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Sample records for c1 inhibitor deficiency

  1. C1 inhibitor deficiency: 2014 United Kingdom consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, H J; Tarzi, M D; Ashworth, F; Bethune, C; Cale, C; Dempster, J; Gompels, M; Jolles, S; Seneviratne, S; Symons, C; Price, A; Edgar, D

    2015-01-01

    C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder manifesting with recurrent attacks of disabling and potentially life-threatening angioedema. Here we present an updated 2014 United Kingdom consensus document for the management of C1 inhibitor-deficient patients, representing a joint venture between the United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Network and Hereditary Angioedema UK. To develop the consensus, we assembled a multi-disciplinary steering group of clinicians, nurses and a patient representative. This steering group first met in 2012, developing a total of 48 recommendations across 11 themes. The statements were distributed to relevant clinicians and a representative group of patients to be scored for agreement on a Likert scale. All 48 statements achieved a high degree of consensus, indicating strong alignment of opinion. The recommendations have evolved significantly since the 2005 document, with particularly notable developments including an improved evidence base to guide dosing and indications for acute treatment, greater emphasis on home therapy for acute attacks and a strong focus on service organization. PMID:25605519

  2. C1 inhibitor deficiency: 2014 United Kingdom consensus document.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, H J; Tarzi, M D; Ashworth, F; Bethune, C; Cale, C; Dempster, J; Gompels, M; Jolles, S; Seneviratne, S; Symons, C; Price, A; Edgar, D

    2015-06-01

    C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder manifesting with recurrent attacks of disabling and potentially life-threatening angioedema. Here we present an updated 2014 United Kingdom consensus document for the management of C1 inhibitor-deficient patients, representing a joint venture between the United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Network and Hereditary Angioedema UK. To develop the consensus, we assembled a multi-disciplinary steering group of clinicians, nurses and a patient representative. This steering group first met in 2012, developing a total of 48 recommendations across 11 themes. The statements were distributed to relevant clinicians and a representative group of patients to be scored for agreement on a Likert scale. All 48 statements achieved a high degree of consensus, indicating strong alignment of opinion. The recommendations have evolved significantly since the 2005 document, with particularly notable developments including an improved evidence base to guide dosing and indications for acute treatment, greater emphasis on home therapy for acute attacks and a strong focus on service organization. PMID:25605519

  3. Pediatric hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is a rare, life-threatening disorder. It is characterized by attacks of angioedema involving the skin and/or the mucosa of the upper airways, as well as the intestinal mucosa. In approximately 50 per cent of cases, clinical manifestations may appear during childhood. The complex management of HAE in pediatric patients is in many respects different from the management of adults. Establishing the diagnosis early, preferably before the onset of clinical symptoms, is essential in cases with a positive family history. Complement studies usually afford accurate diagnosis, whereas molecular genetics tests may prove helpful in uncertain cases. Appropriate therapy, supported by counselling, suitable modification of lifestyle, and avoidance of triggering factors (which primarily include mechanical trauma, mental stress and airway infections in children) may spare the patient unnecessary surgery and may prevent mortality. Prompt control of edematous attacks, short-term prophylaxis and intermittent therapy are recommended as the primary means for the management of pediatric cases. Medicinal products currently used for the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema include antifibrinolytics, attenuated androgens, and C1-INH replacement therapy. Current guidelines favour antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis because of their favorable safety profile but efficacy may be lacking. Attenuated androgens administered in the lowest effective dose are another option. C1-INH replacement therapy is also an effective and safe agent for children. Regular monitoring and follow-up of patients are necessary. PMID:20667121

  4. Prophylaxis in hereditary angioedema (HAE) with C1 inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Greve, Jens; Strassen, Ulrich; Gorczyza, Marina; Dominas, Nina; Frahm, Uta-Marie; Mühlberg, Heike; Wiednig, Michaela; Zampeli, Vasiliki; Magerl, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of subcutaneous or submucosal edema. Laryngeal manifestations can be life-threatening. In the majority of cases, the disease can be adequately treated with an on-demand approach - in some cases, however, short- or long-term prophylaxis is indicated. Attenuated androgens used to be the drugs of choice, but they are associated with considerable side effects and no longer commercially available in the German-speaking countries of the EU. They are currently being replaced by more effective and more tolerable agents such C1-inhibitors, the kallikrein inhibitor ecallantide, and the B2 receptor antagonist icatibant, which have recently obtained market authorization. These new drugs have had a major impact, especially on the indications and procedures for long-term prophylaxis. According to the most recent international consensus papers and our own experience, self-administered C1-inhibitors are now the first option for long-term prophylactic therapy. The decision for prophylaxis should no longer be based on single parameters such as the frequency of attacks but on adequate overall disease control including quality of life. More drugs are currently being developed, which may lead to further changes in the treatment algorithms of HAE. PMID:26972189

  5. Angiooedema due to acquired deficiency of C1-esterase inhibitor associated with leucocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Farkas, H; Szongoth, M; Bély, M; Varga, L; Fekete, B; Karádi, I; Füst, G

    2001-01-01

    A hereditary and an acquired type of C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency have been described. Manifestations characteristic of both forms include recurrent subcutaneous and submucosal angiooedema. Acquired C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency has been observed in association with lymphoproliferative disorders, malignancy, autoimmune diseases and infections. We report on a case with the acquired form of the disease accompanied by leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Treatment with antimalarial agents resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and signs. Furthermore, C1-esterase inhibitor concentration and activity, as well as C1 levels, all returned to normal. PMID:11720182

