Science.gov

Sample records for butyrate induces cell

  1. Transcriptome characterization by deep-RNA-sequencing underlies the mechanisms of butyrate-induced epigenomic regulation in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate), especially butyrate, alter cell differentiation, proliferation, motility, and in particular, induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through its histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition activity. Butyrate is a great inducer of ...

  2. Activation of PPAR{gamma} is not involved in butyrate-induced epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, S.; Waechtershaeuser, A.; Loitsch, S.; Knethen, A. von; Bruene, B.; Stein, J. . E-mail: j.stein@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2005-10-15

    Histone deacetylase-inhibitors affect growth and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells by inducing expression of several transcription factors, e.g. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) or vitamin D receptor (VDR). While activation of VDR by butyrate mainly seems to be responsible for cellular differentiation, the activation of PPAR{gamma} in intestinal cells remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PPAR{gamma} in butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition and differentiation induction in Caco-2 cells. Treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands ciglitazone and BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl) enhanced butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas cell differentiation was unaffected after treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands rosiglitazone and MCC-555. Experiments were further performed in dominant-negative PPAR{gamma} mutant cells leading to an increase in cell growth whereas butyrate-induced cell differentiation was again unaffected. The present study clearly demonstrated that PPAR{gamma} is involved in butyrate-induced inhibition of cell growth, but seems not to play an essential role in butyrate-induced cell differentiation.

  3. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Methods Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5–5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Results Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin

  4. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present evidence that butyrate induced histone acetylation regulates miRNA expression. MicroRNA expression microarray profiling revealed that 35 miRNA transcripts are significantly (p <0.05) differentially expressed after cells were treated with 10 mM butyrate. Among them, 11 transcripts are dif...

  5. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  6. Butyrate produced by commensal bacteria potentiates phorbol esters induced AP-1 response in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells. PMID:23300800

  7. Protective activity of butyrate on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in isolated human colonocytes and HT29 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Rosignoli, P; Fabiani, R; De Bartolomeo, A; Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Pelli, M A; Morozzi, G

    2001-10-01

    Epidemiological studies support the involvement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in colon physiology and the protective role of butyrate on colon carcinogenesis. Among the possible mechanisms by which butyrate may exert its anti-carcinogenicity an antioxidant activity has been recently suggested. We investigated the effects of butyrate and mixtures of SCFA (butyrate, propionate and acetate) on DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated human colonocytes and in two human colon tumour cell lines (HT29 and HT29 19A). Human colonocytes were isolated from endoscopically obtained samples and the DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage in normal colonocytes in a dose-dependent manner which was statistically significant at concentrations over 10 microM. At 15 microM H(2)O(2) DNA damage in HT29 and HT29 19A cells was significantly lower than that observed in normal colonocytes (P < 0.01). Pre-incubation of the cells with physiological concentrations of butyrate (6.25 and 12.5 mM) reduced H(2)O(2) (15 microM) induced damage by 33 and 51% in human colonocytes, 45 and 75% in HT29 and 30 and 80% in HT29 19A, respectively. Treatment of cells with a mixture of 25 mM acetate + 10.4 mM propionate + 6.25 mM butyrate did not induce DNA damage, while a mixture of 50 mM acetate + 20.8 mM propionate + 12.5 mM butyrate was weakly genotoxic only towards normal colonocytes. However, both mixtures were able to reduce the H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by about 50% in all cell types. The reported protective effect of butyrate might be important in pathogenetic mechanisms mediated by reactive oxygen species, and aids understanding of the apparent protection toward colorectal cancer exerted by dietary fibres, which enhance the butyrate bioavailability in the colonic mucosa. PMID:11577008

  8. Butyrate attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in intestinal cells and Crohn's mucosa through modulation of antioxidant defense machinery.

    PubMed

    Russo, Ilaria; Luciani, Alessandro; De Cicco, Paola; Troncone, Edoardo; Ciacci, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CrD). High levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) induce the activation of the redox-sensitive nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB), which in turn triggers the inflammatory mediators. Butyrate decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by the lamina propria mononuclear cells in CrD patients via inhibition of NF-κB activation, but how it reduces inflammation is still unclear. We suggest that butyrate controls ROS mediated NF-κB activation and thus mucosal inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells and in CrD colonic mucosa by triggering intracellular antioxidant defense systems. Intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and colonic mucosa from 14 patients with CrD and 12 controls were challenged with or without lipopolysaccaride from Escherichia coli (EC-LPS) in presence or absence of butyrate for 4 and 24 h. The effects of butyrate on oxidative stress, p42/44 MAP kinase phosphorylation, p65-NF-κB activation and mucosal inflammation were investigated by real time PCR, western blot and confocal microscopy. Our results suggest that EC-LPS challenge induces a decrease in Gluthation-S-Transferase-alpha (GSTA1/A2) mRNA levels, protein expression and catalytic activity; enhanced levels of ROS induced by EC-LPS challenge mediates p65-NF-κB activation and inflammatory response in Caco-2 cells and in CrD colonic mucosa. Furthermore butyrate treatment was seen to restore GSTA1/A2 mRNA levels, protein expression and catalytic activity and to control NF-κB activation, COX-2, ICAM-1 and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine. In conclusion, butyrate rescues the redox machinery and controls the intracellular ROS balance thus switching off EC-LPS induced inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells and in CrD colonic mucosa. PMID:22412931

  9. SKW 6.4 cell differentiation induced by interleukin 6 is stimulated by butyrate.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, T; Gohda, E; Iji, H; Fujiwara, M; Yamamoto, I

    1998-08-01

    We investigated if sodium butyrate (NaBu), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, and its analogs modulate cytokine-induced differentiation of the human B cell line SKW 6.4 transformed by the Epstein-Barr virus. NaBu markedly enhanced interleukin (IL)-6-induced IgM production with an accompanying increase in the level of histone H4 acetylation and augmented IgM production induced by IL-4 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. From both the enhancing effect of cell differentiation and the effect of inducing histone hyperacetylation in SKW 6.4 cells, other histone deacetylase inhibitors and NaBu analogs were divided into three groups: those that increased both IL-6-induced antibody production and histone acetylation, those that caused histone hyperacetylation, but failed to induce the differentiation, and those that were ineffective at inducing either activity. No agent that enhanced IgM production without inducing histone hyperacetylation was found among the inhibitors and analogs we tested. These results suggest that the increase in the histone acetylation is necessary, but it is insufficient to augment differentiation of SKW 6.4 cells. Thus another activity of NaBu in addition to the inhibition of histone deacetylase may be involved in promoting IL-6-induced differentiation. Our results also suggest that fatty acids that have a straight chain of four carbon atoms or are branched with four and five carbon atoms, which contain no hydrophilic substituents, or those with similar structures, show this other activity. PMID:9826026

  10. ChIp-seq of bovine cells (MDBK) to study butyrate-induced histone modification with 10 datasets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next-generation sequencing was combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology to analyze histone modification (acetylation) induced by butyrate and to map the epigenomic landscape of normal histone H3, H4 in rumen cells of the cow. Ten variants of histone H3 and H4 modification were m...

  11. Butyrate-induced proapoptotic and antiangiogenic pathways in EAT cells require activation of CAD and downregulation of VEGF

    SciTech Connect

    Belakavadi, Madesh . E-mail: belakama@umdnj.edu; Prabhakar, B.T.; Salimath, Bharathi P.

    2005-10-07

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in the colon, induces cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in transformed cell lines. In this report, we study the effects of butyrate (BuA) on the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells in vivo. BuA, when injected intraperitoneally (i.p) into mice, inhibited proliferation of EAT cells. Further, induction of apoptosis in EAT cells was monitored by nuclear condensation, annexin-V staining, DNA fragmentation, and translocation of caspase-activated DNase into nucleus upon BuA-treatment. Ac-DEVD-CHO, a caspase-3 inhibitor, completely inhibited BuA-induced apoptosis, indicating that activation of caspase-3 mediates the apoptotic pathway in EAT cells. The proapoptotic effect of BuA also reflects on the antiangiogenic pathway in EAT cells. The antiangiogenic effect of BuA in vivo was demonstrated by the downregulation of the secretion of VEGF in EAT cells. CD31 immunohistochemical staining of peritoneum sections clearly indicated a potential angioinhibitory effect of BuA in EAT cells. These results suggest that BuA, besides regulating other fundamental cellular processes, is able to modulate the expression/secretion of the key angiogenic growth factor VEGF in EAT cells.

  12. Butyrate greatly enhances derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells by promoting epigenetic remodeling and the expression of pluripotency-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Prashant; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Yen, Jonathan; Ye, Zhaohui; Zou, Jizhong; Dowey, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A; Ohm, Joyce E; Yu, Wayne; Baylin, Stephen B; Yusa, Kosuke; Bradley, Allan; Meyers, David J; Mukherjee, Chandrani; Cole, Philip A; Cheng, Linzhao

    2010-04-01

    We report here that butyrate, a naturally occurring fatty acid commonly used as a nutritional supplement and differentiation agent, greatly enhances the efficiency of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell derivation from human adult or fetal fibroblasts. After transient butyrate treatment, the iPS cell derivation efficiency is enhanced by 15- to 51-fold using either retroviral or piggyBac transposon vectors expressing 4 to 5 reprogramming genes. Butyrate stimulation is more remarkable (>100- to 200-fold) on reprogramming in the absence of either KLF4 or MYC transgene. Butyrate treatment did not negatively affect properties of iPS cell lines established by either 3 or 4 retroviral vectors or a single piggyBac DNA transposon vector. These characterized iPS cell lines, including those derived from an adult patient with sickle cell disease by either the piggyBac or retroviral vectors, show normal karyotypes and pluripotency. To gain insights into the underlying mechanisms of butyrate stimulation, we conducted genome-wide gene expression and promoter DNA methylation microarrays and other epigenetic analyses on established iPS cells and cells from intermediate stages of the reprogramming process. By days 6 to 12 during reprogramming, butyrate treatment enhanced histone H3 acetylation, promoter DNA demethylation, and the expression of endogenous pluripotency-associated genes, including DPPA2, whose overexpression partially substitutes for butyrate stimulation. Thus, butyrate as a cell permeable small molecule provides a simple tool to further investigate molecular mechanisms of cellular reprogramming. Moreover, butyrate stimulation provides an efficient method for reprogramming various human adult somatic cells, including cells from patients that are more refractory to reprogramming. PMID:20201064

  13. Butyrate Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Bovine Cells through Targeting Gene Expression relevance to DNA Replication Apparatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using both real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in bovine kidney epithelial cells, we systematically investigated the gene expression relevance to DNA replication apparatus targeted by butyrate. The real-time PCR and Western blot data generally confirmed the microarray analysis. From the quan...

  14. Butyrate induces profound changes in gene expression related to multiple signal pathways in bovine kidney epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Robert W; Li, CongJun

    2006-01-01

    Background Global gene expression profiles of bovine kidney epithelial cells regulated by sodium butyrate were investigated with high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. The bovine microarray with 86,191 distinct 60mer oligonucleotides, each with 4 replicates, was designed and produced with Maskless Array Synthesizer technology. These oligonucleotides represent approximately 45,383 unique cattle sequences. Results 450 genes significantly regulated by butyrate with a median False Discovery Rate (FDR) = 0 % were identified. The majority of these genes were repressed by butyrate and associated with cell cycle control. The expression levels of 30 selected genes identified by the microarray were confirmed using real-time PCR. The results from real-time PCR positively correlated (R = 0.867) with the results from the microarray. Conclusion This study presented the genes related to multiple signal pathways such as cell cycle control and apoptosis. The profound changes in gene expression elucidate the molecular basis for the pleiotropic effects of butyrate on biological processes. These findings enable better recognition of the full range of beneficial roles butyrate may play during cattle energy metabolism, cell growth and proliferation, and possibly in fighting gastrointestinal pathogens. PMID:16972989

  15. Pathways analysis identifies perturbation of genetic networks induced by butyrate in a bovine kidney epithelial cell line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant species have evolved to metabolize the short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA), acetate, propionate, and butyrate to fulfill up to 70% of their nutrient energy requirements. The inherent VFA dependence of ruminant cells was exploited in order to add a level of increased sensitivity to the s...

  16. Zinc Sensing Receptor Signaling, Mediated by GPR39, Reduces Butyrate-Induced Cell Death in HT29 Colonocytes via Upregulation of Clusterin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Limor; Azriel-Tamir, Hagit; Arotsker, Natan; Sekler, Israel; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Zinc enhances epithelial proliferation, protects the digestive epithelial layer and has profound antiulcerative and antidiarrheal roles in the colon. Despite the clinical significance of this ion, the mechanisms linking zinc to these cellular processes are poorly understood. We have previously identified an extracellular Zn2+ sensing G-protein coupled receptor (ZnR) that activates Ca2+ signaling in colonocytes, but its molecular identity as well as its effects on colonocytes' survival remained elusive. Here, we show that Zn2+, by activation of the ZnR, protects HT29 colonocytes from butyrate induced cell death. Silencing of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR39 expression abolished ZnR-dependent Ca2+ release and Zn2+-dependent survival of butyrate-treated colonocytes. Importantly, GPR39 also mediated ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange activity as this activity was found in native colon tissue but not in tissue obtained from GPR39 knock-out mice. Although ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange reduced the cellular acid load induced by butyrate, it did not rescue HT29 cells from butyrate induced cell death. ZnR/GPR39 activation however, increased the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein clusterin in butyrate-treated cells. Furthermore, silencing of clusterin abolished the Zn2+-dependent survival of HT29 cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that extracellular Zn2+, acting through ZnR, regulates intracellular pH and clusterin expression thereby enhancing survival of HT29 colonocytes. Moreover, we identify GPR39 as the molecular moiety of ZnR in HT29 and native colonocytes. PMID:22545109

  17. Green tea phenolics inhibit butyrate-induced differentiation of colon cancer cells by interacting with monocarboxylate transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tena, S.; Vizán, P.; Dudeja, P.K.; Centelles, J.J.; Cascante, M.

    2016-01-01

    Diet has a significant impact on colorectal cancer and both dietary fiber and plant-derived compounds have been independently shown to be inversely related to colon cancer risk. Butyrate (NaB), one of the principal products of dietary fiber fermentation, induces differentiation of colon cancer cell lines by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs). On the other hand, (−)-epicatechin (EC) and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), two abundant phenolic compounds of green tea, have been shown to exhibit antitumoral properties. In this study we used colon cancer cell lines to study the cellular and molecular events that take place during co-treatment with NaB, EC and EGCG. We found that (i) polyphenols EC and EGCG fail to induce differentiation of colon adenocarcinoma cell lines; (ii) polyphenols EC and EGCG reduce NaB-induced differentiation; (iii) the effect of the polyphenols is specific for NaB, since differentiation induced by other agents, such as trichostatin A (TSA), was unaltered upon EC and EGCG treatment, and (iv) is independent of the HDAC inhibitory activity of NaB. Also, (v) polyphenols partially reduce cellular NaB; and (vi) on a molecular level, reduction of cellular NaB uptake by polyphenols is achieved by impairing the capacity of NaB to relocalize its own transporter (monocarboxylate transporter 1, MCT1) in the plasma membrane. Our findings suggest that beneficial effects of NaB on colorectal cancer may be reduced by green tea phenolic supplementation. This valuable information should be of assistance in choosing a rational design for more effective diet-driven therapeutic interventions in the prevention or treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:23994611

  18. Genome-wide ChIP-seq mapping and analysis of butyrate-induced H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and epigenomic landscapes alteration in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile short-chain fatty acids (VFAs, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) are nutrients especially critical to ruminants. Beyond their nutritional impact, clear evidence is beginning to link modifications in chromatin structure induced by butyrate to cell cycle progression, DNA replication and over...

  19. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Birren, B.W.; Taplitz, S.J.; Herschman, H.R.

    1987-11-01

    The authors examined in the H4IIE rat heptoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequence to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation.

  20. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  1. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  2. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  3. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  4. Acetylcarnitine potentiates the anticarcinogenic effects of butyrate on SW480 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Elimrani, Ihsan; Dionne, Serge; Saragosti, Dan; Qureshi, Ijaz; Levy, Emile; Delvin, Edgar; Seidman, Ernest G

    2015-08-01

    Butyrate is a potent anticarcinogenic compound against colon cancer cells in vitro. However, its rapid metabolism is hypothesized to limit its anticancer benefits in colonic epithelial cells. Carnitine, a potent antioxidant, is essential to fatty acid oxidation. The aims of this study were to identify a colon cancer cell line capable of transporting carnitine. We evaluated the effect of carnitine and acetylcarnitine (ALCAR) on the response of colon carcinoma cells to butyrate. We explored the mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenic benefit. SW480 cells were incubated with butyrate ± carnitine or ALCAR. Carnitine uptake was assessed using [3H]-carnitine. Apoptosis and cell viability were assessed using an ELISA kit and flow cytometry, respectively. Modulation of proteins implicated in carnitine transport, cell death and proliferation were assessed by western blotting. SW480 cells were found to transport carnitine primarily via the OCTN2 transporter. Butyrate induced SW480 cell death occurred at concentrations of 2 mM and higher. Cells treated with the combination of butyrate (3 mM) with ALCAR exhibited increased mortality. The addition of carnitine or ALCAR also increased butyrate-induced apoptosis. Butyrate increased levels of cyclin D1, p21 and PARP p86, but decreased Bcl-XL and survivin levels. Butyrate also downregulated dephospho-β-catenin and increased acetylated histone H4 levels. Butyrate and carnitine decreased survivin levels by ≥25%. ALCAR independently induced a 20% decrease in p21. These results demonstrate that butyrate and ALCAR are potentially beneficial anticarcinogenic nutrients that inhibit colon cancer cell survival in vitro. The combination of both agents may have superior anticarcinogenic properties than butyrate alone. PMID:26043725

  5. Butyrate enhances antibacterial effects while suppressing other features of alternative activation in IL-4-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Maria R; Saxena, Alpana; Reyes, José-Luis; McKay, Derek M

    2016-05-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate is produced by fermentation of dietary fiber by the intestinal microbiota; butyrate is the primary energy source of colonocytes and has immunomodulatory effects. Having shown that macrophages differentiated with IL-4 [M(IL-4)s] can suppress colitis, we hypothesized that butyrate would reinforce an M(IL-4) phenotype. Here, we show that in the presence of butyrate M(IL-4)s display reduced expression of their hallmark markers Arg1 and Ym1 and significantly suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide, IL-12p40, and IL-10 production. Butyrate treatment likely altered the M(IL-4) phenotype via inhibition of histone deacetylation. Functionally, M(IL-4)s treated with butyrate showed increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria, compared with M(IL-4) and this was not accompanied by enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production. Culture of regulatory T cells with M(IL-4)s and M(IL-4 + butyrate)s revealed that both macrophage subsets suppressed expression of the regulatory T-cell marker Foxp3. However, Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4 + butyrate) produced less IL-17A than Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4). These data illustrate the importance of butyrate, a microbial-derived metabolite, in the regulation of gut immunity: the demonstration that butyrate promotes phagocytosis in M(IL-4)s that can limit T-cell production of IL-17A reveals novel aspects of bacterial-host interaction in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis. PMID:27012776

  6. Sensitization of human colon cancer cells to sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis by modulation of sphingosine kinase 2 and protein kinase D

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Min; Liu, Yungang; Zou, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (SphKs) have been recognized as important proteins regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Of the two isoforms of SphK (SphK1 and SphK2), little is known about the functions of SphK2. Sodium butyrate (NaBT) has been established as a promising chemotherapeutic agent, but the precise mechanism for its effects is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of SphK2 in NaBT-induced apoptosis of HCT116 colon cancer cells. The results indicated that following NaBT treatment SphK2 was translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, leading to its accumulation in the cytoplasm; in the meantime, only mild apoptosis occurred. However, downregulation of SphK2 resulted in sensitized apoptosis, and overexpression of SphK2 led to even lighter apoptosis; these strongly indicate an inhibitory role of SphK2 in cell apoptosis induced by NaBT. After knocking down protein kinase D (PKD), another protein reported to be critical in cell proliferation/apoptosis process, by using siRNA, blockage of cytoplasmic accumulation of SphK2 and sensitized apoptosis following NaBT treatment were observed. The present study suggests that PKD and SphK2 may form a mechanism for the resistance of cancer cells to tumor chemotherapies, such as HCT116 colon cancer cells to NaBT, and these two proteins may become molecular targets for designation of new tumor-therapeutic drugs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the present study sodium butyrate (10 mM) induced mild apoptosis of cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apoptosis was negatively regulated by cytoplasmic Sphingosine Kinase 2 (SphK2). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Translocation of SphK2 from nucleus to cytoplasm was mediated by protein kinase D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of SphK2 or protein kinase D leads to sensitized cell apoptosis.

  7. Short-chain fatty acids and colon cancer cells: the vitamin D receptor--butyrate connection.

    PubMed

    Gaschott, Tanja; Stein, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    Butyrate and its prodrug tributyrin, as well as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3), have important physiological effects on proliferation and differentiation in a variety of malignant cells. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in butyrate-induced cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest in Caco-2 cells, a human colon cancer cell line. Cell differentiation was evaluated by analyzing the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP). Protein of VDR, cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) and of cdk inhibitors was quantified by Western blot analysis, VDR-mRNA by PCR. Pre- and postconfluent cells were assessed for VDR binding activity. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Tributyrin significantly increased VDR-mRNA level (250% vs. control) and VDR binding activity. Butyrate also enhanced VDR protein content in the nucleus in a time- and dose-dependent manner and more potently than other short-chain fatty acids of a related structure. Both butyrate (640% vs. control) and 1,25-(OH)2D3 (350% vs. control) significantly stimulated differentiation, whereas combined treatment with butyrate and 1,25-(OH)2D3 resulted in a synergistic amplification of AP activity (1400% vs. control). In the presence of the VDR antagonist ZK 191732, butyrate-induced differentiation was completely abolished (150% vs. control). While butyrate alone increased p21Waf1/Cip1 expression and down-regulated cdk 6 and cyclin A, and combined exposure with 1,25-(OH)2D3 resulted in a synergistic enhancement of butyrate-induced changes, expressions did not change from control level after treatment with butyrate and ZK 191732. G1 cell cycle arrest induced by butyrate was also abolished after combined treatment with butyrate and ZK 191732. In conclusion, differentiation and cell cycle arrest of Caco-2 cells induced by butyrate are mediated by up-regulation of VDR, followed by a stimulation of the negative cell cycle regulator p21Waf1/Cip1 and by a down

  8. Butyrate regulates the expression of inflammatory and chemotactic cytokines in human acute leukemic cells during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Stephanie R; Pellom, Samuel T; Shanker, Anil; Adunyah, Samuel E

    2016-08-01

    Butyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor implicated in many studies as a potential therapy for various forms of cancer. High concentrations of butyrate (>1.5mM) have been shown to activate apoptosis in several cancer cell lines including prostate, breast, and leukemia. Butyrate is also known to influence multiple signaling pathways that are mediators of cytokine production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of high concentrations of butyrate on the cancer microenvironment vis-à-vis apoptosis, cellular migration, and capacity to modulate cytokine expression in cancer cells. The results indicate that high concentrations of butyrate induced a 2-fold activation of caspase-3 and reduced cell viability by 60% in U937 leukemia cells. Within 24h, butyrate significantly decreased the levels of chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in HL-60 and U937 cells, and decreased CCL5 in THP-1 leukemia cells. Differential effects were observed in treatments with valproic acid for CCL2 and CCL5 indicating butyrate-specificity. Many of the biological effects examined in this study are linked to activation of the AKT and MAPK signaling pathways; therefore, we investigated whether butyrate alters the levels of phosphorylated forms of these signaling proteins and how it correlated with the expression of chemokines. The results show that butyrate may partially regulate CCL5 production via p38 MAPK. The decrease in p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT levels correlated with the decrease in CCL2 production. These data suggest that while promoting apoptosis, butyrate has the potential to influence the cancer microenvironment by inducing differential expression of cytokines. PMID:27253488

  9. Butyrate-mediated acquisition of chemoresistance by human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyang Ri; Choi, Hyeon Gyeom; Jeon, Chae Kyung; Lim, Soo-Jeong; Kim, So Hee

    2016-08-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid produced by the intestinal microflora and it not only induces apoptosis but also inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells. Recently, it has been reported that butyrate may cause resistance in colon cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the effects of increased resistance to butyrate in HCT116 colon cancer cells. We established HCT116 cells resistant to butyrate (HCT116/BR) by treating HCT116 parental cells (HCT116/PT) with increasing concentrations of butyrate to a maximum of 1.6 mM for 3 months. The butyrate concentrations that inhibited cell growth by 50% (IC50) were 0.508 and 5.50 mM in HCT116/PT and HCT116/BR cells. The values after treatment with paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin and trichostatin A (TSA) were 2.42, 2.36, 4.31 and 11.3-fold higher, respectively, in HCT116/BR cells compared with HCT116/PT cells. The protein expression of drug efflux pumps, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) and the multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), did not differ between HCT116/PT and HCT116/BR cells. The expression level of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein was increased while those of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bim proteins were reduced in HCT116/BR cells. There were no significant differences in cell motility and invasion. This study suggests that exposure of colon cancer cells to butyrate results in development of resistance to butyrate, which may play a role in the acquisition of chemoresistance in colon cancer. PMID:27277338

  10. Butyrate downregulates α2β1 integrin: a possible role in the induction of apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Buda, A; Qualtrough, D; Jepson, M A; Martines, D; Paraskeva, C; Pignatelli, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: Integrins mediate cell matrix adhesion and regulate cell growth and survival. In colonic epithelial cells, α2β1 integrin controls glandular differentiation and proliferation. Butyrate stimulates differentiation and induces apoptosis in vitro. Aims: We investigated whether butyrate induction of apoptosis was associated with perturbation of integrin mediated cell matrix adhesion. Methods: Three colonic cancer cell lines (SW1222, SW620, LS174T) were studied. Adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins, expression of α2β1 integrin, and apoptosis were studied in adherent cells after treatment with 4 mM butyrate. Results: Butyrate decreased the attachment to type I collagen in SW620 cells and type I and IV collagen in LS174T cells. The decreased cell attachment was associated with downregulation of α2β1 integrin and increased apoptosis in adherent cells. No changes in α2β1 expression or matrix adhesion were seen in SW1222 cells, which were also found to be less sensitive to butyrate induction of apoptosis. Downregulation of α2β1 integrin preceded the detection of apoptosis. Conclusion: Apoptosis induced by butyrate is associated with downregulation of expression and functional activity of α2β1 integrin. Perturbation of cell matrix adhesion may be a novel mechanism by which butyrate induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. PMID:12692060

  11. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or

  12. Mechanism of Butyrate Stimulation of Triglyceride Storage and Adipokine Expression during Adipogenic Differentiation of Porcine Stromovascular Cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Ajuwon, Kolapo M

    2015-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), products of microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, exert multiple metabolic effects in cells. Previously, we had demonstrated that soluble fiber influenced fat mass accumulation, gut microbial community structure and SCFA production in pigs. The current study was designed to identify effects of SCFA treatment during adipogenic differentiation of porcine stromovascular cells on lipid metabolism and adipokine expression. Differentiating cells were treated with varying concentrations of butyrate. Results show that butyrate treatment enhanced adipogenesis and lipid accumulation, perhaps through upregulation of glucose uptake and de novo lipogenesis and other mechanisms that include induction of SREBP-1c, C/EBPα/β, GLUT4, LPL, PPARγ, GPAT4, DGAT1 and DGAT2 expression. In addition, butyrate induced adiponectin expression, resulting in activation of downstream target genes, such as AMPK and AKT. Activation of AMPK by butyrate led to phosphorylation of ACC. Although increased ACO gene expression was seen with butyrate treatment, experiments with the peroxisomal fatty acid inhibitor, thioridazine, suggest that butyrate may have an inhibitory effect on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. Our studies also provide evidence that butyrate may inhibit lipolysis, perhaps in an FFAR3-dependent manner. Therefore, this study presents a novel paradigm for butyrate action in adipocytes and shows that adipocytes are capable of utilizing butyrate, leading to increased expression of adiponectin for enhanced glucose uptake and improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:26713737

  13. Alternate splicing regulated by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a signaling molecule and a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HADCs), butyrate exerts its impacts on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. In this study, we examined the effect of...

  14. Butyrate modulates bacterial adherence on LS174T human colorectal cells by stimulating mucin secretion and MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Park, Jeong Hyeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Fermentation of dietary fiber results in production of various short chain fatty acids in the colon. In particular, butyrate is reported to regulate the physical and functional integrity of the normal colonic mucosa by altering mucin gene expression or the number of goblet cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether butyrate modulates mucin secretion in LS174T human colorectal cells, thereby influencing the adhesion of probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains and subsequently inhibiting pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli. In addition, possible signaling pathways involved in mucin gene regulation induced by butyrate treatment were also investigated. MATERIALS/METHODS Mucin protein content assay and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining were performed in LS174T cells treated with butyrate at various concentrations. Effects of butyrate on the ability of probiotics to adhere to LS174T cells and their competition with E. coli strains were examined. Real time polymerase chain reaction for mucin gene expression and Taqman array 96-well fast plate-based pathway analysis were performed on butyrate-treated LS174T cells. RESULTS Treatment with butyrate resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mucin protein contents in LS174T cells with peak effects at 6 or 9 mM, which was further confirmed by PAS staining. Increase in mucin protein contents resulted in elevated adherence of probiotics, which subsequently reduced the adherent ability of E. coli. Treatment with butyrate also increased transcriptional levels of MUC3, MUC4, and MUC12, which was accompanied by higher gene expressions of signaling kinases and transcription factors involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS Based on our results, butyrate is an effective regulator of modulation of mucin protein production at the transcriptional and translational levels, resulting in changes in the adherence of gut microflora. Butyrate

  15. Comparison of the butyrate effects on neurotransmitter receptors in neurohybrids NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Chuang, D.M.

    1987-08-31

    The authors previous study demonstrated that long term treatment of NCB-20 cells with sodium butyrate resulted in a marked increase in the density of delta-opioid receptors with a much lesser effect on muscarinic cholinergic and no effect on alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors. In the present study the authors investigated the effect of sodium butyrate on these three types of receptors in NG108-15 cells whose neuroblastoma parent is the same as that of NCB-20 cells. Long term treatment of NG108-15 cells with sodium butyrate (0.5 mM) induced a 2-fold increase in the density of the specific binding of /sup 3/H-clonidine. A comparable increase in the number of binding sites was detected when /sup 3/H-yohimbine was used as the receptor ligand. The butyrate-induced increase in the alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptor binding could be totally abolished by treatment with a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, suggesting that synthesis of receptor protein is involved. The same butyrate treatment had no significant effect on opioid and muscarinic cholinergic receptor bindings. Thus, butyrate effects on the expression of these three types of receptors in NG108-15 and NCB-20 cells are dramatically different. These data suggest that induction by butyrate of neurotransmitter receptors requires concerted action of genetic factors of both parents of the neurohybrids. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Effects of 5-azacytidine and butyrate on differentiation and apoptosis of hepatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X M; Wang, X; Li, J; Evers, B M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cellular effects of 5-azacytidine (5-azaC) and sodium butyrate on two human liver cancers, HepG2 and Hep3B. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Primary liver cancer is a significant health problem; treatment options are limited and prognosis is poor. Recent studies have focused on the role that programmed cell death (i.e., apoptosis) plays in both normal and neoplastic growth: certain genes can either suppress (e.g., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL) or promote (e.g., Bik, Bax, Bak) apoptosis. The identification of novel agents targeted to specific molecular pathways may be beneficial in the treatment of this disease. METHODS: Human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B were treated with 5-azaC alone, butyrate alone, or 5-azaC and butyrate. Morphologic and proliferative changes were assessed by light microscopy and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine staining; flow cytometry was used to determine cell cycle characteristics. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA laddering and the in situ apoptosis detection assay using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. In addition, total RNA and protein were analyzed by ribonuclease protection and Western blot, respectively, to assess changes in the expression of apoptosis-related genes. RESULTS: Treatment with either 5-azaC or butyrate inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in both HepG2 and Hep3B cells; the combination of 5-azaC and butyrate was not more effective than either agent alone. 5-azaC alone resulted in a more differentiated-appearing morphology and G2 cell cycle arrest in both cell lines. Treatment with 5-azaC or butyrate affected the expression levels of proteins of the Bcl-2 family. CONCLUSIONS: Both 5-azaC and butyrate induced apoptosis in the HepG2 and Hep3B liver cancer cells; 5-azaC treatment alone produced G2 arrest in both cell lines. Proteins of the Bcl-2 family may play a role in the cellular changes that occur with treatment, but further studies are required to define this potential role. Products of the

  17. Involvement of the Antioxidant Effect and Anti-inflammatory Response in Butyrate-Inhibited Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Omana P.; Ranganna, Kasturi; Milton, Shirlette G.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms by altering the expression and, in turn, functions of target genes have potential to modify cellular processes that are characteristics of atherosclerosis, including inflammation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis/cell death. Butyrate, a natural epigenetic modifier and a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is an inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, a critical event in atherogenesis. Here, we examined whether glutathione peroxidases (GPxs), a family of antioxidant enzymes, are modulated by butyrate, contributing to its antiproliferation action on VSMC through the regulation of the inflammatory response by using western blotting, immunostaining methods and activity assay. Treatment of VSMC with butyrate not only upregulates glutathione peroxidase (GPx) 3 and GPx4, but also increases the overall catalytic activity of GPx supporting involvement of antioxidant effect in butyrate arrested VSMC proliferation. Moreover, analysis of the redox-sensitive NF-κB transcription factor system, the target of GPx, reveals that butyrate causes downregulation of IKKα, IKKβ, IkBα and NF-κBp65 expression and prevents NF-κBp65 phosphorylation at serine536 causing inhibition of the expression NF-κB target inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase, VCAM-1 and cyclooxygenase-2. Overall, these observations suggest a link between the antioxidant effect and anti-inflammatory response in butyrate-arrested VSMC proliferation, accentuating the atheroprotective and therapeutic potential of natural products, like butyrate, in vascular proliferative diseases. PMID:25390157

  18. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  19. Effects of butyrate on the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in bovine kidney epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in bovine kidney epithelial cells primarily via down-regulating cell cycle-related gene expression and enhancing expression of pro-apoptotic genes. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays an essential role in these processes as well a...

