3972690

  1. Automatic system for corneal ulcer diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; de Sousa, Sidney J. F.

    1997-05-01

    Corneal Ulcer is a very common disease in agricultural countries and it is responsible for 10% of the blindness causes. One of the main aspects to be observed in these cases is the increasing or decreasing of the affected area. We have been developing an automatic optical system in order to evaluate the affected area (the ulcer) to be implemented in a public hospital (400 patients per week are analyzed). The optical system is implemented in a Slit Lamp and connected to a CCD detector. The image is displayed in a PC monitor by a commercial frame grabber and a dedicated software for determining the area of the ulcer has been developed.

  2. [Study of genetic markers of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Onosova, E A; Tsimmerman, I Ia

    1989-05-01

    The results of determination of various hereditary predisposition markers in peptic ulcer are given: in the population, in patients with duodenal ulcer and in their siblings (risk group). Of importance for revealing subjects with hereditary predisposition to duodenal ulcer are the clinico-genealogical analysis, determination of the blood group, especially in simultaneous determination of a "secretory status" ("status of non-secretion" of the ABH blood system agglutinogen in the saliva), increase in the mass of parietal cells and, to some extent, of the distinguishing features of dermatoglyphics (in combination with the above markers). Determination of taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide is non-informative. PMID:2770215

  3. Risk factors for healing of duodenal ulcer under antacid treatment: do ulcer patients need individual treatment?

    PubMed

    Massarrat, S; Müller, H G; Schmitz-Moormann, P

    1988-03-01

    In order to identify the risk factors affecting the healing of duodenal ulcer, a clinical trial with effective dose of antacid was carried out in 53 patients. Duration of ulcer history, number of relapses, duration of the last and present relapse, number, duration and severity of pain attacks in the present ulcer relapse, pain radiation to back, vomiting, appetite, smoking habit, intake of analgesics and previous haemorrhage were registered. Number of ulcers, ulcer depth, bublar narrowing, erosions, duodenitis at initial endoscopy and healing of ulcer were assessed by one endoscopist. Basic and peak acid output were measured. The extent of duodenitis on the site opposite the ulcer was determined by histological examination. Sixty per cent of the duodenal ulcers were healed after three weeks. By univariate analysis, the following factors affect the healing; pain radiation to back and pain duration during treatment (p less than 0.001), multiple or deep ulcers, narrowing of duodenal bulb (p less than 0.01), number of pain attacks and poor appetite (p less than 0.05). By the stepwise logistic regression model, the following factors were selected as predictors for healing of duodenal ulcer with 76% correct classification: pain radiation to back (p = 0.002), deep ulcer (p = 0.013), multiple ulcers (p = 0.028). Number of cigarettes/day (p less than 0.007) and male sex (p = 0.036). By this model, the prediction of healing could be accurately assessed in 78% in a new sample. Individual treatment should be carried out on the basis of these factors. PMID:3356359

  4. Enhancing Documentation of Pressure Ulcer Prevention Interventions: A Quality Improvement Strategy to Reduce Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese M; Thompson, Susan L; Halvorson, Anna M; Zeitler, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers requires the implementation of evidence-based interventions. A quality improvement project was conducted to provide nurses with data on the frequency with which pressure ulcer prevention interventions were performed as measured by documentation. Documentation reports provided feedback to stakeholders, triggering reminders and reeducation. Intervention reports and modifications to the documentation system were effective both in increasing the documentation of pressure ulcer prevention interventions and in decreasing the number of avoidable hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. PMID:26863048

  5. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  6. A large Italian observational multicentre study on vascular ulcers of the lower limbs (Studio Ulcere Vascolari).

    PubMed

    Apollonio, Alessandro; Antignani, Pier L; Di Salvo, Michelangelo; Failla, Giacomo; Guarnera, Giorgio; Mosti, Giovanni; Ricci, Elia

    2016-02-01

    An observational study of 2 years was promoted by the Italian Association for Cutaneous Ulcers (AIUC) in order to monitor the epidemiology of leg ulcers, the trend of healing and the more frequent therapeutic approaches in lower limb ulcers. Fifty-nine sites in 14 different Italian regions involved in the study, with 1333 enrolled patients (1163 patients fully evaluated and followed up for 9 months). A prevalence of females (62%) was observed with a mean age of 70 years and a high rate of hypertension (62%), diabetes (38%) and obesity (29%). Venous ulcer was most frequent (55%), followed by mixed (25%) and diabetic (8·3%) ulcers. Basically, all patients received a local therapy (LT) (compression and advanced local therapies), while 63% of patients have an associated systemic pharmaceutical treatment. Ulcer healing rates progressively increased throughout the study and despite the type of observational study does not allow conclusions on the treatment, it was observed that the patients receiving additional systemic drugs were associated with a more rapid acceleration of healing rates of ulcers compared to LT alone (3 months: 39·7% versus 29·2%; 6 months: 62·0% versus 47·0%; 9 months: 74·7% versus 63·8%). In particular, the Studio Ulcere Vascolari (SUV) study showed that a combination treatment with sulodexide and compression therapy allows for a greater increase in the healing rates in venous ulcers. PMID:24618175

