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Sample records for c-c bond energy

  1. The computation of C-C and N-N bond dissociation energies for singly, doubly, and triply bonded systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies (D sub e) of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, N2, N2H2, and N2H4 are studied at various levels of correlation treatment. The convergence of D sub e with respect to the one particle basis is studied at the single reference modified coupled-pair functional (MCPF) level. At all levels of correlation treatment, the errors in the bond dissociation energies increase with the degree of multiple bond character. The multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) D sub e values, corrected for an estimate of higher excitations, are in excellent agreement with those determined using the size extensive averaged coupled pair functional (ACPF) method. It was found that the full valence complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF)/MRCI calculations are reproduced very well by MRCI calculations based on a CASSCF calculation that includes in the active space only those electrons involved in the C-C or N-N bonds. To achieve chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mole) for the D sub e values of the doubly bonded species C2H4 and N2H2 requires one particle basis sets including up through h angular momentum functions (l = 5) and a multireference treatment of electron correlation: still higher levels of calculation are required to achieve chemical accuracy for the triply bonded species C2H2 and N2.

  2. The computation of C-C and N-N bond dissociation energies for singly, doubly, and triply bonded systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies (De) of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, N2, N2H2, and N2H4 are studied at various levels of correlation treatment. The convergence of De with respect to the one-particle basis is studied at the single-reference modified coupled-pair-functional (MCPF)level. At all levels of correlation treatment, the errors in the bond dissociation energies increase with the degree of multiple bond character. The multireference configuration-interaction (MRCI) De values, corrected for an estimate of higher excitations, are in excellent agreement with those determined using the size-extensive averaged-coupled-pair-functional (ACPF) method. The full-valence complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF)/MRCI calculations are reproduced very well by MRCI calculations based on a CASSCF calculation that includes in the active space only those electrons involved in the C-C or N-N bonds.

  3. HC[triple bond]P and H3C-C[triple bond]P as proton acceptors in protonated complexes containing two phosphorus bases: structures, binding energies, and spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Bene, Janet E Del

    2007-10-01

    Ab initio calculations at the MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ level have been carried out to investigate the structures and binding energies of cationic complexes involving protonated sp, sp2, and sp3 phosphorus bases as proton donor ions and the sp-hybridized phosphorus bases H-C[triple bond]P and H3C-C[triple bond]P as proton acceptors. These proton-bound complexes exhibit a variety of structural motifs, but all are stabilized by interactions that occur through the pi cloud of the acceptor base. The binding energies of these complexes range from 6 to 15 kcal/mol. Corresponding complexes with H3C-C[triple bond]P as the proton acceptor are more stable than those with H-C[triple bond]P as the acceptor, a reflection of the greater basicity of H3C-C[triple bond]P. In most complexes with sp2- or sp3-hybridized P-H donor ions, the P-H bond lengthens and the P-H stretching frequency is red-shifted relative to the corresponding monomers. Complex formation also leads to a lengthening of the C[triple bond]P bond and a red shift of the C[triple bond]P stretching vibration. The two-bond coupling constants 2pihJ(P-P) and 2pihJ(P-C) are significantly smaller than 2hJ(P-P) and 2hJ(P-C) for complexes in which hydrogen bonding occurs through lone pairs of electrons on P or C. This reflects the absence of significant s electron density in the hydrogen-bonding regions of these pi complexes. PMID:17760429

  4. Understanding Rotation about a C=C Double Bond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrows, Susan E.; Eberlein, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The study focuses on the process and energetic cost of twisting around a C=C double bond and provides instructors with a simple vehicle for rectifying the common misrepresentation of C=C double bonds as rigid and inflexible. Discussions of cis and trans isomers of cycloalkenes are a good entry point for introducing students to the idea of a…

  5. Alkali metal mediated C-C bond coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz)2, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz)2, the structure of [Li(Bz)2]- was drastically changed: Bz-Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C-C single bond was formed in the C1-C1' position of Bz-Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz-Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C-C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  6. Ag-catalyzed C-H/C-C bond functionalization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Zhong; Jiao, Ning

    2016-08-21

    Silver, known and utilized since ancient times, is a coinage metal, which has been widely used for various organic transformations in the past few decades. Currently, the silver-catalyzed reaction is one of the frontier areas in organic chemistry, and the progress of research in this field is very rapid. Compared with other transition metals, silver has long been believed to have low catalytic efficiency, and most commonly, it is used as either a cocatalyst or a Lewis acid. Interestingly, the discovery of Ag-catalysis has been significantly improved in recent years. Especially, Ag(i) has been demonstrated as an important and versatile catalyst for a variety of organic transformations. However, so far, there has been no systematic review on Ag-catalyzed C-H/C-C bond functionalization. In this review, we will focus on the development of Ag-catalyzed C-H/C-C bond functionalization and the corresponding mechanism. PMID:27056573

  7. Cuprous Oxide Catalyzed Oxidative C-C Bond Cleavage for C-N Bond Formation: Synthesis of Cyclic Imides from Ketones and Amines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Lu, Jianmin; Ma, Jiping; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Feng

    2015-11-16

    Selective oxidative cleavage of a C-C bond offers a straightforward method to functionalize organic skeletons. Reported herein is the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of ketone for C-N bond formation over a cuprous oxide catalyst with molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A wide range of ketones and amines are converted into cyclic imides with moderate to excellent yields. In-depth studies show that both α-C-H and β-C-H bonds adjacent to the carbonyl groups are indispensable for the C-C bond cleavage. DFT calculations indicate the reaction is initiated with the oxidation of the α-C-H bond. Amines lower the activation energy of the C-C bond cleavage, and thus promote the reaction. New insight into the C-C bond cleavage mechanism is presented. PMID:26494312

  8. Manganese-catalyzed regiospecific sp(3) C-S bond formation through C-C bond cleavage of cyclobutanols.

    PubMed

    Ren, Rongguo; Wu, Zhen; Zhu, Chen

    2016-06-21

    A manganese-catalyzed regioselective sp(3) C-S bond formation through C-C bond cleavage of cyclobutanols is described. A variety of primary and secondary alkyl thioethers are efficiently prepared under mild reaction conditions. The mechanistic pathways involving radical-mediated tandem C-C bond cleavage and C-S bond formation are proposed. PMID:27279018

  9. Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activation on Pt and Ni surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The work has focussed on hydrogen induced bond activation in adsorbed organic molecules and intermediates containin C-S and C-N and C-C bonds on Ni(100), Ni(111), and Pt(111) surfaces. Fluorescence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) above the carbon K edge was used for adsorbed organic reactants and in-situ kinetic studies of bond activation. Results indicate that the activation is enhanced on Ni relative to Pt. Methylthiolate and methylamine adsorbed on Pt(111) were studied.

  10. Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activation on Pt and Ni surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    The work has focussed on hydrogen induced bond activation in adsorbed organic molecules and intermediates containin C-S and C-N and C-C bonds on Ni(100), Ni(111), and Pt(111) surfaces. Fluorescence Yield Near Edge Spectroscopy (FYNES) above the carbon K edge was used for adsorbed organic reactants and in-situ kinetic studies of bond activation. Results indicate that the activation is enhanced on Ni relative to Pt. Methylthiolate and methylamine adsorbed on Pt(111) were studied.

  11. C-C and C-Heteroatom Bond Dissociation Energies in CH 3 R'C(OH) 2 : Energetics for Photocatalytic Processes of Organic Diolates on TiO 2 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tsang-Hsiu; Dixon, David A.; Henderson, Michael A.

    2010-08-26

    The bond energies of a range of gem-diols, CH3R'C(OH)2 (R' = H, F, Cl, Br, CN, NO2, CF3, CH3CH2, CH3CH2CH2, CH3CH2CH2CH2, ((CH3)2)CH, (CH3)3C, ((CH3)2CH)CH2, (CH3CH2)(CH3)CH, C6H5 (CH3CH2)(CH3)CH) which serve as models for binding to a surface have been studied with density functional theory (DFT) and the molecular orbital G3(MP2) methods to provide thermodynamic data for the analysis of the photochemistry of ketones on TiO2. The ultraviolet (UV) photon-induced photodecomposition of adsorbed acetone and 3,3-dimethylbutanone on the rutile TiO2 (110) surface have been investigated with photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The C-CH3 and C-C(R') bond dissociation energies in CH3R'C(OH)2 were predicted, and our calculated bond dissociation energies are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. We used a series of isodemic reactions to provide small corrections to the various bond dissociation energies. The calculated bond dissociation energies are in agreement with the observed photodissociation processes except for R' = CF3, suggesting that these processes are under thermodynamic control. For R' = CF3, reaction dynamics also play a role in determining the photodissociation mechanism. The gas phase Brönsted acidities of the gem-diols were calculated. For three molecules, R' = Cl, Br, and NO2, loss of a proton leads to the formation of a complex of acetic acid with the anion Cl-, Br-, and NO2-. The acidities of these three species are very high with the former two having acidities comparable to CF3SO3H. The ketones (R'RC(=O)) are weak Lewis acids except where addition of OH- leads to the dissociation of the complex to form an anion bonded to acetic acid, R' = NO2, Cl, and Br. The X-C bond dissociation energies for a number of X-CO2- species were calculated and these should be useful in correlating with photochemical reactivity studies.

  12. Stereochemistry of enzymatic water addition to C=C bonds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Water addition to carbon-carbon double bonds using hydratases is attracting great interest in biochemistry. Most of the known hydratases are involved in primary metabolism and to a lesser extent in secondary metabolism. New hydratases have recently been added to the toolbox, both from natural sources or artificial metalloenzymes. In order to comprehensively understand how the hydratases are able to catalyse the water addition to carbon-carbon double bonds, this review will highlight the mechanistic and stereochemical studies of the enzymatic water addition to carbon-carbon double bonds, focusing on the syn/anti-addition and stereochemistry of the reaction. PMID:25640045

  13. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N.; Allwood, Daniel M.; Blakemore, David C.; Ley, Steven V.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  14. Aromaticity effects on the profiles of the lowest triplet-state potential-energy surfaces for rotation about the C=C bonds of olefins with five-membered ring substituents: an example of the impact of Baird's rule.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Fogarty, Heather A; Möllerstedt, Helene; Brink, Maria; Ottosson, Henrik

    2013-08-01

    A density functional theory study on olefins with five-membered monocyclic 4n and 4n+2 π-electron substituents (C4H3X; X=CH(+), SiH(+), BH, AlH, CH2, SiH2, O, S, NH, and CH(-)) was performed to assess the connection between the degree of substituent (anti)aromaticity and the profile of the lowest triplet-state (T1) potential-energy surface (PES) for twisting about olefinic C=C bonds. It exploited both Hückel's rule on aromaticity in the closed-shell singlet ground state (S0) and Baird's rule on aromaticity in the lowest ππ* excited triplet state. The compounds CH2=CH(C4H3X) were categorized as set A and set B olefins depending on which carbon atom (C2 or C3) of the C4H3X ring is bonded to the olefin. The degree of substituent (anti)aromaticity goes from strongly S0 -antiaromatic/T1 -aromatic (C5H4 (+)) to strongly S0 -aromatic/T1- antiaromatic (C5H4(-)). Our hypothesis is that the shapes of the T1 PESs, as given by the energy differences between planar and perpendicularly twisted olefin structures in T1 [ΔE(T1)], smoothly follow the changes in substituent (anti)aromaticity. Indeed, correlations between ΔE(T1) and the (anti)aromaticity changes of the C4 H3 X groups, as measured by the zz-tensor component of the nucleus-independent chemical shift ΔNICS(T1;1)zz , are found both for sets A and B separately (linear fits; r(2) =0.949 and 0.851, respectively) and for the two sets combined (linear fit; r(2) =0.851). For sets A and B combined, strong correlations are also found between ΔE(T1) and the degree of S0 (anti)aromaticity as determined by NICS(S0,1)zz (sigmoidal fit; r(2) =0.963), as well as between the T1 energies of the planar olefins and NICS(S0,1)zz (linear fit; r(2) =0.939). Thus, careful tuning of substituent (anti)aromaticity allows for design of small olefins with T1 PESs suitable for adiabatic Z/E photoisomerization. PMID:23794153

  15. Synthesis of 2-Benzylphenyl Ketones by Aryne Insertion into Unactivated C-C Bonds.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bin; Tang, Jinghua; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    A transition-metal-free procedure to access to functionalized 2-benzylphenyl ketones is described by direct insertion of arynes into benzylic C-C bonds. This reaction was promoted by cesium fluoride at room temperature, allowing the products to form in high selectivity and achieve good functional group tolerance. PMID:27004731

  16. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Insertion of Allenes into C-C Bonds of Benzocyclobutenols.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunliang; Liu, Li-Chuan; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Chenran; Zhang, Qing-Wei; He, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Herein we report a Rh(I)-catalyzed two carbon insertion into C-C bonds of benzocyclobutenols by employing symmetrical and unsymmetrical allenes. This reaction provides rapid access to alkylidene tetralins bearing two adjacent stereogenic centers in good yields and diasteroselectivities. PMID:26727276

  17. Formation of C-C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Bower, John F; Krische, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The formation of C-C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile-nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C-H bonds. PMID:21822399

  18. Formation of C-C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, John F.; Krische, Michael J.

    The formation of C-C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile-nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C-H bonds.

  19. Spectroscopic Characterization of Lanthanum-Mediated Dehydrogenation and C-C Bond Coupling of Ethylene.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sudesh; Cao, Wenjin; Zhang, Yuchen; Roudjane, Mourad; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    La(C2H2) and La(C4H6) are observed from the reaction of laser-vaporized La atoms with ethylene molecules by photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and characterized by mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy. La(C2H2) is identified as a metallacyclopropene and La(C4H6) as a metallacyclopentene. The three-membered ring is formed by concerted H2 elimination and the five-membered cycle by dehydrogenation and C-C bond coupling. Both metallacycles prefer a doublet ground state with a La 6s-based unpaired electron. Ionization of the neutral doublet state of either complex produces a singlet ion state by removing the La-based electron. The ionization allows accurate measurements of the adiabatic ionization energy of the neutral doublet state and metal-ligand and ligand-based vibrational frequencies of the neutral and ionic states. Although the La atom is in a formal oxidation state of +2, the ionization energies of these metal-hydrocarbon cycles are lower than that of the neutral La atom. Deuteration has a small effect on the ionization energies of the two cyclic radicals but distinctive effects on their vibrational frequencies. PMID:27322131

  20. Facile P-C/C-H Bond-Cleavage Reactivity of Nickel Bis(diphosphine) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Li, Haixia; Appel, Aaron M; Hall, Michael B; Bullock, R Morris

    2016-07-01

    Unusual cleavage of P-C and C-H bonds of the P2 N2 ligand, in heteroleptic [Ni(P2 N2 )(diphosphine)](2+) complexes under mild conditions, results in the formation of an iminium formyl nickelate featuring a C,P,P-tridentate coordination mode. The structures of both the heteroleptic [Ni(P2 N2 )(diphosphine)](2+) complexes and the resulting iminium formyl nickelate have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the mechanism of the P-C/C-H bond cleavage, which involves C-H bond cleavage, hydride rotation, Ni-C/P-H bond formation, and P-C bond cleavage. PMID:27189413

  1. [Hydrogen induced C-C, C-N, and C-S bond activities on Pi and Ni surfaces]: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    This document summarizes research applied to chemical bond activation studies. Topics summarized include: Carbon nitrogen bonds experimentation with aniline on Ni(111), Mi(100), and Pt(111) surfaces; carbon sulfur bonds experimentation with methanethiol, phenylthiol, and dimethyl disulfide on Pt(111) and Ni(111) surfaces; carbon-carbon bonds experimentation on Ni(100), Ni(111) and Pt(111) surfaces; and in-situ fluorescence yield near edge spectroscopy.

  2. Baeyer-Villiger C-C bond cleavage reaction in gilvocarcin and jadomycin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tibrewal, Nidhi; Pahari, Pallab; Wang, Guojun; Kharel, Madan K.; Morris, Caleb; Downey, Theresa; Hou, Yanpeng; Bugni, Tim S.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    GilOII has been unambiguously identified as the key enzyme performing the crucial C-C bond cleavage reaction responsible for the unique rearrangement of a benz[a]anthracene skeleton to the benzo[d]naphthopyranone backbone typical for the gilvocarcin type natural anticancer antibiotics. Further investigations of this enzyme led to the isolation of a hydroxy-oxepinone intermediate which allowed important conclusions regarding the cleavage mechanism. PMID:23102024

  3. A quantum chemical topological analysis of the C-C bond formation in organic reactions involving cationic species.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez, Patricia

    2014-07-21

    ELF topological analysis of the ionic Diels-Alder (I-DA) reaction between the N,N-dimethyliminium cation and cyclopentadiene (Cp) has been performed in order to characterise the C-C single bond formation. The C-C bond formation begins in the short range of 2.00-1.96 Åvia a C-to-C pseudoradical coupling between the most electrophilic center of the iminium cation and one of the two most nucleophilic centers of Cp. The electron density of the pseudoradical center generated at the most electrophilic carbon of the iminium cation comes mainly from the global charge transfer which takes place along the reaction. Analysis of the global reactivity indices indicates that the very high electrophilic character of the iminium cation is responsible for the negative activation energy found in the gas phase. On the other hand, the analysis of the radical P(k)(o) Parr functions of the iminium cation, and the nucleophilic P(k)(-) Parr functions of Cp makes the characterisation of the most favourable two-center interaction along the formation of the C-C single bond possible. PMID:24901220

  4. Metalloenzyme-Like Zeolites as Lewis Acid Catalysts for C-C Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-10-19

    The use of metalloenzyme-like zeolites as Lewis acid catalysts for C-C bond formation reactions has received increasing attention over the past few years. In particular, the observation of direct aldol condensation reactions enabled by hydrophobic zeolites with isolated framework metal sites has encouraged the development of catalytic approaches for producing chemicals from biomass-derived compounds. The discovery of new Diels-Alder cycloaddition/dehydration routes and experimental and computational studies of Lewis acid catalyzed carbonyl-ene reactions have given a further boost to this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26465652

  5. Formation of C-C bonds via ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation().

    PubMed

    Moran, Joseph; Krische, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of diverse π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of aldehydes provides products of carbonyl addition. Dehydrogenation of primary alcohols in the presence of the same π-unsaturated reactants provides identical products of carbonyl addition. In this way, carbonyl addition is achieved from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents or metallic reductants. In this account, the discovery of ruthenium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming transfer hydrogenations and the recent development of diastereo- and enantioselective variants are discussed. PMID:23430602

  6. Structure sensitivity of hydrogenolytic cleavage of endocyclic and exocyclic C-C bonds in methylcyclohexane over supported iridium particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hui; Gutierrez, Oliver Y.; Haller, Gary L.; Mei, Donghai; Rousseau, Roger J.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2013-01-02

    Structure sensitivities, H2 pressure effects and temperature dependencies for rates and selectivities of endo- and exocyclic C–C bond cleavage in methylcyclohexane were studied over supported Ir catalysts. The rate of endocyclic C–C bond cleavage first decreased and then increased with declining Ir dispersion from 0.65 to 0.035. The ring opening (RO) product distribution remained unchanged with varying H2 pressure on small Ir particles, while further shifting to methylhexanes with increasing H2 pressure on large particles. In contrast, the rate and selectivity of exocyclic C–C bond cleavage decreased monotonically with increasing H2 pressure and decreasing Ir particle size. The distinct dependencies of endocyclic and exocyclic C–C bond cleavage pathways on Ir dispersion and H2 pressure suggest that they are mediated by surface species with different ensemble size requirements. DFT calculations were performed on an Ir50 cluster and an Ir(111) surface, with or without pre-adsorbed hydrogen atoms, to provide insight into the observed effects of particle size and H2 pressure on RO pathways. On small Ir particles, the calculated dehydrogenation enthalpies for all endocyclic bonds were similar and affected to similar extents by H2 pressure; on large particles, the selectivity to n-heptane (via substituted C-C bond cleavage) was even lower than on small particles as a result of the least favorable adsorption and dehydrogenation energetics for hindered bonds. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The computing time is provided by the user project from EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific

  7. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach that has

  8. Comparison of the kinetics and thermodynamics for methyl radical addition to C=C, C=O, and C=S double bonds.

    PubMed

    Henry, David J; Coote, Michelle L; Gómez-Balderas, Rodolfo; Radom, Leo

    2004-02-18

    The barriers, enthalpies, and rate constants for the addition of methyl radical to the double bonds of a selection of alkene, carbonyl, and thiocarbonyl species (CH(2)=Z, CH(3)CH=Z, and (CH(3))(2)C=Z, where Z = CH(2), O, or S) and for the reverse beta-scission reactions have been investigated using high-level ab inito calculations. The results are rationalized with the aid of the curve-crossing model. The addition reactions proceed via early transition structures in all cases. The barriers for addition of methyl radical to C=C bonds are largely determined by the reaction exothermicities. Addition to the unsubstituted carbon center of C=C double bonds is favored over addition to the substituted carbon center, both kinetically (lower barriers) and thermodynamically (greater exothermicities). The barriers for addition to C=O bonds are influenced by both the reaction exothermicity and the singlet-triplet gap of the substrate. Addition to the carbon center is favored over addition to the oxygen, also both thermodynamically and kinetically. For the thiocarbonyl systems, addition to the carbon center is thermodynamically favored over addition to sulfur. However, in this case, the reaction is contrathermodynamic, addition to the sulfur center having a lower barrier due to spin density considerations. Entropic differences among corresponding addition and beta-scission reactions are relatively minor, and the differences in reaction rates are thus dominated by differences in the respective reaction barriers. PMID:14871104

  9. Recent Advances in Transition-Metal-Free Oxygenation of Alkene C=C Double Bonds for Carbonyl Generation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jie-Ping; Gao, Yong; Wei, Li

    2016-08-01

    Carbonyl-forming reactions are a class of fundamental transformations in organic chemistry. Guided by the current importance of environmentally benign metal-free catalysis and synthesis, herein we review recent advances in carbonyl-generation reactions based on alkene C=C double oxygenation as well as related cascade reactions in the synthesis of diverse organic products. The content of this focus review consists of two important but different reaction models: oxygenation based on full C=C double-bond cleavage and oxygenation based on partial C=C double-bond cleavage. PMID:27237866

  10. A Homogeneous, Recyclable Polymer Support for Rh(I)-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Ranjan; Tunge, Jon A.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and practical polymer-supported, homogeneous, recyclable biphephos rhodium(I) catalyst has been developed for C-C bond formation reactions. Control of polymer molecular weight allowed tuning of the polymer solubility such that the polymer-supported catalyst is soluble in nonpolar solvents and insoluble in polar solvents. Using the supported rhodium catalysts, addition of aryl and vinylboronic acids to the electrophiles such as enones, aldehydes, N-sulfonyl aldimines, and alkynes occurs smoothly to provide products in high yields. Additions of terminal alkynes to enones and industrially relevant hydroformylation reactions have also been successfully carried out. Studies show that the leaching of Rh from the polymer support is low and catalyst recycle can be achieved by simple precipitation and filtration. PMID:21895010

  11. Bronsted-Evans-Polany relationships for C-C bond forming and C-C bond breaking reactions in thiamine-catalyzed decarboxylation of 2-keto acids using density functional theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Broadbelt, L. J.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of generalized enzyme reactions suggests that a wide variety of substrates can undergo enzymatic transformations, including those whose biotransformation has not yet been realized. The use of quantum chemistry to evaluate kinetic feasibility is an attractive approach to identify enzymes for the proposed transformation. However, the sheer number of novel transformations that can be generated makes this impractical as a screening approach. Therefore, it is essential to develop structure/activity relationships based on quantities that are more efficient to calculate. In this work, we propose a structure/activity relationship based on the free energy of binding or reaction of non-native substrates to evaluate the catalysis relative to that of native substrates. While Broensted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relationships such as that proposed here have found broad application in heterogeneous catalysis, their extension to enzymatic catalysis is limited. We report here on density functional theory (DFT) studies for C-C bond formation and C-C bond cleavage associated with the decarboxylation of six 2-keto acids by a thiamine-containing enzyme (EC 1.2.7.1) and demonstrate a linear relationship between the free energy of reaction and the activation barrier. We then applied this relationship to predict the activation barriers of 17 chemically similar novel reactions. These calculations reveal that there is a clear correlation between the free energy of formation of the transition state and the free energy of the reaction, suggesting that this method can be further extended to predict the kinetics of novel reactions through our computational framework for discovery of novel biochemical transformations.

  12. Silver(I) NHC mediated C-C bond activation of alkyl nitriles and catalytic efficiency in oxazoline synthesis.

    PubMed

    Heath, Rachael; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-05-21

    Preparation of silver triazolylidene (trz) species from triazolium salts and Ag2O in refluxing MeCN leads to a selective C-C bond cleavage and the formation of complexes of general formula [(trz)Ag(CN)] from Calkyl-CN bond activation. Moreover, these silver carbene complexes are precursors of highly active catalysts for oxazoline formation via aldol condensation. PMID:25913007

  13. Observation of Spontaneous C=C Bond Breaking in the Reaction between Atomic Boron and Ethylene in Solid Neon.

    PubMed

    Jian, Jiwen; Lin, Hailu; Luo, Mingbiao; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2016-07-11

    A ground-state boron atom inserts into the C=C bond of ethylene to spontaneously form the allene-like compound H2 CBCH2 on annealing in solid neon. This compound can further isomerize to the propyne-like HCBCH3 isomer under UV light excitation. The observation of this unique spontaneous C=C bond insertion reaction is consistent with theoretical predictions that the reaction is thermodynamically exothermic and kinetically facile. This work demonstrates that the stronger C=C bond, rather than the less inert C-H bond, can be broken to form organoboron species from the reaction of a boron atom with ethylene even at cryogenic temperatures. PMID:27240114

  14. Central C-C Bonding Increases Optical and Chemical Stability of NIR Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Hoon; Owens, Eric A.; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Wada, Hideyuki; Gravier, Julien; Bao, Kai; Frangioni, John V.; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2014-01-01

    Functional near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores have played a major role in the recent advances in bioimaging. However, the optical and physicochemical stabilities of NIR fluorophores in the biological and physiological environment are still a challenge. Especially, the ether linkage on the meso carbon of heptamethine core is fragile when exposed to serum proteins or other amine-rich biomolecules. To solve such a structural limitation, a rigid carbon-carbon bond was installed onto the framework of ether-linked NIR fluorophores through the Suzuki coupling. The robust fluorophores replaced as ZW800-1C and ZW800-3C displayed enhanced optical and chemical stability in various solvents and a 100% warm serum environment (> 99%, 24 h). The biodistribution and clearance of C-C coupled ZW800 compounds were almost identical to the previously developed oxygen-substituted ZW800 compounds. When conjugated with a small molecule ligand, ZW800-1C maintained the identical stable form in warm serum (>98%, 24 h), while ZW800-1A hydrolyzed quickly after 4 h incubation (34%, 24 h). PMID:25530846

  15. Acceptorless dehydrogenation of C-C single bonds adjacent to functional groups by metal-ligand cooperation.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Shuhei; Akiyama, Midori; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2013-12-18

    Unprecedented direct acceptorless dehydrogenation of C-C single bonds adjacent to functional groups to form α,β-unsaturated compounds has been accomplished by using a new class of group 9 metal complexes. Metal-ligand cooperation operated by the hydroxycyclopentadienyl ligand was proposed to play a major role in the catalytic transformation. PMID:24299029

  16. Enantioselective Rh-Catalyzed Carboacylation of C═N Bonds via C-C Activation of Benzocyclobutenones.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lin; Xu, Tao; Li, Hongbo; Dong, Guangbin

    2016-01-13

    Herein we describe the first enantioselective Rh-catalyzed carboacylation of oximes (imines) via C-C activation. In this transformation, the benzocyclobutenone C1-C2 bond is selectively activated by a low valent rhodium catalyst and subsequently the resulting two Rh-C bonds add across a C═N bond, which provides a unique approach to access chiral lactams. A range of polycyclic nitrogen-containing scaffolds were obtained in good yields with excellent enantioselectivity. Further derivatization of the lactam products led to a rapid entry to various novel fused heterocycles. PMID:26674855

  17. Identification of Possible Pathways for C-C Bond Formation during Electrochemical Reduction of CO2: New Theoretical Insights from an Improved Electrochemical Model.

    PubMed

    Goodpaster, Jason D; Bell, Alexis T; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-04-21

    We have carried out a periodic Kohn-Sham density functional theory investigation of the pathways by which carbon-carbon bonds could be formed during the electrochemical reduction of CO2 on Cu(100) using a model that includes the effects of the electrochemical potential, solvent, and electrolyte. The electrochemical potential was set by relating the applied potential to the Fermi energy and then calculating the number of electrons required by the simulation cell for that specific Fermi energy. The solvent was included as a continuum dielectric, and the electrolyte was described using a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann model. The calculated potential of zero charge for a variety of surfaces agrees with experiment to within a mean average error of 0.09 V, thereby validating the assumptions of the model. Analysis of the mechanism for C-C bond formation revealed that at low-applied potential, C-C bond formation occurs through a CO dimer. However, at high applied potentials, a large activation barrier blocks this pathway; therefore, C-C bond formation occurs through reaction of adsorbed CHO and CO. Rate parameters determined from our calculations were used to simulate the kinetics of ethene formation during the electrochemical reduction of CO over a Cu(100) surface. An excellent match was observed between previously reported measurements of the partial current for ethene formation as a function of applied voltage and the variation in the partial current for C-C bond formation predicted by our microkinetic model. The electrochemical model reported here is simple, fairly easy to implement, and involves only a small increase in computational cost over calculations neglecting the effects of the electrolyte and the applied field. Therefore, it can be used to study the effects of applied potential and electrolyte composition on the energetics of surface reactions for a wide variety of electrochemical reactions. PMID:27045040

  18. Gold-Catalyzed Oxidation of Propargylic Ethers with Internal C-C Triple Bonds: Impressive Regioselectivity Enabled by Inductive Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Kegong; D’Souza, Brendan; Nelson, Jon; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Inductive perturbations of C-C triple bonds are shown to dictate the regiochemistry of gold-catalyzed oxidation of internal C-C triple bonds in the cases of propargylic ethers, resulting in highly regioselective formation of β-alkoxy-α,β-unsaturated ketones (up to >50/1 selectivity) via α-oxo gold carbene intermediates. Ethers derived from primary propargylic alcohols can be reliably transformed in good yields, and various functional groups are tolerated. With substrates derived from secondary propargylic alcohols, the development of a new P,N-bidentate ligand enables the minimization of competing alkyl group migration to the gold carbene center over the desired hydride migration; the preferred migration of a phenyl group, however, results in efficient formation of a α-phenyl-β-alkoxy-α,β-unsaturated ketone. These results further advance the surrogacy of a propargyl moiety to synthetically versatile enone function with reliable and readily predictable regioselectivity. PMID:25284890

  19. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation for C-C Bond Formation: Hydrohydroxyalkylation and Hydroaminoalkylation via Reactant Redox Pairs.

    PubMed

    Perez, Felix; Oda, Susumu; Geary, Laina M; Krische, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Merging the chemistry of transfer hydrogenation and carbonyl or imine addition, a broad new family of redox-neutral or reductive hydrohydroxyalkylations and hydroaminomethylations have been developed. In these processes, hydrogen redistribution between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants is accompanied by C-C bond formation, enabling direct conversion of lower alcohols to higher alcohols. Similarly, hydrogen redistribution between amines to π-unsaturated reactants results in direct conversion of lower amines to higher amines. Alternatively, equivalent products of hydrohydroxyalkylation and hydroaminomethylation may be generated through the reaction of carbonyl compounds or imines with π-unsaturated reactants under the conditions of 2-propanol-mediated reductive coupling. Finally, using vicinally dioxygenated reactants, that is, diol, ketols, or diones, successive transfer hydrogenative coupling occurs to generate 2 C-C bonds, resulting in products of formal [4+2] cycloaddition. PMID:27573275

  20. The use of ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C bonds.

    PubMed

    Kelsen, Vinciane; Wendt, Bianca; Werkmeister, Svenja; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias; Chaudret, Bruno

    2013-04-28

    The performance of well-defined ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles (NPs) as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C and C=X bonds is reported. Monodisperse iron nanoparticles of about 2 nm size are synthesized by the decomposition of {Fe(N[Si(CH3)3]2)2}2 under dihydrogen. They are found to be active for the hydrogenation of various alkenes and alkynes under mild conditions and weakly active for C=O bond hydrogenation. PMID:23505625

  1. Energy pulse bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    To eliminate many of the present termination problems a technique called energy pulse bonding (EPB) was developed. The process demonstrated the capability of: (1) joining conductors without prior removal of insulations, (2) joining conductors without danger of brittle intermetallics, (3) increased joint temperature capability, (4) simultaneous formation of several bonds, (5) capability of higher joint density, and (6) a production oriented process. The following metals were successfully bonded in the solid state: copper, beryllium copper, phosphor bronze, aluminum, brass, and Kovar.

  2. Raman spectroscopic determination of the length, strength, compressibility, Debye temperature, elasticity, and force constant of the C-C bond in graphene.

    PubMed

    Yang, X X; Li, J W; Zhou, Z F; Wang, Y; Yang, L W; Zheng, W T; Sun, Chang Q

    2012-01-21

    From the perspective of bond relaxation and bond vibration, we have formulated the Raman phonon relaxation of graphene, under the stimuli of the number-of-layers, the uni-axial strain, the pressure, and the temperature, in terms of the response of the length and strength of the representative bond of the entire specimen to the applied stimuli. Theoretical unification of the measurements clarifies that: (i) the opposite trends of the Raman shifts, which are due to the number-of-layers reduction, of the G-peak shift and arises from the vibration of a pair of atoms, while the D- and the 2D-peak shifts involve the z-neighbor of a specific atom; (ii) the tensile strain-induced phonon softening and phonon-band splitting arise from the asymmetric response of the C(3v) bond geometry to the C(2v) uni-axial bond elongation; (iii) the thermal softening of the phonons originates from bond expansion and weakening; and (iv) the pressure stiffening of the phonons results from bond compression and work hardening. Reproduction of the measurements has led to quantitative information about the referential frequencies from which the Raman frequencies shift as well as the length, energy, force constant, Debye temperature, compressibility and elastic modulus of the C-C bond in graphene, which is of instrumental importance in the understanding of the unusual behavior of graphene. PMID:22105904

  3. Chemoselective Radical Dehalogenation and C-C Bond Formation on Aryl Halide Substrates Using Organic Photoredox Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Poelma, Saemi O; Burnett, G Leslie; Discekici, Emre H; Mattson, Kaila M; Treat, Nicolas J; Luo, Yingdong; Hudson, Zachary M; Shankel, Shelby L; Clark, Paul G; Kramer, John W; Hawker, Craig J; Read de Alaniz, Javier

    2016-08-19

    Despite the number of methods available for dehalogenation and carbon-carbon bond formation using aryl halides, strategies that provide chemoselectivity for systems bearing multiple carbon-halogen bonds are still needed. Herein, we report the ability to tune the reduction potential of metal-free phenothiazine-based photoredox catalysts and demonstrate the application of these catalysts for chemoselective carbon-halogen bond activation to achieve C-C cross-coupling reactions as well as reductive dehalogenations. This procedure works both for conjugated polyhalides as well as unconjugated substrates. We further illustrate the usefulness of this protocol by intramolecular cyclization of a pyrrole substrate, an advanced building block for a family of natural products known to exhibit biological activity. PMID:27276418

  4. Unlocking Hydrogenation for C-C Bond Formation: A Brief Overview of Enantioselective Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Abbas; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenation of π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of carbonyl compounds or imines promotes reductive C-C coupling, providing a byproduct-free alternative to stoichiometric organometallic reagents in an ever-increasing range of C=X (X = O, NR) additions. Under transfer hydrogenation conditions, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants triggers generation of electrophile-nucleophile pairs, enabling carbonyl addition directly from the alcohol oxidation level, bypassing discrete alcohol oxidation and generation of stoichiometric byproducts. PMID:22125398

  5. Ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) catalyzed modification of ketones via two C-C bond cleavages with the retention of the oxo-group.

    PubMed

    Feng, Peng; Sun, Xiang; Su, Yijin; Li, Xinyao; Zhang, Li He; Shi, Xiaodong; Jiao, Ning

    2014-06-20

    A simple ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) catalyzed functionalization of ketones through double C-C bond cleavage strategy has been disclosed. This reaction provides a mild, practical method toward carbamoyl azides, which are versatile intermediates and building blocks in organic synthesis. Based on relevant mechanistic studies, a unique and plausible C-C bond and N-O bond cleavage process is proposed, where the oxyamination intermediate plays an important role in this reaction. PMID:24906031

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of C-C bond scission in polyethylene and linear alkanes: effects of the condensed phase.

    PubMed

    Popov, Konstantin V; Knyazev, Vadim D

    2014-03-27

    The reaction of C-C bond scission in polyethylene chains of various lengths was studied using molecular dynamics under the conditions of vacuum and condensed phase (polymer melt). A method of assigning meaningful rate constant values to condensed-phase bond scission reactions based on a kinetic mechanism accounting for dissociation, reverse recombination, and diffusional separation of fragments was developed. The developed method accounts for such condensed-phase phenomena as cage effects and diffusion of the decay products away from the reaction site. The results of C-C scission simulations indicate that per-bond rate constants decrease by an order of magnitude as the density of the system increases from vacuum to the normal density of a polyethylene melt. Additional calculations were performed to study the dependence of the rate constant on the length of the polymer chain under the conditions of the condensed phase. The calculations demonstrate that the rate constant is independent of the degree of polymerization if polyethylene samples of different lengths are kept at the same pressure. However, if instead molecular systems of different polyethylene chain lengths decompose under the conditions of the same density, shorter chains result in higher pressures and lower rate constants. The observed effect is attributed to a higher degree of molecular crowding (lower fraction of free intermolecular space available for molecular motion) in the case of shorter molecules. PMID:24571517

  7. Ternary Electrocatalysts for Oxidizing Ethanol to Carbon Dioxide: Making Ir Capable of Splitting C-C bond

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meng; Cullen, David A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Marinkovic, N.; More, Karren Leslie; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2013-01-01

    Splitting the C-C bond is the main obstacle to electroxidation of ethanol (EOR) to CO2. We recently demonstrated that the ternary PtRhSnO2 electrocatalyst can accomplish that reaction at room temperature with Rh having a unique capability to split the C-C bond. In this article we report the finding that Ir can be induced to split the C-C bond as a component of the ternary catalyst. We synthesized, characterized and compared the properties of several ternary electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported nanoparticle (NP) electrocatalysts comprising a SnO2 NP core decorated with multi-metallic nanoislands (MM = PtIr, PtRh, IrRh, PtIrRh) were prepared using a seeded growth approach. An array of characterization techniques were employed to establish the composition and architecture of the synthesized MM /SnO2 NPs, while electrochemical and in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies elucidated trends in activity and the nature of the reaction intermediates and products. Both EOR reactivity and selectivity towards CO2 formation of several of these MM /SnO2/C electrocatalysts are significantly higher compared to conventional Pt/C and Pt/SnO2/C catalysts. We demonstrate that the PtIr/SnO2/C catalyst with high Ir content shows outstanding catalytic property with the most negative EOR onset potential and reasonably good selectivity towards ethanol complete oxidation to CO2. PtRh/SnO2/C catalysts with a moderate Rh content exhibit the highest EOR selectivity, as deduced from infrared studies.

  8. Matching plasmon resonances to the C=C and C-H bonds in estradiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbomson, Ifeoma G.; McMeekin, Scott; De La Rue, Richard; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2015-03-01

    We tune nanoantennas to resonate within mid-infrared wavelengths to match the vibrational resonances of C=C and C-H of the hormone estradiol. Modelling and fabrication of the nanoantennas produce plasmon resonances between 2 μm to 7 μm. The hormone estradiol was dissolved in ethanol and evaporated, leaving thickness of a few hundreds of nanometres on top of gold asymmetric split H-like shaped on a fused silica substrate. The reflectance was measured and a red-shift is recorded from the resonators plasmonic peaks. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is use to observe enhanced spectra of the stretching modes for the analyte which belongs to alkenyl biochemical group.

  9. Direct Construction of 4-Hydroxybenzils via Para-Selective C-C Bond Coupling of Phenols and Aryl Methyl Ketones.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jia-Chen; Cheng, Yan; Wang, Miao; Wu, Yan-Dong; Wu, An-Xin

    2016-09-01

    A highly para-selective C-C bond coupling is presented between phenols C(sp(2)) and aryl methyl ketones C(sp(3)), which enables the direct construction of 4-hydroxybenzil derivatives. This practical method exhibits a broad substrate scope and large-scale applicability and represents a general gateway to the hydroxybenzil natural product family. Mechanistic investigations indicated that the combination of HI with DMSO realized the oxidative carbonylation of aryl methyl ketones, while boric acid acted as a dual-functional relay reagent to promote this transformation. PMID:27513164

  10. Cyanoalkylation: Alkylnitriles in Catalytic C-C Bond-Forming Reactions.

    PubMed

    López, Rosa; Palomo, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Alkylnitriles are one of the most ubiquitous nitrogen-containing chemicals and are widely employed in reactions which result in nitrile-group conversion into other functionalities. Nevertheless, their use as carbon pronucleophiles in carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions has been hampered by difficulties associated mainly with the catalytic generation of active species, that is, α-cyano carbanions or metalated nitriles. Recent investigations have addressed this challenge and have resulted in different modes of alkylnitrile activation. This review illustrates these findings, which have set the foundation for the development of practical and conceptually new catalytic, direct cyanoalkylation methodologies. PMID:26387483

  11. Efficient C-C bond splitting on Pt monolayer and sub-monolayer catalysts during ethanol electro-oxidation: Pt layer strain and morphology effects.

    PubMed

    Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Yuan, Qiuyi; Petkov, Valeri; Gan, Lin; Rudi, Stefan; Yang, Ruizhi; Huang, Yunhui; Brankovic, Stanko R; Strasser, Peter

    2014-09-21

    Efficient catalytic C-C bond splitting coupled with complete 12-electron oxidation of the ethanol molecule to CO2 is reported on nanoscale electrocatalysts comprised of a Pt monolayer (ML) and sub-monolayer (sML) deposited on Au nanoparticles (Au@Pt ML/sML). The Au@Pt electrocatalysts were synthesized using surface limited redox replacement (SLRR) of an underpotentially deposited (UPD) Cu monolayer in an electrochemical cell reactor. Au@Pt ML showed improved catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) and, unlike their Pt bulk and Pt sML counterparts, was able to generate CO2 at very low electrode potentials owing to efficient C-C bond splitting. To explain this, we explore the hypothesis that competing strain effects due to the Pt layer coverage/morphology (compressive) and the Pt-Au lattice mismatch (tensile) control surface chemisorption and overall activity. Control experiments on well-defined model Pt monolayer systems are carried out involving a wide array of methods such as high-energy X-ray diffraction, pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis, in situ electrochemical FTIR spectroscopy, and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy. The vibrational fingerprints of adsorbed CO provide compelling evidence on the relation between surface bond strength, layer strain and morphology, and catalytic activity. PMID:25081353

  12. Intramolecular Interaction, Photoisomerization, and Mechanical C-C Bond Dissociation of 1,2-Di(9-anthryl)benzene and Its Photoisomer: A Fundamental Moiety of Anthracene-Based π-Cluster Molecules.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, Tomohiko; Uno, Shin-Ya; Hirao, Yasukazu; Kubo, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    We report variable and unique properties of 1,2-di(9-anthryl)benzene 1 as a fundamental moiety of anthracene-based π-cluster molecules. Due to a through-space π-conjugation between anthracene units, excimer emission at room temperature and charge delocalized state in radical cation state of 1 could be observed. Photoirradiation to 1 afforded an intramolecular [4 + 4] cyclized anthracene dimer 1' having a high strain energy with long C-C bond that exceeded 1.68 Å, resulting in C-C bond dissociation by simple mechanical grinding. PMID:26828776

  13. Rh(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of N-Unprotected Indoles from Imidamides and Diazo Ketoesters via C-H Activation and C-C/C-N Bond Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zisong; Yu, Songjie; Li, Xingwei

    2016-02-19

    The synthesis of N-unprotected indoles has been realized via Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation of imidamides with α-diazo β-ketoesters. The reaction occurs with the release of an amide coproduct, which originates from both the imidamide and the diazo as a result of C═N cleavage of the imidamide and C-C(acyl) cleavage of the diazo. A rhodacyclic intermediate has been isolated and a plausible mechanism has been proposed. PMID:26824751

  14. Theoretical study of the bond dissociation energies of methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Walch, Stephen P.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical study of the bond dissociation energies for H2O and CH3OH is presented. The C-H and O-H bond energies are computed accurately with the modified coupled-pair functional method using a large basis set. For these bonds, an accuracy of +/- 2 kcal/mol is achieved, which is consistent with the C-H and C-C single bond energies of other molecules. The C-O bond is much more difficult to compute accurately because it requires higher levels of correlation treatment and more extensive one-particle basis sets.

  15. Palladium(ii)-catalyzed C-C and C-O bond formation for the synthesis of C1-benzoyl isoquinolines from isoquinoline N-oxides and nitroalkenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiu-Ling; Li, Wei-Ze; Wang, Ying-Chun; Ren, Qiu; Wang, Heng-Shan; Pan, Ying-Ming

    2016-08-01

    C1-Benzoyl isoquinolines can be generated via a palladium(ii)-catalyzed C-C and C-O coupling of isoquinoline N-oxides with aromatic nitroalkenes. The reaction proceeds through remote C-H bond activation and subsequent intramolecular oxygen atom transfer (OAT). In this reaction, the N-O bond was designed as a directing group in the C-H bond activation as well as the source of an oxygen atom. PMID:27443150

  16. Bonding and Integration of C-C Composite to Cu-Clad-Molybdenum for Thermal Management Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Singh, M.; Shpargel, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional carbon-carbon composites with either resin-derived matrix or CVI matrix were joined to Cu-clad-Mo using active Ag-Cu braze alloys for thermal management applications. The joint microstructure and composition were examined using Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy, and the joint hardness was characterized using the Knoop microhardness testing. Observations on the infiltration of the composite with molten braze, dissolution of metal substrate, and solute segregation at the C-C surface have been discussed. The thermal response of the integrated assembly is also briefly discussed.

  17. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  18. Influence of sulfur addition and S-induced wall catalytic effect on C-C bond cleavage and aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(-1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl NMBB predominately yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors lead to substantially higher catalyst activity and subsequently higher conversion. In order to clarify the effect of sulfur alone on model compound conversion, NMBB was treated with sulfur in concentrations of 1.2 to 3.4 wt%, corresponding to conditions present in catalytic runs with sulfur. It was found that increasing sulfur concentrations leads to higher NMBB conversion. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent influence on the reactor walls. It reacted with the transition metals in the steel to form a microscopic black iron sulfide layer on the surface, which could not be removed mechanically. The {open_quotes}non catalytic{close_quotes} runs after experiments with added sulfur yielded higher conversion than normal runs with new reactors. This {open_quotes}wall catalytic effect{close_quotes} can be reduced by treating sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid for a short period of time and subsequent immersing into a base bath over night. These results demonstrate the significant influence of sulfur addition and S-induced residual wall-effect on C-C bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics in batch reactors.

  19. Influence of sulfur addition and S-induced wall catalytic effects on C-C bond cleavage and aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, designated as NMBB, predominately yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors lead to substantially higher catalyst activity and subsequently higher conversion. NMBB was also treated with sulfur alone in the absence of catalysts in concentrations of 1.2 to 3.4 wt, corresponding to conditions present in catalytic runs with added sulfur to precursors. It was found that increasing sulfur concentrations lead to higher NMBB conversion. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent influence on the reactor walls. It reacted with the transition metals in the stainless steel to form a microscopic black iron sulfide layer on the surface, which could not be removed mechanically. The {open_quotes}non-catalytic{close_quotes} runs which were done after experiments with added sulfur yielded higher conversions than normal runs done in new reactors. This {open_quotes}wall catalytic effect{close_quotes} can be reduced by treating sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid for a short period of time and subsequent immersing into a base bath overnight. These results demonstrate the significant influence of sulfur addition and S-induced residual wall-effect on C-C bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics in batch reactors.

  20. Bond energy analysis revisited and designed toward a rigorous methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Hiromi; Ohashi, Hideaki; Imamura, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Yasuaki

    2011-09-01

    The present study theoretically revisits and numerically assesses two-body energy decomposition schemes including a newly proposed one. The new decomposition scheme is designed to make the equilibrium bond distance equivalent with the minimum point of bond energies. Although the other decomposition schemes generally predict the wrong order of the C-C bond strengths of C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6, the new decomposition scheme is capable of reproducing the C-C bond strengths. Numerical assessment on a training set of molecules demonstrates that the present scheme exhibits a stronger correlation with bond dissociation energies than the other decomposition schemes do, which suggests that the new decomposition scheme is a reliable and powerful analysis methodology.

  1. A DFT study on the NHC catalysed Michael addition of enols to α,β-unsaturated acyl-azoliums. A base catalysed C-C bond-formation step.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Sáez, José A; Arnó, Manuel

    2014-02-14

    The NHC catalysed nucleophilic additions of enols to α,β-unsaturated acyl-azolium intermediates have been investigated using DFT methods at the MPWB1K/6-31G** computational level. In the direct and the conjugate additions, formation of a hydrogen bond (HB) with the carboxyl oxygen is not sufficient to favour the C-C bond formation as a consequence of the low nucleophilic character of enols. Interestingly, when enols form a HB with the chloride counterion, the activation energies associated with the conjugate addition decrease as a consequence of the increased nucleophilic character of enols and the increased electrophilic character of the 'acyl-azolium + Cl' ion pair. Analysis of the DFT reactivity indices allows establishing a base catalysed C-C bond-formation step promoted by the chloride counterion. PMID:24343422

  2. C-H Bond activation and C-C bond formation in the reaction of 2,5-dimethylthiophene with TpMe2Ir compounds.

    PubMed

    Paneque, Margarita; Poveda, Manuel L; Carmona, Ernesto; Salazar, Verónica

    2005-04-21

    The bulky 2,5-dimethylthiophene (2,5-Me2T) reacts at 60 degrees C with TpMe2Ir(C2H4)2 to give a mixture of two TpMe2Ir(III) hydride products, 3 and 4, that contain in addition a thienyl (3) or a thienyl-derived ligand (4). For the generation of 3 only sp2 C-H activation is needed, but the formation of 4 requires also the activation of an sp3 C-H bond and the formation of a new C-C bond (between vinyl and thienyl fragments). In the presence of 2,5-Me2T, compound 4 reacts further to produce a complex thiophenic structure (5, characterized by X-ray methods) that derives formally from two molecules of 2,5-Me2T and a vinyl fragment. Compounds 3-5 can be readily protonated by [H(OEt2)2][BAr'4](Ar'= 3,5-C6H3(CF3)2), with initial generation of carbene ligands (in the case of 3 and 5) as a consequence of H+ attack at the beta-carbon of the Ir-thienyl unit. Free, substituted thiophenes, derived from the original 2,5-Me2T, may be isolated in this way. PMID:15824780

  3. Metal-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage in alkanes: effects of methyl substitution on transition-state structures and stability.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, David W; Hibbitts, David D; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-07-01

    Methyl substituents at C-C bonds influence hydrogenolysis rates and selectivities of acyclic and cyclic C2-C8 alkanes on Ir, Rh, Ru, and Pt catalysts. C-C cleavage transition states form via equilibrated dehydrogenation steps that replace several C-H bonds with C-metal bonds, desorb H atoms (H*) from saturated surfaces, and form λ H2(g) molecules. Activation enthalpies (ΔH(‡)) and entropies (ΔS(‡)) and λ values for (3)C-(x)C cleavage are larger than for (2)C-(2)C or (2)C-(1)C bonds, irrespective of the composition of metal clusters or the cyclic/acyclic structure of the reactants. (3)C-(x)C bonds cleave through α,β,γ- or α,β,γ,δ-bound transition states, as indicated by the agreement between measured activation entropies and those estimated for such structures using statistical mechanics. In contrast, less substituted C-C bonds involve α,β-bound species with each C atom bound to several surface atoms. These α,β configurations weaken C-C bonds through back-donation to antibonding orbitals, but such configurations cannot form with (3)C atoms, which have one C-H bond and thus can form only one C-M bond. (3)C-(x)C cleavage involves attachment of other C atoms, which requires endothermic C-H activation and H* desorption steps that lead to larger ΔH(‡) values but also larger ΔS(‡) values (by forming more H2(g)) than for (2)C-(2)C and (2)C-(1)C bonds, irrespective of alkane size (C2-C8) or cyclic/acyclic structure. These data and their mechanistic interpretation indicate that low temperatures and high H2 pressures favor cleavage of less substituted C-C bonds and form more highly branched products from cyclic and acyclic alkanes. Such interpretations and catalytic consequences of substitution seem also relevant to C-X cleavage (X = S, N, O) in desulfurization, denitrogenation, and deoxygenation reactions. PMID:24961991

  4. Stereoselective Halogenation of Integral Unsaturated C-C Bonds in Chemically and Mechanically Robust Zr and Hf MOFs.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Ross J; Griffin, Sarah L; Wilson, Claire; Forgan, Ross S

    2016-03-24

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) containing Zr(IV) -based secondary building units (SBUs), as in the UiO-66 series, are receiving widespread research interest due to their enhanced chemical and mechanical stabilities. We report the synthesis and extensive characterisation, as both bulk microcrystalline and single crystal forms, of extended UiO-66 (Zr and Hf) series MOFs containing integral unsaturated alkene, alkyne and butadiyne units, which serve as reactive sites for postsynthetic modification (PSM) by halogenation. The water stability of a Zr-stilbene MOF allows the dual insertion of both -OH and -Br groups in a single, aqueous bromohydrination step. Quantitative bromination of alkyne- and butadiyne-containing MOFs is demonstrated to be stereoselective, as a consequence of the linker geometry when bound in the MOFs, while the inherent change in hybridisation and geometry of integral linker atoms is facilitated by the high mechanical stabilities of the MOFs, allowing bromination to be characterised in a single-crystal to single-crystal (SCSC) manner. The facile addition of bromine across the unsaturated C-C bonds in the MOFs in solution is extended to irreversible iodine sequestration in the vapour phase. A large-pore interpenetrated Zr MOF demonstrates an I2 storage capacity of 279 % w/w, through a combination of chemisorption and physisorption, which is comparable to the highest reported capacities of benchmark iodine storage materials for radioactive I2 sequestration. We expect this facile PSM process to not only allow trapping of toxic vapours, but also modulate the mechanical properties of the MOFs. PMID:26916707

  5. A facile C-C bond cleavage in the epoxides and its use for the synthesis of oxygenated heterocycles by a ring expansion strategy.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipathi, Pandarinathan; Grée, Danielle; Grée, René

    2002-02-01

    The bicyclic epoxy alcohols when treated with DAST gave a new class of rearranged organofluorine compounds, by a ring expansion via C-C bond cleavage of the oxirane ring. The outcome of this reaction with respect to ring size and stereochemical relation between the functionalities is presented here. PMID:11820902

  6. A Selective Rh(I) -Catalyzed Substrate-Controlled C-C Bond Activation of Benzyl Sulfonamide/Alcohol-Tethered Alkylidenecyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Liu, Jia-Xin; Tang, Xiang-Ying; Shi, Min

    2016-08-01

    Benzyl sulfonamide/alcohol-tethered alkylidenecyclopropanes undergo a rhodium-catalyzed and substrate-controlled selective C-C bond activation, producing three types of common organic structural units: benzo[c]azepine/oxepines, dihydronaphthalen-1-amines, and conjugated dienes. Epoxidation and aromatization of these products to construct two useful compounds have also been achieved. PMID:27305281

  7. Rhodium-catalyzed oxidative coupling of triarylmethanols with internal alkynes via successive C-H and C-C bond cleavages.