  20. Varying butyric acid amounts induce different stress- and cell death-related signals in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells: implications in neuropathic pain absence during periodontal disease progression.

    PubMed

    Seki, Keisuke; Cueno, Marni E; Kamio, Noriaki; Saito, Yuko; Kamimoto, Atsushi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2016-06-01

    Neuropathic pain is absent from the early stages of periodontal disease possibly due to neurite retraction. Butyric acid (BA) is a periodontopathic metabolite that activates several stress-related signals and, likewise, induce neurite retraction. Neuronal cell death is associated to neurite retraction which would suggest that BA-induced neurite retraction is ascribable to neuronal cell death. However, the underlying mechanism of BA-related cell death signaling remains unknown. In this study, we exposed NGF-treated PC12 cells to varying BA concentrations [0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, 5.0 mM] and determined selected stress-related (H2O2, glutathione reductase, calcium (Ca(2+)), plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA), and GADD153/CHOPS) and cell death-associated (extrinsic: FasL, TNF-α, TWEAK, and TRAIL; intrinsic: cytochrome C (CytC), NF-kB, CASP8, CASP9, CASP10, and CASP3) signals. Similarly, we confirmed cell death execution by chromatin condensation. Our results showed that low (0.5 mM) and high (1.0 and 5.0 mM) BA levels differ in stress and cell death signaling. Moreover, at periodontal disease-level BA concentration (5 mM), we observed that only FasL amounts were affected and occurred concurrently with chromatin condensation insinuating that cells have fully committed to neurodegeneration. Thus, we believe that both stress and cell death signaling in NGF-treated PC12 cells are affected differently depending on BA concentration. In a periodontal disease scenario, we hypothesize that during the early stages, low BA amounts accumulate resulting to both stress- and cell death-related signals that favor neurite non-proliferation, whereas, during the later stages, high BA amounts accumulate resulting to both stress- and cell death-related signals that favor neurodegeneration. More importantly, we propose that neuropathic pain absence at any stage of periodontal disease progression is ascribable to BA accumulation regardless of amount. PMID:26994613

  1. Induction of cellular deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in butyrate-treated cells by simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, S.; Diamond, L.; Baserga, R.

    1981-11-01

    Sodium butyrate (3mM) inhibited the entry into the S phase of quiescent 3T3 cells stimulated by serum, but had no effect on the accumulation of cellular ribonucleic acid. Simian virus 40 infection or manual microinjection of cloned fragments from the simian virus 40 A gene caused quiescent 3T3 cells to enter the S phase even in the presence of butyrate. NGI cells, a line of 3T3 cells transformed by simian virus 40, grew vigorously in 3 mM butyrate. Homokaryons were formed between G/sub 1/ and S-phase 3T3 cells. Butyrate inhibited the induction of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis that usually occurs in G/sub 1/ nuclei when G/sub 1/ cells are fused with S-phase cells. However, when G/sub 1/ 3T3 cells were fused with exponentially growing NGI cells, the 3T3 nuclei were induced to enter deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis. In tsAF8 cells, a ribonucleic acid polymerase II mutant that stops in the G/sub 1/ phase of the cell cycle, no temporal sequence was demonstrated between the butyrate block and the temperature-sensitive block. These results confirm previous reports that certain virally coded proteins can induce cell deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in the absence of cellular functions that are required by serum-stimulated cells. The author's interpretation of these data is that butyrate inhibited cell growth by inhibiting the expression of genes required for the G/sub o/ ..-->.. G/sub 1/ ..-->.. S transition and that the product of the simian virus 40 A gene overrode this inhibition by providing all of the necessary functions for the entry into the S phase.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Dibutyric cAMP and Butyric Acid on the Differentiation of Human Eosinophilic Leukemia EoL-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purification of enough numbers of circulating eosinophils is difficult because eosinophils account for less than 5% peripheral blood leukocytes. Human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells have been considered an in vitro source of eosinophils as they can differentiate into mature eosinophil-like cells when incubated with dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) or butyric acid. In this study, the viability and phenotypic maturation of EoL-1 cells stimulated by either dbcAMP or butyric acid were comparatively analyzed. After treatment with 100 µM dbcAMP or 0.5 µM butyric acid, EoL-1 cells showed morphological signs of differentiation, although the number of nonviable EoL-1 cells was significantly increased following butyric acid treatment. Stimulation of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid more effectively induced the expression of mature eosinophil markers than stimulation with dbcAMP. These results suggest that treatment of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid for limited duration could be an effective strategy for inducing their differentiation. Considering that expression of CCR3 was not sufficient in EoL-1 cells stimulated with 0.5 µM butyric acid, treatment of the chemically stimulated EoL-1 cells with cytokines, which primarily support eosinophil maturation, would help to obtain differentiated EoL-1 cells with greater functional maturity. PMID:26770185

  3. Genome-wide ChIP-seq mapping and analysis of butyrate-induced H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and epigenomic landscape alteration in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing next-generation sequencing technology, combined with ChIP (Chromatin Immunoprecipitation) technology, we analyzed histone modification (acetylation) induced by butyrate and the large-scale mapping of the epigenomic landscape of normal histone H3 and acetylated histone H3K9 and H3K27. To d...

  4. Butyrate-rich colonic microenvironment is a relevant selection factor for metabolically adapted tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Jacinta; Caiado, Francisco; Carvalho, Tânia; Torre, Cheila; Gonçalves, Luís G; Casalou, Cristina; Lamosa, Pedro; Rodrigues, Margarida; Zhu, Zhenping; Lam, Eric W F; Dias, Sérgio

    2010-12-10

    The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) butyrate is a product of colonic fermentation of dietary fibers. It is the main source of energy for normal colonocytes, but cannot be metabolized by most tumor cells. Butyrate also functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor to control cell proliferation and apoptosis. In consequence, butyrate and its derived drugs are used in cancer therapy. Here we show that aggressive tumor cells that retain the capacity of metabolizing butyrate are positively selected in their microenvironment. In the mouse xenograft model, butyrate-preselected human colon cancer cells gave rise to subcutaneous tumors that grew faster and were more angiogenic than those derived from untreated cells. Similarly, butyrate-preselected cells demonstrated a significant increase in rates of homing to the lung after intravenous injection. Our data showed that butyrate regulates the expression of VEGF and its receptor KDR at the transcriptional level potentially through FoxM1, resulting in the generation of a functional VEGF:KDR autocrine growth loop. Cells selected by chronic exposure to butyrate express higher levels of MMP2, MMP9, α2 and α3 integrins, and lower levels of E-cadherin, a marker for epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The orthotopic model of colon cancer showed that cells preselected by butyrate are able to colonize the animals locally and at distant organs, whereas control cells can only generate a local tumor in the cecum. Together our data shows that a butyrate-rich microenvironment may select for tumor cells that are able to metabolize butyrate, which are also phenotypically more aggressive. PMID:20926374

  5. Biosynthesis of heparin. Effects of n-butyrate on cultured mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsson, K.G.; Riesenfeld, J.; Lindahl, U.

    1985-10-05

    Murine mastocytoma cells were incubated in vitro with inorganic (TVS)sulfate, in the absence or presence of 2.5 mM n-butyrate, and labeled heparin was isolated. The polysaccharide produced in the presence of butyrate showed a lower charge density on anion exchange chromatography than did the control material and a 3-fold increased proportion of components with high affinity for antithrombin. Structural analysis of heparin labeled with (TH) glucosamine in the presence of butyrate showed that approximately 35% of the glucosamine units were N-acetylated, as compared to approximately 10% in the control material; the nonacetylated glucosamine residues were N-sulfated. The presence of butyrate thus leads to an inhibition of the N-deacetylation/N-sulfation process in heparin biosynthesis, along with an augmented formation of molecules with high affinity for antithrombin. Preincubation of the mastocytoma cells with butyrate was required for manifestation of either effect; when the preincubation period was reduced from 24 to 10 h the effects of butyrate were no longer observed. A polysaccharide formed on incubating mastocytoma microsomal fraction with UDP-(TH)glucuronic acid, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, and 3'-phosphoadenylylsulfate in the presence of 5 mM butyrate showed the same N-acetyl/N-sulfate ratio as did the corresponding control polysaccharide, produced in the absence of butyrate. These findings suggest that the effect of butyrate on heparin biosynthesis depends on the integrity of the cell.

  6. Cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles as a butyric acid pro-drug: effects on cell proliferation, cell-cycle distribution and c-myc expression in human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Serpe, Loredana; Laurora, Stefano; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Ugazio, Elena; Ponti, Renata; Canaparo, Roberto; Briatore, Federica; Barrera, Giuseppina; Gasco, Maria Rosa; Bernengo, Maria Grazia; Eandi, Mario; Zara, Gian Paolo

    2004-06-01

    Cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles (chol-but SLN) have been proposed as a pro-drug to deliver butyric acid. We compared the effects on cell growth, cell-cycle distribution and c-myc expression of chol-but SLN and sodium butyrate (Na-but) in the human leukemic cell lines Jurkat, U937 and HL-60. In all the cell lines 0.5 and 1.0 mM chol-but SLN provoked a complete block of cell growth. Cell-cycle analysis demonstrated in Jurkat cells that 0.25 mM chol-but SLN caused a pronounced increase of G2/M cells and a decrease of G0/G1 cells, whereas in U937 and HL-60 cells chol-but SLN led to a dose-dependent increase of G0/G1 cells, with a decrease of G2/M cells. In Jurkat and HL-60 cells 0.5 mM chol-but SLN induced a significant increase of sub-G0/G1 apoptotic cells. Cell growth and cell-cycle distribution were unaffected by the same concentrations of Na-but. A concentration of 0.25 mM chol-but SLN was able to cause a rapid and transient down-regulation of c-myc expression in all the cell lines, whereas 1 mM Na-but caused a slight reduction of c-myc expression only in U937 cells. The results show how chol-but SLN affects the proliferation pattern of both myeloid and lymphoid cells to an extent greater than the natural butyrate. PMID:15166628

  7. Comparative Analysis of Protocols to Induce Human CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by Combinations of IL-2, TGF-beta, Retinoic Acid, Rapamycin and Butyrate.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Angelika; Eriksson, Matilda; Shang, Ming-Mei; Weyd, Heiko; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress other immune cells and are critical mediators of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutic manipulation of Tregs is subject to numerous clinical investigations including trials for adoptive Treg transfer. Since the number of naturally occurring Tregs (nTregs) is minute, it is highly desirable to develop a complementary approach of inducing Tregs (iTregs) from naïve T cells. Mouse studies exemplify the importance of peripherally induced Tregs as well as the applicability of iTreg transfer in different disease models. Yet, procedures to generate iTregs are currently controversial, particularly for human cells. Here we therefore comprehensively compare different established and define novel protocols of human iTreg generation using TGF-β in combination with other compounds. We found that human iTregs expressed several Treg signature molecules, such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 and EOS, while exhibiting low expression of the cytokines Interferon-γ, IL-10 and IL-17. Importantly, we identified a novel combination of TGF-β, retinoic acid and rapamycin as a robust protocol to induce human iTregs with superior suppressive activity in vitro compared to currently established induction protocols. However, iTregs generated by these protocols did not stably retain Foxp3 expression and did not suppress in vivo in a humanized graft-versus-host-disease mouse model, highlighting the need for further research to attain stable, suppressive iTregs. These results advance our understanding of the conditions enabling human iTreg generation and may have important implications for the development of adoptive transfer strategies targeting autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26886923

  8. Comparative Analysis of Protocols to Induce Human CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by Combinations of IL-2, TGF-beta, Retinoic Acid, Rapamycin and Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Angelika; Eriksson, Matilda; Shang, Ming-Mei; Weyd, Heiko; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress other immune cells and are critical mediators of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutic manipulation of Tregs is subject to numerous clinical investigations including trials for adoptive Treg transfer. Since the number of naturally occurring Tregs (nTregs) is minute, it is highly desirable to develop a complementary approach of inducing Tregs (iTregs) from naïve T cells. Mouse studies exemplify the importance of peripherally induced Tregs as well as the applicability of iTreg transfer in different disease models. Yet, procedures to generate iTregs are currently controversial, particularly for human cells. Here we therefore comprehensively compare different established and define novel protocols of human iTreg generation using TGF-β in combination with other compounds. We found that human iTregs expressed several Treg signature molecules, such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 and EOS, while exhibiting low expression of the cytokines Interferon-γ, IL-10 and IL-17. Importantly, we identified a novel combination of TGF-β, retinoic acid and rapamycin as a robust protocol to induce human iTregs with superior suppressive activity in vitro compared to currently established induction protocols. However, iTregs generated by these protocols did not stably retain Foxp3 expression and did not suppress in vivo in a humanized graft-versus-host-disease mouse model, highlighting the need for further research to attain stable, suppressive iTregs. These results advance our understanding of the conditions enabling human iTreg generation and may have important implications for the development of adoptive transfer strategies targeting autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26886923

  9. Melatonin and its precursors in Y79 human retinoblastoma cells: Effect of sodium butyrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Mei Hua; Coviella, Ignacio Lopez G.; Lynch, Harry J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    The release of melatonin and the production of its precursors, S-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin, in cultured Y79 human retinoblastoma cells were studied. This biosynthetic capability was found to be dependent on cell differentiation, which was initiated by culturing Y79 cells for 7 days in dishes coated with poly-D-lysine to promote cell adhesion to the surface of the culture dishes. Differentiation was further induced by exposing the cell monolayer to sodium butyrate (3 mM) for 3 days. This protocol dramatically increased the release of melatonin, and the syntheses of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin in response to forskolin stimulation. Exposure to dopamine (10 micro-M) or L-DOPA (100 micro-M) markedly diminished the forskolin-stimulated release of melatonin, as well as the production of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin. These observations indicate that Y79 cells represent a primitive cell line which, following appropriate differentiation (e.g. treatment with sodium butyrate) can display biochemical characteristics similar to those of the human retina. Moreover, serotonin synthesis and melatonin release appear to be coupled in Y79 cells. The inhibition of melatonin release by dopamine supports the hypothesis that in these cells, melatonin and dopamine are components of a retinal feedback loop.

  10. Butyrate Induced IGF2 Activation Correlated with Distinct Chromatin Signatures Due to Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joo Heon; Li, Robert W; Gao, Yuan; Bickhart, Derek M; Liu, George E; Li, Weizhong; Wu, Sitao; Li, Cong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Histone modification has emerged as a very important mechanism regulating the transcriptional status of the genome. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone controlling various cellular processes, including proliferation and apoptosis. H19 gene is closely linked to IGF2 gene, and IGF2 and H19 are reciprocally regulated imprinted genes. The epigenetic signature of H19 promoter (hypermethylation) on the paternal allele plays a vital role in allowing the expression of the paternal allele of IGF2.46 Our previous studies demonstrate that butyrate regulates the expression of IGF2 as well as genes encoding IGF Binding proteins. To obtain further understanding of histone modification and its regulatory potentials in controlling IGF2/H19 gene expression, we investigated the histone modification status of some key histones associated with the expression of IGF2/H19 genes in bovine cells using RNA-seq in combination with Chip-seq technology. A high-resolution map of the major chromatin modification at the IGF2/H19 locus induced by butyrate was constructed to illustrate the fundamental association of the chromatin modification landscape that may play a role in the activation of the IGF2 gene. High-definition epigenomic landscape mapping revealed that IGF2 and H19 have distinct chromatin modification patterns at their coding and promoter regions, such as TSSs and TTSs. Moreover, the correlation between the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of IGF2/H19 locus and histone modification (acetylation and methylation) indicated that epigenetic signatures/markers of DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation were differentially distributed on the expressed IGF2 and silenced H19 genes. Our evidence also suggests that butyrate-induced regional changes of histone acetylation statusin the upstream regulation domain of H19 may be related to the reduced expression of H19 and strong activation of IGF2. Our results provided insights into the mechanism

  11. The proteomic study of sodium butyrate antiproliferative/cytodifferentiation effects on K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Grebenová, Dana; Kuzelová, Katerina; Pluskalová, Michaela; Peslová, Gabriela; Halada, Petr; Hrkal, Zbynek

    2006-01-01

    Employing methods of cell biology and proteome analysis tools, we examined effects of an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, sodium butyrate (SB), on the proliferation/differentiation characteristics of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)-derived cells K562. SB suppressed proliferation of K562 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase, which was followed by their transition to G0 phase (decrease of Ki-67 antigen-positive cells) and erythroid differentiation (increased glycophorin A expression and synthesis of hemoglobins). Neither terminal apoptosis (low counts of TUNEL-positive cells) nor necrosis (moderate counts of propidium iodide-positive cells) occurred. Importantly, SB attenuated protein expression of CML-related chimeric kinase BCR-ABL that is responsible for the deregulated proliferation of CML cells. The proteomic analysis (2-D electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and/or Western blotting) revealed several proteins that were differentially expressed or their mobility was altered due to butyrate treatment, namely, HSP90, HSP70, p23, cyclophilin A (CYPA), prefoldin2 (PFD2) and alpha-, gamma-, epsilon-human globin chains. Perturbation of HSP90 multichaperone complex of which BCR-ABL is the client protein is presumably a cause of BCR-ABL suppression. Changes in other proteins with chaperonic functions, CYPA and PFD2, may reflect SB antiproliferative and cytodifferentiation effects. PMID:16978890

  12. Destructive effects of butyrate on the cell envelope of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kurata, Satoshi; Zaman, Cynthia; Woo, Timothy Derk Hoong; Takahashi, Motomichi; Matsubara, Sachie; Kawakami, Hayato; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori can be found in the oral cavity and is mostly detected by the use of PCR techniques. Growth of H. pylori is influenced by various factors in the mouth, such as the oral microflora, saliva and other antimicrobial substances, all of which make colonization of the oral cavity by H. pylori difficult. In the present study, we analysed the effect of the cell supernatant of a representative periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis on H. pylori and found that the cell supernatant destroyed the H. pylori cell envelope. As P. gingivalis produces butyric acid, we focused our research on the effects of butyrate and found that it significantly inhibited the growth of H. pylori. H. pylori cytoplasmic proteins and DNA were detected in the extracellular environment after treatment with butyrate, suggesting that the integrity of the cell envelope was compromised and indicating that butyrate has a bactericidal effect on H. pylori. In addition, levels of extracellular H. pylori DNA increased following treatment with the cell supernatant of butyric acid-producing bacteria, indicating that the cell supernatant also has a bactericidal effect and that this may be due to its butyric acid content. In conclusion, butyric acid-producing bacteria may play a role in affecting H. pylori colonization of the oral cavity. PMID:22194341

  13. Butyrate plays differential roles in cellular signaling in cancerous HCT116 and noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects in colon. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate plays differential roles in cancerous and non-cancerous cells through si...

  14. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diakos, Christos; Prieschl, Eva E.; Saeemann, Marcus D.; Boehmig, Georg A.; Csonga, Robert; Sobanov, Yury; Baumruker, Thomas; Zlabinger, Gerhard J. . E-mail: gerhard.zlabinger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-10-20

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-{alpha} transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling.

  15. Retinoid- and sodium-butyrate-induced decrease in heat shock protein 70 membrane-positive tumor cells is associated with reduced sensitivity to natural killer cell lysis, growth delay, and altered growth morphology.

    PubMed

    Gehrmann, Mathias; Schönberger, Johann; Zilch, Tanja; Rossbacher, Lydia; Thonigs, Gerald; Eilles, Christoph; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2005-01-01

    Human tumors frequently present heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) on their cell membranes, whereas corresponding normal tissues fail to do so. Therefore, an Hsp70 membrane-positive phenotype provided a tumor-specific marker. Moreover, membrane-bound Hsp70 provides a target structure for the cytolytic attack mediated by natural killer (NK) cells. Vitamin A derivatives 13-cis retinoic acid (13-RA) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and sodium-butyrate (SBU) are known for their redifferentiating capacity. Therefore, we asked the question whether loss in tumorigenicity might be associated with a reduced Hsp70 membrane expression. For our studies we used epithelial colon (CX+/CX-) and thyroid (ML-1) cancer cells, with initially different Hsp70 cell surface expression pattern. After treatment up to 7 weeks with freshly prepared 13-RA, ATRA, and SBU at nonlethal concentrations of 10 microM, 1 microM, and 0.5 mM, respectively, growth morphology, Hsp70 levels, and sensitivity toward Hsp70-specific NK cells were compared with that of untreated tumor cells. Significant growth delay was determined in CX+ tumor cells after 6 weeks treatment with 13-RA. Concomitantly, growth morphology changed from spheroid cell clusters to monolayers. Despite a weak increase in cytosolic Hsp70, the percentage of Hsp70 membrane-positive cells dropped significantly after repeated treatments with 13-RA and ATRA in CX+ and ML-1 but not in CX- tumor cells. Similar results were observed with SBU. Functionally, the decrease in Hsp70 membrane-positive CX+ and ML-1 cells correlated with a reduced sensitivity to lysis mediated by NK cells. In summary, redifferentiating agents predominantly affected Hsp70 membrane-positive tumors. The decrease in Hsp70 membrane positivity correlated with a lower sensitivity to NK lysis, growth delay, and altered growth morphology. PMID:16038410

  16. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661480

  17. Butyrate activates the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 expression in breast cancer cells and enhances the antitumor activity of 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Odília; Preto, Ana; Pacheco, António; Pinheiro, Céline; Azevedo-Silva, João; Moreira, Roxana; Pedro, Madalena; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Baltazar, Fátima; Casal, Margarida

    2012-02-01

    Most malignant tumors exhibit the Warburg effect, which consists in increased glycolysis rates with production of lactate, even in the presence of oxygen. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), maintain these glycolytic rates, by mediating the influx and/or efflux of lactate and are overexpressed in several cancer cell types. The lactate and pyruvate analogue 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an inhibitor of the energy metabolism, which has been proposed as a specific antitumor agent. In the present study, we aimed at determining the effect of 3-BP in breast cancer cells and evaluated the putative role of MCTs on this effect. Our results showed that the three breast cancer cell lines used presented different sensitivities to 3-BP: ZR-75-1 ER (+)>MCF-7 ER (+)>SK-BR-3 ER (-). We also demonstrated that 3-BP reduced lactate production, induced cell morphological alterations and increased apoptosis. The effect of 3-BP appears to be cytotoxic rather than cytostatic, as a continued decrease in cell viability was observed after removal of 3-BP. We showed that pre-incubation with butyrate enhanced significantly 3-BP cytotoxicity, especially in the most resistant breast cancer cell line, SK-BR-3. We observed that butyrate treatment induced localization of MCT1 in the plasma membrane as well as overexpression of MCT4 and its chaperone CD147. Our results thus indicate that butyrate pre-treatment potentiates the effect of 3-BP, most probably by increasing the rates of 3-BP transport through MCT1/4. This study supports the potential use of butyrate as adjuvant of 3-BP in the treatment of breast cancer resistant cells, namely ER (-). PMID:22350013

  18. Melatonin and its precursors in Y79 human retinoblastoma cells - Effect of sodium butyrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Mei H.; Lopez G.-Coviella, Ignacio; Lynch, Harry J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the release of melatonin and the production of its precursors, 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin, in cultured Y79 human retinoblastoma cells. This biosynthetic capability was found to be dependent on cell differentiation, which was initiated by culturing Y79 cells for 7 days in dishes coated with poly-D-lysine to promote cell adhesion to the surface of the culture dishes. Differentiation was further induced by exposing the cell monolayer to sodium butyrate (3 mM) for three days. This protocol dramatically increased the release of melatonin, and the syntheses of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin in response to forskolin stimulation. Exposure to dopamine or L-DOPA markedly diminished the forskolin-stimulated release of melatonin, as well as the production of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin. These observations indicate that Y79 cells represent a primitive cell line which, following appropriate differentiation can display biochemical characteristics similar to those of the human retina. Moreover, serotonin synthesis and melatonin release appear to be coupled in Y79 ceils.

  19. The effect of short-chain fatty acids butyrate, propionate, and acetate on urothelial cell kinetics in vitro: potential therapy in augmentation cystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Dyer, J P; Featherstone, J M; Solomon, L Z; Crook, T J; Cooper, A J; Malone, P S

    2005-07-01

    The intestinal element of enterocystoplasty is affected by chronic inflammatory changes, which lead to excess mucus production, urinary tract infections, and stone formation. There is also an increased risk of malignancy. These inflammatory changes may be due to diversion colitis, which affects colonic segments excluded from the faecal stream and likewise may respond to intraluminal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) therapy. The SCFAs have interesting antiproliferative, differentiating, and pro-apoptotic effects, which are protective against colorectal cancer and may influence the risk of malignancy in enterocystoplasty. Before intravesical therapy can be considered, the effect on normal urothelium must be investigated. Primary urothelial cells cultured from biopsy specimens and transformed urothelial (RT112 and MGH-U1) and intestinal cell lines (HT29 and CaCo-2) were incubated with SCFAs. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to measure the residual viable biomass to assess cell proliferation. Proliferation of primary and transformed urothelial cells in culture was inhibited by all SCFAs in a similar time- and dose-dependent manner. The concentration of SCFA required to inhibit growth of primary cells by 50% (IC50) was 20 mM of butyrate, 120 mM of propionate, and 240 mM of acetate after incubation for 1 h. After 72 h the IC50 was 2 mM of butyrate, 4 mM of propionate, and 20 mM of acetate. Transformed urothelial and colon cancer cell lines demonstrated similar growth inhibition. Butyrate was the most potent inhibitor of cell proliferation, followed by propionate and then acetate. Growth inhibition is not an immediate cytotoxic effect, and urothelial cells show a degree of adaptation to butyrate and growth recovery after incubation with butyrate. In conclusion, butyrate- and propionate-induced growth inhibition is potentially clinically significant and may have therapeutically beneficial implications in vivo. PMID:15864601

  20. The niacin/butyrate receptor GPR109A suppresses mammary tumorigenesis by inhibiting cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Elangovan, Selvakumar; Pathania, Rajneesh; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Ananth, Sudha; Padia, Ravi N.; Lan, Ling; Singh, Nagendra; Martin, Pamela M.; Hawthorn, Lesleyann; Prasad, Puttur D.; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Thangaraju, Muthusamy

    2014-01-01

    GPR109A, a G-protein-coupled receptor, is activated by niacin and butyrate. Upon activation in colonocytes, GPR109A potentiates anti-inflammatory pathways, induces apoptosis, and protects against inflammation-induced colon cancer. In contrast, GPR109A activation in keratinocytes induces flushing by activation of Cox-2-dependent inflammatory signaling and, the receptor expression is upregulated in human epidermoid carcinoma. Thus, depending on the cellular context and tissue, GPR109A functions either as a tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter. However, the expression status and the functional implications of this receptor in the mammary epithelium are not known. Here we show that GPR109A is expressed in normal mammary tissue and, irrespective of the hormone receptor status, its expression is silenced in human primary breast tumor tissues, breast cancer cell lines, and in tumor tissues of three different murine mammary tumor models. Functional expression of this receptor in human breast cancer cell lines decreases cAMP production, induces apoptosis, and blocks colony formation and mammary tumor growth. Transcriptome analysis revealed that GPR109A activation inhibits genes, which are involved in cell survival and anti-apoptotic signaling, in human breast cancer cells. In addition, deletion of Gpr109a in mice increased tumor incidence and triggered early onset of mammary tumorigenesis with increased lung metastasis in MMTV-Neu mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer. These findings suggest that GPR109A is a tumor suppressor in mammary gland and that pharmacological induction of this gene in tumor tissues followed by its activation with agonists could be an effective therapeutic strategy to treat breast cancer. PMID:24371223

  1. INDUCTION OF APOPTOSIS BY BUTYRATE CORRELATES WITH INCREASING LEVEL OF PROTEIN UBIQUITINATION IN BOVINE KIDNEY EPITHELIAL CELLS (MDBK)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While butyrate (BT) is largely regarded as the minor short-chain fatty acid ([butyrate]< [acetate] or [proiponate]) formed during microbial fermatation in ruminants, an increasing body of evidence has clearly shown effects beyond those attributable to its function in nutrition. BT modulates cell d...