  7. Cutaneous leishmaniasis "chiclero's ulcer" in subtropical Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Martinez, Leonardo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2013-08-01

    An 18-year-old female presented with a severe ulcerative lesion on her right ear of 6 weeks duration. Her right ear was edematous and erythematous with a large, painless ulcerative lesion covering a third of the pinna and satellite papular lesions on the posterior. She was diagnosed with chiclero's ulcer. A skin smear stained with Diff-quik showed abundant Leishmania parasites. Chiclero's ulcer is a rare clinical presentation and is typically severe and difficult to treat. Physicians in Ecuador recommend administering prolonged intramuscular Glucantime. Side effects are common and can be severe resulting in low patient compliance. Because of preferences of the patient and the large volume needed for her weight, we recommended topical treatment with a lotion of Glucantime mixed half and half with white Merthiolate. After applying this lotion to the lesion 3 to 4 times a day for 6 weeks, the lesion healed. PMID:23926136

  8. Automatic analysis of the corneal ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; Chiaradia, Caio; Faria de Sousa, Sidney J.

    1999-06-01

    A very common disease in agricultural countries is the corneal ulcer. Particularly in the public hospitals, several patients come every week presenting this kind of pathology. One of the most important features to diagnose the regression of the disease is the determination of the vanishing of the affected area. An automatic system (optical system and software), attached to a Slit Lamp, has been developed to determine automatically the area of the ulcer and to follow up its regression. The clinical procedure to isolate the ulcer is still done, but the measuring time is fast enough to not cause discomfort to the patient as the traditional evaluation does. The system has been used in the last 6 months in a hospital that has about 80 patients per week presenting corneal ulcer. The patients follow up (which is an indispensable criteria for the cure of the disease) has been improved by the system and has guaranteed the treatment success.

  9. Automatic system for corneal ulcer diagnostic: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; Chiaradia, Caio; Faria de Sousa, Sidney J.

    1998-06-01

    Corneal Ulcer is a deepithelization of the cornea and it is a very common disease in agricultural countries. The clinician most used parameter in order to identify a favorable ulcer evolution is the regress of the affected area. However, this kind of evaluation is subjective, once just the horizontal and vertical axes are measured based on a graduated scale and the affected area is estimated. Also, the registration of the disease is made by photographs. In order to overcome the subjectiveness and to register the images in a more accessible way (hard disks, floppy disks, etc.), we have developed an automatic system in order to evaluate the affected area (the ulcer). An optical system is implemented in a Slit Lamp (SL) and connected to a CCD detector. The image is displayed in PC monitor by a commercial frame grabber and a dedicated software for determining the area of the ulcer (precision of 20 mm) has been developed.

  10. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  11. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis with Pyoderma Gangrenosum

    PubMed Central

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrián; Vargas-Laguna, Elena; Aguilar, Antonio; Gallego, Miguel Ángel; Vergara, Claudia; Nistal, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is an unusual necrotizing noninfective and ulcerative skin disease whose cause is unknown. Ophthalmic involvement in pyoderma gangrenosum is an unusual event. Only a few cases have been reported, from which we can highlight scleral, corneal, and orbital cases. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis is a process which destroys the peripheral cornea. Its cause is still unknown although it is often associated with autoimmune conditions. Pyoderma gangrenosum should be included in the differential diagnosis of peripheral ulcerative keratitis. Early recognition of these manifestations can vary the prognosis by applying the appropriate treatment. We introduce a 70-year-old woman who suffered pyoderma gangrenosum associated with peripheral ulcerative keratitis in her left eye. The patient's skin lesions and peripheral keratitis responded successfully to systemic steroids and cyclosporine A. PMID:26527531