    PubMed

    Uto, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Masaki; Ueura, Kenji; Tsurugi, Hayato; Satoh, Tetsuya; Miura, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    The rhodium-catalyzed oxidative coupling of triarylmethanols with internal alkynes effectively proceeds in a 1:2 manner via cleavage of C-H and C-C bonds to produce the corresponding naphthalene derivatives. Addition of tri- or tetraphenylcyclopentadiene as a ligand is crucial for the reaction to occur efficiently. PMID:18052297

  8. Catalytic constructive deoxygenation of lignin-derived phenols: new C-C bond formation processes from imidazole-sulfonates and ether cleavage reactions.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Stuart M; Harkness, Gavin J; Clarke, Matthew L

    2014-10-01

    As part of a programme aimed at exploiting lignin as a chemical feedstock for less oxygenated fine chemicals, several catalytic C-C bond forming reactions utilising guaiacol imidazole sulfonate are demonstrated. These include the cross-coupling of a Grignard, a non-toxic cyanide source, a benzoxazole, and nitromethane. A modified Meyers reaction is used to accomplish a second constructive deoxygenation on a benzoxazole functionalised anisole. PMID:25130565

  9. NAD(P)H-Independent Asymmetric C=C Bond Reduction Catalyzed by Ene Reductases by Using Artificial Co-substrates as the Hydrogen Donor

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Christoph K; Clay, Dorina; Entner, Marcello; Plank, Markus; Faber, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    To develop a nicotinamide-independent single flavoenzyme system for the asymmetric bioreduction of C=C bonds, four types of hydrogen donor, encompassing more than 50 candidates, were investigated. Six highly potent, cheap, and commercially available co-substrates were identified that (under the optimized conditions) resulted in conversions and enantioselectivities comparable with, or even superior to, those obtained with traditional two-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H)-recycling systems. PMID:24382795

  10. Selectfluor-Mediated Simultaneous Cleavage of C-O and C-C Bonds in α,β-Epoxy Ketones Under Transition-Metal-Free Conditions: A Route to 1,2-Diketones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Ren, Shaobo; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yunkui

    2015-07-01

    Selectfluor-mediated simultaneous cleavage of C-O and C-C bonds in α,β-epoxy ketones has been successfully achieved under transition-metal-free conditions. The reaction gives 1,2-diketone compounds in moderate to good yields involving a ring-opening/benzoyl rearrangement/C-C bond cleavage sequence under oxidative conditions. PMID:26050519

  11. Chlorine atom-initiated low-temperature oxidation of prenol and isoprenol: The effect of C=C double bonds on the peroxy radical chemistry in alcohol oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-07-04

    The chlorine atom-initiated oxidation of two unsaturated primary C5 alcohols, prenol (3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, (CH3)2CCHCH2OH) and isoprenol (3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, CH2C(CH3)CH2CH2OH), is studied at 550 K and low pressure (8 Torr). The time- and isomer-resolved formation of products is probed with multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS) using tunable vacuum ultraviolet ionizing synchrotron radiation. The peroxy radical chemistry of the unsaturated alcohols appears much less rich than that of saturated C4 and C5 alcohols. The main products observed are the corresponding unsaturated aldehydes – prenal (3-methyl-2-butenal) from prenol oxidation and isoprenal (3-methyl-3-butenal) from isoprenol oxidation. No significant products arising from QOOH chemistry are observed. Thesemore » results can be qualitatively explained by the formation of resonance stabilized allylic radicals via H-abstraction in the Cl + prenol and Cl + isoprenol initiation reactions. The loss of resonance stabilization upon O2 addition causes the energies of the intermediate wells, saddle points, and products to increase relative to the energy of the initial radicals and O2. These energetic shifts make most product channels observed in the peroxy radical chemistry of saturated alcohols inaccessible for these unsaturated alcohols. The experimental findings are underpinned by quantum-chemical calculations for stationary points on the potential energy surfaces for the reactions of the initial radicals with O2. Under our conditions, the dominant channels in prenol and isoprenol oxidation are the chain-terminating HO2-forming channels arising from radicals, in which the unpaired electron and the –OH group are on the same carbon atom, with stable prenal and isoprenal co-products, respectively. These results suggest that the presence of C=C double bonds in alcohols will reduce low-temperature reactivity during autoignition.« less

  12. Theoretical insights into how the first C-C bond forms in the methanol-to-olefin process catalysed by HSAPO-34.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Wang, Haifeng; Hu, P

    2016-05-25

    We report here a comprehensive understanding of the first C-C coupling during the induction period of the methanol-to-olefin process using density functional theory with the HSE06 hybrid functional. We illustrate the possible routes of formation for the active carbenium ion (CH3OCH2(+)), which has been identified to play an important part in triggering the formation of the first C-C bond and the hydrocarbon pool species. CH3OCH2(+) can be generated not only from dimethyl ether and Z(O)-CH3, but also from the reaction of HCHO and Z(O)-CH3, which has a lower effective barrier. An understanding of the dominance of CH3OCH2(+) over other carbocations and direct C-C coupling pathways is presented and quantitatively analysed. The charge distribution in the formation of CH3OCH2(+) is revealed and it is confirmed that the carbenium ion is thermodynamically more favoured than the radical. The subsequent reaction after the first C-C coupling was investigated, which uncovered some important active C2 species that possibly led to the formation of the active hydrocarbon pool intermediates and may finally realize the catalytic cycle. PMID:27173579

  13. Diversification of ortho-Fused Cycloocta-2,5-dien-1-one Cores and Eight- to Six-Ring Conversion by σ Bond C-C Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Eccleshare, Lee; Lozada-Rodríguez, Leticia; Cooper, Phillippa; Burroughs, Laurence; Ritchie, John; Lewis, William; Woodward, Simon

    2016-08-22

    Sequential treatment of 2-C6 H4 Br(CHO) with LiC≡CR(1) (R(1) =SiMe3 , tBu), nBuLi, CuBr⋅SMe2 and HC≡CCHClR(2) [R(2) =Ph, 4-CF3 Ph, 3-CNPh, 4-(MeO2 C)Ph] at -50 °C leads to formation of an intermediate carbanion (Z)-1,2-C6 H4 {CA (=O)C≡CB R(1) }{CH=CH(CH(-) )R(2) } (4). Low temperatures (-50 °C) favour attack at CB leading to kinetic formation of 6,8-bicycles containing non-classical C-carbanion enolates (5). Higher temperatures (-10 °C to ambient) and electron-deficient R(2) favour retro σ-bond C-C cleavage regenerating 4, which subsequently closes on CA providing 6,6-bicyclic alkoxides (6). Computational modelling (CBS-QB3) indicated that both pathways are viable and of similar energies. Reaction of 6 with H(+) gave 1,2-dihydronaphthalen-1-ols, or under dehydrating conditions, 2-aryl-1-alkynylnaphthlenes. Enolates 5 react in situ with: H2 O, D2 O, I2 , allylbromide, S2 Me2 , CO2 and lead to the expected C-E derivatives (E=H, D, I, allyl, SMe, CO2 H) in 49-64 % yield directly from intermediate 5. The parents (E=H; R(1) =SiMe3 , tBu; R(2) =Ph) are versatile starting materials for NaBH4 and Grignard C=O additions, desilylation (when R(1) =SiMe) and oxime formation. The latter allows formation of 6,9-bicyclics via Beckmann rearrangement. The 6,8-ring iodides are suitable Suzuki precursors for Pd-catalysed C-C coupling (81-87 %), whereas the carboxylic acids readily form amides under T3P® conditions (71-95 %). PMID:27452351

  14. Splitting a Substrate into Three Parts: Gold-Catalyzed Nitrogenation of Alkynes by C-C and C≡C Bond Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chong; Su, Yijin; Shen, Tao; Shi, Xiaodong; Jiao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    A gold-catalyzed nitrogenation of alkynes for the synthesis of carbamides and amino tetrazoles through C-C and C≡C bond cleavages is described. A diverse set of functionalized carbamide and amino tetrazole derivatives were selectively constructed under mild conditions. The chemoselectivity can be easily switched by the selection of the acid additives. The reaction is characterized by its broad substrate scope, direct construction of high value products, easy operation under air, and mild conditions at room temperature. This chemistry provides a way to transform alkynes by splitting the substrate into three parts. PMID:26494539

  15. Unique properties of C,C'-linked nido-biscarborane tetraanions. Synthesis, structure and bonding of ruthenium monocarbollide via unprecedented cage carbon extrusion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Da; Zhang, Jiji; Lin, Zhenyang; Xie, Zuowei

    2016-08-21

    Four reaction pathways have been found in the reaction of a C,C'-linked nido-biscarborane tetraanionic salt with [Ru(p-cymene)Cl2]2, leading to the isolation and structural characterization of redox, triple cage B-H oxidative addition, cage expansion and cage carbon extrusion products. Among these, the unprecedented cage carbon extrusion results in the formation of a new 6π-electron carboranyl ligand [C2B10H10](2-). The bonding interactions between this ligand and the Ru(ii) center have also been discussed on the basis of DFT calculations. PMID:27405999

  16. Iron-promoted C-C bond cleavage of 1,3-diketones: a route to 1,2-diketones under mild reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lehao; Cheng, Kai; Yao, Bangben; Xie, Yongju; Zhang, Yuhong

    2011-07-15

    A conceptual method for the preparation of 1,2-diketones is reported. The selective C-C bond cleavage of 1,3-diketones affords the 1,2-diketones in high yields under mild reaction conditions in air by the use of FeCl(3) as the catalyst and tert-butyl nitrite (TBN) as the oxidant without the use of solvent. The possible reaction mechanism is discussed. This protocol provides an expeditious route to the useful 1,2-diketones. PMID:21627329

  17. C-C Bond Formation: Synthesis of C5 Substituted Pyrimidine and C8 Substituted Purine Nucleosides Using Water Soluble Pd-imidate Complex.

    PubMed

    Gayakhe, Vijay; Ardhapure, Ajaykumar V; Kapdi, Anant R; Sanghvi, Yogesh S; Serrano, Jose Luis; Schulzke, Carola

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of a highly efficient, water soluble [Pd(Sacc)2 (TPA)2 ] complex for C-C bond formation is described. Additionally, application of the [Pd(Sacc)2 (TPA)2 ] complex for Suzuki-Miyaura arylation of all four nucleosides (5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine [5-IdU], 5-iodo-2'-deoxycytidine [5-IdC], 8-bromo-2'-deoxyadenosine, and 8-bromo-2'-deoxyguanosine) with various aryl/heteroaryl boronic acids in plain water under milder conditions is demonstrated. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248782

  18. Stability of the C-C covalent bonds in fullerenes in the solid body-vapor structure during the thermodynamic action by a quasi-pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. P.; Semenova, I. A.; Churilov, G. N.

    2015-04-01

    The explosive evaporation of a fullerene mixture in a vacuum of ˜10-2 Pa during the contraction of a 1-kW hollow electron beam into a spot on a substrate in a time of 0.1-1 s is considered. A comparative analysis of the Raman spectra and the absorption electron spectra of a starting fullerene mixture powder and the vapor condensates shows that the evaporation of C60 and C70 fullerenes proceeds without breaking C-C covalent bonds.

  19. Synthesis of Indolizines through Oxidative Linkage of C-C and C-N Bonds from 2-Pyridylacetates.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Darapaneni Chandra; Ravi, Chitrakar; Pappula, Venkatanarayana; Adimurthy, Subbarayappa

    2015-07-01

    Synthesis of indolizine-1-carboxylates through the Ortoleva-King reaction of 2-pyridylacetate followed by the Aldol condensation under mild reaction conditions has been described. This protocol is compatible with a broad range of functional groups, and it has been also successfully extended to unsaturated ketones, bringing about the regioselective formation of benzoyl-substituted indolizines through Michael addition followed by C-N bond formation, which are difficult to prepare by previous methods in a single step. PMID:26044904

  20. Chlorine atom-initiated low-temperature oxidation of prenol and isoprenol: The effect of C=C double bonds on the peroxy radical chemistry in alcohol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-07-04

    The chlorine atom-initiated oxidation of two unsaturated primary C5 alcohols, prenol (3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, (CH3)2CCHCH2OH) and isoprenol (3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, CH2C(CH3)CH2CH2OH), is studied at 550 K and low pressure (8 Torr). The time- and isomer-resolved formation of products is probed with multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS) using tunable vacuum ultraviolet ionizing synchrotron radiation. The peroxy radical chemistry of the unsaturated alcohols appears much less rich than that of saturated C4 and C5 alcohols. The main products observed are the corresponding unsaturated aldehydes – prenal (3-methyl-2-butenal) from prenol oxidation and isoprenal (3-methyl-3-butenal) from isoprenol oxidation. No significant products arising from QOOH chemistry are observed. These results can be qualitatively explained by the formation of resonance stabilized allylic radicals via H-abstraction in the Cl + prenol and Cl + isoprenol initiation reactions. The loss of resonance stabilization upon O2 addition causes the energies of the intermediate wells, saddle points, and products to increase relative to the energy of the initial radicals and O2. These energetic shifts make most product channels observed in the peroxy radical chemistry of saturated alcohols inaccessible for these unsaturated alcohols. The experimental findings are underpinned by quantum-chemical calculations for stationary points on the potential energy surfaces for the reactions of the initial radicals with O2. Under our conditions, the dominant channels in prenol and isoprenol oxidation are the chain-terminating HO2-forming channels arising from radicals, in which the unpaired electron and the –OH group are on the same carbon atom, with stable prenal and isoprenal co-products, respectively. These results suggest that the presence of C=C double bonds in alcohols will reduce

  1. A Novel Strategy for Biomass Upgrade: Cascade Approach to the Synthesis of Useful Compounds via C-C Bond Formation Using Biomass-Derived Sugars as Carbon Nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Sho; Baba, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Due to the depletion of fossil fuels, biomass-derived sugars have attracted increasing attention in recent years as an alternative carbon source. Although significant advances have been reported in the development of catalysts for the conversion of carbohydrates into key chemicals (e.g., degradation approaches based on the dehydration of hydroxyl groups or cleavage of C-C bonds via retro-aldol reactions), only a limited range of products can be obtained through such processes. Thus, the development of a novel and efficient strategy targeted towards the preparation of a range of compounds from biomass-derived sugars is required. We herein describe the highly-selective cascade syntheses of a range of useful compounds using biomass-derived sugars as carbon nucleophiles. We focus on the upgrade of C2 and C3 oxygenates generated from glucose to yield useful compounds via C-C bond formation. The establishment of this novel synthetic methodology to generate valuable chemical products from monosaccharides and their decomposed oxygenated materials renders carbohydrates a potential alternative carbon resource to fossil fuels. PMID:27447603

  2. Reactivity of biomimetic iron(II)-2-aminophenolate complexes toward dioxygen: mechanistic investigations on the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of substituted 2-aminophenols.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biswarup; Bhunya, Sourav; Paul, Ankan; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2014-05-19

    The isolation and characterization of a series of iron(II)-2-aminophenolate complexes [(6-Me3-TPA)Fe(II)(X)](+) (X = 2-amino-4-nitrophenolate (4-NO2-HAP), 1; X = 2-aminophenolate (2-HAP), 2; X = 2-amino-3-methylphenolate (3-Me-HAP), 3; X = 2-amino-4-methylphenolate (4-Me-HAP), 4; X = 2-amino-5-methylphenolate (5-Me-HAP), 5; X = 2-amino-4-tert-butylphenolate (4-(t)Bu-HAP), 6 and X = 2-amino-4,6-di-tert-butylphenolate (4,6-di-(t)Bu-HAP), 7) and an iron(III)-2-amidophenolate complex [(6-Me3-TPA)Fe(III)(4,6-di-(t)Bu-AP)](+) (7(Ox)) supported by a tripodal nitrogen ligand (6-Me3-TPA = tris(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)amine) are reported. Substituted 2-aminophenols were used to prepare the biomimetic iron(II) complexes to understand the effect of electronic and structural properties of aminophenolate rings on the dioxygen reactivity and on the selectivity of C-C bond cleavage reactions. Crystal structures of the cationic parts of 5·ClO4 and 7·BPh4 show six-coordinate iron(II) centers ligated by a neutral tetradentate ligand and a monoanionic 2-aminophenolate in a bidentate fashion. While 1·BPh4 does not react with oxygen, other complexes undergo oxidative transformation in the presence of dioxygen. The reaction of 2·ClO4 with dioxygen affords 2-amino-3H-phenoxazin-3-one, an auto-oxidation product of 2-aminophenol, whereas complexes 3·BPh4, 4·BPh4, 5·ClO4 and 6·ClO4 react with O2 to exhibit C-C bond cleavage of the bound aminophenolates. Complexes 7·ClO4 and 7(Ox)·BPh4 produce a mixture of 4,6-di-tert-butyl-2H-pyran-2-imine and 4,6-di-tert-butyl-2-picolinic acid. Labeling experiments with (18)O2 show the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen into the cleavage products. The reactivity (and stability) of the intermediate, which directs the course of aromatic ring cleavage reaction, is found to be dependent on the nature of ring substituent. The presence of two tert-butyl groups on the aminophenolate ring in 7·ClO4 makes the complex slow to cleave the C-C

  3. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Ellison, G.B.; Gutman, D.

    1993-03-21

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies.

  4. C-H activation and C=C double bond formation reactions in iridium ortho-methyl arylphosphane complexes.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Walter; Ballico, Maurizio; Del Zotto, Alessandro; Zangrando, Ennio; Rigo, Pierluigi

    2007-01-01

    The Vaska-type iridium(I) complex [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2-MeC(6)H(4))}(2)] (1), characterized by an X-ray diffraction study, was obtained from iridium(III) chloride hydrate and PPh(2)(2,6-MeRC(6)H(3)) with R=H in DMF, whereas for R=Me, activation of two ortho-methyl groups resulted in the biscyclometalated iridium(III) compound [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}(2)] (2). Conversely, for R=Me the iridium(I) compound [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}(2)] (3) can be obtained by treatment of [IrCl(COE)(2)](2) (COE=cyclooctene) with carbon monoxide and the phosphane in acetonitrile. Compound 3 in CH(2)Cl(2) undergoes intramolecular C-H oxidative addition, affording the cyclometalated hydride iridium(III) species [IrHCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}{PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}] (4). Treatment of 2 with Na[BAr(f) (4)] (Ar(f)=3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)) gives the fluxional cationic 16-electron complex [Ir(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}(2)][BAr(f) (4)] (5), which reversibly reacts with dihydrogen to afford the delta-agostic complex [IrH(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}{PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}][BAr(f)(4)] (6), through cleavage of an Ir-C bond. This species can also be formed by treatment of 4 with Na[BAr(f)(4)] or of 2 with Na[BAr(f)(4)] through C-H oxidative addition of one ortho-methyl group, via a transient 14-electron iridium(I) complex. Heating of the coordinatively unsaturated biscyclometalated species 5 in toluene gives the trans-dihydride iridium(III) complex [IrH(2)(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-MeC(6)H(3)CH=CHC(6)H(3)Me-2,6)PPh(2)}][BAr(f) (4)] (7), containing a trans-stilbene-type terdentate ligand, as result of a dehydrogenative carbon-carbon double bond coupling reaction, possibly through an iridium carbene species. PMID:17535000

  5. A Substrate-Assisted Mechanism of Nucleophile Activation in a Ser-His-Asp Containing C-C Bond Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzzini, Antonio C.; Bhowmik, Shiva; Ghosh, Subhangi; Yam, Katherine C.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2013-11-12

    The meta-cleavage product (MCP) hydrolases utilize a Ser–His–Asp triad to hydrolyze a carbon–carbon bond. Hydrolysis of the MCP substrate has been proposed to proceed via an enol-to-keto tautomerization followed by a nucleophilic mechanism of catalysis. Ketonization involves an intermediate, ESred, which possesses a remarkable bathochromically shifted absorption spectrum. We investigated the catalytic mechanism of the MCP hydrolases using DxnB2 from Sphingomonas wittichii RW1. Pre-steady-state kinetic and LC ESI/MS evaluation of the DxnB2-mediated hydrolysis of 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoic acid to 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoic acid and benzoate support a nucleophilic mechanism catalysis. In DxnB2, the rate of ESred decay and product formation showed a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 2.5, indicating that a proton transfer reaction, assigned here to substrate ketonization, limits the rate of acylation. For a series of substituted MCPs, this rate was linearly dependent on MCP pKa2nuc ~ 1). Structural characterization of DxnB2 S105A:MCP complexes revealed that the catalytic histidine is displaced upon substrate-binding. The results provide evidence for enzyme-catalyzed ketonization in which the catalytic His–Asp pair does not play an essential role. The data further suggest that ESred represents a dianionic intermediate that acts as a general base to activate the serine nucleophile. This substrate-assisted mechanism of nucleophilic catalysis distinguishes MCP hydrolases from other serine hydrolases.

  6. An Electron-Poor C64 Nanographene by Palladium-Catalyzed Cascade C-C Bond Formation: One-Pot Synthesis and Single-Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Sabine; Shoyama, Kazutaka; Schmidt, David; Würthner, Frank

    2016-05-23

    Herein, we report the one-pot synthesis of an electron-poor nanographene containing dicarboximide groups at the corners. We efficiently combined palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling and dehydrohalogenation to synthesize an extended two-dimensional π-scaffold of defined size in a single chemical operation starting from N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-4,5-dibromo-1,8-naphthalimide and a tetrasubstituted pyrene boronic acid ester as readily accessible starting materials. The reaction of these precursors under the conditions commonly used for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling afforded a C64 nanographene through the formation of ten C-C bonds in a one-pot process. Single-crystal X-ray analysis unequivocally confirmed the structure of this unique extended aromatic molecule with a planar geometry. The optical and electrochemical properties of this largest ever synthesized planar electron-poor nanographene skeleton were also analyzed. PMID:27058998

  7. Tailored synthesis of various nanomaterials by using a graphene-oxide-based gel as a nanoreactor and nanohybrid-catalyzed C-C bond formation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abhijit; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-12-01

    New graphene oxide (GO)-based hydrogels that contain vitamin B2/B12 and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) have been synthesized in water (at neutral pH value). These gel-based soft materials have been used to synthesize various metal nanoparticles, including Au, Ag, and Pd nanoparticles, as well as nanoparticle-containing reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-based nanohybrid systems. This result indicates that GO-based gels can be used as versatile reactors for the synthesis of different nanomaterials and hybrid systems on the nanoscale. Moreover, the RGO-based nanohybrid hydrogel with Pd nanoparticles was used as an efficient catalyst for C-C bond-formation reactions with good yields and showed high recyclability in Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions. PMID:25224859

  8. Bis(trifluoromethyl)methylene addition to vinyl-terminated SAMs: a gas-phase C-C bond-forming reaction on a surface.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, Malgorzata; O'Hagan, David; Hähner, Georg

    2014-05-20

    Vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silicon oxide substrates were chemically modified by the addition of a bis(trifluoromethyl)methylene group in a rare gas-phase C-C bond-forming reaction to directly generate films carrying terminal CF3 groups. The vinyl-terminated films were treated with hexafluoroacetone azine (HFAA) for modification. The films were characterized with ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this study, we find that for optimized conditions clean reactions occur on a surface between SAMs with terminal olefins and HFAA, and the product is consistent with bis(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropanation formation after nitrogen extrusion. PMID:24806554

  9. Reversible Sigma C-C Bond Formation Between Phenanthroline Ligands Activated by (C5Me5)2Yb

    SciTech Connect

    Nocton, Grégory; Lukens, Wayne W.; Booth, Corwin H.; Rozenel, Sergio S.; Medling, Scott A.; Maron, Laurent; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-06-26

    The electronic structure and associated magnetic properties of the 1,10-phenanthroline adducts of Cp*2Yb are dramatically different from those of the 2,2?-bipyridine adducts. The monomeric phenanthroline adducts are ground state triplets that are based upon trivalent Yb(III), f13, and (phen ) that are only weakly exchange coupled, which is in contrast to the bipyridine adducts whose ground states are multiconfigurational, open-shell singlets in which ytterbium is intermediate valent ( J. Am. Chem. Soc 2009, 131, 6480; J. Am. Chem. Soc 2010, 132, 17537). The origin of these different physical properties is traced to the number and symmetry of the LUMO and LUMO+1 of the heterocyclic diimine ligands. The bipy has only one 1 orbital of b1 symmetry of accessible energy, but phen has two orbitals of b1 and a2 symmetry that are energetically accessible. The carbon p-orbitals have different nodal properties and coefficients and their energies, and therefore their populations change depending on the position and number of methyl substitutions on the ring. A chemical ramification of the change in electronic structure is that Cp 2Yb(phen) is a dimer when crystallized from toluene solution, but a monomer when sublimed at 180190 C. When 3,8-Me2phenanthroline is used, the adduct Cp*2Yb(3,8-Me2phen) exists in the solution in a dimer monomer equilibrium in which G is near zero. The adducts with 3-Me, 4-Me, 5-Me, 3,8-Me2, and 5,6-Me2-phenanthroline are isolated and characterized by solid state X-ray crystallography, magnetic susceptibility and LIII-edge XANES spectroscopy as a function of temperature and variable-temperature 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Reversible sigma C-C bond formation between phenanthroline ligands activated by (C5Me5)2Yb.

    PubMed

    Nocton, Grégory; Lukens, Wayne W; Booth, Corwin H; Rozenel, Sergio S; Medling, Scott A; Maron, Laurent; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-06-18

    The electronic structure and associated magnetic properties of the 1,10-phenanthroline adducts of Cp*2Yb are dramatically different from those of the 2,2'-bipyridine adducts. The monomeric phenanthroline adducts are ground state triplets that are based upon trivalent Yb(III), f(13), and (phen(•-) ) that are only weakly exchange coupled, which is in contrast to the bipyridine adducts whose ground states are multiconfigurational, open-shell singlets in which ytterbium is intermediate valent ( J. Am. Chem. Soc 2009 , 131 , 6480 ; J. Am. Chem. Soc 2010 , 132 , 17537 ). The origin of these different physical properties is traced to the number and symmetry of the LUMO and LUMO+1 of the heterocyclic diimine ligands. The bipy(•-) has only one π*1 orbital of b1 symmetry of accessible energy, but phen(•-) has two π* orbitals of b1 and a2 symmetry that are energetically accessible. The carbon pπ-orbitals have different nodal properties and coefficients and their energies, and therefore their populations change depending on the position and number of methyl substitutions on the ring. A chemical ramification of the change in electronic structure is that Cp*2Yb(phen) is a dimer when crystallized from toluene solution, but a monomer when sublimed at 180-190 °C. When 3,8-Me2phenanthroline is used, the adduct Cp*2Yb(3,8-Me2phen) exists in the solution in a dimer-monomer equilibrium in which ΔG is near zero. The adducts with 3-Me, 4-Me, 5-Me, 3,8-Me2, and 5,6-Me2-phenanthroline are isolated and characterized by solid state X-ray crystallography, magnetic susceptibility and LIII-edge XANES spectroscopy as a function of temperature and variable-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24852897

  11. A first principles study on CVD graphene growth on copper surfaces: C-C bonding reactions at graphene edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Nobuo; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Nara, Jun; Takahisa, Ohno

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable research interest owing to its potential application to future electronic devices. Large area and high quality graphene is needed for device applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a copper surface with a hydrocarbon source is one of the practical methods to produce graphene. This method is appropriate for creating large area graphene with low cost, and the graphene growth control to obtain a high quality product is a remaining challenge. The carbon atom nucleation and cluster growth processes in the CVD reactions have been studied extensively as key steps that affect the graphene growth behavior. We have been studying the carbon atom reactions in these processes by theoretical approaches In the present study, we have focused on the later stage of CVD reaction, that is, carbon atom reactions at graphene edges by which carbon clusters grow in the Cu-CVD We have found that these reactions have energy barriers of ~1 eV. First principles simulation code PHASE http://www.ciss.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/riss/english/project/device/) was used in the theoretical calculations.

  12. Formation of C-C and C-O bonds and oxygen removal in reactions of alkanediols, alkanols, and alkanals on copper catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sad, María E; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2011-12-21

    This study reports evidence for catalytic deoxygenation of alkanols, alkanals, and alkanediols on dispersed Cu clusters with minimal use of external H(2) and with the concurrent formation of new C-C and C-O bonds. These catalysts selectively remove O-atoms from these oxygenates as CO or CO(2) through decarbonylation or decarboxylation routes, respectively, that use C-atoms present within reactants or as H(2)O using H(2) added or formed in situ from CO/H(2)O mixtures via water-gas shift. Cu catalysts fully convert 1,3-propanediol to equilibrated propanol-propanal intermediates that subsequently form larger oxygenates via aldol-type condensation and esterification routes without detectable involvement of the oxide supports. Propanal-propanol-H(2) equilibration is mediated by their chemisorption and interconversion at surfaces via C-H and O-H activation and propoxide intermediates. The kinetic effects of H(2), propanal, and propanol pressures on turnover rates, taken together with measured selectivities and the established chemical events for base-catalyzed condensation and esterification reactions, indicate that both reactions involve kinetically relevant bimolecular steps in which propoxide species, acting as the base, abstract the α-hydrogen in adsorbed propanal (condensation) or attack the electrophilic C-atom at its carbonyl group (esterification). These weakly held basic alkoxides render Cu surfaces able to mediate C-C and C-O formation reactions typically catalyzed by basic sites inherent in the catalyst, instead of provided by coadsorbed organic moieties. Turnover rates for condensation and esterification reactions decrease with increasing Cu dispersion, because low-coordination corner and edge atoms prevalent on small clusters stabilize adsorbed intermediates and increase the activation barriers for the bimolecular kinetically relevant steps required for both reactions. PMID:22023723

  13. Mild and Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of the C=C Bond in α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds Using Supported Palladium Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nagendiran, Anuja; Pascanu, Vlad; Bermejo Gómez, Antonio; González Miera, Greco; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Verho, Oscar; Martín-Matute, Belén; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2016-05-17

    Chemoselective reduction of the C=C bond in a variety of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds using supported palladium nanoparticles is reported. Three different heterogeneous catalysts were compared using 1 atm of H2 : 1) nano-Pd on a metal-organic framework (MOF: Pd(0) -MIL-101-NH2 (Cr)), 2) nano-Pd on a siliceous mesocellular foam (MCF: Pd(0) -AmP-MCF), and 3) commercially available palladium on carbon (Pd/C). Initial studies showed that the Pd@MOF and Pd@MCF nanocatalysts were superior in activity and selectivity compared to commercial Pd/C. Both Pd(0) -MIL-101-NH2 (Cr) and Pd(0) -AmP-MCF were capable of delivering the desired products in very short reaction times (10-90 min) with low loadings of Pd (0.5-1 mol %). Additionally, the two catalytic systems exhibited high recyclability and very low levels of metal leaching. PMID:27111403

  14. Acetaldehyde partial oxidation on the Au(111) model catalyst surface: C-C bond activation and formation of methyl acetate as an oxidative coupling product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatok, Mustafa; Vovk, Evgeny I.; Shah, Asad A.; Turksoy, Abdurrahman; Ozensoy, Emrah

    2015-11-01

    Partial oxidation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) on the oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst was investigated via Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction Spectroscopy (TPRS) techniques, where ozone (O3) was utilized as the oxygen delivery agent providing atomic oxygen to the reacting surface. We show that for low exposures of O3 and small surface oxygen coverages, two partial oxidation products namely, methyl acetate (CH3COOCH3) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) can be generated without the formation of significant quantities of carbon dioxide. The formation of methyl acetate as the oxidative coupling reaction product implies that oxygen pre-covered Au(111) single crystal model catalyst surface can activate C-C bonds. In addition to the generation of these products; indications of the polymerization of acetaldehyde on the gold surface were also observed as an additional reaction route competing with the partial and total oxidation pathways. The interplay between the partial oxidation, total oxidation and polymerization pathways reveals the complex catalytic chemistry associated with the interaction between the acetaldehyde and atomic oxygen on catalytic gold surfaces.

  15. Direct construction of 2-alkylbenzo-1,3-azoles via C-H activation of alkanes for C-C and C-X (X = O, S) bond formation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arvind K; Yadav, Lal Dhar S

    2015-03-01

    Copper catalyzed straightforward synthesis of 2-alkylbenzoxa(thia)azoles from aryl isocyanates/isothiocyanates and simple alkanes is reported. The protocol utilizes ditertiary butyl peroxide (DTBP) as a radical initiator and involves sequential formation of C-C and C-X (X = O, S) bonds followed by aromatization in a one-pot procedure. PMID:25578954

  16. Sulfur in coal: Model studies of the role of ArS radicals in C-C and C-S bond formation and structural evolution in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Alnajjar, M.S.; Franz, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Experiments in this paper show the importance of thiyl radicals in sulfur containing coals during coal liquefaction processes. The presence of arylthiyl radicals enhances the cleavage of C-C, C=C, and C=C bonds in these otherwise refactory systems. Abstraction reactions, 1,2-phenyl migration from sulfur to carbon and displacement reactions at sulfur may be important mechanisms of structural evolution during liquefaction. In addition to cleavage of arylalkyl structures, the results also show that undesirable retrograde formation of inert diaryl- and triarylmethanes may be a consequence of the presence of sulfur and the attending aryl thiol structures. Thus, while a reaction medium including sulfur and hydrogen has been demonstrated to lead to the enhance cleavage of the bibenzyl model structure the present results suggest that retrograde reactions may be significant undesired pathways in coal liquefaction in the presence of sulfur. 17 refs.

  17. Direct C-C Coupling of CO2 and the Methyl Group from CH4 Activation through Facile Insertion of CO2 into Zn-CH3 σ-Bond.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuntao; Cui, Chaonan; Han, Jinyu; Wang, Hua; Zhu, Xinli; Ge, Qingfeng

    2016-08-17

    Conversion of CO2 and CH4 to value-added products will contribute to alleviating the green-house gas effect but is a challenge both scientifically and practically. Stabilization of the methyl group through CH4 activation and facile CO2 insertion ensure the realization of C-C coupling. In the present study, we demonstrate the ready C-C coupling reaction on a Zn-doped ceria catalyst. The detailed mechanism of this direct C-C coupling reaction was examined based on the results from density functional theory calculations. The results show that the Zn dopant stabilizes the methyl group by forming a Zn-C bond, thus hindering subsequent dehydrogenation of CH4. CO2 can be inserted into the Zn-C bond in an activated bent configuration, with the transition state in the form of a three-centered Zn-C-C moiety and an activation barrier of 0.51 eV. The C-C coupling reaction resulted in the acetate species, which could desorb as acetic acid by combining with a surface proton. The formation of acetic acid from CO2 and CH4 is a reaction with 100% atom economy, and the implementation of the reaction on a heterogeneous catalyst is of great importance to the utilization of the greenhouse gases. We tested other possible dopants including Al, Ga, Cd, In, and Ni and found a positive correlation between the activation barrier of C-C coupling and the electronegativity of the dopant, although C-H bond activation is likely the dominant reaction on the Ni-doped ceria catalyst. PMID:27452233

  18. A calculation of the diffusion energies for adatoms on surfaces of F.C.C. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, T.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The activation energies for diffusion were determined for gold, platinum and iridium adatoms on plane and plane PT surfaces and were found to be in good agreement with the measurements reported by Bassett and Webber. The Lennard-Jones pair potentials were used to model the interatomic forces, and relaxation of the substrate atoms in near proximity to the adatom was considered in detail. The present calculations clarify the mechanism of the observed two-dimensional diffusion of platinum and iridium atoms on a plane PT surface. The results are compared with those obtained using Morse potential functions and different relaxation techniques.

  19. Chlorination-Promoted Skeletal-Cage Transformations of C88 Fullerene by C2 Losses and a C-C Bond Rotation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shangfeng; Wei, Tao; Scheurell, Kerstin; Kemnitz, Erhard; Troyanov, Sergey I

    2015-10-19

    High-temperature chlorination of fullerene C88 (isomer 33) with VCl4 gives rise to skeletal transformations affording several nonclassical (NC) fullerene chlorides, C86 (NC1)Cl24/26 and C84 (NC2)Cl26 , with one and two heptagons, respectively, in the carbon cages. The branched skeletal transformation including C2 losses as well as a Stone-Wales rearrangement has been comprehensively characterized by the structure determination of two intermediates and three final chlorination products. Quantum-chemical calculations demonstrate that the average energy of the C-Cl bond is significantly increased in chlorides of nonclassical fullerenes with a large number of chlorinated sites of pentagon-pentagon adjacency. PMID:26332709

  20. Metal- and Oxidant-Free Synthesis of Quinazolinones from β-Ketoesters with o-Aminobenzamides via Phosphorous Acid-Catalyzed Cyclocondensation and Selective C-C Bond Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwen; Dong, Jianyu; Chen, Xiuling; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Yongbo; Yin, Shuang-Feng

    2015-10-01

    A general and efficient phosphorous acid-catalyzed cyclocondensation of β-ketoesters with o-aminobenzamides via selective C-C bond cleavage leading to quinazolinones is developed. This reaction proceeds smoothly under metal- and oxidant-free conditions, giving both 2-alkyl- and 2-aryl-substituted quinazolinones in excellent yields. This strategy can also be applied to the synthesis of other N-heterocycles, such as benzimidazoles and benzothiazoles. PMID:26339716

  1. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O((3)P)+allyl radical intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L; Alligood, Bridget W; Butler, Laurie J; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2010-09-01

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H(2)COCH)CH(2)Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H(2)COCH)CH(2)+Cl, c-(H(2)COCH)+CH(2)Cl, and C(3)H(4)O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H(2)COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C(2)H(3)O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H(2)CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C(3)H(4)O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H(2)COC)=CH(2); the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C(3)H(5)O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O((3)P)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C(2)H(4) and H(2)CO+C(2)H(3) product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C(2)H(4) products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H(2)CO+C(2)H(3) product channel of the O((3)P)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from tangential recoil during the dissociation of highly rotationally excited nascent radicals formed photolytically in this

  2. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  3. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Fathi, Zakaryae; Wei, Jianghua

    1998-01-01

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy.

  4. Adhesive bonding using variable frequency microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Fathi, Z.; Wei, J.

    1998-08-25

    Methods of facilitating the adhesive bonding of various components with variable frequency microwave energy are disclosed. The time required to cure a polymeric adhesive is decreased by placing components to be bonded via the adhesive in a microwave heating apparatus having a multimode cavity and irradiated with microwaves of varying frequencies. Methods of uniformly heating various articles having conductive fibers disposed therein are provided. Microwave energy may be selectively oriented to enter an edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein. An edge portion of an article having conductive fibers therein may be selectively shielded from microwave energy. 26 figs.

  5. Towards an understanding of the bonding in polyoxometalates through bond order and bond energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Adam J; Cavigliasso, Germán

    2003-01-01

    The molecular and electronic structures of transition metal complexes, [MOCl5]n- (n = 2 for M = V,Nb,Ta and n = 1 for Mo,W) and mixed-metal polyoxometalates, [M'M5O19]3-V,Nb,Ta, M = Mo,W) containing a single terminal oxo group on each metal, and of complexes of the uranyl ion [UO2]2+, [UO2(H2O)5]2+ and [UO2Cl4]2-, have been calculated using density functional methods. The calculated structures of the complexes are in good agreement with available experimental parameters. For the mixed-metal hexametalates, for which no crystallographic data is available, the calculations predict a small tetragonal compression of the clusters with only minor structural changes compared to the parent molybdate and tungstate. The metal oxygen bonding in these anions has been probed using Mayer-Mulliken, bond energy and atoms in molecule analyses (AIM). These methods provide a consistent description of the bonding in polyoxometalates. The terminal bonds between transition metal or uranium and oxygen atoms have large sigma and pi components with the pi contributions exceeding the sigma bonding. The transition metals utilize their d orbitals almost exclusively to bond to oxygen whilst uranium uses both its 5f and 6d orbitals. Oxygen atom charges increase and covalency indexes decrease with coordination number, with a marked separation of these terms according to the oxygen atom type. The total valency and AIM energies of the oxygen atoms are predicted to be almost constant for all types of oxygen site. The constancy of the bonding power of the oxygen atoms appears to be an important factor in determining the gross structures and details of the bonding in polyoxometalates. The Mayer Mulliken approach provides direct characterization of the bonding power of atoms and the extent of the interaction between pairs of atoms that is consistent with the results of the considerably more computationally demanding bond energy and AIM approaches. PMID:14527219

  6. Bond-Energy and Surface-Energy Calculations in Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhart, James G.; Horner, Steve

    2010-01-01

    A simple technique appropriate for introductory materials science courses is outlined for the calculation of bond energies in metals from lattice energies. The approach is applied to body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and hexagonal-closest-packed (hcp) metals. The strength of these bonds is tabulated for a variety metals and is…

  7. Theoretical study of the bond dissociation energies of propyne (C3H4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The C-C and C-H bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of propyne have been computed using the modified coupled-pair functional method. Due to hyperconjugation, the C-C and methyl C-H single bonds are stronger and weaker, respectively than those in ethane. The acetylenic C-H and C triple bond C BDEs are larger and smaller, respectively, than in acetylene, also as a result of the hyperconjugation. Our best estimate of 92.5 +/- 2 kcal/mol for the methyl C-H BDE in propyne is slightly larger than the experimental value. For the acetylenic C-H BDE in propyne we predict 135.9 +/- 2 kcal/mol.

  8. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O({sup 3}P)+allyl radical intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Alligood, Bridget W.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2010-09-07

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H{sub 2}COCH)CH{sub 2}Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H{sub 2}COCH)CH{sub 2}+Cl, c-(H{sub 2}COCH)+CH{sub 2}Cl, and C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H{sub 2}COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H{sub 2}CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H{sub 2}COC)=CH{sub 2}; the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O({sup 3}P)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} product channel of the O({sup 3}P)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from

  9. Ruthenium(0) Catalyzed Endiyne-α-Ketol [4+2] Cycloaddition: Convergent Assembly of Type II Polyketide Substructures via C-C Bond Forming Transfer Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Aakarsh; Perez, Felix; Krische, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Upon exposure of 3,4-benzannulated 1,5-diynes (benzo-endiynes) to α-ketols (α-hydroxyketones) in the presence of ruthenium(0) catalysts derived from Ru3(CO)12 and RuPhos or CyJohnPhos, successive redox-triggered C-C coupling occurs to generate products of [4+2] cycloaddition. The proposed catalytic mechanism involves consecutive alkyne-carbonyl oxidative couplings to form transient oxaruthana-cycles that suffer α-ketol mediated transfer hydrogenolysis. This process provides a new, convergent means of assembling Type II polyketide substructures. PMID:25938947

  10. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Directed ortho-C-H Bond Functionalization of Aromatic Ketazines via C-S and C-C Coupling.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Wu, An; Wang, Mingyang; Zhu, Jin

    2015-11-01

    Described herein is a convenient and efficient method for sulfuration and olefination of aromatic ketazines via rhodium-catalyzed oxidative C-H bond activation. A range of substituted substrates are supported, and a possible mechanism is proposed according to experimental results of kinetic isotopic effect, reversibility studies, and catalysis of rhodacycle intermediate c1. PMID:26417874

  11. An approach to benzophosphole oxides through silver- or manganese-mediated dehydrogenative annulation involving C-C and C-P bond formation.

    PubMed

    Unoh, Yuto; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Miura, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    Benzophosphole construction was achieved through the Ag(I) -mediated dehydrogenative annulation of phenylphosphine oxides with internal alkynes in a process involving CC and CP bond formation. A wide range of asymmetrical phenylacetylenes could be employed and the reactions proceeded with perfect regioselectivity. Moreover, the annulation could be conducted even at room temperature when a Mn(III) promoter was used in place of Ag(I) . PMID:24127410

  12. The Bond Dissociation Energies of 1-Butene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies of 1-butene and several calibration systems are computed using the G2(MP2) approach. The agreement between the calibration systems and experiment is very good. The computed values for 1-butene are compared with calibration systems and the agreement between the computed results for 1-butene and the "rule of thumb" values from the smaller systems is remarkably good.

  13. General and facile method for exo-methlyene synthesis via regioselective C-C double-bond formation using a copper-amine catalyst system.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Takashi; Nakamura, Kimiaki; Itonaga, Kohei; Ishikawa, Shingo

    2014-11-01

    In this study, for distal-selective β-hydride elimination to produce exomethylene compounds with a newly formed Csp(3)-Csp(3) bond between tertiary alkyl halides and α-alkylated styrenes, a combination of a Cu(I) salt and a pyridine-based amine ligand (TPMA) is found to be a very efficient catalyst system. The yields and regioselectivities were high, and the regioselectivity was found to be dependent on the structure of the alkyl halide, with bulky alkyl halides showing the highest distal selectivities. PMID:25315319

  14. Does C-C bonding proceed during exposure of adequate metal surfaces to CH{sub 4}? Reply to {open_quotes}Comment by Z. Hlavathy, Z. Paal, and P. Tetenyi{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Amaraiglio, A.; Pareja, P.; Amariglio, H.

    1997-02-01

    The comments, results, and reflections presented by Hlavathy and co-workers in their Letter aim at demonstrating that C-C bonding between CH{sub x} adspecies, formed upon exposure of Pt to CH{sub 4}, can proceed as well during the exposure itself as during further exposure to H{sub 2}. This possibility was implicitly put forward because they thought that a tight parallelism exists between the interactions of CH{sub 4} and CO with a metal surface, provided that the exposure to CH{sub 4} is carried out at a high enough temperature (450{degrees}C). In both cases these authors assumed that three kinds of carbon, C{sub {alpha}}, C{sub {beta}}, and C{sub {gamma}}, can be formed, C{sub {alpha}} being the main species responsible for the production of CH{sub 4} and of the C{sub 2}, alkanes obtained when the metal was further contacted with H{sub 2} at 100{degrees}C. As they argued that C{sub {alpha}} (also named carbidic carbon) has only metal atoms in its first coordination shell, they were implicitly led it that C-C bonding must take place during the hydrogenation step. The authors have not denied this possibility, but they have suggested that different situations can result from exposures to CH{sub 4} conducted at temperatures much lower than those used by Koerts et al.. 13 refs.

  15. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Iron(II) and Iron(I) Complexes Bearing Bisphosphine Ligands of Relevance to Iron-Catalyzed C-C Cross-Coupling.

    PubMed

    Kneebone, Jared L; Fleischauer, Valerie E; Daifuku, Stephanie L; Shaps, Ari A; Bailey, Joseph M; Iannuzzi, Theresa E; Neidig, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Chelating phosphines are effective additives and supporting ligands for a wide array of iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. While recent studies have begun to unravel the nature of the in situ-formed iron species in several of these reactions, including the identification of the active iron species, insight into the origin of the differential effectiveness of bisphosphine ligands in catalysis as a function of their backbone and peripheral steric structures remains elusive. Herein, we report a spectroscopic and computational investigation of well-defined FeCl2(bisphosphine) complexes (bisphosphine = SciOPP, dpbz, (tBu)dppe, or Xantphos) and known iron(I) variants to systematically discern the relative effects of bisphosphine backbone character and steric substitution on the overall electronic structure and bonding within their iron complexes across oxidation states implicated to be relevant in catalysis. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and density functional theory (DFT) studies demonstrate that common o-phenylene and saturated ethyl backbone motifs result in small but non-negligible perturbations to 10Dq(Td) and iron-bisphosphine bonding character at the iron(II) level within isostructural tetrahedra as well as in five-coordinate iron(I) complexes FeCl(dpbz)2 and FeCl(dppe)2. Notably, coordination of Xantphos to FeCl2 results in a ligand field significantly reduced relative to those of its iron(II) partners, where a large bite angle and consequent reduced iron-phosphorus Mayer bond orders (MBOs) could play a role in fostering the unique ability of Xantphos to be an effective additive in Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura alkyl-alkyl cross-couplings. Furthermore, it has been found that the peripheral steric bulk of the SciOPP ligand does little to perturb the electronic structure of FeCl2(SciOPP) relative to that of the analogous FeCl2(dpbz) complex, potentially suggesting that differences in the steric properties of these ligands might be more important in

  16. Methanol conversion to hydrocarbons over zeolite H-ZSM-5: Investigation of the role of CO and ketene in the formation of the initial C-C bond

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, G.J.; Johnston, P. ); Hunter, R. ); Van Rensburg, L.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Mechanistic studies concerning the formation of the initial carbon-carbon bond in the methanol conversion reaction over zeolite H-ZSM-5 are described and discussed. In particular, the possible roles of CO as a reaction intermediate or as a catalyst, via the formation of ketene, are evaluated. Experiments using [sup 13]CH[sub 3]OH/[sup 12]CO reactant mixtures demonstrate that no CO is incorporated into ethene, the primary product of this reaction. In addition, CO is found to have no significant effect on the induction period for this reaction. Model experiments for the methylation of ketene by reaction with Me[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and Me[sub 3]O[sup +]SbCl[sub 6][sup [minus

  17. Interaction of a pseudo-π C-C bond with cuprous and argentous chlorides: Cyclopropane⋯CuCl and cyclopropane⋯AgCl investigated by rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Zaleski, Daniel P; Mullaney, John C; Bittner, Dror M; Tew, David P; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2015-10-28

    Strongly bound complexes (CH2)3⋯MCl (M = Cu or Ag), formed by non-covalent interaction of cyclopropane and either cuprous chloride or argentous chloride, have been generated in the gas phase by means of the laser ablation of either copper or silver metal in the presence of supersonically expanded pulses of a gas mixture containing small amounts of cyclopropane and carbon tetrachloride in a large excess of argon. The rotational spectra of the complexes so formed were detected with a chirped-pulse, Fourier transform microwave spectrometer and analysed to give rotational constants and Cu and Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling constants for eight isotopologues of each of (CH2)3⋯CuCl and (CH2)3⋯AgCl. The geometry of each of these complexes was established unambiguously to have C(2v) symmetry, with the three C atoms coplanar, and with the MCl molecule lying along a median of the cyclopropane C3 triangle. This median coincides with the principal inertia axis a in each of the two complexes (CH2)3⋯MCl. The M atom interacts with the pseudo-π bond linking the pair of equivalent carbon atoms (F)C (F = front) nearest to it, so that M forms a non-covalent bond to one C-C edge of the cyclopropane molecule. The (CH2)3⋯MCl complexes have similar angular geometries to those of the hydrogen- and halogen-bonded analogues (CH2)3⋯HCl and (CH2)3⋯ClF, respectively. Quantitative details of the geometries were determined by interpretation of the observed rotational constants and gave results in good agreement with those from ab initio calculations carried out at the CCSD(T)(F12*)/aug-cc-pVTZ-F12 level of theory. Interesting geometrical features are the lengthening of the (F)C-(F)C bond and the shrinkage of the two equivalent (B)C-(F)C (B = back) bonds relative to the C-C bond in cyclopropane itself. The expansions of the (F)C-(F)C bond are 0.1024(9) Å and 0.0727(17) Å in (CH2)3⋯CuCl and (CH2)3⋯AgCl, respectively, according to the determined r0 geometries. The C-C bond

  18. Ether complexes of tungsten with two different binding modes: An O-bound ether and an {eta}{sup 2}-(C=C) vinyl ether. Evidence for C-H...O hydrogen bonding of vinylic C-H groups

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.S.; Szalda, D.J.; Bullock, R.M.

    1996-11-13

    The reaction of PhCH(OCH{sup 3}){sup 2} with Cp(CO){sup 3}WH and HOTf gives [Cp(CO){sup 3}W(PhCH{sup 2}OCH{sup 3})]{sup +}OTf{sup -}. The structure of this benzyl methyl ether complex was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and was shown to have the ether bonded to tungsten through the oxygen. This compound was isolated as a kinetic product of the reaction; it decomposes in solution by releasing free PhCH{sup 2}OCH{sup 3} and forming Cp(CO){sup 3}WOTf. An analog with the BAr`{sup 4}{sup -} counterion [Ar` = 3, 5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] is more stable. The reaction of the vinyl acetal CH{sup 2}=CHCH(OEt){sup 2} with Cp(CO){sup 3}WH and HOTf produces [Cp(CO){sup 3}W({eta}{sup 2}-EtOCH=CHCH{sup 3})]{sup +} OTf{sup -}, in which the ether is bonded to tungsten through the C=C bond of the vinyl ether. The crystal structure of this compound shows that the W-C(OEt) distance (2.69(3) A) is significantly longer than the W-C(CH{sup 3}) distance (2.37(3) A). There are weak C-H...O hydrogen bonds between both vinyl CH`s and oxygens of the triflate counterions. Evidence is presented that some of these weak hydrogen bonds are maintained in CD{sup 2}Cl{sup 2} solution but not in CD{sup 3}CN. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Synthesis of seco-B-ring bryostatin analogue WN-1 via C-C bond-forming hydrogenation: critical contribution of the B-ring in determining bryostatin-like and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-like properties.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Ian P; Ketcham, John M; Blumberg, Peter M; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Peach, Megan L; Krische, Michael J

    2014-09-24

    The seco-B-ring bryostatin analogue, macrodiolide WN-1, was prepared in 17 steps (longest linear sequence) and 30 total steps with three bonds formed via hydrogen-mediated C-C coupling. This synthetic route features a palladium-catalyzed alkoxycarbonylation of a C2-symmetric diol to form the C9-deoxygenated bryostatin A-ring. WN-1 binds to PKCα (Ki = 16.1 nM) and inhibits the growth of multiple leukemia cell lines. Although structural features of the WN-1 A-ring and C-ring are shared by analogues that display bryostatin-like behavior, WN-1 displays PMA-like behavior in U937 cell attachment and proliferation assays, as well as in K562 and MV-4-11 proliferation assays. Molecular modeling studies suggest the pattern of internal hydrogen bonds evident in bryostatin 1 is preserved in WN-1, and that upon docking WN-1 into the crystal structure of the C1b domain of PKCδ, the binding mode of bryostatin 1 is reproduced. The collective data emphasize the critical contribution of the B-ring to the function of the upper portion of the molecule in conferring a bryostatin-like pattern of biological activity. PMID:25207655

  20. A Tungsten Complex with a Bidentate, Hemilabile N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand, Facile Displacement of the Weakly Bound W-(C=C) Bond, and the Vulnerability of the NHC Ligand Towards Catalyst Deactivation During Ketone Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,F.; Dioumaev, V.; Szalda, D.; Hanson, J.; Bullock, R.

    2007-01-01

    The initial reaction observed between the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) and molybdenum and tungsten hydride complexes CpM(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3})H (M = Mo, W) is deprotonation of the metal hydride by IMes, giving [(IMes)H]{sup +}[CpM(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3})]{sup -}. At longer reaction times and higher temperatures, the reaction of IMes with CpM(CO){sub 2}(PR{sub 3})H (M = Mo, W; R = Me, Ph) produces CpM(CO){sub 2}(IMes)H. Hydride transfer from CpW(CO)2(IMes)H to Ph{sub 3}C{sub +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -} gives CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -}, which was crystallographically characterized using X-ray radiation from a synchrotron. The IMes is bonded as a bidentate ligand, through the carbon of the carbene as well as forming a weak bond from the metal to a C=C bond of one mesityl ring. The weakly bound C=C ligand is hemilabile, being readily displaced by H{sub 2}, THF, ketones, or alcohols. Reaction of CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +} with H{sub 2} gives the dihydride complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(H){sub 2}]{sup +}. Addition of Et{sub 2}CH-OH to CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -} gives the alcohol complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}CH-OH)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -}, which was characterized by crystallography and exhibits no evidence for hydrogen bonding of the bound OH group. Addition of H{sub 2} to the ketone complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}C=O)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -} produces an equilibrium with the dihydride [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(H){sub 2}]{sup +} (K{sub eq} = 1.1 x 10{sup 3} at 25 {sup o}C). The tungsten ketone complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}C=O)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -}- serves as a modest catalyst for hydrogenation of Et{sub 2}C=O to Et{sub 2}CH-OH in neat ketone solvent. Decomposition of the catalyst produces [H(IMes)]{sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -}, indicating that these

  1. Model for particle production in nuclear reactions at intermediate energies: Application to C-C collisions at 95 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudouet, J.; Durand, D.

    2016-07-01

    A model describing nuclear collisions at intermediate energies is presented and the results are compared with recently measured double differential cross sections in C-C reactions at 95 MeV/nucleon. Results show the key role played by geometrical effects and the memory of the entrance channel, in particular the momentum distributions of the two incoming nuclei. Special attention is paid to the description of processes occurring at midrapidity. To this end, a random particle production mechanism by means of a coalescence process in velocity space is considered in the overlap region of the two interacting nuclei.

  2. The Calculation of Accurate Metal-Ligand Bond Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Partridge, Harry, III; Ricca, Alessandra; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The optimization of the geometry and calculation of zero-point energies are carried out at the B3LYP level of theory. The bond energies are determined at this level, as well as at the CCSD(T) level using very large basis sets. The successive OH bond energies to the first row transition metal cations are reported. For most systems there has been an experimental determination of the first OH. In general, the CCSD(T) values are in good agreement with experiment. The bonding changes from mostly covalent for the early metals to mostly electrostatic for the late transition metal systems.

  3. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Zanoni, R.; Stranges, S.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-04-07

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the {sigma}/{pi} hyperconjugation in EtFC and the {pi}-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  4. Ambient pressure XPS and IRRAS investigation of ethanol steam reforming on Ni-CeO2(111) catalysts: an in situ study of C-C and O-H bond scission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongyuan; Duchoň, Tomáš; Wang, Huanru; Grinter, David C; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Qiang; Jeong, Beomgyun; Crumlin, Ethan J; Matolín, Vladimír; Stacchiola, Dario J; Rodriguez, José A; Senanayake, Sanjaya D

    2016-06-22

    Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (AP-IRRAS) have been used to elucidate the active sites and mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming reaction (ESR) over Ni-CeO2(111) model catalysts. Our results reveal that surface layers of the ceria substrate are both highly reduced and hydroxylated under reaction conditions while the small supported Ni nanoparticles are present as Ni(0)/NixC. A multifunctional, synergistic role is highlighted in which Ni, CeOx and the interface provide an ensemble effect in the active chemistry that leads to H2. Ni(0) is the active phase leading to both C-C and C-H bond cleavage in ethanol and it is also responsible for carbon accumulation. On the other hand, CeOx is important for the deprotonation of ethanol/water to ethoxy and OH intermediates. The active state of CeOx is a Ce(3+)(OH)x compound that results from extensive reduction by ethanol and the efficient dissociation of water. Additionally, we gain an important insight into the stability and selectivity of the catalyst by its effective water dissociation, where the accumulation of surface carbon can be mitigated by the increased presence of surface OH groups. The co-existence and cooperative interplay of Ni(0) and Ce(3+)(OH)x through a metal-support interaction facilitate oxygen transfer, activation of ethanol/water as well as the removal of coke. PMID:27095305

  5. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Stranges, S.; Zanoni, R.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the σ/π hyperconjugation in EtFC and the π-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  6. Do Bond Functions Help for the Calculation of Accurate Bond Energies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The bond energies of 8 chemically bound diatomics are computed using several basis sets with and without bond functions (BF). The bond energies obtained using the aug-pVnZ+BF basis sets (with a correction for basis set superposition error, BSSE) tend to be slightly smaller that the results obtained using the aug-pV(n+I)Z basis sets, but slightly larger than the BSSE corrected aug-pV(n+I)Z results. The aug-cc-pVDZ+BF and aug-cc-pVTZ+BF basis sets yield reasonable estimates of bond energies, but, in most cases, these results cannot be considered highly accurate. Extrapolation of the results obtained with basis sets including bond functions appears to be inferior to the results obtained by extrapolation using atom-centered basis sets. Therefore bond functions do not appear to offer a path for obtaining highly accurate results for chemically bound systems at a lower computational cost than atom centered basis sets.

  7. Emissive osmium(II) complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene-based C^C^C-pincer ligands and aromatic diimines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Chan, Siu-Chung; Lee, Wing-Chun; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2012-08-20

    Osmium(II) complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-methylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C(1)^C^C(1)) or 1,3-bis(3-methylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C(2)^C^C(2)) and aromatic diimine (2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), or 4,4'-diphenyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Ph(2)bpy)) in the form of [Os(C^C^C)(N^N)(CO)](+) have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Os-C(NHC) bonds are essentially single (Os-C(NHC) distances = 2.079(5)-2.103(7) Å). Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (λ(max) = 493-536 nm, ε(max) = (5-10) × 10(3) dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1), solvent = CH(3)CN) originate from a d(π)(Os(II)) → π*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the d(π)(Os(II)) and π*(N^N) levels contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the red-spectral region (674-731 nm) with quantum yields of 10(-4)-10(-2) and emission lifetimes of around 1-6 μs. Transient absorption spectroscopy and spectroelectrochemical measurements have also been used to probe the nature of the emissive excited-states. Overall, this joint experimental and theoretical investigation reveals that the C^C^C ligands can be used to modulate the photophysical properties of a [Os(N^N)] core via the formation of the hybrid [Os + C^C^C] frontier orbitals. PMID:22873818

  8. Calculation of bond dissociation energies of diatomic molecules using bond function basis sets with counterpoise corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Pan, Y.K.; Tao, F.M.