  2. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor mevastatin enhances the growth inhibitory effect of butyrate in the colorectal carcinoma cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Wächtershäuser, A; Akoglu, B; Stein, J

    2001-07-01

    Mevastatin is an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid, reduces proliferation and induces differentiation of human colon cancer cells. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of mevastatin, alone or in combination with butyrate, on proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis in the human colorectal carcinoma cell line Caco-2. In this report we show that mevastatin combined with butyrate synergistically suppressed growth of Caco-2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, incubation with mevastatin arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle after 24 h with a switch to the G2/M phase after 72 h. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdk) 4 and cdk 6 as well as cyclin D1, while cdk 2 and cyclin E protein levels remained unchanged during mevastatin treatment. Cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27 were significantly upregulated by mevastatin. The proapoptotic properties of mevastatin were further enhanced by co-incubation with butyrate. Lastly, the effects of mevastatin could be reversed by addition of mevalonate, but not farnesyl- or geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, intermediate products of cholesterol synthesis, to the medium. These results suggest that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors like mevastatin may enhance the antiproliferative effect of butyrate in colon cancer cells via induction of apoptosis together with a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. PMID:11408350

  3. Butyrate alleviates metabolic impairments and protects pancreatic β cell function in pregnant mice with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua-Ping; Chen, Xuan; Li, Ming-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The relative or absolute deficiency of pancreatic β-cell mass function underlies the pathogenesis of diabetes. It is necessary to alleviate the metabolic stress and reduce the demand for insulin to decrease the effects of mutations affecting β-cell expansion. Butyrate is a natural nutrient existed in food and can also be produced physiologically through the intestinal fermentation of fiber. Pregnancy and obesity model would be helpful for understanding how β-cell adapt to insulin resistance and how butyrate alleviate the metabolic impairment and protect pancreatic β cell function in pregnant mice with obesity. C57BL/6J female mice were divided into three groups and fed with high fat food (HF group, 40% energy from fat), high fat with sodium butyrate food (HSF group, 95% HF with 5% butyrate), or control food (CF group, 14% energy from fat), respectively. The feeding would last for 14 weeks before mating and throughout the gestation period. A subset of dams were sacrificed at gestational day (GD) 14.5 to evaluate the changes of metabolism and β-cell function, mass, proliferation and apoptosis, inflammatory reaction of islet from different diet. Pancreases were double immuno-labeled to assess the islet morphology, insulin expression, expression of proliferation gene PCNA and anti-apoptosis gene bcl-2. Moreover, we detected the expression of NF-κB, phosphorylated NF-κB (pNF-κB) to evaluate the islet inflammatory response with immunohistochemistry. Mice fed with HSF showed obviously changes including the decreased values of weight gain, glucose, insulin, triglyceride and total cholesterol level of blood compared with high fat diet group, and the reduced circulating maternal pro-inflammation factors at GD14.5. Mice fed with HF displayed β-cell hyperplasia with a greater β-cell size and β-cell area in pancreas. Furthermore, the higher ratio of apoptosis and inflammatory response were found in HF group compared with HSF and CF group, while the proliferation

  4. Accelerated dysbiosis of gut microbiota during aggravation of DSS-induced colitis by a butyrate-producing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianpeng; Wu, Yanqiu; Wang, Jing; Wu, Guojun; Long, Wenmin; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yufeng; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Chenhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria (BPB) are potential probiotic candidates for inflammatory bowel diseases as they are often depleted in the diseased gut microbiota. However, here we found that augmentation of a human-derived butyrate-producing strain, Anaerostipes hadrus BPB5, significantly aggravated colitis in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-treated mice while exerted no detrimental effect in healthy mice. We explored how the interaction between BPB5 and gut microbiota may contribute to this differential impact on the hosts. Butyrate production and severity of colitis were assessed in both healthy and DSS-treated mice, and gut microbiota structural changes were analysed using high-throughput sequencing. BPB5-inoculated healthy mice showed no signs of colitis, but increased butyrate content in the gut. In DSS-treated mice, BPB5 augmentation did not increase butyrate content, but induced significantly more severe disease activity index and much higher mortality. BPB5 didn't induce significant changes of gut microbiota in healthy hosts, but expedited the structural shifts 3 days earlier toward the disease phase in BPB5-augmented than DSS-treated animals. The differential response of gut microbiota in healthy and DSS-treated mice to the same potentially beneficial bacterium with drastically different health consequences suggest that animals with dysbiotic gut microbiota should also be employed for the safety assessment of probiotic candidates. PMID:27264309

  5. Accelerated dysbiosis of gut microbiota during aggravation of DSS-induced colitis by a butyrate-producing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianpeng; Wu, Yanqiu; Wang, Jing; Wu, Guojun; Long, Wenmin; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yufeng; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Chenhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate-producing bacteria (BPB) are potential probiotic candidates for inflammatory bowel diseases as they are often depleted in the diseased gut microbiota. However, here we found that augmentation of a human-derived butyrate-producing strain, Anaerostipes hadrus BPB5, significantly aggravated colitis in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-treated mice while exerted no detrimental effect in healthy mice. We explored how the interaction between BPB5 and gut microbiota may contribute to this differential impact on the hosts. Butyrate production and severity of colitis were assessed in both healthy and DSS-treated mice, and gut microbiota structural changes were analysed using high-throughput sequencing. BPB5-inoculated healthy mice showed no signs of colitis, but increased butyrate content in the gut. In DSS-treated mice, BPB5 augmentation did not increase butyrate content, but induced significantly more severe disease activity index and much higher mortality. BPB5 didn’t induce significant changes of gut microbiota in healthy hosts, but expedited the structural shifts 3 days earlier toward the disease phase in BPB5-augmented than DSS-treated animals. The differential response of gut microbiota in healthy and DSS-treated mice to the same potentially beneficial bacterium with drastically different health consequences suggest that animals with dysbiotic gut microbiota should also be employed for the safety assessment of probiotic candidates. PMID:27264309

  6. Radiation induces acid tolerance of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and enhances bioproduction of butyric acid through a metabolic switch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Butyric acid as a renewable resource has become an increasingly attractive alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T is well documented as a fermentation strain for the production of acids. However, it has been reported that butyrate inhibits its growth, and the accumulation of acetate also inhibits biomass synthesis, making production of butyric acid from conventional fermentation processes economically challenging. The present study aimed to identify whether irradiation of C. tyrobutyricum cells makes them more tolerant to butyric acid inhibition and increases the production of butyrate compared with wild type. Results In this work, the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 3.6, 7.2 and 10.8 g·L-1 equivalents were studied. The results showed that, regardless of the irradiation used, there was a gradual inhibition of cell growth at butyric acid concentrations above 10.8 g·L-1, with no growth observed at butyric acid concentrations above 3.6 g·L-1 for the wild-type strain during the first 54 h of fermentation. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also showed significantly different expression levels of proteins with molecular mass around the wild-type and irradiated strains. The results showed that the proportion of proteins with molecular weights of 85 and 106 kDa was much higher for the irradiated strains. The specific growth rate decreased by 50% (from 0.42 to 0.21 h-1) and the final concentration of butyrate increased by 68% (from 22.7 to 33.4 g·L-1) for the strain irradiated at 114 AMeV and 40 Gy compared with the wild-type strains. Conclusions This study demonstrates that butyric acid production from glucose can be significantly improved and enhanced by using 12C6+ heavy ion-irradiated C. tyrobutyricum. The approach is economical, making it competitive compared with similar fermentation processes. It may prove useful as

  7. Discoloration of poly(vinyl butyral) in cells exposed to real and simulated solar environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Shumka, A.

    1984-01-01

    The discoloration of poly(vinl butyral) (PVB) films used in solar cell modules is described. Transmission absorption, Fourier transformation IR absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy were used for this study. The discoloration of the PVB has been found to be affected by oxygen, moisture, temperature and light. However, the most severe discoloration observed is clearly associated with the migration of positive silver ions, which can be accelerated in the presence of electric fields. The metallization is the source of the silver, and the data are consistent with an interfacial reaction between the silver and PVB followed by transport into the polymer.

  8. Regulation of T-type calcium channel expression by sodium butyrate in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Erika M; Zamora, Francis J; Puplampu-Dove, Yvonne A; Kiessu, Ezechielle; Hearne, Jennifer L; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2015-02-15

    Several cellular mechanisms contribute to the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells, including exposure to sodium butyrate (NaBu), a naturally occurring salt of the short chain fatty acid n-butyric acid. NaBu belongs to a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors with potential anticancer function. T-type calcium channel expression constitutes an important route for calcium influx in tumor cells that may trigger changes in cell proliferation and differentiation. In this work we investigated the role NaBu on the differentiation of lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP) cells and its effect on T-type Ca(2+) channel expression. NaBu stimulates the morphological and molecular differentiation of LNCaP cells. Stimulation of LNCaP cells with NaBu evokes a significant increase in the expression of the Cav3.2 T-type channel subunits. Furthermore, the increased Cav3.2 expression promotes membrane insertion of T-type Ca(2+) channels capable of generating fast inactivating Ca(2+) currents, sensitive to 100μM Ni(2+) ions. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channel function reduces the outgrowth of neurite-like processes in LNCaP cells. NaBu-evoked expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels is also involved in the regulation of cell viability. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channels causes a significant reduction in the viability of LNCaP cells treated with 1mM NaBu, suggesting that Ca(2+) influx via T-type channels can promote cell proliferation. However, increased expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels enhanced the cytotoxic effect of thapsigargin and paclitaxel on cell proliferation. These findings demonstrate that NaBu stimulates T-type Ca(2+) channel expression, thereby regulating both the morphological differentiation and growth of prostate cancer cells. PMID:25557765

  9. BUTYRATE DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATES CYTOKINES AND PROLIFERATION IN PORCINE PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although butyrate modulates proliferation and cytokine production by PBMC in some species, the role of butyrate as a regulator of immunocyte function in the pig has not been studied. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to determine whether butyrate influences peripheral blood mononuc...

  10. Cytoarchitecture of Kirsten sarcoma virus-transformed rat kidney fibroblasts: butyrate-induced reorganization within the actin microfilament network.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M P; Higgins, P J

    1988-10-01

    Murine sarcoma virus-transformed rat fibroblasts (KNRK cells) undergo marked cytoarchitectural reorganization during in vitro exposure to sodium-n-butyrate (NaB) resulting in restoration of (1) a more typical fibroblastoid morphology, (2) proper cell-to-cell orientation, and (3) substratum adherence. Augmented cell spreading, involving greater than 90% of the population, was a function of culture density and time of exposure to NaB (2 mM final concentration). Induced cell spreading reflected a 2.5- to 3.0-fold increase in both total cellular actin content and deposition of actin into the detergent-resistant cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal actin deposition in response to NaB was accompanied by the formation of occasionally dense, parallel alignments of F-actin-containing microfilaments and by a dramatic increase in the size and incidence of actin-enriched membrane ruffles. Long-term NaB-treated cells exhibited parallel orientations of microfilaments similar to those found in untransformed fibroblasts. Increased cytoskeletal actin occurred within 24 hr of NaB exposure, correlating with the initial reorganization of actin-containing microfilaments detected microscopically, and reflected concomitant 3-fold increases in cellular alpha-actinin and fibronectin content. In contrast, the amount of vimentin, tropomyosin, and tubulin in NaB-treated cells was significantly decreased. NaB-induced morphologic restructuring of sarcoma virus-transformed fibroblasts, thus, impacts on all three basic cytoskeletal systems. Selective increases, however, were evident in particular cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha-actinin, fibronectin) implicated in microfilament networking and cell spreading. PMID:2844835

  11. Exposure to sodium butyrate leads to functional downregulation of calcium-activated potassium channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jeremy; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Linsdell, Paul; Cowley, Elizabeth A

    2006-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by genetic mutations that lead to dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. The most common mutation, DeltaF508, causes inefficient trafficking of mutant CFTR protein from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane. Therapeutic efforts have been aimed at increasing the level of DeltaF508-CFTR protein in the membrane using agents such as sodium butyrate. In this study, we investigated the effects of culturing a human airway epithelial cell line, Calu-3, in the presence of 5 mM sodium butyrate. Within 24 h, butyrate exposure caused a significant decrease in the basal, as well as Ca(2+)-activated, anion secretion by Calu-3 cell monolayers, determined by the change in transepithelial short-circuit current in response to the Ca(2+)-elevating agent thapsigargin. The secretory response to 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone, an activator of the basolateral Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel KCNN4, was similarly reduced by butyrate treatment. Quantitative PCR revealed that these functional effects were associated with dramatic decreases in mRNA for both KCNN4 and CFTR. Furthermore, the KCNQ1 K(+) channel was upregulated after butyrate treatment. We suggest that prolonged exposure to sodium butyrate downregulates the expression of both KCNN4 and CFTR, leading to a functional loss of Ca(2+)-activated anion secretion. Thus, butyrate may inhibit, rather than stimulate, the anion secretory capacity of human epithelial cells that express wild-type CFTR, particularly in tissues that normally exhibit robust Ca(2+)-activated secretion. PMID:17047984

  12. Fed-batch strategies using butyrate for high cell density cultivation of Pseudomonas putida and its use as a biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Cerrone, Federico; Duane, Gearoid; Casey, Eoin; Davis, Reeta; Belton, Ian; Kenny, Shane T; Guzik, Maciej W; Woods, Trevor; Babu, Ramesh P; O'Connor, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    A mathematically based fed-batch bioprocess demonstrated the suitability of using a relatively cheap and renewable substrate (butyric acid) for Pseudomonas putida CA-3 high cell density cultivation. Butyric acid fine-tuned addition is critical to extend the fermentation run and avoid oxygen consumption while maximising the biomass volumetric productivity. A conservative submaximal growth rate (μ of 0.25 h(-1)) achieved 71.3 g L(-1) of biomass after 42 h of fed-batch growth. When a more ambitious feed rate was supplied in order to match a μ of 0.35 h(-1), the volumetric productivity was increased to 2.0 g L(-1) h(-1), corresponding to a run of 25 h and 50 g L(-1) of biomass. Both results represent the highest biomass and the best biomass volumetric productivity with butyrate as a sole carbon source. However, medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) accumulation with butyrate grown cells is low (4 %). To achieve a higher mcl-PHA volumetric productivity, decanoate was supplied to butyrate grown cells. This strategy resulted in a PHA volumetric productivity of 4.57 g L(-1) h(-1) in the PHA production phase and 1.63 g L(-1) h(-1)over the lifetime of the fermentation, with a maximum mcl-PHA accumulation of 65 % of the cell dry weight. PMID:25104034

  13. Beneficial effects of sodium butyrate in 6-OHDA induced neurotoxicity and behavioral abnormalities: Modulation of histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev; Singh, Sumel

    2015-09-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Recent studies have investigated the involvement of epigenetic modifications in PD. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to be beneficial in cognitive and motor deficit states. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) - induced experimental PD like symptoms in rats. To produce motor deficit, 6-OHDA was administered unilaterally in the right medial forebrain bundle. Three weeks after 6-OHDA administration, the rats were challenged with apomorphine. Following this, the animals were treated with sodium butyrate (150 and 300 mg/kg i.p.) once daily for 14 days. Movement abnormalities were assessed by battery of behavioral tests. Biochemically, oxidative stress markers, neuroinflammation and dopamine were measured in striatal brain homogenate. Further, to explore the molecular mechanism(s), we measured the level of global H3 histone acetylation and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). 6-OHDA administration results in significant motor deficit along with reduction in striatal dopamine level. 6-OHDA treated rats showed elevated oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. Treatment with sodium butyrate results in significant attenuation of motor deficits and increased striatal dopamine level. Moreover, sodium butyrate treatment attenuated the oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers. These effects occur concurrently with increased global H3 histone acetylation and BDNF levels. Thus, the observed results of the present study are indicative for the therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors in PD. PMID:26048426

  14. Reciprocal modulation of histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A on the energy metabolism of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Mariana Figueiredo; Carvalho, Érika; Pezzuto, Paula; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Amoêdo, Nivea Dias

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cells display different bioenergetic profiles when compared to normal cells. In the present work we showed metabolic reprogramming by means of inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDACis), sodium butyrate and trichostatin A in breast cancer cells representing different stages of aggressiveness and metabolic profile. When testing the effect of NaB and TSA on viability of cells, it was shown that non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells were less affected by increasing doses of the drugs than the tumorigenic, hormone dependent, tightly cohesive MCF-7, T-47D and the highly metastatic triple-negative MDA-MB 231 cells. T-47D cells were the most sensitive to treatment with both, NaB and TSA. Experiments measuring anchorage- independent growth of tumor cells showed that MCF-7, T-47D, and MDA-MB-231 cells were equally sensitive to the treatment with NaB. The NaB induced an attenuation of glycolysis, reflected by a decrease in lactate release in MCF-7 and T47D lines. Pyruvate kinase activity was significantly enhanced by NaB in MDA-MB-231 cells only. In contrast, the inhibitor enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity specifically in T-47 D cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was shown to be differentially modulated by NaB in the cell lines investigated: the enzyme was inhibited in MCF-7 cells, whereas in T-47D and MDA-MB-231 cells, G6PDH was activated. NaB and TSA were able to significantly increase the oxygen consumption by MDA-MB-231 and T-47D cells. Collectively the results show that epigenetic changes associated to acetylation of proteins in general affect the energy metabolism in all cancer cell lines and that mitochondria may occupy a central role in metastasis. PMID:25510910

  15. Structural alterations of adhesion mediating components in cells cultured on poly-beta-hydroxy butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Nebe, B; Forster, C; Pommerenke, H; Fulda, G; Behrend, D; Bernewski, U; Schmitz, K P; Rychly, J

    2001-09-01

    Polymers may serve as a biodegradable material in tissue engineering. To assess the biocompatibility of poly-beta-hydroxy butyric acid (PHB), we studied the structural organization of cellular molecules involved in adhesion using osteoblastic and epithelial cell lines. On PHB, both cell lines revealed a rounded cell shape due to reduced spreading. The filamentous organization of the actin cytoskeleton was impaired. In double immunofluorescence analyses we demostrated that the colocalization of the fibronectin fibrils with the actin filaments was lost in cultures on PHB. Similarly, collagen II distribution was altered, whereas the organization of collagen I was not obviously affected. Further evidence for impaired structural organization was obtained for the beta1-integrin receptor and vinculin which mediate the interaction of the cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix. In confluent epithelial cells, the tight junction protein ZO-1 showed a larger lateral extension in the cell-cell contacts when cells were grown on PHB. Because structural organization of components which mediate cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion controls cell physiology these parameters could be a sensitive indicator for the biocompatibility of implant materials. PMID:11511040

  16. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Sabita N.; Kala, Rishabh; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24518414

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Indole-3-Butyric Acid-Induced Adventitious Root Formation in Nodal Cuttings of Camellia sinensis (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kang; Wang, Li-Yuan; Wu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Li, Hai-Lin; Tan, Li-Qiang; Cao, Hong-Li; Cheng, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) is a popular world beverage, and propagation of tea plants chiefly depends on the formation of adventitious roots in cuttings. To better understand potential mechanisms involved in adventitious root formation, we performed transcriptome analysis of single nodal cuttings of C. sinensis treated with or without indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) using the Illumina sequencing method. Totally 42.5 million RNA-Seq reads were obtained and these were assembled into 59,931 unigenes, with an average length of 732 bp and an N50 of 1292 bp. In addition, 1091 differentially expressed unigenes were identified in the tea cuttings treated with IBA compared to controls, including 656 up- and 435 down-regulated genes. Further real time RT-PCR analysis confirmed RNA-Seq data. Functional annotation analysis showed that many genes were involved in plant hormone signal transduction, secondary metabolism, cell wall organization and glutathione metabolism, indicating potential contributions to adventitious rooting. Our study presents a global view of transcriptome profiles of tea cuttings in response to IBA treatment and provides new insights into the fundamental mechanisms associated with auxin-induced adventitious rooting. Our data will be a valuable resource for genomic research about adventitious root formation in tea cuttings, which can be used to improve rooting for difficult-to-root varieties. PMID:25216187

  18. Transcriptome analysis of indole-3-butyric acid-induced adventitious root formation in nodal cuttings of Camellia sinensis (L.).

    PubMed

    Wei, Kang; Wang, Li-Yuan; Wu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Li, Hai-Lin; Tan, Li-Qiang; Cao, Hong-Li; Cheng, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) is a popular world beverage, and propagation of tea plants chiefly depends on the formation of adventitious roots in cuttings. To better understand potential mechanisms involved in adventitious root formation, we performed transcriptome analysis of single nodal cuttings of C. sinensis treated with or without indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) using the Illumina sequencing method. Totally 42.5 million RNA-Seq reads were obtained and these were assembled into 59,931 unigenes, with an average length of 732 bp and an N50 of 1292 bp. In addition, 1091 differentially expressed unigenes were identified in the tea cuttings treated with IBA compared to controls, including 656 up- and 435 down-regulated genes. Further real time RT-PCR analysis confirmed RNA-Seq data. Functional annotation analysis showed that many genes were involved in plant hormone signal transduction, secondary metabolism, cell wall organization and glutathione metabolism, indicating potential contributions to adventitious rooting. Our study presents a global view of transcriptome profiles of tea cuttings in response to IBA treatment and provides new insights into the fundamental mechanisms associated with auxin-induced adventitious rooting. Our data will be a valuable resource for genomic research about adventitious root formation in tea cuttings, which can be used to improve rooting for difficult-to-root varieties. PMID:25216187

  19. Oral butyrate reduces oxidative stress in atherosclerotic lesion sites by a mechanism involving NADPH oxidase down-regulation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Edenil C; Santos, Lana Claudinez Dos; Leonel, Alda J; de Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; Santos, Elândia Aparecida; Navia-Pelaez, Juliana M; da Silva, Josiane Fernandes; Mendes, Bárbara Pinheiro; Capettini, Luciano S A; Teixeira, Lilian G; Lemos, Virginia S; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I

    2016-08-01

    Butyrate is a 4-carbon fatty acid that has antiinflammatory and antioxidative properties. It has been demonstrated that butyrate is able to reduce atherosclerotic development in animal models by reducing inflammatory factors. However, the contribution of its antioxidative effects of butyrate on atherogenesis has not yet been studied. We investigated the influence of butyrate on oxidative status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) release and oxidative enzymes (NADPH oxidase and iNOS) in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE(-/-) mice and in oxLDL-stimulated peritoneal macrophages and endothelial cells (EA.hy926). The lesion area in aorta was reduced while in the aortic valve, although lesion area was unaltered, superoxide production and protein nitrosylation were reduced in butyrate-supplemented mice. Peritoneal macrophages from the butyrate group presented a lower free radical release after zymosan stimulus. When endothelial cells were pretreated with butyrate before oxLDL stimulus, the CCL-2 and superoxide ion productions and NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox were reduced. In macrophage cultures, in addition to a reduction in ROS release, nitric oxide and iNOS expression were down-regulated. The data suggest that one mechanism related to the effect of butyrate on atherosclerotic development is the reduction of oxidative stress in the lesion site. The reduction of oxidative stress related to NADPH oxidase and iNOS expression levels associated to butyrate supplementation attenuates endothelium dysfunction and macrophage migration and activation in the lesion site. PMID:27261536

  20. Effect of butyrate on immune response of a chicken macrophage cell line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyric acid is a major short chain fatty acid (SCFA) produced in the gastrointestinal tract by anaerobic bacterial fermentation which has been demonstrated to have beneficial health effects in many species including poultry. To understand the immunomodulating effects of butyrate on chicken macropha...

  1. A kinetic-metabolic model based on cell energetic state: study of CHO cell behavior under Na-butyrate stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ghorbaniaghdam, Atefeh; Henry, Olivier; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2013-04-01

    A kinetic-metabolic model approach describing and simulating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell behavior is presented. The model includes glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, respiratory chain, redox state and energetic metabolism. Growth kinetic is defined as a function of the major precursors for the synthesis of cell building blocks. Michaelis-Menten type kinetic is used for metabolic intermediates as well as for regulatory functions from energy shuttles (ATP/ADP) and cofactors (NAD/H and NADP/H). Model structure and parameters were first calibrated using results from bioreactor cultures of CHO cells expressing recombinant t-PA. It is shown that the model can simulate experimental data for all available experimental data, such as extracellular glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium concentration time profiles, as well as cell energetic state. A sensitivity analysis allowed identifying the most sensitive parameters. The model was then shown to be readily adaptable for studying the effect of sodium butyrate on CHO cells metabolism, where it was applied to the cases with sodium butyrate addition either at mid-exponential growth phase (48 h) or at the early plateau phase (74 h). In both cases, a global optimization routine was used for the simultaneous estimation of the most sensitive parameters, while the insensitive parameters were considered as constants. Finally, confidence intervals for the estimated parameters were calculated. Results presented here further substantiate our previous findings that butyrate treatment at mid-exponential phase may cause a shift in cellular metabolism toward a sustained and increased efficiency of glucose utilization channeled through the TCA cycle. PMID:22976819

  2. The short chain fatty acid, butyrate, stimulates MUC2 mucin production in the human colon cancer cell line, LS174T

    SciTech Connect

    Hatayama, Hajime; Iwashita, Jun; Kuwajima, Akiko; Abe, Tatsuya . E-mail: abetats@akita-pu.ac.jp

    2007-05-11

    The short fatty acid, butyrate, which is produced by intestinal anaerobic bacteria in the colon, has inhibitory activity on histone deacetylases (HDACs). Treatment of the human colon cancer cell line, LS174T, with 1-2 mM sodium butyrate stimulated MUC2 mucin production, as determined by histological PAS staining of carbohydrate chains of mucin, and confirmed at the protein and mRNA levels by immunoblotting with anti-MUC2 antibody and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Increases in acetylated histone H3 in the LS174T cells treated with butyrate suggest inhibition of HDACs in these cells. Butyrate-stimulated MUC2 production in the LS174T cells was inhibited by the MEK inhibitor, U0126, implicating the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascades in this process. Proliferation of the LS174T cells was inhibited by butyrate treatment. Although apoptotic nuclear DNA fragmentation could not be detected, cell-cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in the butyrate-treated cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Thus butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor, inhibits proliferation of LS174T cells but stimulates MUC2 production in individual cells.

  3. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Saldanha, Sabita N.; Kala, Rishabh; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2014-05-15

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells. - Highlights: • EGCG and NaB as a combination inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation. • The combination treatment induces DNA damage, G2/M and G1 arrest and apoptosis. • Survivin is effectively down-regulated by the combination treatment. • p21 and p53 expressions are induced by the combination treatment. • Epigenetic proteins DNMT1 and HDAC1 are

  4. Dose-dependent stimulatory and inhibitory effects of luminal and serosal n-butyric acid on epithelial cell proliferation of pig distal colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Akiko; Sakata, Takashi

    2005-06-01

    Large bowel bacteria convert various carbohydrates into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). SCFA stimulate epithelial cell proliferation of the large intestine in vivo and inhibit that of various cells in vitro. Supposing that too high concentration of SCFA on the serosal side is responsible for their inhibitory effect in vitro, we studied effects of luminal and serosal n-butyric acid (0, 0.1, 1, or 10 mmol/L, adjusted to neutral pH) on the epithelial cell proliferation rate of pig colonic mucosa in organ culture taking crypt cell production rate (CCPR) as the measure of proliferative activity. With 0 or 0.1 mmol/L n-butyric acid on the serosal side, luminal n-butyric acid increased CCPR at 1.0 mmol/L, and decreased CCPR at 10 mmol/L when compared to the luminal 0 mmol/L control. With 1.0 or 10 mmol/L serosal n-butyric acid, luminal n-butyric acid depressed CCPR dose-dependently. The above results indicated that n-butyric acid stimulated colonic epithelial cell proliferation at low concentration and inhibit it at high concentration with interaction effect to enhance the inhibitory action. The stimulatory effect of a low dose of serosal n-butyric acid may be responsible for the distant trophic effect of SCFA. PMID:16161765

  5. Cell-associated alpha-amylases of butyrate-producing Firmicute bacteria from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Alan G; Scott, Karen P; Martin, Jenny C; Rincon, Marco T; Flint, Harry J

    2006-11-01

    Selected butyrate-producing bacteria from the human colon that are related to Roseburia spp. and Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens showed a good ability to utilize a variety of starches for growth when compared with the Gram-negative amylolytic anaerobe Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. A major cell-associated amylase of high molecular mass (140-210 kDa) was detected in each strain by SDS-PAGE zymogram analysis, and genes corresponding to these enzymes were analysed for two representative strains. Amy13B from But. fibrisolvens 16/4 is a multi-domain enzyme of 144.6 kDa that includes a family 13 glycoside hydrolase domain, and duplicated family 26 carbohydrate-binding modules. Amy13A (182.4 kDa), from Roseburia inulinivorans A2-194, also includes a family 13 domain, which is preceded by two repeat units of approximately 116 aa rich in aromatic residues, an isoamylase N-terminal domain, a pullulanase-associated domain, and an additional unidentified domain. Both Amy13A and Amy13B have N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal cell-wall sorting signals, including a modified LPXTG motif similar to that involved in interactions with the cell surface in other Gram-positive bacteria, a hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and a basic C terminus. The overexpressed family 13 domains showed an absolute requirement for Mg2+ or Ca2+ for activity, and functioned as 1,4-alpha-glucanohydrolases (alpha-amylases; EC 3.2.1.1). These major starch-degrading enzymes thus appear to be anchored to the cell wall in this important group of human gut bacteria. PMID:17074899

  6. Nanostructured, highly aligned poly(hydroxy butyrate) electrospun fibers for differentiation of skeletal and cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Polini, Alessandro; Genchi, Giada G; Ciofani, Gianni; Iandolo, Donata; Mattoli, Virgilio; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo; Pisignano, Dario

    2011-01-01

    The influence of novel nanostructured anisotropically electrospun poly(hydroxy butyrate) matrices on skeletal and cardiac muscle-like cell proliferation and differentiation was investigated, in comparison with isotropic and no-topographically cues-provided substrates. After the matrix characterization, in terms of surface SEM imaging and mechanical properties, cell differentiation on the different substrates was evaluated. Myogenin and F-actin staining at several differentiation time-points suggested that aligned nanofibers promote differentiation of both cell types. Moreover, quantitative parameters for each cell line are provided to clarify which aspects of the differentiation process are influenced by the different matrix topographies. PMID:22255117

  7. Efficacy of the dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor butyrate alone or in combination with vitamin A against proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Andrade, F O; Nagamine, M K; Conti, A De; Chaible, L M; Fontelles, C C; Jordão Junior, A A; Vannucchi, H; Dagli, M L Z; Bassoli, B K; Moreno, F S; Ong, T P

    2012-09-01

    The combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and retinoids has been suggested as a potential epigenetic strategy for the control of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treatment with butyrate, a dietary HDACi, combined with vitamin A on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the crystal violet staining method. MCF-7 cells were plated at 5 x 10(4) cells/mL and treated with butyrate (1 mM) alone or combined with vitamin A (10 µM) for 24 to 120 h. Cell proliferation inhibition was 34, 10 and 46% following treatment with butyrate, vitamin A and their combination, respectively, suggesting that vitamin A potentiated the inhibitory activities of butyrate. Furthermore, exposure to this short-chain fatty acid increased the level of histone H3K9 acetylation by 9.5-fold (Western blot), but not of H4K16, and increased the expression levels of p21WAF1 by 2.7-fold (Western blot) and of RARβ by 2.0-fold (quantitative real-time PCR). Our data show that RARβ may represent a molecular target for butyrate in breast cancer cells. Due to its effectiveness as a dietary HDACi, butyrate should be considered for use in combinatorial strategies with more active retinoids, especially in breast cancers in which RARβ is epigenetically altered. PMID:22714808

  8. Vimentin, colon cancer progression and resistance to butyrate and other HDACis.

    PubMed

    Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Dietary fibre protects against colorectal cancer (CRC) most likely through the activity of its fermentation product, butyrate. Butyrate functions as a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that hyperactivates Wnt signalling and induces apoptosis of CRC cells. However, individuals who consume a high-fibre diet may still develop CRC; therefore, butyrate resistance may develop over time. Furthermore, CRC cells that are resistant to butyrate are cross-resistant to clinically relevant therapeutic HDACis, suggesting that the development of butyrate resistance in vivo can result in HDACi-resistant CRCs. Butyrate/HDACi-resistant CRC cells differ from their butyrate/HDACi-sensitive counterparts in the expression of many genes, including the gene encoding vimentin (VIM) that is usually expressed in normal mesenchymal cells and is involved in cancer metastasis. Interestingly, vimentin is overexpressed in butyrate/HDACi-resistant CRC cells although Wnt signalling is suppressed in such cells and that VIM is a Wnt activity-targeted gene. The expression of vimentin in colonic neoplastic cells could be correlated with the stage of neoplastic progression. For example, comparative analyses of LT97 microadenoma cells and SW620 colon carcinoma cells revealed that although vimentin is not detectable in LT97 cells, it is highly expressed in SW620 cells. Based upon these observations, we propose that the differential expression of vimentin contributes to the phenotypic differences between butyrate-resistant and butyrate-sensitive CRC cells, as well as to the differences between early-stage and metastatic colorectal neoplastic cells. We discuss the hypothesis that vimentin is a key factor integrating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, colonic neoplastic progression and resistance to HDACis. PMID:27072512

  9. Butyrate inhibits inflammatory responses through NFκB inhibition: implications for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Segain, J; de la Bletiere, D R.; Bourreille, A; Leray, V; Gervois, N; Rosales, C; Ferrier, L; Bonnet, C; Blottiere, H; Galmiche, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Proinflammatory cytokines are key factors in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), which is involved in their gene transcription, is increased in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients. As butyrate enemas may be beneficial in treating colonic inflammation, we investigated if butyrate promotes this effect by acting on proinflammatory cytokine expression.
METHODS—Intestinal biopsy specimens, isolated lamina propria cells (LPMC), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with or without butyrate for assessment of secretion of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and mRNA levels. NFκB p65 activation was determined by immunofluorescence and gene reporter experiments. Levels of NFκB inhibitory protein (IκBα) were analysed by western blotting. The in vivo efficacy of butyrate was assessed in rats with trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis.
RESULTS—Butyrate decreased TNF production and proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression by intestinal biopsies and LPMC from CD patients. Butyrate abolished lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced expression of cytokines by PBMC and transmigration of NFκB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. LPS induced NFκB transcriptional activity was decreased by butyrate while IκBα levels were stable. Butyrate treatment also improved TNBS induced colitis.
CONCLUSIONS—Butyrate decreases proinflammatory cytokine expression via inhibition of NFκB activation and IκBα degradation. These anti-inflammatory properties provide a rationale for assessing butyrate in the treatment of CD.


Keywords: inflammation; butyrate; Crohn's disease; nuclear factor kappa B; cytokines PMID:10940278

  10. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and...

  11. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of D...

  12. Sodium Butyrate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Reverses Behavioral and Mitochondrial Alterations in Animal Models of Depression Induced by Early- or Late-life Stress.