  6. Acquired C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency in lymphomas: prevalence, symptoms, and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Bekos, Christine; Perkmann, Thomas; Krauth, Maria; Raderer, Markus; Lechner, Klaus; Jaeger, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    We retrospectively studied the prevalence of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH) deficiency in 131 patients with various lymphomas. We determined C1 INH activity, C1 INH antigen, and C4 concentration at diagnosis and after chemotherapy. In follicular lymphoma (FL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) consecutive patients were studied. In these entities, the prevalence of C1 INH deficiency was 10.2% in DLBCL, 4.1% in CLL, and 0% in FL and Hodgkin lymphoma. In indolent lymphomas, we identified only single cases of C1 INH deficiency, predominantly in splenic marginal zone lymphomas (SMZL) (four cases). Only three patients were symptomatic while the majority (11 cases) was asymptomatic. In DLBCL patients who were successfully treated with chemotherapy, complete normalization of C1 INH activity and C4 was observed. In contrast, C1 INH deficiency remained in SMZL patients after splenectomy. We conclude that C1 INH deficiency in lymphomas is frequently asymptomatic and responsive to immunochemotherapy. PMID:26795750

  7. In pursuit of excellence: an integrated care pathway for C1 inhibitor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Manson, A L; Price, A; Dempster, J; Clinton-Tarestad, P; Greening, C; Enti, R; Hill, S; Grigoriadou, S; Buckland, M S; Longhurst, H J

    2013-01-01

    There are estimated to be approximately 1500 people in the United Kingdom with C1 inhibitor (C1INH) deficiency. At BartsHealth National Health Service (NHS) Trust we manage 133 patients with this condition and we believe that this represents one of the largest cohorts in the United Kingdom. C1INH deficiency may be hereditary or acquired. It is characterized by unpredictable episodic swellings, which may affect any part of the body, but are potentially fatal if they involve the larynx and cause significant morbidity if they involve the viscera. The last few years have seen a revolution in the treatment options that are available for C1 inhibitor deficiency. However, this occurs at a time when there are increased spending restraints in the NHS and the commissioning structure is being overhauled. Integrated care pathways (ICP) are a tool for disseminating best practice, for facilitating clinical audit, enabling multi-disciplinary working and for reducing health-care costs. Here we present an ICP for managing C1 inhibitor deficiency. PMID:23607500

  8. Hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor deficiency: biological and clinical characteristics in 235 patients.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, A; Cicardi, M

    1992-07-01

    Two hundred and twenty-six patients with inherited C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency, also known as hereditary angioedema (HAE), have been studied. They belonged to 80 unrelated families, and in 11 of them C1-INH was functionally deficient but antigenically normal (type II HAE). Genetic analysis of type 1 families demonstrated restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 11% and abnormal mRNAs in 25%. In type II families, the site of the mutation appeared to determine the rate of catabolism of the dysfunctional C1-INH and its antigenic plasma levels. Clinical symptoms (subcutaneous and mucous swellings) generally first appeared within the second decade of life. The frequency of symptoms was highly variable from patient to patient, but a few patients remained asymptomatic throughout their lives. Prophylactic treatment with attenuated androgens was administered to 59 patients and was totally effective in 57, without significant side effects. Sixty-seven laryngeal and 15 abdominal attacks were treated with C1-INH plasma concentrate, yielding initial regression of symptoms in 30 to 90 minutes. The acquired deficiency of C1-INH, also known as acquired angioedema, was diagnosed in 9 patients. Eight of them had an autoantibody against C1-INH; the only patient without the autoantibody had associated chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Prophylactic treatment with attenuated androgens was effective in this last patient, while those with the autoantibody against C1-INH benefited from prophylaxis with antifibrinolytic agents. Replacement therapy with C1-INH concentrate was necessary only for patients with autoantibodies and required doses 3 or 4 times higher than those used in HAE. PMID:1518394

  9. The Janus faces of acquired angioedema: C1-inhibitor deficiency, lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Maddalena Alessandra; Castelli, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Several clinical and biological features of lymphoproliferative diseases have been associated with an increased risk of developing autoimmune manifestations. Acquired deficiency of C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) (AAE) is a rare syndrome clinically similar to hereditary angioedema (HAE) characterized by local increase in vascular permeability (angioedema) of the skin and the gastrointestinal and oro-pharyngo-laryngeal mucosa. Bradykinin, a potent vasoactive peptide, released from high molecular weight kininogen when it is cleaved by plasma kallikrein (a serine protease controlled by C1-INH), is the mediator of symptoms. In total 46% of AAE patients carry an underlying hematological disorder including monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) or B cell malignancies. However, 74% of AAE patients have anti-C1-INH autoantibodies without hematological, clinical or instrumental evidence of lymphoproliferative disease. Unlike HAE patients, AAE patients usually have late-onset symptoms, do not have a family history of angioedema and present variable response to treatment due to the hypercatabolism of C1-INH. Experiments show that C1-INH and/or the classical complement pathway were consumed by the neoplastic lymphatic tissues and/or anti-C1-INH neutralizing autoantibodies. Therapy of AAE follows two directions: 1) prevention/reversal of the symptoms of angioedema; and 2) treatment of the associated disease. Different forms of B cell disorders coexist and/or evolve into each other in AAE and seem to be dominated by an altered control of B cell proliferation, thus AAE represents an example of the strict link between autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation. PMID:26068904