    1996-01-15

    Bond function basis sets combined with the counterpoise procedure are used to calculate the molecular dissociation energies D{sub e} of 24 diatomic molecules and ions. The calculated values of D{sub e} are compared to those without bond functions and/or counterpoise corrections. The equilibrium bond lengths r{sub e}, and harmonic frequencies w{sub e} are also calculated for a few selected molecules. The calculations at the fourth-order-Moller-Plesset approximation (MP4) have consistently recovered about 95-99% of the experimental values for D{sub e}, compared to as low as 75% without use of bond functions. The calculated values of r{sub 3} are typically 0.01 {Angstrom} larger than the experimental values, and the calculated values of w{sub e} are over 95% of the experimental values. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. How resonance assists hydrogen bonding interactions: an energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, John Frederick; Mo, Yirong

    2007-01-15

    Block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of the ab initio valence bond (VB) theory, was employed to explore the nature of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHBs) and to investigate the mechanism of synergistic interplay between pi delocalization and hydrogen-bonding interactions. We examined the dimers of formic acid, formamide, 4-pyrimidinone, 2-pyridinone, 2-hydroxpyridine, and 2-hydroxycyclopenta-2,4-dien-1-one. In addition, we studied the interactions in beta-diketone enols with a simplified model, namely the hydrogen bonds of 3-hydroxypropenal with both ethenol and formaldehyde. The intermolecular interaction energies, either with or without the involvement of pi resonance, were decomposed into the Hitler-London energy (DeltaEHL), polarization energy (DeltaEpol), charge transfer energy (DeltaECT), and electron correlation energy (DeltaEcor) terms. This allows for the examination of the character of hydrogen bonds and the impact of pi conjugation on hydrogen bonding interactions. Although it has been proposed that resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds are accompanied with an increasing of covalency character, our analyses showed that the enhanced interactions mostly originate from the classical dipole-dipole (i.e., electrostatic) attraction, as resonance redistributes the electron density and increases the dipole moments in monomers. The covalency of hydrogen bonds, however, changes very little. This disputes the belief that RAHB is primarily covalent in nature. Accordingly, we recommend the term "resonance-assisted binding (RAB)" instead of "resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RHAB)" to highlight the electrostatic, which is a long-range effect, rather than the electron transfer nature of the enhanced stabilization in RAHBs. PMID:17143867

  10. The Tautomeric Half-reaction of BphD, a C-C Bond Hydrolase Kinetic and Structural Evidence Supporting a Key Role for Histidine 265 of the Catalytic triad

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, Geoff P.; Bhowmik, Shiva; Seah, Stephen Y.K.; Kumar, Pravindra; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2010-01-07

    BphD of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 catalyzes an unusual C-C bond hydrolysis of 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoic acid (HOPDA) to afford benzoic acid and 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoic acid (HPD). An enol-keto tautomerization has been proposed to precede hydrolysis via a gem-diol intermediate. The role of the canonical catalytic triad (Ser-112, His-265, Asp-237) in mediating these two half-reactions remains unclear. We previously reported that the BphD-catalyzed hydrolysis of HOPDA ({lambda}{sub max} is 434 nm for the free enolate) proceeds via an unidentified intermediate with a red-shifted absorption spectrum ({lambda}{sub max} is 492 nm) (Horsman, G. P., Ke, J., Dai, S., Seah, S. Y. K., Bolin, J. T., and Eltis, L. D. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 11071-11086). Here we demonstrate that the S112A variant generates and traps a similar intermediate ({lambda}{sub max} is 506 nm) with a similar rate, 1/{tau} {approx} 500 s{sup -1}. The crystal structure of the S112A:HOPDA complex at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution identified this intermediate as the keto tautomer, (E)-2,6-dioxo-6-phenyl-hex-3-enoate. This keto tautomer did not accumulate in either the H265A or the S112A/H265A double variants, indicating that His-265 catalyzes tautomerization. Consistent with this role, the wild type and S112A enzymes catalyzed tautomerization of the product HPD, whereas H265A variants did not. This study thus identifies a keto intermediate, and demonstrates that the catalytic triad histidine catalyzes the tautomerization half-reaction, expanding the role of this residue from its purely hydrolytic function in other serine hydrolases. Finally, the S112A:HOPDA crystal structure is more consistent with hydrolysis occurring via an acyl-enzyme intermediate than a gem-diol intermediate as solvent molecules have poor access to C6, and the closest ordered water is 7{angstrom} away.

  11. Bond resonance energy and verification of the isolated pentagon rule

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, Jun Ichi

    1995-04-12

    The isolated pentagon rule (IPR) states that fullerenes with isolated pentagons are kinetically much more stable than their fused pentagon counterparts. This rule can be verified in terms of a graph-theoretically defined bond resonance energy. In general, a {pi} bond shared by two pentagons has a large negative bond resonance energy, thus contributing significantly to the increase in kinetic instability or chemical reactivity of the molecule. The existence of such highly antiaromatic local structures sharply distinguishes IPR-violating fullerenes from isolated-pentagon isomers. {pi}bonds shared by two pentagons are shared by many antiaromatic conjugated circuits but not by relatively small aromatic conjugated circuits. 39 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Estimating the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in chitosan oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, G. P.; Lazarev, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The effect the number of chitosan monomer units CTS n ( n = 1-5), the protonation of chitosan dimers, and the interaction between CTS n ( n = 1-3) and acetate ions have on the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds is investigated by means of QTAIM analysis and solving the vibrational problem within the cluster-continuum model. It is established that the number of H-bonds in CTS n is 2 n - 1 and the total energy of H-bonds grows by ~20 kJ/mol. It is concluded that the hydrogen bonds between CTS and acetate ions play a major role in the stabilization of polyelectrolyte complexes in dilute acetic acid solutions of CTS.

  13. Ubiquitous Transgenic Overexpression of C-C Chemokine Ligand 2: A Model to Assess the Combined Effect of High Energy Intake and Continuous Low-Grade Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Mariné-Casadó, Roger; Rull, Anna; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Menendez, Javier A.; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Sirvent, Juan J.; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Corbí, Angel L.; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Aragonès, Gerard; García-Heredia, Anabel; Camps, Jordi; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Joven, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Excessive energy management leads to low-grade, chronic inflammation, which is a significant factor predicting noncommunicable diseases. In turn, inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism are associated with the course of these diseases; mitochondrial dysfunction seems to be at the crossroads of mutual relationships. The migration of immune cells during inflammation is governed by the interaction between chemokines and chemokine receptors. Chemokines, especially C-C-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), have a variety of additional functions that are involved in the maintenance of normal metabolism. It is our hypothesis that a ubiquitous and continuous secretion of CCL2 may represent an animal model of low-grade chronic inflammation that, in the presence of an energy surplus, could help to ascertain the afore-mentioned relationships and/or to search for specific therapeutic approaches. Here, we present preliminary data on a mouse model created by using targeted gene knock-in technology to integrate an additional copy of the CCl2 gene in the Gt(ROSA)26Sor locus of the mouse genome via homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Short-term dietary manipulations were assessed and the findings include metabolic disturbances, premature death, and the manipulation of macrophage plasticity and autophagy. These results raise a number of mechanistic questions for future study. PMID:24453432

  14. Ubiquitous transgenic overexpression of C-C chemokine ligand 2: a model to assess the combined effect of high energy intake and continuous low-grade inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Riera-Borrull, Marta; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Mariné-Casadó, Roger; Rull, Anna; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Menendez, Javier A; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Sirvent, Juan J; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Corbí, Angel L; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Aragonès, Gerard; García-Heredia, Anabel; Camps, Jordi; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Joven, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Excessive energy management leads to low-grade, chronic inflammation, which is a significant factor predicting noncommunicable diseases. In turn, inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism are associated with the course of these diseases; mitochondrial dysfunction seems to be at the crossroads of mutual relationships. The migration of immune cells during inflammation is governed by the interaction between chemokines and chemokine receptors. Chemokines, especially C-C-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), have a variety of additional functions that are involved in the maintenance of normal metabolism. It is our hypothesis that a ubiquitous and continuous secretion of CCL2 may represent an animal model of low-grade chronic inflammation that, in the presence of an energy surplus, could help to ascertain the afore-mentioned relationships and/or to search for specific therapeutic approaches. Here, we present preliminary data on a mouse model created by using targeted gene knock-in technology to integrate an additional copy of the CCl2 gene in the Gt(ROSA)26Sor locus of the mouse genome via homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Short-term dietary manipulations were assessed and the findings include metabolic disturbances, premature death, and the manipulation of macrophage plasticity and autophagy. These results raise a number of mechanistic questions for future study. PMID:24453432

  15. The bond length and bond energy of gaseous CrW.

    PubMed

    Matthew, Daniel J; Oh, Sang Hoon; Sevy, Andrew; Morse, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Supersonically cooled CrW was studied using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. The vibronically resolved spectrum was recorded over the region 21 100 to 23 400 cm(-1), showing a very large number of bands. Seventeen of these bands, across three different isotopologues, were rotationally resolved and analyzed. All were found to arise from the ground (1)Σ(+) state of the molecule and to terminate on states with Ω' = 0. The average r0 bond length across the three isotopic forms was determined to be 1.8814(4) Å. A predissociation threshold was observed in this dense manifold of vibronic states at 23 127(10) cm(-1), indicating a bond dissociation energy of D0(CrW) = 2.867(1) eV. Using the multiple bonding radius determined for atomic Cr in previous work, the multiple bonding radius for tungsten was calculated to be 1.037 Å. Comparisons are made between CrW and the previously investigated group 6 diatomic metals, Cr2, CrMo, and Mo2, and to previous computational studies of this molecule. It is also found that the accurately known bond dissociation energies of group 5/6 metal diatomics Cr2, V2, CrW, NbCr, VNb, Mo2, and Nb2 display a qualitative linear dependence on the sum of the d-orbital radial expectation values, r; this relationship allows the bond dissociation energies of other molecules of this type to be estimated. PMID:27276956

  16. The Chemical Bond in C2.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Markus; Frenking, Gernot

    2016-03-14

    Quantum chemical calculations using the complete active space of the valence orbitals have been carried out for Hn CCHn (n=0-3) and N2 . The quadratic force constants and the stretching potentials of Hn CCHn have been calculated at the CASSCF/cc-pVTZ level. The bond dissociation energies of the C-C bonds of C2 and HC≡CH were computed using explicitly correlated CASPT2-F12/cc-pVTZ-F12 wave functions. The bond dissociation energies and the force constants suggest that C2 has a weaker C-C bond than acetylene. The analysis of the CASSCF wavefunctions in conjunction with the effective bond orders of the multiple bonds shows that there are four bonding components in C2 , while there are only three in acetylene and in N2 . The bonding components in C2 consist of two weakly bonding σ bonds and two electron-sharing π bonds. The bonding situation in C2 can be described with the σ bonds in Be2 that are enforced by two π bonds. There is no single Lewis structure that adequately depicts the bonding situation in C2 . The assignment of quadruple bonding in C2 is misleading, because the bond is weaker than the triple bond in HC≡CH. PMID:26756311

  17. Direct, redox-neutral prenylation and geranylation of secondary carbinol C-H bonds: C4-regioselectivity in ruthenium-catalyzed C-C couplings of dienes to α-hydroxy esters.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joyce C; Geary, Laina M; Chen, Te-Yu; Zbieg, Jason R; Krische, Michael J

    2012-09-26

    The ruthenium catalyst generated in situ from Ru(3)(CO)(12) and tricyclohexylphosphine, PCy(3), promotes the redox-neutral C-C coupling of aryl-substituted α-hydroxy esters to isoprene and myrcene at the diene C4-position, resulting in direct carbinol C-H prenylation and geranylation, respectively. This process enables direct conversion of secondary to tertiary alcohols in the absence of stoichiometric byproducts or premetalated reagents, and is the first example of C4-regioselectivity in catalytic C-C couplings of 2-substituted dienes to carbonyl partners. Mechanistic studies corroborate a catalytic cycle involving diene-carbonyl oxidative coupling. PMID:22985393

  18. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    ScienceCinema

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2014-06-13

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  19. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2013-03-27

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  20. Bond Dissociation Energies in Second-Row Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Daniel J.; Matus, Myrna H.; Switzer, Jackson R.; Dixon, David A.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Christe, Karl O.

    2008-04-10

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Heats of formation at 0 and 298 K are predicted for PF₃, PF₅, PF₃O, SF₂, SF₄, SF₆, SF₂O, SF₂O₂, and SF₄O as well as a number of radicals derived from these stable compounds on the basis of coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. In order to achieve near chemical accuracy (±1 kcal/mol), additional corrections were added to the complete basis set binding energies based on frozen core coupled cluster theory energies: a correction for core-valence effects, a correction for scalar relativistic effects, a correction for first-order atomic spin-orbit effects, and vibrational zero-point energies. The calculated values substantially reduce the error limits for these species. A detailed comparison of adiabatic and diabatic bond dissociation energies (BDEs) is made and used to explain trends in the BDEs. Because the adiabatic BDEs of polyatomic molecules represent not only the energy required for breaking a specific bond but also contain any reorganization energies of the bonds in the resulting products, these BDEs can be quite different for each step in the stepwise loss of ligands in binary compounds. For example, the adiabatic BDE for the removal of one fluorine ligand from the very stable closed-shell SF₆ molecule to give the unstable SF₅ radical is 2.8 times the BDE needed for the removal of one fluorine ligand from the unstable SF₅ radical to give the stable closed-shell SF₄ molecule. Similarly, the BDE for the removal of one fluorine ligand from the stable closed-shell PF₃O molecule to give the unstable PF₂O radical is higher than the BDE needed to remove the oxygen atom to give the stable closed

  1. Heats of Formation and Bond Energies in Group III Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Melius, Carl F.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present heats of formation and bond energies for Group-III compounds obtained from calculations of molecular ground-state I electronic energies. Data for compounds of the form MXn are presented, where M = B, Al, Ga, and In, X = He H, Cl, and CH3, and n = 1-3. Energies for the B, Al, and Ga compounds are obtained from G2 predictions, while those for the In compounds are obtained from CCSD(T)/CBS calculations; these are the most accurate calculations for indium-containing compounds published to date. In most cases, the calculated thermochemistry is in good agreement with published values derived from experiments for those species that have well-established heats of formation. Bond energies obtained from the heats of formation follow the expected trend (Cl much greater than CH3 approx. H). However, the CH3M-(CH3)2 bond energies obtained for trimethylgallium and trimethylindium are considerably stronger (greater than 15 kcal/mol) than currently accepted values.

  2. Energy-based analysis of biochemical cycles using bond graphs

    PubMed Central

    Gawthrop, Peter J.; Crampin, Edmund J.

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic aspects of chemical reactions have a long history in the physical chemistry literature. In particular, biochemical cycles require a source of energy to function. However, although fundamental, the role of chemical potential and Gibb's free energy in the analysis of biochemical systems is often overlooked leading to models which are physically impossible. The bond graph approach was developed for modelling engineering systems, where energy generation, storage and transmission are fundamental. The method focuses on how power flows between components and how energy is stored, transmitted or dissipated within components. Based on the early ideas of network thermodynamics, we have applied this approach to biochemical systems to generate models which automatically obey the laws of thermodynamics. We illustrate the method with examples of biochemical cycles. We have found that thermodynamically compliant models of simple biochemical cycles can easily be developed using this approach. In particular, both stoichiometric information and simulation models can be developed directly from the bond graph. Furthermore, model reduction and approximation while retaining structural and thermodynamic properties is facilitated. Because the bond graph approach is also modular and scaleable, we believe that it provides a secure foundation for building thermodynamically compliant models of large biochemical networks. PMID:25383030

  3. Argon hydrochloride, Ar.HCl, bond energy by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miziolek, A. W.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    The infrared absorption of argon (200 to 760 torr) and hydrogen chloride (2 to 6 torr) mixtures is reexamined in the missing Q branch region (spectral region between 2860 and 3010 wavelength/cm) at temperatures ranging from 195 to 298 K. The temperature dependence of two absorption features of the argon hydrogen chloride complex, at 2887 and 2879 wavelength/cm, leads to a bond energy estimate that depends on the assumptions made about the internal degrees of freedom of the complex. It is shown that agreement with experiment can be reached for well depths near 1.2 kcal/mole. This result is relatively insensitive to the choice of the vibrational frequencies and anharmonicities, but does depend on the extent to which the energy level manifolds are truncated to avoid molecular excitation in excess of the bond energy. The bond energy is found to deviate from the commonly accepted value of 0.4 kcal/mole. Possible causes for the discrepancy are considered.

  4. Energy-based analysis of biochemical cycles using bond graphs.

    PubMed

    Gawthrop, Peter J; Crampin, Edmund J

    2014-11-01

    Thermodynamic aspects of chemical reactions have a long history in the physical chemistry literature. In particular, biochemical cycles require a source of energy to function. However, although fundamental, the role of chemical potential and Gibb's free energy in the analysis of biochemical systems is often overlooked leading to models which are physically impossible. The bond graph approach was developed for modelling engineering systems, where energy generation, storage and transmission are fundamental. The method focuses on how power flows between components and how energy is stored, transmitted or dissipated within components. Based on the early ideas of network thermodynamics, we have applied this approach to biochemical systems to generate models which automatically obey the laws of thermodynamics. We illustrate the method with examples of biochemical cycles. We have found that thermodynamically compliant models of simple biochemical cycles can easily be developed using this approach. In particular, both stoichiometric information and simulation models can be developed directly from the bond graph. Furthermore, model reduction and approximation while retaining structural and thermodynamic properties is facilitated. Because the bond graph approach is also modular and scaleable, we believe that it provides a secure foundation for building thermodynamically compliant models of large biochemical networks. PMID:25383030

  5. Bond Dissociation Energies for Substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Their Cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The B3LYP/4-31G approach is used to compute bond energies for a series of substituted benzene, naphthalene, and anthracene molecules and their cations. The benzene bond energies are compared with experiment. The trends in the bond energies are discussed. The ionization energies are also reported and compared with available experiments.

  6. Analysis of liquid metal embrittlement from a bond energy viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. J.; Stoloff, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption induced embrittlement of solid metals by certain liquid metals is analyzed through an Engel-Brewer calculation of the solid-liquid interaction energy, and of the effect of the latter in reducing fracture surface energy. The reduction in fracture surface energy is estimated by comparison of the electronic contribution to the solid-liquid interaction energy with solid-solid bond energy for some 40 liquid-solid couples. Regular solution theory is used to estimate mutual solubility as the relative difference in parameter values. Embrittlement can be predicted by using reduction in fracture surface energy and solubility parameter difference as critical variables. The effect of solute additions to the liquid on the degree of embrittlement is interpreted via the same two variables; the principal effect of solutes is to modify solubility relationships at the solid-liquid interface.

  7. IR Spectra and Bond Energies Computed Using DFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles; Andrews, Lester; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The combination of density functional theory (DFT) frequencies and infrared (IR) intensities and experimental spectra is a very powerful tool in the identification of molecules and ions. The computed and measured isotopic ratios make the identification much more secure than frequencies and intensities alone. This will be illustrated using several examples, such as Mn(CO)n and Mn(CO)n-. The accuracy of DFT metal-ligand bond energies will also be discussed.

  8. Structures, energies, and bonding in the water heptamer.

    PubMed

    Acelas, Nancy; Hincapié, Gina; Guerra, Doris; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2013-07-28

    In this paper we report the geometries and properties of 38 distinct geometrical motifs located on the B3LYP/6-31+G(d), MP2/6-311++G(d, p) potential energy surfaces of the water heptamer. Binding energies of up to 45 kcal/mol are calculated. All motifs fall within 10 kcal/mol of the most stable conformation, with at least 13 structural patterns located no more than 3 kcal/mol above, leading to a very complex potential energy surface, populated by a multitude of motifs each one allowing large numbers of conformations. Cluster stability does not seem to be correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds. Compact structures are energetically favored by electronic energies with zero-point energy corrections, while more open structures are preferred when temperature and entropy are accounted for. The molecular interactions holding the clusters as discrete units lead to large binding energies but are not strong enough to cause significant changes in the geometries of the interacting monomers. Our results indicate that bonding in the water heptamers can be considered as largely non-shared interactions with contributions from intermediate character of increasing covalency. PMID:23901983

  9. Accurate Bond Energies of Hydrocarbons from Complete Basis Set Extrapolated Multi-Reference Singles and Doubles Configuration Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Oyeyemi, Victor B.; Pavone, Michele; Carter, Emily A.

    2011-11-03

    Quantum chemistry has become one of the most reliable tools for characterizing the thermochemical underpinnings of reactions, such as bond dissociation energies (BDEs). The accurate prediction of these particular properties (BDEs) are challenging for ab initio methods based on perturbative corrections or coupled cluster expansions of the single-determinant Hartree-Fock wave function: the processes of bond breaking and forming are inherently multi-configurational and require an accurate description of non-dynamical electron correlation. To this end, we present a systematic ab initio approach for computing BDEs that is based on three components: (1) multi-reference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) for the electronic energies; (2) a two-parameter scheme for extrapolating MRSDCI energies to the complete basis set limit; and (3) DFT-B3LYP calculations of minimumenergy structures and vibrational frequencies to account for zero point energy and thermal corrections. We validated our methodology against a set of reliable experimental BDE values of C*C and C*H bonds of hydrocarbons. The goal of chemical accuracy is achieved, on average, without applying any empirical corrections to the MRSDCI electronic energies. We then use this composite scheme to make predictions of BDEs in a large number of hydrocarbon molecules for which there are no experimental data, so as to provide needed thermochemical estimates for fuel molecules.

  10. Effects of Exchange Energy and Spin-Orbit Coupling on Bond Energies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    2004-01-01

    Since chemical reactions involve the breaking and making of bonds, understanding the relative strengths of bonds is of paramount importance in the study, teaching, and practice of chemistry. Further, it is showed that free atoms having p(super n) configuration with n = 2,3, or 4 are stabilized by exchange energy, and by spin-orbit coupling for n =…

  11. Bond length and local energy density property connections for non-transition-metal oxide-bonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, G V; Spackman, M A; Jayatilaka, D; Rosso, K M; Cox, D F

    2006-11-01

    For a variety of molecules and earth materials, the theoretical local kinetic energy density, G(r(c)), increases and the local potential energy density, V(r(c)), decreases as the M-O bond lengths (M = first- and second-row metal atoms bonded to O) decrease and the electron density, rho(r(c)), accumulates at the bond critical points, r(c). Despite the claim that the local kinetic energy density per electronic charge, G(r(c))/rho(r(c)), classifies bonded interactions as shared interactions when less than unity and closed-shell when greater, the ratio was found to increase from 0.5 to 2.5 au as the local electronic energy density, H(r(c)) = G(r(c)) + V(r(c)), decreases and becomes progressively more negative. The ratio appears to be a measure of the character of a given M-O bonded interaction, the greater the ratio, the larger the value of rho(r(c)), the smaller the coordination number of the M atom and the more shared the bonded interaction. H(r(c))/rho(r(c)) versus G(r(c))/rho(r(c)) scatter diagrams categorize the M-O bonded interactions into domains with the local electronic energy density per electron charge, H(r(c))/rho(r(c)), tending to decrease as the electronegativity differences for the bonded pairs of atoms decrease. The values of G(r(c)) and V(r(c)), estimated with a gradient-corrected electron gas theory expression and the local virial theorem, are in good agreement with theoretical values, particularly for the bonded interactions involving second-row M atoms. The agreement is poorer for shared C-O and N-O bonded interactions. PMID:17078623

  12. Copper-catalyzed domino synthesis of 2-imino-1H-imidazol-5(2H)-ones and quinoxalines involving C-C bond cleavage with a 1,3-dicarbonyl unit as a leaving group.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Ni, Fan; Shu, Wen-Ming; Wu, An-Xin

    2014-09-01

    Although 2-imino-1H-imidazol-5(2H)-ones have important biological activities in metabolism, their synthesis has rarely been investigated. Quinoxalines as "privileged scaffolds" in medicinal chemistry have been extensively investigated, but the development of novel and efficient synthetic methods remains very attractive. Herein, we have developed two copper-catalyzed domino reactions for the synthesis of 2-imino-1H-imidazol-5(2H)-ones and quinoxalines involving CC bond-cleavage with a 1,3-dicarbonyl unit as a leaving group. The domino sequence for the synthesis of 2-imino-1H-imidazol-5(2H)-ones includes aza-Michael addition, intramolecular cyclization, CC bond-cleavage, 1,2-rearrangement, and aerobic dehydrogenation reaction, whereas the domino sequence for the synthesis of quinoxalines includes aza-Michael addition, intramolecular cyclization, elimination reaction, and CC bond-cleavage reaction. The two domino reactions have significant advantages including high efficiency, mild reaction conditions, and high tolerance of various functional groups. PMID:25079446

  13. Measuring the energy landscape of complex bonds using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayyas, Essa; Hoffmann, Peter; Runyan, Lindsay

    2009-03-01

    We measured rupture force of a complex bond of two interacting proteins with atomic force microscopy. Proteins of interest were active and latent Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), type 2 and 9, and their tissue inhibitors TIMP1 and TIMP2. Measurements show that the rupture force depends on the pulling speed; it ranges from 30 pN to 150 pN at pulling speeds 30nm/s to 48000nm/s. Analyzing data using an extended theory enabled us to understand the mechanism of MMP-TIMP interaction; we determined all physical parameters that form the landscape energy of the interaction, in addition to the life time of the bond and its length. Moreover, we used the pulling experiment to study the interaction of TIMP2 with the receptor MT1-MMP on the surface of living cells.

  14. Bond Energies in Models of the Schrock Metathesis Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliu, Monica; Li, Shenggang; Arduengo, Anthony J.; Dixon, David A.

    2011-06-23

    Heats of formation, adiabatic and diabatic bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of the model Schrock-type metal complexes M(NH)(CRR)(OH)₂ (M = Cr, Mo, W; CRR = CH₂, CHF, CF₂) and MO₂(OH)₂ compounds, and Brønsted acidities and fluoride affinities for the M(NH)(CH₂)(OH) ₂ transition metal complexes are predicted using high level CCSD(T) calculations. The metallacycle intermediates formed by reaction of C₂H4 with M(NH)-(CH₂)(OH)2 and MO₂(OH)₂ are investigated at the same level of theory. Additional corrections were added to the complete basis set limit to obtain near chemical accuracy ((1 kcal/mol). A comparison between adiabatic and diabatic BDEs is made and provides an explanation of trends in the BDEs. Electronegative groups bonded on the carbenic carbon lead to less stable Schrock-type complexes as the adiabatic BDEs ofMdCF₂ andMdCHF bonds are much lower than theMdCH₂ bonds. The Cr compounds have smaller BDEs than theWorMo complexes and should be less stable. Different M(NH)(OH)₂(C₃H₆) and MO(OH)₂(OC₂H4) metallacycle intermediates are investigated, and the lowest-energy metallacycles have a square pyramidal geometry. The results show that consideration of the singlet_triplet splitting in the carbene in the initial catalyst as well as in the metal product formed by the retro [2+2] cycloaddition is a critical component in the design of an effective olefin metathesis catalyst in terms of the parent catalyst and the groups being transferred.

  15. Predissociation measurements of bond dissociation energies: VC, VN, and VS.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric L; Davis, Quincy C; Morse, Michael D

    2016-06-21

    The abrupt onset of predissociation in the congested electronic spectra of jet-cooled VC, VN, and VS has been observed using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. It is argued that because of the high density of electronic states in these molecules, the predissociation threshold occurs at the thermochemical threshold for the production of separated atoms in their ground electronic states. As a result, the measured threshold represents the bond dissociation energy. Using this method, bond dissociation energies of D0(V C) = 4.1086(25) eV, D0(V N) = 4.9968(20) eV, and D0(V S) = 4.5353(25) eV are obtained. From these values, enthalpies of formation are derived as Δf,0KH°(V C(g)) = 827.0 ± 8 kJ mol(-1), Δf,0KH°(V N(g)) = 500.9 ± 8 kJ mol(-1), and Δf,0KH°(V S(g)) = 349.3 ± 8 kJ mol(-1). Using a thermochemical cycle and the well-known ionization energies of V, VC, and VN, our results also provide D0(V(+)-C) = 3.7242(25) eV and D0(V(+)-N) = 4.6871(20) eV. These values are compared to previous measurements and to computational results. The precision of these bond dissociation energies makes them good candidates for testing computational chemistry methods, particularly those that employ density functional theory. PMID:27334161

  16. Predissociation measurements of bond dissociation energies: VC, VN, and VS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric L.; Davis, Quincy C.; Morse, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    The abrupt onset of predissociation in the congested electronic spectra of jet-cooled VC, VN, and VS has been observed using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy. It is argued that because of the high density of electronic states in these molecules, the predissociation threshold occurs at the thermochemical threshold for the production of separated atoms in their ground electronic states. As a result, the measured threshold represents the bond dissociation energy. Using this method, bond dissociation energies of D0(V C) = 4.1086(25) eV, D0(V N) = 4.9968(20) eV, and D0(V S) = 4.5353(25) eV are obtained. From these values, enthalpies of formation are derived as Δf,0KH°(V C(g)) = 827.0 ± 8 kJ mol-1, Δf,0KH°(V N(g)) = 500.9 ± 8 kJ mol-1, and Δf,0KH°(V S(g)) = 349.3 ± 8 kJ mol-1. Using a thermochemical cycle and the well-known ionization energies of V, VC, and VN, our results also provide D0(V+-C) = 3.7242(25) eV and D0(V+-N) = 4.6871(20) eV. These values are compared to previous measurements and to computational results. The precision of these bond dissociation energies makes them good candidates for testing computational chemistry methods, particularly those that employ density functional theory.

  17. Controlling the bond scission sequence of oxygenates for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottlemyer, Alan L.

    The so called "Holy Grail" of heterogeneous catalysis is a fundamental understanding of catalyzed chemical transformations which span multidimensional scales of both length and time, enabling rational catalyst design. Such an undertaking is realizable only with an atomic level understanding of bond formation and destruction with respect to intrinsic properties of the metal catalyst. In this study, we investigate the bond scission sequence of small oxygenates (methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol) on bimetallic transition metal catalysts and transition metal carbide catalysts. Oxygenates are of interest both as hydrogen carriers for reforming to H2 and CO and as fuels in direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC). To address the so-called "materials gap" and "pressure gap" this work adopted three parallel research approaches: (1) ultra high vacuum (UHV) studies including temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) on polycrystalline surfaces; (2) DFT studies including thermodynamic and kinetic calculations; (3) electrochemical studies including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). Recent studies have suggested that tungsten monocarbide (WC) may behave similarly to Pt for the electrooxidation of oxygenates. TPD was used to quantify the activity and selectivity of oxygenate decomposition for WC and Pt-modifiedWC (Pt/WC) as compared to Pt. While decomposition activity was generally higher on WC than on Pt, scission of the C-O bond resulted in alkane/alkene formation on WC, an undesired product for DAFC. When Pt was added to WC by physical vapor deposition C-O bond scission was limited, suggesting that Pt synergistically modifies WC to improve the selectivity toward C-H bond scission to produce H2 and CO. Additionally, TPD confirmed WC and Pt/WC to be more CO tolerant than Pt. HREELS results verified that surface intermediates were different on Pt/WC as compared to Pt or WC and evidence of aldehyde

  18. Theoretical determination of the alkali-metal superoxide bond energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies for the alkali-metal superoxides have been computed using extensive Gaussian basis sets and treating electron correlation at the modified coupled-pair functional level. Our computed D0 values are 61.4, 37.2, 40.6, and 38.4 kcal/mol for LiO2, NaO2, KO2, and RbO2, respectively. These values, which are expected to be lower bounds and accurate to 2 kcal/mol, agree well with some of the older flame data, but rule out several recent experimental measurements.

  19. The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Helping students understand "chemical energy" is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk…

  20. Template Catalysis by Metal-Ligand Cooperation. C-C Bond Formation via Conjugate Addition of Non-activated Nitriles under Mild, Base-free Conditions Catalyzed by a Manganese Pincer Complex.

    PubMed

    Nerush, Alexander; Vogt, Matthias; Gellrich, Urs; Leitus, Gregory; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2016-06-01

    The first example of a catalytic Michael addition reaction of non-activated aliphatic nitriles to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds under mild, neutral conditions is reported. A new de-aromatized pyridine-based PNP pincer complex of the Earth-abundant, first-row transition metal manganese serves as the catalyst. The reaction tolerates a variety of nitriles and Michael acceptors with different steric features and acceptor strengths. Mechanistic investigations including temperature-dependent NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations reveal that the cooperative activation of alkyl nitriles, which leads to the generation of metalated nitrile nucleophile species (α-cyano carbanion analogues), is a key step of the mechanism. The metal center is not directly involved in the catalytic bond formation but rather serves, cooperatively with the ligand, as a template for the substrate activation. This approach of "template catalysis" expands the scope of potential donors for conjugate addition reactions. PMID:27164437

  1. Theoretical electron density distributions for Fe- and Cu-sulfide earth materials: a connection between bond length, bond critical point properties, local energy densities, and bonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, G V; Cox, D F; Rosso, K M; Ross, N L; Downs, R T; Spackman, M A

    2007-03-01

    Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net atomic charges were calculated for theoretical electron density distributions, rho(r), generated for a variety of Fe and Cu metal-sulfide materials with high- and low-spin Fe atoms in octahedral coordination and high-spin Fe atoms in tetrahedral coordination. The electron density, rho(rc), the Laplacian, triangle down2rho(rc), the local kinetic energy, G(rc), and the oxidation state of Fe increase as the local potential energy density, V(rc), the Fe-S bond lengths, and the coordination numbers of the Fe atoms decrease. The properties of the bonded interactions for the octahedrally coordinated low-spin Fe atoms for pyrite and marcasite are distinct from those for high-spin Fe atoms for troilite, smythite, and greigite. The Fe-S bond lengths are shorter and the values of rho(rc) and triangle down2rho(rc) are larger for pyrite and marcasite, indicating that the accumulation and local concentration of rho(r) in the internuclear region are greater than those involving the longer, high-spin Fe-S bonded interactions. The net atomic charges and the bonded radii calculated for the Fe and S atoms in pyrite and marcasite are also smaller than those for sulfides with high-spin octahedrally coordinated Fe atoms. Collectively, the Fe-S interactions are indicated to be intermediate in character with the low-spin Fe-S interactions having greater shared character than the high-spin interactions. The bond lengths observed for chalcopyrite together with the calculated bond critical point properties are consistent with the formula Cu+Fe3+S2. The bond length is shorter and the rho(rc) value is larger for the FeS4 tetrahedron displayed by metastable greigite than those displayed by chalcopyrite and cubanite, consistent with a proposal that the Fe atom in greigite is tetravalent. S-S bond paths exist between each of the surface S atoms of adjacent slabs of FeS6 octahedra comprising the layer sulfide smythite

  2. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Downs, R. T.; Spackman, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net atomic charges were calculated for theoretical electron density distributions, F(r), generated for a variety of Fe and Cu metal-sulfide materials with high- and low-spin Fe atoms in octahedral coordination and high-spin Fe atoms in tetrahedral coordination. The electron density, F(rc), the Laplacian, 32F(rc), the local kinetic energy, G(rc), and the oxidation state of Fe increase as the local potential energy density, V(rc), the Fe-S bond lengths, and the coordination numbers of the Fe atoms decrease. The properties of the bonded interactions for the octahedrally coordinated low-spin Fe atoms for pyrite and marcasite are distinct from those for high-spin Fe atoms for troilite, smythite, and greigite. The Fe-S bond lengths are shorter and the values of F(rc) and 32F(rc) are larger for pyrite and marcasite, indicating that the accumulation and local concentration of F(r) in the internuclear region are greater than those involving the longer, high-spin Fe-S bonded interactions. The net atomic charges and the bonded radii calculated for the Fe and S atoms in pyrite and marcasite are also smaller than those for sulfides with high-spin octahedrally coordinated Fe atoms. Collectively, the Fe-S interactions are indicated to be intermediate in character with the low-spin Fe-S interactions having greater shared character than the highspin interactions. The bond lengths observed for chalcopyrite together with the calculated bond critical point properties are consistent with the formula Cu+Fe3+S2. The bond length is shorter and the F(rc) value is larger for the FeS4 tetrahedron displayed by metastable greigite than those displayed by chalcopyrite and cubanite, consistent with a proposal that the Fe atom in greigite is tetravalent. S-S bond paths exist between each of the surface S atoms of adjacent slabs of FeS6 octahedra comprising the layer sulfide smythite, suggesting that the neutral Fe3S4 slabs are

  3. Accurate bond dissociation energies (D 0) for FHF- isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Christopher; Oswald, Rainer; Sebald, Peter; Botschwina, Peter; Stoll, Hermann; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2013-09-01

    Accurate bond dissociation energies (D 0) are determined for three isotopologues of the bifluoride ion (FHF-). While the zero-point vibrational contributions are taken from our previous work (P. Sebald, A. Bargholz, R. Oswald, C. Stein, P. Botschwina, J. Phys. Chem. A, DOI: 10.1021/jp3123677), the equilibrium dissociation energy (D e ) of the reaction ? was obtained by a composite method including frozen-core (fc) CCSD(T) calculations with basis sets up to cardinal number n = 7 followed by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. Smaller terms beyond fc-CCSD(T) cancel each other almost completely. The D 0 values of FHF-, FDF-, and FTF- are predicted to be 15,176, 15,191, and 15,198 cm-1, respectively, with an uncertainty of ca. 15 cm-1.

  4. Mediatorless solar energy conversion by covalently bonded thylakoid monolayer on the glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinhwan; Im, Jaekyun; Kim, Sunghyun

    2016-04-01

    Light reactions of photosynthesis that take place in thylakoid membranes found in plants or cyanobacteria are among the most effective ways of utilizing light. Unlike most researches that use photosystem I or photosystem II as conversion units for converting light to electricity, we have developed a simple method in which the thylakoid monolayer was covalently immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode surface. The activity of isolated thylakoid membrane was confirmed by measuring evolving oxygen under illumination. Glassy carbon surfaces were first modified with partial or full monolayers of carboxyphenyl groups by reductive C-C coupling using 4-aminobenzoic acid and aniline and then thylakoid membrane was bioconjugated through the peptide bond between amine residues of thylakoid and carboxyl groups on the surface. Surface properties of modified surfaces were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, contact angle measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Photocurrent of 230 nA cm(-2) was observed when the thylakoid monolayer was formed on the mixed monolayer of 4-carboxylpheny and benzene at applied potential of 0.4V vs. Ag/AgCl. A small photocurrent resulted when the 4-carboxyphenyl full monolayer was used. This work shows the possibility of solar energy conversion by directly employing the whole thylakoid membrane through simple surface modification. PMID:26625272

  5. Bond energy effects on strength, cooperativity and robustness of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Ching; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-10-01

    A fundamental challenge in engineering biologically inspired materials and systems is the identification of molecular structures that define fundamental building blocks. Here, we report a systematic study of the effect of the energy of chemical bonds on the mechanical properties of molecular structures, specifically, their strength and robustness. By considering a simple model system of an assembly of bonds in a cluster, we demonstrate that weak bonding, as found for example in H-bonds, results in a highly cooperative behaviour where clusters of bonds operate synergistically to form relatively strong molecular clusters. The cooperative effect of bonding results in an enhanced robustness since the drop of strength owing to the loss of a bond in a larger cluster only results in a marginal reduction of the strength. Strong bonding, as found in covalent interactions such as disulphide bonds or in the backbone of proteins, results in a larger mechanical strength. However, the ability for bonds to interact cooperatively is lost, and, as a result, the overall robustness is lower since the mechanical strength hinges on individual bonds rather than a cluster of bonds. The systematic analysis presented here provides general insight into the interplay of bond energy, robustness and other geometric parameters such as bond spacing. We conclude our analysis with a correlation of structural data of natural protein structures, which confirms the conclusions derived from our study. PMID:23050078

  6. Metallic bond effects on mean excitation energies for stopping powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    Mean excitation energies for first row metals are evaluated by means of the local plasma approximation. Particle corrections based on Pines' (1953) procedure and the Wigner Seitz (1934) model of the metallic state are included. The agreement with experimental values is remarkably good. In contrast to previous work, the calculations given here estimate shifts in the plasma frequency according to the theory for plane wave states in an extended plasma as calculated by Pines. It is demonstrated that the effects of the metallic bond in lithium and beryllium are quite large and that they appear mainly as a result of collective oscillations in the 'free' electron gas formed from the valence electrons. The usefulness of the plasma frequency shift derived for a degenerate electron gas in predicting the plasma frequency shift within the ion core is considered surprising.

  7. Bond dissociation energies from the topology of the charge density using gradient bundle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Amanda; Eberhart, Mark

    2016-02-01

    New and more robust models of chemical bonding are necessary to further our understanding of chemical phenomena. Among these are bond bundle and gradient bundle methods, which analyze bonding interactions in terms of property distributions over geometrically defined volumes. These methods have been shown to provide a systematic framework from which to search for structure-property relationships. In addition to providing a brief review of some of the relationships found using this framework, we present new findings that relate the lowering of kinetic energy in bonding regions to bond dissociation energy.

  8. Calculation of activation energies for hydrogen-atom abstractions by radicals containing carbon triple bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L.; Laufer, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Activation energies are calculated by the bond-energy-bond-order (BEBO) and the bond-strength-bond-length (BSBL) methods for the reactions of C2H radicals with H2, CH4, and C2H6 and for the reactions of CN radicals with H2 and CH4. The BSBL technique accurately predicts the activation energies for these reactions while the BEBO method yields energies averaging 9 kcal higher than those observed. A possible reason for the disagreement is considered.

  9. Structures, bonding and energies of N 6 isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhovtsev, Mikhail N.; von Ragué Schleyer, Paul

    1992-10-01

    The most stable N 6 isomer, a twisted open-chain C 2 structure, is 188.3 kcal/mol (MP4SDTQ/6-31G(d)//MP2(full)/6-31 G(d) + ZPE(MP2/6-31 G(d))) higher in energy than three N 2 molecules. In contrast to benzene, hexazine, N 6, prefers a non-planar twist-boat D 2 structure, but this is 26.0 kcal/mol less stable than the C 2 form. The D 6h altenative is a second-order saddle point at MP2 (full)/6-31G(d) 2.1 kcal/mol higher in energy at MP4SDTQ/6-311 (+s)G(d)//MP2(full)/6-311 (+s)G(2d) + ZPE (MP2/6-31G(d)). The homodesmotic and hyperhomodesmotic reaction energies indicate that the D 6h structure is destabilized (-17.6 and -10.4 kcal/mol, respectively), in contrast to the stabilization of benzene (23.9 and 20.3 kcal/mol, respectively, MP4SDTQ/6-31 G(d, p)//MP2(full)/6-31 G(d, p)). NBO analysis shows that none of the N atoms in the N 6 open-chain structures forms more than four covalent bonds. The other N 6 valence isomers, hexaaza-Dewar-benzene, hexaazabicyclopropenyl, and hexaazaprismane are higher in energy than hexazine (33.9, 29.6 and 115.8 kcal/mol, respectively) at MP4SDTQ(fc)/6-31 G(d)/MP2(full)/6-31 G(d) + ZPE(HF/6-31 G(d)).

  10. An Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Ionization Energies of Polyynes (H-(C = C)n-H; n = 1 - 9)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Sun, Bian Jian; Lin, Hong Mao; Chang, Agnes H. H.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-05-17

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical work on the ionization energies of polyacetylene -- organic molecules considered as important building blocks to form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the proto planetary nebulae such as of CRL 618. This set of astrophysical data can be utilized with significant confidence in future astrochemical models of photon-dominated regions and also of the proto planetary nebulae CRL 618. We recommend ionization energies of polyacetylenes from diacetylene up to heptaacetylene with an experimental accuracy of +- 0.05 eV: 10.03 eV (diacetylene), 9.45 eV (triacetylene), 9.08 eV (tetraacetylene), 8.75 eV (pentaacetylene), 8.65 eV (hexaacetylene), and 8.50 eV (heptaacetylene); further, ionization energies and with an accuracy of +- 0.1 eV: 8.32 eV (octaacetylene) and 8.24 eV (nonaacetylene) were computed. Implications of these energies to the redox chemistry involved in the multiply charged metal-ion mediated chemistry of hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan are also discussed.

  11. Interstellar Isomers: The Importance of Bonding Energy Differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remijan, Anthony J.; Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Jewell, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    We present strong detections of methyl cyanide (CH3CN), vinyl cyanide (CH2CHCN), ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) and cyanodiacetylene (HC4CN) molecules with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) toward the Sgr B2(N) molecular cloud. Attempts to detect the corresponding isocyanide isomers were only successful in the case of methyl isocyanide (CH3NC) for its J(sub K) = 1(sub 0) - 0(sub 0) transition, which is the first interstellar report of this line. To determine the spatial distribution of CH3NC, we used archival Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array data for the J(sub K) = 1(sub 0) - 0(sub 0) transitions but no emission was detected. From ab initio calculations, the bonding energy difference between the cyanide and isocyanide molecules is greater than 8500 per centimeter (greater than 12,000 K). Thus, cyanides are the more stable isomers and would likely be formed more preferentially over their isocyanide counterparts. That we detect CH3NC emission with a single antenna (Gaussian beamsize(omega(sub B))=1723 arcsec(sup 2)) but not with an interferometer (omega(sub b)=192 arcsec(sup 2)), strongly suggests that CH3NC has a widespread spatial distribution toward the Sgr B2(N) region. Other investigators have shown that CH3CN is present both in the LMH hot core of Sgr B2(N) and in the surrounding medium, while we have shown that CH3NC appears to be deficient in the LMH hot core. Thus, largescale, non-thermal processes in the surrounding medium may account for the conversion of CH3CN to CH3NC while the LMH hot core, which is dominated by thermal processes, does not produce a significant amount of CH3NC. Ice analog experiments by other investigators have shown that radiation bombardment of CH3CN can produce CH3NC, thus supporting our observations. We conclude that isomers separated by such large bonding energy differences are distributed in different interstellar environments, making the evaluation of column density ratios between such isomers irrelevant unless it can

  12. The trouble with chemical energy: why understanding bond energies requires an interdisciplinary systems approach.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Melanie M; Klymkowsky, Michael W

    2013-06-01

    Helping students understand "chemical energy" is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in physics and physical sciences; and 3) the failure of chemistry courses to explicitly link molecular with macroscopic energy ideas. From a constructivist perspective, it is unlikely that students can, without a coherent understanding of such a central concept, attain a robust and accurate understanding of new concepts. However, changes are on the horizon, guided by the increasing understanding that difficult concepts require coherent, well-designed learning progressions and the new National Research Council Framework for K-12 Science Education. We provide supporting evidence for our assertions and suggestions for an interdisciplinary learning progression designed to better approach the concept of bond energies, a first step in an understanding chemical energy and behavior of reaction systems that is central to biological systems. PMID:23737636

  13. A revised set of values of single-bond radii derived from the observed interatomic distances in metals by correction for bond number and resonance energy

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus; Kamb, Barclay

    1986-01-01

    An earlier discussion [Pauling, L. (1947) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69, 542] of observed bond lengths in elemental metals with correction for bond number and resonance energy led to a set of single-bond metallic radii with values usually somewhat less than the corresponding values obtained from molecules and complex ions. A theory of resonating covalent bonds has now been developed that permits calculation of the number of resonance structures per atom and of the effective resonance energy per bond. With this refined method of correcting the observed bond lengths for the effect of resonance energy, a new set of single-bond covalent radii, in better agreement with values from molecules and complex ions, has been constructed. PMID:16593698

  14. Conformational changes of 1-4-glucopyranosyl residues of a sulfated C-C linked hexasaccharide.

    PubMed

    Coletti, Alessia; Elli, Stefano; Macchi, Eleonora; Galzerano, Patrizia; Zamani, Leila; Guerrini, Marco; Torri, Giangiacomo; Vismara, Elena

    2014-05-01

    This work describes the structure of a fully sulfated maltotriose alpha-beta C-C linked dimer, where a central glycosidic bond was substituted by a non natural, hydrolase-resistant C-C bond. Such compound shows anti-metastatic properties being an inhibitor of the heparanase enzymatic activity and of P-selectin-mediated cell-cell interactions. NMR spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure and conformational properties of this C-C linked hexasaccharide. The presence of sulfate substituents and the internal C-C bond drives the two internal rings in an unusual (1)C(4) chair conformation, while the external rings linked by glycosidic bonds retain the typical (4)C(1) conformation. The NMR results were confirmed by molecular mechanics calculations using structure corresponding di- and tetrasaccharides as models. PMID:24680506

  15. The Trouble with Chemical Energy: Why Understanding Bond Energies Requires an Interdisciplinary Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Helping students understand “chemical energy” is notoriously difficult. Many hold inconsistent ideas about what energy is, how and why it changes during the course of a chemical reaction, and how these changes are related to bond energies and reaction dynamics. There are (at least) three major sources for this problem: 1) the way biologists talk about chemical energy (which is also the way we talk about energy in everyday life); 2) the macroscopic approach to energy concepts that is common in physics and physical sciences; and 3) the failure of chemistry courses to explicitly link molecular with macroscopic energy ideas. From a constructivist perspective, it is unlikely that students can, without a coherent understanding of such a central concept, attain a robust and accurate understanding of new concepts. However, changes are on the horizon, guided by the increasing understanding that difficult concepts require coherent, well-designed learning progressions and the new National Research Council Framework for K–12 Science Education. We provide supporting evidence for our assertions and suggestions for an interdisciplinary learning progression designed to better approach the concept of bond energies, a first step in an understanding chemical energy and behavior of reaction systems that is central to biological systems. PMID:23737636

  16. Two-State Reactivity Mechanism of Benzene C-C Activation by Trinuclear Titanium Hydride.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Guan, Wei; Yan, Li-Kai; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-09-01

    The cleavage of inert C-C bonds is a central challenge in modern chemistry. Multinuclear transition metal complexes would be a desirable alternative because of the synergetic effect of multiple metal centers. In this work, carbon-carbon bond cleavage and rearrangement of benzene by a trinuclear titanium hydride were investigated using density functional theory. The reaction occurs via a novel "two-state reactivity" mechanism. The important elementary steps consist of hydride transfer, benzene coordination, dehydrogenation, oxidative addition, hydride-proton exchange, and reductive elimination. Most importantly, the ground-state potential energy surface switches from nearly degenerate triplet and antiferromagnetic singlet states to a closed-shell singlet state in the dearomatization of benzene, which effectively decreases the activation barrier. Furthermore, the roles of the transition metal centers and hydrides were clarified. PMID:27549571

  17. Direct computation of general chemical energy differences: Application to ionization potentials, excitation, and bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Harrison, Robert J; Yanai, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Chemists are mainly interested in energy differences. In contrast, most quantum chemical methods yield the total energy which is a large number compared to the difference and has therefore to be computed to a higher relative precision than would be necessary for the difference alone. Hence, it is desirable to compute energy differences directly, thereby avoiding the precision problem. Whenever it is possible to find a parameter which transforms smoothly from an initial to a final state, the energy difference can be obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to that parameter (c.f., thermodynamic integration or adiabatic connection methods). If the dependence on the parameter is predominantly linear, accurate results can be obtained by single-point integration. In density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock, we applied the formalism to ionization potentials, excitation energies, and chemical bond breaking. Example calculations for ionization potentials and excitation energies showed that accurate results could be obtained with a linear estimate. For breaking bonds, we introduce a non-geometrical parameter which gradually turns the interaction between two fragments of a molecule on. The interaction changes the potentials used to determine the orbitals as well as constraining the orbitals to be orthogonal.

  18. Direct computation of general chemical energy differences: Application to ionization potentials, excitation, and bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beste, A.; Harrison, R. J.; Yanai, T.

    2006-08-01

    Chemists are mainly interested in energy differences. In contrast, most quantum chemical methods yield the total energy which is a large number compared to the difference and has therefore to be computed to a higher relative precision than would be necessary for the difference alone. Hence, it is desirable to compute energy differences directly, thereby avoiding the precision problem. Whenever it is possible to find a parameter which transforms smoothly from an initial to a final state, the energy difference can be obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to that parameter (cf. thermodynamic integration or adiabatic connection methods). If the dependence on the parameter is predominantly linear, accurate results can be obtained by single-point integration. In density functional theory and Hartree-Fock, we applied the formalism to ionization potentials, excitation energies, and chemical bond breaking. Example calculations for ionization potentials and excitation energies showed that accurate results could be obtained with a linear estimate. For breaking bonds, we introduce a nongeometrical parameter which gradually turns the interaction between two fragments of a molecule on. The interaction changes the potentials used to determine the orbitals as well as the constraint on the orbitals to be orthogonal.

  19. Iminopropadienones RN=C=C=C=O and bisiminopropadienes RN=C=C=C=NR: Matrix infrared spectra and anharmonic frequency calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, Didier; Baraille, Isabelle; Andersen, Heidi Gade; Wentrup, Curt

    2013-10-01

    Methyliminopropadienone MeN=C=C=C=O 1a was generated by flash vacuum thermolysis from four different precursors and isolated in solid argon. The matrix-isolation infrared spectrum is dominated by unusually strong anharmonic effects resulting in complex fine structure of the absorptions due to the NCCCO moiety in the 2200 cm-1 region. Doubling and tripling of the corresponding absorption bands are observed for phenyliminopropadienone PhN=C=C=C=O 1b and bis(phenylimino)propadiene PhN=C=C=C=NPh 9, respectively. Anharmonic vibrational frequency calculations allow the identification of a number of overtones and combination bands as the cause of the splittings for each molecule. This method constitutes an important tool for the characterization of reactive intermediates and unusual molecules by matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy.

  20. Aerobic synthesis of substituted quinoline from aldehyde and aniline: copper-catalyzed intermolecular C-H active and C-C formative cyclization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rulong; Liu, Xingxing; Pan, Congming; Zhou, Xiaoqiang; Li, Xiaoni; Kang, Xing; Huang, Guosheng

    2013-09-20

    An efficient method for the direct synthesis of substituted quinolines from anilines and aldehydes through C-H functionalization, C-C/C-N bond formation, and C-C bond cleavage has been developed. The method is simple and practical and employs air as an oxidant. PMID:24024912

  1. Prediction of the bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, and bond dissociation energy of octahedral seaborgium hexacarbonyl, Sg(CO){sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.S.; Bursten, B.E.

    1999-11-24

    The recent syntheses of several new elements (including the recent reports of elements 116 and 118), coupled with the controversy surrounding the naming of elements 104--109, have stimulated a great interest in the chemistry of the transactinide elements. This contribution addresses hypothetical hexacarbonyl complex of seaborgium (Sg, element 106), which is predicted to be a 6d-block transition element with six valence electrons, analogous to Cr, Mo, and W. The authors have previously predicted that, if it were to exist, Sg(CO){sub 6} would exhibit metal-carbonyl bonding that is very similar to that in Cr(CO){sub 6}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, and W(CO){sub 6}, and quite unlike that of the unknown valence isoelectronic actinide complex U(CO){sub 6}. This finding is in accord with the scant experimental data available for Sg. The relativistic DV-X{alpha} method used in the earlier paper facilitated the analysis of the molecular orbitals of Sg(CO){sub 6}, but did not allow for the calculation of total-energy properties, such as bond lengths and vibrational frequencies. Here the authors will use the superior methodology they have applied to other transactinide molecules to compare the bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, and CO dissociation energy of hypothetical Sg(CO){sub 6} to those of Mo(CO){sub 6} and W(CO){sub 6}.

  2. The effect of bond functions on dissociation energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The procedure employing bond functions recently suggested by Wright and Buenker has been applied to the N2 X 1 Sigma g + potential curve within the CAS SCF + MRSD CI treatment of electron correlation. The basis set used herein is identical to that employed by these authors in their SCF + CI calculations. The De and and the shape of the resulting potential curve, as judged by the computed vibrational levels, is not so accurate as would be expected from the results reported by Wright and Buenker (1984). The results indicate that using the CI superposition errors associated with bond functions to cancel basis set incompleteness depends on the treatment of the electron correlation.

  3. Intrinsic affinities of alkali cations for 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6: Bond dissociation energies of gas-phase M{sup +}-crown ether complexes

    SciTech Connect

    More, M.B.; Ray, D.; Armentrout, P.B.

    1999-01-20

    Bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of M{sup +}[c-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 5}] and M{sup +}[c-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 6}] for M = Na, K, Rb, and Cs are reported. The BDEs are determined experimentally by analysis of the thresholds for collision-induced dissociation of the cation-crown ether complexes by xenon measured by using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. In all cases, the primary and lowest energy dissociation channel observed experimentally in endothermic loss of the ligand molecule. The cross section thresholds are interpreted to yield 0 and 298 K BDEs after accounting for the effects of multiple ion-molecule collisions, internal energy of the complexes, and unimolecular decay rates. For both 18-crown-6 and 15-crown-5, the BDEs decrease monotonically with increasing cation size. These results indicate that the intrinsic affinity of c-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 5} and c-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 6} for M{sup +} is determined principally by the charge density of the cation not by the ratio of the ionic radius to the cavity size. The BDEs reported here are in fair agreement with recent ab initio calculations at the MP2 level with 6-31+G* basis sets. The experimental values are systematically smaller than the computed values by 8 {+-} 2 kJ/mol per metal-oxygen interaction. The existence of less strongly bound isomers in the experimental apparatus for Rb{sup +}(15-crown-5) and Cs{sup +}(15-crown-5) appears likely, but their absence for Na{sup +} and K{sup +} complexes indicates interesting metal-dependent dynamics to the formation of such isomers.

  4. The Bond Energy of CH3-H: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorain, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment, designed for use in the undergraduate laboratory, that measures the bond energies of molecules using a small commercial mass spectrometer and low-cost digital voltmeters. (BT)

  5. Protein unfolding from free-energy calculations: Integration of the Gaussian network model with bond binding energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Amit; Granek, Rony

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by single molecule experiments, we study thermal unfolding pathways of four proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor, barnase, ubiquitin, and adenylate kinase, using bond network models that combine bond energies and elasticity. The protein elasticity is described by the Gaussian network model (GNM), to which we add prescribed bond binding energies that are assigned to all (nonbackbone) connecting bonds in the GNM of native state and assumed identical for simplicity. Using exact calculation of the Helmholtz free energy for this model, we consider bond rupture single events. The bond designated for rupture is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all (nonbackbone) bonds in the network. Plotting the free-energy profile along this pathway at different temperatures, we observe a few major partial unfolding, metastable or stable, states, that are separated by free-energy barriers and change role as the temperature is raised. In particular, for adenylate kinase we find three major partial unfolding states, which is consistent with single molecule FRET experiments [Pirchi et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 493 (2011), 10.1038/ncomms1504] for which hidden Markov analysis reveals between three and five such states. Such states can play a major role in enzymatic activity.

  6. A Dynamic Pathway for Stone-Wales Bond Rotation on Carbon Nanotubes through Diamond-Like Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chen-Yu; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, Kyeong-Jae; Menon, Madhu

    2003-01-01

    A new lower energy barrier with a two-step pathway of Stone-Wales (SW) ,ond rotation on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is found through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CNTs under tension. The first step involves going over to a stable sp3-like metastable configuration with half rotated and partially tilted C-C bond. The second step involves going over to the fully rotated C-C bond with the formation of a SW defect in the nanotube. The energy barrier for this two-step dynamic pathway is significantly lower than the previously known static barrier for in-plane rotation of the C-C bond on a tensile strained (> 4%) CNT.

  7. Equilibrium Acidities and Homolytic Bond Dissociation Energies of Acidic C H Bonds in Alpha-Arylacetophenones and Related Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alnajjar, Mikhail S. ); Zhang, Xian-Man; Gleicher, Gerald J.; Truksa, Scott V.; Franz, James A. )

    2002-12-13

    The equilibrium acidities (pKAHs) and the oxidation potentials of the conjugate anions (Eox(A?{approx})s) were determined in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for eight ketones of the structure GCOCH3 and twenty of the structure RCOCH2G, (where R= alkyl, phenyl and G= alkyl, aryl). The homolytic bond dissociation energies (BDEs) for the acidic C H bonds of the ketones were estimated using the equation, BDEAH= 1.37pKAH+ 23.1Eox(A?{approx})+ 73.3. While the equilibrium acidities of GCOCH3 were found to be dependent on the remote substituent G, the BDE values for the C H bonds remained essentially invariant (93.5+ 0.5 kcal/mol). A linear correlation between pKAH values and (Eox(A?{approx})s) was found for the ketones. For RCOCH2G ketones, both pKAH and BDE values for the adjacent C-H bonds are sensitive to the nature of the substituent G. However, the steric bulk of the aryl group tends to exert a leveling effect on BDE's. The BDE of?p-9-anthracenylacetophenone is higher than that of??-2-anthracenylacetophenone by 3 kcal/mole, reflecting significant steric inhibition of resonance in the 9-substituted system. A range of 80.7 - 84.4 kcal/mole is observed for RCOCH2G ketones. The results are discussed in terms of solvation, steric, and resonance effects. Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to illustrate the effect of steric interactions on radical and anion geometries. The DFT results parallel the trends in the experimental BDEs of??-arylacetophenones.