  12. Restoring Psychology's Role in Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Overmier, J Bruce; Murison, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the transition from the belief that gastrointestinal ulcers are caused primarily by psychological factors to the current state of belief that they are caused primarily by infection and argues that neither is fully accurate. We argue that psychological factors play a significant role as predisposing to vulnerability, modulating of precipitation, and sustaining of gastric ulceration. We review data that challenge the assumption of a simple infectious disease model and adduce recent preclinical data that confirm the predisposing, modulatory, and sustaining roles for psychological factors. We note that others, too, are now challenging the adequacy of the contemporary simple bacterial infection model. We hope to replace the competition between psychology and medicine with cooperation in understanding and treating patients suffering gastric ulceration and ulcer. PMID:23457084

  13. Managing leg ulceration in intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Jemell

    2015-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulceration is a long-term condition commonly associated with lower-limb injecting and chronic venous hypertension caused by collapsed veins, incompetent valves, deep vein thrombosis and reflux. It is not usually a medical emergency, but intravenous (IV) drug users with leg ulcers can attend emergency departments (EDs) with a different primary complaint such as pain or because they cannot access local primary care or voluntary services. Leg ulceration might then be identified during history taking, so it is important that ED nurses know how to assess and manage these wounds. This article explains how to assess and manage chronic venous leg ulcers in patients with a history of IV drug use, and highlights the importance of referral to specialist services when required, and to local primary care or voluntary services, before discharge to prevent admission and re-attendance. PMID:26344539

  14. Case 3: chronic venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hämmerle, Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    A non-healing, sloughy venous leg ulcer quickly responded to topical treatment including octenilin Wound Gel and octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution. Full healing occurred within 6 weeks. PMID:26949848

  15. Antacids in the treatment of duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lublin, H; Amiri, S; Jensen, H E

    1985-01-01

    Fifty patients with endoscopically proven pyloric-prepyloric ulcers (PU/PPU) and 50 with duodenal ulcers (DU) completed a six-week double-blind clinical trial initially comprising 124 patients. The antacid-treated patients received 10 ml of an antacid suspension seven times a day (buffering 367.5 mmol acid). Healing rate after three weeks of treatment was 74% in the antacid and 42% in the placebo group (p less than 0.01). After six weeks the corresponding figures were 96 and 68% (p less than 0.001). Regarding the PU/PPU and DU subgroups we found significant differences compared to placebo in the PU/PPU group only. Antacids caused a significantly faster and more perceptible pain relief than placebo. We found no significant correlation between ulcer healing and smoking habits. Regression analyses showed that, besides antacids, ulcer size and peak acid output influenced the healing rate significantly. PMID:3883700

  16. Solitary Pouch Ulcer: A New Clinical Entity?

    PubMed

    Pricolo, Victor E

    2016-07-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a well-known clinical entity, likely secondary to a defecatory dysfunction. In patients who have undergone restorative proctocolectomy with ileoanal reservoir, it is conceivable that a similar pathophysiology may lead to "solitary pouch ulcer," but such a syndrome has not been reported to date. This article reports 2 such cases and clinical success with lasting symptomatic relief through local therapy and behavior modification rather than anti-inflammatory. PMID:26859123

  17. Approach to diagnosing lower extremity ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Eri; Margolis, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic leg ulcers (as differentiated from wound of the foot) are most often due to venous disease, arterial insufficiency (peripheral arterial disease), or a combination of both. Treatment modalities vary depending on the etiology of the ulcer, so it is important to make an appropriate diagnosis of the wound. Like for most medical illnesses, the determination of the etiology of these wounds is based on history, physical examination, and testing. PMID:23742278

  18. Pressure ulcer prevention: utilizing unlicensed assistive personnel.

    PubMed

    Walker Sewill, Danielle K; Van Sell, Sharon; Kindred, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide education to the RN regarding pressure ulcer prevention and best practice interventions. This investigation focuses on the definition of a pressure ulcer, risk factors for pressure ulcers, and the benefits and importance of using unlicensed assistive personnel to help prevent pressure ulcers. A comprehensive literature review was completed using the Texas Woman's University Library, the Texas Christian University Library, and the World Wide Web. The search engine used was Google. The databases included were CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source. The literature was current, defined as from the last 10 years, and the primary language searched was English. Full-text articles from these databases were included as well as print publications from the university collections. The key search terms from the literature review included (a) pressure ulcer, (b) prevention, (c) unlicensed assistive personnel, (d) nursing assistant, (e) theory of nursing knowledge, (f) incidence, (g) prevalence, (h) Braden scale, (i) moisture, and (j) repositioning. Best practice guidelines were reviewed via the Joanna Briggs database, National Guideline Clearinghouse, Cochrane Library, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the National Institutes of Health. Literature was synthesized to define evidence-based practices that would justify the use of unlicensed assistive personnel for the prevention and care of pressure ulcers. PMID:20827067