  10. Hereditary and acquired angioedema: problems and progress: proceedings of the third C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency workshop and beyond.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Angelo; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Binkley, Karen E; Blanch, Alvaro; Bork, Konrad; Bouillet, Laurence; Bucher, Christoph; Castaldo, Anthony J; Cicardi, Marco; Davis, Alvin E; De Carolis, Caterina; Drouet, Christian; Duponchel, Christiane; Farkas, Henriette; Fáy, Kálmán; Fekete, Béla; Fischer, Bettina; Fontana, Luigi; Füst, George; Giacomelli, Roberto; Gröner, Albrecht; Hack, C Erik; Harmat, George; Jakenfelds, John; Juers, Mathias; Kalmár, Lajos; Kaposi, Pál N; Karádi, István; Kitzinger, Arianna; Kollár, Tímea; Kreuz, Wolfhart; Lakatos, Peter; Longhurst, Hilary J; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada; Monnier, Nicole; Nagy, István; Németh, Eva; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Nuijens, Jan H; O'grady, Caroline; Pappalardo, Emanuela; Penna, Vincenzo; Perricone, Carlo; Perricone, Roberto; Rauch, Ursula; Roche, Olga; Rusicke, Eva; Späth, Peter J; Szendei, George; Takács, Edit; Tordai, Attila; Truedsson, Lennart; Varga, Lilian; Visy, Beáta; Williams, Kayla; Zanichelli, Andrea; Zingale, Lorenza

    2004-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare but life-threatening condition, manifests as acute attacks of facial, laryngeal, genital, or peripheral swelling or abdominal pain secondary to intra-abdominal edema. Resulting from mutations affecting C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), inhibitor of the first complement system component, attacks are not histamine-mediated and do not respond to antihistamines or corticosteroids. Low awareness and resemblance to other disorders often delay diagnosis; despite availability of C1-INH replacement in some countries, no approved, safe acute attack therapy exists in the United States. The biennial C1 Esterase Inhibitor Deficiency Workshops resulted from a European initiative for better knowledge and treatment of HAE and related diseases. This supplement contains work presented at the third workshop and expanded content toward a definitive picture of angioedema in the absence of allergy. Most notably, it includes cumulative genetic investigations; multinational laboratory diagnosis recommendations; current pathogenesis hypotheses; suggested prophylaxis and acute attack treatment, including home treatment; future treatment options; and analysis of patient subpopulations, including pediatric patients and patients whose angioedema worsened during pregnancy or hormone administration. Causes and management of acquired angioedema and a new type of angioedema with normal C1-INH are also discussed. Collaborative patient and physician efforts, crucial in rare diseases, are emphasized. This supplement seeks to raise awareness and aid diagnosis of HAE, optimize treatment for all patients, and provide a platform for further research in this rare, partially understood disorder. PMID:15356535

  11. A focused parameter update: hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.

    PubMed

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lang, David M; Craig, Timothy; Dreyfus, David; Hsieh, Fred; Khan, David; Sheikh, Javed; Weldon, David; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Cox, Linda; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Randolph, Christopher R; Schuller, Diane E; Spector, Sheldon L; Tilles, Stephen A; Wallace, Dana

    2013-06-01

    These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters (JTFPP), representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The AAAAI and the ACAAI have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "A focused parameter update: Hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the JTFPP, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters understands that the cost of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents is an important concern that might appropriately influence the work-up and treatment chosen for a given patient. The JTFPP recognizes that the emphasis of our primary recommendations regarding a medication might vary, for example, depending on third-party payer issues and product patent expiration dates. However, because the cost of a given test or agent is so widely variable and there is a paucity of pharmacoeconomic data, the JTFPP generally does not consider cost when formulating practice parameter recommendations. In some instances the cost benefit of an intervention is considered relevant, and commentary might be provided. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion

  12. Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1 Inhibitor Deficiency in Serbia: Two Novel Mutations and Evidence of Genotype-Phenotype Association

    PubMed Central

    Andrejević, Slađana; Korošec, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Košnik, Mitja; Mijanović, Radovan; Bonači-Nikolić, Branka; Rijavec, Matija

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent life-threatening oedemas and/or abdominal pain and caused by mutations affecting the C1 inhibitor gene, SERPING1. We sought to investigate the spectrum of SERPING1 mutations in Serbia and the possible genotype-phenotype association. C1-INH-HAE was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and laboratory criteria in 40 patients from 27 families; four were asymptomatic. Mutational analysis of the SERPING1 gene was performed by sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Disease-causing mutations in SERPING1 were identified in all patients. In C1-INH-HAE type I, we identified 19 different mutations, including 6 missense mutations, 6 nonsense mutations, 2 small deletions, 1 small insertion, 2 splicing defects and 2 large deletions. Two of the mutations (c.300C>T and c.1184_1185insTA) are reported here for the first time. All C1-INH-HAE type II patients from three families harboured the same substitution (c.1396C>T). Based on the type of mutation identified in the SERPING1 gene, patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (nonsense, frameshift, large deletions/insertions, splicing defect, and mutations at Arg444) or group 2 (missense, excluding mutations at Arg444). Significant differences were found in the clinical severity score (P = 0.005), prevalence of laryngeal (P = 0.040) and facial (P = 0.013) oedema, and long-term prophylaxis (P = 0.023) between the groups with different types of mutations. Because our population consisted of related subjects, differences in the severity score between mutation groups were further confirmed using the generalized estimating equation (P = 0.038). Our study identified 20 different disease-causing mutations, including two novel mutations, in all C1-INH-HAE patients, highlighting the heterogeneity of mutations in the SERPING1 gene. Furthermore, it appears that mutations with a clear effect