    PubMed

    Valvassori, Samira S; Resende, Wilson R; Budni, Josiane; Dal-Pont, Gustavo C; Bavaresco, Daniela V; Réus, Gislaine Z; Carvalho, André F; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Furlanetto, Camila B; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of sodium butyrate on depressive-like behavior and mitochondrial alteration parameters in animal models of depression induced by maternal deprivation or chronic mild stress in Wistar rats. maternal deprivation was established by separating pups from their mothers for 3 h daily from postnatal day 1 to day 10. Chronic mild stress was established by water deprivation, food deprivation, restraint stress, isolation and flashing lights. Sodium butyrate or saline was administered twice a day for 7 days before the behavioral tests. Depressive behavior was evaluated using the forced swim test. The activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes (succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase) and of mitochondrial chain complexes (I, II, II-III and IV) was measured in the striatum of rats. From these analyses it can be observed that sodium butyrate reversed the depressive-like behavior observed in both animal models of depression. Additionally, maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress inhibited mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and increased the activity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Sodium butyrate treatment reversed -maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress- induced dysfunction in the striatum of rats. In conclusion, sodium butyrate showed antidepressant effects in maternal deprivation and chronic mild stress-treated rats, and this effect can be attributed to its action on the neurochemical pathways related to depression. PMID:26216027

  13. Effects of Sodium Butyrate and Its Synthetic Amide Derivative on Liver Inflammation and Glucose Tolerance in an Animal Model of Steatosis Induced by High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Simeoli, Raffaele; Russo, Roberto; Iacono, Anna; Santoro, Anna; Paciello, Orlando; Ferrante, Maria Carmela; Canani, Roberto Berni; Calignano, Antonio; Meli, Rosaria

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease. Insulin resistance (IR) appears to be critical in its pathogenesis. We evaluated the effects of sodium butyrate (butyrate) and its synthetic derivative N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenyl-ethyl) butyramide (FBA) in a rat model of insulin resistance and steatosis induced by high-fat diet (HFD). Methods After weaning, young male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups receiving different diets for 6 weeks: 1. control group (standard diet); 2. HFD; 3. HFD plus butyrate (20 mg/kg/die) and 4. HFD plus FBA (42.5 mg/Kg/die, the equimolecular dose of butyrate). Liver tissues of the rats were analyzed by Western blot and real-time PCR. Insulin resistance, liver inflammation and Toll-like pattern modifications were determined. Results Evaluation of these two preparations of butyrate showed a reduction of liver steatosis and inflammation in HFD fed animals. The compounds showed a similar potency in the normalisation of several variables, such as transaminases, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index, and glucose tolerance. Both treatments significantly reduced hepatic TNF-α expression and restored GLUTs and PPARs, either in liver or adipose tissue. Finally, FBA showed a higher potency in reducing pro-inflammatory parameters in the liver, via suppression of Toll-like receptors and NF-κB activation. Conclusions Our results demonstrated a protective effect of butyrate in limiting molecular events underlying the onset of IR and NAFLD, suggesting a potential clinical relevance for this substance. In particular, its derivative, FBA, could represent an alternative therapeutic option to sodium butyrate, sharing a comparable efficacy, but a better palatability and compliance. PMID:23861927

  14. Indolyl-3-butyric acid-induced Arabidopsis stomatal opening mediated by 3',5'-cyclic guanosine-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Cousson, A

    2010-12-01

    It has been pharmacologically suggested that 3',5'-cyclic guanosine-monophosphate (cGMP) mediates indolyl-3-butyric acid (IBA)-induced stomatal opening. In Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., such investigations compared the wild type (Columbia and Ws ecotypes) to mutants knockout for either GTP-binding protein (G protein) α subunit 1 (gpa1-4), putative G protein-coupled receptor 1 (gcr1-5), calcineurin B-like isoform 1 (cbl1) or 9 (cbl9), or the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF (atrbohD/F). Stomatal opening to IBA or the permeant cGMP analogue, 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) was abolished in the atrbohD/F mutant. The IBA response was fully or partially suppressed, respectively, in the gcr1-5 mutant, or the gpa1-4 and cbl1 mutants. In the cbl9 mutant, the response to IBA or 8-Br-cGMP, respectively, was partially or fully suppressed. Phenylarsine oxide (PAO) affected the IBA response, which the cbl1 mutant overlapped or the gpa1-4 and cbl9 mutants increased up to 100% inhibition. 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione, mas17, the (Rp)-diastereomer of 8-bromo-3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cGMPS), nicotinamide, ruthenium red (RRed), 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK506 converged to affect the IBA response, which the gpa1-4 and cbl9 mutants overlapped or the cbl1 mutant and PAO increased up to 100% inhibition. Rp-8-Br-cGMPS, nicotinamide, RRed, BAPTA, CsA or FK506 paralled the cbl9 and atrbohD/F mutants to abolish the 8-Br-cGMP response. Based on so far revealed features of these mutants and pharmacological compounds, these results confirmed cGMP as a Ca(2+)-mobilizing second messenger for apoplastic auxin whose perception and transduction would implicate a seven-transmembrane receptor - G protein - guanylyl cyclase unit at the guard cell plasma membrane. PMID:20951600

  15. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27094081

  16. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27094081

  17. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells.

  18. Li-Ion Cells Employing Electrolytes With Methyl Propionate and Ethyl Butyrate Co-Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate at low temperatures to satisfy the requirements of such applications as landers, rovers, and penetrators. A number of terrestrial applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) also require energy storage devices that can operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 C), while still providing high power capability and long life. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-30 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. These limitations at very low temperatures are due to poor electrolyte conductivity, poor lithium intercalation kinetics over the electrode surface layers, and poor ionic diffusion in the electrode bulk. Two wide-operating-temperature-range electrolytes have been developed based on advances involving lithium hexafluorophosphate-based solutions in carbonate and carbonate + ester solvent blends, which have been further optimized in the context of the technology and targeted applications. The approaches employed include further optimization of electrolytes containing methyl propionate (MP) and ethyl butyrate (EB), which are effective co-solvents, to widen the operating temperature range beyond the baseline systems. Attention was focused on further optimizing ester-based electrolyte formulations that have exhibited the best performance at temperatures ranging from -60 to +60 C, with an emphasis upon improving the rate capability at -20 to -40 C. This was accomplished by increasing electrolyte salt concentration to 1.20M and increasing the ester content to 60 percent by volume to increase the ionic conductivity at low temperatures. Two JPL-developed electrolytes 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MP (20:20:60 v/v %) and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+EB (20:20:60 v/v %) operate effectively over a wide

  19. Intraperitoneal administration of butyrate prevents the severity of acetic acid colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malago, Joshua J.; Sangu, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarectal infusion of butyrate improves colorectal disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). However, it is not established whether systemically administered butyrate benefits such patients. The current study aimed at exploring and comparing the potential of intraperitoneally, intrarectally, and orally administered butyrate against acetic acid (AA)-induced UC in rats. Intrarectal administration of 2 ml of 50% AA was done after or without prior treatment of rats for 7 consecutive days with 100 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB) intraperitoneally, intrarectally, or orally. Rats were sacrificed after 48 h of AA-treatment. Subsequently, colon sections were processed routinely for histopathological examination. We clinically observed diarrhea, loose stools, and hemoccult-positive stools, and histologically, epithelial loss and ulceration, crypt damage, goblet cell depletion, hemorrhage, and mucosal infiltration of inflammatory cells. The changes were significantly reduced by intraperitoneal, intrarectal, or oral butyrate, with intraperitoneal butyrate exhibiting the highest potency. It is concluded that intraperitoneal administration of butyrate abrogates the lesions of AA-induced UC and its potency surpasses that of intrarectal or oral butyrate. PMID:25743124

  20. Sodium Butyrate Ameliorates L-Arginine-Induced Pancreatitis and Associated Fibrosis in Wistar Rat: Role of Inflammation and Nitrosative Stress.

    PubMed

    Kanika, Gayathri; Khan, Sabbir; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2015-08-01

    Several reports indicated that histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a crucial role in inflammation and fibrogenesis. Sodium butyrate (SB) is a short-chain fatty acid having HDAC inhibition potential. The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of SB against L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced pancreatic fibrosis in Wistar rats. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced by twice intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 20% L-Arg (250 mg/100 g) at 2-h interval on day 1, 4, 7, and 10, whereas SB (800 mg/kg/day) was administrated for 10 days. At the end of the study, biochemical estimations, histological alterations, DNA damage, and the expression of various proteins were evaluated. Posttreatment of SB decreased L-Arg-induced oxidative and nitrosative stress, DNA damage, histological alterations, and fibrosis. Interestingly, posttreatment of SB significantly decreased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin, interleukin-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and 3-nitrotyrosine. The present study demonstrated that posttreatment of SB alleviates L-Arg-induced pancreatic damage and fibrosis in rat. PMID:25774002

  1. Solid lipid nanoparticles of cholesteryl butyrate inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Minelli, R; Occhipinti, S; Gigliotti, C L; Barrera, G; Gasco, P; Conti, L; Chiocchetti, A; Zara, G P; Fantozzi, R; Giovarelli, M; Dianzani, U; Dianzani, C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Solid lipid nanoparticles containing cholesteryl butyrate (cholbut SLN) can be a delivery system for the anti-cancer drug butyrate. These nanoparticles inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear and tumour cells to endothelial cells and migration of tumour cells, suggesting that they may act as anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour agents. Here we have evaluated the effects of cholbut SLN on tumour cell growth using in vitro and in vivo models. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cholbut SLNs were incubated with cultures of four tumour cell lines, and cell growth was analysed by assessing viability, clonogenic capacity and cell cycle. Effects on intracellular signalling was assessed by Western blot analysis of Akt expression. The in vivo anti-tumour activity was measured in two models of PC-3 cell xenografts in SCID/Beige mice. KEY RESULTS Cholbut SLN inhibited tumour cell line viability, clonogenic activity, Akt phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. In mice injected i.v. with PC3-Luc cells and treated with cholbut SLN, . in vivo optical imaging and histological analysis showed no metastases in the lungs of the treated mice. In another set of mice injected s.c. with PC-3 cells and treated with cholbut SLN when the tumour diameter reached 2 mm, analysis of the tumour dimensions showed that treatment with cholbut SLN substantially delayed tumour growth. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Cholbut SLN were effective in inhibiting tumour growth in vitro and in vivo. These effects may involve, in part, inhibition of Akt phosphorylation, which adds another mechanism to the activity of this multipotent drug. PMID:23713413

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate suppresses proliferation and promotes apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells by regulation of the MDM2–p53 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chuhai; Wu, Boyi; Chen, Binwei; Shi, Qunwei; Guo, Jianhong; Fan, Ziwen; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been reported to induce tumor cell growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of one histone deacetylase inhibitor – sodium butyrate (SB) – on osteosarcoma (OS) cell proliferation and apoptosis and also the molecular mechanisms by which SB exerts regulatory effects on OS cells. U2OS and MG63 cells were treated with SB at various concentrations. Then, cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and flow cytometry assays, respectively; the expression of Ki67, Bax, Bcl-2, MDM2, and p53 proteins was determined by using Western blot assay. The results showed that SB suppressed proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and promoted apoptosis of OS cells. In addition, SB enhanced p53 expression and decreased MDM2 expression, indicating that SB can regulate MDM2–p53 feedback loop. p53 inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis, whereas MDM2 promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis, which indicated that functional effect of SB on OS cell lines at least in part depended on the MDM2–p53 signaling. We also explored the effect of SB on OS cells in vivo and found that SB suppressed the growth of OS cells with no noticeable effect on activity and body weight of mice in vivo. These findings will offer new clues for OS development and progression and offer SB as a potent targeted agent for OS treatment. PMID:27445491

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate suppresses proliferation and promotes apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells by regulation of the MDM2-p53 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuhai; Wu, Boyi; Chen, Binwei; Shi, Qunwei; Guo, Jianhong; Fan, Ziwen; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been reported to induce tumor cell growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of one histone deacetylase inhibitor - sodium butyrate (SB) - on osteosarcoma (OS) cell proliferation and apoptosis and also the molecular mechanisms by which SB exerts regulatory effects on OS cells. U2OS and MG63 cells were treated with SB at various concentrations. Then, cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and flow cytometry assays, respectively; the expression of Ki67, Bax, Bcl-2, MDM2, and p53 proteins was determined by using Western blot assay. The results showed that SB suppressed proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and promoted apoptosis of OS cells. In addition, SB enhanced p53 expression and decreased MDM2 expression, indicating that SB can regulate MDM2-p53 feedback loop. p53 inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis, whereas MDM2 promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis, which indicated that functional effect of SB on OS cell lines at least in part depended on the MDM2-p53 signaling. We also explored the effect of SB on OS cells in vivo and found that SB suppressed the growth of OS cells with no noticeable effect on activity and body weight of mice in vivo. These findings will offer new clues for OS development and progression and offer SB as a potent targeted agent for OS treatment. PMID:27445491

  4. Osteogenesis from Dental Pulp Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Conditioned Medium Including Melatonin within a Mixture of Hyaluronic, Butyric, and Retinoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Margherita; Basoli, Valentina; Santaniello, Sara; Cruciani, Sara; Delitala, Alessandro Palmerio; Pinna, Roberto; Milia, Egle; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Fontani, Vania; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Muggironi, Roberta; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Ventura, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have shown relevant potential for cell therapy in the orthopedic and odontoiatric fields. The optimization of their osteogenic potential is currently a major challenge. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF A) has been recently reported to act as a major conductor of osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we attempted to prime endogenous VEGF A expression without the need for viral vector mediated gene transfer technologies. We show that hDPSCs exposure to a mixture of hyaluronic, butyric, and retinoic acids (HA + BU + RA) induced the transcription of a gene program of osteogenesis and the acquirement of an osteogenic lineage. Such response was also elicited by cell exposure to melatonin, a pleiotropic agent that recently emerged as a remarkable osteogenic inducer. Interestingly, the commitment to the osteogenic fate was synergistically enhanced by the combinatorial exposure to a conditioned medium containing both melatonin and HA + BU + RA. These in vitro results suggest that in vivo osteogenesis might be improved and further studies are needed. PMID:26880937

  5. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  6. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate and valproic acid delay spontaneous cell death in purified rat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Jennifer; Pielen, Amelie; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have neuroprotective effects under various neurodegenerative conditions, e.g., after optic nerve crush (ONC). HDACi-mediated protection of central neurons by increased histone acetylation has not previously been demonstrated in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), although epigenetic changes were shown to be associated with cell death after ONC. We investigated whether HDACi can delay spontaneous cell death in purified rat RGCs and analyzed concomitant histone acetylation levels. Methods RGCs were purified from newborn (postnatal day [P] 0–P2) rat retinas by immunopanning with antibodies against Thy-1.1 and culturing in serum-free medium for 2 days. RGCs were treated with HDACi, each at several different concentrations: 0.1–10 mM sodium butyrate (SB), 0.1–2 mM valproic acid (VPA), or 0.5–10 nM trichostatin A (TSA). Negative controls were incubated in media alone, while positive controls were incubated in 0.05–0.4 IU/µl erythropoietin. Survival was quantified by counting viable cells using phase-contrast microscopy. The expression of acetylated histone proteins (AcH) 3 and 4 was analyzed in RGCs by immunohistochemistry. Results SB and VPA enhanced RGC survival in culture, with both showing a maximum effect at 0.1 mM (increase in survival to 188% and 163%, respectively). Their neuroprotective effect was comparable to that of erythropoietin at 0.05 IU/µl. TSA 0.5–1.0 nM showed no effect on RGC survival, and concentrations ≥5 nM increased RGC death. AcH3 and AcH4 levels were only significantly increased in RGCs treated with 0.1 mM SB. VPA 0.1 mM produced only a slight effect on histone acetylation. Conclusions Millimolar concentrations of SB and VPA delayed spontaneous cell death in purified RGCs; however, significantly increased histone acetylation levels were only detectable in RGCs after SB treatment. As the potent HDACi TSA was not neuroprotective, mechanisms other than histone acetylation may be the

  8. Butyric acid in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Załęski, Andrzej; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Butyric acid (butanoic acid) belongs to a group of short-chain fatty acids and is thought to play several beneficial roles in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyric anion is easily absorbed by enteric cells and used as a main source of energy. Moreover, butyric acid is an important regulator of colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis, gastrointestinal tract motility and bacterial microflora composition in addition to its involvement in many other processes including immunoregulation and anti-inflammatory activity. The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal condition, is complex, and its precise mechanisms are still unclear. This article describes the potential benefits of butyric acid in IBS. PMID:24868283

  9. Butyric acid in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Załęski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Butyric acid (butanoic acid) belongs to a group of short-chain fatty acids and is thought to play several beneficial roles in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyric anion is easily absorbed by enteric cells and used as a main source of energy. Moreover, butyric acid is an important regulator of colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis, gastrointestinal tract motility and bacterial microflora composition in addition to its involvement in many other processes including immunoregulation and anti-inflammatory activity. The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal condition, is complex, and its precise mechanisms are still unclear. This article describes the potential benefits of butyric acid in IBS. PMID:24868283

  10. Enteric Bacterial Metabolites Propionic and Butyric Acid Modulate Gene Expression, Including CREB-Dependent Catecholaminergic Neurotransmission, in PC12 Cells - Possible Relevance to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nankova, Bistra B.; Agarwal, Raj; MacFabe, Derrick F.; La Gamma, Edmund F.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) like propionic (PPA), and butyric acid (BA), which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal) or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s) was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals such as

  11. Searching for Synbiotics to increase Colonic Butyrate Concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is produced by microbial fermentation of plant fiber in the gut and a preferred substrate for gut epithelial cells. In ruminants, butyrate contributes to 70% of energy metabolism. In monogastric species, butyrate also plays an important role in energy metabolism in the hindgut. Moreover, bu...

  12. Butyrate enemas upregulate Muc genes expression but decrease adherent mucus thickness in mice colon.

    PubMed

    Gaudier, E; Rival, M; Buisine, M-P; Robineau, I; Hoebler, C

    2009-01-01

    Colonic mucosal protection is provided by the mucus gel, mainly composed of mucins. Several factors can modulate the formation and the secretion of mucins, and among them butyrate, an end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. However, the specific effect of butyrate on the various colonic mucins, and the consequences in terms of the mucus layer thickness are not known. Our aim was to determine whether butyrate modulates colonic MUC genes expression in vivo and whether this results in changes in mucus synthesis and mucus layer thickness. Mice received daily for 7 days rectal enemas of butyrate (100 mM) versus saline. We demonstrated that butyrate stimulated the gene expression of both secreted (Muc2) and membrane-linked (Muc1, Muc3, Muc4) mucins. Butyrate especially induced a 6-fold increase in Muc2 gene expression in proximal colon. However, butyrate enemas did not modify the number of epithelial cells containing the protein Muc2, and caused a 2-fold decrease in the thickness of adherent mucus layer. Further studies should help understanding whether this last phenomenon, i.e. the decrease in adherent mucus gel thickness, results in a diminished protective function or not. PMID:18198997

  13. Expression profiling of sodium butyrate (NaB)-treated cells: identification of regulation of genes related to cytokine signaling and cancer metastasis by NaB.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jeena; Mudduluru, Giridhar; Antony, Sini; Vashistha, Surabhi; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2004-08-19

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce growth arrest and apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells. Sodium butyrate (NaB), a short chain fatty acid, is a HDAC inhibitor and is produced in the colonic lumen as a consequence of microbial degradation of dietary fibers. In order to dissect out the mechanism of NaB-induced growth inhibition of cancer cells, we carried out expression profiling of a human lung carcinoma cell line (H460) treated with NaB using a cDNA microarray. Of the total 1728 genes analysed, there were 32 genes with a mean expression value of 2.0-fold and higher and 66 genes with a mean expression value 3.0-fold and lower in NaB-treated cells. For a few selected genes, we demonstrate that their expression pattern by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis is matching with the results obtained by microarray analysis. Closer view at the expression profile of NaB-treated cells revealed the downregulation of a total of 16 genes associated with cytokine signaling, in particular, interferon gamma (IFNgamma) pathway. In good correlation, NaB-pretreated cells failed to induce interferon regulatory factor 1, an INFgamma target gene, efficiently upon IFNgamma addition. These results suggest that NaB inhibits proinflammatory cytokine signaling pathway, thus providing proof of mechanism for its anti-inflammatory activity. We also found that NaB induced three genes, which are known metastatic suppressors, and downregulated 11 genes, which have been shown to promote metastasis. Upregulation of metastatic suppressor Kangai 1 (KAI1) by NaB in a time-dependent manner was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. The differential regulation of metastasis-associated genes by NaB provides explanation for the anti-invasive properties of NaB. Therefore, our study presents new evidence for pathways regulated by NaB, thus providing evidence for the mechanism behind anti-inflammatory and antimetastatic activities of NaB. PMID:15318170

  14. Retraction: Open and closed conformations reveal induced fit movements in butyrate kinase 2 activation. J. Diao, Y. D. Ma, and M. S. Hasson.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    The following article from Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics, "Open and closed conformations reveal induced fit movements in butyrate kinase 2 activation," by Jiasheng Diao, Yunglin D. Ma, and Miriam S. Hasson, published online on 21 October 2010 in Wiley Online Library (onlinelibrary.wiley.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, and Wiley Periodicals. The retraction has been agreed because it was established by internal investigation performed by Purdue University that the authors of this article are not the owners of the data and have no right to publication. PMID:19847916

  15. Butyrate and glucose metabolism by colonocytes in experimental colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, M; Krishnan, S; Ramakrishna, B; Mathan, M; Pulimood, A; Murthy, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Impaired colonocyte metabolism of butyrate has been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Colonocyte butyrate metabolism was investigated in experimental colitis in mice.
METHODS—Colitis was induced in Swiss outbred white mice by oral administration of 4% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Colonocytes isolated from colitic and normal control mice were incubated with [14C]butyrate or glucose, and production of 14CO2, as well as of intermediate metabolites (acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate), was measured. The effect of different substrate concentrations on oxidation was also examined.
RESULTS—Butyrate oxidation (µmol/h per mg protein; mean (SEM)) was significantly reduced in DSS colitis, values on day 7 of DSS administration being 0.177 (0.007) compared with 0.406 (0.035) for control animals (p<0.001). Glucose oxidation (µmol/h per mg protein; mean (SEM)) on day 7 of DSS administration was significantly higher than in controls (0.06 (0.006) v 0.027 (0.004), p<0.001). Production of β-hydroxybutyrate was decreased and production of lactate increased in DSS colitis compared with controls. Increasing butyrate concentration from 10 to 80 mM enhanced oxidation in DSS colitis (0.036 (0.002) to 0.285 (0.040), p<0.001), although it continued to remain lower than in controls. Surface and crypt epithelial cells showed similar ratios of butyrate to glucose oxidation. When 1 mM DSS was added to normal colonocytes in vitro, it did not alter butyrate oxidation. The initial histological lesion of DSS administration was very patchy and involved crypt cells. Abnormal butyrate oxidation became apparent only after six days of DSS administration, at which time histological abnormalities were more widespread.
CONCLUSIONS—Colonocyte metabolism of butyrate, but not of glucose, is impaired in DSS colitis, and may be important in pathophysiology. Histological abnormalities preceded measurable defects in butyrate

  16. The activation of the TLR2/p38 pathway by sodium butyrate in bovine mammary epithelial cells is involved in the reduction of Staphylococcus aureus internalization.

    PubMed

    Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Medina-Estrada, Ivan; Báez-Magaña, Marisol; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an etiological agent of human and animal diseases, and it is able to internalize into non-professional phagocytic cells (i.e. bovine mammary epithelial cells, bMECs), which is an event that is related to chronic and recurrent infections. bMECs contribute to host innate immune responses (IIR) through TLR pathogen recognition, whereby TLR2 is the most relevant for S. aureus. In a previous report, we showed that sodium butyrate (NaB, 0.5mM), which is a short chain fatty acid (SCFA), reduced S. aureus internalization into bMECs by modulating their IIR. However, the molecular mechanism of this process has not been described, which was the aim of this study. The results showed that the TLR2 membrane abundance (MA) and mRNA expression were induced by 0.5mM NaB ∼1.6-fold and ∼1.7-fold, respectively. Additionally, 0.5mM NaB induced p38 phosphorylation, but not JNK1/2 or ERK1/2 phosphorylation in bMECs, which reached the baseline when the bMECs were S. aureus-challenged. Additionally, bMECs that were treated with 0.5mM NaB (24h) showed activation of 8 transcriptional factors (AP-1, E2F-1, FAST-1, MEF-1, EGR, PPAR, ER and CBF), which were partially reverted when the bMECs were S. aureus-challenged. Additionally, 0.5mM NaB (24h) up-regulated mRNA expression of the antimicrobial peptides, TAP (∼4.8-fold), BNBD5 (∼3.2-fold) and BNBD10 (∼2.6-fold). Notably, NaB-treated and S. aureus-challenged bMECs increased the mRNA expression of all of the antimicrobial peptides that were evaluated, and this was evident for LAP and BNBD5. In the NaB-treated bMECs, we did not detect significant expression changes for IL-1β and IL-6 and only TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-8 were induced. Interestingly, the NaB-treated and S. aureus-challenged bMECs maintained the anti-inflammatory response that was induced by this SCFA. In conclusion, our results suggest that 0.5mM NaB activates bMECs via TLR2/p38, which leads to improved antimicrobial defense before/after pathogen

  17. Molecular pathways: gene-environment interactions regulating dietary fiber induction of proliferation and apoptosis via butyrate for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Bultman, Scott J

    2014-02-15

    Gene-environment interactions are so numerous and biologically complicated that it can be challenging to understand their role in cancer. However, dietary fiber and colorectal cancer prevention may represent a tractable model system. Fiber is fermented by colonic bacteria into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. One molecular pathway that has emerged involves butyrate having differential effects depending on its concentration and the metabolic state of the cell. Low-moderate concentrations, which are present near the base of colonic crypts, are readily metabolized in the mitochondria to stimulate cell proliferation via energetics. Higher concentrations, which are present near the lumen, exceed the metabolic capacity of the colonocyte. Unmetabolized butyrate enters the nucleus and functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that epigenetically regulates gene expression to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis as the colonocytes exfoliate into the lumen. Butyrate may therefore play a role in normal homeostasis by promoting turnover of the colonic epithelium. Because cancerous colonocytes undergo the Warburg effect, their preferred energy source is glucose instead of butyrate. Consequently, even moderate concentrations of butyrate accumulate in cancerous colonocytes and function as HDAC inhibitors to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. These findings implicate a bacterial metabolite with metaboloepigenetic properties in tumor suppression. PMID:24270685

  18. Cytokine responses of intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells to non-pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic yeasts in the presence of butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Shizue; Totsuka, Mamoru; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Hosoi, Tomohiro

    2007-10-01

    Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and their cell wall components, zymosan and glucan, have been shown to stimulate interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL-8) production by intestinal epithelial cell-like Caco-2 cells pre-cultured with 10 mM butyric acid. We examined in this study whether these yeasts also altered the production of other cytokines and cyclooxygenases (COXs) by Caco-2 cells. Culturing Caco-2 cells with 10 mM butyric acid and 15% FBS for 4 days enhanced the basal levels of mRNA encoding IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, stem cell factor, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, TGF-beta3, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, COX-1, and COX-2, but not of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and TGF-beta2. The inclusion of live S. cerevisiae or C. albicans further enhanced the production of IL-8, but not of the other cytokines and COXs. The non-pathogenic yeasts, C. kefyr, C. utilis, C. versatilis, Kluyveromyces lactis, K. marxianus, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, used for the production of fermented foods and probiotics, and the opportunistic pathogens, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis, isolated from human tissue samples also enhanced IL-8 secretion by Caco-2 cells. PMID:17928716

  19. Efficacy of sodium butyrate adjunct therapy in shigellosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of shigellosis in rabbits with butyrate reduces clinical severity and counteracts the downregulation of cathelicidin (CAP-18) in the large intestinal epithelia. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether butyrate can be used as an adjunct to antibiotics in the treatment of shigellosis in patients. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group designed clinical trial was conducted. Eighty adult patients with shigellosis were randomized to either the Intervention group (butyrate, n = 40) or the Placebo group (normal saline, n = 40). The Intervention group was given an enema containing sodium butyrate (80 mM), twice daily for 3 days, while the Placebo group received the same dose of normal saline. The primary endpoint of the trial was to assess the efficacy of butyrate in improving clinical, endoscopic and histological features of shigellosis. The secondary endpoint was to study the effect of butyrate on the induction of antimicrobial peptides in the rectum. Clinical outcomes were assessed and concentrations of antimicrobial peptides (LL-37, human beta defensin1 [HBD-1] and human beta defensin 3 [HBD-3]) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β] and interleukin-8 [IL-8]) were measured in the stool. Sigmoidoscopic and histopathological analyses, and immunostaining of LL-37 in the rectal mucosa were performed in a subgroup of patients. Results Compared with placebo, butyrate therapy led to the early reduction of macrophages, pus cells, IL-8 and IL-1β in the stool and improvement in rectal histopathology. Butyrate treatment induced LL-37 expression in the rectal epithelia. Stool concentration of LL-37 remained significantly higher in the Intervention group on days 4 and 7. Conclusion Adjunct therapy with butyrate during shigellosis led to early reduction of inflammation and enhanced LL-37 expression in the rectal epithelia with prolonged release of LL-37 in the stool. Trial Registration Clinical

  20. Periodontal disease level-butyric acid amounts locally administered in the rat gingival mucosa induce ER stress in the systemic blood.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Saito, Yuko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2016-05-01

    Periodontal diseases have long been postulated to contribute to systemic diseases and, likewise, it has been proposed that periodontal disease treatment may ameliorate certain systemic diseases. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are major secondary metabolites produced by oral anaerobic bacteria and, among the SCFAs, butyric acid (BA) in high amounts contribute to periodontal disease development. Periodontal disease level-butyric acid (PDL-BA) is found among patients suffering from periodontal disease and has previously shown to induce oxidative stress, whereas, oxidative stress is correlated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This would imply that PDL-BA may likewise stimulate ER stress, however, this was never elucidated. A better understanding of the correlation between PDL-BA and systemic ER stress stimulation could shed light on the possible systemic effects of PDL-BA-related periodontal diseases. Here, PDL-BA was injected into the gingival mucosa and the systemic blood obtained from the rat jugular was collected at 0, 15, 60, and 180 min post-injection. Collected blood samples were purified and only the blood cytosol was used throughout this study. Subsequently, we measured blood cytosolic GADD153, Ca(2+), representative apoptotic and inflammatory caspases, and NF-κB amounts. We found that PDL-BA presence increased blood cytosolic GADD153 and Ca(2+) amounts. Moreover, we observed that blood cytosolic caspases and NF-κB were activated only at 60 and 180 min post-injection in the rat gingival mucosa. This suggests that PDL-BA administered through the gingival mucosa may influence the systemic blood via ER stress stimulation and, moreover, prolonged PDL-BA retention in the gingival mucosa may play a significant role in ER stress-related caspase and NF-κB activation. In a periodontal disease scenario, we propose that PDL-BA-related ER stress stimulation leading to the simultaneous activation of apoptosis and inflammation may contribute to periodontal disease

  1. Modeling of Open-Circuit Voltage of Phenyl-C61-Butyric Acid Methyl Ester-Like Based Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rodrigo M; Batagin-Neto, Augusto; Lavarda, Francisco C

    2015-12-01

    New materials are currently being sought for use in active layers of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells, and computational modeling plays an important role in this search. Although open circuit voltage (V(oc)) is one of the fundamental quantities that determine the efficiency of a solar cell, there is no consensus on the best way to estimate this magnitude for new materials from calculations of the electronic structure. In this paper, we compare ways of predicting V(oc) values employing a diverse group of blends and conclude that it is possible to have a good prediction tool for organic solar cells based on phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) acceptor molecules. PMID:26682440