  8. Hypovalency--a kinetic-energy density description of a 4c-2e bond.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-06-01

    A bond descriptor based on the kinetic energy density, the localized-orbital locator (LOL), is used to characterize the nature of the chemical bond in electron deficient multi-center bonds. The boranes B(2)H(6), B(4)H(4), B(4)H(10), [B(6)H(6)](2-), and [B(6)H(7)](-) serve as prototypical examples of hypovalent 3c-2e and 4c-2e bonding. The kinetic energy density is derived from a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals obtained from pure density functional calculations (PBE/TZVP), and the topology of LOL is analyzed in terms of (3,-3) attractors (Gamma). The B-B-B and B-H-B 3c-2e, and the B-B-H-B 4c-2e bonding situations are defined by their own characteristic LOL profiles. The presence of one attractor in relation to the three or four atoms that are engaged in electron deficient bonding provides sufficient indication of the type of 3c-2e or 4c-2e bond present. For the 4c-2e bond in [B(6)H(7)](-) the LOL analysis is compared to results from an experimental QTAIM study. PMID:19452076

  9. 98. Catalog HHistory 1, C.C.C., 19 Tree Planting, Negative No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. Catalog H-History 1, C.C.C., 19 Tree Planting, Negative No. P 474c (Photographer and date unknown) TRANSPLANTING TREE. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  10. Direct, Sequential, and Stereoselective Alkynylation of C,C-Dibromophosphaalkenes.

    PubMed

    Shameem, Muhammad A; Esfandiarfard, Keyhan; Öberg, Elisabet; Ott, Sascha; Orthaber, Andreas

    2016-07-18

    The first direct alkynylation of C,C-dibromophosphaalkenes by a reaction with sulfonylacetylenes is reported. Alkynylation proceeds selectively in the trans position relative to the P substituent to afford bromoethynylphosphaalkenes. Owing to the absence of transition metals in the procedure, the previously observed conversion of dibromophosphaalkenes into phosphaalkynes through the phosphorus analog of the Fritsch-Buttenberg-Wiechell rearrangement is thus suppressed. The bromoethynylphosphaalkenes can subsequently be converted to C,C-diacetylenic, cross-conjugated phosphaalkenes by following a Sonogashira coupling protocol in good overall yields. By using the newly described method, full control over the stereochemistry at the P=C double bond is achieved. The substrate scope of this reaction is demonstrated for different dibromophosphaalkenes as well as different sulfonylacetylenes. PMID:27310813

  11. Bond Graph Modeling and Validation of an Energy Regenerative System for Emulsion Pump Tests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilei; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    The test system for emulsion pump is facing serious challenges due to its huge energy consumption and waste nowadays. To settle this energy issue, a novel energy regenerative system (ERS) for emulsion pump tests is briefly introduced at first. Modeling such an ERS of multienergy domains needs a unified and systematic approach. Bond graph modeling is well suited for this task. The bond graph model of this ERS is developed by first considering the separate components before assembling them together and so is the state-space equation. Both numerical simulation and experiments are carried out to validate the bond graph model of this ERS. Moreover the simulation and experiments results show that this ERS not only satisfies the test requirements, but also could save at least 25% of energy consumption as compared to the original test system, demonstrating that it is a promising method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests. PMID:24967428

  12. Bond graph modeling and validation of an energy regenerative system for emulsion pump tests.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilei; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    The test system for emulsion pump is facing serious challenges due to its huge energy consumption and waste nowadays. To settle this energy issue, a novel energy regenerative system (ERS) for emulsion pump tests is briefly introduced at first. Modeling such an ERS of multienergy domains needs a unified and systematic approach. Bond graph modeling is well suited for this task. The bond graph model of this ERS is developed by first considering the separate components before assembling them together and so is the state-space equation. Both numerical simulation and experiments are carried out to validate the bond graph model of this ERS. Moreover the simulation and experiments results show that this ERS not only satisfies the test requirements, but also could save at least 25% of energy consumption as compared to the original test system, demonstrating that it is a promising method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests. PMID:24967428

  13. Bond Energies and Thermochemical Properties of Ring-Opened Diradicals and Carbenes of exo-Tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]decane.

    PubMed

    Hudzik, Jason M; Castillo, Álvaro; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2015-09-24

    Exo-tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]decane (TCD) or exo-tetrahydrodicyclopentadiene is an interesting strained ring compound and the single-component high-energy density hydrocarbon fuel known as JP-10. Important initial reactions of TCD at high temperatures could cleave a strained carbon-carbon (C-C) bond in the ring system creating diradicals also constrained by the remaining ring system. This study determines the thermochemical properties of these diradicals (TCD-H2 mJ-nJ where m and n correspond to the cleaved carbons sites) including the carbon-carbon bond dissociation energy (C-C BDE) corresponding to the cleaved TCD site. Thermochemical properties including enthalpies (ΔH°f298), entropies (S(T)), heat capacities (Cp(T)), and C-H and C-C BDEs for the parent (TCD-H2 m-n), radical (TCD-H2 mJ-n and m-nJ), diradical (TCD-H2 mJ-nJ), and carbene (TCD-H2 mJJ-n and m-nJJ) species are determined. Structures, vibrational frequencies, moments of inertia, and internal rotor potentials are calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Standard enthalpies of formation in the gas phase for the TCD-H2 m-n parent and radical species are determined using the B3LYP density functional theory and the higher level G3MP2B3 and CBS-QB3 composite methods. For singlet and triplet TCD diradicals and carbenes, M06-2X, ωB97X-D, and CCSD(T) methods are included in the analysis to determine ΔH°f298 values. The C-C BDEs are further calculated using CASMP2(2,2)/aug-cc-pvtz//CASSCF(2,2)/cc-pvtz and with the CASMP2 energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The bond energies calculated with these methods are shown to be comparable to the other calculation methods. Isodesmic work reactions are used for enthalpy analysis of these compounds for effective cancelation of systematic errors arising from ring strain. C-C BDEs range from 77.4 to 84.6 kcal mol(-1) for TCD diradical singlet species. C-H BDEs for the parent TCD-H2 m-n carbon sites range from 93 to 101 kcal mol(-1) with a

  14. Renewable energy liberation by nonthermal intermolecular bond dissociation in water and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graneau, N.; Verdoold, S.; Oudakker, G.; Yurteri, C. U.; Marijnissen, J. C. M.

    2011-02-01

    Prior indication that renewable energy can be extracted from hydrogen bonds in water has led to several investigations of the energy balance when bulk liquid is converted into micron scale droplets by directional (nonthermal) forces. The demonstration of this effect has previously involved pulsed high current arcs in water which produce large electrodynamic forces. Here, we show that renewable energy is also liberated during the creation of droplets by electrostatic forces in electrohydrodynamic atomization (electrospray) experiments. Using both ethanol and water, the energy outputs, primarily the droplet kinetic energy, were always greater than the energy inputs, implying that stored energy was liberated from the liquid. The energetics of generic chemical bonding are investigated to demonstrate that although this discovery was not publicly anticipated, it is consistent with conventional theory. This experimental breakthrough should have a major impact on the quest for renewable energy sources, capable of powering electricity generators.

  15. Understanding selenocysteine through conformational analysis, proton affinities, acidities and bond dissociation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Damanjit; Sharma, Punita; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Kaur, Mondeep

    Density functional methods have been employed to characterize the gas phase conformations of selenocysteine. The 33 stable conformers of selenocysteine have been located on the potential energy surface using density functional B3LYP/6-31+G* method. The conformers are analyzed in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. The proton affinity, gas phase acidities, and bond dissociation energies have also been evaluated for different reactive sites of selenocysteine for the five lowest energy conformers at B3LYP/6-311++G*//B3LYP/6-31+G* level. Evaluation of these intrinsic properties reflects the antioxidant activity of selenium in selenocysteine.0

  16. A Novel Method to Quantify Soil Aggregate Stability by Measuring Aggregate Bond Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrat, Rachel; Rawlins, Barry G.; Quinton, John N.; Watts, Chris W.; Whitmore, Andy P.

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a key indicator of soil quality because it controls physical, biological and chemical functions important in cultivated soils. Micro-aggregates are responsible for the long term sequestration of carbon in soil, therefore determine soils role in the carbon cycle. It is thus vital that techniques to measure aggregate stability are accurate, consistent and reliable, in order to appropriately manage and monitor soil quality, and to develop our understanding and estimates of soil as a carbon store to appropriately incorporate in carbon cycle models. Practices used to assess the stability of aggregates vary in sample preparation, operational technique and unit of results. They use proxies and lack quantification. Conflicting results are therefore drawn between projects that do not provide methodological or resultant comparability. Typical modern stability tests suspend aggregates in water and monitor fragmentation upon exposure to an un-quantified amount of ultrasonic energy, utilising a laser granulometer to measure the change in mean weight diameter. In this project a novel approach has been developed based on that of Zhu et al., (2009), to accurately quantify the stability of aggregates by specifically measuring their bond energies. The bond energies are measured operating a combination of calorimetry and a high powered ultrasonic probe, with computable output function. Temperature change during sonication is monitored by an array of probes which enables calculation of the energy spent heating the system (Ph). Our novel technique suspends aggregates in heavy liquid lithium heteropolytungstate, as opposed to water, to avoid exposing aggregates to an immeasurable disruptive energy source, due to cavitation, collisions and clay swelling. Mean weight diameter is measured by a laser granulometer to monitor aggregate breakdown after successive periods of calculated ultrasonic energy input (Pi), until complete dispersion is achieved and bond

  17. Calculation of structures and bond dissociation energies of radical cations: The importance of through-bond delocalization in bibenzylic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M. )

    1990-12-19

    Structures ad energies ({Delta}H{degree}{sub f}) of radical cations and their radical and cationic fragments have been calculated by use of AM1 semiempirical molecular orbital theory and compared with experimental data in the literature. Experimental {Delta}H{degree}{sub f} correlate linearly with calculated heats giving nonzero intercepts and nonunit slopes. The best correlations as judged by the variance of the fit are obtained when performed according to structure types, i.e., aromatic radical cations, alkane radical cations, radicals, and cations. These correlations enable corrections to AM1 values that allow prediction of experimental {Delta}H{degree}{sub f} with uncertainties that approach experimental uncertainties. Used in this way, AM1 can augment experimental thermochemical data and enable confident predictions of reaction enthalpies. Bibenzylic radical cations are calculated to have charge and sin localized in only one of the aromatic rings ether through space or through the ethylenic bond are found.

  18. Mapping the Globe with C & C Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, A. A.

    2001-12-01

    C & C Technologies is an international survey and mapping company with an entrepreneurial spirit that is evident throughout. C & C was recently awarded the MTS (Marine Technology Society) ROV Committee Corporate Excellence Award in recognition of their pioneering spirit displayed by the introduction of the HUGIN 3000 Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) to the offshore industry. This presentation will outline the wide variety of global mapping projects that C & C has performed for government, private sector, and academia. These include high-resolution mapping of Cater Lake, the Panama Canal, Antarctica, Lake Tahoe, and the HUGIN 3000ś discovery of the German submarine U-166 in 5000 feet of water in the Gulf of Mexico. Adacemic disciplines required to support these technical challenges will be characterized and job opportunities in this emerging field will be addressed.

  19. Size, Kinetics, and Free Energy of Clusters Formed by Ultraweak Carbohydrate-Carbohydrate Bonds.

    PubMed

    Witt, Hannes; Savić, Filip; Oelkers, Marieelen; Awan, Shahid I; Werz, Daniel B; Geil, Burkhard; Janshoff, Andreas

    2016-04-12

    Weak noncovalent intermolecular interactions play a pivotal role in many biological processes such as cell adhesion or immunology, where the overall binding strength is controlled through bond association and dissociation dynamics as well as the cooperative action of many parallel bonds. Among the various molecules participating in weak bonds, carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are probably the most ancient ones allowing individual cells to reversibly enter the multicellular state and to tell apart self and nonself cells. Here, we scrutinized the kinetics and thermodynamics of small homomeric Lewis X-Lewis X ensembles formed in the contact zone of a membrane-coated colloidal probe and a solid supported membrane ensuring minimal nonspecific background interactions. We used an atomic force microscope to measure force distance curves at Piconewton resolution, which allowed us to measure the force due to unbinding of the colloidal probe and the planar membrane as a function of contact time. Applying a contact model, we could estimate the free binding energy of the formed adhesion cluster as a function of dwell time and thereby determine the precise size of the contact zone, the number of participating bonds, and the intrinsic rates of association and dissociation in the presence of calcium ions. The unbinding energy per bond was found to be on the order of 1 kBT. Approximately 30 bonds were opened simultaneously at an off-rate of koff = 7 ± 0.2 s(-1). PMID:27074683

  20. The Scalar Relativistic Contribution to Ga-Halide Bond Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The one-electron Douglas Kroll (DK) and perturbation theory (+R) approaches are used to compute the scalar relativistic contribution to the atomization energies of GaFn. These results are compared with the previous GaCln results. While the +R and DK results agree well for the GaCln atom nation energies, they differ for GaFn. The present work suggests that the DK approach is more accurate than the +R approach. In addition, the DK approach is less sensitive to the choice of basis set. The computed atomization energies of GaF2 and GaF3 are smaller than the somewhat uncertain experiments. It is suggested that additional calibration calculations for the scalar relativistic effects in GaF2 and GaF3 would be valuable.

  1. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdew, John P.; Levy, Mel; Painter, G. S.; Wei, Siqing; Lagowski, Jolanta B.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al.and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N2 and F2, which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules.

  2. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-15

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N/sub 2/ and F/sub 2/, which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules.

  3. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ruedenberg, K.

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  4. 102. Catalog HHistory 1, C.C.C., 34 Landscaping, Negative No. 6040a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    102. Catalog H-History 1, C.C.C., 34 Landscaping, Negative No. 6040a (Photographer and date unknown) BEAUTIFICATION PROGRAM STARTED AS SOON AS GRADING ALONG THE DRIVE WAS COMPLETED. CCC CAMP 3 SHOWN PLANTING LAUREL. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  5. A periodic energy decomposition analysis method for the investigation of chemical bonding in extended systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2015-05-21

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the bonding energy between two fragments (e.g., the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital relaxation energies. This is complemented by consideration of dispersion interactions via a pairwise scheme. One major extension toward a previous implementation [Philipsen and Baerends, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12470 (2006)] lies in the separate discussion of electrostatic and Pauli and the addition of a dispersion term. The pEDA presented here for an implementation based on atomic orbitals can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy, and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface-adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight the performance of the method representing insulating (CO on MgO(001)), metallic (H{sub 2} on M(001), M = Pd, Cu), and semiconducting (CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} on Si(001)) substrates. These examples cover diverse substrates as well as bonding scenarios ranging from weakly interacting to covalent (shared electron and donor acceptor) bonding. The results presented lend confidence that the pEDA will be a powerful tool for the analysis of surface-adsorbate bonding in the future, enabling the transfer of concepts like ionic and covalent bonding, donor-acceptor interaction, steric repulsion, and others to extended systems.

  6. Bond Functions and Core Correlation Energy Contributions To HeBe Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabi, A. S.; Nour, E. M.; Abdel Halim, W. S.

    An empirical scheme for implementation of bond functions in heteronuclear diatomics is suggested and applied to HeBe using universal even-tempered functions. The effects of bond functions and core-correlation energy on the interaction potential of HeBe calculated at the uncorrelated (SCF) and correlated (MBPT and CC) levels are examined. The results confirm that an accuracy of sub μ Hartree level can be obtained using even-tempered functions with s-, p-, and d- symmetry and that bond functions of size {4s2p} for He and {6s3p} for Be recovers 100% of energy lowering obtained from the addition of 10d atom-centered functions to He and 13d atom centred functions to Be. The various treatments of the electron correlation, conclude that the system is interacting weakly with a well depth from 14.5-24.7 μEh at a separation near 9.1a0 compared with 20.7-25.5 μEh previously reported with a rather limited basis set. The most reliable well depth corrected for BSSE (19.0 μEh) was obtained at the CC-SD(T)level at separation of 8.71a0 taking into account the effects of bond functions and core correlation energy. Potential energy curves at the CC-SD(T) valence and CC-SD(T) valence + core correlation levels are analyzed in analytical forms in terms of exchange repulsion, induction and dispersion components.

  7. Ionic bond effects on the mean excitation energy for stopping power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Chang, C. K.; Kamaratos, E.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular mean excitation energies for ionic bonded molecules calculated according to the local plasma approximation are compared to the Bragg rule. Adjustments of 15% are calculated for LiF in agreement with experiments while 6% adjustments are predicted for HF and 3% for LiH.

  8. Contributions of mass and bond energy difference and interface defects on thermal boundary conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, ChangJin; Roberts, Nicholas

    2015-09-01

    The impact of mass and bond energy difference and interface defects on thermal boundary conductance (TBC) is investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) with the Lennard-Jones (L-J) interatomic potential. Results show that the maximum TBC is achieved when the mass and bond energy of two dissimilar materials are matched, although the effective thermal conductivity is not necessarily a maximum due to the contributions of the thermal conductivity of the constituent materials. Mass and bond energy differences result in a mismatch between phonon dispersions, limiting high frequency phonon transport at the interface. This frequency mismatch is defined by a frequency ratio, which is a ratio of the characteristic frequencies of the two materials, presented in the discussion section, and is a reference of the level of phonon dispersion mismatch. Inelastic scattering may result at higher temperatures, especially when there exists a bond energy difference, resulting in strain in the lattice, which would allow phonons outside the allowable frequency range to contribute to transport. TBC decreases abruptly with small mass differences, but at which point larger differences in mass have no impact. In addition, interdiffusion across the interface further reduces the TBC between the frequency ratios of 0.79 and 1.26 while vacancies have negligible impact.

  9. Covalent bonding effect on the mean excitation energy of H2 with the local plasma model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamaratos, E.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical bonding is taken into account explicitly in the determination of the mean excitation energy (I) for stopping power of H2 with the local plasma approximation by employing molecular electronic wave functions for H2 for the first time. This procedure leads to a new value for IH2 that is higher than all accepted experimental and theoretical values.

  10. The Dissociation Energies of He2, HeH, and ArH; A Bond Function Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The bond energies and bond lengths are determined for He2, HeH, and ArH at the CCSD(T) level using both atom-centered basis sets and those that include bond functions. The addition of bond functions dramatically improves the rate of convergence of the results with respect to the size of the atom-centered basis set; with bond functions, triple zeta atom-centered basis set, outperform quintuple zeta basis sets without bond functions. The addition of bond functions also reduces the number of diffuse functions that must be added to the atom-centered sets. Employing bond functions appear to offer a very cost effective method of computing the interaction between weakly bound systems, especially for He.

  11. Average bond energies between boron and elements of the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh groups of the periodic table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altshuller, Aubrey P

    1955-01-01

    The average bond energies D(gm)(B-Z) for boron-containing molecules have been calculated by the Pauling geometric-mean equation. These calculated bond energies are compared with the average bond energies D(exp)(B-Z) obtained from experimental data. The higher values of D(exp)(B-Z) in comparison with D(gm)(B-Z) when Z is an element in the fifth, sixth, or seventh periodic group may be attributed to resonance stabilization or double-bond character.

  12. Quantum dynamics study of fulvene double bond photoisomerization: The role of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution and excitation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Blancafort, Lluis; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2011-10-07

    The double bond photoisomerization of fulvene has been studied with quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Fulvene is a test case to develop optical control strategies based on the knowledge of the excited state decay mechanism. The decay takes place on a time scale of several hundred femtoseconds, and the potential energy surface is centered around a conical intersection seam between the ground and excited state. The competition between unreactive decay and photoisomerization depends on the region of the seam accessed during the decay. The dynamics are carried out on a four-dimensional model surface, parametrized from complete active space self-consistent field calculations, that captures the main features of the seam (energy and locus of the seam and associated branching space vectors). Wave packet propagations initiated by single laser pulses of 5-25 fs duration and 1.85-4 eV excitation energy show the principal characteristics of the first 150 fs of the photodynamics. Initially, the excitation energy is transferred to a bond stretching mode that leads the wave packet to the seam, inducing the regeneration of the reactant. The photoisomerization starts after the vibrational energy has flowed from the bond stretching to the torsional mode. In our propagations, intramolecular energy redistribution (IVR) is accelerated for higher excess energies along the bond stretch mode. Thus, the competition between unreactive decay and isomerization depends on the rate of IVR between the bond stretch and torsion coordinates, which in turn depends on the excitation energy. These results set the ground for the development of future optical control strategies.

  13. Trans-reflection thermal driven deformable mirror with flexible bonding in high energy laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xingkun; Huang, Lei; Gong, Mali; Xue, Qiao

    2014-09-01

    Deformable mirrors used in high energy laser system suffer from problems like the stress from adhesive solidification or the relatively expensive unit price of piezoceramic actuator. The thermal driven deformable mirror (TDDM) investigated here provided a promising prospect to solve these problems. Four scenarios of TDDM were studied and compared. Results showed that the trans-reflection TDDM with flexible bonding best met the requirement in practical use. The flexible bonding excluded the stress problem in the solidification of adhesives, trans-reflection brought about enough correction range, and the choice of thermo-electric cooler as actuator could greatly bring down the cost of adaptive optics apparatus as well.

  14. Fabrication and Characterization of a Lead Zirconate Titanate Micro Energy Harvester Based on Eutectic Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Gui; Sun, Jian; Yang, Chun-Sheng; Liu, Jing-Quan; Sugiyama, Susumu; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    A lead zirconate titanate(PZT)-Si energy harvester cantilever with PZT bulk ceramics is fabricated by eutectic bonding, polishing and dicing processes. The feasibility of this process is studied using a successful operation of the cantilever in both actuation and harvesting modes. The first prototype made from a PZT-Au-Si cantiliever is tested. The testing results show the voltage output of 632 mV at the frequency of 815 Hz when the excitation acceleration is 0.5 g. The PZT and silicon layers are bonded together to form a sandwiched structure using a gold layer as an intermediate layer.

  15. Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds for Public Building Upgrades. Reducing Energy Bills in the City of Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect

    Zimring, Mark

    2012-07-18

    Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) are federally-subsidized bonds that enable state, tribal, and local government issuers to borrow money to fund a range of energy conservation projects, including public building upgrades that reduce energy use by at least 20 percent, at very attractive borrowing rates and long terms. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the City of Philadelphia received a $15 million QECB award from the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury). The city leveraged $6.25 million of its QECB allocation to finance half of a $12.6 million initiative to upgrade the energy efficiency of City buildings. The upgrades to four city facilities are expected to deliver over $10 million of net savings, and are a major step towards achieving the city’s goal of reducing government energy consumption by 30 percent by 2015.

  16. Interlayer bonding energy of layered minerals: Implication for the relationship with friction coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi; Suehara, Shigeru

    2015-04-01

    The frictional strength of layered minerals is an important component of fault slip physics. A low-friction coefficient of these minerals has been attributed to the interlayer bonding energy (ILBE) of their weak interlayer bonding. The ILBE used for discussing the friction coefficient is based on a simple electrostatic calculation; however, the values should be revisited by precise calculations based on quantum mechanics. In this study, the ILBEs of layered minerals were calculated by using the density functional theory (DFT) method with van der Waals correction. The ILBEs calculated by the simple electrostatic method for hydrogen-bonding minerals such as kaolinite, lizardite, gibbsite, and brucite strongly overestimated the reliable energies calculated by the DFT method. This result should be ascribed to the inaccurate approximation of the point charges at the basal plane. A linear relationship between the experimentally measured friction coefficients of layered minerals and the ILBEs determined by the simple method was not confirmed by using the reliable ILBEs calculated by our DFT method. The results, however, do not remove the possibility of a relationship between interlayer bonding energy and the friction coefficient because the latter, used for comparing the former, was obtained through experiments conducted under various conditions.

  17. Hydrogen Bonding between Metal-Ion Complexes and Noncoordinated Water: Electrostatic Potentials and Interaction Energies.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Jelena M; Misini-Ignjatović, Majda Z; Murray, Jane S; Politzer, Peter; Zarić, Snežana D

    2016-07-01

    The hydrogen bonding of noncoordinated water molecules to each other and to water molecules that are coordinated to metal-ion complexes has been investigated by means of a search of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and through quantum chemical calculations. Tetrahedral and octahedral complexes that were both charged and neutral were studied. A general conclusion is that hydrogen bonds between noncoordinated water and coordinated water are much stronger than those between noncoordinated waters, whereas hydrogen bonds of water molecule in tetrahedral complexes are stronger than in octahedral complexes. We examined the possibility of correlating the computed interaction energies with the most positive electrostatic potentials on the interacting hydrogen atoms prior to interaction and obtained very good correlation. This study illustrates the fact that electrostatic potentials computed for ground-state molecules, prior to interaction, can provide considerable insight into the interactions. PMID:26989883

  18. An efficient algorithm for energy gradients and orbital optimization in valence bond theory.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingchun; Song, Jinshuai; Mo, Yirong; Wu, Wei

    2009-02-01

    An efficient algorithm for energy gradients in valence bond theory with nonorthogonal orbitals is presented. A general Hartree-Fock-like expression for the Hamiltonian matrix element between valence bond (VB) determinants is derived by introducing a transition density matrix. Analytical expressions for the energy gradients with respect to the orbital coefficients are obtained explicitly, whose scaling for computational cost is m(4), where m is the number of basis functions, and is thus approximately the same as in HF method. Compared with other existing approaches, the present algorithm has lower scaling, and thus is much more efficient. Furthermore, the expression for the energy gradient with respect to the nuclear coordinates is also presented, and it provides an effective algorithm for the geometry optimization and the evaluation of various molecular properties in VB theory. Test applications show that our new algorithm runs faster than other methods. PMID:18629879

  19. Addition, cycloaddition, and metathesis reactions of the cationic carbyne complexes [Cp(CO)[sub 2]Mn[triple bond]CCH[sub 2]R][sup +] and neutral vinylidene complexes Cp(CO)[sub 2]M=C=C(H)R (M = Mn, Re)

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, M.R.; Mercando, L.A.; Kelley, C.; Geoffroy, G.L. ); Nombel, P.; Lugan, N.; Mathieu, R. ); Ostrander, R.L.; Owens-Waltermire, B.E.; Rheingold, A.L. )

    1994-03-01

    The cationic alkylidyne complexes [Cp(CO)[sub 2]M=VCCH[sub 2]R][sup +] (M = Re, R = H; M = Mn, R = H, Me, Ph) undergo facile deprotonation to give the corresponding neutral vinylidene complexes Cp(CO)[sub 2]M=C=C(H)R. For [Cp(CO)[sub 2]Re=VCCH[sub 3

  20. Microscopic thermal characterization of C/C and C/C-SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumel, J.; Krapez, J. C.; Lepoutre, F.; Enguehard, F.; Rochais, D.; Neuer, G.; Cataldi, M.

    2002-05-01

    To measure the thermal properties of C/C and C/C-SiC composites constituents, photoreflectance microscopy is used. Specific methods are developed to cope with experimental artefacts (material semi-transparency, convolution effects), so as with fibers and matrix specificities (strong thermal anisotropy, geometric effects…). Experimental results are presented demonstrating the interest of photoreflectance microscopy for a quantitative determination of the microscopic thermal properties of these complex graphite materials.

  1. Bond ionicity, lattice energy, bond energy and microwave dielectric properties of ZnZr(Nb1-xAx)2O8 (A = Ta, Sb) ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Yonggui; Haitao, Wu

    2015-10-14

    The dependence of microwave dielectric properties on the structural characteristics of ZnZr(Nb1-xAx)2O8 (A = Ta, Sb) (0 ≤x≤ 0.10) ceramics is investigated. All the compounds were prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction method and analyzed via multiphase structure refinement. The diffraction patterns of ZnZr(Nb1-xAx)2O8 (A = Ta, Sb) show the monoclinic wolframite structure of ZrZrNb2O8 which consists of an oxygen octahedron, with the Nb ion in the center of the oxygen octahedron. For the ZnZr(Nb1-xAx)2O8 (A = Ta, Sb) ceramics, the dielectric constant (εr) decreased with the decrease in Nb-site bond ionicity. The quality factor (Q×f) of ZnZr(Nb1-xSbx)2O8 ceramics was found to be the highest (89 400 GHz), which is explained in terms of the average of the Nb-site lattice energy. With the decrease in the bond energy of the Nb-site, the temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (|τf|) value increased. The substitution of A(5+) (A = Ta, Sb) for Nb(5+) effectively influences the microstructure and microwave dielectric properties of ZrZrNb2O8 ceramics. PMID:26348992

  2. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbene-based C^C^C-Pincer Ligands and Aromatic Diimines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Lo, Hoi-Shing; Ng, Sze-Wing; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2015-10-01

    Iridium(III) hydrido complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-butylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C1^C^C1) or 1,3-bis(3-butylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C2^C^C2) and aromatic diimine (2,2‧-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,4‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine (Me2bpy), or dipyrido-[3,2-f:2‧,3‧-h]-quinoxaline (dpq)) in the form of [Ir(C^C^C)(N^N)(H)]+ have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Ir-CNHC distances are 2.043(5)-2.056(5) Å. The hydride chemical shifts for complexes bearing C1^C^C1 (-20.6 to -20.3 ppm) are more upfield than those with C2^C^C2 (-19.5 and -19.2 ppm), revealing that C1^C^C1 is a better electron donor than C2^C^C2. Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (λ = 340-530 nm (ɛ ≤ 103 dm3 mol-1 cm-1)) originate from a dπ(IrIII) → π*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the dπ(IrIII) level contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the yellow-spectral region (553-604 nm in CH3CN and CH2Cl2) upon photo-excitation with quantum yields of 10-3-10-1.

  3. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbene-based C^C^C-Pincer Ligands and Aromatic Diimines

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Lo, Hoi-Shing; Ng, Sze-Wing; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Iridium(III) hydrido complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-butylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C1^C^C1) or 1,3-bis(3-butylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C2^C^C2) and aromatic diimine (2,2′-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,4′-dimethyl-2,2′-bipyridine (Me2bpy), or dipyrido-[3,2-f:2′,3′-h]-quinoxaline (dpq)) in the form of [Ir(C^C^C)(N^N)(H)]+ have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Ir–CNHC distances are 2.043(5)–2.056(5) Å. The hydride chemical shifts for complexes bearing C1^C^C1 (−20.6 to −20.3 ppm) are more upfield than those with C2^C^C2 (−19.5 and −19.2 ppm), revealing that C1^C^C1 is a better electron donor than C2^C^C2. Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (λ = 340–530 nm (ε ≤ 103 dm3 mol−1 cm−1)) originate from a dπ(IrIII) → π*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the dπ(IrIII) level contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the yellow-spectral region (553–604 nm in CH3CN and CH2Cl2) upon photo-excitation with quantum yields of 10−3–10−1. PMID:26487542

  4. Hydrogen Induced C-C, C-N, & C-S Bond Activation on Pt & Ni Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gland, J. L.

    2004-07-29

    The primary reactions investigated were chosen based on their importance in fuel and chemical production as well as in environmental remediation, and include reactions for hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), carbon-carbon hydrogenolysis, and hydrocarbon oxidation.

  5. Tubulin Bond Energies and Microtubule Biomechanics Determined from Nanoindentation in Silico

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the primary components of the chromosome segregation machinery, are stabilized by longitudinal and lateral noncovalent bonds between the tubulin subunits. However, the thermodynamics of these bonds and the microtubule physicochemical properties are poorly understood. Here, we explore the biomechanics of microtubule polymers using multiscale computational modeling and nanoindentations in silico of a contiguous microtubule fragment. A close match between the simulated and experimental force–deformation spectra enabled us to correlate the microtubule biomechanics with dynamic structural transitions at the nanoscale. Our mechanical testing revealed that the compressed MT behaves as a system of rigid elements interconnected through a network of lateral and longitudinal elastic bonds. The initial regime of continuous elastic deformation of the microtubule is followed by the transition regime, during which the microtubule lattice undergoes discrete structural changes, which include first the reversible dissociation of lateral bonds followed by irreversible dissociation of the longitudinal bonds. We have determined the free energies of dissociation of the lateral (6.9 ± 0.4 kcal/mol) and longitudinal (14.9 ± 1.5 kcal/mol) tubulin–tubulin bonds. These values in conjunction with the large flexural rigidity of tubulin protofilaments obtained (18,000–26,000 pN·nm2) support the idea that the disassembling microtubule is capable of generating a large mechanical force to move chromosomes during cell division. Our computational modeling offers a comprehensive quantitative platform to link molecular tubulin characteristics with the physiological behavior of microtubules. The developed in silico nanoindentation method provides a powerful tool for the exploration of biomechanical properties of other cytoskeletal and multiprotein assemblies. PMID:25389565

  6. Which Ab Initio Wave Function Methods Are Adequate for Quantitative Calculations of the Energies of Biradicals? The Performance of Coupled-Cluster and Multi-Reference Methods Along a Single-Bond Dissociation Coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ke; Jalan, Amrit; Green, William H.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-01-08

    We examine the accuracy of single-reference and multireference correlated wave function methods for predicting accurate energies and potential energy curves of biradicals. The biradicals considered are intermediate species along the bond dissociation coordinates for breaking the F-F bond in F2, the O-O bond in H2O2, and the C-C bond in CH3CH3. We apply a host of single-reference and multireference approximations in a consistent way to the same cases to provide a better assessment of their relative accuracies than was previously possible. The most accurate method studied is coupled cluster theory with all connected excitations through quadruples, CCSDTQ. Without explicit quadruple excitations, the most accurate potential energy curves are obtained by the single-reference RCCSDt method, followed, in order of decreasing accuracy, by UCCSDT, RCCSDT, UCCSDt, seven multireference methods, including perturbation theory, configuration interaction, and coupled-cluster methods (with MRCI+Q being the best and Mk-MR-CCSD the least accurate), four CCSD(T) methods, and then CCSD.

  7. Theoretical study of the C-H bond dissociation energy of C2H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical study of the convergence of the C-H bond dissociation energy D(0) in C2H with respect to both the one- and n-particle spaces is presented. The calculated C-H bond energies of C2H2 and C2H4, which are in excellent agreement with experiment, are used for calibration. The best estimate for D(0) of 112.4 + or - 2.0 kcal/mol is slightly below the recent experimental value of 116.3 + or - 2.6 kcal/mol, but substantially above a previous theoretical estimate of 102 kcal/mol. The remaining discrepancy with experiment may reflect primarily the uncertainty in the experimental D(0) value of C2 required in the analysis.

  8. Electronic structure, stacking energy, partial charge, and hydrogen bonding in four periodic B-DNA models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Lokendra; Rulis, Paul; Liang, Lei; Ching, W. Y.

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structure of four periodic B-DNA models labeled (AT)10,(GC)10, (AT)5(GC)5, and (AT-GC)5 where A denotes adenine, T denotes thymine, G denotes guanine, and C denotes cytosine. Each model has ten base pairs with Na counterions to neutralize the negative phosphate group in the backbone. The (AT)5(GC)5 and (AT-GC)5 models contain two and five AT-GC bilayers, respectively. When compared against the average of the two pure models, we estimate the AT-GC bilayer interaction energy to be 19.015 Kcal/mol, which is comparable to the hydrogen bonding energy between base pairs obtained from the literature. Our investigation shows that the stacking of base pairs plays a vital role in the electronic structure, relative stability, bonding, and distribution of partial charges in the DNA models. All four models show a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap ranging from 2.14 to 3.12 eV with HOMO states residing on the PO4 + Na functional group and LUMO states originating from the bases. Our calculation implies that the electrical conductance of a DNA molecule should increase with increased base-pair mixing. Interatomic bonding effects in these models are investigated in detail by analyzing the distributions of the calculated bond order values for every pair of atoms in the four models including hydrogen bonding. The counterions significantly affect the gap width, the conductivity, and the distribution of partial charge on the DNA backbone. We also evaluate quantitatively the surface partial charge density on each functional group of the DNA models.

  9. Theoretical study of the C-H bond dissociation energy of acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Peter R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a theoretical study of the convergence of the C-H bond dissociation energy (D sub o) of acetylene with respect to both the one- and n-particle spaces. Their best estimate for D sub o of 130.1 plus or minus 1.0 kcal/mole is slightly below previous theoretical estimates, but substantially above the value determined using Stark anticrossing spectroscopy that is asserted to be an upper bound.

  10. Computation of Bond Dissociation Energies for Removal of Nitrogen Dioxide Groups in Certain Aliphatic Nitro Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ju-Xiang; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Yang, Xiang-Dong; Xiang, Shi-Kai

    2006-04-01

    Bond dissociation energies for removal of nitrogen dioxide groups in 10 aliphatic nitro compounds, including nitromethane, nitroethylene, nitroethane, dinitromethane, 1-nitropropane, 2-nitropropane, 1-nitrobutane, 2-methyl-2-nitropropane, nitropentane, and nitrohexane, are calculated using the highly accurate complete basis set (CBS-Q) and the three hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods B3LYP, B3PW91 and B3P86 with 6-31G** basis set. By comparing the computed bond dissociation energies and experimental results, we find that the B3LYP/6-31G** and B3PW91/6-31G** methods are incapable of predicting the satisfactory bond dissociation energy (BDE). However, B3P86/6-31G** and CBS-Q computations are capable of giving the calculated BDEs, which are in extraordinary agreement with the experimental data. Nevertheless, since CBS-Q computational demands increase rapidly with the number of containing atoms in molecules, larger molecules soon become prohibitively expensive. Therefore, we suggest to take the B3P86/6-31G** method as a reliable method of computing the BDEs for removal of the NO2 groups in the aliphatic nitro compounds.

  11. Students' reasoning about "high-energy bonds" and ATP: A vision of interdisciplinary education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Gouvea, Julia; Redish, Edward F.

    2014-06-01

    As interdisciplinary courses are developed, instructors and researchers have to grapple with questions of how students should make connections across disciplines. We explore the issue of interdisciplinary reconciliation (IDR): how students reconcile seemingly contradictory ideas from different disciplines. While IDR has elements in common with other frameworks for the reconciliation of ideas across contexts, it differs in that each disciplinary idea is considered canonically correct within its own discipline. The setting for the research is an introductory physics course for biology majors that seeks to build greater interdisciplinary coherence and therefore includes biologically relevant topics such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and chemical bond energy. In our case-study data, students grapple with the apparent contradiction between the energy released when the phosphate bond in ATP is broken and the idea that an energy input is required to break a bond. We see students justifying context-dependent modeling choices, showing nuance in articulating how system choices may be related to disciplinary problems of interest. This represents a desired end point of IDR, in which students can build coherent connections between concepts from different disciplines while understanding each concept in its own disciplinary context. Our case study also illustrates elements of the instructional environment that play roles in the process of IDR.

  12. Ultrafast memory loss and energy redistribution in the hydrogen bond network of liquid H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, M. L.; Bruner, B. D.; Huse, N.; Dwyer, J. R.; Chugh, B.; Nibbering, E. T. J.; Elsaesser, T.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2005-03-01

    Many of the unusual properties of liquid water are attributed to its unique structure, comprised of a random and fluctuating three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds that link the highly polar water molecules. One of the most direct probes of the dynamics of this network is the infrared spectrum of the OH stretching vibration, which reflects the distribution of hydrogen-bonded structures and the intermolecular forces controlling the structural dynamics of the liquid. Indeed, water dynamics has been studied in detail, most recently using multi-dimensional nonlinear infrared spectroscopy for acquiring structural and dynamical information on femtosecond timescales. But owing to technical difficulties, only OH stretching vibrations in D2O or OD vibrations in H2O could be monitored. Here we show that using a specially designed, ultrathin sample cell allows us to observe OH stretching vibrations in H2O. Under these fully resonant conditions, we observe hydrogen bond network dynamics more than one order of magnitude faster than seen in earlier studies that include an extremely fast sweep in the OH frequencies on a 50-fs timescale and an equally fast disappearance of the initial inhomogeneous distribution of sites. Our results highlight the efficiency of energy redistribution within the hydrogen-bonded network, and that liquid water essentially loses the memory of persistent correlations in its structure within 50fs.

  13. Bond-Specific Dissociation Following Excitation Energy Transfer for Distance Constraint Determination in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  14. Bond-specific dissociation following excitation energy transfer for distance constraint determination in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Lareau, Nichole M; Stow, Sarah M; McLean, John A; Julian, Ryan R

    2014-09-24

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  15. Impact of mass and bond energy difference and interface defects on thermal boundary conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, ChangJin

    The objective of this study is to use molecular dynamics simulation techniques in order to improve the understanding of phonon transport at the interface of dissimilar materials and the impact of different material properties on thermal boundary conductance (TBC). In order to achieve this goal, we investigated the contributions of mass and bond energy difference and interface defects on TBC at the interface of nanostructured materials using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation and phonon wave-packet (PWP) simulation techniques. NEMD is used to distinguish relative and combined contributions of mass and bond energy difference on TBC. As a result, it is found that the mass has a stronger contribution than the bond energy on lowering the TBC and that the TBC is dependent on the length of interdiffusion region as well as temperature. In addition, evidence of inelastic scattering is observed with interdiffusion regions especially when two materials differ in the bond energy. A detailed description of phonon interactions at the interface is obtained performing PWP simulations. A frequency dependence of the TBC based on phonon dispersion relation is observed. As it is expected, minimum scattering occurs when there exists only vibrational mismatch at the interface and inelastic scattering is to take place at high frequency region when the bond energy of the two materials is different resulting in the strain at the interface. It is also shown that the level of inelastic scattering is dependent on the length of the interdiffusion region. In addition, the TBC calculated with the results of PWP simulations is compared with that of NEMD simulations as well as theoretical predictions from the acoustic mismatch model and the diffuse mismatch model. A simple analytical model, which utilizes knowledge of thermal interface resistance and the interface geometry for the prediction of effective thermal conductivity, is developed. This model is generated based on Si

  16. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  17. Relationships between bond dissociation energies, electron density minima and electrostatic potential minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, John J. M.; Murray, Jane S.; Grice, M. Edward; Politzer, Peter

    The experimental dissociation energies of a group of homonuclear diatomic molecules are found to correlate with computed electron densities pho(r) and electrostatic potentials V (r) at the bond midpoints, supporting an earlier prediction based on density functional arguments (N. H. March, P. M. Kozlowski and F. Perrot 1990, J. molec. Struct. Theochem, 209, 433). The relationships are generalized to 45 molecules of various types, focusing upon the minima of pho(r) and V (r) along internuclear axes. Dissociation energies are shown to be related distinctly more closely to the minimum values of V (r) than to those of pho(r). This complements previous findings for negative monatomic ions as well as the recent observation that the V (r) minima provide the more realistic boundary points between bonded atoms (relative to literature values of covalent radii), and thus further establishes the significance of electrostatic potential axial minima with respect to covalent bonding. In the present work, all calculations were carried out by a density functional procedure (Becke exchange, Lee, Yang and Parr correlation, 6-31G** basis sets).

  18. Distribution of Exchange Energy in a Bond-alternating S=1 Quantum Spin Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Zheludev, Andrey I; Masuda, Takatsugu; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David; Papenbrock, Thomas F; Barnes, Ted {F E }; Park, S.

    2004-01-01

    The quasi-one-dimensional bond-alternating S=1 quantum antiferromagnet [Ni(N,N'-bis(3aminopropyl)propane-1,3-diamine({mu}-NO{sub 2})]ClO{sub 4} (NTENP) is studied by single-crystal inelastic neutron scattering. Parameters of the measured dispersion relation for magnetic excitations are compared to existing numerical results and used to determine the magnitude of bond-strength alternation. The measured neutron-scattering intensities are also analyzed, using the first-moment sum rules for the magnetic dynamic structure factor, to directly determine the modulation of ground-state exchange energies. These independently determined modulation parameters characterize the level of spin dimerization in NTENP. First-principles density-matrix renormalization-group calculations are used to study the relation between these two quantities.

  19. A single theoretical descriptor for the bond-dissociation energy of substituted phenols.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Carolina; Almodovar, Iriux; Rezende, Marcos Caroli

    2015-01-01

    Relative to the corresponding value of phenol, the bond-dissociation energies (BDE) of substituted phenols correlate well with a single descriptor: the Mulliken charge on the oxygen atom of the phenoxyl radical. However, the correlation fails for phenols ortho-substituted with polar groups. Internal reaction coordinates (IRC) for the model reaction of hydrogen abstraction by the hydroperoxyl radical from various 2- and 4-substituted phenols were calculated in order to investigate the role of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds and steric effects on the process. Calculations yielded theoretical values in good agreement with experimental ΔBDE values. The hydrogen-abstraction process was further analyzed in terms of density functional theory (DFT)-based reactivity indices such as local electrophilicity, the Fukui function for nucleophilic attack, and dual descriptor values of the phenolic hydroxyl oxygen along the IRC. PMID:25617211

  20. Prediction of Reliable Metal-PH₃ Bond Energies for Ni, Pd, and Pt in the 0 and +2 Oxidation States

    SciTech Connect

    Craciun, Raluca; Vincent, Andrew J.; Shaughnessy, Kevin H.; Dixon, David A.

    2010-06-21

    Phosphine-based catalysts play an important role in many metal-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions yet reliable values of their bond energies are not available. We have been studying homogeneous catalysts consisting of a phosphine bonded to a Pt, Pd, or Ni. High level electronic structure calculations at the CCSD(T)/complete basis set level were used to predict the M-PH₃ bond energy (BE) for the 0 and +2 oxidation states for M=Ni, Pd, and Pt. The calculated bond energies can then be used, for example, in the design of new catalyst systems. A wide range of exchange-correlation functionals were also evaluated to assess the performance of density functional theory (DFT) for these important bond energies. None of the DFT functionals were able to predict all of the M-PH3 bond energies to within 5 kcal/mol, and the best functionals were generalized gradient approximation functionals in contrast to the usual hybrid functionals often employed for main group thermochemistry.

  1. The Role of Interfacial Molecular Structure and Hydrogen-Bonding in Gas-Surface Energy Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Scott; Fergusion, Melinda; Morris, John

    2004-03-01

    Atomic-beam scattering experiments using n-alkanethiol and w-functionalized alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold are employed to explore the dynamics of gas-surface energy exchange in collisions with model organic surfaces. The studies are performed by directing a nearly monoenergetic beam of 80 kJ/mol Ar atoms onto a particular SAM at an incident angle of 30° with respect to the surface normal and recording the time-of-flight distributions for the atoms as they scatter from the surface at a final angle of 30°. Among the monolayers studied, long-chain methyl-terminated SAMs are found to be the most effective at dissipating the translational energy of impinging atoms. For alkanethiols with greater than seven total carbon atoms, we find that, for specular scattering conditions, over 80the incident energy is transferred to the surface and that over 60with the surface before scattering back into the gas phase. In contrast to methyl-terminated monolayers, SAMs constructed from hydrogen-bonding alkanethiols exhibit characteristics of more rigid collision partners. The Ar atoms transfer about 77with only 43equilibrium before recoiling. Further comparisons of mixed hydroxyl- and methyl-terminated SAMs and alkene-terminated SAMs suggest that intramonolayer hydrogen bonding of terminal functional groups may play an important role in determining the extent of energy transfer and thermalization.

  2. The effect of tensile stress on the conformational free energy landscape of disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Anjukandi, Padmesh; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Ribas-Arino, Jordi; Marx, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bridges are no longer considered to merely stabilize protein structure, but are increasingly recognized to play a functional role in many regulatory biomolecular processes. Recent studies have uncovered that the redox activity of native disulfides depends on their C-C-S-S dihedrals, χ2 and χ'2. Moreover, the interplay of chemical reactivity and mechanical stress of disulfide switches has been recently elucidated using force-clamp spectroscopy and computer simulation. The χ2 and χ'2 angles have been found to change from conformations that are open to nucleophilic attack to sterically hindered, so-called closed states upon exerting tensile stress. In view of the growing evidence of the importance of C-C-S-S dihedrals in tuning the reactivity of disulfides, here we present a systematic study of the conformational diversity of disulfides as a function of tensile stress. With the help of force-clamp metadynamics simulations, we show that tensile stress brings about a large stabilization of the closed conformers, thereby giving rise to drastic changes in the conformational free energy landscape of disulfides. Statistical analysis shows that native TDi, DO and interchain Ig protein disulfides prefer open conformations, whereas the intrachain disulfide bridges in Ig proteins favor closed conformations. Correlating mechanical stress with the distance between the two a-carbons of the disulfide moiety reveals that the strain of intrachain Ig protein disulfides corresponds to a mechanical activation of about 100 pN. Such mechanical activation leads to a severalfold increase of the rate of the elementary redox S(N)2 reaction step. All these findings constitute a step forward towards achieving a full understanding of functional disulfides. PMID:25286308

  3. The Bond Order of C2 from a Strictly N-Representable Natural Orbital Energy Functional Perspective.

    PubMed

    Piris, Mario; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M

    2016-03-14

    The bond order of the ground electronic state of the carbon dimer has been analyzed in the light of natural orbital functional theory calculations carried out with an approximate, albeit strictly N-representable, energy functional. Three distinct solutions have been found from the Euler equations of the minimization of the energy functional with respect to the natural orbitals and their occupation numbers, which expand upon increasing values of the internuclear coordinate. In the close vicinity of the minimum energy region, two of the solutions compete around a discontinuity point. The former, corresponding to the absolute minimum energy, features two valence natural orbitals of each of the following symmetries, σ, σ*, π and π*, and has three bonding interactions and one antibonding interaction, which is very suggestive of a bond order large than two but smaller than three. The latter, features one σ-σ* linked pair of natural orbitals and three degenerate pseudo-bonding like orbitals, paired each with one triply degenerate pseudo-antibonding orbital, which points to a bond order larger than three. When correlation effects, other than Hartree-Fock for example, between the paired natural orbitals are accounted for, this second solution vanishes yielding a smooth continuous dissociation curve. Comparison of the vibrational energies and electron ionization energies, calculated on this curve, with their corresponding experimental marks, lend further support to a bond order for C2 intermediate between acetylene and ethylene. PMID:26822104

  4. A program to calculate non-bonded interaction energy in biomolecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, K; Prasad, C V

    1982-02-01

    This paper describes a program to calculate intermolecular as well as intramolecular electronic potential energy resulting from non-bonded interactions. The underlying theory is obtained by the application of Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory to non-overlap regions of a molecular system. The rigorous theoretical expressions for the energy terms are simplified by approximations consistent with those commonly employed in semi-empirical molecular orbital theories. The program is particularly suited for the study of biomolecular assemblies, and in situations where insight into contributions to total energy from various component interaction types is desired. The inclusion of the non-additive dispersion effects in this approach makes it especially interesting for the study of cooperative phenomena in the light of a recent finding [1]. PMID:7067416

  5. Comparison of DFT with Traditional Methods for the Calculation of Vibrational Frequencies and Bond Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies of MO2 are computed at many levels of theory, including HF, B3LYP, BP86, CASSCF, MP2, and CCSD(T). The computed results are compared with the available experimental results. Most of the methods fail for at least one state of the systems considered. The accuracy of the results and the origin of the observed failures are discussed. The B3LYP bond energies are compared with traditional methods for a variety of systems, ranging from FeCOn+ to SiCln and its positive ions. The cases where B3LYP differs from the traditional methods are discussed.

  6. Accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules : gaussian-2 theory with bond separation energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-04-22

    Gaussian-2 (G2) theory is combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. For a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O, and N, our method yields enthalpies of formation, {Delta}H{sub f}{sup 0}(298 K), with a mean absolute deviation from experiment of only 0.5 kcal/mol. This is an improvement of a factor of three over the deviation of 1.5 kcal/mol seen in standard G2 theory.

  7. Correcting for the free energy costs of bond or angle constraints in molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    König, Gerhard; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Free energy simulations are an important tool in the arsenal of computational biophysics, allowing the calculation of thermodynamic properties of binding or enzymatic reactions. This paper introduces methods to increase the accuracy and precision of free energy calculations by calculating the free energy costs of constraints during post-processing. The primary purpose of employing constraints for these free energy methods is to increase the phase space overlap between ensembles, which is required for accuracy and convergence. Methods The free energy costs of applying or removing constraints are calculated as additional explicit steps in the free energy cycle. The new techniques focus on hard degrees of freedom and use both gradients and Hessian estimation. Enthalpy, vibrational entropy, and Jacobian free energy terms are considered. Results We demonstrate the utility of this method with simple classical systems involving harmonic and anharmonic oscillators, four-atomic benchmark systems, an alchemical mutation of ethane to methanol, and free energy simulations between alanine and serine. The errors for the analytical test cases are all below 0.0007 kcal/mol, and the accuracy of the free energy results of ethane to methanol is improved from 0.15 to 0.04 kcal/mol. For the alanine to serine case, the phase space overlaps of the unconstrained simulations range between 0.15 and 0.9%. The introduction of constraints increases the overlap up to 2.05%. On average, the overlap increases by 94% relative to the unconstrained value and precision is doubled. Conclusions The approach reduces errors arising from constraints by about an order of magnitude. Free energy simulations benefit from the use of constraints through enhanced convergence and higher precision. General Significance The primary utility of this approach is to calculate free energies for systems with disparate energy surfaces and bonded terms, especially in multi-scale molecular mechanics

  8. Autyomatic Differentiation of C/C++

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-14

    Automatic differentiation (AD) tools mechanize the process of developing code for the computation of derivatives. AD avoids the inaccuracies inherent in numerical approximations. Furthermore, sophisticated AD algoirthms can often produce c ode that is more reliable and more efficient than code written by an expert programmer. ADIC is the first and only AD tool for C and C++ based on compiler technology. This compiler foundation makes possible analyses and optimizations not available in toos basedmore » on operator overloading. The earliest implementations of ADIC included support for ANSI C applications, ADIC 2.0 lverages EDG, a commercial C/C++ parser, to provide robust C++ differentiation support. Modern AD tools, including ADIC are implemented in a modular way, aiming to isolate language-dependent program analyses and semantic transformations. The component design leads to much higher implementation quality because the different components can be implemented by experts in each of the different domains involved. For example, a compiler expert can focus on parsing, canonicalizing, and unparising C and C++, while an expert in graph theory and algorithms can produce new differentiation modules without having to worry about the complexity of parsing and generating C++ code. Thsi separation of concerns was achieved through the use of language-independent program analysis interfaces (in collaboration with researcgers at Rice University) and a language-independent XML representation of the computational portions of programs (XAIF). In addition to improved robustness and faster development times, this design naturally enables the reuse of program analysis algorithms and differentiation modules in compiler-based AD tools for other languages. In fact, the analysis and differention components are used in both ADIC and the Open AD Fortran front-end (based on Rice's Open64 compiler.« less

  9. Autyomatic Differentiation of C/C++

    SciTech Connect

    Beata Winnicka, Boyana Norris

    2005-11-14

    Automatic differentiation (AD) tools mechanize the process of developing code for the computation of derivatives. AD avoids the inaccuracies inherent in numerical approximations. Furthermore, sophisticated AD algoirthms can often produce c ode that is more reliable and more efficient than code written by an expert programmer. ADIC is the first and only AD tool for C and C++ based on compiler technology. This compiler foundation makes possible analyses and optimizations not available in toos based on operator overloading. The earliest implementations of ADIC included support for ANSI C applications, ADIC 2.0 lverages EDG, a commercial C/C++ parser, to provide robust C++ differentiation support. Modern AD tools, including ADIC are implemented in a modular way, aiming to isolate language-dependent program analyses and semantic transformations. The component design leads to much higher implementation quality because the different components can be implemented by experts in each of the different domains involved. For example, a compiler expert can focus on parsing, canonicalizing, and unparising C and C++, while an expert in graph theory and algorithms can produce new differentiation modules without having to worry about the complexity of parsing and generating C++ code. Thsi separation of concerns was achieved through the use of language-independent program analysis interfaces (in collaboration with researcgers at Rice University) and a language-independent XML representation of the computational portions of programs (XAIF). In addition to improved robustness and faster development times, this design naturally enables the reuse of program analysis algorithms and differentiation modules in compiler-based AD tools for other languages. In fact, the analysis and differention components are used in both ADIC and the Open AD Fortran front-end (based on Rice's Open64 compiler.

  10. Synthesis, structure, and reductive elimination in the series Tp'Rh(PR3)(Ar(F))H; determination of rhodium-carbon bond energies of fluoroaryl substituents.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Taro; Brennessel, William W; Clot, Eric; Eisenstein, Odile; Jones, William D

    2010-11-21

    A series of complexes of the type Tp'Rh(PR(3))(Ar(F))H, where PR(3) = PMe(3) (3) and PMe(2)Ph (9), Ar(F) = C(6)F(5) (a), 2,3,4,5-C(6)F(4)H (b), 2,3,5,6-C(6)F(4)H (c), 2,4,6-C(6)F(3)H(2) (d), 2,3-C(6)F(2)H(3) (e), 2,5-C(6)F(2)H(3) (g), and 2-C(6)FH(4) (h) and Tp' = tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate, has been synthesized as stable crystalline compounds by the reactions of the [Tp'Rh(PR(3))] fragment with the corresponding fluorinated aromatic hydrocarbons, and their structures were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis together with X-ray crystallography. The kinetics of the reductive eliminations of fluoroarenes from complexes 3a-h in benzene-d(6) solutions at 140 °C were investigated, but were complicated by the formation of the rhodium(I) bisphosphine complex, Tp'Rh(PMe(3))(2) (4). On the other hand, thermal reactions of (9) in THF-d(8) solutions at 120 °C resulted in the formation of an intramolecular C-H bond activated complex of the phenyl group on the phosphorus atom, Tp'Rh(κ(2)-C(6)H(4)-2-PMe(2))H (7), which prevents the formation of the corresponding bisphosphine complex. The experimentally determined rates of the reductive eliminations of fluoroarenes from the complexes 9a-h and their kinetic selectivities for formation in competition with the metallacycle have been used to determine relative Rh-CAr(F) bond energies. The Rh-CAr(F) bond energy is found to be dependent on the number of ortho fluorines. A plot of Rh-CAr(F) vs. C-H bond strengths resulted in a line with a slope R(M-C/C-H) of 2.15 that closely matches the DFT calculated value (slope = 2.05). PMID:20924525

  11. Understanding bond formation in polar one-step reactions. Topological analyses of the reaction between nitrones and lithium ynolates.