  13. A nationwide study of acquired C1-inhibitor deficiency in France: Characteristics and treatment responses in 92 patients.

    PubMed

    Gobert, Delphine; Paule, Romain; Ponard, Denise; Levy, Pierre; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Bouillet, Laurence; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle; Drouet, Christian; Gayet, Stéphane; Launay, David; Martin, Ludovic; Mekinian, Arsène; Leblond, Véronique; Fain, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Acquired angioedema (AAE) due to C1-inhibitor (C1INH) deficiency is rare. Treatment options for acute attacks are variable and used off-label. Successful treatment of the associated lymphoma with rituximab seems to prevent acute attacks in subjects with AAE. The aim of this study was to describe AAE manifestations, its associated diseases, and patients' responses to treatments in a representative cohort.A retrospective nationwide study was conducted in France. The inclusion criteria were recurrent angioedema attacks and an acquired decrease in functional C1INH <50% of the reference value.A total of 92 cases were included, with a median age at onset of 62 years. Facial edema and abdominal pain were the most frequent symptoms. Fifteen patients were hospitalized in the intensive care unit because of laryngeal edema, and 1 patient died. Anti-C1INH antibodies were present in 43 patients. The associated diseases were primarily non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 44, with 24 splenic marginal zone lymphomas) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n = 24). Three patients had myeloma, 1 had amyloid light-chain (of immunoglobulin) (AL) amyloidosis, 1 patient had a bronchial adenocarcinoma, and 19 patients had no associated disease. Icatibant relieved the symptoms in all treated patients (n = 26), and plasma-derived C1INH concentrate in 19 of 21 treated patients. Six patients experienced thromboembolic events under tranexamic acid prophylaxis. Rituximab prevented angioedema in 27 of 34 patients as a monotherapy or in association with chemotherapy. Splenectomy controlled AAE in 7 patients treated for splenic marginal zone lymphoma. After a median follow-up of 4.2 years, angioedema was on remission in 52 patients.AAE cases are primarily associated with indolent lymphoma-especially splenic marginal zone lymphoma-and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance but not with autoimmune diseases or other conditions. Icatibant and plasma-derived C1INH concentrate control

  14. 86 The Efficacy and Safety of Human Plasma-derived C1-Inhibitor Concentrate Administered for the Treatment of Attacks in Pediatric Patients with Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1-Inhibitor Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Henriette; Csuka, Dorottya; Zotter, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Erika; Kelemen, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Lilian; Fejes, János; Harmat, George

    2012-01-01

    Background Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH) is a life-threatening, rare disease characterized by recurrent edematous attacks. In 50% of cases, the initial onset of symptoms occurs between 5 and 11 years of age. There are limited data on the emergency treatment of acute episodes in pediatric patients. Our aim was to analyze the efficacy and safety of human plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate in our pediatric patient population with HAE-C1-INH. Methods 50 pediatric patients (23 boys, 27 girls; 45 HAE type I, 5 HAE type II patients) were enrolled. The follow-up period began at the time of diagnosis and ended when the patient turned 18 years old. The indications for the use of C1-INH concentrate were upper airway oedema of any severity; moderate-to-severe abdominal edema; edema of face, neck, or lips and severe edema of the extremities and trunk. Clinical and laboratory data were entered into the Hungarian HAE Registry. Results 152 attacks out of 1392 experienced by 42 patients were treated with C1-INH concentrate (28% of attacks at home and 72% at the clinic). The distribution of C1-INH-treated attacks by location was as follows: 38% subcutaneous, 32% abdominal, 30% upper airway. In all locations, the clinical symptoms were consistently relieved by 500 IU C1-INH concentrate. An additional 500 IU dose of C1-INH concentrate was required in 4 cases only. The symptoms improved within 15 to 60 minutes of drug administration. Time to complete resolution was 24 to 48 hours in subcutaneous edema, 12 to 24 hours in abdominal attacks, and less than 12 hours when the edema involved the upper airways. No progression or recurrence of the attack was observed. Repeated administration did not reduce therapeutic efficacy of the drug. Adverse events did not occur. Transmission of viral infections (HIV, HBV, HBC, Parvo virus B19) was not detected. Comparing the first and last year of follow-up, anti-C1-INH antibodies (IgA, IgG, IgM types) did not show any

  15. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bork, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Until recently it was assumed that hereditary angioedema was a disease that results exclusively from a genetic deficiency of the C1 inhibitor. In 2000, families with hereditary angioedema, normal C1 inhibitor activity, and protein in plasma were described. Since then, numerous patients and families with that condition have been reported. Most of the patients were women. In many of the affected women, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy containing estrogens, and pregnancies triggered the clinical symptoms. In some families mutations in the coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) gene were detected. PMID:24176211