  2. The Intestinal Epithelial Cell Differentiation Marker Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (ALPi) Is Selectively Induced by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) in Colon Cancer Cells in a Kruppel-like Factor 5 (KLF5)-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joongho; Carr, Azadeh; Corner, Georgia A.; Tögel, Lars; Dávaos-Salas, Mercedes; Tran, Hoanh; Chueh, Anderly C.; Al-Obaidi, Sheren; Chionh, Fiona; Ahmed, Naseem; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Young, Joanne P.; Malo, Madhu S.; Hodin, Richard A.; Arango, Diego; Sieber, Oliver M.; Augenlicht, Leonard H.; Dhillon, Amardeep S.; Weber, Thomas K.; Mariadason, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate promotes differentiation of colon cancer cells as evidenced by induced expression and enzyme activity of the differentiation marker intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPi). Screening of a panel of 33 colon cancer cell lines identified cell lines sensitive (42%) and resistant (58%) to butyrate induction of ALP activity. This differential sensitivity was similarly evident following treatment with the structurally distinct HDACi, MS-275. Resistant cell lines were significantly enriched for those harboring the CpG island methylator phenotype (p = 0.036, Chi square test), and resistant cell lines harbored methylation of the ALPi promoter, particularly of a CpG site within a critical KLF/Sp regulatory element required for butyrate induction of ALPi promoter activity. However, butyrate induction of an exogenous ALPi promoter-reporter paralleled up-regulation of endogenous ALPi expression across the cell lines, suggesting the presence or absence of a key transcriptional regulator is the major determinant of ALPi induction. Through microarray profiling of sensitive and resistant cell lines, we identified KLF5 to be both basally more highly expressed as well as preferentially induced by butyrate in sensitive cell lines. KLF5 overexpression induced ALPi promoter-reporter activity in resistant cell lines, KLF5 knockdown attenuated butyrate induction of ALPi expression in sensitive lines, and butyrate selectively enhanced KLF5 binding to the ALPi promoter in sensitive cells. These findings demonstrate that butyrate induction of the cell differentiation marker ALPi is mediated through KLF5 and identifies subsets of colon cancer cell lines responsive and refractory to this effect. PMID:25037223

  3. Butyrate production from high-fiber diet protects against lymphoma tumor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Sun, Wei; Yu, Shanshan; Yang, Yu; Ai, Limei

    2016-10-01

    Gut microbiota and dietary fiber are critical for protecting body from obesity, diabetes and cancer. Butyrate, produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary fibers, is demonstrated to be protective against the development of colorectal cancer as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. We report that high-fiber diet and butyrate significantly inhibited the growth lymphoma tumors. Butyrate induced apoptosis of lymphoma tumor cells and significantly up-regulated histone 3 acetylation (H3ac) level and target genes such as Fas, P21, P27. Our results unravel an instrumental role of fiber diet and their metabolites on lymphoma tumor and demonstrate an intervention potential on the prevention and therapy of lymphoma. PMID:26885564

  4. Combinatorial chemopreventive effect of butyric acid, nicotinamide and calcium glucarate against the 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene induced mouse skin tumorigenesis attained by enhancing the induction of intrinsic apoptotic events.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Prakash; Sahay, Satya; Pandey, Manuraj; Qadri, Syed S Y H; Gupta, Krishna P

    2015-01-25

    We explored the basis of the combinatorial chemopreventive effect of butyric acid (BA), nicotinamide (NA) and calcium glucarate (CAG) on mouse skin exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). We studied the effects of topical application of DMBA in the presence or absence of BA, NA and CAG on the regulators of apoptosis. DMBA treatment suppressed Bax, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, release of cyt c, Apaf1, caspase-9, -3 mediated apoptosis. Downregulation of p21 and upregulation of Bcl-2, mut p53 were also observed in only DMBA treated mice. Simultaneous application of BA, NA and CAG induced a mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, characterized by a rise in the Bax, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, release of cyt c, upregulation of Apaf1 with down-stream activation of caspase-9, -3. Furthermore treatment with BA, NA and CAG demonstrated an upregulation of p21 and downregulation of Bcl-2, mut p53. But this effect was enhanced in the presence of all the three compounds together in combination. Chemoprevention by a combination of BA, NA and CAG by inducing the apoptosis, the natural cell death, suggest the importance of the potential combinational strategies capable of preventing skin tumor development. PMID:25478867

  5. The SCFA butyrate stimulates the epithelial production of retinoic acid via inhibition of epithelial HDAC.

    PubMed

    Schilderink, Ronald; Verseijden, Caroline; Seppen, Jurgen; Muncan, Vanesa; van den Brink, Gijs R; Lambers, Tim T; van Tol, Eric A; de Jonge, Wouter J

    2016-06-01

    In the intestinal mucosa, retinoic acid (RA) is a critical signaling molecule. RA is derived from dietary vitamin A (retinol) through conversion by aldehyde dehydrogenases (aldh). Reduced levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are associated with pathological microbial dysbiosis, inflammatory disease, and allergy. We hypothesized that SCFAs contribute to mucosal homeostasis by enhancing RA production in intestinal epithelia. With the use of human and mouse epithelial cell lines and primary enteroids, we studied the effect of SCFAs on the production of RA. Functional RA conversion was analyzed by Adlefluor activity assays. Butyrate (0-20 mM), in contrast to other SCFAs, dose dependently induced aldh1a1 or aldh1a3 transcript expression and increased RA conversion in human and mouse epithelial cells. Epithelial cell line data were replicated in intestinal organoids. In these organoids, butyrate (2-5 mM) upregulated aldh1a3 expression (36-fold over control), whereas aldh1a1 was not significantly affected. Butyrate enhanced maturation markers (Mucin-2 and villin) but did not consistently affect stemness markers or other Wnt target genes (lgr5, olfm4, ascl2, cdkn1). In enteroids, the stimulation of RA production by SCFA was mimicked by inhibitors of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) but not by HDAC1/2 inhibitors nor by agonists of butyrate receptors G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR)43 or GPR109A, indicating that butyrate stimulates RA production via HDAC3 inhibition. We conclude that the SCFA butyrate inhibits HDAC3 and thereby supports epithelial RA production. PMID:27151945

  6. Sodium butyrate epigenetically modulates high-fat diet-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptation, obesity and insulin resistance through nucleosome positioning

    PubMed Central

    Henagan, Tara M; Stefanska, Barbara; Fang, Zhide; Navard, Alexandra M; Ye, Jianping; Lenard, Natalie R; Devarshi, Prasad P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sodium butyrate (NaB), an epigenetic modifier, is effective in promoting insulin sensitivity. The specific genomic loci and mechanisms underlying epigenetically induced obesity and insulin resistance and the targets of NaB are not fully understood. Experimental Approach The anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of NaB treatment were measured by comparing phenotypes and physiologies of C57BL/6J mice fed a low-fat diet (LF), high-fat diet (HF) or high-fat diet plus NaB (HF + NaB) for 10 weeks. We determined a possible mechanism of NaB action through induction of beneficial skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations and applied microccocal nuclease digestion with sequencing (MNase-seq) to assess whole genome differences in nucleosome occupancy or positioning and to identify associated epigenetic targets of NaB. Key Results NaB prevented HF diet-induced increases in body weight and adiposity without altering food intake or energy expenditure, improved insulin sensitivity as measured by glucose and insulin tolerance tests, and decreased respiratory exchange ratio. In skeletal muscle, NaB increased the percentage of type 1 fibres, improved acylcarnitine profiles as measured by metabolomics and produced a chromatin structure, determined by MNase-seq, similar to that seen in LF. Targeted analysis of representative nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes showed specific repositioning of the −1 nucleosome in association with altered gene expression. Conclusions and Implications NaB treatment may be an effective pharmacological approach for type 2 diabetes and obesity by inducing −1 nucleosome repositioning within nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes, causing skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations that result in more complete β-oxidation and a lean, insulin sensitive phenotype. PMID:25559882

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor-dependent disruption of a specific nucleosome on the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter is prevented by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed Central

    Bresnick, E H; John, S; Berard, D S; LeFebvre, P; Hager, G L

    1990-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously developed cell lines derived from mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and C127 mammary tumor cells that stably express mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat fusion genes in bovine papillomavirus-based episomes. Glucocorticoid hormone strongly activates transcription from episomes and induces the disruption of a single nucleosome in an array of phased nucleosomes on the MMTV promoter. Sodium butyrate inhibits the glucocorticoid hormone-dependent development of a nuclease-hypersensitive site that is due to the displacement of this nucleosome, and inhibits induction of RNA transcripts from episomes. Saturation binding studies show that butyrate treatment does not significantly affect the amount or the hormone-binding affinity of the glucocorticoid receptor. In a transient transfection assay, glucocorticoid hormone can activate transcription from a MMTV long terminal repeat-driven luciferase gene construct equivalently in untreated and butyrate-treated cells, indicating that the soluble factors necessary for transactivation of the MMTV promoter are unaffected by butyrate. The differential effect of butyrate on the induction of stable chromatin templates and transiently expressed plasmids suggests that butyrate prevents nucleosome displacement and represses transcription by inducing a modification of chromatin. Images PMID:2160080

  8. Swine Intestinal Tract Harbors a High Diversity of Butyrate-Producing Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a preferred energy source of human colonic epithelial cells, and changes in the communities of butyrate-producing bacteria have been associated with adverse health. We hypothesize that in swine, like in humans, butyrate-producing bacteria contribute to a healthy intestinal ecosystem. T...

  9. Protective role of sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor on beta-cell proliferation, function and glucose homeostasis through modulation of p38/ERK MAPK and apoptotic pathways: study in juvenile diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Jena, G B

    2014-04-25

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) also known as juvenile diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disorder that precipitates in genetically susceptible individuals by environmental factors particularly during early age. Both genetic and epigenetic factors are implicated in the beta-cell development, proliferation, differentiation and function. Recent evidences suggested that there is a link between diabetes and histone deacetylases (HDACs), because HDAC inhibitors promote beta-cell development, proliferation and function as well as improve glucose homeostasis. Sodium butyrate (NaB) is a short chain fatty acid having HDAC inhibition activity. The present study was aimed to investigate the protective role of NaB treatment on the beta-cell proliferation, function and glucose homeostasis as well as apoptosis in juvenile diabetic rat. Diabetes was induced by single injection of STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) in chilled citrate buffer, while NaB (500 mg/kg/day) was administrated by i.p. route for 21 days as pre- and post-treatment schedule. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, HbA1c, glucose tolerance, apoptosis, and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), p38, p53, caspase-3, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) as well as histone acetylation were evaluated. NaB treatment decreased plasma glucose, HbA1c, beta-cell apoptosis and improved plasma insulin level and glucose homeostasis through HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation in diabetic animal as compared to control. NaB treatment improved the beta-cell proliferation, function and glucose homeostasis as well as reduced beta-cell apoptosis in juvenile diabetic rat by the modulation of p38/ERK MAPK and apoptotic pathway. PMID:24530320

  10. Digital mRNA profiling of N-glycosylation gene expression in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells treated with sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Eun Gyo; Lee, Gyun Min

    2014-02-10

    To understand the effects of sodium butyrate (NaBu) on protein glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells producing Fc-fusion glycoprotein were subjected to 3mM NaBu. The addition of NaBu to the cultures reduced the relative proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of the glycoprotein. Fifty-two N-glycosylation-related gene expressions were also assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which can provide a direct digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. Among them, ten genes (ugp, slc35a2, ganc, man1a, man1c, mgat5a, st3gal5, glb1, neu1, and neu3) were up-regulated and three genes (b4galt2, st3gal3, and neu2) were down-regulated significantly. Altered expression patterns in st3gal3, neu1, and neu3, which have roles in the sialic acid biosynthesis pathway, correlated with reduced sialic acid content of the glycoprotein by NaBu. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effect of NaBu on N-glycosylation in rCHO cells. PMID:24333461

  11. Investigation of TiO2 Surface Modification with [6,6]-Phenyl-C61-butyric Acid for Titania/Polymer Hybrid Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Teng; Zhang, Jinyu; Kojima, Ryota; Tadaki, Daisuke; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated modification of TiO2 surfaces with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid (PCBA) used for fabrication of TiO2/poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) hybrid solar cells. The surface modification process was monitored using in-situ infrared absorption spectroscopy in the multiple-internal reflection geometry (MIR-IRAS). IR data showed that longer exposure of TiO2 surfaces to an organic solution of PCBA leads to undesirable formation of a physisorbed PCBA overlayer that cannot be removed by rinsing the surface in pure solvent. We found that ultrasonic cleaning of the TiO2 surface removed most of the physisorbed PCBA molecules. Modification of TiO2 surfaces with PCBA molecules drastically increased the short circuit current of TiO2/P3HT-based hybrid solar cells, which is ascribed to improved charge separation efficiency at the TiO2/P3HT interface. The physisorbed PCBA molecules decreased the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. We demonstrated that the power conversion efficiency is improved by ultrasonic cleaning following PCBA deposition.

  12. Selective oxidation of trimethylolpropane to 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)butyric acid using growing cells of Corynebacterium sp. ATCC 21245.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Mahmoud; Dishisha, Tarek; Sayed, Waiel F; Salem, Wesam M; Temerk, Hanan A; Pyo, Sang-Hyun

    2016-03-10

    Multifunctional chemicals including hydroxycarboxylic acids are gaining increasing interest due to their growing applications in the polymer industry. One approach for their production is a biological selective oxidation of polyols, which is difficult to achieve by conventional chemical catalysis. In the present study, trimethylolpropane (TMP), a trihydric alcohol, was subjected to selective oxidation using growing cells of Corynebacterium sp. ATCC 21245 as a biocatalyst and yielding the dihydroxy-monocarboxylic acid, 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)butyric acid (BHMB). The study revealed that co-substrates are crucial for this reaction. Among the different evaluated co-substrates, a mixture of glucose, xylose and acetate at a ratio of 5:5:2 was found optimum. The optimal conditions for biotransformation were pH 8, 1v/v/m airflow and 500rpm stirring speed. In batch mode of operation, 70.6% of 5g/l TMP was converted to BHMB in 10 days. For recovery of the product the adsorption pattern of BHMB to the anion exchange resin, Ambersep(®) 900 (OH(-)), was investigated in batch and column experiments giving maximum static and dynamic binding capacities of 135 and 144mg/g resin, respectively. BHMB was separated with 89.7% of recovery yield from the fermentation broth. The approach is applicable for selective oxidation of other highly branched polyols by biotransformation. PMID:26804932

  13. Strategies for production of butanol and butyl-butyrate through lipase-catalyzed esterification.

    PubMed

    Xin, Fengxue; Basu, Anindya; Yang, Kun-Lin; He, Jianzhong

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a fermentation process for production of butanol and butyl-butyrate by using Clostridium sp. strain BOH3 is developed. This strain is able to produce butyric acid and butanol when it ferments 60 g/L xylose. Meanwhile, it also excreted indigenous lipases (induced by olive oil) which naturally convert butyric acid and butanol into 1.2 g/L of butyl-butyrate. When Bio-OSR was used as both an inducer for lipase and extractant for butyl-butyrate, the butyl-butyrate concentration can reach 6.3 g/L. To further increase the yield, additional lipases and butyric acid are added to the fermentation system. Moreover, kerosene was used as an extractant to remove butyl-butyrate in situ. When all strategies are combined, 22.4 g/L butyl-butyrate can be produced in a fed-batch reactor spiked with 70 g/L xylose and 7.9 g/L butyric acid, which is 4.5-fold of that in a similar system (5 g/L) with hexadecane as the extractant. PMID:26710347

  14. Rationale for the luminal provision of butyrate in intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wächtershäuser, A; Stein, J

    2000-08-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA), especially butyrate, play central metabolic roles in maintaining the mucosal barrier in the gut. A lack of SCFA, leading to endogenous starvation of enterocytes, may be the cause of ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory conditions. The main source of SCFA is dietary fibre, but they can also be derived from structured lipids, e. g. tributyrin. Once absorbed by non-ionic diffusion or carrier-mediated anion exchanges, SCFA are either used locally as fuel for the enterocytes or enter the portal bloodstream. Butyrate has been shown to increase wound healing and to reduce inflammation in the small intestine. In the colon, butyrate is the dominant energy source for epithelial cells and affects cellular proliferation and differentiation by yet unknown mechanisms. Recent data suggest that the luminal provision of butyrate may be an appropriate means to improve wound healing in intestinal surgery and to ameliorate symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:11079736

  15. Concentration of clobetasone butyrate in aqueous humour.

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, S C; Richards, A B

    1983-01-01

    The concentrations of clobetasone butyrate and betamethasone were measured in aqueous humour of patients undergoing cataract extraction 12.5 to 18.5 hours after application into the lower conjunctival sac of an ointment containing 0.1% of the steroid. Samples were assayed from 10 patients receiving clobetasone butyrate and 13 patients receiving betamethasone phosphate. There were measurable concentrations in only 2 samples in the former group, and both were 0.1 ng/ml. In the betamethasone group measurable concentrations were found in 11 samples, and the concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 20.3 ng/ml, with the highest concentrations between 12.5 and 13.5 hours after application. The concentration of betamethasone in the aqueous humour decreased by about 90% in the 6 hours from 12.5 to 18.5 hours after application. It is speculative as to whether it is these differences in pharmacokinetic behaviour, or other differences in biological or physicochemical properties, which are responsible for the minimal effect on intraocular pressure induced by clobetasone butyrate compared with betamethasone. PMID:6824626

  16. In vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of calcium [1-14C]butyrate in free or protected forms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a by-product of microbial carbohydrate fermentation that occurs primarily in the large intestine. When added to feed, butyrate quickly disappears in the upper digestive tract. Because butyrate is important for the epithelial cell development and for mucosal integrity, and for animal grow...

  17. The microbe-derived short chain fatty acid butyrate targets miRNA-dependent p21 gene expression in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shien; Dong, Tien Sy; Dalal, Sushila R; Wu, Feng; Bissonnette, Marc; Kwon, John H; Chang, Eugene B

    2011-01-01

    Colonic microbiota ferment non-absorbed dietary fiber to produce prodigious amounts of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that benefit the host through a myriad of metabolic, trophic, and chemopreventative effects. The chemopreventative effects of the SCFA butyrate are, in part, mediated through induction of p21 gene expression. In this study, we assessed the role of microRNA(miRNA) in butyrate's induction of p21 expression. The expression profiles of miRNAs in HCT-116 cells and in human sporadic colon cancers were assessed by microarray and quantitative PCR. Regulation of p21 gene expression by miR-106b was assessed by 3' UTR luciferase reporter assays and transfection of specific miRNA mimics. Butyrate changed the expression of 44 miRNAs in HCT-116 cells, many of which were aberrantly expressed in colon cancer tissues. Members of the miR-106b family were decreased in the former and increased in the latter. Butyrate-induced p21 protein expression was dampened by treatment with a miR-106b mimic. Mutated p21 3'UTR-reporter constructs expressed in HCT-116 cells confirmed direct miR-106b targeting. Butyrate decreased HCT-116 proliferation, an effect reversed with the addition of the miR-106b mimic. We conclude that microbe-derived SCFAs regulate host gene expression involved in intestinal homeostasis as well as carcinogenesis through modulation of miRNAs. PMID:21283757

  18. Untangling the fiber yarn: butyrate feeds Warburg to suppress colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Carlos; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2014-12-01

    Dietary composition has an important role in shaping the gut microbiota. In turn, changes in the diet directly impinge on bacterial metabolites present in the intestinal lumen. Whether such metabolites play a role in intestinal cancer has been a topic of hot debate. In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Donohoe and colleagues show that dietary fiber protects against colorectal carcinoma in a microbiota-dependent manner. Furthermore, fiber-derived butyrate acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells experiencing the Warburg effect. PMID:25477104

  19. Butyric acid stimulates bovine neutrophil functions and potentiates the effect of platelet activating factor.

    PubMed

    Carretta, M D; Hidalgo, A I; Burgos, J; Opazo, L; Castro, L; Hidalgo, M A; Figueroa, C D; Taubert, A; Hermosilla, C; Burgos, R A

    2016-08-01

    Increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production is associated with subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and activation of inflammatory processes. In humans and rodents, SCFAs modulate inflammatory responses in the gut via free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2). In bovines, butyric acid is one of the most potent FFA2 agonists. Its expression in bovine neutrophils has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a role in innate immune response in cattle. This study aimed to evaluate if butyric acid modulates oxidative and non-oxidative functions or if it can potentiate other inflammatory mediators in bovine neutrophils. Our results showed that butyric acid can activate bovine neutrophils, inducing calcium (Ca(2+)) influx and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, two second messengers involved in FFA2 activation. Ca(2+) influx induced by butyric acid was dependent on the extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) source and phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Butyric acid alone had no significant effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and chemotaxis; however, a priming effect on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, was observed. Butyric acid increased CD63 expression and induced the release of neutrophil granule markers matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and lactoferrin. Finally, we observed that butyric acid induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation without affecting cellular viability. These findings suggest that butyric acid, a component of the ruminal fermentative process, can modulate the innate immune response of ruminants. PMID:27288853

  20. Microbial electrosynthesis of butyrate from carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ganigué, R; Puig, S; Batlle-Vilanova, P; Balaguer, M D; Colprim, J

    2015-02-21

    This work proves for the first time the bioelectrochemical production of butyrate from CO2 as a sole carbon source. The highest concentration of butyrate achieved was 20.2 mMC, with a maximum butyrate production rate of 1.82 mMC d(-1). The electrochemical characterisation demonstrated that the CO2 reduction to butyrate was hydrogen driven. Production of ethanol and butanol was also observed opening up the potential for biofuel production. PMID:25608945

  1. ALA-Butyrate prodrugs for Photo-Dynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovitch, G.; Nudelman, A.; Ehenberg, B.; Rephaeli, A.; Malik, Z.

    2010-05-01

    The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration has led to many applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer. However, the hydrophilic nature of ALA limits its ability to penetrate the cells and tissues, and therefore the need for ALA derivatives became an urgent research target. In this study we investigated the activity of novel multifunctional acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of ALA that upon metabolic hydrolysis release active components such as, formaldehyde, and the histone deacetylase inhibitory moiety, butyric acid. Evaluation of these prodrugs under photo-irradiation conditions showed that butyryloxyethyl 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate (ALA-BAC) generated the most efficient photodynamic destruction compared to ALA. ALA-BAC stimulated a rapid biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in human glioblastoma U-251 cells which resulted in generation of intracellular ROS, reduction of mitochondrial activity, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death of the cells. The apoptotic cell death induced by ALA / ALA-BAC followed by PDT equally activate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals and both pathways may occur simultaneously. The main advantage of ALA-BAC over ALA stems from its ability to induce photo-damage at a significantly lower dose than ALA.

  2. [Pharmacological study on hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Otomo, S; Higuchi, S; Nakaike, S; Takeshita, K; Tanaka, M; Gotoh, Y; Osada, Y; Tsuchida, K; Inoue, K; Kyogoku, K; Tarumoto, Y; Sasajima, M; Ohzeki, M

    1981-12-01

    The topical and systemic anti-inflammatory activities of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate (HBP) were studied. The systemic anti-inflammatory activities of HBP and reference steroids were examined for their effects on dinitrochlorobenzene dermatitis, carrageenin edema, cotton pellet granuloma and adjuvant arthritis in rats and by the delayed allergic edema test in mice. The topical anti-inflammatory activities of these steroids were examined for their effects on croton oil dermatitis, croton oil ear edema, carrageenin edema and cotton pellet granuloma in rats. Furthermore, effects of these steroids on liver glycogen deposition in mice, thymolysis, and decrease of serum corticosterone level in rats were examined. Systemically administered HBP was less potent than betamethasone 17-valerate (BV), but was almost equal to hydrocortisone 17-butyrate (HB) in anti-inflammatory activity, and its effects on liver glycogen deposition, thymolysis, and the decrease of serum corticosterone level. However, the topical anti-inflammatory activity of HBP was more potent than that of BV and HB, although in the same experiment, thymolytic activity of HBP was less potent than that of BV, but was almost equal to HB. The inhibitory effect of HBP on hypotonic induced hemolysis was weaker than that of BV, but was stronger than that of HB in vitro. The affinity of HBP was higher than that of BV and HB to polymorphonuclear leucocytes used as the inflammatory cells in vitro. On the other hand no marked difference was observed in the affinity to erythrocytes used as the non-inflammatory cells in vitro. These results suggest that HBP is a useful drug which has superior topical anti-inflammatory activity, but has a weak systemic effect. PMID:7333567

  3. The microbial metabolite butyrate regulates intestinal macrophage function via histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pamela V; Hao, Liming; Offermanns, Stefan; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-02-11

    Given the trillions of microbes that inhabit the mammalian intestines, the host immune system must constantly maintain a balance between tolerance to commensals and immunity against pathogens to avoid unnecessary immune responses against otherwise harmless bacteria. Misregulated responses can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The mechanisms by which the immune system maintains this critical balance remain largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that the short-chain fatty acid n-butyrate, which is secreted in high amounts by commensal bacteria, can modulate the function of intestinal macrophages, the most abundant immune cell type in the lamina propria. Treatment of macrophages with n-butyrate led to the down-regulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, IL-6, and IL-12, but did not affect levels of TNF-α or MCP-1. These effects were independent of toll-like receptor signaling and activation of G-protein-coupled receptors, two pathways that could be affected by short-chain fatty acids. In this study, we provide several lines of evidence that suggest that these effects are due to the inhibition of histone deacetylases by n-butyrate. These findings elucidate a pathway in which the host may maintain tolerance to intestinal microbiota by rendering lamina propria macrophages hyporesponsive to commensal bacteria through the down-regulation of proinflammatory effectors. PMID:24390544

  4. Thalidomide is more efficient than sodium butyrate in enhancing GATA-1 and EKLF gene expression in erythroid progenitors derived from HSCs with β-globin gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Jalali Far, Mohammad Ali; Dehghani Fard, Ali; Hajizamani, Saiedeh; Mossahebi-Mohammadi, Majid; Yaghooti, Hamid; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficient induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is considered as an effective therapeutic approach in beta thalassemia. HbF inducer agents can induce the expression of γ-globin gene and produce high levels of HbF via different epigenetic and molecular mechanisms. Thalidomide and sodium butyrate are known as HbF inducer drugs. Material and methods: CD133+ stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood of a newborn with minor β-thalassemia in order to evaluate the effects of these two drugs on the in vitro expression of GATA-1 and EKLF genes as erythroid transcription factors. CD133+ stem cells were expanded and differentiated into erythroid lineage and then treated with thalidomide and sodium butyrate and finally analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using student’s t-test by SPSS software. Results: Thalidomide and sodium butyrate increased GATA-1 and EKLF gene expression, compared to the non-treated control (P<0.05). Conclusion: Thalidomide was more efficient than sodium butyrate in augmenting expression of GATA-1 and EKLF genes. It seems that GATA-1 and EKLF have crucial roles in the efficient induction of HbF by thalidomide. PMID:27047649

  5. Oncogenic ras alters sensitivity of mouse colonocytes to butyrate and fatty acid mediated growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy D; Zhang, Jianhu; Davidson, Laurie A; Lupton, Joanne R; Chapkin, Robert S

    2002-12-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and butyrate favorably modulate colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis. In order to elucidate how oncogenic Ras modulates responses to these chemopreventive nutrients, we incubated isogenic non-transformed and Ras malignant transformed mouse colon cells with butyrate and DHA or linoleic acid (LA). Combining DHA with 1mM butyrate decreased proliferation relative to LA or no PUFA treatment in both cell lines. At a higher butyrate dose (5mM), caspase 3 activity was elevated to a greater extent in Ras transformed cells. Only non-transformed cells were sensitive to the apoptogenic effects of DHA, indicating that Ras transformation alters sensitivity to dietary chemopreventive agents. PMID:12183072

  6. Identification of genes involved in indole-3-butyric acid-induced adventitious root formation in nodal cuttings of Camellia sinensis (L.) by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kang; Wang, Liyuan; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Chengcai; Ma, Chunlei; Zhang, Liqun; Gong, Wuyun; Wu, Liyun

    2013-02-10

    The plant hormone auxin plays a key role in adventitious rooting. To increase our understanding of genes involved in adventitious root formation, we identified transcripts differentially expressed in single nodal cuttings of Camellia sinensis treated with or without indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). A total of 77 differentially expressed transcripts, including 70 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated sequences, were identified in tea cuttings under IBA treatment. Seven candidate transcripts were selected and analyzed for their response to IBA, and IAA by real time RT-PCR. All these transcripts were up regulated by at least two folds one day after IBA treatment. Meanwhile, IAA showed less positive effects on the expression of candidate transcripts. The full-length cDNA of a F-box/kelch gene was also isolated and found to be similar to a group of At1g23390 like genes. These unigenes provided a new source for mining genes related to adventitious root formation, which facilitate our understanding of relative fundamental metabolism. PMID:23201417

  7. Improved in vivo antitumor effect of a daunorubicin - GnRH-III bioconjugate modified by apoptosis inducing agent butyric acid on colorectal carcinoma bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kapuvári, Bence; Hegedüs, Rózsa; Schulcz, Ákos; Manea, Marilena; Tóvári, József; Gacs, Alexandra; Vincze, Borbála; Mező, Gábor

    2016-08-01

    Compared to classical chemotherapy, peptide-based drug targeting is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer, which can provide increased selectivity and decreased side effects to anticancer drugs. Among various homing devices, gonadotropin-releasing hormone-III (GnRH-III) peptide represents a suitable targeting moiety, in particular in the treatment of hormone independent tumors that highly express GnRH receptors (e.g. colon carcinoma). We have previously shown that GnRH-III[(4)Lys(Ac),(8)Lys(Dau = Aoa)] bioconjugate, in which daunorubicin was attached via oxime linkage to the (8)Lys of a GnRH-III derivative, exerted significant in vivo antitumor effect on subcutaneously developed HT-29 colon tumor. In contrast, results of the study reported here indicated that this compound was not active on an orthotopically developed tumor. However, if Lys in position 4 was acylated with butyric acid instead of acetic acid, the resulting bioconjugate GnRH-III[(4)Lys(Bu),(8)Lys(Dau = Aoa)] had significant tumor growth inhibitory effect. Furthermore, it prevented tumor neovascularization, without detectable side effects. Nevertheless, the development of metastases could not be inhibited by the bioconjugate; therefore, its application in combination with a metastasis preventive agent might be necessary in order to achieve complete tumor remission. In spite of this result, the treatment with GnRH-III[(4)Lys(Bu),(8)Lys(Dau = Aoa)] bioconjugate proved to have significant benefits over the administration of free daunorubicin, which was used at the maximum tolerated dose. PMID:27146514

  8. Epidermal cell DNA content and intermediate filaments keratin 10 and vimentin after treatment of psoriasis with calcipotriol cream once daily, twice daily and in combination with clobetasone 17-butyrate cream or betamethasone 17-valerate cream: a comparative flow cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Glade, C P; Van Erp, P E; Van De Kerkhof, P C

    1996-09-01

    Calcipotriol and corticosteroids, two therapy modalities frequently prescribed in the treatment of psoriasis, are often used in combination. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the cell biological response pattern of concurrent use of calcipotriol and corticosteroids is different from calcipotriol monotherapy. Forty patients with chronic plaque psoriasis were divided at random in four parallel groups and treated for 8 weeks with: (1) calcipotriol cream (50 micrograms/g once daily); (2) calcipotriol cream twice daily; (3) calcipotriol and clobetasone 17-butyrate (0.5 mg/g) creams; and (4) calcipotriol and betamethasone 17-valerate (1 mg/g) creams. Before and after treatment keratotome biopsies were taken and single cell suspensions prepared for flow cytometric analysis. Flow cytometric multiparameter quantification of markers for proliferation (TO-PRO-3), differentiation (antikeratin 10) and inflammation (antivimentin) was used to evaluate all four therapy modalities. A statistically significant decrease of the percentage of basal cells in S- and G2M-phase (proliferation) was obtained with all therapy modalities, except for calcipotriol monotherapy applied once daily. A significant reduction of the number of vimentin-positive cells (non-keratinocytes) was observed following combined treatment with calcipotriol and clobetasone butyrate. In contrast, monotherapy with calcipotriol had virtually no effect on the number of vimentin-positive cells. It can be concluded that: (i) calcipotriol monotherapy, applied once daily was less antiproliferative compared with twice daily applications of calcipotriol or the combined treatment with corticosteroids and that (ii) the combination of calcipotriol and corticosteroids proved to have a marked effect on the percentage of non-keratinocytes, in contrast to the modest effect of calcipotriol. PMID:8949429

  9. Graphene composite for improvement in the conversion efficiency of flexible poly 3-hexyl-thiophene:[6,6]-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, A. K. E-mail: akc.barc@gmail.com; Gusain, Abhay; Jha, P.; Koiry, S. P.; Saxena, Vibha; Veerender, P.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.

    2014-03-31

    The solution of thin graphene-sheets obtained from a simple ultrasonic exfoliation process was found to chemically interact with [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) molecules. The thinner graphene-sheets have significantly altered the positions of highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of PCBM, which is beneficial for the enhancement of the open circuit voltage of the solar cells. Flexible bulk heterojunction solar cells fabricated using poly 3-hexylthiophene (P3HT):PCBM-graphene exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 2.51%, which is a ∼2-fold increase as compared to those fabricated using P3HT:PCBM. Inclusion of graphene-sheets not only improved the open-circuit voltage but also enhanced the short-circuit current density owing to an improved electron transport.