  19. Subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery for venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lee, D W H; Lam, Y H; Chan, A C W; Chung, S C S

    2003-08-01

    We report the treatment and outcomes of 12 patients who underwent subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery for severe chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulceration. All patients had received prior superficial venous ablative surgery and presented with incompetent perforating veins in the calf and persistent venous ulceration (lasting >10 years). Outcome measures included ulcer healing time, recurrence, clinical symptom, and disability scores. There was one wound complication after subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery. The cumulative ulcer healing rate was 25% at 3 months, 42% at 6 months, and 92% at 1 year. One patient developed ulcer recurrence at 12 months after surgery. The mean clinical score and disability score decreased from 13.00 (standard deviation, 2.26) to 4.83 (1.47) and 1.75 (0.45) to 0.50 (0.52), respectively (P<0.001) after a median follow-up of 15.0 months (interquartile range, 12.0-21.5 months). Subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery was safe and effective in the treatment of patients with severe chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulceration caused by incompetent perforating veins in the calf. PMID:12904616

  20. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  1. A programme to reduce acquired pressure ulcers in care homes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Trish Morris; Marks-Maran, Di

    Prevention of pressure ulcers is a major health concern, especially for older people. Much of the literature related to prevention of pressure ulcers focuses on hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. There is less literature related to prevention of pressure ulcers in care homes. This article presents a review of the literature related to prevention of pressure ulcers in care homes and an ambitious project undertaken by one care home provider to raise awareness of pressure ulcers, provide training in prevention and monitor and evaluate pressure ulcers in over 200 care home across the UK. Known as MI SKIN, the project involves ongoing training to all levels of care staff, a robust system of monitoring pressure ulcers and a mechanism to investigate and learn from any incident of pressure ulcer using root cause analysis. PMID:26110989

  2. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  3. US skin disease assessment: ulcer and wound care.

    PubMed

    Markova, Alina; Mostow, Eliot N

    2012-01-01

    Chronic ulcers are a growing cause of patient morbidity and contribute significantly to the cost of health care in the United States. The most common etiologies of chronic ulcers include venous leg ulcers (VLUs), pressure ulcers (PrUs), diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers (DFUs), and leg ulcers of arterial insufficiency. Chronic wounds account for an estimated $6 to $15 billion annually in US health care costs; however, it is difficult to get accurate measurements on this, because these patients are often seen in a variety of settings or simply fail to access the health care system. PMID:22117872

  4. Fournier's gangrene complicating ulcerative pancolitis.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Ignatiadou, Eleftheria; Sarandi, Maria; Godevenos, Dimitrios; Asproudis, Ioannis; Fatouros, Michael; Tsianos, Epameinondas V

    2010-06-01

    Fournier gangrene is a very rare and a rapidly progressing, polymicrobial necrotizing faciitis or myonecrosis of the perineal, perianal and genital regions, with a high mortality rate. Infection is associated with superficial traum, urological and colorectal diseases and operations. The most commonly found bacteria are Escherichia coli followed by Bacteroides and streptococcal species. Diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, and immunosuppression are perpetuating co-factors. Fournier's gangrene complicating inflammatory bowel disease has been reported in three patients so far, two with Crohn's disease. A 78-year-old man diagnosed with ulcerative pancolitis was referred for fever, and painful perianal and scrotal swelling after perianal surgery for a horseshoe-type perianal abscess. Since bowel disease diagnosis, patient was on mesalazine and achieved long-term remission. Perianal abscess occurred suddenly one week before perianal surgery without any evidence of pre-existing fistula or other abnormalities. Physical examination showed extensive edema and crepitus of perineum and genitalia and patient had symptoms of significant toxicity. The diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene was made and patient underwent emergency surgery with extensive surgical debridement of the scrotal and perianal area and Hartman procedure with a diverting colostomy. In addition, patient started on therapy with mesalazine 3gr, methylprednisolone 16 mg, parenteral nutrition and broad spectrum of antibiotics. Two days after the first operation the patient needed a second operation for perianal debridement. On the fourth day, blood cultures showed E. coli. Patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 34 days of hospitalization. On follow up, disease review is scheduled and colostomy closure is planned. PMID:21122507