  16. Expression of the SERPING1 gene is not regulated by promoter hypermethylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SERPING1 mutations causing Hereditary Angioedema type I (HAE-I) due to C1-Inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency display a dominant-negative effect usually resulting in protein levels far below the expected 50%. To further investigate mechanisms for its reduced expression, we analyzed the promoter DNA methylation status of SERPING1 and its influence on C1-INH expression. Global epigenetic reactivation correlated with C1-INH mRNA synthesis and protein secretion in Huh7 hepatoma cells. However, PBMCs extracted from controls, HAE-I and HAE-II patients presented identical methylation status of the SERPING1 promoter when analyzed by bisulphite sequencing; the proximal CpG island (exon 2) is constitutively unmethylated, while the most distant one (5.7Kb upstream the transcriptional start site) is fully methylated. These results correlate with the methylation profile observed in Huh7 cells and indicate that there is not a direct epigenetic regulation of C1-INH expression in PBMCs specific for each HAE type. Other indirect modes of epigenetic regulation cannot be excluded. PMID:25053016

  17. A Nationwide Study of Norwegian Patients with Hereditary Angioedema with C1 Inhibitor Deficiency Identified Six Novel Mutations in SERPING1

    PubMed Central

    Johnsrud, Irene; Kulseth, Mari Ann; Rødningen, Olaug Kristin; Landrø, Linn; Helsing, Per; Waage Nielsen, Erik; Heimdal, Ketil

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is characterized by relapsing, non-pruritic swelling in skin and submucosal tissue. Symptoms can appear in early infancy when diagnosis is more difficult. In the absence of a correct diagnosis, treatment of abdominal attacks often lead to unnecessary surgery, and laryngeal edema can cause asphyxiation. A cohort study of 52 patients from 25 unrelated families in Norway was studied. Diagnosis of C1-INH-HAE was based on international consensus criteria including low functional and/or antigenic C1-INH values and antigenic C4. As SERPING1 mutations in Norwegian patients with C1-INH-HAE are largely undescribed and could help in diagnosis, we aimed to find and describe these mutations. Mutation analysis of the SERPING1 gene was performed by Sanger sequencing of all protein coding exons and exon-intron boundaries. Samples without detected mutation were further analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to detect deletions and duplications. Novel mutations suspected to lead to splice defects were analyzed on the mRNA level. Fifty-two patients from 25 families were included. Forty-four (84,6%) suffered from C1-INH-HAE type I and eight (15,4%) suffered from C1-INH-HAE type II. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were found in 22/25 families (88%). Thirteen unique mutations were detected, including six previously undescribed. There were three missense mutations including one mutation affecting the reactive center loop at codon 466, three nonsense mutations, three small deletions/duplications, three gross deletions, and one splice mutation. PMID:26154504

  18. Platelet C1- inhibitor. A secreted alpha-granule protein.

    PubMed Central

    Schmaier, A H; Smith, P M; Colman, R W

    1985-01-01

    In order to characterize which proteins of the contact phase of coagulation interact with platelets, human platelets were studied immunochemically and functionally to determine if they contain C1- inhibitor. By means of monospecific antibody to C1- inhibitor, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CELISA) was developed to measure directly platelet C1- inhibitor. With the CELISA, from 33 to 115 ng of C1- inhibitor antigen per 10(8) platelets from 15 normal donors was quantified in lysates of washed human platelets solubilized in nonionic detergent. The mean concentration in 10(8) platelets was 62 +/- 33 ng (SD). Plasma C1- inhibitor either in the platelet suspension medium or on the surface of the platelets could account for only from 6.5 to 16% of the total antigen measured in the solubilized platelets. Upon functional studies, platelets contained 84 +/- 36 ng (SD) of C1- inhibitor activity in 10(8) platelets. As assessed by the CELISA, platelet C1- inhibitor antigen was immunochemically identical to plasma and purified C1- inhibitor. In contrast, the mean concentration of platelet C1- inhibitor antigen in platelets from four patients with classical hereditary angioedema was 8.3 ng/10(8) platelets (range, 5.3 to 11.3 ng/10(8) platelets). 25 and 31% of the total platelet C1- inhibitor was secreted without cell lysis from normal platelets after exposure to collagen (20 micrograms/ml) and thrombin (1 U/ml), respectively, and this secretion was blocked by metabolic inhibitors. Platelet subcellular fractionation showed that platelet C1- inhibitor resided mostly in alpha-granules, similar to the location of platelet fibrinogen. Thus, human platelets contained C1- inhibitor, which became available by platelet secretion. The identification of platelet C1- inhibitor suggests that platelets may modulate the activation of the proteins of early blood coagulation and the classical complement pathways. Images PMID:3965505

  19. C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) autoantibodies in hereditary angioedema. Strong correlation with the severity of disease in C1-INH concentrate naïve patients.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Széplaki, Gábor; Visy, Beáta; Füst, George; Harmat, George; Miklós, Katalin; Németh, Julianna; Cervenak, László; Karádi, István; Farkas, Henriette