    PubMed

    Roca-López, David; Polo, Victor; Tejero, Tomás; Merino, Pedro

    2015-04-17

    The mechanism of the reaction between nitrones and lithium ynolates has been studied using DFT methods at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ/PCM=THF level. After the formation of a starting complex an without energy barrier, in which the lithium atom is coordinated to both nitrone and ynolate, the reaction takes place in one single kinetic step through a single transition structure. However, the formation of C-C and C-O bonds takes place sequentially through a typical two-stage, one-step process. A combined study of noncovalent interactions (NCIs) and electron localization function (ELFs) of selected points along the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) of the reaction confirmed that, in the transition structure, only the C-C bond is being formed to some extent, whereas an electrostatic interaction is present between carbon and oxygen atoms previous to the formation of the C-O bond. Indeed, the formation of the second C-O bond only begins when the first C-C bond is completely formed without formation of any intermediate. Once the C-C bond is formed and before the C-O bond formation starts the RMS gradient norm dips, approaching but not reaching 0, giving rise to a hidden intermediate. PMID:25803829

  12. Accurate hydrogen bond energies within the density functional tight binding method.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, A; Niehaus, T A; Frauenheim, T

    2015-04-01

    The density-functional-based tight-binding (DFTB) approach has been recently extended by incorporating one-center exchange-like terms in the expansion of the multicenter integrals. This goes beyond the Mulliken approximation and leads to a scheme which treats in a self-consistent way the fluctuations of the whole dual density matrix and not only its diagonal elements (Mulliken charges). To date, only the performance of this new formalism to reproduce excited-state properties has been assessed (Domínguez et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2013, 9, 4901-4914). Here we study the effect of our corrections on the computation of hydrogen bond energies for water clusters and water-containing systems. The limitations of traditional DFTB to reproduce hydrogen bonds has been acknowledged often. We compare our results for a set of 22 small water clusters and water-containing systems as well as for five water hexadecamers to those obtained with the DFTB3 method. Additionally, we combine our extension with a third-order energy expansion in the charge fluctuations. Our results show that the new formalisms significantly improve upon original DFTB. PMID:25763597

  13. Empirical valence bond models for reactive potential energy surfaces: a parallel multilevel genetic program approach.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Michael A; Coker, David F

    2011-07-28

    We describe a new method for constructing empirical valence bond potential energy surfaces using a parallel multilevel genetic program (PMLGP). Genetic programs can be used to perform an efficient search through function space and parameter space to find the best functions and sets of parameters that fit energies obtained by ab initio electronic structure calculations. Building on the traditional genetic program approach, the PMLGP utilizes a hierarchy of genetic programming on two different levels. The lower level genetic programs are used to optimize coevolving populations in parallel while the higher level genetic program (HLGP) is used to optimize the genetic operator probabilities of the lower level genetic programs. The HLGP allows the algorithm to dynamically learn the mutation or combination of mutations that most effectively increase the fitness of the populations, causing a significant increase in the algorithm's accuracy and efficiency. The algorithm's accuracy and efficiency is tested against a standard parallel genetic program with a variety of one-dimensional test cases. Subsequently, the PMLGP is utilized to obtain an accurate empirical valence bond model for proton transfer in 3-hydroxy-gamma-pyrone in gas phase and protic solvent. PMID:21806098

  14. Evaluating interaction energies of weakly bonded systems using the Buckingham-Hirshfeld method

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtal, A.; Van Alsenoy, C.; Geerlings, P.

    2014-05-14

    We present the finalized Buckingham-Hirshfeld method (BHD-DFT) for the evaluation of interaction energies of non-bonded dimers with Density Functional Theory (DFT). In the method, dispersion energies are evaluated from static multipole polarizabilities, obtained on-the-fly from Coupled Perturbed Kohn-Sham calculations and partitioned into diatomic contributions using the iterative Hirshfeld partitioning method. The dispersion energy expression is distributed over four atoms and has therefore a higher delocalized character compared to the standard pairwise expressions. Additionally, full multipolar polarizability tensors are used as opposed to effective polarizabilities, allowing to retain the anisotropic character at no additional computational cost. A density dependent damping function for the BLYP, PBE, BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0 functionals has been implemented, containing two global parameters which were fitted to interaction energies and geometries of a selected number of dimers using a bi-variate RMS fit. The method is benchmarked against the S22 and S66 data sets for equilibrium geometries and the S22x5 and S66x8 data sets for interaction energies around the equilibrium geometry. Best results are achieved using the B3LYP functional with mean average deviation values of 0.30 and 0.24 kcal/mol for the S22 and S66 data sets, respectively. This situates the BHD-DFT method among the best performing dispersion inclusive DFT methods. Effect of counterpoise correction on DFT energies is discussed.

  15. Distinguishing Bonds.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-23

    The energy change per electron in a chemical or physical transformation, ΔE/n, may be expressed as Δχ̅ + Δ(VNN + ω)/n, where Δχ̅ is the average electron binding energy, a generalized electronegativity, ΔVNN is the change in nuclear repulsions, and Δω is the change in multielectron interactions in the process considered. The last term can be obtained by the difference from experimental or theoretical estimates of the first terms. Previously obtained consequences of this energy partitioning are extended here to a different analysis of bonding in a great variety of diatomics, including more or less polar ones. Arguments are presented for associating the average change in electron binding energy with covalence, and the change in multielectron interactions with electron transfer, either to, out, or within a molecule. A new descriptor Q, essentially the scaled difference between the Δχ̅ and Δ(VNN + ω)/n terms, when plotted versus the bond energy, separates nicely a wide variety of bonding types, covalent, covalent but more correlated, polar and increasingly ionic, metallogenic, electrostatic, charge-shift bonds, and dispersion interactions. Also, Q itself shows a set of interesting relations with the correlation energy of a bond. PMID:26910496

  16. Vibrational analysis on the revised potential energy curve of the low-barrier hydrogen bond in photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) has a characteristic hydrogen bond (H bond) between p-coumaric acid chromophore and Glu46, whose OH bond length has been observed to be 1.21 Å by the neutron diffraction technique [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 106, 440-4]. Although it has been expected that such a drastic elongation of the OH bond could be caused by the quantum effect of the hydrogen nucleus, previous theoretical computations including the nuclear quantum effect have so far underestimated the bond length by more than 0.07 Å. To elucidate the origin of the difference, we performed a vibrational analysis of the H bond on potential energy curve with O…O distance of 2.47 Å on the equilibrium structure, and that with O…O distance of 2.56 Å on the experimental crystal structure. While the vibrationally averaged OH bond length for equilibrium structure was underestimated, the corresponding value for crystal structure was in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental values. The elongation of the O…O distance by the quantum mechanical or thermal fluctuation would be indispensable for the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond in PYP. PMID:27274362

  17. Vibrational analysis on the revised potential energy curve of the low-barrier hydrogen bond in photoactive yellow protein

    PubMed Central

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) has a characteristic hydrogen bond (H bond) between p-coumaric acid chromophore and Glu46, whose OH bond length has been observed to be 1.21 Å by the neutron diffraction technique [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 106, 440–4]. Although it has been expected that such a drastic elongation of the OH bond could be caused by the quantum effect of the hydrogen nucleus, previous theoretical computations including the nuclear quantum effect have so far underestimated the bond length by more than 0.07 Å. To elucidate the origin of the difference, we performed a vibrational analysis of the H bond on potential energy curve with O…O distance of 2.47 Å on the equilibrium structure, and that with O…O distance of 2.56 Å on the experimental crystal structure. While the vibrationally averaged OH bond length for equilibrium structure was underestimated, the corresponding value for crystal structure was in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental values. The elongation of the O…O distance by the quantum mechanical or thermal fluctuation would be indispensable for the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond in PYP. PMID:27274362

  18. Dynamics of chemical bonding mapped by energy-resolved 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Fabrizio; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-07-10

    Chemical bonding dynamics are fundamental to the understanding of properties and behavior of materials and molecules. Here, we demonstrate the potential of time-resolved, femtosecond electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for mapping electronic structural changes in the course of nuclear motions. For graphite, it is found that changes of milli-electron volts in the energy range of up to 50 electron volts reveal the compression and expansion of layers on the subpicometer scale (for surface and bulk atoms). These nonequilibrium structural features are correlated with the direction of change from sp2 [two-dimensional (2D) graphene] to sp3 (3D-diamond) electronic hybridization, and the results are compared with theoretical charge-density calculations. The reported femtosecond time resolution of four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy represents an advance of 10 orders of magnitude over that of conventional EELS methods. PMID:19589997

  19. Rhodium-catalyzed C-C coupling reactions via double C-H activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai-Shuai; Qin, Liu; Dong, Lin

    2016-05-18

    Various rhodium-catalyzed double C-H activations are reviewed. These powerful strategies have been developed to construct C-C bonds, which might be widely embedded in complex aza-fused heterocycles, polycyclic skeletons and heterocyclic scaffolds. In particular, rhodium(iii) catalysis shows good selectivity and reactivity to functionalize the C-H bond, generating reactive organometallic intermediates in most of the coupling reactions. Generally, intermolecular, intramolecular and multi-component coupling reactions via double C-H activations with or without heteroatom-assisted chelation are discussed in this review. PMID:27099126

  20. The Pairwise Correlated Generalized Valence Bond Model of Electronic Structure I; The Estimation of Pair Energies from Orbital Overlaps

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    A new method for the accurate a priori calculation of atomic and molecular energies is proposed. The new method agrees with experiment to within less than 1 kcal/mole in all cases examined thus far, and is applicable to excited states and to transition states for chemical reactions. Since the new method corrects the results of generalized valence bond calculations for the effects of electron pair correlations, we call the new method the pairwise correlated generalized valence bond method. PMID:16592172

  1. Effect of excitation energy on dentine bond strength and composite properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Greener, E H

    1994-06-01

    A number of available dentine adhesives and dental composites require light activation for polymerization. There are many variables which affect the light absorbing properties (e.g. bond strength) of these materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of excitation energy (EE) on the dentine shear bond strength (SBS) of two lengths (2.1 mm and 3.25 mm) of light-cured (or dual-cured) dentine adhesives/dental composites. Diametral tensile (DTS) and compressive (CS) strengths of the same composites were also studied as a function of EE. Three resin composites with their respective adhesives (Marathon One/Tenure, Z100/Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Herculite XRV/Optibond) were used. Five commercial curing lights were used to produce spectra of 100-650 mW cm-2. The data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. No significant correlation was observed at the P > 0.05 level between EE and SBS in the shorter specimens. The SBS of Optibond is independent of EE and composite length. The SBS data were also analysed with Weibull statistics. The characteristic strengths calculated varied between 14 and 27 MPa. For the composites tested, mean values of DTS varied between 33 and 54 MPa and CS varied between 167 and 414 MPa. The DTS and CS of Z100 were significantly greater than those of the other materials. Intensities > or = 250 mW cm-2 produced equivalent mechanical properties within all composite materials and equivalent bond strengths in systems which included dentine, adhesive and composite resin. PMID:8027461

  2. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in C-C and C-SiC Composites to Copper-Clad-Molybdenum System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites with CVI and resin-derived matrices, and C/SiC composites reinforced with T-300 carbon fibers in a CVI SiC matrix were joined to Cu-clad Mo using two Ag-Cu braze alloys, Cusil-ABA (1.75% Ti) and Ticusil (4.5% Ti). The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of Ti at the composite/braze interface, and a tendency toward delamination in resin-derived C/C composite. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the CVI C/C composites was observed. The Knoop microhardness (HK) distribution across the C/C joints indicated sharp gradients at the interface, and a higher hardness in Ticusil than in Cusil-ABA. For the C/SiC composite to Cu-clad-Mo joints, the effect of composite surface preparation revealed that ground samples did not crack whereas unground samples cracked. Calculated strain energy in brazed joints in both systems is comparable to the strain energy in a number of other ceramic/metal systems. Theoretical predictions of the effective thermal resistance suggest that such joined systems may be promising for thermal management applications.

  3. Assessment of experimental bond dissociation energies using composite ab initio methods and evaluation of the performances of density functional methods in the calculation of bond dissociation energies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jin-Ti; Huang, Hao; Guo, Qing-Xiang

    2003-01-01

    Composite ab initio CBS-Q and G3 methods were used to calculate the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of over 200 compounds listed in CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (2002 ed.). It was found that these two methods agree with each other excellently in the calculation of BDEs, and they can predict BDEs within 10 kJ/mol of the experimental values. Using these two methods, it was found that among the examined compounds 161 experimental BDEs are valid because the standard deviation between the experimental and theoretical values for them is only 8.6 kJ/mol. Nevertheless, 40 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be highly inaccurate as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 20 kJ/mol. Furthermore, 11 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be seriously flawed as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 40 kJ/mol. Using the 161 cautiously validated experimental BDEs, we then assessed the performances of the standard density functional (DFT) methods including B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91, and BH&HLYP in the calculation of BDEs. It was found that the BH&HLYP method performed poorly for the BDE calculations. B3LYP, B3P86, and B3PW91, however, performed reasonably well for the calculation of BDEs with standard deviations of about 12.1-18.0 kJ/mol. Nonetheless, all the DFT methods underestimated the BDEs by 4-17 kJ/mol in average. Sometimes, the underestimation by the DFT methods could be as high as 40-60 kJ/mol. Therefore, the DFT methods were more reliable for relative BDE calculations than for absolute BDE calculations. Finally, it was observed that the basis set effects on the BDEs calculated by the DFT methods were usually small except for the heteroatom-hydrogen BDEs. PMID:14632451

  4. Energetic multifunctionalized nitraminopyrazoles and their ionic derivatives: ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-04-15

    Diverse functionalization was introduced into the pyrazole framework giving rise to a new family of ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials. By incorporating extended cationic interactions, nitramine-based ionic derivatives exhibit good energetic performance and enhanced molecular stability. Performance parameters including heats of formation and detonation properties were calculated by using Gaussian 03 and EXPLO5 v6.01 programs, respectively. It is noteworthy to find that 5-nitramino-3,4-dinitropyrazole, 4, has a remarkable measured density of 1.97 g cm(-3) at 298 K, which is consistent with its crystal density (2.032 g cm(-3), 150 K), and ranks highest among azole-based CHNO compounds. Energetic evaluation indicates that, in addition to the molecular compound 4, some ionic derivatives, 9, 11, 12, 17, 19, and 22, also have high densities (1.83-1.97 g cm(-3)), excellent detonation pressures and velocities (P, 35.6-41.6 GPa; vD, 8880-9430 m s(-1)), as well as acceptable impact and friction sensitivities (IS, 4-30 J; FS, 40-240 N). These attractive features highlight the application potential of nitramino hydrogen-bonded interactions in the design of advanced energetic materials. PMID:25807076

  5. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.; Shang, S. L.; Shchur, Ya.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K.

    2016-02-01

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH2PO4, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD2PO4, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X3H(SO4)2 superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M3H(SO4)2 compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance ROO, being a measure of the HB strength.

  6. Protein collapse driven against solvation free energy without H-bonds.

    PubMed

    Karandur, Deepti; Harris, Robert C; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-01-01

    Proteins collapse and fold because intramolecular interactions and solvent entropy, which favor collapse, outweigh solute-solvent interactions that favor expansion. Since the protein backbone actively participates in protein folding and some intrinsically disordered proteins are glycine rich, oligoglycines are good models to study the protein backbone as it collapses, both during conformational changes in disordered proteins and during folding. The solvation free energies of short glycine oligomers become increasingly favorable as chain length increases. In contrast, the solubility limits of glycine oligomers decrease with increasing chain length, indicating that peptide-peptide, and potentially solvent-solvent interactions, overcome peptide-solvent interactions to favor aggregation at finite concentrations of glycine oligomers. We have recently shown that hydrogen- (H-) bonds do not contribute significantly to the concentration-based aggregation of pentaglycines but that dipole-dipole (CO) interactions between the amide groups on the backbone do. Here we demonstrate for the collapse of oligoglycines ranging in length from 15 to 25 residues similarly that H-bonds do not contribute significantly to collapse but that CO dipole interactions do. These results illustrate that some intrapeptide interactions that determine the solubility limit of short glycine oligomers are similar to those that drive the collapse of longer glycine peptides. PMID:26174309

  7. Zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy of the hydrogen-bonded phenol-water complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopfer, Otto; Reiser, Georg; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus; Schlag, Edward W.; Colson, Steven D.

    1994-07-01

    Two-photon, two-color (1+1') zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectra are presented for the 1:1 phenol-water complex, a prototype system for hydrogen bonding between an aromatic molecule and a simple solvent. ZEKE spectra via different (intermolecular) vibrational intermediate S1 levels of the fully protonated complex (C6H5OH-H2O, h3) as well as the ZEKE spectrum via the vibrationless S1 state of the threefold deuterated complex (C6H5OD-D2O, d3) have been recorded. The spectra are rich in structure, which is mainly attributable to intermolecular vibrations of the ionic complex. Progressions of the intermolecular stretch vibration (240 cm-1) in combination with different intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational levels are the dominant feature of all ZEKE spectra obtained and indicate a large change in the complex geometry along the hydrogen-bond coordinate on ionization. Comparison between the spectrum of the d3 complex and the spectra via different intermediate intermolecular levels of the h3 complex has allowed a more detailed analysis of the intermolecular features compared to previously reported results. Finally, the vibrational assignments obtained are compared with ab initio results for the phenol-water cation reported in the following paper in this issue.

  8. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Y; Moreh, R; Shang, S L; Shchur, Ya; Wang, Y; Liu, Z K

    2016-02-01

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH2PO4, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD2PO4, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X3H(SO4)2 superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M3H(SO4)2 compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance ROO, being a measure of the HB strength. PMID:26851916

  9. A big data approach to the ultra-fast prediction of DFT-calculated bond energies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid access to intrinsic physicochemical properties of molecules is highly desired for large scale chemical data mining explorations such as mass spectrum prediction in metabolomics, toxicity risk assessment and drug discovery. Large volumes of data are being produced by quantum chemistry calculations, which provide increasing accurate estimations of several properties, e.g. by Density Functional Theory (DFT), but are still too computationally expensive for those large scale uses. This work explores the possibility of using large amounts of data generated by DFT methods for thousands of molecular structures, extracting relevant molecular properties and applying machine learning (ML) algorithms to learn from the data. Once trained, these ML models can be applied to new structures to produce ultra-fast predictions. An approach is presented for homolytic bond dissociation energy (BDE). Results Machine learning models were trained with a data set of >12,000 BDEs calculated by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//DFTB. Descriptors were designed to encode atom types and connectivity in the 2D topological environment of the bonds. The best model, an Associative Neural Network (ASNN) based on 85 bond descriptors, was able to predict the BDE of 887 bonds in an independent test set (covering a range of 17.67–202.30 kcal/mol) with RMSD of 5.29 kcal/mol, mean absolute deviation of 3.35 kcal/mol, and R2 = 0.953. The predictions were compared with semi-empirical PM6 calculations, and were found to be superior for all types of bonds in the data set, except for O-H, N-H, and N-N bonds. The B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)//DFTB calculations can approach the higher-level calculations B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) with an RMSD of 3.04 kcal/mol, which is less than the RMSD of ASNN (against both DFT methods). An experimental web service for on-line prediction of BDEs is available at http://joao.airesdesousa.com/bde. Conclusion Knowledge could be automatically extracted by

  10. Mass analyzed threshold ionization of phenolṡCO: Intermolecular binding energies of a hydrogen-bonded complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Stephen R.; Dessent, Caroline E. H.; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    1999-08-01

    [PhenolṡCO]+ was studied using a combination of two-color resonant zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy and mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy to investigate the interaction of the CO ligand with a hydrogen-bonding cation. Vibrational progressions were observed in three intermolecular modes, the in-plane bend (42 cm-1), stretch (130 cm-1), and in-plane wag (160 cm-1), and are consistent with a planar hydrogen-bonded structure where the CO bonds through the carbon atom to the phenol OH group. Dissociation energies for the S0, S1, and D0 states were determined as 659±20, 849±20, and 2425±10 cm-1, respectively. The cationic and neutral dissociation energies of the phenolṡCO complex are considerably stronger than those of phenolṡN2, demonstrating the extent to which the larger quadrupole of CO affects the strength of binding.

  11. A QSPR study of O-H bond dissociation energy in phenols.

    PubMed

    Bosque, Ramón; Sales, Joaquim

    2003-01-01

    A Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) is developed for the O-H bond dissociation energy (BDE) of a set of 78 phenols. The data set was composed of monosubstituted, disubstituted, and polysubstituted phenolic derivatives containing substituents with different steric and electronic effects in the ortho-, meta-, and para-positions of the aromatic ring. The proposed model, derived from multiple linear regression, contains seven descriptors calculated solely from the molecular structure of compounds. The average absolute relative errors are 1.37% (R(2) = 0.8978; SD: 6.67) and 1.13% (R(2) = 0.9076; SD: 4.26) for the working set (62 compounds) and the prediction set (16 compounds), respectively. These results are better than those obtained from DFT calculations, QSAR approach, and correlations with Hammet parameters. PMID:12653532

  12. Nano-Bonding of Silicon Oxides-based surfaces at Low Temperature: Bonding Interphase Modeling via Molecular Dynamics and Characterization of Bonding Surfaces Topography, Hydro-affinity and Free Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaley, Shawn D.

    In this work, a new method, "Nanobonding(TM)" [1,2] is conceived and researched to bond Si-based surfaces, via nucleation and growth of a 2 D silicon oxide SiOxHx interphase connecting the surfaces at the nanoscale across macroscopic domains. Nanobonding cross-bridges two smooth surfaces put into mechanical contact in an O2/H 2O mixed ambient below T ≤200 °C via arrays of SiOxH x molecules connecting into a continuous macroscopic bonding interphase. Nano-scale surface planarization via wet chemical processing and new spin technology are compared via Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TMAFM) , before and after nano-bonding. Nanobonding uses precursor phases, 2D nano-films of beta-cristobalite (beta-c) SiO2, nucleated on Si(100) via the Herbots-Atluri (H-A) method [1]. beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) is ordered and flat with atomic terraces over 20 nm wide, well above 2 nm found in native oxides. When contacted with SiO2 this ultra-smooth nanophase can nucleate and grow domains with cross-bridging molecular strands of hydroxylated SiOx, instead of point contacts. The high density of molecular bonds across extended terraces forms a strong bond between Si-based substrates, nano- bonding [2] the Si and silica. A new model of beta-cristobalite SiO2 with its <110> axis aligned along Si[100] direction is simulated via ab-initio methods in a nano-bonded stack with beta-c SiO2 in contact with amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2), modelling cross-bridging molecular bonds between beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) and a-SiO2 as during nanobonding. Computed total energies are compared with those found for Si(100) and a-SiO2 and show that the presence of two lattice cells of !-c SiO2 on Si(100) and a-SiO2 lowers energy when compared to Si(100)/ a-SiO 2 Shadow cone calculations on three models of beta-c SiO2 on Si(100) are compared with Ion Beam Analysis of H-A processed Si(100). Total surface energy measurements via 3 liquid contact angle analysis of Si(100) after H-A method processing are also compared

  13. Universal Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations for C-C, C-O, C-N, N-O, N-N, and O-O Dissociation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shengguang

    2010-10-27

    It is shown that for all the essential bond forming and bond breaking reactions on metal surfaces, the reactivity of the metal surface correlates linearly with the reaction energy in a single universal relation. Such correlations provide an easy way of establishing trends in reactivity among the different transition metals.

  14. Communication: Towards the binding energy and vibrational red shift of the simplest organic hydrogen bond: Harmonic constraints for methanol dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, Matthias; Suhm, Martin A.; Mata, Ricardo A.

    2014-09-14

    The discrepancy between experimental and harmonically predicted shifts of the OH stretching fundamental of methanol upon hydrogen bonding to a second methanol unit is too large to be blamed mostly on diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicity corrections. It is shown that a decisive contribution comes from post-MP2 electron correlation effects, which appear not to be captured by any of the popular density functionals. We also identify that the major deficiency is in the description of the donor OH bond. Together with estimates for the electronic and harmonically zero-point corrected dimer binding energies, this work provides essential constraints for a quantitative description of this simple hydrogen bond. The spectroscopic dissociation energy is predicted to be larger than 18 kJ/mol and the harmonic OH-stretching fundamental shifts by about −121 cm{sup −1} upon dimerization, somewhat more than in the anharmonic experiment (−111 cm{sup −1})

  15. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    PubMed

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom. PMID:26670708

  16. Nanoscale metals and semiconductors for the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthiram, Karthish

    The transduction of electrical energy into chemical bonds represents one potential strategy for storing energy derived from intermittent sources such as solar and wind. Driving the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using light requires (1) developing light absorbers which convert photons into electron-hole pairs and (2) catalysts which utilize these electrons and holes to reduce carbon dioxide and oxidize water, respectively. For both the light absorbers and catalysts, the use of nanoscale particles is advantageous, as charge transport length scales are minimized in the case of nanoscale light absorbers and catalytic surface-area-to-volume ratio is maximized for nanoscale catalysts. In many cases, although semiconductors and metals in the form of thin films and foils are increasingly well-characterized as photoabsorbers and electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide reduction, respectively, the properties of their nanoscale counterparts remain poorly understood. This dissertation explores the nature of the light absorption mode of non-stoichiometric semiconductors which are utilized as light absorbers and the development of catalysts with enhanced stability, activity, and selectivity for carbon dioxide reduction. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the state of development of methods of transducing the energy of photons into chemical bonds. Chapters 2 and 3 investigate the development of stable, active, and selective catalysts for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. Chapter 2 examines how copper nanoparticles have enhanced activities and selectivities for methanation compared to copper foils. Chapter 3 focuses on the development of strategies to stabilize high-surface-area catalysts to prevent surface area loss during electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction. Chapters 4 and 5 entail a fundamental understanding of the light absorption mode of nanoscale photoabsorbers used in both photoelectrochemical cells and in photovoltaics. Chapter 4 focuses on the

  17. Modelling of c-C2H4O formation on grain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhiogrosso, A.; Viti, S.; Ward, M. D.; Price, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Despite its potential reactivity due to ring strain, ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) is a complex molecule that seems to be stable under the physical conditions of an interstellar dense core; indeed, it has been detected towards several high-mass star-forming regions with a column density of the order of 1013 cm-2. To date, its observational abundances cannot be reproduced by chemical models and this may be due to the significant contribution played by its chemistry on grain surfaces. Recently, Ward & Price have performed experiments in order to investigate the surface formation of ethylene oxide starting with oxygen atoms and ethylene ice as reactants. We present a chemical model which includes the most recent experimental results from Ward & Price on the formation of c-C2H4O. We study the influence of the physical parameters of dense cores on the abundances of c-C2H4O. We verify that ethylene oxide can indeed be formed during the cold phase (when the interstellar medium dense cores are formed), via addition of an oxygen atom across the C=C double bond of the ethylene molecule, and released by thermal desorption during the hot core phase. A qualitative comparison between our theoretical results and those from the observations shows that we are able to reproduce the abundances of ethylene oxide towards high-mass star-forming regions.

  18. Zero Steric Potential and bond order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, S.; Noorizadeh, S.

    2016-05-01

    The variation of Zero Steric Potential (ZSP) through a C-C bond shows two maximums, which their values depend on the bond order (BO). A good relationship (R2 = 1) is observed between the mean values of maximum ZSPs and the bond orders of C-C bonds in ethane, ethylene and acetylene, as reference molecules (Ln BO = 1.956ZSP‾max - 0.898). The obtained equation is used to predict the C-C bond orders of more than twenty aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The results show that the obtained bond orders from ZSP‾max are more reliable than those which are evaluated using NBO and Laplacian methods.

  19. Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer Reaction, and the Determination of the Bond Dissociation Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nemykin, Victor N.; Laskin, Julia; Basu, Partha

    2004-07-19

    Redox reactions coupled with the formal loss or gain of an oxygen atom are ubiquitous in chemical processes. Such reactions proceed through the reduction of the donor center (XO) and the oxidation of the acceptor (Y) molecule. Among many examples of the metal centered oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactivity, those involving molybdenum complexes have been widely investigated due to their involvement in mononuclear molybdenum enzymes. The heat of reaction of the overall atom transfer process can be expressed as a difference between the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of the oxygen-donor(X) and oxygen-acceptor(Y) bond, i.e., H=DX=o-DY=O.

  20. Benchmark binding energies of ammonium and alkyl-ammonium ions interacting with water. Are ammonium-water hydrogen bonds strong?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, Valérie; Masella, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl-ammonium ion/water interactions are investigated using high level quantum computations, yielding thermodynamics data in good agreement with gas-phase experiments. Alkylation and hydration lead to weaken the NHsbnd O hydrogen bonds. Upon complete hydration by four water molecules, their main features are close to those of the OHsbnd O bond in the isolated water dimer. Energy decomposition analyses indicate that hydration of alkyl-ammonium ions are mainly due to electrostatic/polarization effects, as for hard monoatomic cations, but with a larger effect of dispersion.

  1. Financing Public Sector Projects with Clean Renewable Energy Bonds; Fact Sheet Series on Financing Renewable Energy Projects, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreycik, C.; Couglin, J.

    2009-12-01

    Clean renewable energy bonds (CREBs) present a low-cost opportunity for public entities to issue bonds to finance renewable energy projects. The federal government lowers the cost of debt by providing a tax credit to the bondholder in lieu of interest payments from the issuer. Because CREBs are theoretically interest free, they may be more attractive than traditional tax-exempt municipal bonds. In February 2009, Congress appropriated a total of $2.4 billion for the "New CREBs" program. No more than one-third of the budget may be allocated to each of the eligible entities: governmental bodies, electric cooperatives, and public power providers. Applications for this round of "New CREBs" were due to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on August 4, 2009. There is no indication Congress will extend the CREBs program; thus going forward, only projects that are approved under the 2009 round will be able to issue CREBs. This factsheet explains the CREBs mechanism and provides guidance on procedures related to issuing CREBs.

  2. Exceptional sensitivity of metal-aryl bond energies to ortho-fluorine substituents: influence of the metal, the coordination sphere, and the spectator ligands on M-C/H-C bond energy correlations.

    PubMed

    Clot, Eric; Mégret, Claire; Eisenstein, Odile; Perutz, Robin N

    2009-06-10

    DFT calculations are reported of the energetics of C-H oxidative addition of benzene and fluorinated benzenes, Ar(F)H (Ar(F) = C(6)F(n)H(5-n), n = 0-5) at ZrCp(2) (Cp = eta(5)-C(5)H(5)), TaCp(2)H, TaCp(2)Cl, WCp(2), ReCp(CO)(2), ReCp(CO)(PH(3)), ReCp(PH(3))(2), RhCp(PH(3)), RhCp(CO), IrCp(PH(3)), IrCp(CO), Ni(H(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PH(2)), Pt(H(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PH(2)). The change in M-C bond energy of the products fits a linear function of the number of fluorine substituents, with different coefficients corresponding to ortho-, meta-, and para-fluorine. The values of the ortho-coefficient range from 20 to 32 kJ mol(-1), greatly exceeding the values for the meta- and para-coefficients (2.0-4.5 kJ mol(-1)). Similarly, the H-C bond energies of Ar(F)H yield ortho- and para-coefficients of 10.4 and 3.4 kJ mol(-1), respectively, and a negligible meta-coefficient. These results indicate a large increase in the M-C bond energy with ortho-fluorine substitution on the aryl ring. Plots of D(M-C) vs D(H-C) yield slopes R(M-C/H-C) that vary from 1.93 to 3.05 with metal fragment, all in excess of values of 1.1-1.3 reported with other hydrocarbyl groups. Replacement of PH(3) by CO decreases R(M-C/H-C) significantly. For a given ligand set and metals in the same group of the periodic table, the value of R(M-C/H-C) does not increase with the strength of the M-C bond. Calculations of the charge on the aryl ring show that variations in ionicity of the M-C bonds correlate with variations in M-C bond energy. This strengthening of metal-aryl bonds accounts for numerous experimental results that indicate a preference for ortho-fluorine substituents. PMID:19453181

  3. Coordination-resolved local bond contraction and electron binding-energy entrapment of Si atomic clusters and solid skins

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Maolin; Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yan E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg; Zhang, Xi; Li, Can; Sun, Chang Q. E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-04-14

    Consistency between x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and density-function theory calculations confirms our bond order-length-strength notation-incorporated tight-binding theory predictions on the quantum entrapment of Si solid skin and atomic clusters. It has been revealed that bond-order deficiency shortens and strengthens the Si-Si bond, which results in the local densification and quantum entrapment of the core and valence electrons. Unifying Si clusters and Si(001) and (111) skins, this mechanism has led to quantification of the 2p binding energy of 96.089 eV for an isolated Si atom, and their bulk shifts of 2.461 eV. Findings evidence the significance of atomic undercoordination that is of great importance to device performance.

  4. Structure, energetics, and bonding of novel potential high energy density materials Rh2(N5)4: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lihong; Bao, Shuangyou; Peng, Jinhui; Li, Kai; Ning, Ping; Guo, Huibin; Zhu, Tingting; Gu, Junjie; Li, Qianshu

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical studies examining a series of binuclear transition metal pentazolides Rh2(N5)4 predict paddle wheel type structures with very short metal-metal distances. Natural bonding orbital analysis indicated that the bonding between the metal atom and the five-membered ring is predominantly ionic for Rh2(N5)4 species, and a high-order metal-metal multiple bonding exists between the two metal atoms. In addition, the presence of the delocalized π orbital plays an important role in the stabilization of Rh2(N5)4. Nucleus independent chemical shift values confirm that the planar N5- exhibits aromaticity. The dissociation energies into mononuclear fragments are predicted for Rh2(N5)4.

  5. The interplay between interface structure, energy level alignment and chemical bonding strength at organic-metal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Willenbockel, M; Lüftner, D; Stadtmüller, B; Koller, G; Kumpf, C; Soubatch, S; Puschnig, P; Ramsey, M G; Tautz, F S

    2015-01-21

    What do energy level alignments at metal-organic interfaces reveal about the metal-molecule bonding strength? Is it permissible to take vertical adsorption heights as indicators of bonding strengths? In this paper we analyse 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on the three canonical low index Ag surfaces to provide exemplary answers to these questions. Specifically, we employ angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy for a systematic study of the energy level alignments of the two uppermost frontier states in ordered monolayer phases of PTCDA. Data are analysed using the orbital tomography approach. This allows the unambiguous identification of the orbital character of these states, and also the discrimination between inequivalent species. Combining this experimental information with DFT calculations and the generic Newns-Anderson chemisorption model, we analyse the alignments of highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) with respect to the vacuum levels of bare and molecule-covered surfaces. This reveals clear differences between the two frontier states. In particular, on all surfaces the LUMO is subject to considerable bond stabilization through the interaction between the molecular π-electron system and the metal, as a consequence of which it also becomes occupied. Moreover, we observe a larger bond stabilization for the more open surfaces. Most importantly, our analysis shows that both the orbital binding energies of the LUMO and the overall adsorption heights of the molecule are linked to the strength of the chemical interaction between the molecular π-electron system and the metal, in the sense that stronger bonding leads to shorter adsorption heights and larger orbital binding energies. PMID:25475998

  6. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  7. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, C. C. Adams, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, C. C. Adams, Photographer August 1931, SEED PACKING ROOM, Gift of New York State Department of Education. - Shaker North Family Washhouse (first), Shaker Road, New Lebanon, Columbia County, NY

  8. Light Induced C-C Coupling of 2-Chlorobenzazoles with Carbamates, Alcohols, and Ethers.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Alexander; Lahm, Günther; Opatz, Till

    2016-06-01

    A light induced, transition-metal-free C-C coupling reaction of 2-chlorobenzazoles with aliphatic carbamates, alcohols, and ethers is presented. Inexpensive reagents, namely sodium acetate, benzophenone, water, and acetonitrile, are employed in a simple reaction protocol using a cheap and widely available 25 W energy saving UV-A lamp at ambient temperature. PMID:27128627

  9. Influence of oxygen inhibition on the surface free-energy and dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kensaku; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Kotaku, Mayumi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Tsubota, Keishi; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2011-10-01

    We compared the surface free-energies and dentin bond strengths of single-step self-etch adhesives with and without an oxygen-inhibited layer. The labial dentin surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The adhesives were applied to the ground dentin, light-irradiated, and the oxygen-inhibited layer was either retained or removed with ethanol. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The dentin bond strengths of specimens with and without the oxygen-inhibited layer were measured. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component was relatively constant at 35.5-39.8 mJ m(-2) . The value of the , Lewis acid component increased slightly when the oxygen-inhibited layer was removed, whereas that of the , Lewis base component decreased significantly. The bond strengths of the self-etch adhesives were significantly lower in specimens without an oxygen-inhibited layer (13.2-13.6 MPa) than in those with an oxygen-inhibited layer (17.5-18.4 MPa). These results indicate that the presence of an oxygen-inhibited layer in single-step self-etch adhesives with advanced photoinitiators promotes higher dentin bond strength. PMID:21896057

  10. C-H and C-C clumping in ethane by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clog, M. D.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is an important natural compound, and its geochemistry can be studied through 13C-13C, 13C-D and/or D-D clumping. Such measurements are potentially important both as a stepping stone towards the study of more complex organic molecules and, in its own regard, to understand processes controlling the generation, migration and destruction of natural gas. Isotopic clumping on C-C and C-H bonds could be influenced by thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, diffusion or gas mixing. Previous work showed that 13C-D clumping in methane generally reflects equilibrium and provides a measure of formation temperature (Stolper et al 2014a), whereas 13C-13C clumping in ethane is likely most controlled by chemical-kinetic processes and/or inheritance from the isotopic structure of source organic compounds (Clog et al 2014). 13C-D clumping in ethane has the potential to provide a thermometer for its synthesis, as it does for methane. However, the difference in C-H bond dissociation energy for these two compounds may suggest a lower 'blocking temperature' for this phenomenon in ethane (the blocking temperature for methane is ≥~250 C in geological conditions). We present analytical techniques to measure both 13C-13C and 13C-D clumping in ethane, using a novel two-instrument technique, including both the Thermo 253-Ultra and the Thermo DFS. In this method, the Ultra is used to measure the relative abundances of combinations nearly isobaric isotopologues: (13C12CH6 + 12C2DH5)/12C2H6 and (13C2H6 + 12C13CDH5)/12C2H6, free of other isobaric interferences like O2. The DFS, a very high resolution single-collector instrument, is then used to measure the ratios of isotopologues of ethane at a single cardinal mass: 12C2DH5/13C12CH6, and 12C13CDH5/13C2H6, with precisions of ~1 permil. Those 4 measurements allow us to calculate the bulk isotopic composition (D and 13C) as well as the abundance of 13C2H6 and 13C12CDH5. We also present progress on the development of software tools

  11. Using the MMFF94 model to predict structures and energies for hydrogen-bonded urea-anion complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2005-07-11

    The performance of the MMFF94 model has been compared with density functional theory (B3LYP/DZVP2) in calculation of hydrogen-bonded complexes of urea with three different shaped Cl?, NO3?, and ClO4? anions. After modification of selected van der Waals parameters, good agreement between the two methods was obtained for geometric parameters and relative conformational energies. Absolute values of MMFF94 binding energies are under estimated, but application of a systematic correction yields binding energies that are within ?1 kcal/mol of B3LYP/DZVP2 values.

  12. On the Use of a Driven Wedge Test to Acquire Dynamic Fracture Energies of Bonded Beam Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, David A.; Pohilt, David; Jacob, George Chennakattu; Starbuck, Michael; Rakesh, Kapania

    2011-01-01

    A driven wedge test is used to characterize the mode I fracture resistance of adhesively bonded composite beam specimens over a range of crosshead rates up to 1 m/s. The shorter moment arms (between wedge contact and crack tip) significantly reduce inertial effects and stored energy in the debonded adherends, when compared with conventional means of testing double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens. This permitted collecting an order of magnitude more crack initiation events per specimen than could be obtained with end-loaded DCB specimens bonded with an epoxy exhibiting significant stick-slip behavior. The localized contact of the wedge with the adherends limits the amount of both elastic and kinetic energy, significantly reduces crack advance during slip events, and facilitates higher resolution imaging of the fracture zone with high speed imaging. The method appears to work well under both quasi-static and high rate loading, consistently providing substantially more discrete fracture events for specimens exhibiting pronounced stick-slip failures. Deflections associated with beam transverse shear and root rotation for the shorter beams were not negligible, so simple beam theory was inadequate for obtaining qualitative fracture energies. Finite element analysis of the specimens, however, showed that fracture energies were in good agreement with values obtained from traditional DCB tests. The method holds promise for use in dynamic testing and for characterizing bonded or laminated materials exhibiting significant stick slip behavior, reducing the number of specimens required to characterize a sufficient number of fracture events.

  13. Chemical bonding in view of electron charge density and kinetic energy density descriptors.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Stalke's dilemma, stating that different chemical interpretations are obtained when one and the same density is interpreted either by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) and subsequent natural resonance theory (NRT) application or by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), is reinvestigated. It is shown that within the framework of QTAIM, the question as to whether for a given molecule two atoms are bonded or not is only meaningful in the context of a well-defined reference geometry. The localized-orbital-locator (LOL) is applied to map out patterns in covalent bonding interaction, and produces results that are consistent for a variety of reference geometries. Furthermore, LOL interpretations are in accord with NBO/NRT, and assist in an interpretation in terms of covalent bonding. PMID:19090572

  14. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC and C/C for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for use as lightweight hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a carbon/carbon (C/C) and a carbon/carbon-silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) material fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) 8, a joint Australia / Air Force Research Laboratory hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kilopascals. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and C/C-SiC materials were installed downstream of a hydrogen-fueled, dual-mode scramjet combustor and tested for several minutes at conditions simulating flight at Mach 5 and Mach 6. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used during some of the tests to reduce heat loss from the back surface and thus increase the heated surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel approximately 177 C (350 F). The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for three cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  15. Bayesian Uncertainty Quantification for Bond Energies and Mobilities Using Path Integral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joshua C.; Fok, Pak-Wing; Chou, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy is often used to distort bonds. The resulting responses, in the form of rupture forces, work applied, and trajectories of displacements, are used to reconstruct bond potentials. Such approaches often rely on simple parameterizations of one-dimensional bond potentials, assumptions on equilibrium starting states, and/or large amounts of trajectory data. Parametric approaches typically fail at inferring complicated bond potentials with multiple minima, while piecewise estimation may not guarantee smooth results with the appropriate behavior at large distances. Existing techniques, particularly those based on work theorems, also do not address spatial variations in the diffusivity that may arise from spatially inhomogeneous coupling to other degrees of freedom in the macromolecule. To address these challenges, we develop a comprehensive empirical Bayesian approach that incorporates data and regularization terms directly into a path integral. All experimental and statistical parameters in our method are estimated directly from the data. Upon testing our method on simulated data, our regularized approach requires less data and allows simultaneous inference of both complex bond potentials and diffusivity profiles. Crucially, we show that the accuracy of the reconstructed bond potential is sensitive to the spatially varying diffusivity and accurate reconstruction can be expected only when both are simultaneously inferred. Moreover, after providing a means for self-consistently choosing regularization parameters from data, we derive posterior probability distributions, allowing for uncertainty quantification. PMID:26331254

  16. The stabilization energies of polyenyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu-Ran; Holmes, John L.

    1994-10-01

    The resonance stabilization energies, Es, of polyenyl radicals can be estimated by the equation Es( N)=-13.2+[3.95-15.8(2) -2/ n] kcal mol -1, where N is the number of C, Cbonds in the polyenyl radicals. This correlation has been extended for predicting the weakest HC, CC and COH bond dissociation energies in vitamin A and similar compounds.

  17. Inferring modules of functionally interacting proteins using the Bond Energy Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ryosuke LA; Morett, Enrique; Vallejo, Edgar E

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-homology based methods such as phylogenetic profiles are effective for predicting functional relationships between proteins with no considerable sequence or structure similarity. Those methods rely heavily on traditional similarity metrics defined on pairs of phylogenetic patterns. Proteins do not exclusively interact in pairs as the final biological function of a protein in the cellular context is often hold by a group of proteins. In order to accurately infer modules of functionally interacting proteins, the consideration of not only direct but also indirect relationships is required. In this paper, we used the Bond Energy Algorithm (BEA) to predict functionally related groups of proteins. With BEA we create clusters of phylogenetic profiles based on the associations of the surrounding elements of the analyzed data using a metric that considers linked relationships among elements in the data set. Results Using phylogenetic profiles obtained from the Cluster of Orthologous Groups of Proteins (COG) database, we conducted a series of clustering experiments using BEA to predict (upper level) relationships between profiles. We evaluated our results by comparing with COG's functional categories, And even more, with the experimentally determined functional relationships between proteins provided by the DIP and ECOCYC databases. Our results demonstrate that BEA is capable of predicting meaningful modules of functionally related proteins. BEA outperforms traditionally used clustering methods, such as k-means and hierarchical clustering by predicting functional relationships between proteins with higher accuracy. Conclusion This study shows that the linked relationships of phylogenetic profiles obtained by BEA is useful for detecting functional associations between profiles and extending functional modules not found by traditional methods. BEA is capable of detecting relationship among phylogenetic patterns by linking them through a common element shared in

  18. Combined valence bond-molecular mechanics potential-energy surface and direct dynamics study of rate constants and kinetic isotope effects for the H +C2H6 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arindam; Zhao, Yan; Lin, Hai; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a multifaceted study of the reaction H +C2H6→H2+C2H5 and three of its deuterium-substituted isotopologs. First we present high-level electronic structure calculations by the W1, G3SX, MCG3-MPWB, CBS-APNO, and MC-QCISD/3 methods that lead to a best estimate of the barrier height of 11.8±0.5kcal/mol. Then we obtain a specific reaction parameter for the MPW density functional in order that it reproduces the best estimate of the barrier height; this yields the MPW54 functional. The MPW54 functional, as well as the MPW60 functional that was previously parametrized for the H +CH4 reaction, is used with canonical variational theory with small-curvature tunneling to calculate the rate constants for all four ethane reactions from 200 to 2000 K. The final MPW54 calculations are based on curvilinear-coordinate generalized-normal-mode analysis along the reaction path, and they include scaled frequencies and an anharmonic C-C bond torsion. They agree with experiment within 31% for 467-826 K except for a 38% deviation at 748 K; the results for the isotopologs are predictions since these rate constants have never been measured. The kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are analyzed to reveal the contributions from subsets of vibrational partition functions and from tunneling, which conspire to yield a nonmonotonic temperature dependence for one of the KIEs. The stationary points and reaction-path potential of the MPW54 potential-energy surface are then used to parametrize a new kind of analytical potential-energy surface that combines a semiempirical valence bond formalism for the reactive part of the molecule with a standard molecular mechanics force field for the rest; this may be considered to be either an extension of molecular mechanics to treat a reactive potential-energy surface or a new kind of combined quantum-mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method in which the QM part is semiempirical valence bond theory; that is, the new potential-energy

  19. Electrochemistry of Au(II) and Au(III) pincer complexes: determination of the Au(II)-Au(II) bond energy.

    PubMed

    Dann, Thomas; Roşca, Dragoş-Adrian; Wright, Joseph A; Wildgoose, Gregory G; Bochmann, Manfred

    2013-10-01

    The bond energy of the unsupported Au-Au bond in the Au(ii) dimer [(C(∧)N(∧)C)Au]2 and the difference between Au(III)-OH and Au(III)-H bond enthalpies have been determined experimentally by electrochemical methods, with Au-OH and Au-H complexes showing unexpected differences in their reduction pathways, supported by DFT modelling. PMID:24051607

  20. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael W; Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2014-05-28

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H2 +, H2, B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation.

  1. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H2+, H2, B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation. PMID:24880263

  2. Is the decrease of the total electron energy density a covalence indicator in hydrogen and halogen bonds?

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio L; Duarte, Darío J R; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2013-05-01

    In this work, halogen bonding (XB) and hydrogen bonding (HB) complexes were studied with the aim of analyzing the variation of the total electronic energy density H(r b ) with the interaction strengthening. The calculations were performed at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of approximation. To explain the nature of such interactions, the atoms in molecules theory (AIM) in conjunction with reduced variational space self-consistent field (RVS) energy decomposition analysis were carried out. Based on the local virial theorem, an equation to decompose the total electronic energy density H(r b ) in two energy densities, (-G(r b )) and 1/4∇(2)ρ(r b ), was derived. These energy densities were linked with the RVS interaction energy components. Through the connection between both decomposition schemes, it was possible to conclude that the decrease in H(r b ) with the interaction strengthening observed in the HB as well as the XB complexes, is mainly due to the increase in the attractive electrostatic part of the interaction energy and in lesser extent to the increase in its covalent character, as is commonly considered. PMID:23187685

  3. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  4. A DFT study on the interaction between adsorbed silver on C₆₀ and disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Khaled; Sohrabinia, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Adsorption of a silver atom on the surface of Buckyball (C₆₀) was investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The Ag atom tends to occupy the bridge site over C--C bond in pentagon-hexagon ring junction with the binding energy of -38.33 kcal mol⁻¹. The capability of destroying S--S bond by both a single silver atom and the silver atom adsorbed on C₆₀ was also investigated by DFT calculations using dimethyl disulfide as the molecular model. The results of the natural bond orbital (NBO) and population analysis indicate that the cleavage of the S--S bond effectively occurs by the silver atom adsorbed on C₆₀. Since denaturation of disulfide bonds of envelope glycoprotein (gp) 120 is a key step in the prevention of the spread of HIV-1, the development of the proposed study is promised to HIV-1 research field. PMID:23085174

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigations of energy transfer and hydrogen-bond breaking in small water and HCl clusters.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Amit K; Czakó, Gábor; Wang, Yimin; Mancini, John S; Bowman, Joel M; Reisler, Hanna

    2014-08-19

    Water is one of the most pervasive molecules on earth and other planetary bodies; it is the molecule that is searched for as the presumptive precursor to extraterrestrial life. It is also the paradigm substance illustrating ubiquitous hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) in the gas phase, liquids, crystals, and amorphous solids. Moreover, H-bonding with other molecules and between different molecules is of the utmost importance in chemistry and biology. It is no wonder, then, that for nearly a century theoreticians and experimentalists have tried to understand all aspects of H-bonding and its influence on reactivity. It is somewhat surprising, therefore, that several fundamental aspects of H-bonding that are particularly important for benchmarking theoretical models have remained unexplored experimentally. For example, even the binding strength between two gas-phase water molecules has never been determined with sufficient accuracy for comparison with high-level electronic structure calculations. Likewise, the effect of cooperativity (nonadditivity) in small H-bonded networks is not known with sufficient accuracy. An even greater challenge for both theory and experiment is the description of the dissociation dynamics of H-bonded small clusters upon acquiring vibrational excitation. This is because of the long lifetimes of many clusters, which requires running classical trajectories for many nanoseconds to achieve dissociation. In this Account, we describe recent progress and ongoing research that demonstrates how the combined and complementary efforts of theory and experiment are enlisted to determine bond dissociation energies (D0) of small dimers and cyclic trimers of water and HCl with unprecedented accuracy, describe dissociation dynamics, and assess the effects of cooperativity. The experimental techniques rely on IR excitation of H-bonded X-H stretch vibrations, measuring velocity distributions of fragments in specific rovibrational states, and determining product

  6. Internal friction and gas desorption of {C}/{C} composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, H.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1994-09-01

    {C}/{C} composites are the most promising candidates as high heat flux component materials, where temperature dependence of mechanical properties and gas desorption behavior at elevated temperature are important properties. At the beginning, the newly developed internal friction measurement apparatus, which enables the accurate measurement of dynamic elastic properties up to 1373 K along with the measurement of gas desorption behavior, was used. The materials studied were unidirectional (UD) {C}/{C} composites reinforced with mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers, which were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 1473 to 2773 K which produced a variety of graphitized microstructures. Two-dimensional (2D) {C}/{C} composites reinfored with flat woven fabrics of PAN type carbon fibers were also studied. These materials were heat treated at 1873 K. From the temperature spectrum of internal friction of 2D {C}/{C} composites, these internal friction peaks were detected and were related to gas desorption. Also the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UD {C}/{C} composites, negative and positive dependence of Young's modulus were observed reflecting microstructure changes resulting from the heat treatments.

  7. Configuration-Space Sampling in Potential Energy Surface Fitting: A Space-Reduced Bond-Order Grid Approach.

    PubMed

    Rampino, Sergio

    2016-07-14

    Potential energy surfaces (PESs) for use in dynamics calculations of few-atom reactive systems are commonly modeled as functional forms fitting or interpolating a set of ab initio energies computed at many nuclear configurations. An automated procedure is here proposed for optimal configuration-space sampling in generating this set of energies as part of the grid-empowered molecular simulator GEMS (Laganà et al., J. Grid Comput. 2010, 8, 571-586). The scheme is based on a space-reduced formulation of the so-called bond-order variables allowing for a balanced representation of the attractive and repulsive regions of a diatom configuration space. Uniform grids based on space-reduced bond-order variables are proven to outperform those defined on the more conventional bond-length variables in converging the fitted/interpolated PES to the computed ab initio one with increasing number of grid points. Benchmarks are performed on the one- and three-dimensional prototype systems H2 and H3 using both a local-interpolation (modified Shepard) and a global-fitting (Aguado-Paniagua) scheme. PMID:26674105

  8. Characterization of Brazed Joints of C-C Composite to Cu-clad-Molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites with either pitch+CVI matrix or resin-derived matrix were joined to copper-clad molybdenum using two active braze alloys, Cusil-ABA (1.75% Ti) and Ticusil (4.5% Ti). The brazed joints revealed good interfacial bonding, preferential precipitation of Ti at the composite/braze interface, and a tendency toward de-lamination in resin-derived C-C composite due to its low inter-laminar shear strength. Extensive braze penetration of the inter-fiber channels in the pitch+CVI C-C composites was observed. The relatively low brazing temperatures (<950 C) precluded melting of the clad layer and restricted the redistribution of alloying elements but led to metallurgically sound composite joints. The Knoop microhardness (HK) distribution across the joint interfaces revealed sharp gradients at the Cu-clad-Mo/braze interface and higher hardness in Ticusil (approx.85-250 HK) than in Cusil-ABA (approx.50-150 HK). These C-C/Cu-clad-Mo joints with relatively low thermal resistance may be promising for thermal management applications.

  9. Accounting for the differences in the structures and relative energies of the highly homoatomic np pi-np pi (n > or = 3)-bonded S2I4 2+, the Se-I pi-bonded Se2I4 2+, and their higher-energy isomers by AIM, MO, NBO, and VB methodologies.

    PubMed

    Brownridge, Scott; Crawford, Margaret-Jane; Du, Hongbin; Harcourt, Richard D; Knapp, Carsten; Laitinen, Risto S; Passmore, Jack; Rautiainen, J Mikko; Suontamo, Reijo J; Valkonen, Jussi

    2007-02-01

    The bonding in the highly homoatomic np pi-np pi (n > or = 3)-bonded S2I42+ (three sigma + two pi bonds), the Se-I pi-bonded Se2I42+ (four sigma + one pi bonds), and their higher-energy isomers have been studied using modern DFT and ab initio calculations and theoretical analysis methods: atoms in molecules (AIM), molecular orbital (MO), natural bond orbital (NBO), and valence bond (VB) analyses, giving their relative energies, theoretical bond orders, and atomic charges. The aim of this work was to seek theory-based answers to four main questions: (1) Are the previously proposed simple pi*-pi* bonding models valid for S2I42+ and Se2I42+? (2) What accounts for the difference in the structures of S2I42+ and Se2I42+? (3) Why are the classically bonded isolobal P2I4 and As2I4 structures not adopted? (4) Is the high experimentally observed S-S bond order supported by theoretical bond orders, and how does it relate to high bond orders between other heavier main group elements? The AIM analysis confirmed the high bond orders and established that the weak bonds observed in S2I42+ and Se2I42+ are real and the bonding in these cations is covalent in nature. The full MO analysis confirmed that S2I42+ contains three sigma and two pi bonds, that the positive charge is essentially equally distributed over all atoms, that the bonding between S2 and two I2+ units in S2I42+ is best described by two mutually perpendicular 4c2e pi*-pi* bonds, and that in Se2I42+, two SeI2+ moieties are joined by a 6c2e pi*-pi* bond, both in agreement with previously suggested models. The VB treatment provided a complementary approach to MO analysis and provided insight how the formation of the weak bonds affects the other bonds. The NBO analysis and the calculated AIM charges showed that the minimization of the electrostatic repulsion between EI2+ units (E = S, Se) and the delocalization of the positive charge are the main factors that explain why the nonclassical structures are favored for S2I42

  10. The influence of large-amplitude librational motion on the hydrogen bond energy for alcohol-water complexes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J; Heimdal, J; Wugt Larsen, R

    2015-10-01

    The far-infrared absorption spectra have been recorded for hydrogen-bonded complexes of water with methanol and t-butanol embedded in cryogenic neon matrices at 2.8 K. The partial isotopic substitution of individual subunits enabled by a dual inlet deposition procedure provides for the first time unambiguous assignments of the intermolecular high-frequency out-of-plane and low-frequency in-plane donor OH librational modes for mixed alcohol-water complexes. The vibrational assignments confirm directly that water acts as the hydrogen bond donor in the most stable mixed complexes and the tertiary alcohol is a superior hydrogen bond acceptor. The class of large-amplitude donor OH librational motion is shown to account for up to 5.1 kJ mol(-1) of the destabilizing change of vibrational zero-point energy upon intermolecular OHO hydrogen bond formation. The experimental findings are supported by complementary electronic structure calculations at the CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. PMID:26304774

  11. Influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer on enamel bonding of dental adhesive systems: surface free-energy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Hirofumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Oouchi, Hajime; Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer (OIL) on the shear bond strength (SBS) to enamel and surface free-energy (SFE) of adhesive systems was investigated. The adhesive systems tested were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to bovine enamel surfaces to determine the SBS, with and without an OIL, of adhesives. The SFE of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. There were no significant differences in the mean SBS of SM and CS specimens with or without an OIL; however, the mean SBS of SU specimens with an OIL was significantly higher than that of SU specimens without an OIL. For all three systems, the mean total SFE (γS), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL promotes higher SBS of a single-step self-etch adhesive system, but not of a three-step or a two-step self-etch primer system. The SFE values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those without an OIL. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive. PMID:26647775

  12. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-21

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg(-1) by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template. PMID:26289389

  13. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  14. Low-cost bump-bonding processes for high energy physics pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Blank, T.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Husemann, U.; Kudella, S.; Weber, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the next generation of collider experiments detectors will be challenged by unprecedented particle fluxes. Thus large detector arrays of highly pixelated detectors with minimal dead area will be required at reasonable costs. Bump-bonding of pixel detectors has been shown to be a major cost-driver. KIT is one of five production centers of the CMS barrel pixel detector for the Phase I Upgrade. In this contribution the SnPb bump-bonding process and the production yield is reported. In parallel to the production of the new CMS pixel detector, several alternatives to the expensive photolithography electroplating/electroless metal deposition technologies are developing. Recent progress and challenges faced in the development of bump-bonding technology based on gold-stud bonding by thin (15 μm) gold wire is presented. This technique allows producing metal bumps with diameters down to 30 μm without using photolithography processes, which are typically required to provide suitable under bump metallization. The short setup time for the bumping process makes gold-stud bump-bonding highly attractive (and affordable) for the flip-chipping of single prototype ICs, which is the main limitation of the current photolithography processes.