  5. Rare cause of odynophagia: Giant esophageal ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Aprile, Giuseppe; Amore, Francesca F; Corona, Daniela; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications are a frequent cause of morbidity after transplantation and may affect up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. Here we report a rare case of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in a kidney transplant recipient. A 37-year-old female presented with a one-week history of odynophagia and weight loss. Upon admission, the patient presented cold sores, and a quantitative cytomegalovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive (105 copies/mL). An upper endoscopy demonstrated the presence of a giant ulcer. Serological test and tissue biopsies were unable to demonstrate an infectious origin of the ulcer. Immunosuppression was reduced and everolimus was introduced. An empirical i.v. therapy with acyclovir was started, resulting in a dramatic improvement in symptoms and complete healing of the ulcer. Only two cases of idiopathic giant esophageal ulcer in kidney transplant recipients have been reported in the literature; in both cases, steroid therapy was successful without recurrence of symptoms or endoscopic findings. However, this report suggests that correction of immune imbalance is mandatory to treat such a rare complication. PMID:27076774

  6. Peptic ulcer in childhood. Psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, G N; Gargoulas, A; Papaloukas, A; Marinopoulou, A; Rabavilas, A D

    1979-01-01

    Thirty children (20 girls and 10 boys, aged 6-16 years) with primary peptic ulcers, matched in paris for age, sex and socio-economic standard to a group of 30 ulcer-free controls, were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview, a structured 'present psychiatric state' examination and to personality and intelligence tests. With one exception all patients suffered from duodenal ulcer; 3 male patients had personalities with psychopathic elements, 7 patients had nicknames, 5 suffered from psychiatric disorders, 3 had attempted suicide in the past, and 3 had had homosexual experiences. These parameters were negative in all controls. The patients had lower mean IQ, worse scholastic adaptation, more anxious and overprotective parents, higher frequency of faddiness in food and lower frequency of nail-biting than the controls. Psychotraumatic events had preceded the onset of ulcer symptomatology in 11 cases. The findings are discussed and the contribution of psychological factors in the pathogenesis of childhood peptic ulcer is stressed. PMID:550183

  7. Differential diagnosis of ulcerative lesions in fish.

    PubMed Central

    Law, M

    2001-01-01

    Tissues such as skin and muscle have a limited repertoire of morphological response to injury. The two most important phenomena that determine the outcome of cell injury appear to be a) critical cell membrane damage, with associated fluid and ionic imbalances; and b) inability of mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, to restart ATP synthesis. In fish, skin ulcers can have many different etiologies, including infectious agents, toxins, physical causes, immunologic causes, and nutritional and metabolic perturbations. This article is concerned primarily with the possible pathways of disease involved in ulcerative lesions of fish. In particular, the high prevalence of ulcerative lesions in Atlantic menhaden found along the mid-Atlantic coast, especially in North Carolina estuarine waters, has received much recent attention. These ulcerative lesions are likely to be initiated by a series of factors that lead ultimately to a breach of the normal barrier function of the skin. Bioassays that attempt to define the role of individual etiologic agents such as fungi (oomycetes) or putative Pfiesteria toxin(s) should recognize this multiplicity of factors and should include appropriate quality control measures for water quality parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, nitrogenous wastes, etc.) as well as bacterial and other contaminants that may confound bioassay results and their interpretation. Consideration of these factors along with the whole animal in the context of its environment can only advance the science, perhaps provide clues to the causative pathways of skin ulcers in fish, and give us keener insight into the health of the aquatic environment. PMID:11677175

  8. Mindfulness May Be Helpful for People with Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by NCCAM, was reported in the journal Digestion . Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease ... flare-up in patients with inactive ulcerative colitis . Digestion. 2014;89:142–155. Additional Resources Meditation Information ...

  9. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome. PMID:25838951

  10. Systemic ketoconazole treatment for Fusarium leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Landau, M; Srebrnik, A; Wolf, R; Bashi, E; Brenner, S

    1992-07-01

    Fusarium oxysporum was isolated from a large foot ulcer in an otherwise healthy 69-year-old man. Although tissue invasion could not be proven histologically, systemic antifungal treatment was administered with satisfactory response. Fusarium species are common soil-inhabiting organisms and plant pathogens. In humans, Fusarium is considered an opportunistic agent in skin ulcers, interdigital spaces, and burned skin, but can also cause mycotic keratitis, onychomycosis, and rarely deep-seated or disseminated infections, especially in an immunocompromised host. The distinction between skin infection and saprophytic growth, as well as optimal treatment regimens for the two types of infection, have not been clearly defined. We describe a case of leg ulcers caused by Fusarium oxysporum in a 69-year-old man treated successfully with oral ketoconazole. "Silent" immunologic disturbances were found in this apparently healthy patient. The case illustrates a relatively benign infection caused by Fusarium that responded to systemic antifungal drug treatment. PMID:1500248