    2007-02-01

    The presence of autoantibodies to C1-inhibitor (C1-INH-Abs) is a hallmark of acquired C1-inhibitor deficiency. However, only scarce data are available on their prevalence in hereditary angioedema (HAE). In a prospective study performed between 2001 and 2004 in 95 patients with Type I or II HAE, serum samples were taken one to three times a year and clinical status of the patients was registered. Serum samples were tested for total activity of the classical pathway, C1q, C3, C4 and C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) concentration and activity levels, as well as the presence of IgG, IgA and IgM type anti-C1-inhibitor antibodies (C1-INH-Ab). Fifty-four healthy age and gender matched persons served as control. Significant differences between the patients and controls in the occurrence of elevated (2S.D. higher than mean of control) C1-INH-Abs titers was found only in the case of IgM type C1-INH-Abs. Elevated (>4.22AU/ml) IgM C1-INH-Abs levels were found in 31 and 4% of the patients and controls, respectively (p<0.001). Surprisingly, high titer IgM C1-INH-Abs were present with equal frequency in the 41 HAE patients ever treated with C1-INH concentrate and in the 54 C1-INH treatment naïve patients. In the latter group, strong positive correlation between the levels of the IgM C1-INH-Abs and the most severe disease (score 1) (p=0.0021) and the yearly attack rate (p=0.0173) were obtained. In addition, the levels of the IgM C1-INH-Abs exhibited strong negative correlation to the C1-inhibitor concentration and functional activity, total classical complement pathway activity, and a positive correlation to total IgM concentration. Taken together, these data indicate that IgM type C1-INH-Abs are present with highly elevated frequency in HAE patients irrespectively of the previous treatment with C1-INH concentrate. Most probable production of these autoantibodies is the consequence of the activation of complement and other plasma enzyme systems during HAE attacks. Determination of IgM C1

  20. Hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Levi, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled generation of bradykinin (BK) due to insufficient levels of protease inhibitors controlling contact phase (CP) activation, increased activity of CP proteins, and/or inadequate degradation of BK into inactive peptides increases vascular permeability via BK-receptor 2 (BKR2) and results in subcutaneous and submucosal edema formation. Hereditary and acquired angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE and -AAE) are diseases characterized by serious and potentially fatal attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of upper airways, facial structures, abdomen, and extremities, due to inadequate control of BK generation. A decreased activity of C1-inhibitor is the hallmark of C1-INH-HAE (types 1 and 2) due to a mutation in the C1-inhibitor gene, whereas the deficiency in C1-inhibitor in C1-INH-AAE is the result of autoimmune phenomena. In HAE with normal C1-inhibitor, a significant percentage of patients have an increased activity of factor XIIa due to a FXII mutation (FXII-HAE). Treatment of C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focuses on restoring control of BK generation by inhibition of CP proteases by correcting the balance between CP inhibitors and BK breakdown or by inhibition of BK-mediated effects at the BKR2 on endothelial cells. This review will address the pathophysiology, clinical picture, diagnosis and available treatment in C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focusing on BK-release and its regulation. Key Messages Inadequate control of bradykinin formation results in the formation of characteristic subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of the skin, upper airways, facial structures, abdomen and extremities as seen in hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema. Diagnosis of hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema may be troublesome as illustrated by the fact that there is a significant delay in diagnosis; a certain grade of suspicion is therefore crucial for quick diagnosis. Submucosal edema formation in

  1. Characterization of C1 inhibitor binding to neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, N S; Boackle, R J; Leu, R W

    1991-01-01

    In a previous study we have isolated neutrophil membrane proteins that non-covalently bind to native C1-INH (105,000 MW) and a non-functional, degraded C1-INH (88,000 MW; C1-INH-88). To further characterize the binding nature, we have designed a novel kinetic C1 titration assay which enables not only a quantification of the removal of fluid-phase C1-INH by neutrophils, but also a concomitant measure of residual C1-INH function. Native C1-INH, when adsorbed to EDTA-pretreated neutrophils, lost its function in the inhibition of fluid-phase C1. The non-functional C1-INH-88, which is probably devoid of a reactive centre, was found to block the binding of native C1-INH to neutrophils. Pretreatment of neutrophils with serine esterase inhibitors did not abrogate binding capacity of the cells for C1-INH, whereas the binding affinity for C1-INH was lost when the cells were pretreated with trypsin. An array of human peripheral blood leucocytes and several lymphoid cell lines has surface binding sites for C1-INH, but not on human erythrocytes and U937 cells. Binding was further confirmed using (i) C1-INH-microsphere beads to neutrophils, in which the binding was blocked when pretreating neutrophils with excess C1-INH or with trypsin, and (ii) radiolabelled C1-INH to neutrophils, which was competitively blocked by unlabelled non-functional C1-INH-88. Desialylation of C1-INH significantly reduced its binding affinity for neutrophils, indicating that the membrane receptor sites on neutrophils could be specific for the binding of sialic acid residues on C1-INH. Overall, our studies indicate that neutrophils or other leucocytes possess specific surface binding sites for the sialic acid-containing portion of C1-INH. PMID:2045131

  2. Contact system activation in patients with HAE and normal C1 inhibitor function.

    PubMed

    Ghannam, Arije; Defendi, Federica; Charignon, Delphine; Csopaki, Françoise; Favier, Bertrand; Habib, Mohammed; Cichon, Sven; Drouet, Christian