  15. Formation of C-C bonds by mandelonitrile lyase in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Wehtje, E; Adlercreutz, P; Mattiasson, B

    1990-06-01

    Mandelonitrile lyase (EC 4.1.2.10) catalyzes the formation of D-mandelonitrile from HCN and benzaldehyde. Mandelonitrile lyase was immobilized by adsorption to support materials, for example, Celite. The enzyme preparations were used in diisopropyl ether for production of D-mandelonitrile. In order to obtain optically pure D-mandelonitrile it was necessary to use reaction conditions which favor the enzymatic reaction and suppress the competing spontaneous reaction, which yields a racemic mixture of D, L-mandelonitrile. The effects of substrate concentrations, water content, and support materials on both the spontaneous and enzymatic reactions were studied. The enzymatic reaction was carried out under conditions where the importance of the spontaneous reaction was negligible and high enantiomeric purity of D-mandelonitrile was achieved (at least 98% enantiomeric excess). The operational stability of the enzyme preparations was studied in batch as well as in continuous systems. It was vital to control the water content in the system to maintain an active preparation. In a packed bed reactor the enzyme preparations were shown to be active and stable. The reactors were run for 50 h with only a small decrease in product yield. PMID:18592607

  16. Hydrocarbon oxidation vs C-C bond-forming approaches for efficient syntheses of oxygenated molecules.

    PubMed

    Fraunhoffer, Kenneth J; Bachovchin, Daniel A; White, M Christina

    2005-01-20

    [Reaction: see text] A hydrocarbon oxidation approach has been applied to the construction of several linear (E)-allylic alcohols that have served as intermediates in the synthesis of natural products and natural product-like molecules. In the original syntheses, these intermediates were constructed using a standard Wittig-type olefination approach. We report here that routes to these same intermediates designed around a hydrocarbon oxidation approach are more efficient both in the total number of functional group manipulations (FGMs) and overall steps, as well as in the overall yield. PMID:15646963

  17. Unidirectional redox-stimulated movement around a C-C single bond.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Christina; Haberhauer, Gebhard

    2011-07-11

    A remarkable challenge for the design of molecular machines is the realization of a synchronized and unidirectional movement caused by an external stimulus. Such a movement can be achieved by a unidirectionally controlled change of the conformation or the configuration. Biphenol derivatives are one possibility to realize a redox-driven unidirectional molecular switch. For this reason, a 4,4'-biphenol derivative was fixed to a chiral cyclopeptidic scaffold and stimulated by chemical oxidants and reduction agents. The conformation of the switch was determined by DFT calculations by using B3LYP and the 6-31G* basis set. The switching process was observed by UV and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic measurements. Several oxidation agents and various conditions were tested, among which (diacetoxy)iodobenzene (DAIB) in methanol proved to be the best. In this way it was possible to synthesize a redox-stimulated molecular switch with a movement that is part of a rotation around a biaryl binding axis. PMID:21626582

  18. Homolytic cleavage C-C bond in the electrooxidation of ethanol and bioethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, J.; Pierna, A. R.; Blanco, T. C.; Morallón, E.; Huerta, F.

    Nowadays, the studies are focused on the search of better electrocatalysts that promote the complete oxidation of ethanol/bioethanol to CO 2. To that end, amorphous bi-catalytic catalysts of composition Ni 59Nb 40Pt 1- xY x (Y = Cu, Ru, x = 0.4% at.) have been developed, obtained by mechanical alloying, resulting in higher current densities and an improvement in tolerance to adsorbed CO vs. Ni 59Nb 40Pt 1 catalyst. By using voltammetric techniques, the appearance of three oxidation peaks can be observed. The first peak could be associated with the electrooxidative process of ethanol/bioethanol to acetaldehyde, the second peak could be the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid, and the last peak might be the final oxidation to CO 2. Chrono-amperometric experiments show qualitative poisoning of catalytic surfaces. However, the in situ Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy, FTIR, is used for the quasi-quantitative determination with which can be observed the appearance and evolution of different vibrational bands of carbonyl and carboxylic groups of different species, as it moves towards anodic potential in the electrooxidative process.

  19. In Pursuit of an Ideal C-C Bond-Forming Reaction

    PubMed Central

    RajanBabu, T. V.

    2009-01-01

    Attempts to introduce the highly versatile vinyl group into other organic molecules in a chemo-, regio- and stereoselective fashion via catalytic activation of ethylene provided challenging opportunities to explore new ligand and salt effects in homogeneous catalysis. This review provides a personal account of the development of enantioselective reactions involving ethylene. PMID:19606231

  20. Using Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) to Fund a Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program: Case Study on Saint Louis County, MO

    SciTech Connect

    Zimring, Mark

    2011-06-23

    Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) are federally-subsidized debt instruments that enable state, tribal, and local government issuers to borrow money to fund a range of qualified energy conservation projects. QECBs offer issuers very attractive borrowing rates and long terms, and can fund low-interest energy efficiency loans for home and commercial property owners. Saint Louis County, MO recently issued over $10 million of QECBs to finance the Saint Louis County SAVES residential energy efficiency loan program. The county's experience negotiating QECB regulations and restrictions can inform future issuers.

  1. The relationship between bond ionicity, lattice energy, coefficient of thermal expansion and microwave dielectric properties of Nd(Nb(1-x)Sb(x))O4 ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Yonggui; Wang, Xiuyu

    2015-06-28

    The crystalline structure refinement, chemical bond ionicity, lattice energy and coefficient of thermal expansion were carried out for Nd(Nb(1-x)Sb(x))O4 ceramics with a monoclinic fergusonite structure to investigate the correlations between the crystalline structure, phase stability, bond ionicity, lattice energy, coefficient of thermal expansion, and microwave dielectric properties. The bond ionicity, lattice energy, and coefficient of thermal expansion of Nd(Nb(1-x)Sb(x))O4 ceramics were calculated using a semiempirical method based on the complex bond theory. The phase structure stability varied with the lattice energy which was resulted by the substitution constant of Sb(5+). With the increasing of the Sb(5+) contents, the decrease of Nb/Sb-O bond ionicity was observed, which could be contributed to the electric polarization. The ε(r) had a close relationship with the Nb/Sb-O bond ionicity. The increase of the Q×f and |τ(f)| values could be attributed to the lattice energy and the coefficient of thermal expansion. The microwave dielectric properties of Nd(Nb(1-x)Sb(x))O4 ceramics with the monoclinic fergusonite structure were strongly dependent on the chemical bond ionicity, lattice energy and coefficient of thermal expansion. PMID:25997635

  2. CO hydrogenation, deoxygenation, and C-C coupling promoted by ((silox)/sub 2/TaH/sub 2/)/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Toreki, R.; LaPointe, R.E.; Wolczanski, P.T.

    1987-11-25

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction considered a potential solution to future energy concerns, has commanded the attention of researchers in both heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis for the past 15 years. The most widely accepted mechanism for this conversion of synthesis gas (CO/H/sub 2/) to hydrocarbons and oxygenates incorporates three crucial steps: (1) CO is deoxygenated, presumably via dissociative adsorption; (2) H-transfer to surface carbides or CO/sub ads/ produces surface methylene groups, (3) C-C bond formation occurs through oligomerization of (CH/sub 2/)/sub ads/. Various organometallic species model the individual steps, yet fall short of corroborating the entire sequence. Reported herein is the carbonylation of ((silox)/sub 2/TaH/sub 2/)/sub 2/ (silox = t-Bu/sub 3/SiO/sup -/) and successive reactions which encompass the critical transformations of the F-T pathway.

  3. Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for High-Temperature Packaging; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    DeVoto, Douglas

    2015-06-10

    This is a technical review of the DOE VTO EDT project EDT063, Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for High-Temperature Packaging. A procedure for analyzing the reliability of sintered-silver through experimental thermal cycling and crack propagation modeling has been outlined and results have been presented.

  4. Aircraft surface coatings study: Energy efficient transport program. [sprayed and adhesive bonded coatings for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Surface coating materials for application on transport type aircraft to reduce drag, were investigated. The investigation included two basic types of materials: spray on coatings and adhesively bonded films. A cost/benefits analysis was performed, and recommendations were made for future work toward the application of this technology.

  5. The correlations among bond ionicity, lattice energy and microwave dielectric properties of (Nd(1-x)La(x))NbO4 ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Yonggui; Li, Lingxia

    2015-07-14

    (Nd1-xLax)NbO4 ceramics were prepared via a conventional solid-state reaction route and the correlations among bond ionicity, lattice energy, phase stability and microwave dielectric properties were investigated. The diffraction patterns showed that the (Nd1-xLax)NbO4 ceramics possessed a monoclinic fergusonite structure. The chemical bond ionicity, bond covalency and lattice energy were calculated using the empirical method. The phase structure stability varied with the lattice energy which resulted due to the substitution content of La(3+) ions. With the increase of La(3+) ion contents, the decrease of Nd/La-O bond ionicity was observed, which could be attributed to the electric polarization. εr has a close relationship with the Nd/La-O bond covalency. The increase of the Q × f values and τf values could be attributed to the change in the lattice energy. The microwave dielectric properties of (Nd1-xLax)NbO4 ceramics with a monoclinic fergusonite structure were strongly dependent on the chemical bond ionicity, bond covalency and lattice energy. PMID:26063124

  6. Spectroscopically determined force field for water dimer: physically enhanced treatment of hydrogen bonding in molecular mechanics energy functions.

    PubMed

    Mannfors, Berit; Palmo, Kim; Krimm, Samuel

    2008-12-11

    Our ab initio transformed spectroscopically determined force field (SDFF) methodology emphasizes, in addition to accurate structure and energy performance, comparable prediction of vibrational properties in order to improve reproduction of interaction forces. It is now applied to the determination of a molecular mechanics (MM) force field for the water monomer and dimer as an initial step in developing a more physically based treatment of the hydrogen bonding that not only underlies condensed-phase water but also must be important in molecular-level protein-water interactions. Essential electrical components of the SDFF for monomer water are found to be the following: an off-plane charge distribution, this distribution consisting of four off-atom charge sites in traditional lone pair (LP) but also in inverted lone pair (ILP) positions; allowance for a diffuse size to these off-atom sites; and the incorporation of charge fluxes (i.e., the change in charge with change in internal coordinate). Parametrization of such an LP/ILP model together with the SDFF analytically transformed valence force field results in essentially exact agreement with ab initio (in this case MP2/6-31++G(d,p)) structure, electrical, and vibrational properties. Although we demonstrate that the properties of this monomer electrical model together with its van der Waals and polarization interactions are transferable to the dimer, this is not sufficient in reproducing comparable dimer properties, most notably the huge increase in infrared intensity of a donor OH stretch mode. This deficiency, which can be eliminated by a large dipole-derivative-determined change in the effective charge flux of the donor hydrogen-bonded OH bond, is not accounted for by the charge flux change in this bond due to the induction effects of the acceptor electric field alone, and can only be fully removed by an added bond flux associated with the extent of overlap of the wave functions of the two molecules. We show that

  7. The Gas Leakage Analysis in C/C Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Hatta, Hiroshi; Bando, Takamasa; Sugibayashi, Toshio

    Gas leakage through carbon fiber reinforcement carbon composites, C/Cs, was discussed so as to apply C/Cs to heat exchangers in an engine system for a future space-plane. Since C/Cs include many cracks and pores, gas easily leaks through C/Cs. To predict and to prevent the gas flow through a C/C, leakage rate was measured as a function of pressure and gas flow path was identified by micro-observation of the C/C. Then, several analytical models were examined to clarify principal mechanism yielding gas flow resistance. It was found that laminar flow models gave far small flow resistance compared with experimental results, but a model based on adiabatic expansion and compression flow, used for gas leak through labyrinth seals, resulted in reasonable agreement. Finally, Si impregnation in a C/C was examined to minimize the gas leakage. This treatment was shown to be an excellent measure to reduce the gas leakage through C/C.

  8. Toward quantification of protein backbone–backbone hydrogen bonding energies: An energetic analysis of an amide-to-ester mutation in an α-helix within a protein

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianmin; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2008-01-01

    Amide-to-ester backbone mutagenesis enables a specific backbone–backbone hydrogen bond (H-bond) in a protein to be eliminated in order to quantify its energetic contribution to protein folding. To extract a H-bonding free energy from an amide-to-ester perturbation free energy (ΔG folding,wt − ΔG folding,mut), it is necessary to correct for the putative introduction of a lone pair–lone pair electrostatic repulsion, as well as for the transfer free energy differences that may arise between the all amide sequence and the predominantly amide sequence harboring an ester bond. Mutation of the 9–10 amide bond within the V9F variant of the predominantly helical villin headpiece subdomain (HP35) to an ester or an E-olefin backbone bond results in a less stable but defined wild-type fold, an attribute required for this study. Comparing the folding free energies of the ester and E-olefin mutants, with correction for the desolvation free energy differences (ester and E-olefin) and the loss of an n-to-π* interaction (E-olefin), yields an experimentally based estimate of +0.4 kcal/mol for the O–O repulsion energy in an α-helical context, analogous to our previous experimentally based estimate of the O–O repulsion free energy in the context of a β-sheet. The small O–O repulsion energy indicates that amide-to-ester perturbation free energies can largely be attributed to the deletion of the backbone H-bonds after correction for desolvation differences. Quantitative evaluation of H-bonding in an α-helix should now be possible, an important step toward deciphering the balance of forces that enable spontaneous protein folding. PMID:18434500

  9. Influence of light intensity on surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Kie; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of light intensity on the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step selfetch adhesives. The adhesives were applied to the dentin surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). Surface-free energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. Dentin bond strengths of the specimens were also measured. Polymerization with a higher light intensity resulted in a lower surface-free energy of the cured adhesives. The greatest bond strength was achieved when a light intensity of 400 mW/cm(2) or greater was used. Our data suggest that the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives are affected by light intensity of the curing unit. PMID:26438984

  10. Formation Mechanism of the First Carbon-Carbon Bond and the First Olefin in the Methanol Conversion into Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Müller, Sebastian; Berger, Daniel; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Tonigold, Markus; Sanchez-Sanchez, Maricruz; Lercher, Johannes A

    2016-05-01

    The elementary reactions leading to the formation of the first carbon-carbon bond during early stages of the zeolite-catalyzed methanol conversion into hydrocarbons were identified by combining kinetics, spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. The first intermediates containing a C-C bond are acetic acid and methyl acetate, which are formed through carbonylation of methanol or dimethyl ether even in presence of water. A series of acid-catalyzed reactions including acetylation, decarboxylation, aldol condensation, and cracking convert those intermediates into a mixture of surface bounded hydrocarbons, the hydrocarbon pool, as well as into the first olefin leaving the catalyst. This carbonylation based mechanism has an energy barrier of 80 kJ mol(-1) for the formation of the first C-C bond, in line with a broad range of experiments, and significantly lower than the barriers associated with earlier proposed mechanisms. PMID:27037603

  11. Relationship between bond stiffness and electrical energy storage capacity in oxides: density functional calculations for h-La2O3, MgO and BeO

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Bo; Cooper, Valentino R; Singh, David J; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2011-01-01

    We report finite electric field calculations for three representative oxide dielectrics: MgO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and BeO. These materials have very different dielectric constants and bond stiffness. Good accord with experimental low field data is obtained. We discuss the results from the point of view of dielectric energy storage and suggest that the low dielectric constant, high bond stiffness material BeO is best from the viewpoint of energy density.

  12. Computationally efficient methodology to calculate C-H and C-X (X = F, Cl, and Br) bond dissociation energies in haloalkanes

    SciTech Connect

    McGivern, W.S.; Derecskei-Kovacs, A.; North, S.W.; Francisco, J.S.

    2000-01-20

    A computationally efficient method for calculating C-H and C-X (X = F, Cl, and Br) bond dissociation energies in haloalkanes has been developed by determining correction factors to MP2/cc-pVtz energies. Corrections for basis set effects were determined by the difference in bond dissociation energies calculated at the MP2/cc-pVtz and MP2/cc-pV5z levels, and correlation effects were corrected by calculating the difference in energies at the MP2/cc-pVtz and CCSD(T)/cc-pVtz levels. Subsequent corrections for the spin-orbit energy of the atomic fragment and zero-point energy were applied to give a final bond dissociation energy. The correction factors were determined using CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}F, CH{sub 3}Cl, and CH{sub 3}Br and are found to yield bond dissociation energies in excellent agreement with experimental results. This correction may also be broadly applied to multihalogen compounds, as shown in calculations of the C-H and C-X bond dissociation energies of CH{sub 2}X{sub 2} and CHX{sub 3} (X = F, Cl, and Br) compounds, which accurately reproduce experimental values.

  13. Low-energy Excitations in the Magnetized State of the Bond-alternating Quantum S=1 Chain System NTENP

    SciTech Connect

    Regnault, L.-P.; Zheludev, Andrey I; Hagiwara, M.; Stunault, A.

    2006-01-01

    High-intensity inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the S=1 quasi-one-dimensional bond-alternating antiferromagnet Ni(C{sub 9}D{sub 24}N{sub 4})(NO{sub 2})ClO{sub 4} (NTENP) are performed in magnetic fields of up to 14.8 T. Excitation in the high field magnetized quantum spin solid (ordered) phase are investigated. In addition to the previously observed coherent long-lived gap excitation [M. Hagiwara et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 94, 177202 (2005)], a broad continuum is detected at lower energies. This observation is consistent with recent numerical studies, and helps explain the suppression of the lowest-energy gap mode in the magnetized state of NTENP. Yet another feature of the excitation spectrum is found at slightly higher energies, and appears to be some kind of multimagnon state.

  14. Energy transport mechanism in the form of proton soliton in a one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded polypeptide chain.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, L; Priya, R; Ayyappan, N; Gopi, D; Jayanthi, S

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of protons in a one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded (HB) polypeptide chain (PC) is investigated theoretically. A new Hamiltonian is formulated with the inclusion of higher-order molecular interactions between peptide groups (PGs). The wave function of the excitation state of a single particle is replaced by a new wave function of a two-quanta quasi-coherent state. The dynamics is governed by a higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the energy transport is performed by the proton soliton. A nonlinear multiple-scale perturbation analysis has been performed and the evolution of soliton parameters such as velocity and amplitude is explored numerically. The proton soliton is thermally stable and very robust against these perturbations. The energy transport by the proton soliton is more appropriate to understand the mechanism of energy transfer in biological processes such as muscle contraction, DNA replication, and neuro-electric pulse transfer on biomembranes. PMID:26198375

  15. Effects of density functionals and dispersion interactions on geometries, bond energies and harmonic frequencies of Etbnd UX3 (E = N, P, CH; X = H, F, Cl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Krishna Kumar; Patidar, Pankaj; Patidar, Sunil Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-12-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed to evaluate the geometries, bonding nature and harmonic frequencies of the compounds [Etbnd UX3] at DFT, DFT-D3, DFT-D3(BJ) and DFT-dDSc levels using different density functionals BP86, BLYP, PBE, revPBE, PW91, TPSS and M06-L. The stretching frequency of Utbnd N bond in [Ntbnd UF3] calculated with DFT/BLYP closely resembles with the experimental value. The performance of different density functionals for accurate Utbnd N vibrational frequencies follows the order BLYP > revPBE > BP86 > PW91 > TPSS > PBE > M06-L. The BLYP functional gives accurate value of the Utbnd E bond distances. The uranium atom in the studied compounds [Etbnd UX3] is positively charged. Upon going from [Etbnd UF3] to [Etbnd UCl3], the partial Hirshfeld charge on uranium atom decreases because of the lower electronegativity of chlorine compared to flourine. The Gopinathan-Jug bond order for Utbnd E bonds ranges from 2.90 to 3.29. The Utbnd E bond dissociation energies vary with different density functionals as M06-L < TPSS < BLYP < revPBE < BP86 < PBE ≈ PW91. The orbital interactions ΔEorb, in all studied compounds [Etbnd UX3] are larger than the electrostatic interaction ΔEelstat, which means the Utbnd N bonds in these compound have greater degree of covalent character (in the range 63.8-77.2%). The Usbnd E σ-bonding interaction is the dominant bonding interaction in the nitride and methylidyne complexes while it is weaker in [Ptbnd UX3]. The dispersion energy contributions to the total bond dissociation energies are rather small. Compared to the Grimme's D3(BJ) corrections, the Corminboeuf's dispersion corrections are larger with metaGGA functionals (TPSS, M06-L) while smaller with GGA functionals.

  16. Influence of surface treatment of contaminated lithium disilicate and leucite glass ceramics on surface free energy and bond strength of universal adhesives.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Fumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Nojiri, Kie; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi; Latta, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of surface treatment of contaminated lithium disilicate and leucite glass ceramic restorations on the bonding efficacy of universal adhesives. Lithium disilicate and leucite glass ceramics were contaminated with saliva, and then cleaned using distilled water (SC), or 37% phosphoric acid (TE), or hydrofluoric acid (CE). Specimens without contamination served as controls. The surface free energy was determined by measuring the contact angles formed when the three test liquids were placed on the specimens. Bond strengths of the universal adhesives were also measured. Saliva contamination and surface treatment of ceramic surfaces significantly influenced the surface free energy. The bond strengths of universal adhesives were also affected by surface treatment and the choice of adhesive materials. Our data suggest that saliva contamination of lithum disilicate and leucite glass ceramics significantly impaired the bonding of the universal adhesives, and reduced the surface free energy of the ceramics. PMID:26632235

  17. Dislocation dissociation in some f.c.c. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The dissociation of a perfect screw dislocation into a stacking fault in an f.c.c. lattice is modeled by the modified lattice statics. The interatomic potentials are obtained from the work of Esterling and Swaroop and differ substantially from those empirical potentials usually employed in defect simulations. The calculated stacking fault widths for aluminum, copper, and silver are in good agreement with weak beam microscopy results.

  18. [Study on spectral emissivity of C/C composites].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Cao, Wei-Wei; Jing, Min; Dong, Xing-Guang; Wang, Cheng-Guo

    2009-11-01

    Different types of C/C composites were prepared by conventional molding, and the changes in normal spectral emissivity of samples were tested. The testing results show that spectral emissivity of C/C composite reinforced by short cut carbon fibers is generally higher than the sample reinforced by carbon cloth in the entire 2500-13000nm wavelength region. The structure of short cut carbon fibers is relatively loose and the number of material particles is less than other samples in unit volume, which increases the penetration depth of electromagnetic waves. This is the reason for higher normal spectral emissivity and better heat radiation property. Meanwhile, the test results of normal spectral emissivity for fiber perform and C/C composite samples show that the spectral emissivity of resin carbon is better than fiber carbon because of the difference in microstructure for the two kinds of carbon materials. Laser Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze the microstructures of different carbon materials, and the results show that because sp3 and sp2 hybrid states of carbon atoms in resin carbon produced more vibration modes, the resin carbon also has higher normal spectral emissivity and better characteristics of heat radiation. PMID:20101951

  19. Inverse Ubbelohde effect in the short hydrogen bond of photosystem II: Relation between H/D isotope effect and symmetry in potential energy profile.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Takano, Yu

    2016-09-01

    The short hydrogen bond between tyrosine Yz and D1-His190 of photosystem II (PSII) was investigated using multicomponent quantum mechanics, where the quantum fluctuation of a hydrogen nucleus was incorporated into electronic structure calculation. Our computation demonstrated that the deuteration for hydrogen in the short hydrogen bond of PSII led to the reduction of the O…N distance. It indicated an inverse Ubbelohde effect typically recognized in strong and symmetric hydrogen-bonding clusters such as FHF(-) and H3O2-. We confirmed that the relation between the geometric isotope effect and the symmetry of the potential energy profile of FHF(-) was reasonably agreed with that of PSII. According to this agreement, the short hydrogen bond in PSII can be regarded as a short strong hydrogen bond. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349328

  20. Catalysis of the Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction by Hydrogen and Halogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nziko, Vincent de Paul N; Scheiner, Steve

    2016-03-18

    The combination of H2C═NH and cis-1,3-butadiene to form a six-membered ring was examined by quantum calculations. The energy barrier for this reaction is substantially lowered by the introduction of an imidazolium catalyst with either a H or halogen (X) atom in the 2-position, which acts via a H or halogen bond to the N atom of the imine, respectively. X = I has the largest effect, and Cl the smallest; Br and H are roughly equivalent. The catalyst retards the formation of the incipient N-C bond from imine to diene while simultaneously accelerating the C-C bond formation. The energy of the π* LUMO of the imine is lowered by the catalyst, which thereby enhances charge transfer from the diene to the imine. Assessment of free energies suggests catalytic rate acceleration by as much as 4-6 orders of magnitude. PMID:26907727

  1. On the Construction of Diabatic and Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces Based on Ab Initio Valence Bond Theory‡

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingchun; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented for deriving effective diabatic states based on ab initio self-consistent field valence bond (VBSCF) theory by reducing the multi-configurational VB Hamiltonian into an effective two-state model. We describe two computational approaches for the optimization of the effective diabatic configurations, resulting in two ways of interpreting such effective diabatic states. In the variational diabatic configuration (VDC) method, the energies of the individual diabatic states are variationally minimized. In the consistent diabatic configuration (CDC) method, both the configuration coefficients and orbital coefficients are simultaneously optimized to minimize the adiabatic ground-state energy in VBSCF calculations. In addition, we describe a mixed molecular orbital and valence bond (MOVB) approach to construct the CDC diabatic and adiabatic states for a chemical reaction, whereas the VDC-MOVB method has been described previously. Employing the symmetric SN2 reaction between NH3 and CH3NH3+ as a test system, we found that the results from ab initio VBSCF and from MOVB calculations are in good agreement, suggesting that the computationally efficient MOVB method is a reasonable model for VB simulations of condensed phase reactions. The results indicate that CDC and VDC diabatic states converge, respectively, to covalent and ionic states as the molecular geometries are distorted from the minimum of the respective diabatic state along the reaction coordinate. Furthermore, the resonance energy that stabilizes the energy of crossing between the two diabatic states, resulting in the transition state of the adiabatic ground-state reaction, has a strong dependence on the overlap integral between the two diabatic states and is a function of both the exchange integral and the total diabatic ground-state energy. PMID:18828577

  2. Electrophilic, Ambiphilic, and Nucleophilic C-H bond Activation. Understanding the electronic continuum of C-H bond activation through transition-state and reaction pathway interaction energy decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Goddard, William A.; Periana, Roy A.

    2010-10-29

    The potential energy and interaction energy profiles for metal- and metal-ligand-mediated alkane C-H bond activation were explored using B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) and the absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (ALMO-EDA). The set of complexes explored range from late transition metal group 10 (Pt and Pd) and group 11 (Au) metal centers to group 7-9 (Ir, Rh, Ru, and W) metal centers as well as a group 3 Sc complex. The coordination geometries, electron metal count (d8, d6, d4, and d0), and ligands (N-heterocycles, O-donor, phosphine, and Cp*) are also diverse. Quantitative analysis using ALMO-EDA of both directions of charge-transfer stabilization (occupied to unoccupied orbital stabilization) energies between the metal-ligand fragment and the coordinated C-H bond in the transition state for cleavage of the C-H bond allows classification of C-H activation reactions as electrophilic, ambiphilic, or nucleophilic on the basis of the net direction of charge-transfer energy stabilization. This bonding pattern transcends any specific mechanistic or bonding paradigm, such as oxidative addition, σ-bond metathesis, or substitution. Late transition metals such as Au(III), Pt(II), Pd(II), and Rh(III) metal centers with N-heterocycle, halide, or O-donor ligands show electrophilically dominated reaction profiles with forward charge-transfer from the C-H bond to the metal, leading to more stabilization than reverse charge transfer from the metal to the C-H bond. Transition states and reaction profiles for d6 Ru(II) and Ir(III) metals with Tp and acac ligands were found to have nearly equal forward and reverse charge-transfer energy stabilization. This ambiphilic region also includes the classically labeled electrophilic cationic species Cp*(PMe3)Ir(Me). Nucleophilic character, where the metal to C-H bond charge-transfer interaction is most stabilizing, was found in

  3. Influence of Ti nanocrystallization on microstructure, interface bonding, surface energy and blood compatibility of surface TiO 2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Honghong; Yu, Chunhang; Xu, Xiaojing; Wang, Ji; Zhai, Rui; Wang, Xiaojing

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress in ultrafine-grained/nano-grained (UFG/NG) titanium permits a consideration for TiO 2 films deposited on nano-grained titanium for antithrombogenic application such as artificial valves and stents. For this paper, the microstructure, interface bonding, surface energy, and blood compatibility features of TiO 2 films deposited by direct current magnetron reactive sputtering technology on NG titanium and coarse-grained (CG) titanium were investigated. The results show that the nanocrystallization of titanium substrate has a significant influence on TiO 2 films. At the same deposition parameters, the content of rutile phase of TiO 2 film was increased from 47% (on the CG titanium substrate) to 72% (on the NG titanium substrate); the adhesion of TiO 2 film was improved from 5.8 N to 17 N; the surface energy was reduced from 6.37 dyn/cm to 3.01 dyn/cm; the clotting time was improved from 18 min to 28 min; the platelets accumulation and pseudopodium of adherent platelets on TiO 2 film on NG titanium were considerably reduced compared to that on CG titanium. The present results demonstrate the possibility of improving the blood compatibility of TiO 2 film through the approach of substrate nanocrystallization. Also it may provide an attractive idea to prepare stents with biological coatings of more outstanding blood compatibility and interface bonding.

  4. Directional Dependence of Hydrogen Bonds: a Density-based Energy Decomposition Analysis and Its Implications on Force Field Development

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenyu; Zhou, Nengjie; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Yingkai

    2011-01-01

    One well-known shortcoming of widely-used biomolecular force fields is the description of the directional dependence of hydrogen bonding (HB). Here we aim to better understand the origin of this difficulty and thus provide some guidance for further force field development. Our theoretical approaches center on a novel density-based energy decomposition analysis (DEDA) method [J. Chem. Phys., 131, 164112 (2009)], in which the frozen density energy is variationally determined through constrained search. This unique and most significant feature of DEDA enables us to find that the frozen density interaction term is the key factor in determining the HB orientation, while the sum of polarization and charge-transfer components shows very little HB directional dependence. This new insight suggests that the difficulty for current non-polarizable force fields to describe the HB directional dependence is not due to the lack of explicit polarization or charge-transfer terms. Using the DEDA results as reference, we further demonstrate that the main failure coming from the atomic point charge model can be overcome largely by introducing extra charge sites or higher order multipole moments. Among all the electrostatic models explored, the smeared charge distributed multipole model (up to quadrupole), which also takes account of charge penetration effects, gives the best agreement with the corresponding DEDA results. Meanwhile, our results indicate that the van der Waals interaction term needs to be further improved to better model directional hydrogen bonding. PMID:22267958

  5. A Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe Based on a Through-Bond Energy Transfer (TBET) System for Imaging HOCl in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Ru; Meng, Ning; Miao, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2015-12-21

    A simple ratiometric probe (Naph-Rh) has been designed and synthesized based on a through-bond energy transfer (TBET) system for sensing HOCl. In this probe, rhodamine thiohydrazide and naphthalene formyl were connected by simple synthesis methods to construct a structure of monothio-bishydrazide. Free probe Naph-Rh showed only the emission of naphthalene. When probe Naph-Rh reacted with HOCl, monothio-bishydrazide could be converted into 1,2,4-oxadiazole, which not only ensured that the donor and the acceptor were connected with electronically conjugated bonds, but also resulted in the spiro-ring opening and the emission of rhodamine. Therefore, a typical TBET process took place. The probe possessed high-energy transfer efficiency and large pseudo-Stokes shifts. As the first TBET probe for HOCl, Naph-Rh showed excellent selectivity and sensitivity toward HOCl over other reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and could respond fast to a low concentration of HOCl in the real sample. In addition, the probe was suitable for imaging HOCl in living cells due to its real-time response, excellent resolution, and reduced cytotoxicity. PMID:26568524

  6. Amino Acid Mean Excitation Energies and Directional Dependencies from Core and Bond Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-12-08

    We determine the mean excitation energies of several amino acids using a Bragg Rule developed for molecular fragments or functional groups. As the composition of the amino acids is very similar, we find that the amino acids have similar mean excitation energies (approximately 70 eV). Differences arise from variation of the side chains (-R); addition of-CH2-groups decreases the mean excitation energy. We also speculate concerning the directional dependence of the amino acid mean excitation energies.

  7. Quantum-chemical calculations of bonding energy and the unit-cell parameters of crystalline magnesium difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Iomin, L.M.; Buznik, V.M.

    1988-11-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations of the bonding energy of the crystal lattice, the unit-cell parameters, and the coordinates of the anions in crystalline magnesium difluoride have been performed in the framework of the Loewdin model. An expression for the energy of the three-particle interactions in rutile-like crystals has been obtained. The calculations were carried out in three successive approximations. A comparison with the experimental data shows that the best description of the interatomic interactions in rutile-like magnesium fluoride (in the framework of the Loewdin model) is achieved in an approximation which takes into account the non-Madelung interactions only in the first coordination sphere. Consideration of the short-range interactions with more distant ions worsens the agreement between theory and experiment.

  8. Bond Dissociation Energies of the Tungsten Fluorides and Their Singly-Charged Ions: A Density Functional Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The dissociation of WF6 and the related singly-charged cations and anions into the lower fluorides and fluorine atoms has been investigated theoretically using density functional theory (B3LYP) and relativistic effective core potentials, with estimates of spin-orbit effects included using a simple model. The inclusion of spin-orbit is essential for a correct description of the thermochemistry. The total atomization energy of the neutral and anionic WF6 is reproduced to within 25 kcal/mol, but comparison of individual bond dissociation energies with available experimental data shows discrepancies of up to 10 kcal/mol. The results are nevertheless useful to help resolve discrepancies in experimental data and provide estimates of missing data.

  9. Iron-Catalyzed C-C Cross-Couplings Using Organometallics.

    PubMed

    Guérinot, Amandine; Cossy, Janine

    2016-08-01

    Over the last decades, iron-catalyzed cross-couplings have emerged as an important tool for the formation of C-C bonds. A wide variety of alkenyl, aryl, and alkyl (pseudo)halides have been coupled to organometallic reagents, the most currently used being Grignard reagents. Particular attention has been devoted to the development of iron catalysts for the functionalization of alkyl halides that are generally challenging substrates in classical cross-couplings. The high functional group tolerance of iron-catalyzed cross-couplings has encouraged organic chemists to use them in the synthesis of bioactive compounds. Even if some points remain obscure, numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the mechanism of iron-catalyzed cross-coupling and several hypotheses have been proposed. PMID:27573401

  10. Quantification of C=C and C=O Surface Carbons in Detonation Nanodiamond by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J -F; Fang, X -W; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2014-05-08

    The ability of solid-state 13C NMR to detect and quantify small amounts of sp2-hybridized carbon on the surface of ~5 nm diameter nanodiamond particles is demonstrated. The C=C carbon fraction is only 1.1 ± 0.4% in pristine purified detonation nanodiamond, while a full single-layer graphitic or “bucky diamond” shell would contain ca. 25% of all C in a 5 nm diameter particle. Instead of large aromatic patches repeatedly proposed in the recent literature, sp3-hybridized CH and COH carbons cover most of the nanodiamond particle surface, accounting for ~5% each. C=O and COO groups also seen in X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) but not detected in previous NMR studies make up ca. 1.5% of all C. They are removed by heat treatment at 800 °C, which increases the aromatic fraction. 13C{1H} NMR demonstrates that the various sp2-hybridized carbons are mostly not protonated, but cross-polarization shows that they are separated from 1H by only a few bond lengths, which proves that they are near the protonated surface. Together, the observed C–H, C–OH, C=O, and C=C groups account for 12–14% of all C, which matches the surface fraction expected for bulk-terminated 5 nm diameter diamond particles.

  11. Unexpected interplay of bonding height and energy level alignment at heteromolecular hybrid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Lüftner, Daniel; Willenbockel, Martin; Reinisch, Eva M; Sueyoshi, Tomoki; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Ramsey, Michael G; Puschnig, Peter; Tautz, F Stefan; Kumpf, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Although geometric and electronic properties of any physical or chemical system are always mutually coupled by the rules of quantum mechanics, counterintuitive coincidences between the two are sometimes observed. The coadsorption of the organic molecules 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride and copper-II-phthalocyanine on Ag(111) represents such a case, since geometric and electronic structures appear to be decoupled: one molecule moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, and vice versa for the other. Our comprehensive experimental and ab-initio theoretical study reveals that, mediated by the metal surface, both species mutually amplify their charge-donating and -accepting characters, respectively. This resolves the apparent paradox, and demonstrates with exceptional clarity how geometric and electronic bonding parameters are intertwined at metal-organic interfaces. PMID:24739211

  12. Unexpected interplay of bonding height and energy level alignment at heteromolecular hybrid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Lüftner, Daniel; Willenbockel, Martin; Reinisch, Eva M.; Sueyoshi, Tomoki; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Ramsey, Michael G.; Puschnig, Peter; Tautz, F. Stefan; Kumpf, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Although geometric and electronic properties of any physical or chemical system are always mutually coupled by the rules of quantum mechanics, counterintuitive coincidences between the two are sometimes observed. The coadsorption of the organic molecules 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride and copper-II-phthalocyanine on Ag(111) represents such a case, since geometric and electronic structures appear to be decoupled: one molecule moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, and vice versa for the other. Our comprehensive experimental and ab-initio theoretical study reveals that, mediated by the metal surface, both species mutually amplify their charge-donating and -accepting characters, respectively. This resolves the apparent paradox, and demonstrates with exceptional clarity how geometric and electronic bonding parameters are intertwined at metal-organic interfaces.

  13. On the Enthalpy of Formation of Hydroxyl Radical and Gas-Phase Bond Dissociation Energies of Water and Hydroxyl

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscic, Branko; Wagner, Albert F.; Harding, Lawerence B.; Asher, Robert L.; Feller, David F. ); Dixon, David A. ); Peterson, Kirk A.; Song, Yang; Qian, Ximei; Ng, C Y.; Liu, Jianbo; Wenwu, Chen

    2001-12-01

    Several photoionization experiments utilizing the positive ion cycle to derive the O-H bond energy converge to a consensus value of AE0(OH+/H2O)= 146117? 24 cm-1 (18.1162? 0.0030 eV). With the most accurate currently available ZEKE value. IE(OH)= 104989? 2 cm-1, corroborated by a number of photoelectron measurements,Error! Bookmark not defined.,Error! Bookmark not defined.,Error! Bookmark not defined.,Error! Bookmark not defined. this leads to D0(H?OH)= 41128? 24 cm-1= 117.59? 0.07 kcal/mol. This corresponds to DHf 0(OH)= 8.85? 0.07 kcal/mol, and implies D0(OH)= 35593? 24 cm-1= 101.76? 0.07 kcal/mol. The most sophisticated theoretical calculations performed so far on the HxO system, CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVnZ, n=Q, 5, 6, and 7, extrapolated to the CBS limit and including corrections for core-valence effects, scalar relativistic effects, incomplete correlation recovery, and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections reproduce the experimental results to within 0.0 - 0.2 k cal/mol. The new values of the two successive bond dissociation energies of water supersede the previously accepted values,Error! Bookmark not defined.,Error! Bookmark not defined. which were based on spectroscopic determinationsError! Bookmark not defined.,Error! Bookmark not defined. of D0(OH) using a very short Birge-Sponer extrapolation on OH/OD A1S+. An exhaustive analysis of the latter approach, combined with the application of the same procedure on a calculated potential energy curve for the state in question, demonstrates that the Birge-Sponer extrapolation underestimates the bond dissociation energy, in spite of the fact that only the last vibrational level was not observed experimentally. The new values affect a large number of other thermochemical quantities which directly or indirectly rely on or refer to D0(H-OH), D0(OH), or DHf?(OH).

  14. Chemical Bonds I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical bonding is discussed from a bond energy, rather than a wave mechanics, viewpoint. This approach is considered to be more suitable for the average student. (The second part of the article will appear in a later issue of the journal.) (AL)

  15. Interfacial Rheology of Hydrogen-Bonded Polymer Multilayers Assembled at Liquid Interfaces: Influence of Anchoring Energy and Hydrophobic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Le Tirilly, Sandrine; Tregouët, Corentin; Reyssat, Mathilde; Bône, Stéphane; Geffroy, Cédric; Fuller, Gerald; Pantoustier, Nadège; Perrin, Patrick; Monteux, Cécile

    2016-06-21

    We study the 2D rheological properties of hydrogen-bonded polymer multilayers assembled directly at dodecane-water and air-water interfaces using pendant drop/bubble dilation and the double-wall ring method for interfacial shear. We use poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as a proton acceptor and a series of polyacrylic acids as proton donors. The PAA series of chains with varying hydrophobicity was fashioned from poly(acrylic acid), (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMAA), and a homemade hydrophobically modified polymer. The latter consisted of a PAA backbone covalently grafted with C12 moieties at 1% mol (referred to as PAA-1C12). Replacing PAA with the more hydrophobic PMAA provides a route for combining hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions to increase the strength and/or the number of links connecting the polyacid chains to PVP. This systematic replacement allows for control of the ability of the monomer units inside the absorbed polymer layer to reorganize as the interface is sheared or compressed. Consequently, the interplay of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions leads to control of the resistance of the polymer multilayers to both shear and dilation. Using PAA-1C12 as the first layer improves the anchoring energy of a few monomers of the chain without changing the strength of the monomer-monomer contact in the complex layer. In this way, the layer does not resist shear but resists compression. This strategy provides the means for using hydrophobicity to control the interfacial dynamics of the complexes adsorbed at the interface of the bubbles and droplets that either elongate or buckle upon compression. Moreover, we demonstrate the pH responsiveness of these interfacial multilayers by adding aliquots of NaOH to the acidic water subphase surrounding the bubbles and droplets. Subsequent pH changes can eventually break the polymer complex, providing opportunities for encapsulation/release applications. PMID:27176147

  16. Describing the chemical bonding in C70 and C70O3 - A quantum chemical topology study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bil, Andrzej; Latajka, Zdzisław; Hutter, Jürg; Morrison, Carole A.

    2014-03-01

    Cc-Cc and Ca-Cb bonds in C70 have dominant characteristics of double bonds, whereas the remaining six other types of bonds are single bonds with contributions from π-electron density. 'Single' bonds can act as active sites in chemical reactions which would typically require a multiple bond, such as addition of an ozone molecule, due to the fact that all adjacent bonds can serve as an efficient source of π-electron density. Thus any alteration in the electron density distribution following functionalization has far-reaching impact. We note that formation of the most stable ozonide isomer causes the smallest total perturbation in the electron density of the parent fullerene and C-C bond evolution correlates well with the shape of the minimum energy path for the ozone ring opening reaction on the fullerene surface. Finally, we observe that the O-O bond in C70O3 is protocovalent, and as such resembles the O-O bond in H2O2.

  17. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distancesmore » determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction of the catalytic properties of numerous supported metal complexes, as summarized in detail here.« less

  18. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distances determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction

  19. Athermal fracture of covalent bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1999-08-01

    Most fracture is athermal. Either because it occurs at low temperatures or because it occurs too fast for thermal activation to be effective. Thus it must be directly activated by applied stresses. This can occur via quantum tunneling when the chemical bonding of a solid resides in localized (covalent) bonds. Then applied stresses can cause the bonding electrons to become delocalized (anti-bonded) through quantum tunneling. That is, the bonds become broken. The process is related to the Zener tunneling process that is thought to be responsible for dielectric breakdown in semiconductors. Under a driving force, bonding electrons tunnel at constant energy from their bonding states into anti-bonding states through the forbidden gap in the bonding energy spectrum.

  20. Strong-field dissociative ionization of a linear triatomic molecule: Relationship between Coulomb-explosion energies and bond angle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Zhang, G.; Hill, W.T. III

    2003-12-01

    Correlation images of the symmetric six-electron Coulomb-explosion channel of CO{sub 2} were used to isolate specific geometries (linear and bent) for angular-resolved analysis of the Coulomb-explosion energy in the framework of both the critical radius R{sub c} and dynamic screening models. We show that it is possible to connect the R{sub c} and screening pictures through a single parameter, a charge defect {sigma}, which depends on the charge state and the ratio between R{sub c} and the equilibrium bond length. Our data show that R{sub c} and hence {sigma} are slow varying functions of bond angle between 145 deg. and 180 deg. with R{sub c}{approx}4 a.u. and {sigma}{approx}0.5 for the symmetric six-electron channel of CO{sub 2}. In the R{sub c} picture, the experimental value for R{sub c} is consistent with a theoretical value associated with CO{sub 2}{sup 3+}, which is considerably smaller than that associated with CO{sub 2}{sup +}({approx}6 a.u.)

  1. Adsorption of Water Monomer and Clusters on Platinum(111) Terrace and Related Steps and Kinks I. Configurations, Energies, and Hydrogen Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Arnadottir, Liney; Stuve, Eric M.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2010-10-01

    Adsorption and rotation of water monomer, dimer, and trimer on the (111) terrace, (221) and (322) stepped, and (763) and (854) kinked surfaces of platinum were studied by density functional theory calculations using the PW91 approximation to the energy functional. On the (111) terrace, water monomer and the donor molecule of the dimer and trimer adsorb at atop sites. The permolecule adsorption energies of the monomer, dimer, and trimer are 0.30, 0.45, and 0.48 eV, respectively. Rotation of monomers, dimers, and trimers on the terrace is facile with energy barriers of 0.02 eV or less. Adsorption on steps and kinks is stronger than on the terrace, as evidenced by monomer adsorption energies of 0.46 to 0.55 eV. On the (221) stepped surface the zigzag extended configuration is most stable with a per-molecule adsorption energy of 0.57 eV. On the (322) stepped surface the dimer, two configurations of the trimer, and the zigzag configuration have similar adsorption energies of 0.55 ± 0.02 eV. Hydrogen bonding is strongest in the dimer and trimer adsorbed on the terrace, with respective energies of 0.30 and 0.27 eV, and accounts for their increased adsorption energies relative to the monomer. Hydrogen bonding is weak to moderate for adsorption at steps, with energies of 0.04 to 0.15 eV, as the much stronger water-metal interactions inhibit adsorption geometries favorable to hydrogen bonding. Correlations of hydrogen bond angles and energies with hydrogen bond lengths are presented. On the basis of these DFT/PW91 results, a model for water cluster formation on the Pt(111) surface can be formulated where kink sites nucleate chains along the top of step edges, consistent with the experimental findings of Morgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 77 (1996) 703.

  2. Core ionization energies of amides as a probe of structure and bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Arthur; Moore, David T.

    1997-09-01

    Core orbital energies are computed for planar ground-state and rotational transition-state structures for formamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide using ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the 6-31G∗ level. Distortion of the amide linkage decreases the core ionization energy of nitrogen and increases the core ionization energies of oxygen and the carbonyl carbon. Similar trends are observed for bridgehead bicyclic lactams and are corroborated by the limited experimental data available. A simple interpretation can be made in the language of resonance theories through reference to contributions of three canonical structures ( 1A-1C) and in particular, the reduced contribution of 1B in distorted amides.

  3. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  4. Thermodynamics of proton transfer in phenol-acetate hydrogen bonds with large proton polarizability and the conversion of light energy into chemical energy in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, H.; Tangermann, U.; Zundel, G.

    1986-11-20

    Phenol-acetate solutions in CCl/sub 4/ are studied by IR spectroscopy as a function of the pK/sub a/ of the phenols. The (I) Ar-OH.../sup -/OC in equilibrium Ar-O/sup -/...HOC (II) hydrogen bonds formed show large proton polarizability as indicated by continua in the IR spectra. The percent proton transfer (PT) increases from the p-cresol-acetate to the pentachlorophenol-acetate system from 0% to 56%. The Gibbs free energy, ..delta..G/sup 0//sub PT/, values of the PT equilibria at 295 K are determined as well as the standard enthalpy values, ..delta..H/sup 0//sub PT/, and the standard entropy values, ..delta..S/sup 0//sub PT. The shape of the intensity of the continuum as a function of the ..delta..H/sup 0//sub PT/ value changes. In the classical approximation the average difference between the two minima of the proton double-minimum potential is given by ..delta..H/sup 0//sub PT/. With the decreasing amount of ..delta..H/sup 0//sub PT/, i.e., decreasing degree of asymmetry, the intensity of the continua decreases at higher and increases at lower wavenumbers. This result is in good agreement with the predictions from calculated line spectra. In the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin a tyrosine-aspartate hydrogen bond is probably of importance for the conversion of light energy into chemical energy. On the basis of the obtained data it is shown that 9.5 kJ/mol can be converted into chemical energy due to a proton transfer induced by a local electrical field in a Tyr-Asp hydrogen bond. Furthermore, if the Ar-O/sup -/...HOC structure is broken afterwards by a conformation change, at least 25 kJ/mol of conformation energy is converted. Thus, altogether 34.5 kJ/mol of Gibbs free energy may be converted into chemical energy and stored by these processes.

  5. Metastable innershell molecular state (MIMS) III: The universal binding energy and bond length of the homonucleus K-shell MIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Young K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the discovery of a universal Z2-dependency of the binding energy of the homonucleus K-shell MIMS (K-MIMS: Metastable Innershell Molecular State bound by K-shell electrons), which has been established by analyzing extensive existing experimental data over several decades. An intuitive analytical theory on the K-MIMS has been developed for the homologous molecules to the He*2 excimer, which elucidates the universal Z-dependent behavior of the K-MIMS. The theory predicts a 1 / Z-dependency of the K-MIMS bond length, which is in agreement with the quasimolecule sizes estimated from the x-ray generation cross-sections in H-like Bi82+ and U91+ impact on Au solids.

  6. Theoretical study of the C-H bond dissociation energies of CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and H2C2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The successive C-H bond dissociation energies of CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and H2C2O (ketene) are determined using large-basis sets and a high level of correlation treatment. For CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 the computed values are in excellent agreement with experiment. Using these results, the values 107.9 + or - 2.0 and 96.7 + or - 2.0 kcal/mol are recommended for the C-H bond dissociation energies of H2C2O and HC2O, respectively.

  7. Defect structures in deformed F.C.C. metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; Victoria, M.

    1997-08-01

    A high density of small defect clusters, similar to those observed in irradiated or quenched metals, has been observed in the deformed f.c.c. metals Cu, Au and Ni. The preliminary results show that the defect clusters are predominantly stacking fault tetrahedral (SFT). The SFT number density, rather than the size distribution, is deformation dependent. The defect cluster density is greater in the vicinities of dislocation tangles and grain boundaries. Their size distribution is wider than that produced by irradiation with an important number of larger clusters being formed. It is argued that these deformation-produced clusters may play a role in determining the flow stress and work hardening at low deformations.

  8. SiC/C nanocomposites with inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Emelchenko, G A; Zhokhov, A A; Masalov, V M; Maximuk, M Yu; Fursova, T N; Bazhenov, A V; Zverkova, I I; Khasanov, S S; Steinman, E A; Tereshenko, A N

    2010-11-26

    The synthesis, morphology, structural and optical characteristics of SiC/C nanocomposites with an inverse opal lattice have been investigated. The samples were prepared by thermochemical treatment of opal matrices filled with carbon compounds which was followed by silicon dioxide dissolution. The samples were studied by electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, IR and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The electron microscopy data revealed a highly porous periodic structure which was a three-dimensional replica of the voids of the initial opal lattice. The hexagonal silicon carbide was found to be non-uniformly distributed throughout the volume, its greater part located in the surface layer up to 50 µm deep. The data of x-ray diffraction, IR and Raman scattering spectroscopy enabled us to assume that the composite had hexagonal diamond fragments. The photoluminescence and optical reflection spectra of the composites have been measured. PMID:21030770

  9. Size-extensivity-corrected multireference configuration interaction schemes to accurately predict bond dissociation energies of oxygenated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Oyeyemi, Victor B.; Krisiloff, David B.; Keith, John A.; Libisch, Florian; Pavone, Michele; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-01-28

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons play important roles in combustion science as renewable fuels and additives, but many details about their combustion chemistry remain poorly understood. Although many methods exist for computing accurate electronic energies of molecules at equilibrium geometries, a consistent description of entire combustion reaction potential energy surfaces (PESs) requires multireference correlated wavefunction theories. Here we use bond dissociation energies (BDEs) as a foundational metric to benchmark methods based on multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) for several classes of oxygenated compounds (alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and methyl esters). We compare results from multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction to those utilizing a posteriori and a priori size-extensivity corrections, benchmarked against experiment and coupled cluster theory. We demonstrate that size-extensivity corrections are necessary for chemically accurate BDE predictions even in relatively small molecules and furnish examples of unphysical BDE predictions resulting from using too-small orbital active spaces. We also outline the specific challenges in using MRCI methods for carbonyl-containing compounds. The resulting complete basis set extrapolated, size-extensivity-corrected MRCI scheme produces BDEs generally accurate to within 1 kcal/mol, laying the foundation for this scheme's use on larger molecules and for more complex regions of combustion PESs.

  10. Size-extensivity-corrected multireference configuration interaction schemes to accurately predict bond dissociation energies of oxygenated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Oyeyemi, Victor B; Krisiloff, David B; Keith, John A; Libisch, Florian; Pavone, Michele; Carter, Emily A

    2014-01-28

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons play important roles in combustion science as renewable fuels and additives, but many details about their combustion chemistry remain poorly understood. Although many methods exist for computing accurate electronic energies of molecules at equilibrium geometries, a consistent description of entire combustion reaction potential energy surfaces (PESs) requires multireference correlated wavefunction theories. Here we use bond dissociation energies (BDEs) as a foundational metric to benchmark methods based on multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) for several classes of oxygenated compounds (alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and methyl esters). We compare results from multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction to those utilizing a posteriori and a priori size-extensivity corrections, benchmarked against experiment and coupled cluster theory. We demonstrate that size-extensivity corrections are necessary for chemically accurate BDE predictions even in relatively small molecules and furnish examples of unphysical BDE predictions resulting from using too-small orbital active spaces. We also outline the specific challenges in using MRCI methods for carbonyl-containing compounds. The resulting complete basis set extrapolated, size-extensivity-corrected MRCI scheme produces BDEs generally accurate to within 1 kcal/mol, laying the foundation for this scheme's use on larger molecules and for more complex regions of combustion PESs. PMID:25669533

  11. Size-extensivity-corrected multireference configuration interaction schemes to accurately predict bond dissociation energies of oxygenated hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyeyemi, Victor B.; Krisiloff, David B.; Keith, John A.; Libisch, Florian; Pavone, Michele; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons play important roles in combustion science as renewable fuels and additives, but many details about their combustion chemistry remain poorly understood. Although many methods exist for computing accurate electronic energies of molecules at equilibrium geometries, a consistent description of entire combustion reaction potential energy surfaces (PESs) requires multireference correlated wavefunction theories. Here we use bond dissociation energies (BDEs) as a foundational metric to benchmark methods based on multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) for several classes of oxygenated compounds (alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and methyl esters). We compare results from multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction to those utilizing a posteriori and a priori size-extensivity corrections, benchmarked against experiment and coupled cluster theory. We demonstrate that size-extensivity corrections are necessary for chemically accurate BDE predictions even in relatively small molecules and furnish examples of unphysical BDE predictions resulting from using too-small orbital active spaces. We also outline the specific challenges in using MRCI methods for carbonyl-containing compounds. The resulting complete basis set extrapolated, size-extensivity-corrected MRCI scheme produces BDEs generally accurate to within 1 kcal/mol, laying the foundation for this scheme's use on larger molecules and for more complex regions of combustion PESs.

  12. Low-energy physical properties of high- Tc superconducting Cu oxides: A comparison between the resonating valence bond and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Yu; Shih, C. T.; Chou, C. P.; Huang, S. M.; Lee, T. K.; Xiang, T.; Zhang, F. C.

    2006-06-01

    In a recent review by Anderson and co-workers, it was pointed out that an early resonating valence bond (RVB) theory is able to explain a number of unusual properties of high-temperature superconducting (SC) Cu oxides. Here we extend previous calculations to study more systematically the low-energy physical properties of the plain vanilla d -wave RVB state, and to compare the results with the available experiments. We use a renormalized mean-field theory combined with variational Monte Carlo and power Lanczos methods to study the RVB state of an extended t-J model in a square lattice with parameters suitable for the hole-doped Cu oxides. The physical observable quantities we study include the specific heat, the linear residual thermal conductivity, the in-plane magnetic penetration depth, the quasiparticle energy at the antinode (π,0) , the superconducting energy gap, the quasiparticle spectra, and the Drude weights. The traits of nodes (including kF , the Fermi velocity vF , and the velocity along Fermi surface v2 ), and the SC order parameter are studied. Comparisons of the theory and the experiments in cuprates show an overall qualitative agreement, especially on their doping dependences.

  13. 30 CFR 281.33 - Bonds and bonding requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 281.33 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... a surety or personal bond to guarantee payment of a deferred portion of the bid. Upon the payment of the full amount of the cash bonus bid, the lessee's bond will be released. (b) All bonds to...

  14. Theoretical study of the OH addition to the endocyclic and exocyclic double bonds of the d-limonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Ramírez, Víctor M.; Nebot-Gil, Ignacio

    2005-06-01

    The initial step of the d-limonene + OH gas-phase reaction mechanism was investigated by means of ab initio calculations. We have considered eight different possibilities for the OH addition, corresponding to the two C-C double bonds, the two C atoms of each double bond, and the syn or anti orientation, with respect to the isopropenyl group (endocyclic attack) or the ring cycle (exocyclic attack). Activation energies calculated at the QCISD(T)/6-31G(d)//UMP2/6-31G(d) level, show that there are preferred orientations for the OH addition under atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure.

  15. The Efficacy of Interactive Analogical Models in the Instruction of Bond Energy Curves in Undergraduate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahani, Vijay M.; Jenkinson, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    We explored analogies used for introducing students to the concept of potential energy wells. Two analogy systems were developed, a spring system and a novel system consisting of electrostatic spheres. These two, distinct analogies were housed within an interactive tool that allowed students to manipulate the analogous systems and witness changes…

  16. Demystifying Introductory Chemistry. Part 3: Ionization Energies, Electronegativity, Polar Bonds, and Partial Charges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, James; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Shows how ionization energies provide a convenient method for obtaining electronegativity values that is simpler than the conventional methods. Demonstrates how approximate atomic charges can be calculated for polar molecules and how this method of determining electronegativities may lead to deeper insights than are typically possible for the…

  17. A Simple Test to Determine the Effectiveness of Different Braze Compositions for Joining Ti-Tubes to C/C Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah; Asthana, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    A simple tube-plate joint tensile test was implemented to compare the effectiveness of commercial brazes, namely, TiCuNi, TiCuSil, and Cu-ABA, used for bonding Ti-tubes joined to C-C composite plates. The different braze systems yielded different; yet, repeatable results. The Cu-ABA system proved to have about twice the load-carrying ability of the other two systems due to the fact that the bonded area between the braze material and the C-C plate was largest for this system. The orientation of the surface fiber tows also had a significant effect on load-carrying ability with tows oriented perpendicular to the tube axis displaying the highest failure loads. Increasing the process load and modifying the surface of the C-C plate by grooving out channels for the Ti-Tube to nest in resulted in increased load-carrying ability for the TiCuSil and Cu-ABA systems due to increased bonded area and better penetration of the braze material into the C-C composite.