  10. Butyrate enema therapy stimulates mucosal repair in experimental colitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Butzner, J D; Parmar, R; Bell, C J; Dalal, V

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) butyrate provides energy for colonocytes, stimulates colonic fluid and electrolyte absorption and is recognised as an effective treatment for multiple types of colitis. AIM--To examine the impact of butyrate enema therapy on the clinical course, severity of inflammation, and SCFA stimulated Na+ absorption in a chronic experimental colitis. METHODS--Distal colitis was induced in rats with a trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) enema. Five days after induction, rats were divided into groups to receive: no treatment, saline enemas, or 100 mM Na-butyrate enemas daily. On day 24, colonic damage score and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were evaluated. Colon was mounted in Ussing chambers and Na+ transport and electrical activities were measured during a basal period and after stimulation with 25 mM butyrate. RESULTS--In the untreated and the saline enema treated TNBS groups, diarrhoea and extensive colonic damage were seen, associated with increased tissue MPO activities and absent butyrate stimulated Na+ absorption. In contrast, in the butyrate enema treated TNBS group, diarrhoea ceased, colonic damage score improved, and tissue MPO activity as well as butyrate stimulated Na+ absorption recovered to control values. CONCLUSION--Butyrate enema therapy stimulated colonic repair, as evidenced by clinical recovery, decreased inflammation, and restoration of SCFA stimulated electrolyte absorption. PMID:8707089

  11. Induction of peroxisomes by butyrate-producing probiotics.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huachun; Endo, Kosuke; Li, Jiawei; Kito, Naoko; Iwai, Naoharu

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11a (Pex11a) deficiency is associated with a reduction in peroxisome abundance and impaired fatty acid metabolism in hepatocytes, and results in steatosis. In the present study, we investigated whether butyrate induces Pex11a expression and peroxisome proliferation, and studied its effect on lipid metabolism. C57BL/6 mice fed standard chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) were treated with tributyrin, 4-phelybutyrate acid (4-PBA), or the butyrate-producing probiotics (Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588 [CBM]) plus inulin (dietary fiber), and the body weight, white adipose tissue, serum triglycerides, mRNA expression, and peroxisome abundance were evaluated. Tributyrin or 4-PBA treatment significantly decreased body weight and increased hepatic mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and Pex11a. In addition, 4-PBA treatment increased peroxisome abundance and the expression of genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation (acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and hydroxysteroid [17-beta] dehydrogenase 4). CBM and inulin administration reduced adipose tissue mass and serum triglycerides, induced Pex11a, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1, and hydroxysteroid (17-beta) dehydrogenase 4 genes, and increased peroxisome abundance in mice fed standard chow or an HFD. In conclusion, elevation of butyrate availability (directly through administration of butyrate or indirectly via administration of butyrate-producing probiotics plus fiber) induces PPARα and Pex11a and the genes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation, increases peroxisome abundance, and improves lipid metabolism. These results may provide a new therapeutic strategy against hyperlipidemia and obesity. PMID:25659146

  12. Butyrate production from dietary fibre and protection against large bowel cancer in a rat model.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, A; Gibson, P R; Young, G P

    1993-01-01

    Butyrate slows the growth of cancer cells cultured in vitro. To determine the relevance of the fermentative production of butyrate in vivo, colonic butyrate concentrations were manipulated by feeding different dietary fibres and were related to tumour development in the rat dimethylhydrazine model of large bowel cancer. It has previously been shown that guar gum and oat bran, while highly fermentable, are associated with low butyrate levels in the distal colon, while wheat bran causes significantly higher concentrations. Diets containing these fibres (nominally 10% w:w) were administered for 3 weeks before, for 10 weeks during, and for 20 weeks after dimethylhydrazine administration, after which animals were killed and examined for tumours. Significantly fewer tumours were seen in the rats fed wheat bran compared with those fed guar or oat bran, and the total tumour mass was lowest in rats fed wheat bran. Rats on a 'no added fibre diet' had an intermediate tumour mass. Regression analysis, performed regardless of dietary group, showed that the concentration in stools of butyrate but not of acetate or stool volume, correlated significantly (and negatively) with tumour mass. These findings indicate that fibre which is associated with high butyrate concentrations in the distal large bowel is protective against large bowel cancer, while soluble fibres that do not raise distal butyrate concentrations, are not protective. Thus, butyrate production in vivo does bear a significant relationship to suppression of tumour formation. PMID:8386131

  13. Proliferative effects of gamma-amino butyric acid on oral squamous cell carcinoma cells are associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Tianyu; Ji, Ping; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Hongmei; Luo, Wenping

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian central nervous system, has been reported to play an important physiological role in peripheral non-neuronal tissues, such as tumors. However, whether deregulated GABA is associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of GABA on the proliferation of the OSCC cell line, Tca8113. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to examine the expression of GABA A type receptor pi subunit (GABRP) in human OSCC tissues, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis were performed to examine the expression of GABRP in Tca8113 cells. The proliferative effects of GABA on Tca8113 cells were analyzed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. The activation status of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was examined by western blot analysis. GABRP expression was observed in the cytoplasm with a higher level in poorly differentiated OSCC tissues. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GABRP were detected in the Tca8113 cells. The addition of GABA and the GABA A type receptor agonist, Muscimol, promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis through the activation of the p38 MAPK and the inhibition of the JNK MAPK signaling pathways. These results imply a novel role of GABA in OSCC. PMID:27222045

  14. Effects of orally applied butyrate bolus on histone acetylation and cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in the liver of chicken – a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Butyrate is known as histone deacetylase inhibitor, inducing histone hyperacetylation in vitro and playing a predominant role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and cell function. We hypothesized that butyrate, endogenously produced by intestinal microbial fermentation or applied as a nutritional supplement, might cause similar in vivo modifications in the chromatin structure of the hepatocytes, influencing the expression of certain genes and therefore modifying the activity of hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Methods An animal study was carried out in chicken as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of butyrate’s epigenetic actions in the liver. Broiler chicks in the early post-hatch period were treated once daily with orally administered bolus of butyrate following overnight starvation with two different doses (0.25 or 1.25 g/kg body weight per day) for five days. After slaughtering, cell nucleus and microsomal fractions were separated by differential centrifugation from the livers. Histones were isolated from cell nuclei and acetylation of hepatic core histones was screened by western blotting. The activity of CYP2H and CYP3A37, enzymes involved in biotransformation in chicken, was detected by aminopyrine N-demethylation and aniline-hydroxylation assays from the microsomal suspensions. Results Orally added butyrate, applied in bolus, had a remarkable impact on nucleosome structure of hepatocytes: independently of the dose, butyrate caused hyperacetylation of histone H2A, but no changes were monitored in the acetylation state of H2B. Intensive hyperacetylation of H3 was induced by the higher administered dose, while the lower dose tended to increase acetylation ratio of H4. In spite of the observed modification in histone acetylation, no significant changes were observed in the hepatic microsomal CYP2H and CYP3A37 activity. Conclusion Orally added butyrate in bolus could cause in vivo

  15. Genotype-dependency of butyrate efficacy in children with congenital chloride diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by life-long, severe diarrhea with intestinal Cl- malabsorption. It results from a reduced activity of the down regulated in adenoma exchanger (DRA), due to mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 (SLC26A3) gene. Currently available therapies are not able to limit the severity of diarrhea in CLD. Conflicting results have been reported on the therapeutic efficacy of oral butyrate. Methods We investigated the effect of oral butyrate (100 mg/kg/day) in seven CLD children with different SLC26A3 genotypes. Nasal epithelial cells were obtained to assess the effect of butyrate on the expression of the two main Cl- transporters: DRA and putative anion transporter-1 (PAT-1). Results A variable clinical response to butyrate was observed regarding the stool pattern and fecal ion loss. The best response was observed in subjects with missense and deletion mutations. Variable response to butyrate was also observed on SLC26A3 (DRA) and SLC26A6 (PAT1) gene expression in nasal epithelial cells of CLD patients. Conclusions We demonstrate a genotype-dependency for butyrate therapeutic efficacy in CLD. The effect of butyrate is related in part on a different modulation of the expression of the two main apical membrane Cl- exchangers of epithelial cells, members of the SLC26 anion family. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical trial Registry ACTRN12613000450718. PMID:24350656

  16. The Future of Butyric Acid in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Dwidar, Mohammed; Park, Jae-Yeon; Mitchell, Robert J.; Sang, Byoung-In

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the different applications of butyric acid and its current and future production status are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on the biofuels industry. As such, this paper discusses different issues regarding butyric acid fermentations and provides suggestions for future improvements and their approaches. PMID:22593687

  17. Preventive effects of butyric acid, nicotinamide, calcium glucarate alone or in combination during the 7, 12-dimethylbenz (a) anthracene induced mouse skin tumorigenesis via modulation of K-Ras-PI3K-AKTpathway and associated micro RNAs.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Prakash; Sahay, Satya; Pandey, Manuraj; Qadri, Syed S Y H; Gupta, Krishna P

    2016-02-01

    Skin cancer is among the most common cancers worldwide and identifiable molecular changes for early and late stage of skin tumorigenesis can suggest the better targets for its control. In this study, we investigated the status of K-Ras-PI3K-AKTpathway followed by NF-κB, cyclin D1, MMP-9 and regulatory micro RNA during 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) induced mouse skin tumorigenesis and its prevention by butyric acid (BA), nicotinamide (NA) and calcium glucarate (CAG), individually or in combination with respect to time. DMBA upregulated the K-Ras, PI3K, Akt, NF-κB, cyclin D1 and MMP-9, but downregulated the PTEN in a time dependent manner. DMBA also reduced the levels of micoRNA let-7a but induced the levels of miR-21 and miR-20a as a function of time. BA, NA and CAG were found to prevent DMBA induced changes, but they were most effective when used together in a combination. Reduced let-7a and miR-211 were correlated with the overexpression of K-Ras and MMP-9. Overexpression of miR-21 and miR-20a was correlated with the down regulation of PTEN and overexpression of Cyclin D1. Collectively, the enhanced chemopreventive potential of natural compound in combination via regulation of K-Ras-PI3K-AKTpathway along with regulatory micro RNAs provide a newer and effective mean for cancer management. PMID:26655363

  18. Nutrient-induced modulation of gene expression and cellular functions: modeling epigenetic regulation in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA), especially butyrate, participate in metabolism both as nutrients and as regulators of histone deacetylation. The major biochemical change that occurs in cells treated with butyrate is the global hyperacetylation of histones. One paradigmatic example of the nutrient-epige...

  19. Butyrate and bioactive proteolytic form of Wnt-5a regulate colonic epithelial proliferation and spatial development.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Hasebe, Takumu; Musch, Mark W; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasushi; He, Tong-Chuan; Lichtenstein, Lev; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Jabri, Bana; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Chang, Eugene B

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and spatial development of colonic epithelial cells are highly regulated along the crypt vertical axis, which, when perturbed, can result in aberrant growth and carcinogenesis. In this study, two key factors were identified that have important and counterbalancing roles regulating these processes: pericrypt myofibroblast-derived Wnt-5a and the microbial metabolite butyrate. Cultured YAMC cell proliferation and heat shock protein induction were analzyed after butryate, conditioned medium with Wnt5a activity, and FrzB containing conditioned medium. In vivo studies to modulate Hsp25 employed intra-colonic wall Hsp25 encoding lentivirus. To silence Wnt-5a in vivo, intra-colonic wall Wnt-5a silencing RNA was used. Wnt-5a, secreted by stromal myofibroblasts of the lower crypt, promotes proliferation through canonical β-catenin activation. Essential to this are two key requirements: (1) proteolytic conversion of the highly insoluble ~40 kD Wnt-5a protein to a soluble 36 mer amino acid peptide that activates epithelial β-catenin and cellular proliferation, and (2) the simultaneous inhibition of butyrate-induced Hsp25 by Wnt-5a which is necessary to arrest the proliferative process in the upper colonic crypt. The interplay and spatial gradients of these factors insures that crypt epithelial cell proliferation and development proceed in an orderly fashion, but with sufficient plasticity to adapt to physiological perturbations including inflammation. PMID:27561676

  20. Butyrate and bioactive proteolytic form of Wnt-5a regulate colonic epithelial proliferation and spatial development

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Hasebe, Takumu; Musch, Mark W.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasushi; He, Tong-Chuan; Lichtenstein, Lev; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Jabri, Bana; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Chang, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and spatial development of colonic epithelial cells are highly regulated along the crypt vertical axis, which, when perturbed, can result in aberrant growth and carcinogenesis. In this study, two key factors were identified that have important and counterbalancing roles regulating these processes: pericrypt myofibroblast-derived Wnt-5a and the microbial metabolite butyrate. Cultured YAMC cell proliferation and heat shock protein induction were analzyed after butryate, conditioned medium with Wnt5a activity, and FrzB containing conditioned medium. In vivo studies to modulate Hsp25 employed intra-colonic wall Hsp25 encoding lentivirus. To silence Wnt-5a in vivo, intra-colonic wall Wnt-5a silencing RNA was used. Wnt-5a, secreted by stromal myofibroblasts of the lower crypt, promotes proliferation through canonical β-catenin activation. Essential to this are two key requirements: (1) proteolytic conversion of the highly insoluble ~40 kD Wnt-5a protein to a soluble 36 mer amino acid peptide that activates epithelial β-catenin and cellular proliferation, and (2) the simultaneous inhibition of butyrate-induced Hsp25 by Wnt-5a which is necessary to arrest the proliferative process in the upper colonic crypt. The interplay and spatial gradients of these factors insures that crypt epithelial cell proliferation and development proceed in an orderly fashion, but with sufficient plasticity to adapt to physiological perturbations including inflammation. PMID:27561676

  1. Actinomyces naeslundii GroEL-dependent initial attachment and biofilm formation in a flow cell system.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshiaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2015-02-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer with important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. The effects of butyric acid, one of short chain fatty acids in A. naeslundii biofilm formation was observed using a flow cell system with Tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose (TSB sucrose). Significant biofilms were established involving live and dead cells in TSB sucrose with 60mM butyric acid but not in concentrations of 6, 30, 40, and 50mM. Biofilm formation failed in 60mM sodium butyrate but biofilm level in 60mM sodium butyrate (pH4.7) adjusted with hydrochloric acid as 60mM butyric media (pH4.7) was similar to biofilm levels in 60mM butyric acid. Therefore, butyric acid and low pH are required for significant biofilm formation in the flow cell. To determine the mechanism of biofilm formation, we investigated initial A. naeslundii colonization in various conditions and effects of anti-GroEL antibody. The initial colonization was observed in the 60mM butyric acid condition and anti-GroEL antibody inhibited the initial colonization. In conclusion, we established a new biofilm formation model in which butyric acid induces GroEL-dependent initial colonization of A. naeslundii resulting in significant biofilm formation in a flow system. PMID:25555820

  2. Restricted Distribution of the Butyrate Kinase Pathway among Butyrate-Producing Bacteria from the Human Colon

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Petra; Duncan, Sylvia H.; McCrae, Sheila I.; Millar, Jacqueline; Jackson, Michelle S.; Flint, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    The final steps in butyrate synthesis by anaerobic bacteria can occur via butyrate kinase and phosphotransbutyrylase or via butyryl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase. Degenerate PCR and enzymatic assays were used to assess the presence of butyrate kinase among 38 anaerobic butyrate-producing bacterial isolates from human feces that represent three different clostridial clusters (IV, XIVa, and XVI). Only four strains were found to possess detectable butyrate kinase activity. These were also the only strains to give PCR products (verifiable by sequencing) with degenerate primer pairs designed within the butyrate kinase gene or between the linked butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes. Further analysis of the butyrate kinase/phosphotransbutyrylase genes of one isolate, L2-50, revealed similar organization to that described previously from different groups of clostridia, along with differences in flanking sequences and phylogenetic relationships. Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase activity was detected in all 38 strains examined, suggesting that it, rather than butyrate kinase, provides the dominant route for butyrate formation in the human colonic ecosystem that contains a constantly high concentration of acetate. PMID:15028695

  3. Inhibition of IL-8 gene expression in Caco-2 cells by compounds which induce histone hyperacetylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, N; Katz, J P; Martin, D R; Wu, G D

    1997-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis, an idiopathic inflammatory disease of the colonic mucosa, can be effectively treated by enemas containing short chain fatty acids (SCFA) such as butyrate, propionate, and acetate. The molecular mechanisms that lead to this response have not been well characterized. It is well known that intestinal inflammation leads to an alteration in patterns of epithelial differentiation with an increase in epithelial proliferation and an expansion of cell populations in an undifferentiated state. SCFAs such as butyrate are capable of inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing a differentiated phenotype in vitro. The Caco-2 colon cancer cell line was used to study the effect of SCFAs and the process of cellular differentiation on the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 8 (IL-8). SCFAs and trichostatin A, structurally unrelated compounds which both induce histone hyperacetylation, both led to a dose-dependent inhibition of IL-8 gene expression. Furthermore, spontaneous differentiation of Caco-2 cells by growth to a post-confluent state also inhibited the expression of IL-8. A possible mechanism by which SCFAs may be effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis may be through their ability to increase histone acetylation states and inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory substances by the intestinal epithelium. PMID:9067093

  4. The Dependence of Donor:Acceptor Ratio on the Photovoltaic Performances of Blended poly (3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl) and (6,6)-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fauzia, Vivi; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Yahya, Muhammad

    2010-10-24

    Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells using blended poly (3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl)(P3OT) and (6,6)-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 71}BM) have been fabricated. P3OT and PC{sub 71}BM were used as the electron donor (D) and acceptor (A), respectively. Both materials were mixed and dissolved in dichlorobenzene with three different D:A ratios i.e. 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 (weight) while maintained at the concentration of 2 wt%(26 mg/ml). The blended thin films were sandwiched between the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and the aluminum film. This paper reports the influence of donor:acceptor ratio on the performance of solar cell devices measured by current-voltage measurement both in the dark and under 1.5 AM solar illumination. It was found that all devices showed the photovoltaic effect with poor diode behavior and the donor:acceptor ratio significantly influenced on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

  5. The Dependence of Donor:Acceptor Ratio on the Photovoltaic Performances of Blended poly (3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl) and (6,6)-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzia, Vivi; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Yahya, Muhammad

    2010-10-01

    Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells using blended poly (3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl)(P3OT) and (6,6)-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) have been fabricated. P3OT and PC71BM were used as the electron donor (D) and acceptor (A), respectively. Both materials were mixed and dissolved in dichlorobenzene with three different D:A ratios i.e. 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 (weight) while maintained at the concentration of 2 wt% (26 mg/ml). The blended thin films were sandwiched between the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and the aluminum film. This paper reports the influence of donor:acceptor ratio on the performance of solar cell devices measured by current-voltage measurement both in the dark and under 1.5 AM solar illumination. It was found that all devices showed the photovoltaic effect with poor diode behavior and the donor:acceptor ratio significantly influenced on the performance of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

  6. The Bacterial Fermentation Product Butyrate Influences Epithelial Signaling via Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Changes in Cullin-1 Neddylation1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amrita; Wu, Huixia; Collier-Hyams, Lauren S.; Kwon, Young-Man; Hanson, Jason M.; Neish, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    The human enteric flora plays a significant role in intestinal health and disease. Populations of enteric bacteria can inhibit the NF-κB pathway by blockade of IκB-α ubiquitination, a process catalyzed by the E3-SCFβ-TrCP ubiquitin ligase. The activity of this ubiquitin ligase is regulated via covalent modification of the Cullin-1 subunit by the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. We previously reported that interaction of viable commensal bacteria with mammalian intestinal epithelial cells resulted in a rapid and reversible generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that modulated neddylation of Cullin-1 and resulted in suppressive effects on the NF-κB pathway. Herein, we demonstrate that butyrate and other short chain fatty acids supplemented to model human intestinal epithelia in vitro and human tissue ex vivo results in loss of neddylated Cul-1 and show that physiological concentrations of butyrate modulate the ubiquitination and degradation of a target of the E3-SCFβ-TrCP ubiquitin ligase, the NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α. Mechanistically, we show that physiological concentrations of butyrate induces reactive oxygen species that transiently alters the intracellular redox balance and results in inactivation of the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12 in a manner similar to effects mediated by viable bacteria. Because the normal flora produces significant amounts of butyrate and other short chain fatty acids, these data provide a functional link between a natural product of the intestinal normal flora and important epithelial inflammatory and proliferative signaling pathways. PMID:19109186

  7. The dietary histone deacetylase inhibitor sulforaphane induces human β-defensin-2 in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Markus; Reynders, Veerle; Loitsch, Stefan; Steinhilber, Dieter; Schröder, Oliver; Stein, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides like human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) play an important role in the innate immune system protecting the intestinal mucosa against bacterial invasion. The dietary histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors sulforaphane (SFN) and butyrate have received a great deal of attention because of their ability to simultaneously modulate multiple cellular targets involved in cellular protection. In this study the influence of SFN and butyrate on HBD-2 expression as well as the molecular pathways involved in SFN-mediated induction of HBD-2 were scrutinized. Treatment of Caco-2, HT-29 and SW480 cells with SFN led to a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of HBD-2 mRNA expression as determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Moreover, HBD-2 protein production increased in response to SFN, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Induction of HBD-2 was also observed in response to butyrate. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the protein was localized in the cytosol. Coincubation of SFN with a vitamin D receptor (VDR), or an extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 or a nuclear factor-κB inhibitor all reduced HBD-2 mRNA upregulation. In contrast, transfection of cells with a dominant-negative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) mutant vector to inhibit PPARγ wild-type action and inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling did not affect SFN-mediated upregulation of HBD-2 mRNA. Moreover, SFN induced the expression of VDR, PPARγ and phosphorylated ERK1/2 but did not affect p38 MAPK activation. The data clearly demonstrate for the first time that the dietary HDAC inhibitor SFN is able to induce antimicrobial peptides in colonocytes. In this process HBD-2 expression is regulated via VDR, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase and nuclear factor-κB signalling. PMID:18373608

  8. Functional and Molecular Effects of Arginine Butyrate and Prednisone on Muscle and Heart in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guerron, Alfredo D.; Rawat, Rashmi; Sali, Arpana; Spurney, Christopher F.; Pistilli, Emidio; Cha, Hee-Jae; Pandey, Gouri S.; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Francia, Dwight; Farajian, Viken; Escolar, Diana M.; Bossi, Laura; Becker, Magali; Zerr, Patricia; de la Porte, Sabine; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Partridge, Terence; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2010-01-01

    Background The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 months, beginning at 3 months of age, and have comprehensively evaluated the functional, biochemical, histological, and molecular effects of the treatments in this DMD model. Arginine butyrate treatment improved grip strength and decreased fibrosis in the gastrocnemius muscle, but did not produce significant improvement in muscle and cardiac histology, heart function, behavioral measurements, or serum creatine kinase levels. In contrast, 6 months of chronic continuous prednisone treatment resulted in deterioration in functional, histological, and biochemical measures. Arginine butyrate-treated mice gene expression profiling experiments revealed that several genes that control cell proliferation, growth and differentiation are differentially expressed consistent with its histone deacetylase inhibitory activity when compared to control (saline-treated) mdx mice. Prednisone and combination treated groups showed alterations in the expression of genes that control fibrosis, inflammation, myogenesis and atrophy. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that 6 months treatment with arginine butyrate can produce modest beneficial effects on dystrophic pathology in mdx mice by reducing fibrosis and promoting muscle function while chronic continuous treatment with prednisone showed deleterious effects to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of multiple assays systems to monitor both beneficial and toxic effects of drugs with broad range of in vivo

  9. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effect of sodium butyrate preconditioning during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    HU, XIAORONG; ZHANG, KAI; XU, CHANGWU; CHEN, ZHIQAING; JIANG, HONG

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has an important role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has been shown to inhibit HMGB1 expression. In the present study, the effect of sodium butyrate on myocardial I/R injury in rats was investigated. Anesthetized male rats were intraperitoneally administered sodium butyrate (100 or 300 mg/kg) 30 min prior to the induction of ischemia. The rats were then subjected to ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 4 h. Infarct size, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were then measured. The expression of HMGB1 was assessed using western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that pretreatment with sodium butyrate (300 mg/kg) significantly reduced the infarct size, as well as the levels of LDH and CK (P<0.05). In addition, sodium butyrate (300 mg/kg) was shown to significantly inhibit the I/R-induced increase in the level of MDA and reduction in the level of SOD (P<0.05). Furthermore, treatment with sodium butyrate (300 mg/kg) was found to significantly inhibit the expression of TNF-α, IL-6 and HMGB1 induced by I/R injury (P<0.05). In conclusion, the results from the present study suggest that preconditioning with sodium butyrate may attenuate myocardial I/R injury by inhibition of the expression of inflammatory mediators during myocardial I/R. PMID:24944626

  11. The hypophagic response to heat stress is not mediated by GPR109A or peripheral β-OH butyrate.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Chelsea; Foy, Caroline E; Higgins, Mark R; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-05-15

    Rising temperatures resulting from climate change will increase the incidence of heat stress, negatively impacting the labor force and food animal production. Heat stress elevates circulating β-OH butyrate, which induces vasodilation through GPR109a. Interestingly, both heat stress and intraperitoneal β-OH butyrate administration induce hypophagia. Thus, we aimed to investigate the role of β-OH butyrate in heat stress hypophagia in mice. We found that niacin, a β-OH butyrate mimetic that cannot be oxidized to generate ATP, also reduces food intake. Interestingly, the depression in food intake as a result of 8-h intraperitoneal niacin or 48-h heat exposure did not result from changes in hypothalamic expression of orexigenic or anorexigenic signals (AgRP, NPY, or POMC). Genetically eliminating GPR109a expression did not prevent the hypophagic response to heat exposure, intraperitoneal β-OH butyrate (5.7 mmol/kg), or niacin (0.8 mmol/kg). Hepatic vagotomy eliminated the hypophagic response to β-OH butyrate and niacin but did not affect the hypophagic response to heat exposure. We subsequently hypothesized that the hypophagic response to heat stress may depend on direct effects of β-OH butyrate at the central nervous system: β-OH butyrate induced hormonal changes (hyperinsulinemia, hypercorticosteronemia, and hyperleptinemia), or gene expression changes. To test these possibilities, we blocked expression of hepatic hydroxyl methyl glutaryl CoA synthase II (HMGCS2) to prevent hepatic β-OH butyrate synthesis. Mice that lack HMGCS2 maintain a hypophagic response to heat stress. Herein, we establish that the hypophagia of heat stress is independent of GPR109a, the hepatic vagus afferent nerve, and hepatic ketone body synthesis. PMID:26936786

  12. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  13. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and aspirin interact synergistically to induce cell death in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Hüls, Isabel; Sigler, Michael; Palani, Chithra D; Hong, Le Thi Thu; Völker, Uwe; Kroemer, Heyo K; Beck, James F

    2008-07-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin show promise as antineoplastic agents. The treatment with both HDIs and aspirin can result in hyperacetylation of proteins. In this study, we investigated whether HDIs and aspirin interacted in inducing anticancer activity and histone acetylation. We found that the HDIs, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and sodium butyrate, and aspirin cooperated to induce cell death in the ovarian cancer cell line, A2780. The effect was synergistic, as evidenced by CI-isobologram analysis. However, aspirin had no effect on histone acetylation, neither in the absence nor presence of HDIs. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying the synergistic action of HDIs and aspirin, we employed the deacetylated metabolite of aspirin, salicylic acid, and the cyclooxygenase-1- and -2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and NS-398, respectively. We found that HDIs and salicylic acid interacted synergistically, albeit less efficiently than HDIs and aspirin, to induce cancer cell death, suggesting that the acetyl and the salicyl moiety contributed to the cooperative interaction of aspirin with HDIs. SC-560 and NS-398 had little effect both when applied alone or in conjunction with HDIs, indicating that the combinatorial effect of HDIs and aspirin was not the result of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that HDIs and aspirin synergize to induce cancer cell death and, thus, provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the potential of combining HDIs and aspirin as a strategy for anticancer therapy. PMID:18575740

  15. Butyrate delivered by butyrylated starch increases distal colonic epithelial apoptosis in carcinogen-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Julie M; Young, Graeme P; Topping, David L; Bird, Anthony R; Cobiac, Lynne; Scherer, Benjamin L; Winkler, Jessica G; Lockett, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    Animal studies show that increasing large bowel butyrate concentration through ingestion of butyrylated or resistant starches opposes carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, which is consistent with population data linking greater fiber consumption with lowered colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Butyrate has been shown to regulate the apoptotic response to DNA damage. This study examined the impact of increasing large bowel butyrate concentration by dietary butyrylated starch on the colonic epithelium of rats treated with the genotoxic carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Four groups of 10 male rats were fed AIN-93G based-diets containing either low amylose maize starch (LAMS), LAMS with 3% tributyrin, 10% high amylose maize starch (HAMS) or 10% butyrylated HAMS (HAMSB). HAMS and HAMSB starches were cooked by heating in water. After 4 weeks, rats were injected once with AOM and killed 6 h later. Rates of apoptosis and proliferation were measured in colonic epithelium. Short-chain fatty acid concentrations in large bowel digesta and hepatic portal venous plasma were higher in HAMSB than all other groups. Apoptotic rates in the distal colon were increased by HAMSB and correlated with luminal butyrate concentrations but cellular proliferation rates were unaffected by diet. The increase in apoptosis was most marked in the base and proliferative zone of the crypt. Regulation of luminal butyrate using HAMSB increases the rates of apoptotic deletion of DNA-damaged colonocytes. We propose this pro-apoptotic function of butyrate plays a major role reducing tumour formation in the AOM-treated rat and that these data support a potential protective role of butyrate in CRC. PMID:22080572

  16. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  17. Multi-scale Modeling Study of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6 6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester Towards Organic Photovoltaic Cell Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hanjong; Kim, Ki Chul; Jang, Seung Soon

    2015-03-01

    To date, organic photovoltaic cells have gained attention due to their promising potential in the industry. Its efficiency needs to be improved through constructing better morphologies. There are three morphological quantities that affect the efficiency. The domain size of the electron donor phase has to be small and the interface-to-volume ratio of the blend must be large. The percolation ratio has to be high. To investigate the morphological properties of the active layer systems, the state-of-the-art multi-scale modeling is employed. In this study, P3HT and PCBM blends have used as our active layer candidates. We have developed our own force field parameters to accurately describe potential energy surfaces in the layer systems. Subsequently, coarse-grained force field for P3HT and PCBM have been developed based on the improved atomistic force field parameters in order to simulate larger systems. The results from coarse-grained models are validated through the comparison with those from the full atomistic models. Using the molecular dynamics simulations, the newly developed coarse-grained models will be further used to study how the crystallinity of P3HT affects the morphological properties in the active layers.