    2013-11-01

    In addition to hereditary angioedema (HAE) with C1 inhibitor (C1INH) deficiency, a type of HAE with dominant inheritance and normal C1INH function (HAE with normal C1INH) has been described. This relates to contact phase activation with exaggerated kinin formation, and mutations in the coagulation factor XII gene have been identified in some affected families, but the cause of the disease has remained elusive in a majority of families. Several triggering factors are responsible for developing kinin forming system, with participation of endothelium and mast cell component. Angioedema conditions meet the accumulation of kinins with failed kinin catabolism. PMID:24176216

  3. Influence of C1-inhibitor on inflammation, edema and shock.

    PubMed

    Dickneite, G

    1993-12-01

    C1-Inhibitor (Berinert, C1 INH), a 104 kDa protein, inhibits complement components (C1 esterase) as well as enzymes of the contact phase of coagulation (Factor XII, Factor XI) and kallikrein, thus regulating kinin generation. C1 INH is used for the treatment of the hereditary angioneurotic edema. This paper will give a survey about the evidence in recent literature concerning the potential efficacy of the compound on other diseases associated with shock, capillary leakage and inflammation as well. In our own experiments we evaluated whether the compound could influence acute inflammatory reactions or the severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) as a consequence of an experimental septic shock. To prevent the sepsis-induced DIC we co-infused the thrombin inhibitors AT III or rec. hirudin in combination with C1 INH. Coinfusion of C1-inhibitor (50-200 U/kg x h) with either rec. hirudin or AT III significantly improved survival rate compared to thrombin inhibitor alone. PMID:8172580

  4. Inactivation of factor XII active fragment in normal plasma. Predominant role of C-1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    de Agostini, A; Lijnen, H R; Pixley, R A; Colman, R W; Schapira, M

    1984-06-01

    To define the factors responsible for the inactivation of the active fragment derived from Factor XII (Factor XIIf ) in plasma, we studied the inactivation kinetics of Factor XIIf in various purified and plasma mixtures. We also analyzed the formation of 125I-Factor XIIf -inhibitor complexes by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In purified systems, the bimolecular rate constants for the reactions of Factor XIIf with C-1-inhibitor, alpha 2-antiplasmin, and antithrombin III were 18.5, 0.91, and 0.32 X 10(4) M-1 min-1, respectively. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that 1:1 stoichiometric complexes were formed between 125I-Factor XIIf and each of these three inhibitors. In contrast, kinetic and SDS-PAGE studies indicated that Factor XIIf did not react with alpha 1-antitrypsin or alpha 2-macroglobulin. The inactivation rate constant of Factor XIIf by prekallikrein-deficient plasma was 14.4 X 10(-2) min-1, a value that was essentially identical to the value predicted from the studies in purified systems (15.5 X 10(-2) min-1). This constant was reduced to 1.8 X 10(-2) min-1 when Factor XIIf was inactivated by prekallikrein-deficient plasma that had been immunodepleted (less than 5%) of C-1-inhibitor. In addition, after inactivation in normal plasma, 74% of the active 125I-Factor XIIf was found to form a complex with C-1-inhibitor, whereas 26% of the enzyme formed complexes with alpha 2-antiplasmin and antithrombin III. Furthermore, 42% of the labeled enzyme was still complexed with C-1-inhibitor when 125I-Factor XII was inactivated in hereditary angioedema plasma that contained 32% of functional C-1-inhibitor. This study quantitatively demonstrates the dominant role of C-1-inhibitor in the inactivation of Factor XIIf in the plasma milieu. PMID:6725552

  5. [Hereditary angioneurotic edema: a molecular disease caused by a defect in the O-glycosylation of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH)].

    PubMed

    Ollier-Hartmann, M P; Strecker, G; Montreuil, J; Hartmann, L

    1984-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of neutral and aminosaccharides in C 1-esterase inhibitor (C 1-INH), protein of the complement system, was performed. We observe a mixed glycosylation of the molecule with an N-glycosylated: O-glycosylated chain ratio of 1: 4. The loss of the inhibitory activity of the molecule in hereditary angioedema (O ANH) is associated with an O-glycosylation deficiency which differs according to the two molecular variants: C 1-INH (1 A) and C 1-INH (II) previously described. PMID:6440668

  6. C1 inhibitor serpin domain structure reveals the likely mechanism of heparin potentiation and conformational disease.

    PubMed

    Beinrohr, László; Harmat, Veronika; Dobó, József; Lörincz, Zsolt; Gál, Péter; Závodszky, Péter

    2007-07-20

    C1 inhibitor, a member of the serpin family, is a major down-regulator of inflammatory processes in blood. Genetic deficiency of C1 inhibitor results in hereditary angioedema, a dominantly inheritable, potentially lethal disease. Here we report the first crystal structure of the serpin domain of human C1 inhibitor, representing a previously unreported latent form, which explains functional consequences of several naturally occurring mutations, two of which are discussed in detail. The presented structure displays a novel conformation with a seven-stranded beta-sheet A. The unique conformation of the C-terminal six residues suggests its potential role as a barrier in the active-latent transition. On the basis of surface charge pattern, heparin affinity measurements, and docking of a heparin disaccharide, a heparin binding site is proposed in the contact area of the serpin-proteinase encounter complex. We show how polyanions change the activity of the C1 inhibitor by a novel "sandwich" mechanism, explaining earlier reaction kinetic and mutagenesis studies. These results may help to improve therapeutic C1 inhibitor preparations used in the treatment of hereditary angioedema, organ transplant rejection, and heart attack. PMID:17488724