  18. Low energy electron induced cytosine base release in 2′-deoxycytidine-3′-monophosphate via glycosidic bond cleavage: A time-dependent wavepacket study

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran, Renjith; Sarma, Manabendra

    2014-09-14

    Low energy electron (LEE) induced cytosine base release in a selected pyrimidine nucleotide, viz., 2′-deoxycytidine-3′-monophosphate is investigated using ab initio electronic structure methods and time dependent quantum mechanical calculations. It has been noted that the cytosine base scission is comparatively difficult process than the 3′ C–O bond cleavage from the lowest π{sup *} shape resonance in energy region <1 eV. This is mainly due to the high activation energy barrier associated with the electron transfer from the π{sup *} orbital of the base to the σ{sup *} orbital of the glycosidic N–C bond. In addition, the metastable state formed after impinging LEE (0–1 eV) has very short lifetime (10 fs) which may decay in either of the two competing auto-detachment or dissociation process simultaneously. On the other hand, the selected N–C mode may cleave to form the cytosine base anion at higher energy regions (>2 eV) via tunneling of the glycosidic bond. Resonance states generated within this energy regime will exist for a duration of ∼35–55 fs. Comparison of salient features of the two dissociation events, i.e., 3′ C–O single strand break and glycosidic N–C bond cleavage in 3′-dCMPH molecule are also provided.

  19. Low energy electron induced cytosine base release in 2'-deoxycytidine-3'-monophosphate via glycosidic bond cleavage: A time-dependent wavepacket study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Renjith; Sarma, Manabendra

    2014-09-01

    Low energy electron (LEE) induced cytosine base release in a selected pyrimidine nucleotide, viz., 2'-deoxycytidine-3'-monophosphate is investigated using ab initio electronic structure methods and time dependent quantum mechanical calculations. It has been noted that the cytosine base scission is comparatively difficult process than the 3' C-O bond cleavage from the lowest π* shape resonance in energy region <1 eV. This is mainly due to the high activation energy barrier associated with the electron transfer from the π* orbital of the base to the σ* orbital of the glycosidic N-C bond. In addition, the metastable state formed after impinging LEE (0-1 eV) has very short lifetime (10 fs) which may decay in either of the two competing auto-detachment or dissociation process simultaneously. On the other hand, the selected N-C mode may cleave to form the cytosine base anion at higher energy regions (>2 eV) via tunneling of the glycosidic bond. Resonance states generated within this energy regime will exist for a duration of ˜35-55 fs. Comparison of salient features of the two dissociation events, i.e., 3' C-O single strand break and glycosidic N-C bond cleavage in 3'-dCMPH molecule are also provided.

  20. Ab initio study of β-lactam antibiotics. I. Potential energy surface for the amidic CN bond breaking in the β-lactam + OH - reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrongolo, Carlo; Ranghino, Graziella; Scordamaglia, Raimondo

    1980-01-01

    The potential energy surface of the β-lactam + OH - reaction, related to the mode of action of β-lactam antibiotics, was investigated using the ab initio Hartree—Fock method with the STO-3G basis set. Three possible reaction paths for the B A C2 breaking of the amidic CN bond were obtained and discussed. The minimum-energy reaction path is characterized by the following processes: (1) the formation of a tetrahedral intermediate, ≈ 121 kcal mol -1 more stable than the reagents; (2) a barrier, ≈ 15 kcal mol -1 above the intermediate, which is mainly due to the partial breaking of the amidic bond; (3) the complete breaking of the amidic bond concerted with a proton transfer till the formation of the final product, ≈ 34 kcal mol -1 more stable than the intermediate. The evolution of some molecular orbitals and of the electron population along the reaction path was also discussed.

  1. The Electronegativity Analysis of c-C4F8 as a Potential Insulation Substitute of SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoling; Jiao, Juntao; Li, Bing; Xiao, Dengming

    2016-03-01

    The density distributions related to gas electronegativity for c-C4F8 gas, including negative ion, electron number and electron energy densities in the discharge process, are derived theoretically in both plane-to-plane and point-to-plane electrode geometries. These calculations have been performed through the Boltzmann equation in the condition of a steady-state Townsend (SST) experiment and a fluid model in the condition of both uniform and non-uniform electric fields. The electronegativity coefficients a = n-/ne of c-C4F8 and SF6 are compared to further describe the electron affinity of c-C4F8. The result shows that c-C4F8 represents an obvious electron-attachment performance in the discharge process. However, c-C4F8 still has much weaker gas electronegativity than SF6, whose electronegativity coefficient is lower than that of SF6 by at least three orders of magnitude. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51337006)

  2. Surface-catalyzed C-C covalent coupling strategies toward the synthesis of low-dimensional carbon-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qitang; Gottfried, J Michael; Zhu, Junfa

    2015-08-18

    Carbon-based nanostructures have attracted tremendous interest because of their versatile and tunable properties, which depend on the bonding type of the constituting carbon atoms. Graphene, as the most prominent representative of the π-conjugated carbon-based materials, consists entirely of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms and exhibits a zero band gap. Recently, countless efforts were made to open and tune the band gap of graphene for its applications in semiconductor devices. One promising method is periodic perforation, resulting in a graphene nanomesh (GNM), which opens the band gap while maintaining the exceptional transport properties. However, the typically employed lithographic approach for graphene perforation is difficult to control at the atomic level. The complementary bottom-up method using surface-assisted carbon-carbon (C-C) covalent coupling between organic molecules has opened up new possibilities for atomically precise fabrication of conjugated nanostructures like GNM and graphene nanoribbons (GNR), although with limited maturity. A general drawback of the bottom-up approach is that the desired structure usually does not represent the global thermodynamic minimum. It is therefore impossible to improve the long-range order by postannealing, because once the C-C bond formation becomes reversible, graphene as the thermodynamically most stable structure will be formed. This means that only carefully chosen precursors and reaction conditions can lead to the desired (non-graphene) material. One of the most popular and frequently used organic reactions for on-surface C-C coupling is the Ullmann reaction of aromatic halides. While experimentally simple to perform, the irreversibility of the C-C bond formation makes it a challenge to obtain long-range ordered nanostructures. With no postreaction structural improvement possible, the assembly process must be optimized to result in defect-free nanostructures during the initial reaction, requiring complete

  3. A quinone-assisted photoformation of energy-rich chemical bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Adachi, T.; Stillwell, W.

    1980-01-01

    In a study of biochemical means of solar energy conversion, ADP and inorganic phosphates were converted to ATP by white light in the nonaqueous solvent dimethylformamide in the presence of tetrachloro-p-quinone or ubiquinone. Conversion of ADP to ATP has been accomplished in aqueous suspension by the use of cell-like structures aggregated from poly(aspartic acid, glutamic acid, tyrosine). This is believed to occur through the formation of dopaquinone in the peptide structure during illumination. The way in which the quantitative yield of ATP has been influenced by pH and by added substances, such as FeCl2, was studied.

  4. Compositions and chemical bonding in ceramics by quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Horton, L.L.; McHargue, C.J.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B.; Revcolevschi, A.; Tanaka, S.; Davis, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    Quantitative electron energy-loss spectrometry was applied to a range of ceramic materials at a spatial resolution of <5 nm. Analysis of Fe L{sub 23} white lines indicated a low-spin state with a charge transfer of {approximately}1.5 electrons/atom onto the Fe atoms implanted into (amorphized) silicon carbide. Gradients of 2 to 5% in the Co:O stoichiometry were measured across 100-nm-thick Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} layers in an oxidized directionally solidified CoO-ZrO{sub 2} eutectic, with the highest O levels near the ZrO{sub 2}. The energy-loss near-edge structures were dramatically different for the two cobalt oxides; those for CO{sub 3}O{sub 4} have been incorrectly ascribed to CoO in the published literature. Kinetically stabilized solid solubility occurred in an AlN-SiC film grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on {alpha}(6H)-SiC, and no detectable interdiffusion occurred in couples of MBE-grown AlN on SiC following annealing at up to 1750C. In diffusion couples of polycrystalline AlN on SiC, interfacial 8H sialon (aluminum oxy-nitride) and pockets of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rich {beta}{prime} sialon in the SiC were detected.

  5. Ultrasonically bonded value assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvinski, R. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A valve apparatus capable of maintaining a fluid-tight seal over a relatively long period of time by releasably bonding a valve member to its seat is described. The valve member is bonded or welded to the seat and then released by the application of the same energy to the bond joint. The valve member is held in place during the bonding by a clamping device. An appropriate force device can activate the opening and closing of the valve member. Various combinations of material for the valve member and valve seat can be utilized to provide an adequate sealing bond. Aluminum oxide, stainless steel, inconel, tungsten carbide as hard materials and copper, aluminum, titanium, silver, and gold as soft materials are suggested.

  6. Organohelium compounds: structures, stabilities and chemical bonding analyses.

    PubMed

    Fourré, Isabelle; Alvarez, Elsa; Chaquin, Patrick

    2014-02-24

    This paper deals with the possibility of forming short and relatively strong carbon-helium bonds in small typical organic molecules through substitution of one or several H atoms by He(+). A structural and energetics study (based on high-level calculations) of this unusual bonding, as well as a topological characterization of the resulting cations, is undertaken. Stable species generally requires substitution of about half of the hydrogen atoms for formation. Under these conditions, the number of such species appears to be potentially unlimited. "True" C-He bonds exhibit equilibrium distances ranging from 1.327 (C2H2He2(2+)) to 1.129 Å (He2CO(2+)). The energies of neutral He releasing range from approximately 5 kcal mol(-1) [He2CO(2+), (Z)-C2H2He2(2+)] to 25 kcal mol(-1) (C2HHe3(3+)), but remain most frequently around 10 kcal mol(-1). However, most of He(+)-substituted hydrocarbons are metastable with respect to C-C cleavage, except derivatives of ethene. Atoms in molecules (AIM) and electron localization function (ELF) topological descriptors classify the C-He bond as a weak charge-shift interaction [S. Shaik, D. Danovich, B. Silvi, D. L. Lauvergnat, P. C. Hiberty, Chem. Eur. J. 2005, 11, 6358-6371] in agreement with a recent publication by Rzepa [S. H. Rzepa, Nat. Chem. 2010, 2, 390-393]. He2CO(2+) is the only investigated compound that presents a C-He bonding ELF basin, which indicates a non-negligible covalent contribution to the bond. Other modifications in the electronic structure, such as the breaking of the triple bond in ethyne derivatives or the loss of aromaticity in C6H3He3(3+), are also nicely revealed by the ELF topology. PMID:24488791

  7. Free Energy Diagram for the Heterogeneous Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Glycosidic Bonds in Cellulose*

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Trine Holst; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and thermodynamic data have been analyzed according to transition state theory and a simplified reaction scheme for the enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose. For the cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), we were able to measure or collect relevant values for all stable and activated complexes defined by the reaction scheme and hence propose a free energy diagram for the full heterogeneous process. For other Cel7A enzymes, including variants with and without carbohydrate binding module (CBM), we obtained activation parameters for the association and dissociation of the enzyme-substrate complex. The results showed that the kinetics of enzyme-substrate association (i.e. formation of the Michaelis complex) was almost entirely entropy-controlled and that the activation entropy corresponded approximately to the loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the dissolved enzyme. This implied that the transition state occurred early in the path where the enzyme has lost these degrees of freedom but not yet established extensive contact interactions in the binding tunnel. For dissociation, a similar analysis suggested that the transition state was late in the path where most enzyme-substrate contacts were broken. Activation enthalpies revealed that the rate of dissociation was far more temperature-sensitive than the rates of both association and the inner catalytic cycle. Comparisons of one- and two-domain variants showed that the CBM had no influence on the transition state for association but increased the free energy barrier for dissociation. Hence, the CBM appeared to promote the stability of the complex by delaying dissociation rather than accelerating association. PMID:26183776

  8. JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgast, Paul; Pechkam, Paul

    2007-01-01

    JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK (JMS signifies "Java messaging service" and "SDK" signifies "software development kit") is a software package for developing interfaces that enable legacy programs (here denoted "clients") written in the C and C++ languages to communicate with each other via a JMS broker. This package consists of two main components: the JMS proxy server component and the client C library SDK component. The JMS proxy server component implements a native Java process that receives and responds to requests from clients. This component can run on any computer that supports Java and a JMS client. The client C library SDK component is used to develop a JMS client program running in each affected C or C++ environment, without need for running a Java virtual machine in the affected computer. A C client program developed by use of this SDK has most of the quality-of-service characteristics of standard Java-based client programs, including the following: Durable subscriptions; Asynchronous message receipt; Such standard JMS message qualities as "TimeToLive," "Message Properties," and "DeliveryMode" (as the quoted terms are defined in previously published JMS documentation); and Automatic reconnection of a JMS proxy to a restarted JMS broker.

  9. Molecular Structure and Bonding in Plutonium Carbides: A Theoretical Study of PuC3.

    PubMed

    Molpeceres, Germán; Rayón, Víctor M; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2016-04-14

    The most relevant species of plutonium tricarbide were characterized using theoretical methods. The global minimum is predicted to be a fan structure where the plutonium atom is bonded to a quasi-linear C3 unit. A rhombic isomer, shown to be a bicyclic species with transannular C-C bonding, lies about 39 kJ/mol above the fan isomer. A linear PuCCC isomer and a three-membered ring CPuC2 isomer were found to be higher in energy (150 and 195 kJ/mol, respectively, above the predicted global minimum). The possible processes for the formation of these species are discussed, and the IR spectra were predicted to help in possible experimental detection. The nature of the Pu-C interaction has been analyzed in terms of a topological analysis of the electronic density, showing that Pu-C bonding is essentially ionic with a certain degree of covalent character. PMID:27010701

  10. Spectroscopic constants of diatomic molecules computed correcting Hartree-Fock or general-valence-bond potential-energy curves with correlation-energy functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M.; San-Fabián, Emilio; Moscardó, Federico

    1992-04-01

    The Kohn-Sham energy with exact exchange [using the exact Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange but an approximate correlation-energy functional] may be computed very accurately by adding the correlation obtained from the HF density to the total HF energy. Three density functionals are used: local spin density (LSD), LSD with self-interaction correction, and LSD with generalized gradient correction. This scheme has been extended (Lie-Clementi, Colle-Salvetti, and Moscardo-San-Fabian) to be used with general-valence-bond (GVB) energies and wave functions, so that the extra correlation included in the GVB energy is not counted again. The effect of all these approximate correlations on HF or GVB spectroscopic constants (Re,ωe, and De) is studied. Approximate relations showing how correlation affects them are derived, and may be summarized as follows: (1) the effect on Re and ωe depends only on the correlation derivative at Re, and (2) the effect on De depends mainly on the correlation difference between quasidissociated and equilibrium geometries. A consequence is that all the correlation corrections tested here give larger ωe and De and shorter Re than the uncorrected HF or GVB values. This trend is correct for De for both HF and GVB. For Re and ωe, it is correct in most cases for GVB, but it often fails for the HF cases. A comparison is made with Kohn-Sham calculations with both exchange and correlation approximated. As a final conclusion, it is found that, within the present scheme, a qualitatively correct HF or GVB potential-energy curve, together with a correlation-energy approximation with correct dissociation behavior, is crucial for obtaining good estimates of spectroscopic constants.

  11. Institutional Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, M. June

    Institutional bonding was examined at a public, urban commuter college with exceptionally high attrition and visibly low morale. Changes in bonding and attrition were measured 6 years after a 2-year effort to develop school identity and student feelings of membership. It was found that a simple index of campus morale is provided by level of…

  12. The Effect of Tensile Stress on the Conformational Free Energy Landscape of Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Anjukandi, Padmesh; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Ribas–Arino, Jordi; Marx, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bridges are no longer considered to merely stabilize protein structure, but are increasingly recognized to play a functional role in many regulatory biomolecular processes. Recent studies have uncovered that the redox activity of native disulfides depends on their C–C–S–S dihedrals, and . Moreover, the interplay of chemical reactivity and mechanical stress of disulfide switches has been recently elucidated using force–clamp spectroscopy and computer simulation. The and angles have been found to change from conformations that are open to nucleophilic attack to sterically hindered, so–called closed states upon exerting tensile stress. In view of the growing evidence of the importance of C–C–S–S dihedrals in tuning the reactivity of disulfides, here we present a systematic study of the conformational diversity of disulfides as a function of tensile stress. With the help of force-clamp metadynamics simulations, we show that tensile stress brings about a large stabilization of the closed conformers, thereby giving rise to drastic changes in the conformational free energy landscape of disulfides. Statistical analysis shows that native TDi, DO and interchain Ig protein disulfides prefer open conformations, whereas the intrachain disulfide bridges in Ig proteins favor closed conformations. Correlating mechanical stress with the distance between the two –carbons of the disulfide moiety reveals that the strain of intrachain Ig protein disulfides corresponds to a mechanical activation of about 100 pN. Such mechanical activation leads to a severalfold increase of the rate of the elementary redox reaction step. All these findings constitute a step forward towards achieving a full understanding of functional disulfides. PMID:25286308

  13. Comment on ``Valence-bond theory and the evaluation of electronic energy matrix elements between nonorthogonal Slater determinants''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallup, G. A.

    1986-07-01

    In a recent article [Phys. Rev. A 31, 2107 (1985)] Leasure and Balint-Kurti claim to give a more efficient algorithm than any previously available for determining matrix elements of the Hamiltonian in valence-bond calculations. Actually, an algorithm of no significant difference and the same efficiency has been available since 1972 and has been applied to valence-bond calculations.

  14. Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-C/C-N Coupling of Imidates with α-Diazo Imidamide: Synthesis of Isoquinoline-Fused Indoles.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Li, Lei; Yu, Songjie; Li, Yunyun; Li, Xingwei

    2016-06-17

    Imidate esters and diazo compounds have been established as bifunctional substrates for the construction of biologically active fused heterocycles via rhodium-catalyzed C-H activation and C-C/C-N coupling. This reaction occurs under mild conditions with high efficiency, step economy, and low catalyst loading. PMID:27280947

  15. Energy and structure of bonds in the interaction of organic anions with layered double hydroxide nanosheets: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, A. A.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hybrid and hierarchical nanomaterials based on layered hydroxides and oxyhydroxides of metals is a swiftly progressing field in biomedicine. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) possess a large specific surface area, significant surface electric charge and biocompatibility. Their physical and structural properties enable them to adsorb various kinds of anionic species and to transport them into cells. However, possible side effects resulting from the interaction of LDH with anions of the intercellular and intracellular medium need to be considered, since such interaction can potentially disrupt ion transport, signaling processes, apoptosis, nutrition and proliferation of living cells. In the present paper molecular dynamics is used to determine the energies of interaction of organic anions (aspartic acid, glutamic acid and bicarbonate) with a fragment of layered double hydroxide Mg/Al-LDH. The average number of hydrogen bonds between the anions and the hydroxide surface and characteristic binding configurations are determined. Possible effects of LDH on the cell resulting from binding of protein fragments and replacement of native intracellular anions with delivered anions are considered.

  16. 3Drefine: Consistent Protein Structure Refinement by Optimizing Hydrogen Bonding Network and Atomic-Level Energy Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    One of the major limitations of computational protein structure prediction is the deviation of predicted models from their experimentally derived true, native structures. The limitations often hinder the possibility of applying computational protein structure prediction methods in biochemical assignment and drug design that are very sensitive to structural details. Refinement of these low-resolution predicted models to high-resolution structures close to the native state, however, has proven to be extremely challenging. Thus, protein structure refinement remains a largely unsolved problem. Critical assessment of techniques for protein structure prediction (CASP) specifically indicated that most predictors participating in the refinement category still did not consistently improve model quality. Here, we propose a two-step refinement protocol, called 3Drefine, to consistently bring the initial model closer to the native structure. The first step is based on optimization of hydrogen bonding (HB) network and the second step applies atomic-level energy minimization on the optimized model using a composite physics and knowledge-based force fields. The approach has been evaluated on the CASP benchmark data and it exhibits consistent improvement over the initial structure in both global and local structural quality measures. 3Drefine method is also computationally inexpensive, consuming only few minutes of CPU time to refine a protein of typical length (300 residues). PMID:22927229

  17. Energy and structure of bonds in the interaction of organic anions with layered double hydroxide nanosheets: A molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Tsukanov, A.A.; Psakhie, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hybrid and hierarchical nanomaterials based on layered hydroxides and oxyhydroxides of metals is a swiftly progressing field in biomedicine. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) possess a large specific surface area, significant surface electric charge and biocompatibility. Their physical and structural properties enable them to adsorb various kinds of anionic species and to transport them into cells. However, possible side effects resulting from the interaction of LDH with anions of the intercellular and intracellular medium need to be considered, since such interaction can potentially disrupt ion transport, signaling processes, apoptosis, nutrition and proliferation of living cells. In the present paper molecular dynamics is used to determine the energies of interaction of organic anions (aspartic acid, glutamic acid and bicarbonate) with a fragment of layered double hydroxide Mg/Al-LDH. The average number of hydrogen bonds between the anions and the hydroxide surface and characteristic binding configurations are determined. Possible effects of LDH on the cell resulting from binding of protein fragments and replacement of native intracellular anions with delivered anions are considered. PMID:26817816

  18. Energy and structure of bonds in the interaction of organic anions with layered double hydroxide nanosheets: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tsukanov, A A; Psakhie, S G

    2016-01-01

    The application of hybrid and hierarchical nanomaterials based on layered hydroxides and oxyhydroxides of metals is a swiftly progressing field in biomedicine. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) possess a large specific surface area, significant surface electric charge and biocompatibility. Their physical and structural properties enable them to adsorb various kinds of anionic species and to transport them into cells. However, possible side effects resulting from the interaction of LDH with anions of the intercellular and intracellular medium need to be considered, since such interaction can potentially disrupt ion transport, signaling processes, apoptosis, nutrition and proliferation of living cells. In the present paper molecular dynamics is used to determine the energies of interaction of organic anions (aspartic acid, glutamic acid and bicarbonate) with a fragment of layered double hydroxide Mg/Al-LDH. The average number of hydrogen bonds between the anions and the hydroxide surface and characteristic binding configurations are determined. Possible effects of LDH on the cell resulting from binding of protein fragments and replacement of native intracellular anions with delivered anions are considered. PMID:26817816

  19. Copper Complexes with NH-Imidazolyl and NH-Pyrazolyl Units and Determination of Their Bond Dissociation Gibbs Energies.

    PubMed

    Wilting, Alexander; Kügler, Merle; Siewert, Inke

    2016-02-01

    We synthesized two dinuclear copper complexes, which have ionizable N imidazole and N pyrazole protons in the ligand, respectively, and determined the BDFE of the hypothetical H atom transfer reactions Cu(II)(LH(-1)) + H(•) ↔ Cu(I)(L) in MeOH/H2O (BDFE: bond dissociation Gibbs (free) energy). The ligands have two adjacent N,N',O-binding pockets, which differ in one N-heterocycle: L(a) has an imidazole unit and L(c), a pyrazole unit. The copper(II) complexes of L(a) and L(c) have been characterized, and the substitution pattern has only little influence on the structural properties. The BDFEs of the hypothetical PCET reactions have been determined by means of the species distribution and the redox potentials of the involved species in MeOH/H2O (80/20 by weight). The pyrazole copper complex 3 exhibits a lower BDFE than the isoelectronic imidazole copper complex 1 (1, 292(3) kJ mol(-1); 3, 279(1) kJ mol(-1)). The difference is mainly caused by the higher acidity of the N pyrazole proton of 3 compared to the N imidazole proton of 1. The redox potentials of 1 and 3 are very similar. PMID:26788812

  20. Block-Localized Density Functional Theory (BLDFT), Diabatic Coupling, and Their Use in Valence Bond Theory for Representing Reactive Potential Energy Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cembran, Alessandro; Song, Lingchun; Mo, Yirong; Gao, Jiali

    2010-01-01

    A multistate density functional theory in the framework of the valence bond model is described. The method is based on a block-localized density functional theory (BLDFT) for the construction of valence-bond-like diabatic electronic states and is suitable for the study of electron transfer reactions and for the representation of reactive potential energy surfaces. The method is equivalent to a valence bond theory with the treatment of the localized configurations by using density functional theory (VBDFT). In VBDFT, the electron densities and energies of the valence bond states are determined by BLDFT. A functional estimate of the off-diagonal matrix elements of the VB Hamiltonian is proposed, making use of the overlap integral between Kohn–Sham determinants and the exchange-correlation functional for the ground state substituted with the transition (exchange) density. In addition, we describe an approximate approach, in which the off-diagonal matrix element is computed by wave function theory using block-localized Kohn–Sham orbitals. The key feature is that the electron density of the adiabatic ground state is not directly computed nor used to obtain the ground-state energy; the energy is determined by diagonalization of the multistate valence bond Hamiltonian. This represents a departure from the standard single-determinant Kohn–Sham density functional theory. The multistate VBDFT method is illustrated by the bond dissociation of H2+ and a set of three nucleophilic substitution reactions in the DBH24 database. In the dissociation of H2+, the VBDFT method yields the correct asymptotic behavior as the two protons stretch to infinity, whereas approximate functionals fail badly. For the SN2 nucleophilic substitution reactions, the hybrid functional B3LYP severely underestimates the barrier heights, while the approximate two-state VBDFT method overcomes the self-interaction error, and overestimates the barrier heights. Inclusion of the ionic state in a three

  1. Interlayer bonding in IIb chlorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.; Giese, R.F. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The interlayer bond energy of a IIb-4 chlorite has been calculated as a function of layer charge, the site of the charge and the selective replacement of hydroxyl groups by fluoride ions. Long hydrogen bonds between the hydroxide sheet and the adjacent oxygens are strong and by themselves sufficient to create a stable structure. Coupled substitutions giving the 2:1 layer a negative charge and the hydroxide sheet a positive charge increase substantially the interlayer bond energy. 3 figures.

  2. A polarizable dipole-dipole interaction model for evaluation of the interaction energies for N-H···O=C and C-H···O=C hydrogen-bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Shi; Huang, Cui-Ying; Hao, Jiao-Jiao; Wang, Chang-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    In this article, a polarizable dipole-dipole interaction model is established to estimate the equilibrium hydrogen bond distances and the interaction energies for hydrogen-bonded complexes containing peptide amides and nucleic acid bases. We regard the chemical bonds N-H, C=O, and C-H as bond dipoles. The magnitude of the bond dipole moment varies according to its environment. We apply this polarizable dipole-dipole interaction model to a series of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing the N-H···O=C and C-H···O=C hydrogen bonds, such as simple amide-amide dimers, base-base dimers, peptide-base dimers, and β-sheet models. We find that a simple two-term function, only containing the permanent dipole-dipole interactions and the van der Waals interactions, can produce the equilibrium hydrogen bond distances compared favorably with those produced by the MP2/6-31G(d) method, whereas the high-quality counterpoise-corrected (CP-corrected) MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ interaction energies for the hydrogen-bonded complexes can be well-reproduced by a four-term function which involves the permanent dipole-dipole interactions, the van der Waals interactions, the polarization contributions, and a corrected term. Based on the calculation results obtained from this polarizable dipole-dipole interaction model, the natures of the hydrogen bonding interactions in these hydrogen-bonded complexes are further discussed. PMID:24497309

  3. A Novel Strategy for Preparation of Si-HA Coatings on C/C Composites by Chemical Liquid Vaporization Deposition/Hydrothermal Treatments.

    PubMed

    Xin-Bo, Xiong; Xin-Ye, Ni; Ya-Yun, Li; Cen-Cen, Chu; Ji-Zhao, Zou; Xie-Rong, Zeng

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy for the preparation of Si-doped hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) coatings on H2O2-treated carbon/carbon composites (C/C) was developed. HA coating was prepared on C/C through chemical liquid vaporization deposition (CLVD)/hydrothermal treatment. HA coating was immersed in an H2SiO3 solution at an autoclave at 413 K for transformation into Si-HA coating. The effects of H2SiO3 mass contents on the phase, morphology, and composition of the Si-HA coatings were studied through SEM, EDS,XRD, and FTIR. Their bonding performance to C/C was measured through a scratch test. Under the optimal content condition, the in vitro skull osteoblast response behaviors of the Si-HA coating were evaluated. Results showed that SiO3(2-) could enter into the HA lattice and occupy the PO4(3-) sites. Doped SiO3(2-) significantly improved the bonding performance of the HA coating to C/C in comparison with the untreated HA. The adhesive strength of the coatings initially increased and then decreased with increasing H2SiO3 content. Meanwhile, the cohesive strength of the Si-HA coatings was almost nearly identical. The Si-HA coating achieved at a content of 90% H2SiO3 exhibited the best bonding performance, and its osteoblast compatibility in vitro was superior to that of the untreated HA coating on C/C through CLVD/hydrothermal treatment. PMID:27492664

  4. A Novel Strategy for Preparation of Si-HA Coatings on C/C Composites by Chemical Liquid Vaporization Deposition/Hydrothermal Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Xin-bo, Xiong; Xin-ye, Ni; Ya-yun, Li; Cen-cen, Chu; Ji-zhao, Zou; Xie-rong, Zeng

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy for the preparation of Si-doped hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) coatings on H2O2-treated carbon/carbon composites (C/C) was developed. HA coating was prepared on C/C through chemical liquid vaporization deposition (CLVD)/hydrothermal treatment. HA coating was immersed in an H2SiO3 solution at an autoclave at 413 K for transformation into Si-HA coating. The effects of H2SiO3 mass contents on the phase, morphology, and composition of the Si-HA coatings were studied through SEM, EDS,XRD, and FTIR. Their bonding performance to C/C was measured through a scratch test. Under the optimal content condition, the in vitro skull osteoblast response behaviors of the Si-HA coating were evaluated. Results showed that SiO32− could enter into the HA lattice and occupy the PO43− sites. Doped SiO32− significantly improved the bonding performance of the HA coating to C/C in comparison with the untreated HA. The adhesive strength of the coatings initially increased and then decreased with increasing H2SiO3 content. Meanwhile, the cohesive strength of the Si-HA coatings was almost nearly identical. The Si-HA coating achieved at a content of 90% H2SiO3 exhibited the best bonding performance, and its osteoblast compatibility in vitro was superior to that of the untreated HA coating on C/C through CLVD/hydrothermal treatment. PMID:27492664

  5. A Novel Strategy for Preparation of Si-HA Coatings on C/C Composites by Chemical Liquid Vaporization Deposition/Hydrothermal Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin-Bo, Xiong; Xin-Ye, Ni; Ya-Yun, Li; Cen-Cen, Chu; Ji-Zhao, Zou; Xie-Rong, Zeng

    2016-08-01

    A novel strategy for the preparation of Si-doped hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) coatings on H2O2-treated carbon/carbon composites (C/C) was developed. HA coating was prepared on C/C through chemical liquid vaporization deposition (CLVD)/hydrothermal treatment. HA coating was immersed in an H2SiO3 solution at an autoclave at 413 K for transformation into Si-HA coating. The effects of H2SiO3 mass contents on the phase, morphology, and composition of the Si-HA coatings were studied through SEM, EDS,XRD, and FTIR. Their bonding performance to C/C was measured through a scratch test. Under the optimal content condition, the in vitro skull osteoblast response behaviors of the Si-HA coating were evaluated. Results showed that SiO32‑ could enter into the HA lattice and occupy the PO43‑ sites. Doped SiO32‑ significantly improved the bonding performance of the HA coating to C/C in comparison with the untreated HA. The adhesive strength of the coatings initially increased and then decreased with increasing H2SiO3 content. Meanwhile, the cohesive strength of the Si-HA coatings was almost nearly identical. The Si-HA coating achieved at a content of 90% H2SiO3 exhibited the best bonding performance, and its osteoblast compatibility in vitro was superior to that of the untreated HA coating on C/C through CLVD/hydrothermal treatment.

  6. Influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on bond durability of universal adhesives and surface free-energy characteristics of enamel.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of duration of phosphoric acid pre-etching on the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel. Three universal adhesives and extracted human molars were used. Two no-pre-etching groups were prepared: ground enamel; and enamel after ultrasonic cleaning with distilled water for 30 s to remove the smear layer. Four pre-etching groups were prepared: enamel pre-etched with phosphoric acid for 3, 5, 10, and 15 s. Shear bond strength (SBS) values of universal adhesive after no thermal cycling and after 30,000 or 60,000 thermal cycles, and surface free-energy values of enamel surfaces, calculated from contact angle measurements, were determined. The specimens that had been pre-etched showed significantly higher SBS and surface free-energy values than the specimens that had not been pre-etched, regardless of the aging condition and adhesive type. The SBS and surface free-energy values did not increase for pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. There were no significant differences in SBS values and surface free-energy characteristics between the specimens with and without a smear layer. The results of this study suggest that phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel improves the bond durability of universal adhesives and the surface free-energy characteristics of enamel, but these bonding properties do not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times of longer than 3 s. PMID:27315775

  7. NXY halogen bonds. Comparison with NHY H-bonds and CXY halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Binod; Scheiner, Steve

    2016-07-21

    Quantum calculations examine how the NHY H-bond compares to the equivalent NXY halogen bond, as well as to comparable CH/CX donors. Succinimide and saccharin, and their corresponding halogen-substituted derivatives, are chosen as the prototype NH/NX donors, paired with a wide range of electron donor molecules. The NHY H-bond is weakened if the bridging H is replaced by Cl, and strengthened by I; a Br halogen bond is roughly comparable to a H-bond. The lone pairs of the partner molecule are stronger electron donors than are π-systems. Whereas Coulombic forces represent the largest fraction of the attractive force in the H-bonds, induction energy is magnified in the halogen bonds, surpassing electrostatics in several cases. Mutation of NH/NX to CH/CX weakens the binding energy to roughly half its original value, while also lengthening the intermolecular distances by 0.3-0.8 Å. PMID:27327538

  8. Ablation properties of C/C-SiC composites tested on an arc heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jian; Zhang, Hongbo; Xiong, Xiang; Zuo, Jinglv; Tao, Huijin

    2011-11-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon and silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) composites were fabricated by a combination of chemical vapor infiltration and liquid silicon infiltration. Ablation properties of C/C-SiC composites and C/C composites with similar technique were tested on a high-pressure arc heater. The results show that ablation properties of C/C-SiC composites are more severe than those of C/C composites. Ablation of C/C-SiC composites includes oxidation, sublimation of SiC (Si), and mechanical denudation. Oxidation and sublimation of SiC (Si) lead to the enlarged ablation rates between carbon fibers and matrices, which finally cause serious ablation of C/C-SiC composites.

  9. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage of 1,2-hydroxy ethers b7 vanadium(V) dipicolinate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Susan K; Gordon, John C; Thorn, David L; Scott, Brian L; Baker, R Tom

    2009-01-01

    The development of alternatives to current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals is becoming increasingly important due to concerns over climate change, growing world energy demand, and energy security issues. Using non-food derived biomass to produce renewable feedstocks for chemicals and fuels is a particularly attractive possibility. However, the majority of biomass is in the form of lignocellulose, which is often not fully utilized due to difficulties associated with breaking down both lignin and cellulose. Recently, a number of methods have been reported to transform cellulose directly into more valuable materials such as glucose, sorbitol, 5-(chloromethyl)furfural, and ethylene glycol. Less progress has been made with selective transformations of lignin, which is typically treated in paper and forest industries by kraft pulping (sodium hydroxide/sodium sulfide) or incineration. Our group has begun investigating aerobic oxidative C-C bond cleavage catalyzed by dipicolinate vanadium complexes, with the idea that a selective C-C cleavage reaction of this type could be used to produce valuable chemicals or intermediates from cellulose or lignin. Lignin is a randomized polymer containing methoxylated phenoxy propanol units. A number of different linkages occur naturally; one of the most prevalent is the {beta}-O-4 linkage shown in Figure 1, containing a C-C bond with 1,2-hydroxy ether substituents. While the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of 1,2-diols has been reported for a number of metals, including vanadium, iron, manganese, ruthenium, and polyoxometalate complexes, C-C bond cleavage of 1,2-hydroxy ethers is much less common. We report herein vanadium-mediated cleavage of C-C bonds between alcohol and ether functionalities in several lignin model complexes. In order to explore the scope and potential of vanadium complexes to effect oxidative C-C bond cleavage in 1,2-hydroxy ethers, we examined the reactivity of the lignin model complexes pinacol monomethyl ether (A

  10. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  11. Polyhydrides of Platinum Group Metals: Nonclassical Interactions and σ-Bond Activation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Oliván, Montserrat

    2016-08-10

    The preparation, structure, dynamic behavior in solution, and reactivity of polyhydride complexes of platinum group metals, described during the last three decades, are contextualized from both organometallic and coordination chemistry points of view. These compounds, which contain dihydrogen, elongated dihydrogen, compressed dihydride, and classical dihydride ligands promote the activation of B-H, C-H, Si-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, C-N, and C-F, among other σ-bonds. In this review, it is shown that, unlike other more mature areas, the chemistry of polyhydrides offers new exciting conceptual challenges and at the same time the possibility of interacting with other fields including the conversion and storage of regenerative energy, organic synthetic chemistry, drug design, and material science. This wide range of possible interactions foresees promising advances in the near future. PMID:27268136

  12. A comparison of ab initio quantum-mechanical and experimental D0 binding energies of eleven H-bonded and eleven dispersion-bound complexes.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Susanta; Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-10-28

    Dissociation energies (D0) of 11 H-bonded and 11 dispersion-bound complexes were calculated as the sum of interaction energies and the change of zero-point vibrational energies (ΔZPVE). The structures of H-bonded complexes were optimized at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ level, at which deformation and harmonic ΔZPVE energies were also calculated. The structures of dispersion-bound complexes were optimized at the DFT-D3 level, and harmonic ΔZPVE energies were determined at the same level as well. For comparison, CCSD(T)/CBS D0 energies were also evaluated for both types of complexes. The CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energy was constructed as the sum of MP2/CBS interaction energy, extrapolated from aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, and ΔCCSD(T) correction, determined with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The ΔZPVE energies were determined for all complexes at the harmonic level and for selected complexes, these energies were also calculated using second-order vibration perturbation (VPT2) theory. For H-bonded complexes, the harmonic CCSD(T)/CBS D0 energies were in better agreement with the experimental values (with a mean relative error (MRE) of 6.2%) than the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ D0 (a MRE of 12.3%). The same trend was found for dispersion-bound complexes (6.2% (MRE) at CCSD(T)/CBS and 7.7% (MRE) at the DFT-D3 level). When the anharmonic ΔZPVE term was included instead of harmonic one, the agreement between theoretical and experimental D0 deteriorated for H-bonded as well as dispersion-bound complexes. Finally, the applicability of "diagonal approximation" for determining the anharmonic ΔZPVE was shown. For the phenolH2O complex, the ΔZPVE energy calculated at the VPT2 level and on the basis of "diagonal approximation" differed by less than 0.1 kcal mol(-1). PMID:26392236

  13. Impact of deformation energy on the hydrogen bonding interactions in gas phase 3-X catechol ⋯ H2O complexes (X = H, F, Cl, Br): The effect of approach of a water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Debojit Kumar; Sarkar, Biplab

    2016-06-01

    The conformations and nature of hydrogen bonding interactions for 3-X catechol ⋯ H2O (X = H, F, Cl, Br) has been investigated by ab initio MP2, CCSD(T), and density functional B3LYP, wB97XD and M06-2X methods. The changes in interaction energies due to deformation of the structures has been studied in detail. The intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions due to the different direction of approach of water molecule have been discussed. A detailed natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based energy decomposition analysis has been carried out to elucidate interaction strength and properties in these hydrogen bonded systems. The charge transfer percentage (CTP) has been derived which will be universally useful for correlating binding energy, deformation energy and the geometrical parameters such as angles, bond lengths, etc. for other systems as well.

  14. Electron transfer characterization of iron and cobalt porphyrins and copper complexes, and of their metal-carbon and metal-oxygen bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Qui, Aimin

    1992-12-31

    The electron-transfer and oxidation-reduction chemistry for the alkyl-iron and alkyl-cobalt porphyrins [(Por)M-R] and copper complexes has been investigated on the basis of cyclic voltammetric and controlled-potential-electrolysis measurements. Half-wave potentials for the oxidation and the reduction of (Por)M-R are directly influenced by the nature of the electron-donating or electron-withdrawing groups on the porphyrin ring and the structure of the alkyl groups. The redox potentials for a series of copper complexes are affected by the electron donating ability and the chelate effect of the ligands. Hydrolysis of the copper(II) cations (Cu{sup II}L{sub n}{sup 2+}) occurs in water. The reactivity of copper(I) complexes with dioxygen is directly related to the oxidation potential of the complexes in the solvent. The combination of Cu{sup I}(bpy)2{sup +} and tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide induces O{sub 2} activation to oxygenate methylenic carbon to ketones. Mechanistic schemes have been developed on the basis of electrochemical and spectrophotometric characteristics and reaction-product profiles for copper(II)-bis(bipyridine) [Cu{sup II}(bpy)2{sup 2+}]/base-induced activation of O{sub 2} to dehydrogenate primary alcohols to aldehydes. The free energies of bond formation (-{Delta}G{sub BF}) for the (Por)M-R and copper-ligand (oxygen or nitrogen) bonds have been determined from the redox potentials of the corresponding electrode reactions. The values of -{Delta}G{sub BF} are 14-35 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} for iron porphyrins and 20-38 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} for cobalt porphyrins which depend on the structures of the porphyrins and the alkyl groups. Apparent bond energies are 18-51 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} for the Cu{sup II}-L bonds are 46-78 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} for the Cu{sup I}-L bonds. The free energies of bond formation for the L{sub n}Cu{sup I}-OO bonds are 7-16 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}.

  15. Determination and interrelation of bond heterolysis and homolysis energies in solution. Final report, January 1988-August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    Solution phase heats of heterolysis Delta H(sub(het)) and homolysis Delta H(sub(homo)) were determined for covalent bonds that can be cleaved to produce resonance-stabilized carbenium ions, anions, and radicals. Simple and broadly applicable correlation equations were developed which relate Delta H(sub(het)) to ion stabilization properties pK(sub(R+5)) and pK(sub a) and relate Delta H(sub(homo)) to radical stabilization properties (AOPs and CRPs). Important conclusions from the study are: (1) there is no general correlation between Delta H(sub(het)) and Delta H(sub(homo)) which implies that heterolytic bond cleavage pathways in coal will be quite different than the homolytic bond cleavage pathways associated with coal thermolysis; (2) many covalent bonds in coal which require high temperature for homolytic cleavage may be susceptible to heterolytic cleavage under mild conditions; and (3) coal conversion process chemistry based upon heterolytic bond cleavage may be more selective and controllable than homolytic bond cleavage associated with coal thermolysis.

  16. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  17. Bonding structure of carbon nitride films by infrared ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskarakis, A.; Logothetidis, S.; Gioti, M.

    2001-09-01

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited by reactive sputtering to study the effect of the ion bombardment during deposition (IBD) on their bonding structure. Fourier-transform infrared (IR) ellipsometry (FTIRE) was used to identify and distinguish the characteristic bands of the sp3 C-N, sp2 C=N, sp1 (-C≡N, -N≡C) and the IR-inactive C=C bonds. The results are compared and discussed in view of the films' electronic behavior through the dielectric function ɛ(ω) in NIR-visible-UV region and with those obtained by nanoindentation measurements. The low-energy IBD is suggested to promote the homogeneous N distribution in the films, resulting in films with low hardness (~6 GPa) and stress. On the contrary, the high-energy IBD results in high-N concentration in localized regions of the films, where possibly the formation of fullerenelike and C3N4 structures is favored. Indeed, hardness values up to 45 GPa were measured at some regions of these films, along with the high stress and hardness that they exhibit. Their absorption due to π-->π* electronic transitions is higher and exhibit strong absorption ~1.6 eV where the low-energy IBD films are transparent. Furthermore, the effect of postdeposition thermal annealing to 900 °C on the bonding structure of the films was investigated. It was found that the structural modifications induced by the N removal from the carbon-nitrogen bonds depend on the bonding structure of the films, as determined by the IBD energy. The N evolution from sp3 C-N bonds is more intense in low-energy IBD films and more pronounced around 450 °C, while the C-N bonds of pentagons and C3N4 structures, contained mainly in high-energy IBD films, are more stable and break at higher temperatures. Above 600 °C, N is evolved from the sp2 C=N bonds, while the most stable structures (i.e., sp1 -N≡C and -C≡N groups) break above 700 °C. The thermal treatment differentially affects the electronic transitions; the π-->π* are almost stable, while

  18. Dispersion-correcting potentials can significantly improve the bond dissociation enthalpies and noncovalent binding energies predicted by density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    DiLabio, Gino A.; Koleini, Mohammad

    2014-05-14

    Dispersion-correcting potentials (DCPs) are atom-centered Gaussian functions that are applied in a manner that is similar to effective core potentials. Previous work on DCPs has focussed on their use as a simple means of improving the ability of conventional density-functional theory methods to predict the binding energies of noncovalently bonded molecular dimers. We show in this work that DCPs developed for use with the LC-ωPBE functional along with 6-31+G(2d,2p) basis sets are capable of simultaneously improving predicted noncovalent binding energies of van der Waals dimer complexes and covalent bond dissociation enthalpies in molecules. Specifically, the DCPs developed herein for the C, H, N, and O atoms provide binding energies for a set of 66 noncovalently bonded molecular dimers (the “S66” set) with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.21 kcal/mol, which represents an improvement of more than a factor of 10 over unadorned LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) and almost a factor of two improvement over LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) used in conjunction with the “D3” pairwise dispersion energy corrections. In addition, the DCPs reduce the MAE of calculated X-H and X-Y (X,Y = C, H, N, O) bond dissociation enthalpies for a set of 40 species from 3.2 kcal/mol obtained with unadorned LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) to 1.6 kcal/mol. Our findings demonstrate that broad improvements to the performance of DFT methods may be achievable through the use of DCPs.

  19. A mild route to mesoporous Mo2C-C hybrid nanospheres for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qing; Zhao, Xinyu; Xiao, Ying; Zhao, Di; Cao, Minhua

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we have developed a mild route to fabricate typically mesoporous Mo2C-C hybrid nanospheres based on a solvothermal synthesis and reduction-carbonization process. This work opens a low-temperature route to synthesize valuable carbides. The resultant Mo2C-C hybrid, for the first time, is used as an anode material in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Compared with bulk Mo2C, the Mo2C-C hybrid exhibits much better electrochemical performance. Remarkably, the hybrid electrode can deliver a specific capacity of over 670 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at 100 mA g-1, which is much higher than that of the bulk material (113 mA h g-1). Even cycled at a high current density of 1000 mA g-1, high capacities of around 400-470 mA h g-1 can still be retained for the Mo2C-C hybrid. It might benefit from the synergistic effect of the nanohybridization, effectively relieving the volume change during the repeated lithium insertion-extraction reactions and maintaining the integrity of the electrical connections. It is expected that the present synthesis strategy for the Mo2C-C hybrid can be extended to other nanostructured carbides with good energy storage performance.In this work, we have developed a mild route to fabricate typically mesoporous Mo2C-C hybrid nanospheres based on a solvothermal synthesis and reduction-carbonization process. This work opens a low-temperature route to synthesize valuable carbides. The resultant Mo2C-C hybrid, for the first time, is used as an anode material in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Compared with bulk Mo2C, the Mo2C-C hybrid exhibits much better electrochemical performance. Remarkably, the hybrid electrode can deliver a specific capacity of over 670 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at 100 mA g-1, which is much higher than that of the bulk material (113 mA h g-1). Even cycled at a high current density of 1000 mA g-1, high capacities of around 400-470 mA h g-1 can still be retained for the Mo2C-C hybrid. It might benefit from the synergistic effect of

  20. Metal Azolate/Carboxylate Frameworks as Catalysts in Oxidative and C-C Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tăbăcaru, Aurel; Xhaferaj, Nertil; Martins, Luísa M D R S; Alegria, Elisabete C B A; Chay, Rogério S; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Domasevitch, Konstantin V; Pombeiro, Armando J L; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio

    2016-06-20

    The five metal azolate/carboxylate (MAC) compounds [Cd(dmpzc)(DMF)(H2O)] (Cd-dmpzc), [Pd(H2dmpzc)2Cl2] (Pd-dmpzc), [Cu(Hdmpzc)2] (Cu-dmpzc), [Zn4O(dmpzc)3]·Solv (Zn-dmpzc·S), and [Co4O(dmpzc)3]·Solv (Co-dmpzc·S) were isolated by coupling 3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-carboxylic acid (H2dmpzc) to cadmium(II), palladium(II), copper(II), zinc(II), and cobalt(II) salts. While Cd-dmpzc and Pd-dmpzc had never been prepared in the past, for Cu-dmpzc, Zn-dmpzc·S, and Co-dmpzc·S we optimized alternative synthetic paths that, in the case of the copper(II) and cobalt(II) derivatives, are faster and grant higher yields than the previously reported ones. The crystal structure details were determined ab initio (Cd-dmpzc and Pd-dmpzc) or refined (Cu-dmpzc, Zn-dmpzc·S, and Co-dmpzc·S) by means of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). While Cd-dmpzc is a nonporous 3D MAC framework, Pd-dmpzc shows a 3D hybrid coordination/hydrogen-bonded network, in which Pd(H2dmpzc)2Cl2 monomers are present. The thermal behavior of the five MAC compounds was investigated by coupling thermal analysis to variable-temperature PXRD. Their catalytic activity was assessed in oxidative and C-C coupling reactions, with the copper(II) and cadmium(II) derivatives being the first nonporous MAC frameworks to be tested as catalysts. Cu-dmpzc is the most active catalyst in the partial oxidation of cyclohexane by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in acetonitrile (yields up to 12% after 9 h) and is remarkably active in the solvent-free microwave-assisted oxidation of 1-phenylethanol to acetophenone (yields up to 99% at 120 °C in only 0.5 h). On the other hand, activated Zn-dmpzc·S (Zn-dmpzc) is the most active catalyst in the Henry C-C coupling reaction of aromatic aldehydes with nitroethane, showing appreciable diastereoselectivity toward the syn-nitroalkanol isomer (syn:anti selectivity up to 79:21). PMID:27266480

  1. Acid gradient across plasma membrane can drive phosphate bond synthesis in cancer cells: acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25874623

  2. The Dissociation Energies of CH4 and C2H2 Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies of CH4 and C2H2 and their fragments are investigated using basis set extrapolations and high levels of correlation. The computed bond dissociation energies (D(sub e)) are accurate to within 0.2 kcal/mol. The agreement with the experimental (D(sub 0)) values is excellent if we assume that the zero-point energy of C2H is 9.18 kcal/mol. The effect of core (1s) correlation on the bond dissociation energies of C-H bonds is shown to vary from 0.2 to 0.7 kcal/mol and that for C-C bonds varies from 0.4 to 2.2 kcal/mol.

  3. Insulation bonding test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  4. The antimony-group 11 chemical bond: Dissociation energies of the diatomic molecules CuSb, AgSb, and AuSb

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, V.; Ciccioli, A. E-mail: andrea.ciccioli@uniroma1.it; Gigli, G. E-mail: andrea.ciccioli@uniroma1.it

    2014-02-14

    The intermetallic molecules CuSb, AgSb, and AuSb were identified in the effusive molecular beam produced at high temperature under equilibrium conditions in a double-cell-like Knudsen source. Several gaseous equilibria involving these species were studied by mass spectrometry as a function of temperature in the overall range 1349–1822 K, and the strength of the chemical bond formed between antimony and the group 11 metals was for the first time measured deriving the following thermochemical dissociation energies (D{sub 0}{sup ∘}, kJ/mol): 186.7 ± 5.1 (CuSb), 156.3 ± 4.9 (AgSb), 241.3 ± 5.8 (AuSb). The three species were also investigated computationally at the coupled cluster level with single, double, and noniterative quasiperturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)). The spectroscopic parameters were calculated from the potential energy curves and the dissociation energies were evaluated at the Complete Basis Set limit, resulting in an overall good agreement with experimental values. An approximate evaluation of the spin-orbit effect was also performed. CCSD(T) calculations were further extended to the corresponding group 11 arsenide species which are here studied for the first time and the following dissociation energies (D{sub 0}{sup ∘}, kJ/mol): 190 ± 10 (CuAs), 151 ± 10 (AgAs), 240 ± 15 (AuAs) are proposed. Taking advantage of the new experimental and computational information here presented, the bond energy trends along group 11 and 4th and 5th periods of the periodic table were analyzed and the bond energies of the diatomic species CuBi and AuBi, yet experimentally unobserved, were predicted on an empirical basis.

  5. Components of the Bond Energy in Polar Diatomic Molecules, Radicals, and Ions Formed by Group-1 and Group-2 Metal Atoms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoyu; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-07-14

    Although many transition metal complexes are known to have high multireference character, the multireference character of main-group closed-shell singlet diatomic molecules like BeF, CaO, and MgO has been less studied. However, many group-1 and group-2 diatomic molecules do have multireference character, and they provide informative systems for studying multireference character because they are simpler than transition metal compounds. The goal of the present work is to understand these multireference systems better so that, ultimately, we can apply what we learn to more complicated multireference systems and to the design of new exchange-correlation functionals for treating multireference systems more adequately. Fourteen main-group diatomic molecules and one triatomic molecule (including radicals, cations, and anions, as well as neutral closed-shell species) have been studied for this article. Eight of these molecules contain a group-1 element, and six contain a group-2 element. Seven of these molecules are multireference systems, and eight of them are single-reference systems. Fifty-three exchange-correlation functionals of 11 types [local spin-density approximation (LSDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA), nonseparable gradient approximation (NGA), global-hybrid GGA, meta-GGA, meta-NGA, global-hybrid meta GGA, range-separated hybrid GGA, range-separated hybrid meta-GGA, range-separated hybrid meta-NGA, and DFT augmented with molecular mechanics damped dispersion (DFT-D)] and the Hartree-Fock method have been applied to calculate the bond distance, bond dissociation energy (BDE), and dipole moment of these molecules. All of the calculations are converged to a stable solution by allowing the symmetry of the Slater determinant to be broken. A reliable functional should not only predict an accurate BDE but also predict accurate components of the BDE, so each bond dissociation energy has been decomposed into ionization potential (IP) of the electropositive

  6. Active Thermochemical Tables: Sequential Bond Dissociation Enthalpies of Methane, Ethane, and Methanol and the Related Thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ruscic, Branko

    2015-07-16

    Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) thermochemistry for the sequential bond dissociations of methane, ethane, and methanol systems were obtained by analyzing and solving a very large thermochemical network (TN). Values for all possible C-H, C-C, C-O, and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies at 298.15 K (BDE298) and bond dissociation energies at 0 K (D0) are presented. The corresponding ATcT standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of the resulting CHn, n = 4-0 species (methane, methyl, methylene, methylidyne, and carbon atom), C2Hn, n = 6-0 species (ethane, ethyl, ethylene, ethylidene, vinyl, ethylidyne, acetylene, vinylidene, ethynyl, and ethynylene), and COHn, n = 4-0 species (methanol, hydroxymethyl, methoxy, formaldehyde, hydroxymethylene, formyl, isoformyl, and carbon monoxide) are also presented. The ATcT thermochemistry of carbon dioxide, water, hydroxyl, and carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms is also included, together with the sequential BDEs of CO2 and H2O. The provenances of the ATcT enthalpies of formation, which are quite distributed and involve a large number of relevant determinations, are analyzed by variance decomposition and discussed in terms of principal contributions. The underlying reasons for periodic appearances of remarkably low and/or unusually high BDEs, alternating along the dissociation sequences, are analyzed and quantitatively rationalized. The present ATcT results are the most accurate thermochemical values currently available for these species. PMID:25760799

  7. Linear heterocyclic aromatic fluorescence compounds having various donor-acceptor spacers prepared by the combination of carbon-carbon bond and carbon-nitrogen bond cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Fu, Shu-Jun; Xu, Feng; Tao, Tao; Zhu, Hao-Yu; Cao, Kou-Sen; Huang, Wei; You, Xiao-Zeng

    2011-06-01

    A family of novel linear 1,10-phenanthroline-based (A-D-A-D-A) and oligothiophene-based (A-D-D-D-(D)-A) heterocyclic aromatic fluorescence compounds having N-containing imidazole and pyridine tails with effective π-conjugated systems, prepared by the combination of carbon-carbon (C-C) bond and carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bond cross-coupling reactions, is described. They have molecular lengths of more than 2.30 nm in the cases of 4, 6, 9, and 26, various D-A spacers, and certain N-coordination sites (phen, imidazole, and pyridine). X-ray single-crystal structures of 13 compounds reveal a variety of trans and cis configurations with different dihedral angles between adjacent aromatic heterocycles. Synthetic, computational, and spectral studies have been made to reveal the differences between cross-coupling approaches on the C-C bond and C-N bond formation as well as band gaps and energy levels and optical and electrochemical properties for related compounds. The influences of introducing a β-methyl group to the thiophene ring on reaction activity, solubility, and conformation of related compounds have also been discussed. PMID:21513323

  8. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  9. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  10. Modeling of the Reaction Mechanism of Enzymatic Radical C-C Coupling by Benzylsuccinate Synthase.

    PubMed

    Szaleniec, Maciej; Heider, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques and density functional theory calculations were performed to study the mechanism of enzymatic radical C-C coupling catalyzed by benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS). BSS has been identified as a glycyl radical enzyme that catalyzes the enantiospecific fumarate addition to toluene initiating its anaerobic metabolism in the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica, and this reaction represents the general mechanism of toluene degradation in all known anaerobic degraders. In this work docking calculations, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and DFT+D2 cluster modeling was employed to address the following questions: (i) What mechanistic details of the BSS reaction yield the most probable molecular model? (ii) What is the molecular basis of enantiospecificity of BSS? (iii) Is the proposed mechanism consistent with experimental observations, such as an inversion of the stereochemistry of the benzylic protons, syn addition of toluene to fumarate, exclusive production of (R)-benzylsuccinate as a product and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) ranging between 2 and 4? The quantum mechanics (QM) modeling confirms that the previously proposed hypothetical mechanism is the most probable among several variants considered, although C-H activation and not C-C coupling turns out to be the rate limiting step. The enantiospecificity of the enzyme seems to be enforced by a thermodynamic preference for binding of fumarate in the pro(R) orientation and reverse preference of benzyl radical attack on fumarate in pro(S) pathway which results with prohibitively high energy barrier of the radical quenching. Finally, the proposed mechanism agrees with most of the experimental observations, although the calculated intrinsic KIE from the model (6.5) is still higher than the experimentally observed values (4.0) which suggests that both C-H activation and radical quenching may jointly be involved in the kinetic control of the reaction. PMID:27070573

  11. Overview of C/C-SiC Composite Development for the Orion Launch Abort System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Lee R.; Valentine, Peter G.; Schofield, Elizabeth S.; Beshears, Ronald D.; Coston, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Past and present efforts by the authors to further understanding of the ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material used in the valve components of the Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) Attitude Control Motor (ACM) will be presented. The LAS is designed to quickly lift the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) away from its launch vehicle in emergency abort scenarios. The ACM is a solid rocket motor which utilizes eight throttleable nozzles to maintain proper orientation of the CEV during abort operations. Launch abort systems have not been available for use by NASA on manned launches since the last Apollo ]Saturn launch in 1975. The CMC material, carbon-carbon/silicon-carbide (C/C-SiC), is manufactured by Fiber Materials, Inc. and consists of a rigid 4-directional carbon-fiber tow weave reinforced with a mixed carbon plus SiC matrix. Several valve and full system (8-valve) static motor tests have been conducted by the motor vendor. The culmination of these tests was the successful flight test of the Orion LAS Pad Abort One (PA ]1) vehicle on May 6, 2010. Due to the fast pace of the LAS development program, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center assisted the LAS community by performing a series of material and component evaluations using fired hardware from valve and full ]system development motor tests, and from the PA-1 flight ACM motor. Information will be presented on the structure of the C/C-SiC material, as well as the efficacy of various non ]destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, including but not limited to: radiography, computed tomography, nanofocus computed tomography, and X-ray transmission microscopy. Examinations of the microstructure of the material via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy will also be discussed. The findings resulting from the subject effort are assisting the LAS Project in risk assessments and in possible modifications to the final ACM operational design.