  18. Feed-drug interaction of orally applied butyrate and phenobarbital on hepatic cytochrome P450 activity in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mátis, G; Kulcsár, A; Petrilla, J; Hermándy-Berencz, K; Neogrády, Zs

    2016-08-01

    The expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes may be affected by several nutrition-derived compounds, such as by the commonly applied feed additive butyrate, possibly leading to feed-drug interactions. The aim of this study was to provide some evidence if butyrate can alter the activity of hepatic CYPs in chickens exposed to CYP-inducing xenobiotics, monitoring for the first time the possibility of such interaction. Ross 308 chickens in the grower phase were treated with daily intracoelomal phenobarbital (PB) injection (80 mg/kg BW), applied as a non-specific CYP-inducer, simultaneously with two different doses of intra-ingluvial sodium butyrate boluses (0.25 and 1.25 g/kg BW) for 5 days. Activity of CYP2H and CYP3A subfamilies was assessed by specific enzyme assays from isolated liver microsomes. According to our results, the lower dose of orally administered butyrate significantly attenuated the PB-triggered elevation of both hepatic CYP2H and CYP3A activities, which might be in association with the partly common signalling pathways of butyrate and CYP-inducing drugs, such as that of PB. Based on these data, butyrate may take part in pharmacoepigenetic interactions with simultaneously applied drugs or other CYP-inducing xenobiotics, with possible consequences for food safety and pharmacotherapy. Butyrate was found to be capable to maintain physiological CYP activity by attenuating CYP induction, underlining the safety of butyrate application in poultry nutrition. PMID:26614344

  19. Butyrate modulates antioxidant enzyme expression in malignant and non-malignant human colon tissues.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Franziska; Wilhelm, Anne; Jablonowski, Nadja; Mothes, Henning; Greulich, Karl Otto; Glei, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The induction of antioxidant enzymes is an important mechanism in colon cancer chemoprevention, but the response of human colon tissue to butyrate, a gut fermentation product derived from dietary fiber, remains largely unknown. Therefore, our study investigated the effect of a butyrate treatment on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in matched human colon tissues of different transformation stages (n = 3-15 in each group) ex vivo. By performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and spectrophotometric measurements, we found an increase in SOD2 at expression and activity level in colonic adenocarcinomas (mRNA: 1.96-fold; protein: 1.41-fold, activity: 1.8-fold; P < 0.05). No difference was detectable for CAT between normal, adenoma, and carcinoma colon tissues. Treatment of normal colon epithelium (12 h) with a physiologically relevant concentration of butyrate (10 mM) resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CAT mRNA (1.24-fold) and protein (1.39-fold), without affecting the enzymatic activity. Consequently, preliminary experiments failed to show any protective effect of butyrate against H2 O2 -mediated DNA damage. Despite a significantly lowered SOD2 transcript (0.51-fold, P < 0.01) and, to a lesser extent, protein level (0.86-fold) after butyrate exposure of normal colon cells, the catalytic activity was significantly enhanced (1.19-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting an increased protection against tissue superoxide radicals. In malignant tissues, greater variations in response to butyrate were observed. Furthermore, both enzymes showed an age-dependent decrease in activity in normal colon epithelium (CAT: r = -0.49, P = 0.09; SOD2: r = -0.58, P = 0.049). In conclusion, butyrate exhibited potential antioxidant features ex vivo but cellular consequences need to be investigated more in depth. PMID:24677319

  20. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  1. New holographic polymeric composition based on plexiglass, polyvinyl butyral, and phenanthrenquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusevich, Vladislav; Tolstik, Elen; Kowarschik, Richard; Egorova, Elena; Matusevich, Yuri I.; Krul, Leonid

    2013-05-01

    The newly developed Plexiglas films containing polyvinyl butyral resins and phenanthrenequinone molecules as photosensitive dopant, which are proposed for the practical application as interlayer of laminated safety glass, are shown for the first time. The injection of the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate) into the polyvinyl butyral protective interlayer provides a homogenous distribution of the recording holographic medium in the layer and allows fixing the entire surface grating in the laminated glass. In addition, the original properties of polyvinyl butyral as a connecting material were preserved during manufacturing of the laminated glass. This allows a recording of holographic structures directly after baking of the laminated glass, thus reducing the destruction of the gratings due to the elevated temperatures. The diffractive structures in phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral polymeric layers with thicknesses of hundreds of microns are sealed between two panels of glass (so-called laminated glass) and are generated by illumination with an Argon-laser of 514 nm. Efficiently fixed and long-term stable holographic gratings recorded in the phenanthrenequinone-poly(methyl methacrylate)-polyvinyl butyral layer enable to produce transparent laminated glass with inserted diffractive elements, which can be used e.g. for Head-up Displays in automobile windshields or as holographic light concentrators for solar cells.

  2. Ciprofloxacin Affects Host Cells by Suppressing Expression of the Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides Cathelicidins and Beta-Defensin-3 in Colon Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Protim; Mily, Akhirunnesa; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Jalal, Shah; Bergman, Peter; Raqib, Rubhana; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics exert several effects on host cells including regulation of immune components. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), e.g., cathelicidins and defensins display multiple functions in innate immunity. In colonic mucosa, cathelicidins are induced by butyrate, a bacterial fermentation product. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotics on butyrate-induced expression of cathelicidins and beta-defensins in colon epithelial cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin and clindamycin reduce butyrate-induced transcription of the human cathelicidin LL-37 in the colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. Suppression of LL-37 peptide/protein by ciprofloxacin was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that ciprofloxacin suppresses the rabbit cathelicidin CAP-18 in rectal epithelia of healthy and butyrate-treated Shigella-infected rabbits. Ciprofloxacin also down-regulated butyrate-induced transcription of the human beta-defensin-3 in HT-29 cells. Microarray analysis of HT-29 cells revealed upregulation by butyrate with subsequent down-regulation by ciprofloxacin of additional genes encoding immune factors. Dephosphorylation of histone H3, an epigenetic event provided a possible mechanism of the suppressive effect of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, LL-37 peptide inhibited Clostridium difficile growth in vitro. In conclusion, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin exert immunomodulatory function by down-regulating AMPs and other immune components in colonic epithelial cells. Suppression of AMPs may contribute to the overgrowth of C. difficile, causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea. PMID:27025750

  3. Direct block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel by butyrate and phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P

    2001-01-12

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is inhibited by a broad range of intracellular organic anions. Here it is shown, using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines, that the fatty acids butyrate and 4-phenylbutyrate cause a voltage-dependent block of CFTR Cl(-) currents when applied to the cytoplasmic face of membrane patches, with apparent K(d)s (at 0 mV) of 29.6 mM for butyrate and 6.6 mM for 4-phenylbutyrate. At the single channel level, both these fatty acids caused an apparent reduction in CFTR current amplitude, suggesting a kinetically fast blocking mechanism. The concentration-dependence of block suggests that CFTR-mediated Cl(-) currents in vivo may be affected by both 4-phenylbutyrate used in the treatment of various diseases, including cystic fibrosis, and by butyrate produced endogenously within the colonic lumen. PMID:11164382

  4. Inhibition of HDAC increases the senescence induced by natural polyphenols in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Vargas, José E; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo C; Suhre, Tais; Kipper, Franciele C; Bonatto, Diego; Lenz, Guido

    2014-08-01

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible block of cellular division, and induction of senescence is being considered for treatment of many cancer types, mainly those resistant to classical pro-apoptotic therapies. Resveratrol (Rsv) and quercetin (Quer), two natural polyphenols, are able to induce senescence in different cancer models, including gliomas, the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor. These polyphenols modulate the activity of several proteins involved in cell growth and death in cancer cells, including histone deacetylases (HDAC), but the role of HDAC in senescence induced by Rsv and Quer is unclear. The HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB) potentiated the pro-senescent effect of Rsv and Quer in human and rat glioma cell lines but not in normal rat astrocytes. Furthermore, the increment of Quer-induced senescence by NaB was accompanied by an increase of reactive oxygen species levels and an increment of the number of cells with nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, these data support a positive role of HDAC inhibition on the senescence induced by these polyphenols, and therefore co-treatment of HDAC inhibitors and polyphenols emerges as a potential alternative for gliomas. PMID:25070040

  5. Addition of 2-deoxyglucose enhances growth inhibition but reverses acidification in colon cancer cells treated with phenformin.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Chacko, Jerel; Bolikal, Sandhya; Hong, Ji Y; Chung, Ryan; Ortega, Andres; desbordes, Charles

    2011-02-01

    A report that effects of butyrate on some cells may be mediated by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) prompted this study which examines if other AMPK activators can induce differentiation and inhibit proliferation of colon cancer cells in a manner similar to butyrate. Using induction of alkaline phosphatase as a marker, it was observed that compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, is able to reduce the differentiating effect of butyrate on SW1116 and Caco-2 colon cancer cells. Metformin was observed to be less effective than butyrate in the induction of alkaline phosphatase but was more effective as a growth inhibitor. Phenformin was found to be a more potent growth inhibitor than metformin and both compounds cause acidification of the medium when incubated with colon cancer cells. Combined incubation of 2-deoxyglucose with either of the biguanides prevented the acidification of the medium but enhanced the growth inhibitory effects. PMID:21378320

  6. Increased growth of Bifidobacterium and Eubacterium by germinated barley foodstuff, accompanied by enhanced butyrate production in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kanauchi, O; Fujiyama, Y; Mitsuyama, K; Araki, Y; Ishii, T; Nakamura, T; Hitomi, Y; Agata, K; Saiki, T; Andoh, A; Toyonaga, A; Bamba, T

    1999-02-01

    Germinated barley foodstuff (GBF) derived from the aleurone and scutellum fractions of germinated barley mainly consists of low-lignified hemicellulose and glutamine-rich protein. GBF improves the proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells and defecation, through the bacterial production of short chain fatty acids (SCFA), especially butyrate. In this study we investigated the mechanism of production of butyrate by microflora in humans and in vitro. Daily administration of 9 g GBF for 14 successive days significantly increased fecal butyrate content. Fecal Bifidobacterium and Eubacterium were also significantly increased by GBF administration in healthy volunteers. Ten anaerobic micro-organisms selected from intestinal microflora were cultured in vitro in the medium containing GBF as a sole carbon source (GBF medium). After a 3-day incubation, 7 strains (Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei, Bacteroides ovatus, Clostridium butyricum, and Eubacterium limosum) lowered the medium pH producing SCFA. Eubacterium grown together with Bifidobacterium in GBF medium efficiently produced butyrate. On the other hand, GBF changed the intestinal microflora and increased probiotics such as Bifidobacterium in the intestinal tract. As a result, butyrate was produced by the mutual action of Eubacterium and Bifidobacterium. This butyrate is considered to enhance the proliferation of colonic epithelial cells. PMID:9917526

  7. Propionic acid secreted from propionibacteria induces NKG2D ligand expression on human-activated T lymphocytes and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Lars; Hansen, Karen Aagaard; Jensen, Helle; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Stougaard, Peter; Hansen, Helle Rüsz; Jurlander, Jesper; Skov, Søren

    2009-07-15

    We found that propionic acid secreted from propionibacteria induces expression of the NKG2D ligands MICA/B on activated T lymphocytes and different cancer cells, without affecting MICA/B expression on resting peripheral blood cells. Growth supernatant from propionibacteria or propionate alone could directly stimulate functional MICA/B surface expression and MICA promoter activity by a mechanism dependent on intracellular calcium. Deletion and point mutations further demonstrated that a GC-box motif around -110 from the MICA transcription start site is essential for propionate-mediated MICA promoter activity. Other short-chain fatty acids such as lactate, acetate, and butyrate could also induce MICA/B expression. We observed a striking difference in the molecular signaling pathways that regulate MICA/B. A functional glycolytic pathway was essential for MICA/B expression after exposure to propionate and CMV. In contrast, compounds with histone deacetylase-inhibitory activity such as butyrate and FR901228 stimulated MICA/B expression through a pathway that was not affected by inhibition of glycolysis, clearly suggesting that MICA/B is regulated through different molecular mechanisms. We propose that propionate, produced either by bacteria or during cellular metabolism, has significant immunoregulatory function and may be cancer prophylactic. PMID:19553547

  8. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  9. Recent Developments in β-Cell Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells Induced by Small and Large Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S. Suresh; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.; Singh, A. J. A. Ranjith; Peng, I-Chia; Priya, Sivan Padma; Hamat, Rukman Awang; Higuchi, Akon

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), hold promise as novel therapeutic tools for diabetes treatment because of their self-renewal capacity and ability to differentiate into beta (β)-cells. Small and large molecules play important roles in each stage of β-cell differentiation from both hESCs and hiPSCs. The small and large molecules that are described in this review have significantly advanced efforts to cure diabetic disease. Lately, effective protocols have been implemented to induce hESCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into functional β-cells. Several small molecules, proteins, and growth factors promote pancreatic differentiation from hESCs and hMSCs. These small molecules (e.g., cyclopamine, wortmannin, retinoic acid, and sodium butyrate) and large molecules (e.g. activin A, betacellulin, bone morphogentic protein (BMP4), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), noggin, transforming growth factor (TGF-α), and WNT3A) are thought to contribute from the initial stages of definitive endoderm formation to the final stages of maturation of functional endocrine cells. We discuss the importance of such small and large molecules in uniquely optimized protocols of β-cell differentiation from stem cells. A global understanding of various small and large molecules and their functions will help to establish an efficient protocol for β-cell differentiation. PMID:25526563

  10. Proteins implicated in the increase of adhesivity induced by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Grebeňová, D; Röselová, P; Pluskalová, M; Halada, P; Rösel, D; Suttnar, J; Brodská, B; Otevřelová, P; Kuželová, K

    2012-12-21

    We have previously shown that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) treatment increases the adhesivity of leukemic cells to fibronectin at clinically relevant concentrations. Now, we present the results of the proteomic analysis of SAHA effects on leukemic cell lines using 2-DE and ProteomLab PF2D system. Histone acetylation at all studied acetylation sites reached the maximal level after 5 to 10 h of SAHA treatment. No difference in histone acetylation between subtoxic and toxic SAHA doses was observed. SAHA treatment induced cofilin phosphorylation at Ser3, an increase in vimentin and paxillin expression and a decrease in stathmin expression as confirmed by western-blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. The interaction of cofilin with 14-3-3 epsilon was documented using both Duolink system and coimmunoprecipitation. However, this interaction was independent of cofilin Ser3 phosphorylation and the amount of 14-3-3-ε-bound cofilin did not rise following SAHA treatment. SAHA-induced increase in the cell adhesivity was associated with an increase in PAK phosphorylation in CML-T1 cells and was abrogated by simultaneous treatment with IPA-3, a PAK inhibitor. The effects of SAHA on JURL-MK1 cells were similar to those of other histone deacetylase inhibitors, tubastatin A and sodium butyrate. The proteome analysis also revealed several potential non-histone targets of histone deacetylases. PMID:23022583

  11. Enhanced production of IL-18 in butyrate-treated intestinal epithelium by stimulation of the proximal promoter region.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Uwe; Koyama, Noriko; Hosoda, Tomoko; Nuernberger, Heike; Sato, Kazuto; Hoelzer, Dieter; Herweck, Frank; Manigold, Tobias; Singer, Manfred V; Rossol, Siegbert; Böcker, Ulrich

    2002-09-01

    Expression of IL-18 in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) has been implicated in Th1 cell-mediated chronic intestinal inflammation and anti-tumor immunity. However, physiological regulatory factors have not been identified. Besides their effects on proliferation and restitution, immunomodulatory functions have been attributed to short chain fatty acids (SCFA). We investigated the effect of SCFA (butyrate, propionate, acetate) on expression of IL-18 in IEC in vitro and in vivo. Expression of IL-18 mRNA and protein in human carcinoma-derived HT-29 and Caco-2 cells was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot. Transcriptional regulation of IL-18 gene expression was determined by transient transfection of wild-type and mutated IL-18 promoter. Further, in vivo expression of IL-18 in the intestine from butyrate-treated and untreated mice was assessed by immunohistochemistry. IL-18 mRNA and the IL-18 protein were expressed in IEC, while IL-18 secretion was not observed. Butyrate and acetate increased intracellular IL-18 content in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. In contrast to proinflammatory stimuli butyrate potently activated the IL-18 promoter, indicating that IL-18 is regulated at the transcriptional level by SCFA. Furthermore, a 108-bp sequence in the proximal region was identified to be essential for IL-18 promoter activation by butyrate. As proof of principle butyrate effects were confirmed in vivo by demonstration of increased IL-18 protein expression in IEC from butyrate-treated mice. In conclusion, SCFA up-regulate IL-18 protein expression in IEC, suggesting a potential regulatory contribution of these luminal constituents to T cell mediated inflammatory and neoplastic intestinal conditions. PMID:12207348

  12. Protective role of taurine against morphine-induced neurotoxicity in C6 cells via inhibition of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiaqing; Li, Yan; Yan, Guangyan; Bu, Qian; Lv, Lei; Yang, Yanzhu; Zhao, Jinxuan; Shao, Xue; Deng, Yi; Zhu, Ruimin; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2011-11-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the protective role of taurine (2-aminoethanesulphonicacid) against morphine-induced neurotoxicity in C6 cells. It was found that taurine significantly increased the viability of C6 cells treated by morphine, showing the neuroprotective role against morphine-induced neurotoxicity. However, such neuroprotective effect of taurine could not be blocked by bicuculline, an antagonist of gamma-amino butyrate (GABA) receptor. To determine the oxidative damage induced by morphine, the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were measured in C6 cells. The decreased activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx in C6 cells were observed after morphine treatment for 48 h. However, taurine administration effectively ameliorated morphine-induced oxidative insult. To estimate anti-apoptosis effect of taurine, flow cytometry analysis as well as detection for caspase-3 and Bcl-2 expressions was performed after morphine exposure for 48 h. It was found that Bcl-2 expression was down regulated by morphine, whereas taurine could reverse morphine-induced decrease in Bcl-2 expression. Taurine showed no effect on caspase-3 expression. Collectively, the results show that taurine possesses the capability to ameliorate morphine-induced oxidative insult and apoptosis in C6 cells, probably due to its antioxidant activity rather than activation of GABA receptors. PMID:21611853

  13. Fibrinogen induces endothelial cell permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Roberts, Andrew M.; Dean, William L.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by an increased blood content of fibrinogen (Fg), a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein. Fg is a biomarker of inflammation and its degradation products have been associated with microvascular leakage. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases endothelial cell (EC) permeability through extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and by inducing F-actin formation. In cultured ECs, Fg binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and to α5β1 integrin, caused phosphorylation of ERK. Subsequently, F-actin formation increased and coincided with formation of gaps between ECs, which corresponded with increased permeability of ECs to albumin. Our data suggest that formation of F-actin and gaps may be the mechanism for increased albumin leakage through the EC monolayer. The present study indicates that elevated un-degraded Fg may be a factor causing microvascular permeability that typically accompanies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:17849175

  14. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  15. Short-chain fatty acids induce cytoskeletal and extracellular protein modifications associated with modulation of proliferation on primary culture of rat intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Le Blay, G; Blottière, H M; Ferrier, L; Le Foll, E; Bonnet, C; Galmiche, J P; Cherbut, C

    2000-08-01

    Short-chain fatty acids are the main end products of bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates. Their role on the metabolism and biology of colonocytes is now well characterized. However, the functional consequences of their presence on intestinal smooth muscle cells remain poorly studied. We aimed to assess the effect of different short-chain fatty acids on ileal and colonic smooth muscle cells in primary culture and on A7R5 line. Butyrate (above 0.1 mM) inhibited A7R5 cell proliferation, while at low concentration (0.05 to 0.5 mM) butyrate significantly stimulated the proliferation of ileal and colonic myocytes in primary culture. An inhibition was observed at higher concentrations. Collagenous and noncollagenous protein synthesis was stimulated by butyrate. Moreover, butyrate stimulated actin and myosin expression. Thus, butyrate, which is produced by dietary fiber fermentation, may affect intestinal muscles by directly acting at the molecular level on myocytes. PMID:11007115

  16. Human c-fgr induces a monocyte-specific enzyme in NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kazushi; Akiyama, Tetsu; Toyoshima, Kumao ); Wongsasant, Budsaba )

    1991-12-01

    The mutant c-fgr protein (p58{sup c-fgr/F523}) containing Phe-523 instead of Tyr-523 exhibited transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells like other protein-tyrosine kinases of the src family, but normal p58{sup c-fgr} (p58{sup c-fgr/wt}) did not. The mutant protein showed tyrosine kinase activity threefold higher than that of the normal protein in vitro. Surprisingly, transfection of the normal c-fgr gene into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in induction of sodium fluoride (NaF)-sensitive {alpha}-naphthyl butyrate esterase ({alpha}-NBE), marker enzyme of cells of monocytic origin, which was not induced in v-src-, v-fgr-, or lyn-transfected NIH 3T3 cells. The NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE induced in c-fgr transfectants was shown by isoelectric focusing to have a pI of 5.2 to 5.4, a range which was the same as those for thioglycolate-induced murine peritoneal macrophages and 1{alpha}, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-treated WEHI-3B cells. Immunoblotting studies with antophosphotyrosine antibodies revealed that 58-, 62-, 75-, 120-, 200-, and 230-kDa proteins were commonly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in cells transfected with the mutated c-fgr. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of specific cellular substrate proteins is important in induction of NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE and cell transformation by p58{sup c-fgr}.

  17. Capsaicin induces immunogenic cell death in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Peng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is characterized by the early surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT). As a specific signaling molecule, CRT on the surface of apoptotic tumor cells mediates the recognition and phagocytosis of tumor cells by antigen presenting cells. To date, only a small quantity of anti-cancer chemicals have been found to induce ICD, therefore it is clinically important to identify novel chemicals that may induce ICD. The purpose of the present study is to explore the function of capsaicin in inducing ICD. In the current study, MTT assays were used to examine the growth inhibiting effects of MG-63 cells when they were treated with capsaicin or cisplatin. Mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis were used to investigate capsaicin- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, the effects of capsaicin and cisplatin were evaluated for their abilities in inducing calreticulin membrane translocation and mediating ICD in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63). The results demonstrated that capsaicin and cisplatin can induce the apoptosis of MG-63 cells. However, only capsaicin induced a rapid translocation of CRT from the intracellular space to the cell surface. Treatment with capsaicin increased phagocytosis of MG-63 cells by dendritic cells (DCs), and these MG-63-loaded DCs could efficiently stimulate the secretion of IFN-γ by lymphocytes. These results identify capsaicin as an anti-cancer agent capable of inducing ICD in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. PMID:27446273

  18. Short-chain fatty acid-initiated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells is linked to mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Heerdt, B G; Houston, M A; Augenlicht, L H

    1997-05-01

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced during microbial fermentation of fiber, induces growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells in vitro, and our prior work has shown that this induction is tightly linked to mitochondrial activity. Here we demonstrate that 12 h following induction, SW620 human colonic carcinoma cells accumulate simultaneously in G0-G1 and G2-M of the cell cycle. Four h later, during this G0-G1 to G2-M arrest, cells begin to undergo apoptosis. Using a series of unrelated agents that modulate mitochondrial functions, we demonstrate that mitochondrial electron transport and membrane potential are critical in initiation of this butyrate-mediated growth arrest and apoptosis. Colonic tumorigenesis is characterized by abnormalities in proliferation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial activities. Thus, butyrate may reduce risk for colon cancer by inducing a pathway that enhances mitochondrial function, ultimately resulting in initiation of growth arrest and apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells. PMID:9149903

  19. Simultaneous Clostridial fermentation, lipase-catalyzed esterification, and ester extraction to enrich diesel with butyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Corjan; Heeres, Arjan S; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of 1-butanol from fermentation broth is energy-intensive since typical concentrations in fermentation broth are below 20 g L(-1). To prevent butanol inhibition and high downstream processing costs, we aimed at producing butyl esters instead of 1-butanol. It is shown that it is possible to perform simultaneously clostridial fermentation, esterification of the formed butanol to butyl butyrate, and extraction of this ester by hexadecane. The very high partition coefficient of butyl butyrate pulls the esterification towards the product side even at fermentation pH and relatively low butanol concentrations. The hexadecane extractant is a model diesel compound and is nontoxic to the cells. If butyl butyrate enriched diesel can directly be used as car fuel, no product recovery is required. A proof-of-principle experiment for the one-pot bio-ester production from glucose led to 5 g L(-1) butyl butyrate in the hexadecane phase. The principle may be extended to a wide range of esters, especially to longer chain ones. PMID:22833369

  20. Reductive Carboxylation of Propionate to Butyrate in Methanogenic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Tholozan, J. L.; Samain, E.; Grivet, J. P.; Moletta, R.; Dubourguier, H. C.; Albagnac, G.

    1988-01-01

    During the batch degradation of sodium propionate by the anaerobic sludge from an industrial digestor, we observed a significant amount of butyrate formation. Varying the initial propionate concentrations did not alter the ratio of maximal butyrate accumulation to initial propionate concentration within a large range. By measuring the decrease in the radioactivity of [1-14C]butyrate during propionate degradation, we estimated that about 20% of the propionate was converted to butyrate. Labeled butyrate was formed from [1-14C]propionate with the same specific radioactivity, suggesting a possible direct pathway from propionate to butyrate. We confirmed this hypothesis by nuclear magnetic resonance studies with [13C]propionate. The results showed that [1-13C]-, [2-13C]-, and [3-13C]propionate were converted to [2-13C]-, [3-13C]-, and [4-13C]butyrate, respectively, demonstrating the direct carboxylation on the carboxyl group of propionate without randomization of the other two carbons. In addition, we observed an exchange reaction between C-2 and C-3 of the propionate, indicating that acetogensis may proceed through a randomizing pathway. The physiological significance and importance of various metabolic pathways involved in propionate degradation are discussed, and an unusual pathway of butyrate synthesis is proposed. PMID:16347557

  1. Isolation of unique butyrate-producing bacteria from swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate-producing bacteria in humans contribute to a healthy gastrointestinal tract and are known to be species from clostridial clusters IV, IX, XIVa, and XVI - with the community dominated by clusters XIVa and IV. However, the composition of the butyrate-producing bacterial community in swine is...

  2. Increased Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure Is Associated With Altered Gut Microbiota Composition and Butyrate Production in Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Arango, Luisa F; Barrett, Helen L; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Morrison, Mark; Dekker Nitert, Marloes

    2016-10-01

    The risk of developing pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia is higher in obese pregnant women. In obesity, the composition of the gut microbiota is altered. Obesity is also associated with low-grade inflammation. Metabolites from the gut microbiota may contribute to both hypertension and inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the composition of the gut microbiota in overweight and obese pregnant women is associated with blood pressure and levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The composition of the gut microbiota was determined with 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing in 205 women at 16 weeks gestation from the SPRING study (the Study of Probiotics in Gestational Diabetes). Expression of butyrate-producing genes in the gut microbiota was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were measured in fasting serum of a subset of 70 women. Blood pressure was slightly but significantly higher in obese compared with overweight women. The abundance of the butyrate-producing genus Odoribacter was inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure. Butyrate production capacity was decreased, but plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations increased in obese pregnant women. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were inversely correlated with expression of butyrate kinase and Odoribacter abundance. This study shows that in overweight and obese pregnant women at 16 weeks gestation, the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and butyrate production in the gut microbiota is significantly negatively associated with blood pressure and with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels. Increasing butyrate-producing capacity may contribute to maintenance of normal blood pressure in obese pregnant women. PMID:27528065

  3. Sodium butyrate alleviates adipocyte inflammation by inhibiting NLRP3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xukai; He, Gang; Peng, Yan; Zhong, Weitian; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a common feature of Type II diabetes, metabolic disorders, hypertension and other vascular diseases. Recent studies showed that obesity-induced inflammation may be critical for IR. To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of sodium butyrate (NaB) on obesity-induced inflammation, the db/db mice were intraperitoneally injected with NaB for 6 weeks. Glucose control was evaluated by glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin tolerance test (ITT). Adipose tissue was harvested for gene expression analysis. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with Tnf-α to mimic the inflammatory state and gene expression was detected by realtime PCR and Western blotting. Our results showed that NaB treatment improved glucose control in db/db mice as determined by GTT and ITT tests. Gene expression analysis showed that NaB inhibited cytokines and immunological markers including CD68, Interferon-γ and Mcp in adipose tissues in db/db mice. Moreover, NaB inhibited cytokine releasing in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with TNF-α. Further analysis of inflammation pathway showed that NLRP3 was activated in db/db mice, which was efficiently inhibited by NaB treatment. Our data suggest that inhibition of obesity-induced inflammation alleviates IR, and NaB might be a potential anti-inflammatory agent for obesity. PMID:26234821

  4. Sodium butyrate alleviates adipocyte inflammation by inhibiting NLRP3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xukai; He, Gang; Peng, Yan; Zhong, Weitian; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a common feature of Type II diabetes, metabolic disorders, hypertension and other vascular diseases. Recent studies showed that obesity-induced inflammation may be critical for IR. To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of sodium butyrate (NaB) on obesity-induced inflammation, the db/db mice were intraperitoneally injected with NaB for 6 weeks. Glucose control was evaluated by glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin tolerance test (ITT). Adipose tissue was harvested for gene expression analysis. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with Tnf-α to mimic the inflammatory state and gene expression was detected by realtime PCR and Western blotting. Our results showed that NaB treatment improved glucose control in db/db mice as determined by GTT and ITT tests. Gene expression analysis showed that NaB inhibited cytokines and immunological markers including CD68, Interferon-γ and Mcp in adipose tissues in db/db mice. Moreover, NaB inhibited cytokine releasing in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with TNF-α. Further analysis of inflammation pathway showed that NLRP3 was activated in db/db mice, which was efficiently inhibited by NaB treatment. Our data suggest that inhibition of obesity-induced inflammation alleviates IR, and NaB might be a potential anti-inflammatory agent for obesity. PMID:26234821

  5. Chronically Elevated Levels of Short-Chain Fatty Acids Induce T Cell-Mediated Ureteritis and Hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongho; Goergen, Craig J; HogenEsch, Harm; Kim, Chang H

    2016-03-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are major products of gut microbial fermentation and profoundly affect host health and disease. SCFAs generate IL-10(+) regulatory T cells, which may promote immune tolerance. However, SCFAs can also induce Th1 and Th17 cells upon immunological challenges and, therefore, also have the potential to induce inflammatory responses. Because of the seemingly paradoxical SCFA activities in regulating T cells, we investigated, in depth, the impact of elevated SCFA levels on T cells and tissue inflammation in mice. Orally administered SCFAs induced effector (Th1 and Th17) and regulatory T cells in ureter and kidney tissues, and they induced T cell-mediated ureteritis, leading to kidney hydronephrosis (hereafter called acetate-induced renal disease, or C2RD). Kidney hydronephrosis in C2RD was caused by ureteral obstruction, which was, in turn, induced by SCFA-induced inflammation in the ureteropelvic junction and proximal ureter. Oral administration of all major SCFAs, such as acetate, propionate, and butyrate, induced the disease. We found that C2RD development is dependent on mammalian target of rapamycin activation, T cell-derived inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-17, and gut microbiota. Young or male animals were more susceptible than old or female animals, respectively. However, SCFA receptor (GPR41 or GPR43) deficiency did not affect C2RD development. Thus, SCFAs, when systemically administered at levels higher than physiological levels, cause dysregulated T cell responses and tissue inflammation in the renal system. The results provide insights into the immunological and pathological effects of chronically elevated SCFAs. PMID:26819206

  6. Forced chromatin looping raises fetal hemoglobin in adult sickle cells to higher levels than pharmacologic inducers.

    PubMed

    Breda, Laura; Motta, Irene; Lourenco, Silvia; Gemmo, Chiara; Deng, Wulan; Rupon, Jeremy W; Abdulmalik, Osheiza Y; Manwani, Deepa; Blobel, Gerd A; Rivella, Stefano

    2016-08-25

    Overcoming the silencing of the fetal γ-globin gene has been a long-standing goal in the treatment of sickle cell disease (SCD). The major transcriptional enhancer of the β-globin locus, called the locus control region (LCR), dynamically interacts with the developmental stage-appropriate β-type globin genes via chromatin looping, a process requiring the protein Ldb1. In adult erythroid cells, the LCR can be redirected from the adult β- to the fetal γ-globin promoter by tethering Ldb1 to the human γ-globin promoter with custom-designed zinc finger (ZF) proteins (ZF-Ldb1), leading to reactivation of γ-globin gene expression. To compare this approach to pharmacologic reactivation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF), hematopoietic cells from patients with SCD were treated with a lentivirus expressing the ZF-Ldb1 or with chemical HbF inducers. The HbF increase in cells treated with ZF-Ldb1 was more than double that observed with decitabine and pomalidomide; butyrate had an intermediate effect whereas tranylcypromine and hydroxyurea showed relatively low HbF reactivation. ZF-Ldb1 showed comparatively little toxicity, and reduced sickle hemoglobin (HbS) synthesis as well as sickling of SCD erythroid cells under hypoxic conditions. The efficacy and low cytotoxicity of lentiviral-mediated ZF-Ldb1 gene transfer compared with the drug regimens support its therapeutic potential for the treatment of SCD. PMID:27405777

  7. Vancomycin treatment and butyrate supplementation modulate gut microbe composition and severity of neointimal hyperplasia after arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Ho, Karen J; Xiong, Liqun; Hubert, Nathaniel J; Nadimpalli, Anuradha; Wun, Kelly; Chang, Eugene B; Kibbe, Melina R

    2015-12-01

    Gut microbial metabolites are increasingly recognized as determinants of health and disease. However, whether host -: microbe crosstalk influences peripheral arteries is not understood. Neointimal hyperplasia, a proliferative and inflammatory response to arterial injury, frequently limits the long-term benefits of cardiovascular interventions such as angioplasty, stenting, and bypass surgery. Our goal is to assess the effect of butyrate, one of the principal short chain fatty acids produced by microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, on neointimal hyperplasia development after angioplasty. Treatment of male Lewis Inbred rats with oral vancomycin for 4 weeks changed the composition of gut microbes as assessed by 16S rRNA-based taxonomic profiling and decreased the concentration of circulating butyrate by 69%. In addition, rats treated with oral vancomycin had exacerbated neointimal hyperplasia development after carotid angioplasty. Oral supplementation of butyrate reversed these changes. Butyrate also inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration, and cell cycle progression in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Our results suggest for the first time that gut microbial composition is associated with the severity of arterial remodeling after injury, potentially through an inhibitory effect of butyrate on VSMC. PMID:26660548

  8. Improved In Vitro Antileukemic Activity of All-Trans Retinoic Acid Loaded in Cholesteryl Butyrate Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Lima, Flávia Alves; Carneiro, Guilherme; Ramos Jonas Periera; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; de Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2016-02-01

    All-trans retinoic acid, a hydrophobic drug, has become one of the most successful examples of differentiation agents used for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. On the other hand, histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as cholesteryl butyrate, present differentiating activity and.can potentiate action of drugs such as all-trans retinoic acid. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent a promising alternative for administration of hydrophobic drugs such as ATRA. This study aimed to develop, characterize, and evaluate the cytotoxicity of all-trans retinoic acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for leukemia treatment. The influence of in situ formation of an ion pairing between all-trans retinoic acid and lipophilic amines on the characteristics of the particles (size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency) was evaluated. Cholesteryl butyrate, a butyric acid donor, was used as a component of the lipid matrix. In vitro activity on cell viability and distribution of cell cycle phases were evaluated for HL-60, Jurkat, and THP-1 cell lines. The encapsulation efficiency of all-trans retinoic acid in cholesteryl butyrate-solid lipid nanoparticles was significantly increased by the presence of the amine. Inhibition of cell viability by all-trans retinoic acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was more pronounced than the free drug. Analysis of the distribution of cell cycle phases also showed increased activity for all-trans retinoic acid-loaded cholesteryl butyrate-solid lipid nanoparticles, with a clear increase in subdiploid DNA content. The ion pair formation in SLN containing cholesteryl butyrate can be explored as a simple and inexpensive strategy to improve the efficacy and bioavail-ability of ATRA in the treatment of the cancer and metabolic diseases in which this retinoid plays an important role. PMID:27433579

  9. Plasmonic-based colorimetric and spectroscopic discrimination of acetic and butyric acids produced by different types of Escherichia coli through the different assembly structures formation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    La, Ju A; Lim, Sora; Park, Hyo Jeong; Heo, Min-Ji; Sang, Byoung-In; Oh, Min-Kyu; Cho, Eun Chul

    2016-08-24

    We present a plasmonic-based strategy for the colourimetric and spectroscopic differentiation of various organic acids produced by bacteria. The strategy is based on our discovery that particular concentrations of dl-lactic, acetic, and butyric acids induce different assembly structures, colours, and optical spectra of gold nanoparticles. We selected wild-type (K-12 W3110) and genetically-engineered (JHL61) Escherichia coli (E. coli) that are known to primarily produce acetic and butyric acid, respectively. Different assembly structures and optical properties of gold nanoparticles were observed when different organic acids, obtained after the removal of acid-producing bacteria, were mixed with gold nanoparticles. Moreover, at moderate cell concentrations of K-12 W3110 E. coli, which produce sufficient amounts of acetic acid to induce the assembly of gold nanoparticles, a direct estimate of the number of bacteria was possible based on time-course colour change observations of gold nanoparticle aqueous suspensions. The plasmonic-based colourimetric and spectroscopic methods described here may enable onsite testing for the identification of organic acids produced by bacteria and the estimation of bacterial numbers, which have applications in health and environmental sciences. PMID:27497013

  10. Valeric acid induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in CHO cell cultures and improves recombinant antibody productivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hyoung; Noh, Soo Min; Woo, Ju Rang; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Gyun Min

    2016-03-01

    To find a more effective chemical reagent for improved monoclonal antibody (mAb) production, eight chemical reagents (curcumin, quercein, DL-sulforaphane, thymidine, valeric acid, phenyl butyrate, valproic acid, and lithium chloride) known to induce cell cycle arrest were examined individually as chemical additives to recombinant CHO (rCHO) cell cultures producing mAb. Among these chemical additives, valeric acid showed the best production performance. Valeric acid decreased specific growth rate (μ), but increased culture longevity and specific mAb productivity (qmAb ) in a dose-dependent manner. The beneficial effect of valeric acid on culture longevity and qmAb outweighed its detrimental effect on μ, resulting in 2.9-fold increase in the maximum mAb concentration when 1.5 mM valeric acid was added to the cultures. Furthermore, valeric acid did not negatively affect the mAb quality attributes with regard to aggregation, charge variation, and galactosylation. Unexpectedly, galactosylation of the mAb increased by the 1.5 mM valeric acid addition. Taken together, the results obtained here demonstrate that valeric acid is an effective chemical reagent to increase mAb production in rCHO cells. PMID:26663903

  11. Clinical evaluation of clobetasone butyrate: a comparative study of its effects in postoperative inflammation and on intraocular pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsell, T G; Bartholomew, R S; Walker, S R

    1980-01-01

    Clobetasone butyrate, a new corticosteroid with a high topical activity, has been compared with prednisolone phosphate and a placebo in the treatment of inflammation following cataract extraction. These 2 steroids were more effective in relieving postoperative inflammation than placebo (P less than 0.05), though no obvious clinical differences between the 2 compounds emerged from this investigation. However, a single-blind comparative study against betamethasone phosphate in patients suspected of having steroid-induced glaucoma showed that, while betamethasone phosphate significantly raised intraocular pressure, clobetasone butyrate had only a minimal effect, and this difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.02). PMID:6986899

  12. Effects of dietary humic and butyric acid on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide in young pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humic acid (MFG) and fat protected butyric acid (BA) has been shown to modulate energy metabolism and inflammation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of MFG and BA, alone and in combination, on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced in...

  13. Histone Hyperacetylation Up-regulates Protein Kinase Cδ in Dopaminergic Neurons to Induce Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Kondru, Naveen; Ghosh, Anamitra; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stress-sensitive protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) has been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms regulating PKCδ expression in neurons. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which the PKCδ gene can be regulated by histone acetylation. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBu) induced PKCδ expression in cultured neurons, brain slices, and animal models. Several other HDAC inhibitors also mimicked NaBu. The chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that hyperacetylation of histone H4 by NaBu is associated with the PKCδ promoter. Deletion analysis of the PKCδ promoter mapped the NaBu-responsive element to an 81-bp minimal promoter region. Detailed mutagenesis studies within this region revealed that four GC boxes conferred hyperacetylation-induced PKCδ promoter activation. Cotransfection experiments and Sp inhibitor studies demonstrated that Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 regulated NaBu-induced PKCδ up-regulation. However, NaBu did not alter the DNA binding activities of Sp proteins or their expression. Interestingly, a one-hybrid analysis revealed that NaBu enhanced transcriptional activity of Sp1/Sp3. Overexpression of the p300/cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP) potentiated the NaBu-mediated transactivation potential of Sp1/Sp3, but expressing several HDACs attenuated this effect, suggesting that p300/CBP and HDACs act as coactivators or corepressors in histone acetylation-induced PKCδ up-regulation. Finally, using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that NaBu up-regulation of PKCδ sensitizes neurons to cell death in a human dopaminergic cell model and brain slice cultures. Together, these results indicate that histone acetylation regulates PKCδ expression to augment nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell death, which could contribute to the progressive neuropathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:25342743

  14. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  15. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Impact of butyric acid on butanol formation by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Regestein, Lars; Doerr, Eric Will; Staaden, Antje; Rehmann, Lars

    2015-11-01

    The butanol yield of the classic fermentative acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) process has been enhanced in the past decades through the development of better strains and advanced process design. Nevertheless, by-product formation and the incomplete conversion of intermediates still decrease the butanol yield. This study demonstrates the potential of increasing the butanol yield from glycerol though the addition of small amounts of butyric acid. The impact of butyric acid was investigated in a 7L stirred tank reactor. The results of this study show the positive impact of butyric acid on butanol yield under pH controlled conditions and the metabolic stages were monitored via online measurement of carbon dioxide formation, pH value and redox potential. Butyric acid could significantly increase the butanol yield at low pH values if sufficient quantities of primary carbon source (glycerol) were present. PMID:26233327

  17. Fuel cells: Hydrogen induced insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2016-06-01

    Coupling high ionic and low electronic conductivity in the electrolyte of low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells remains a challenge. Now, the electronic conductivity of a perovskite electrolyte, which has high proton conductivity, is shown to be heavily suppressed when exposed to hydrogen, leading to high fuel cell performance.

  18. Induced pluripotency of human prostatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Sun, Ning; Young, Sarah R; Nolley, Rosalie; Santos, Jennifer; Wu, Joseph C; Peehl, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a valuable resource for discovery of epigenetic changes critical to cell type-specific differentiation. Although iPS cells have been generated from other terminally differentiated cells, the reprogramming of normal adult human basal prostatic epithelial (E-PZ) cells to a pluripotent state has not been reported. Here, we attempted to reprogram E-PZ cells by forced expression of Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4 using lentiviral vectors and obtained embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like colonies at a frequency of 0.01%. These E-PZ-iPS-like cells with normal karyotype gained expression of pluripotent genes typical of iPS cells (Tra-1-81, SSEA-3, Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4) and lost gene expression characteristic of basal prostatic epithelial cells (CK5, CK14, and p63). E-PZ-iPS-like cells demonstrated pluripotency by differentiating into ectodermal, mesodermal, and endodermal cells in vitro, although lack of teratoma formation in vivo and incomplete demethylation of pluripotency genes suggested only partial reprogramming. Importantly, E-PZ-iPS-like cells re-expressed basal epithelial cell markers (CD44, p63, MAO-A) in response to prostate-specific medium in spheroid culture. Androgen induced expression of androgen receptor (AR), and co-culture with rat urogenital sinus further induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a hallmark of secretory cells, suggesting that E-PZ-iPS-like cells have the capacity to differentiate into prostatic basal and secretory epithelial cells. Finally, when injected into mice, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed basal epithelial cell markers including CD44 and p63. When co-injected with rat urogenital mesenchyme, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed AR and expression of p63 and CD44 was repressed. DNA methylation profiling identified epigenetic changes in key pathways and genes involved in prostatic differentiation as E-PZ-iPS-like cells converted to differentiated AR- and PSA-expressing cells. Our results suggest that

  19. Clinical evaluation of clobetasone butyrate eye drops in episcleritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Jones, D; Tokarewicz, A; Watson, P G

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients took part in a double-blind, between-patient clinical trial to compare clobetasone butyrate, betamethasone phosphate, and placebo eye drops in the treatment of episcleritis. Although from the symptom scores the patients given placebo appeared to do as well as the other patients in the first week of treatment, they did significantly less well after this time. Clobetasone butyrate and betamethasone phosphate eye drops seemed to be equally effective in the treatment of this disease. PMID:7028088

  20. Comparison of desoximetasone and hydrocortisone butyrate in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Zachariae, H

    1976-01-01

    Thirty psoriatics were treated for 2 weeks on a double-blind controlled basis with desoximetasone (0.25%) and with hydrocortisone butyrate (0.1%). It was a randomised left-right comparative trial. Thirteen out of 27 patients preferred desoximetasone, 3 patients preferred hydrocortisone butyrate. There was also a significantly better effect of desoximetasone as judged by the observer after the second week of treatment. PMID:60029

  1. Select forms of tumor cell apoptosis induce dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Sandra; Santori, Fabio R; Ng, Bruce; Liebes, Leonard; Formenti, Silvia C; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2005-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a crucial role in initiating immune responses to tumors. DC can efficiently present antigens from apoptotic tumor cells, but apoptotic cells are thought to lack the inflammatory signals required to induce DC maturation. Here, we show that apoptosis of 67NR mouse carcinoma cells via the Fas (CD95) pathway or induced by the anticancer drug bortezomib (PS-341) but not by ultraviolet irradiation is associated with the production of maturation signals for DC. These data have important implications for the effects of chemotherapy on antitumor immunity in solid and hematologic malignancies. PMID:15569694

  2. Colonic mucin synthesis is increased by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Finnie, I A; Dwarakanath, A D; Taylor, B A; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sodium butyrate and sodium bromo-octanoate (an inhibitor of beta oxidation) on colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) synthesis have been assessed using tissue from colonic resection samples. Epithelial biopsy specimens were incubated for 16 hours in RPMI 1640 with glutamine, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and N-acetyl-[3H]-glucosamine ([3H]-Glc NAc), and differing concentrations of sodium butyrate. Incorporation of [3H] Glc NAc into mucin by normal epithelium at least 10 cm distant from colonic cancer was increased in the presence of sodium butyrate in a dose dependent manner, with maximum effect (476%) at a concentration of 0.1 mM (number of specimens = 24 from six patients, p < 0.001). The increase in response to butyrate was not seen when specimens were incubated in the presence of the beta oxidation inhibitor sodium bromo-octanoate 0.05 M. The striking increase in mucin synthesis that results when butyrate is added to standard nutrient medium suggests that this may be an important mechanism affecting the rate of mucin synthesis in vivo and may also explain the therapeutic effect of butyrate in colitis. PMID:7890244

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and transforming growth factor-beta induce 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Min; Ding, Yunfei; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung

    2006-09-14

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been actively exploited as potential anticancer agents. To identify gene targets of HDAC inhibitors, we found that HDAC inhibitors such as sodium butyrate, scriptaid, apicidin and oxamflatin induced the expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a potential cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) antagonist and tumor suppressor, in a time and concentration dependent manner in A549 and H1435 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Detailed analyses indicated that HDAC inhibitors activated the 15-PGDH promoter-luciferase reporter construct in transfected A549 cells. A representative HDAC inhibitor, scriptaid, and its negative structural analog control, nullscript, were further evaluated at the chromatin level. Scriptaid but not nullscript induced a significant accumulation of acetylated histones H3 and H4 which were associated with the 15-PGDH promoter as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) also induced the expression of 15-PGDH in a time and concentration dependent manner in A549 and H1435 cells. Induction of 15-PGDH expression by TGF-beta1 was synergistically stimulated by the addition of Wnt3A which was inactive by itself. However, combination of TGF-beta and an HDAC inhibitor, scriptaid, only resulted in an additive effect. Together, our results indicate that 15-PGDH is one of the target genes that HDAC inhibitors and TGF-beta may induce to exhibit tumor suppressive effects. PMID:16844092

  4. Sodium butyrate protects the intestinal barrier function in peritonitic mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaofeng; Song, Huimin; Wang, Yunlei; Sheng, Yingmo; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Peritonitis is a commonly seen disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is prevalently considered that the impaired intestinal barrier during peritonitis is the access point of gut microbes into the blood system, and acts as the engine of the following systemic infection. In our previous study, we found that Sodium Butyrate (NaB) was protective on intestinal barrier function. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effects of NaB on overwhelming infection animal models of peritonitis. Methods: Mouse cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model was used to study the effects of NaB on the intestinal barrier. Experimental animals were fed of NaB by gavage. Post-CLP mortality, gut permeability and intestinal histological alterations were studied. Results: Gastrointestinal NaB pharmacodynamics profiles after medication were studied. Measurements of NaB concentration in chyme showed significantly higher intestinal concentration of NaB in the NaB treated group than that of the control group. CLP-induced mortality was significantly decreased by oral NaB treatments. Gut permeability was largely increased after CLP, which was partially prevented by NaB feeding. Histological study showed that intestinal, especially ileal injury following peritonitis was substantially alleviated by NaB treatments. Moreover, tissue regeneration was also prompted by NaB. Conclusion: NaB has a potential protective effect on intestinal barrier function in peritonitis. PMID:26064302

  5. Nonviral Methods for Inducing Pluripotency to Cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Doherty, Ryan; Wang, Wenxin

    2013-01-01

    The concept of inducing pluripotency to adult somatic cells by introducing reprogramming factors to them is one that has recently emerged, gained widespread acclaim and garnered much attention among the scientific community. The idea that cells can be reprogrammed, and are not unidirectionally defined opens many avenues for study. With their clear potential for use in the clinic, these reprogrammed cells stand to have a huge impact in regenerative medicine. This realization did not occur overnight but is, however, the product of many decades worth of advancements in researching this area. It was a combination of such research that led to the development of induced pluripotent stem cells as we know it today. This review delivers a brief insight in to the roots of iPS research and focuses on succinctly describing current nonviral methods of inducing pluripotency using plasmid vectors, small molecules and chemicals, and RNAs. PMID:23841088

  6. Nonviral methods for inducing pluripotency to cells.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Ryan; Greiser, Udo; Wang, Wenxin

    2013-01-01

    The concept of inducing pluripotency to adult somatic cells by introducing reprogramming factors to them is one that has recently emerged, gained widespread acclaim and garnered much attention among the scientific community. The idea that cells can be reprogrammed, and are not unidirectionally defined opens many avenues for study. With their clear potential for use in the clinic, these reprogrammed cells stand to have a huge impact in regenerative medicine. This realization did not occur overnight but is, however, the product of many decades worth of advancements in researching this area. It was a combination of such research that led to the development of induced pluripotent stem cells as we know it today. This review delivers a brief insight in to the roots of iPS research and focuses on succinctly describing current nonviral methods of inducing pluripotency using plasmid vectors, small molecules and chemicals, and RNAs. PMID:23841088

  7. Cell Chirality Induces Collective Cell Migration in Epithelial Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    During early development, epithelial cells form a monolayer sheet and migrate in a uniform direction. Here, we address how this collective migration can occur without breaking the cell-to-cell attachments. Repeated contraction and expansion of the cell-to-cell interfaces enables the cells to rearrange their positions autonomously within the sheet. We show that when the interface tension is strengthened in a direction that is tilted from the body axis, cell rearrangements occur in such a way that unidirectional movement is induced. We use a vertex model to demonstrate that such anisotropic tension can generate the unidirectional motion of cell sheets. Our results suggest that cell chirality facilitates collective cell migration during tissue morphogenesis.

  8. Gemcitabine induces cell senescence in human pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-26

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) commonly require chemotherapy because they frequently develop metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors. Gemcitabine, an analogue of cytosine arabinoside, is commonly used for PDAC treatment. We observed that gemcitabine induced senescence phenotypes characterized by enhanced senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-Gal) staining and increased expression of senescence-associated molecules in two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, Miapaca-2 and Panc-1, which exhibit resistance to gemcitabine but not L3.pl cells with a high sensitivity to gemcitabine. Gemcitabine-induced cell senescence can be inhibited by reactive oxygen species inhibitor, N-acetyl cysteine. Although gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression, anti-CXCL8 antibody failed to reduce gemcitabine-induced increases in SA β-Gal-positive cell numbers. These observations would indicate that cell senescence can proceed independently of CXCL8 expression, a characteristic feature of senescence-associated secretion phenotype. PMID:27311854

  9. Enhancing Butanol Production under the Stress Environments of Co-Culturing Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae Integrated with Exogenous Butyrate Addition

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongzhen; Ge, Laibing; Zhang, Jingshu; Zhao, Yanli; Ding, Jian; Li, Zhigang; He, Zhenni; Chen, Rui; Shi, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an efficient acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation strategy integrating Clostridium acetobutylicum/Saccharomyces cerevisiae co-culturing system with exogenous butyrate addition, was proposed and experimentally conducted. In solventogenic phase, by adding 0.2 g-DCW/L-broth viable S. cerevisiae cells and 4.0 g/L-broth concentrated butyrate solution into C. acetobutylicum culture broth, final butanol concentration and butanol/acetone ratio in a 7 L anaerobic fermentor reached the highest levels of 15.74 g/L and 2.83 respectively, with the increments of 35% and 43% as compared with those of control. Theoretical and experimental analysis revealed that, the proposed strategy could, 1) extensively induce secretion of amino acids particularly lysine, which are favorable for both C. acetobutylicum survival and butanol synthesis under high butanol concentration environment; 2) enhance the utilization ability of C. acetobutylicum on glucose and over-produce intracellular NADH for butanol synthesis in C. acetobutylicum metabolism simultaneously; 3) direct most of extra consumed glucose into butanol synthesis route. The synergetic actions of effective amino acids assimilation, high rates of substrate consumption and NADH regeneration yielded highest butanol concentration and butanol ratio in C. acetobutylicum under this stress environment. The proposed method supplies an alternative way to improve ABE fermentation performance by traditional fermentation technology. PMID:26489085

  10. Effects of Sodium Butyrate on Methamphetamine-Sensitized Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, John H.; Hitzemann, Robert J.; Edmunds, Stephanie; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroadaptations associated with behavioral sensitization induced by repeated exposure to methamphetamine (MA) appear to be involved in compulsive drug pursuit and use. Increased histone acetylation, an epigenetic effect resulting in altered gene expression, may promote sensitized responses to psychostimulants. The role of histone acetylation in the expression and acquisition of MA-induced locomotor sensitization was examined by measuring the effect of histone deacetylase inhibition by sodium butyrate (NaB). For the effect on expression, vehicle or NaB (630 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered 30 min prior to MA challenge in mice treated repeatedly with MA (10 days of 2 mg/kg MA) or saline (10 days), and then locomotor response to MA challenge was measured. NaB treatment increased the locomotor response to MA in both acutely MA treated and sensitized animals. For acquisition, NaB was administered 30 min prior to each MA exposure (10 days of 1 or 2 mg/kg), but not prior to the MA challenge test. Treatment with NaB during the sensitization acquisition period significantly increased locomotor activation by MA in sensitized mice only. NaB alone did not significantly alter locomotor activity. Acute NaB or MA, but not the combination, appeared to increase striatal acetylation at histone H4. Repeated treatment with MA, but not NaB or MA plus NaB, increased striatal acetylation at histone H3. Although increased histone acetylation may alter the expression of genes involved in acute locomotor response to MA and in the acquisition of MA-induced sensitization, results for acetylation at H3 and H4 showed little correspondence with behavior. PMID:23137698

  11. A comparison of three pH control methods for revealing effects of undissociated butyric acid on specific butanol production rate in batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    pH control has been essential for butanol production with Clostridium acetobutylicum. However, it is not very clear at what pH level the acid crash will occur, at what pH level butanol production will be dominant, and at what pH level butyric acid production will be prevailing. Furthermore, contradictory results have been reported about required acidic conditions for initiation of solventogenesis. In this study, with the aim of further understanding the role of undissociated butyric acid in butanol production, we investigated the correlation between undissociated butyric acid concentration and specific butanol production rate in batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum by comparing three pH control approaches: NaOH neutralization (at 12, 24 or 36 h), CaCO3 supplementation (2, 5, or 8 g/l) and NaOAc buffering (pH 4.6, 5.0 or 5.6). By neutralizing the fermentation pH to ~5.0 at different time, we observed that neutralization should take place at the beginning of exponential phase (12 h), and otherwise resulting in lower concentrations of undissociated butyric acid, cell biomass and final butanol. CaCO3 supplementation extended cell growth to 36 h and resulted in higher butyrate yield under 8 g/L of CaCO3. In the NaOAc buffering, the highest specific butanol rate (0.58 h−1) was associated with the highest undissociated butyric acid (1.92 g/L). The linear correlation of the undissociated butyric acid with the specific butanol production rates suggested the undissociated butyric acid could be the major driving force for butanol production. PMID:23294525

  12. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  13. TWEAK induces liver progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Aniela; Ambrose, Christine; Parr, Michael; Lincecum, John M; Wang, Monica Z; Zheng, Timothy S; Browning, Beth; Michaelson, Jennifer S; Baetscher, Manfred; Baestcher, Manfred; Wang, Bruce; Bissell, D Montgomery; Burkly, Linda C

    2005-09-01

    Progenitor ("oval") cell expansion accompanies many forms of liver injury, including alcohol toxicity and submassive parenchymal necrosis as well as experimental injury models featuring blocked hepatocyte replication. Oval cells can potentially become either hepatocytes or biliary epithelial cells and may be critical to liver regeneration, particularly when hepatocyte replication is impaired. The regulation of oval cell proliferation is incompletely understood. Herein we present evidence that a TNF family member called TWEAK (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis) stimulates oval cell proliferation in mouse liver through its receptor Fn14. TWEAK has no effect on mature hepatocytes and thus appears to be selective for oval cells. Transgenic mice overexpressing TWEAK in hepatocytes exhibit periportal oval cell hyperplasia. A similar phenotype was obtained in adult wild-type mice, but not Fn14-null mice, by administering TWEAK-expressing adenovirus. Oval cell expansion induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) was significantly reduced in Fn14-null mice as well as in adult wild-type mice with a blocking anti-TWEAK mAb. Importantly, TWEAK stimulated the proliferation of an oval cell culture model. Finally, we show increased Fn14 expression in chronic hepatitis C and other human liver diseases relative to its expression in normal liver, which suggests a role for the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway in human liver injury. We conclude that TWEAK has a selective mitogenic effect for liver oval cells that distinguishes it from other previously described growth factors. PMID:16110324

  14. Umbelliprenin Induces Apoptosis in CLL Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ziai, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Omid; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Zamani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease that requires innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. Many Ferula species, including F. asa-foetida, synthesize terpenyloxy coumarins. One of these coumarins is umbelliprenin, which has been implicated with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines. In this study induction of apoptosis by umbelliprenin on Jurkat T-CLL and Raji B-CLL cell lines was studied. In this regard, cells were incubated with various concentrations of umbelliprenin in-vitro for different times and assayed for apoptosis with annexin V–FITC/PI double staining flowcytometry method. Results showed that umbelliprenin induced apoptosis in leukemic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that CLL cells were more susceptible to umbelliprenin induced cell death than normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs). Moreover, we study the induction of apoptosis in Jurkat cells by umbelliprenin in the presence of interleukin 4 (IL-4) as an agent that causes resistance to apoptosis in CLL cells, was also student. We showed that IL-4 can not reduce apoptotic effect of umbelliprenin. The preferential toxicity of umbelliprenin for CLL cells, supports the hypothesis that oral administration of umbelliprenin in the form of foods or folk medicines containing this coumarin, might enhance protection against the development of CLL in man with little side effects. In conclusion, umbelliprenin may be an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of CLL, and thus clinical studies with umbelliprenin may be appropriate. PMID:24250490

  15. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon; Uyeno, Yutaka

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10. PMID:26921420

  16. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  17. Optically-Induced Cell Fusion on Cell Pairing Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Po-Fu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-02-01

    Cell fusion is a critical operation for numerous biomedical applications including cell reprogramming, hybridoma formation, cancer immunotherapy, and tissue regeneration. However, unstable cell contact and random cell pairings have limited efficiency and yields when utilizing traditional methods. Furthermore, it is challenging to selectively perform cell fusion within a group of cells. This study reports a new approach called optically-induced cell fusion (OICF), which integrates cell-pairing microstructures with an optically-induced, localized electrical field. By projecting light patterns onto a photoconductive film (hydrogen-rich, amorphous silicon) coated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass while an alternating current electrical field was applied between two such ITO glass slides, “virtual” electrodes could be generated that could selectively fuse pairing cells. At 10 kHz, a 57% cell paring rate and an 87% fusion efficiency were successfully achieved at a driving voltage of 20  Vpp, suggesting that this new technology could be promising for selective cell fusion within a group of cells.

  18. Optically-Induced Cell Fusion on Cell Pairing Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Fu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion is a critical operation for numerous biomedical applications including cell reprogramming, hybridoma formation, cancer immunotherapy, and tissue regeneration. However, unstable cell contact and random cell pairings have limited efficiency and yields when utilizing traditional methods. Furthermore, it is challenging to selectively perform cell fusion within a group of cells. This study reports a new approach called optically-induced cell fusion (OICF), which integrates cell-pairing microstructures with an optically-induced, localized electrical field. By projecting light patterns onto a photoconductive film (hydrogen-rich, amorphous silicon) coated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass while an alternating current electrical field was applied between two such ITO glass slides, "virtual" electrodes could be generated that could selectively fuse pairing cells. At 10 kHz, a 57% cell paring rate and an 87% fusion efficiency were successfully achieved at a driving voltage of 20  V(pp), suggesting that this new technology could be promising for selective cell fusion within a group of cells. PMID:26912054

  19. Optically-Induced Cell Fusion on Cell Pairing Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Po-Fu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion is a critical operation for numerous biomedical applications including cell reprogramming, hybridoma formation, cancer immunotherapy, and tissue regeneration. However, unstable cell contact and random cell pairings have limited efficiency and yields when utilizing traditional methods. Furthermore, it is challenging to selectively perform cell fusion within a group of cells. This study reports a new approach called optically-induced cell fusion (OICF), which integrates cell-pairing microstructures with an optically-induced, localized electrical field. By projecting light patterns onto a photoconductive film (hydrogen-rich, amorphous silicon) coated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass while an alternating current electrical field was applied between two such ITO glass slides, “virtual” electrodes could be generated that could selectively fuse pairing cells. At 10 kHz, a 57% cell paring rate and an 87% fusion efficiency were successfully achieved at a driving voltage of 20  Vpp, suggesting that this new technology could be promising for selective cell fusion within a group of cells. PMID:26912054

  20. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    PubMed Central

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg−1 protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24–7.64 U mg−1 protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  1. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors.

    PubMed

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23-0.99 U mg(-1) protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg(-1) protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24-7.64 U mg(-1) protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  2. OSKM Induce Extraembryonic Endoderm Stem Cells in Parallel to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Anthony; Halbisen, Michael A.; Wang, Kai; Latham, Keith; Ralston, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Summary The reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and MYC (OSKM) can reactivate the pluripotency network in terminally differentiated cells, but also regulate expression of non-pluripotency genes in other contexts, such as the mouse primitive endoderm. The primitive endoderm is an extraembryonic lineage established in parallel to the pluripotent epiblast in the blastocyst, and is the progenitor pool for extraembryonic endoderm stem (XEN) cells. We show that OSKM induce expression of endodermal genes, leading to formation of induced XEN (iXEN) cells, which possess key properties of blastocyst-derived XEN cells, including morphology, transcription profile, self-renewal, and multipotency. Our data show that iXEN cells arise in parallel to induced pluripotent stem cells, indicating that OSKM drive cells to two distinct cell fates during reprogramming. PMID:26947975

  3. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate-induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of highly conserved, small non-coding RNAs (~22 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. MicroRNAs are encoded by specific genes in the genome, which are transcribed as primary transcripts called primary miRNA. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) bind to compl...

  4. Induced DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, R.

    1985-01-01

    The survival of cultured rat kangaroo cells (PtK-2) and human xeroderma pigmentosum cells incubated with 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide subsequent to ultraviolet irradiation is lower than that of cells incubated without cycloheximide. The drop in survival is considerably larger than that produced by incubation of unirradiated cells with cycloheximide. The phenomenon was also observed when PtK-2 cells were incubated with emetine, another protein synthesis inhibitor, or with 5,6-dichloro-1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a RNA synthesis inhibitor. PtK cells which received a preliminary UV treatment followed by an incubation period without cycloheximide and then a second irradiation and 24 hour incubation with cycloheximide, survived the effects of the second irradiation better than cells which were incubated in the presence of cycloheximide after the first and second UV irradiation. The application of cycloheximide for 24 hours after UV irradiation of PtK cells resulted in one-half as many 6-thioguanine resistant cells as compared to the number of 6-thioguanine resistant cells found when cycloheximide was not used. These experiments indicate that a UV-inducible cycloheximide-sensitive DNA repair pathway is present in PtK and xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which is error-prone in PtK cells.

  5. Radiation-induced hypomethylation triggers urokinase plasminogen activator transcription in meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2013-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD) expression. However, oxidative damage by H(2)O(2) or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor) blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation triggers u

  6. Radiation-Induced Hypomethylation Triggers Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Transcription in Meningioma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD) expression. However, oxidative damage by H2O2 or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor) blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation triggers u

  7. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-03-18

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  9. Cell Death Mechanisms Induced by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, L; Arenas-Del Angel, M C; Zenteno, E; Chávez, R; Lascurain, R

    2009-01-01

    One of the functions of the immune system is to recognize and destroy abnormal or infected cells to maintain homeostasis. This is accomplished by cytotoxic lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity is a highly organized multifactor process. Here, we reviewed the apoptosis pathways induced by the two main cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets, natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+ T cells. In base to recent experimental evidence, we reviewed NK receptors involved in recognition of target-cell, as well as lytic molecules such as perforin, granzymes-A and -B, and granulysin. In addition, we reviewed the Fas-FasL intercellular linkage mediated pathway, and briefly the cross-linking of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor pathway. We discussed three models of possible molecular interaction between lytic molecules from effector cytotoxic cells and target-cell membrane to induction of apoptosis. PMID:19254476

  10. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.