  12. Photodissociation dynamics of cyclopropenylidene, c-C3 H2.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Michael S; Giegerich, Jens; Pachner, Kai; Lang, Daniel; Kiendl, Benjamin; MacDonell, Ryan J; Krueger, Anke; Fischer, Ingo

    2015-10-01

    In this joint experimental and theoretical study we characterize the complete dynamical "life cycle" associated with the photoexcitation of the singlet carbene cyclopropenylidene to the lowest lying optically bright excited electronic state: from the initial creation of an excited-state wavepacket to the ultimate fragmentation of the molecule on the vibrationally hot ground electronic state. Cyclopropenylidene is prepared in this work using an improved synthetic pathway for the preparation of the precursor quadricyclane, thereby greatly simplifying the assignment of the molecular origin of the measured photofragments. The excitation process and subsequent non-adiabatic dynamics have been previously investigated employing time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and are now complemented with high-level ab initio trajectory simulations that elucidate the specific vibronic relaxation pathways. Lastly, the fragmentation channels accessed by the molecule following internal conversion are probed using velocity map imaging (VMI) so that the identity of the fragmentation products and their corresponding energy distributions can be definitively assigned. PMID:26385048

  13. Design and evaluation of a 2D array PIN photodiode bump bonded to readout IC for the low energy x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Sunwoo; Park, Shin-Woong; Yi, Yun

    2006-01-01

    A 2D array radiation sensor, consisting of an array of PIN photodiodes bump bonded to readout integrated circuit (IC), has been developed for operation with low energy X-rays. The PIN photodiode array and readout IC for this system have been fabricated. The main performance measurements are the following: a few pA-scale leakage current, 350 pF junction capacitance, 30 microm-depth depletion layer and a 250 microm intrinsic layer at zero bias. This PIN photodiode array and readout IC were fabricated using a PIN photodiode process and standard 0.35 microm CMOS technology, respectively. The readout circuit is operated from a 3.3 V single power supply. Finally, a 2D array radiation sensor has been developed using bump bonding between the PIN photodiode and the readout electronics. PMID:17946079

  14. Clarifying Chemical Bonding. Overcoming Our Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapkiewicz, Annis

    1991-01-01

    Demonstrations to help students change their misconceptions about chemical bond breaking are presented. Students' misconceptions about chemical bonds in both biological and chemical systems are discussed. A calculation for the release of energy from respiration is presented. (KR)

  15. Looking for high energy density compounds among polynitraminecubanes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wei-Jie; Li, Lu-Lin; Li, Bu-Tong; Wu, Hai-Shun

    2013-02-01

    Based on fully optimized geometric structures at DFT-B3LYP/6-311G** level, we calculated electronic structures, heats of formation, strain energies, bond dissociation energies and detonation performance (detonation velocity and detonation pressure) for a series of polynitraminecubanes. Our results have shown that energy gaps of cubane derivatives are much higher than that of triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), which means that cubane derivatives may be more sensitive than TATB. Polynitraminecubanes have high and positive heats of formation, and a good linear relationship between heats of formation and nitramine group numbers was presented. As the number of nitramine groups in the molecule increases, the enthalpies of combustion values are increasingly negative, but the specific enthalpy of combustion values decreases. It is found that all cubane derivatives have high strain energies, which are affected by the number and position of nitramine group. The calculated bond dissociation energies of C-NHNO(2) and C-C bond show that the C-C bond should be the trigger bond in the pyrolysis process. It is found that detonation velocity (D), detonation pressure (P) and molecule density (ρ) have good linear relationship with substituented group numbers. Heptanitraminecubane and octanitraminecubane have good detonation performance over 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), and they can be regarded as potential candidates of high energy density compounds (HEDCs). The results have not only shown that these compounds may be used as HEDCs, but also provide some useful information for further investigation. PMID:22961623

  16. Pd loaded amphiphilic COF as catalyst for multi-fold Heck reactions, C-C couplings and CO oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Mullangi, Dinesh; Nandi, Shyamapada; Shalini, Sorout; Sreedhala, Sheshadri; Vinod, Chathakudath P.; Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    COFs represent a class of polymers with designable crystalline structures capable of interacting with active metal nanoparticles to form excellent heterogeneous catalysts. Many valuable ligands/monomers employed in making coordination/organic polymers are prepared via Heck and C-C couplings. Here, we report an amphiphilic triazine COF and the facile single-step loading of Pd0 nanoparticles into it. An 18–20% nano-Pd loading gives highly active composite working in open air at low concentrations (Conc. Pd(0) <0.05 mol%, average TON 1500) catalyzing simultaneous multiple site Heck couplings and C-C couplings using ‘non-boronic acid’ substrates, and exhibits good recyclability with no sign of catalyst leaching. As an oxidation catalyst, it shows 100% conversion of CO to CO2 at 150 °C with no loss of activity with time and between cycles. Both vapor sorptions and contact angle measurements confirm the amphiphilic character of the COF. DFT-TB studies showed the presence of Pd-triazine and Pd-Schiff bond interactions as being favorable. PMID:26057044

  17. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  18. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a bonding theory which provides a framework for the description of a wide range of substances and provides quantitative information of remarkable accuracy with far less computational effort than that required of other approaches. Includes applications, such as calculation of bond energies of two binary hydrides (methane and diborane).…

  19. Synthesis of 3,4-Disubstituted 2H-Benzopyrans Through C-C Bond Formation via Electrophilic Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Worlikar, Shilpa A.; Kesharwani, Tanay; Yao, Tuanli; Larock, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    The electrophilic cyclization of substituted propargylic aryl ethers by I2, ICl and PhSeBr produces 3,4-disubstituted 2H-benzopyrans in excellent yields. This methodology results in vinylic halides or selenides under mild reaction conditions, and tolerates a variety of functional groups, including methoxy, alcohol, aldehyde and nitro groups. PMID:17288382

  20. Efficient Access to Multifunctional Trifluoromethyl Alcohols through Base-Free Catalytic Asymmetric C-C Bond Formation with Terminal Ynamides.

    PubMed

    Cook, Andrea M; Wolf, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The asymmetric addition of terminal ynamides to trifluoromethyl ketones with a readily available chiral zinc catalyst gives CF3 -substituted tertiary propargylic alcohols in up to 99 % yield and 96 % ee. The exclusion of organozinc additives and base as well as the general synthetic utility of the products are key features of this reaction. The value of the β-hydroxy-β-trifluoromethyl ynamides is exemplified by selective transformations to chiral Z- and E-enamides, an amide, and N,O-ketene acetals. The highly regioselective hydration, stereoselective reduction, and hydroacyloxylation reactions proceed with high yields and without erosion of the ee value of the parent β-hydroxy ynamides. PMID:26806871

  1. Visible Light-Induced Radical Rearrangement to Construct C-C Bonds via an Intramolecular Aryl Migration/Desulfonylation Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyuan; Hu, Bei; Dong, Wuheng; Xie, Xiaomin; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Zhaoguo

    2016-08-19

    A highly efficient intramolecular selective aryl migration/desulfonylation of 2-bromo-N-aryl-N-(arenesulfonyl)amide via visible light-induced photoredox catalysis has been accomplished. This approach allows for the construction of a variety of multisubstituted N,2-diarylacetamide under mild reaction conditions. PMID:27351977

  2. C-C Bond Formation via Copper-Catalyzed Conjugate Addition Reactions to Enones in Water at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Huang, Shenlin; Leong, Wendy Wen Yi; Isley, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugate addition reactions to enones can now be done in water at room temperature with in situ-generated organocopper reagents. Mixing an enone, zinc powder, TMEDA, and an alkyl halide in a micellar environemnt containing catalytic amounts of Cu(I), Ag(I), and Au(III), leads to 1,4-adducts in good isolated yields: no organometallic precursor is involved. PMID:23190029

  3. Bonding characteristics of the. sqrt. 3-script. sqrt. 3 Ag/Si interface identified by the energy dependence of the photoionization cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, J.; Bertness, K.A.; Cao, R.; Hwang, J.; Lindau, I.

    1987-02-15

    Synchrotron-radiation photoemission of the metal-semiconductor interface has a unique advantage in identifying the bonding characteristics of the rehybridized orbitals between the metal and the semiconductor. By varying the photon energy and measuring the magnitude of the photoionization cross section, the bonding peak at the metal-semiconductor interface can be identified as being formed with or without hybridization with the metal's d orbitals. The latter case is clearly illustrated by the annealed Ag/Si(111) interface. A sharp structure at 3.8 eV below the Fermi level grows as a result of annealing of the Ag/Si(111) interface. This structure is also accompanied by the formation of the ..sqrt..3 x ..sqrt..3 (R30/sup 0/) low-energy electron diffraction pattern and the narrowing of the Ag 4d band signal. Since the so-called Cooper-minimum effect is not observed for this annealing-induced peak, it is concluded that the structure does not have 4d-orbital characteristics within the regime of the theory of linear combination of atomic orbitals. This is the direct evidence to show that the Ag 4d band does not hybridize with the substrate Si sp/sup 3/ orbitals in forming Ag: Si bonds after high-temperature annealing. Judging from the photoionization cross-section variation, it can instead be inferred that the sharp structure has mostly Ag 5s or 5p and Si sp characteristics. The methodology shown here can be extended to other metal-semiconductor interfaces and can provide information on the bonding formation of the metal atoms and the semiconductor substrate.

  4. Bonding characteristics of the √3°√3 Ag/Si interface identified by the energy dependence of the photoionization cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, J.-J.; Bertness, K. A.; Cao, R.; Hwang, J.; Lindau, I.

    1987-02-01

    Synchrotron-radiation photoemission of the metal-semiconductor interface has a unique advantage in identifying the bonding characteristics of the rehybridized orbitals between the metal and the semiconductor. By varying the photon energy and measuring the magnitude of the photoionization cross section, the bonding peak at the metal-semiconductor interface can be identified as being formed with or without hybridization with the metal's d orbitals. The latter case is clearly illustrated by the annealed Ag/Si(111) interface. A sharp structure at 3.8 eV below the Fermi level grows as a result of annealing of the Ag/Si(111) interface. This structure is also accompanied by the formation of the √3 × √3 (R30°) low-energy electron diffraction pattern and the narrowing of the Ag 4d band signal. Since the so-called Cooper-minimum effect is not observed for this annealing-induced peak, it is concluded that the structure does not have 4d-orbital characteristics within the regime of the theory of linear combination of atomic orbitals. This is the direct evidence to show that the Ag 4d band does not hybridize with the substrate Si sp3 orbitals in forming Ag-Si bonds after high-temperature annealing. Judging from the photoionization cross-section variation, it can instead be inferred that the sharp structure has mostly Ag 5s or 5p and Si sp characteristics. The methodology shown here can be extended to other metal-semiconductor interfaces and can provide information on the bonding formation of the metal atoms and the semiconductor substrate. This is important in discussing metal-semiconductor interfaces but difficult to obtain unambiguously with other techniques and in theoretical predictions.

  5. Qgui: A high-throughput interface for automated setup and analysis of free energy calculations and empirical valence bond simulations in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Andberg, Tor Arne Heim; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-07-01

    Structural information and activity data has increased rapidly for many protein targets during the last decades. In this paper, we present a high-throughput interface (Qgui) for automated free energy and empirical valence bond (EVB) calculations that use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for conformational sampling. Applications to ligand binding using both the linear interaction energy (LIE) method and the free energy perturbation (FEP) technique are given using the estrogen receptor (ERα) as a model system. Examples of free energy profiles obtained using the EVB method for the rate-limiting step of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by trypsin are also shown. In addition, we present calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots to obtain the thermodynamic activation enthalpy and entropy with Qgui from running a large number of EVB simulations. PMID:26080356

  6. Anchoring the Gas-Phase Acidity Scale from Hydrogen Sulfide to Pyrrole. Experimental Bond Dissociation Energies of Nitromethane, Ethanethiol, and Cyclopentadiene.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Kent M; Nickel, Alex A; Lanorio, Jerry G; Ghale, Surja B

    2015-07-16

    A meta-analysis of experimental information from a variety of sources is combined with statistical thermodynamics calculations to refine the gas-phase acidity scale from hydrogen sulfide to pyrrole. The absolute acidities of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, and pyrrole are evaluated from literature R-H bond energies and radical electron affinities to anchor the scale. Relative acidities from proton-transfer equilibrium experiments are used in a local thermochemical network optimized by least-squares analysis to obtain absolute acidities of 14 additional acids in the region. Thermal enthalpy and entropy corrections are applied using molecular parameters from density functional theory, with explicit calculation of hindered rotor energy levels for torsional modes. The analysis reduces the uncertainties of the absolute acidities of the 14 acids to within ±1.2 to ±3.3 kJ/mol, expressed as estimates of the 95% confidence level. The experimental gas-phase acidities are compared with calculations, with generally good agreement. For nitromethane, ethanethiol, and cyclopentadiene, the refined acidities can be combined with electron affinities of the corresponding radicals from photoelectron spectroscopy to obtain improved values of the C-H or S-H bond dissociation energies, yielding D298(H-CH2NO2) = 423.5 ± 2.2 kJ mol(-1), D298(C2H5S-H) = 364.7 ± 2.2 kJ mol(-1), and D298(C5H5-H) = 347.4 ± 2.2 kJ mol(-1). These values represent the best-available experimental bond dissociation energies for these species. PMID:25549109

  7. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a C/C and a C/C-SiC material system fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for HIFiRE 8, a joint Australia / AFRL hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kPa. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and the C/C-SiC were tested in the NASA Langley Direct Connect Rig (DCR) at Mach 5 and Mach 6 enthalpy for several minutes. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used in some of the tests to increase the surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel for approximately 350degF. The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for 3 cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  8. 77 FR 10004 - C$ cMoney, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION C$ cMoney, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading February 16, 2012. It appears to the Securities... securities of C$ cMoney, Inc. (``cMoney'') because of questions regarding the accuracy of assertions by...

  9. Importance of the intermolecular Pauli repulsion in embedding calculations for molecular properties: the case of excitation energies for a chromophore in hydrogen-bonded environments.

    PubMed

    Fradelos, Georgios; Wesołowski, Tomasz A

    2011-09-01

    In embedding methods such as those labeled commonly as QM/MM, the embedding operator is frequently approximated by the electrostatic potential generated by nuclei and electrons in the environment. Such approximation is especially useful in studies of the potential energy surface of embedded species. The effect on energy of neglecting the non-Coulombic component of the embedding operator is corrected a posteriori. The present work investigates applicability of such approximation in evaluation of electronic excitation energy, the accuracy of which depends directly on that of the embedding potential. For several model systems involving cis-7-hydroxiquinoline hydrogen-bonded to small molecules, we demonstrate that such truncation of the embedding operator leads to numerically unstable results upon increasing the size of the atomic basis sets. Approximating the non-Coulombic component of the embedding potential using the expression derived in Frozen-Density Embedding Theory ([Wesolowski and Warshel, J. Phys. Chem.1993, 97, 8050] and subsequent works) by means of even a simple bifunctional dependent on the electron density of the chromophore and its hydrogen-bonded environment, restores the numerical stability of the excitation energies that reach a physically meaningful limit for large basis sets. PMID:21766877

  10. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  11. Reinterpretation of the Vibrational Spectroscopy of the Medicinal Bioinorganic Synthon c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2]†

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The Pt(IV) complex c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2] is an important intermediate in the synthesis of Pt(IV) anticancer prodrugs and has been investigated as an anticancer agent in its own right. An analysis of the vibrational spectroscopy of this molecule was previously reported [Faggiani et al., 1982, Can. J. Chem. 60, 529] in which crystallographic determination of the structure of the complex permitted a site group approach. The space group, however, was incorrectly assigned. In the present study we have redetermined at high resolution crystal structures of c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2] and c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2]·H2O2, which enable discussion of the effect of hydrogen bonding on the N–H and O–H vibrational bands. The correct crystallographic site symmetry of the platinum complex in the c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OH)2] structure is employed to conduct a new vibrational analysis using both group theoretical and modern DFT methods. This analysis reveals the nature and symmetry of the “missing band” described in the original publication and suggests a possible explanation for its disappearance. PMID:24515615

  12. Binding energies and 19F nuclear magnetic deshielding in paramagnetic halogen-bonded complexes of TEMPO with haloperfluorocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Meyer, Franck; Recupero, Francesco; Resnati, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    19F NMR measurements and theoretical calculations were performed to study paramagnetic complexes of iodoperfluorocarbons with stable nitroxide radicals. Contrary to what is usually measured for diamagnetic halogen-bonded complexes involving iodoperfluorocarbons, it was found that the formation of complexes with the 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl(piperidin-1-yloxyl) (TEMPO) radical determines downfield shifts in the 19F NMR spectra. The experimental finding was confirmed by calculating nuclear shielding using density functional theory and correcting the isotropic diamagnetic (19)F chemical shift with contact interactions evaluated from the hyperfine coupling tensor. The computational analysis of the interaction between CF3I and TEMPO, by using DFT and MP2 theories, showed that the occurrence of the halogen bond between the interacting partners is associated with a significant charge transfer to CF3I and that the measured downfield shift is due to the occurring spin transfer. PMID:18795762

  13. Electrolytes induce long-range orientational order and free energy changes in the H-bond network of bulk water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yixing; Okur, Halil I.; Gomopoulos, Nikolaos; Macias-Romero, Carlos; Cremer, Paul S.; Petersen, Poul B.; Tocci, Gabriele; Wilkins, David M.; Liang, Chungwen; Ceriotti, Michele; Roke, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Electrolytes interact with water in many ways: changing dipole orientation, inducing charge transfer, and distorting the hydrogen-bond network in the bulk and at interfaces. Numerous experiments and computations have detected short-range perturbations that extend up to three hydration shells around individual ions. We report a multiscale investigation of the bulk and surface of aqueous electrolyte solutions that extends from the atomic scale (using atomistic modeling) to nanoscopic length scales (using bulk and interfacial femtosecond second harmonic measurements) to the macroscopic scale (using surface tension experiments). Electrolytes induce orientational order at concentrations starting at 10 μM that causes nonspecific changes in the surface tension of dilute electrolyte solutions. Aside from ion-dipole interactions, collective hydrogen-bond interactions are crucial and explain the observed difference of a factor of 6 between light water and heavy water. PMID:27152357

  14. Asymmetric bifurcated halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Novák, Martin; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2015-03-01

    Halogen bonding (XB) is being extensively explored for its potential use in advanced materials and drug design. Despite significant progress in describing this interaction by theoretical and experimental methods, the chemical nature remains somewhat elusive, and it seems to vary with the selected system. In this work we present a detailed DFT analysis of three-center asymmetric halogen bond (XB) formed between dihalogen molecules and variously 4-substituted 1,2-dimethoxybenzene. The energy decomposition, orbital, and electron density analyses suggest that the contribution of electrostatic stabilization is comparable with that of non-electrostatic factors. Both terms increase parallel with increasing negative charge of the electron donor molecule in our model systems. Depending on the orientation of the dihalogen molecules, this bifurcated interaction may be classified as 'σ-hole - lone pair' or 'σ-hole - π' halogen bonds. Arrangement of the XB investigated here deviates significantly from a recent IUPAC definition of XB and, in analogy to the hydrogen bonding, the term bifurcated halogen bond (BXB) seems to be appropriate for this type of interaction. PMID:25656525

  15. Sb/Cu2Sb-TiC-C Composite Anode for High-Performance Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chae, Seung Chul; Hur, Jaehyun; Kim, Il Tae

    2016-02-01

    A novel nanostructure consisting of copper-antimony alloy (Cu2Sb) particles dispersed in a conductive hybrid matrix of titanium carbide (TiC) and carbon (C) has been developed by high energy mechanical milling (HEMM) and explored for use as an anode in sodium-ion batteries. By controlling the molar ratio of Cu and Sb, Cu2Sb and Sb are able to co-exist in a matrix. The (Sb)/Cu2Sb-TiC-C samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Specifically, the Cu2Sb-TiC-C composite anode demonstrates better cyclic performance as well as better rate-capability compared to Sb/Cu2Sb-TiC-C. Addition- ally, the introduction of the fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive into the electrolyte leads to improved electrochemical performance even at high-rate current densities, when compared to the electrodes without the FEC additive, owing to the formation of a stable and thin SEI layer. PMID:27433694

  16. High-Performance Zn-TiC-C Nanocomposite Alloy Anode with Exceptional Cycle Life for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Ok; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-07-15

    A Zn-based nanocomposite has been prepared through a facile, low-cost high-energy mechanochemical process and employed as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Structural characterization reveals that the micrometer-sized Zn-TiC-C nanocomposite is composed of Zn nanocrystals uniformly dispersed in a multifunctional TiC and conductive carbon matrix with a tap density of 1.3 g cm(-3). The Zn-TiC-C nanocomposite exhibits high reversible volumetric capacity (468 mA h cm(-3)), excellent cyclability over 800 cycles (79.2% retention), and good rate performance up to 12.5C (75% of its capacity at 0.25C rate). The enhanced electrochemical performance is mainly due to the presence of the well-mixed TiC+C matrix that plays an important role in providing high conductivity as well as mechanical buffer that mitigates the huge volume expansion and contraction during prolonged cycling. In addition, it prevents the particle growth by uniformly dispersing nanosized Zn within itself during cycling, maintaining high utilization (∼100%) and fast reaction kinetics of Zn anode. PMID:26098753

  17. Effect of axial ligand, spin state, and hydrogen bonding on the inner-sphere reorganization energies of functional models of cytochrome P450.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Rana, Atanu; Mittra, Kaustuv; Samanta, Subhra; Sengupta, Kushal; Dey, Abhishek

    2014-10-01

    Using a combination of self-assembly and synthesis, bioinspired electrodes having dilute iron porphyrin active sites bound to axial thiolate and imidazole axial ligands are created atop self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Resonance Raman data indicate that a picket fence architecture results in a high-spin (HS) ground state (GS) in these complexes and a hydrogen-bonding triazole architecture results in a low-spin (LS) ground state. The reorganization energies (λ) of these thiolate- and imidazole-bound iron porphyrin sites for both HS and LS states are experimentally determined. The λ of 5C HS imidazole and thiolate-bound iron porphyrin active sites are 10-16 kJ/mol, which are lower than their 6C LS counterparts. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reproduce these data and indicate that the presence of significant electronic relaxation from the ligand system lowers the geometric relaxation and results in very low λ in these 5C HS active sites. These calculations indicate that loss of one-half a π bond during redox in a LS thiolate bound active site is responsible for its higher λ relative to a σ-donor ligand-like imidazole. Hydrogen bonding to the axial ligand leads to a significant increase in λ irrespective of the spin state of the iron center. The results suggest that while the hydrogen bonding to the thiolate in the 5C HS thiolate bound active site of cytochrome P450 (cyp450) shifts the potential up, resulting in a negative ΔG, it also increases λ resulting in an overall low barrier for the electron transfer process. PMID:25238648

  18. Nature of halogen bonding. A study based on the topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron charge density and an energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; Sosa, Gladis L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2013-05-01

    In this work we investigate the nature of the Cl···N interactions in complexes formed between substituted ammonium [NHn(X3-n) (with n = 0, 1, 2, 3 and X = -CH3, -F] as Lewis bases and F-Cl molecule as Lewis acid. They have been chosen as a study case due to the wide range of variation of their binding energies, BEs. Møller-Plesset [MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p)] calculations show that the BEs for this set of complexes lie in the range from 1.27 kcal/mol (in F-Cl···NF3) to 27.62 kcal/mol [in F-Cl···N(CH3)3]. The intermolecular distribution of the electronic charge density and their L(r) = -¼∇(2)ρ(r) function have been investigated within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory. The intermolecular interaction energy decomposition has also been analyzed using the reduced variational space (RVS) method. The topological analysis of the L(r) function reveals that the local topological properties measured at the (3,+1) critical point [in L(r) topology] are good descriptors of the strength of the halogen bonding interactions. The results obtained from energy decomposition analysis indicate that electrostatic interactions play a key role in these halogen bonding interactions. These results allow us to establish that, when the halogen atom is bonded to a group with high electron-withdrawing capacity, the electrostatic interaction between the electron cloud of the Lewis base and the halogen atom unprotected nucleus of the Lewis acid produces the formation and determines the geometry of the halogen bonded complexes. In addition, a good linear relationship has been established between: the natural logarithm of the BEs and the electrostatic interaction energy between electron charge distribution of N atom and nucleus of Cl atom, denoted as V e-n(N,Cl) within the AIM theory. PMID:23076553

  19. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  20. H-H, C-H, and C-C NMR spin-spin coupling constants calculated by the FP-INDO method for aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. A. T.; Memory, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The FP-INDO (finite perturbation-intermediate neglect of differential overlap) method is used to calculate the H-H, C-H, and C-C coupling constants in hertz for molecules of six different benzenoid hydrocarbons: benzene, naphthalene, biphenyl, anthracene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. The calculations are based on both the actual and the average molecular geometries. It is found that only the actual molecular geometries can always yield the correct relative order of values for the H-H coupling constants. For the calculated C-C coupling constants, as for the calculated C-H coupling constants, the signs are positive (negative) for an odd (even) number of bonds connecting the two nuclei. Agreements between the calculated and experimental values of the coupling constants for all six molecules are comparable to those reported previously for other molecules.

  1. Functional interactions in bacteriorhodopsin: a theoretical analysis of retinal hydrogen bonding with water.

    PubMed Central

    Nina, M; Roux, B; Smith, J C

    1995-01-01

    The light-driven proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin (bR) contains a retinal molecule with a Schiff base moiety that can participate in hydrogen-bonding interactions in an internal, water-containing channel. Here we combine quantum chemistry and molecular mechanics techniques to determine the geometries and energetics of retinal Schiff base-water interactions. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations are used to determine potential surfaces for water-Schiff base hydrogen-bonding and to characterize the energetics of rotation of the C-C single bond distal and adjacent to the Schiff base NH group. The ab initio results are combined with semiempirical quantum chemistry calculations to produce a data set used for the parameterization of a molecular mechanics energy function for retinal. Using the molecular mechanics force field the hydrated retinal and associated bR protein environment are energy-minimized and the resulting geometries examined. Two distinct sites are found in which water molecules can have hydrogen-bonding interactions with the Schiff base: one near the NH group of the Schiff base in a polar region directed towards the extracellular side, and the other near a retinal CH group in a relatively nonpolar region, directed towards the cytoplasmic side. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 PMID:7711248

  2. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  3. LETTERS TO THE EDITORS: Lightning ball: experiments on creation and hypotheses(comment on "Energy density calculations for ball-lightning-like luminous silicon balls" by G S Paiva, J V Ferreira, C C Bastos, M V P dos Santos, A C Pavão)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, Gennadii D.

    2010-05-01

    The problems addressed in this paper include estimating: the energy density of luminous silicon balls, the density range of a natural lightning ball, and whether and how the object created and described in the commented paper (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 180 218 (2010) [Phys. Usp. 53 (2) 209 (2010)]) corresponds to the natural phenomenon.

  4. A Model for the Chemical Bond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    Bond stereochemistry in polyatomic hydrides is explained in terms of the principle of bond energies maximization, which yields X-H straight bonds and suggests the formation of appropriate sp hybrids on the central atom. An introduction to the electron charge distribution in molecules is given, and atomic, overlap, gross and formal charges are…

  5. 30 CFR 282.40 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE... Bonds. (a) Pursuant to the requirements for a bond in § 281.33 of this title, prior to the commencement of any activity on a lease, the lessee shall submit a surety or personal bond to cover the...

  6. 25 CFR 226.6 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bonds. 226.6 Section 226.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.6 Bonds. Lessees shall furnish with each lease a corporate surety bond acceptable to...

  7. 25 CFR 226.6 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bonds. 226.6 Section 226.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.6 Bonds. Lessees shall furnish with each lease a corporate surety bond acceptable to...

  8. High-performance FeSb-TiC-C nanocomposite anodes for sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il Tae; Allcorn, Eric; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2014-07-01

    Antimony-based alloy anodes with a Fe metal support dispersed in a conductive matrix consisting of TiC and carbon have been developed by high energy mechanical milling (HEMM) for sodium-ion batteries. The samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction before and after sodiation at different C rates and by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy before and after cycling for 100 cycles. Electrochemical charge-discharge cycling at various rates and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements have been carried out with and without 2 vol% of the fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive in the electrolyte. With well-defined crystalline FeSb and TiC structures, the FeSb-TiC-C nanocomposite anodes demonstrate superior rate capability with good capacity retention at 10,000 mA g(-1) for sodium-ion storage, which could be ascribed to the novel nanocomposite structure consisting of a good metal (Fe) framework and a combination of conductive TiC and carbon as a matrix. The FEC additive particularly leads to a longer cycle life with high rate capability due to the formation of a stable, thin SEI layer and a smaller charge-transfer resistance. PMID:24848297

  9. Bond coordinates as an alternative: Low energy reactive collisions of He2+ with He; comparison of TD and TI quantum calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Manuel; Bodo, Enrico; Gianturco, Franco A.

    2005-05-01

    ``Reactive'' and ``inelastic'' processes in the ionic He3^+ system[1] have been separated and analyzed through the simulation of the ^3He + ^4He2 collision. The combined use of TD and TI techniques allowed the study for both high and very low kinetic energies; the agreement between the corresponding results in the medium energy range is very good. Influence of the internal excitation of the reagents and implications on the dynamics of evaporation in He clusters will be discussed[2,3]. Emphasis will be made on the TD wavepacket propagation methodology used for the calculation of state-to-state transition probabilies, based bond coordinates: This method[4] was suggested recently by one of the authors, and is applied for the first time to a process with three open channels. Bond coordinates can have several advantages over the use of standard Jacobi ones [1] E. Scifoni, E. Bodo and F. A. Gianturco, Eur. Phys. J. D, 30, 363 (2004) [2] E. Bodo, F. A. Gianturco, A. Dalgarno, J. Phys. B 35 (2002) 2391. [3] E. Bodo and F. A. Gianturco, Eur. Phys. J. D, 31 (2004) 423 [4] M. Lara, A. Aguado, O. Roncero,and M. Paniagua. J. Chem. Phys., 113, 1781 (2000)

  10. Influence of chlorine substitution on intramolecular hydrogen bond energy and ESIPT barrier: Experimental and theoretical measurements on the photophysics of 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Samanta, Anuva; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2010-08-01

    The effect of chlorine atom on the intramolecular hydrogen bond strength and excited state proton transfer barrier in pharmaceutically important chloro-substituted derivative of salicylic acid viz., 3,5-dichlorosalicylic acid (3,5DCSA) has been explored through steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Stokes shifted emission band with negligible solvent polarity dependency corresponds to the spectroscopic signature of excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction. The spectral signature was compared with its parent molecule salicylic acid (SA) and 5-chlorosalicylic acid (5ClSA). Quantum chemical calculations by ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have been fruitfully employed to correlate experimental findings. Calculated S0 and S1 states potential energy surfaces across the proton transfer co-ordinate substantiates the experimental evidence for the occurrence of ESIPT process and negates the ground state intramolecular proton transfer (GSIPT) reaction. Weakening of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) energy and subsequent enhancement of barrier to ESIPT reaction in 3,5DCSA as compared to SA and 5ClSA appears to be a reflection of conjugate impact of electron withdrawing inductive and electron donating resonance effects of chlorine substitutions depending on its location on the aromatic benzene nucleus.

  11. The influence of hydrogen bonding on the dielectric constant and the piezoelectric energy harvesting performance of hydrated metal salt mediated PVDF films.

    PubMed

    Jana, Santanu; Garain, Samiran; Sen, Shrabanee; Mandal, Dipankar

    2015-07-14

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films are filled with various mass fractions (wt%) of hydrated metal salt (MgCl2·6H2O) (Mg-salt) to fabricate high performance piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs). They deliver up to 4 V of open circuit voltage by simply repeated human finger imparting (under a pressure of ∼4.45 kPa) and also generate sufficient power to turn on at least ten commercial blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) instantly. The enhanced piezo-response is attributed to the combined effect of the change in the inherent dipole moment of the electroactive phase containing PVDF itself and H-bonding arising between the Mg-salt filler and PVDF via electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, it also successfully charged the capacitors, signifying practical applicability as a piezoelectric based energy harvester power source. UV-visible optical absorption spectral analysis revealed the possibility to estimate a change in the optical band gap value at different concentrations of Mg-salt filler added PVDF films that possess a useful methodology where the Mg-salt can be used as an optical probe. In addition dielectric properties have been studied to understand the role of molecular kinetic and interfacial polarization occurs in H-bond PVDF films at different applied frequencies at room temperature. PMID:26077827

  12. Controlled energy transfer between isolated donor-acceptor molecules intercalated in thermally self-ensemble two-dimensional hydrogen bonding cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Attar, Hameed A.; Monkman, Andrew P.

    2012-12-01

    Thermally assembled hydrogen bonding cages which are neither size nor guest specific have been developed using a poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) host. A water-soluble conjugated polymer poly(2,5-bis(3-sulfonatopropoxy)-1,4-phenylene, disodium salt-alt-1,4-phenylene) (PPP-OPSO3) as a donor and tris(2,2-bipyridyl)- ruthenium(II) [Ru(bpy)32+] as an acceptor have been isolated and trapped in such a PVA matrix network. This is a unique system that shows negligible exciton diffusion and the donor and acceptor predominantly interact by a direct single step excitation transfer process (DSSET). Singlet and triplet exciton quenching have been studied. Time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurement at different acceptor concentrations has enabled us to determine the dimensionality of the energy-transfer process within the PVA scaffold. Our results reveal that the PVA hydrogen bonding network effectively isolates the donor-acceptor molecules in a two-dimensional layer structure (lamella) leading to the condition where a precise control of the energy and charge transfer is possible.

  13. Basics of Fidelity Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Steven P.

    Fidelity bonds are important for an agency to hold to protect itself against any financial loss that can result from dishonest acts by its employees. Three types of fidelity bonds are available to an agency: (1) public official bonds; (2) dishonesty bonds; and (3) faithful performance bonds. Public official bonds are required by state law to be…

  14. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey C.C. Woodburn, Photographer. January 12, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey C.C. Woodburn, Photographer. January 12, 1934 DETAIL OF ENTRANCE (WEST ELEVATION) - Ferdinand Daniel Pulver House, County Road F-70 Vicinity, Vandalia, Jasper County, IA

  15. C/C composite brake disk nondestructive evaluation by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tsuchin P.; Poudel, Anish; Filip, Peter

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the non-destructive evaluation of thick Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composite aircraft brake disks by using transient infrared thermography (IRT) approach. Thermal diffusivity measurement technique was applied to identify the subsurface anomalies in thick C/C brake disks. In addition, finite element analysis (FEA) modeling tool was used to determine the transient thermal response of the C/C disks that were subjected to flash heating. For this, series of finite element models were built and thermal responses with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models by using custom built in-house IRT system and commercial turnkey system. The analysis and experimental results showed good correlation between thermal diffusivity value and anomalies within the disk. It was demonstrated that the step-heating transient thermal approach could be effectively applied to obtain the whole field thermal diffusivity value of C/C composites.

  16. "Vibrational bonding": a new type of chemical bond is discovered.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher J; Macrae, Roderick M

    2015-01-01

    A long-sought but elusive new type of chemical bond, occurring on a minimum-free, purely repulsive potential energy surface, has recently been convincingly shown to be possible on the basis of high-level quantum-chemical calculations. This type of bond, termed a vibrational bond, forms because the total energy, including the dynamical energy of the nuclei, is lower than the total energy of the dissociated products, including their vibrational zero-point energy. For this to be the case, the ZPE of the product molecule must be very high, which is ensured by replacing a conventional hydrogen atom with its light isotope muonium (Mu, mass = 1/9 u) in the system Br-H-Br, a natural transition state in the reaction between Br and HBr. A paramagnetic species observed in the reaction Mu +Br2 has been proposed as a first experimental sighting of this species, but definitive identification remains challenging. PMID:25942773

  17. 48 CFR 928.103-70 - Review of performance and payment bonds for other than construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds and Other... performance or payment bond, other than an annual bond, shall not antedate the contract to which it pertains....

  18. 48 CFR 928.103-70 - Review of performance and payment bonds for other than construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds and Other... performance or payment bond, other than an annual bond, shall not antedate the contract to which it pertains....

  19. Investigation of the energy barrier to the rotation of amide CN bonds in ACE inhibitors by NMR, dynamic HPLC and DFT.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallah, S; Ben Dhia, M T; Driss, M R; Touil, S

    2016-09-01

    The isomerizations of Enalapril, Perindopril, Enalaprilat and Lisinopril have been investigated using NMR spectroscopic, dynamic chromatographic, unified equation and DFT theoretical calculations. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were determined by varying the temperature in the NMR experiments. At the coalescence temperature, we can evaluate the isomerization barrier to the rotation (ΔG(≠)) around the amide bond. Using dynamics chromatography and an unified equation introduced by Trap, we can determine isomerization rate constants and Gibbs activation energies. Molecular mechanics calculations also provided evidence for the presence of low energy conformers for the ACE due to restricted amide rotation. With the value of barriers (ΔE) between them of the order of (20kJmol(-1)), which is in agreement with the dynamic NMR results and DFT calculations. PMID:27344631

  20. The structural evolution of hydrogenated silicon carbide nanocrystals: an approach from bond energy model, Wang–Landau method and first-principles studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Ting; Zhao, Yu-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Bao

    2016-06-01

    The novel properties of nanomaterials are attributed to their variety of structures, while it is a central task to determine the stable configurations under different environment conditions. Exemplified with the hydrogenated cubic silicon carbide nanocrystals (H-SiCNCs), we propose an efficient approach to determine the stable H-SiCNCs by the convex analysis with the possible candidates pre-screened by the Wang–Landau method and a bond energy model, followed by the property analysis from first-principles. We find that the configurations of H-SiCNCs are dominated by the hydrogen and carbon chemical potentials according to the phase diagram, and there are structural transitions with the increasing size from tetrahedron, hexahedron, to octahedron. The energy gaps of tetrahedral H-SiCNCs are larger than that of octahedral ones at similar sizes, and in hexagonal ones there is a charge separation for the highest occupied molecular orbitals and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals.

  1. Photodissociation of CS2 in the vacuum ultraviolet - Determination of bond dissociation energy from the lowest vibrational level of the ground state CS2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okabe, H.

    1972-01-01

    Photolysis in the vacuum ultraviolet results almost exclusively in the production of S(super-3)P atoms, which is in apparent violation of spin conservation. The threshold energy of incident photons required to produce fluorescence was used to calculate the bond dissociation energy (from the lowest vibrational level of the ground state), and the result agrees with the value previously derived from the photoionization of CS2. The fluorescence excitation spectrum shows peaks corresponding to Rydberg series I and II, indicating that the observed photodissociation of CS2 in the vacuum ultraviolet is mainly the result of predissociation from Rydberg states. The absorption coefficient of CS2 was measured in the region of 1200 to 1400 A.

  2. Metal-catalyzed alpha-arylation of carbonyl and related molecules: novel trends in C-C bond formation by C-H bond functionalization.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Carin C C; Colacot, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-arylated carbonyl compounds are commonly occurring motifs in biologically interesting molecules and are therefore of high interest to the pharmaceutical industry. Conventional procedures for their synthesis often result in complications in scale-up, such as the use of stoichiometric amounts of toxic reagents and harsh reaction conditions. Over the last decade, significant efforts have been directed towards the development of metal-catalyzed alpha-arylations of carbonyl compounds as an alternative synthetic approach that operates under milder conditions. This Review summarizes the developments in this area to date, with a focus on how the substrate scope has been expanded through selection of the most appropriate synthetic method, such as the careful choice of ligands, precatalysts, bases, and reaction conditions. PMID:20058282

  3. On a model of calculating bond strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yang, T. T.; Lin, T. S.

    1976-01-01

    Diffusion bonding is a fabricating process to join the fibers and a matrix together forming a composite. The efficiency of the bonding process depends on temperature, time, and pressure. Based on a simplified pair potential model, an expression for the bond-energy at the fiber-matrix interface is formulated in terms of the above-mentioned three parameters. From this expression and the mean atomic distance, the bond-strength between the fibers and the matrix can be calculated.

  4. Hexacoordinate bonding and aromaticity in silicon phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang

    2010-12-23

    Si-E bondings in hexacoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were analyzed using bond order (BO), energy partition, atoms in molecules (AIM), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL). Bond models were proposed to explain differences between hexacoordinate and tetracoordinate Si-E bondings. Aromaticity of silicon phthalocyanine was investigated using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA), conceptual density functional theory (DFT), ring critical point (RCP) descriptors, and delocalization index (DI). Structure, energy, bonding, and aromaticity of tetracoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were studied and compared with hexacoordinate one. PMID:21105726

  5. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ωα and oscillator strengths fα for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ωα(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li2, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate.

  6. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meer, R. van; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-01-14

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ω{sub α} and oscillator strengths f{sub α} for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ω{sub α}(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li{sub 2}, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate.

  7. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems.

    PubMed

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2014-01-14

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ωα and oscillator strengths fα for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ωα(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li2, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate. PMID:24437859

  8. Mechanical properties of oxidation-resistant SiC/C compositionally graded graphite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Junichi; Fujii, Kimio; Yamada, Reiji

    1997-11-01

    Mechanical properties of oxidation-resistant SiC/C compositionally graded graphite materials composed of a CVD SiC coating layer, a SiC/C graded layer, and a graphite substrate were studied by bending, compressive, and hardness tests at room temperature. CVD SiC coated graphite and graphite with a SiC/C graded layer alone were also examined. The bending strengths of oxidation-resistant SiC/C compositionally graded graphite materials as well as CVD SiC coated graphite were about twice as much as that of graphite. The bending and compressive strengths of graphite with the SiC/C graded layer along were almost the same as those of graphite. The higher strengths of graphite with the CVD SiC layer can be mainly due to the CVD SiC strength itself, and partly due to the smooth CVD surface. No effect of the SiC/C layer on the strengths was discussed in terms of porosity, surface morphology, and the strength of SiC.

  9. FIRST DETECTION OF c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} IN A CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Chunhua; Wilner, David J.; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Oeberg, Karin I.

    2013-03-01

    We report the first detection of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} in a circumstellar disk. The c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} J = 6-5 line (217.882 GHz) is detected and imaged through Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification observations toward the disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 at 0.''8 resolution. The emission is consistent with that arising from a Keplerian rotating disk. Two additional c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} transitions are also tentatively detected, bolstering the identification of this species, but with insufficient signal-to-noise ratio to constrain the spatial distribution. Using a previously developed model for the physical structure of this disk, we fit a radial power-law distribution model to the c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} 6-5 emission and find that c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} is present in a ring structure from an inner radius of about 30 AU to an outer radius of about 165 AU. The column density is estimated to be 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. The clear detection and intriguing ring structure suggest that c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} has the potential to become a useful probe of radiation penetration in disks.

  10. A dense and strong bonding collagen film for carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Sheng; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-08-01

    A strong bonding collagen film was successfully prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. The surface conditions of the modified C/C composites were detected by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The roughness, optical morphology, bonding strength and biocompatibility of collagen films at different pH values were detected by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), universal test machine and cytology tests in vitro. After a 4-h modification in 30% H2O2 solution at 100 °C, the contact angle on the surface of C/C composites was decreased from 92.3° to 65.3°. Large quantities of hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl functional groups were formed on the surface of the modified C/C composites. Then a dense and continuous collagen film was prepared on the modified C/C substrate. Bonding strength between collagen film and C/C substrate was reached to 8 MPa level when the pH value of this collagen film was 2.5 after the preparing process. With 2-day dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslinking at 105 °C, the bonding strength was increased to 12 MPa level. At last, the results of in vitro cytological test showed that this collagen film made a great improvement on the biocompatibility on C/C composites.

  11. C---lH...O and O...H...O bonded intermediates in the dissociation of low energy methyl glycolate radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Dennis; Kingsmill, Carol A.; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Burgers, Peter C.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    1995-08-01

    Low energy methyl glycolate radical cations HOCH2C(=O)OCH3+, 1, abundantly lose HCO, yielding protonated methyl formate H---C(OH)OCH3+. Tandem mass spectrometry based experiments on 2H, 13C and 18O labelled isotopologues show that this loss is largely (about 75%) atom specific. Analysis of the atom connectivity in the product ions indicates that the reaction proceeds analogously to the loss of HCO and CH3CO from ionized acetol HOCH2C(=O)CH3+ and acetoin HOCH(CH3)C(=O)CH3+, respectively. The mechanism, it is proposed, involves isomerization of 1 to the key intermediate CH2=O... H---C(=O)OCH3+, an H-bridged ion-dipole complex of neutral formaldehyde and ionized methyl formate. Next, charge transfer takes place to produce CH3OC(H)=O...HC(H)=O+, an H-bridged ion-dipole complex of ionized formaldehyde and neutral methyl formate, followed by proton transfer to generate the products. Preliminary ab initio calculations executed at the UMP3/6-31G*//6-31G*+ZPVE level of theory are presented in support of this proposal. The non-specific loss of HCO from 1 (about 25%) is rationalized to occur via the same mechanism, but after communication with isomeric dimethyl carbonate ions CH3OC(=O)OCH3+, 2, via the O...H...O bonded intermediate [CH2=O...H...O=C---OCH3]+. The latter pathway is even more important in the formation of CH2OH+ ions from 1 which, it is shown, is not a simple bond cleavage reaction, but may involve consecutive or concerted losses of CH3 and CO2 from the above O...H...O bonded species. Ionized methyl lactate HOCH(CH3)C(=O)OCH3+, the higher homologue of 1, shows a unimolecular chemistry which is akin to that of 1.

  12. Binding energies and bond distances of Ni(CO)x, x=1-4: An application of coupled-cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Rendell, Alistair P.; Rice, Julia E.

    1991-10-01

    The accuracy of the single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T), has been tested for some representative transition metal complexes. For both the binding energy and metal to ligand bond distance of NiCO and Ni(CO)2, the CCSD(T) method yields results in very good agreement with multireference averaged coupled-pair functional (ACPF) calculations. The results are much better than those obtained using either the coupled-pair functional (CPF) or modified CPF (MCPF) methods. The contribution of connected triples to the binding energy is significant for all Ni(CO)x, x=1-4 ranging from 15 kcal/mol for NiCO to 30 kcal/mol for Ni(CO)4. In contrast, for the geometries the connected triples are only of minor importance. In this case, the correct treatment of disconnected quadruple excitations appears to be more important. For Ni(CO)4, the calculated binding energy is 125 kcal/mol (expt. 140 kcal/mol) and the bond distance is 3.46 a0 (exp. 3.45 a0). Virtually all of the remaining discrepancy, relative to experiment, should be due to limitations in the one-particle basis set. In addition, some test calculations were performed for Ni(C2H4), where near degeneracy effects are even more severe than for the nickel carbonyls and the CCSD(T) method gives very accurate results in this case also.

  13. Rearrangements of a Water Molecule in Both Directions between Two Hydrogen-Bonding Sites of 5-Hydroxyindole Cation: Experimental Determination of the Energy Threshold for the Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takamasa; Sakota, Kenji; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2016-03-24

    Rearrangements of a water molecule in both directions between two hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding) sites of the 5-hydroxyindole (5HI) cation was investigated in the gas phase. IR-dip spectra of jet-cooled 5HI-(H2O)1 revealed that two structural isomers, 5HI(OH)-(H2O)1 and 5HI(NH)-(H2O)1, in which a water molecule is bound to either the OH group or the NH group of 5HI, were formed in the S0 state. The IR photodissociation spectrum of [5HI-(H2O)1](+) generated by two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) via the S1-S0 origin of 5HI(NH)-(H2O)1 clearly showed that [5HI(OH)-(H2O)1](+) and [5HI(NH)-(H2O)1](+) coexist in the D0 state. The appearance of [5HI(OH)-(H2O)1](+) after R2PI via the S1-S0 origin of 5HI(NH)-(H2O)1 is explained by isomerization of [5HI(NH)-(H2O)1](+) to [5HI(OH)-(H2O)1](+), which corresponds to the rearrangement of the water. In addition, isomerization in the opposite direction was also observed when [5HI-(H2O)1](+) was generated via the S1-S0 origin of 5HI(OH)-(H2O)1. The upper limit of the energy threshold for the rearrangement of the water in [5HI(NH)-(H2O)1](+) was experimentally determined to be 2127 ± 30 cm(-1) from the adiabatic ionization energy of 5HI(NH)-(H2O)1. Above the energy threshold, the water molecule in [5HI-(H2O)1](+) may fluctuate between the two preferential H-bonding sites of 5HI(+). PMID:26950041

  14. Atomistic bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization of the RbN and CsN clusters (N ≤ 58).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongling; Bo, Maolin; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yonghui; Huang, Yongli; Sun, Chang Q

    2015-11-11

    We systematically examined the effect of atomic undercoordination on the performance of bonds and electrons of Rb and Cs atomic clusters and their solid skins using a combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations. Results show that atomic coordination number reduction shortens the bonds by up to 30% for the Rb13 and Cs13 clusters, which densifies the local electrons and entraps their binding energies. Consistency between predictions and observations revealed that the Rb 4p level shifts from 13.654 eV for an isolated atom to a bulk value of 14.940 eV and the Cs 5p level shifts from 10.284 to 11.830 eV upon bulk formation. Such core-electron densification and entrapment polarize the valence charge from the inner to the outermost layer of skins, which perturbs the local Hamiltonian and hence dictates the unusual behavior of the Rb and Cs solid skins and nanocrystals. PMID:26507096

  15. Coherent Behavior and the Bound State of Water and K+ Imply Another Model of Bioenergetics: Negative Entropy Instead of High-energy Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Jaeken, Laurent; Vasilievich Matveev, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Observations of coherent cellular behavior cannot be integrated into widely accepted membrane (pump) theory (MT) and its steady state energetics because of the thermal noise of assumed ordinary cell water and freely soluble cytoplasmic K+. However, Ling disproved MT and proposed an alternative based on coherence, showing that rest (R) and action (A) are two different phases of protoplasm with different energy levels. The R-state is a coherent metastable low-entropy state as water and K+ are bound to unfolded proteins. The A-state is the higher-entropy state because water and K+ are free. The R-to-A phase transition is regarded as a mechanism to release energy for biological work, replacing the classical concept of high-energy bonds. Subsequent inactivation during the endergonic A-to-R phase transition needs an input of metabolic energy to restore the low entropy R-state. Matveev’s native aggregation hypothesis allows to integrate the energetic details of globular proteins into this view. PMID:23264833

  16. Free Energy Landscapes for S-H Bonds in (Cp2Mo2S4)-Mo-star Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Aaron M.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Franz, James A.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Rakowski DuBois, Mary

    2009-03-23

    Extensive thermochemical data have been determined for a series of complexes derived from Cp*Mo(μ S)2(μ SMe)(μ SH)MoCp* and Cp*Mo(μ S)2(μ SH)2MoCp*. These data include electrochemical potentials, pKa values, homolytic solution bond dissociation free energies (SBDFEs), and hydride donor abilities in acetonitrile. Thermochemical data ranged from +0.6 to -2.0 V vs FeCp2+/o for electrochemical potentials, 5 to 31 for pKa values, 43 to 68 kcal/mol for homolytic SBDFEs, and 44 to 84 kcal/mol for hydride donor abilities. The observed values for these thermodynamic parameters are comparable to those of many transition metal hydrides, which is consistent with the many parallels in the chemistry of these two classes of compounds. The wealth of thermochemical data are presented in free energy landscapes as a useful approach to visualizing and understanding the relative stabilities of all of the species under specified conditions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  17. Energy disposal in the vibrational-state- and bond-selected reaction of water with hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, M.C.; Sinha, A.; Crim, F.F. )

    1991-10-17

    The importance of the reaction of water and hydrogen atoms to atmospheric and combustion processes has motivated both theoretical and experimental studies of its dynamics. The measured OH product state distribution from the reaction of vibrationally excited water with thermal hydrogen atoms supports an intuitive picture of selective disposal in this reaction. Excitation of the third overtone of the O-H stretch (4v{sub OH}) in either water or HOD provides enough energy to initiate the reaction, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) monitors the state populations of the reaction product OH or OD. The internal energy of the detected product is small compared to the roughly 9,000 cm{sup {minus}1} of available energy. The average rotational and vibrational energies of OH produced from reaction of H{sub 2}O(4v{sub OH}) are 320 {plus minus} 10 and 100 {plus minus} 30 cm{sup {minus}1}. The reaction of HOD(4v{sub OH}) produces OD with average rotational and vibrational energies of 190 {plus minus} 10 and 440 {plus minus} 90 cm{sup {minus}1}. Analysis of Doppler profiles in the LIF excitation spectra shows that the energy in relative translation of the products is no more than 5,000 cm{sup {minus}1}, leaving the substantial balance of available energy in the H{sub 2} product, most likely as vibrational excitation.

  18. Relativistic effects for the reaction Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO){sub 6}: Prediction of the mean bond energy, atomization energy, and existence of the first organometallic transactinide superheavy hexacarbonyl Sg(CO){sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Malli, Gulzari L.

    2015-02-14

    Our ab initio all-electron fully relativistic Dirac–Fock (DF) and nonrelativistic (NR) Hartree-Fock calculations predict the DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction: Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO){sub 6} as −7.39 and −6.96 eV, respectively, i.e., our calculated ground state total DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction product Sg(CO){sub 6} are lower by 7.39 and 6.96 eV than the total DF and NR ground state energies of the reactants, viz., one Sg atom plus six CO molecules, respectively. Our calculated DF relativistic and NR atomization energies (Ae) are 65.23 and 64.82 eV, respectively, and so the contribution of relativistic effects to the Ae of ∼0.40 eV is marginal. The Sg–C and C–O optimized bond distances for the octahedral geometry as calculated in our DF (NR) calculations are 2.151 (2.318 Å) and 1.119 (1.114 Å), respectively. The BSSE correction calculated using the DIRAC code ∼14 kcal/mol. The relativistic DF and NR mean energies predicted by us are 118.8 and 111.9 kJ/mol, respectively, and the contribution of ∼7 kJ/mol due to relativistic effects to the mean energy of Sg(CO){sub 6} is negligible. Ours are the first calculations of the relativistic effects for the atomization energy, mean bond energy, and energy of the reaction for possible formation of Sg(CO){sub 6}, and both our relativistic DF and the NR treatments clearly predict for the first time the existence of hexacarbonyl of the transactinide superheavy element seaborgium Sg. In conclusion, relativistic effects are not significant for Sg(CO){sub 6}.

  19. Relativistic effects for the reaction Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO)6: Prediction of the mean bond energy, atomization energy, and existence of the first organometallic transactinide superheavy hexacarbonyl Sg(CO)6.

    PubMed

    Malli, Gulzari L

    2015-02-14

    Our ab initio all-electron fully relativistic Dirac-Fock (DF) and nonrelativistic (NR) Hartree-Fock calculations predict the DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction: Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO)6 as -7.39 and -6.96 eV, respectively, i.e., our calculated ground state total DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction product Sg(CO)6 are lower by 7.39 and 6.96 eV than the total DF and NR ground state energies of the reactants, viz., one Sg atom plus six CO molecules, respectively. Our calculated DF relativistic and NR atomization energies (Ae) are 65.23 and 64.82 eV, respectively, and so the contribution of relativistic effects to the Ae of ∼0.40 eV is marginal. The Sg-C and C-O optimized bond distances for the octahedral geometry as calculated in our DF (NR) calculations are 2.151 (2.318 Å) and 1.119 (1.114 Å), respectively. The BSSE correction calculated using the DIRAC code ∼14 kcal/mol. The relativistic DF and NR mean energies predicted by us are 118.8 and 111.9 kJ/mol, respectively, and the contribution of ∼7 kJ/mol due to relativistic effects to the mean energy of Sg(CO)6 is negligible. Ours are the first calculations of the relativistic effects for the atomization energy, mean bond energy, and energy of the reaction for possible formation of Sg(CO)6, and both our relativistic DF and the NR treatments clearly predict for the first time the existence of hexacarbonyl of the transactinide superheavy element seaborgium Sg. In conclusion, relativistic effects are not significant for Sg(CO)6. PMID:25681910

  20. Relativistic effects for the reaction Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO)6: Prediction of the mean bond energy, atomization energy, and existence of the first organometallic transactinide superheavy hexacarbonyl Sg(CO)6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malli, Gulzari L.

    2015-02-01

    Our ab initio all-electron fully relativistic Dirac-Fock (DF) and nonrelativistic (NR) Hartree-Fock calculations predict the DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction: Sg + 6 CO → Sg(CO)6 as -7.39 and -6.96 eV, respectively, i.e., our calculated ground state total DF relativistic and NR energies for the reaction product Sg(CO)6 are lower by 7.39 and 6.96 eV than the total DF and NR ground state energies of the reactants, viz., one Sg atom plus six CO molecules, respectively. Our calculated DF relativistic and NR atomization energies (Ae) are 65.23 and 64.82 eV, respectively, and so the contribution of relativistic effects to the Ae of ˜0.40 eV is marginal. The Sg-C and C-O optimized bond distances for the octahedral geometry as calculated in our DF (NR) calculations are 2.151 (2.318 Å) and 1.119 (1.114 Å), respectively. The BSSE correction calculated using the DIRAC code ˜14 kcal/mol. The relativistic DF and NR mean energies predicted by us are 118.8 and 111.9 kJ/mol, respectively, and the contribution of ˜7 kJ/mol due to relativistic effects to the mean energy of Sg(CO)6 is negligible. Ours are the first calculations of the relativistic effects for the atomization energy, mean bond energy, and energy of the reaction for possible formation of Sg(CO)6, and both our relativistic DF and the NR treatments clearly predict for the first time the existence of hexacarbonyl of the transactinide superheavy element seaborgium Sg. In conclusion, relativistic effects are not significant for Sg(CO)6.