  7. Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate inhibits the complement classical pathway by potentiating C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Rajabi, Mohsen; Chen, Trina; Karnaukhova, Elena; Kozlowski, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) has become the subject of multidisciplinary investigation as a non-traditional contaminant in the heparin therapeutic preparations that were linked to severe adverse events. In this study, it was found that OSCS inhibited complement fixation on bacteria and bacterial lysis mediated by the complement classical pathway. The inhibition of complement by OSCS is not due to interference with antibody/antigen interaction or due to consumption of C3 associated with FXII-dependent contact system activation. However, OSCS complement inhibition is dependent on C1 inhibitor (C1inh) since the depletion of C1inh from either normal or FXII-deficient complement plasma prevents OSCS inhibition of complement activity. Surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed that immobilized C1inhibitor bound greater than 5-fold more C1s in the presence of OSCS than in presence of heparin. Although heparin can also inhibit complement, OSCS and OSCS contaminated heparin are more potent inhibitors of complement. Furthermore, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG), an anti-inflammatory veterinary medicine with a similar structure to OSCS, also inhibited complement in the plasma of dogs and farm animals. This study provides a new insight that in addition to the FXII-dependent activation of contact system, oversulfated and polysulfated chondroitin-sulfate can inhibit complement activity by potentiating the classical complement pathway regulator C1inh. This effect on C1inh may play a role in inhibiting inflammation as well as impacting bacterial clearance. PMID:23077587

  8. Fluid-phase interaction of C1 inhibitor (C1 Inh) and the subcomponents C1r and C1s of the first component of complement, C1.

    PubMed

    Chesne, S; Villiers, C L; Arlaud, G J; Lacroix, M B; Colomb, M G

    1982-01-01

    Interactions between proenzymic or activated complement subcomponents of C1 and C1 Inh (C1 inhibitor) were analysed by sucrose-density-gradient ultracentrifugation and sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The interaction of C1 Inh with dimeric C1r in the presence of EDTA resulted into two bimolecular complexes accounting for a disruption of C1r. The interaction of C1 Inh with the Ca2+-dependent C1r2-C1s2 complex (8.8 S) led to an 8.5 S inhibited C1r-C1s-C1 Inh complex (1:1:2), indicating a disruption of C1r2 and of C1s2 on C1 Inh binding. The 8.5 S inhibited complex was stable in the presence of EDTA; it was also formed from a mixture of C1r, C1s and C1 Inh in the presence of EDTA or from bimolecular complexes of C1r-C1 Inh and C1s-C1 Inh. C1r II, a modified C1r molecule, deprived of a Ca2+-binding site after autoproteolysis, did not lead to an inhibited tetrameric complex on incubation with C1s and C1 Inh. These findings suggest that, when C1 Inh binds to C1r2-C1s2 complex, the intermonomer links inside C1r2 or C1s2 are weakened, whereas the non-covalent Ca2+-independent interaction between C1r2 and C1s2 is strengthened. The nature of the proteinase-C1 Inh link was investigated. Hydroxylamine (1M) was able to dissociate the complexes partially (pH 7.5) or totally (pH 9.0) when the incubation was performed in denaturing conditions. An ester link between a serine residue at the active site of C1r or C1s and C1 Inh is postulated. PMID:6282262

  9. Degradation of C1-inhibitor by plasmin: implications for the control of inflammatory processes.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, E. M.; Perkins, S. J.; Sim, R. B.; Willis, A. C.; Feighery, C.; Jackson, J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A correct balance between protease and inhibitor activity is critical in the maintenance of homoeostasis; excessive activation of enzyme pathways is frequently associated with inflammatory disorders. Plasmin is an enzyme ubiquitously activated in inflammatory disorder, and C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) is a pivotal inhibitor of protease activity, which is particularly important in the regulation of enzyme cascades generated in plasma. The nature of the interaction between plasmin and C1-Inh is poorly understood. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C1-Inh was immunoadsorbed from the plasma of normal individuals (n = 21), from that of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 18) or adult respiratory distress syndrome (n = 9), and from the plasma and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 18). As plasmin is a putative enzyme responsible for C1-Inh was examined using SDS-PAGE. In addition, peptides cleaved from C1-Inh by plasmin were isolated and sequenced and the precise cleavage sites determined from the known primary sequence of C1-Inh. Homology models of C1-Inh were then constructed. RESULTS: Increased levels of cleaved and inactivated C1-Inh were found in each of the inflammatory disorders examined. Through SDS-PAGE analysis it was shown that plasmin rapidly degraded C1-Inh in vitro. The pattern of C1-Inh cleavage seen in vivo in patients with inflammatory disorders and that produced in vitro following incubation with plasmin were very similar. Homology models of C1-Inh indicate that the majority of the plasmin cleavage sites are adjacent to the reactive site of the inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that local C1-Inh degradation by plasmin may be a central and critical event in the loss of protease inhibition during inflammation. These findings have important implications for our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in inflammation and for the development of more effectively targeted therapeutic regimes. These findings may also explain

  10. Hereditary angio-oedema with normal C1 inhibitor in a family with affected women and men.

    PubMed

    Bork, K; Gül, D; Dewald, G

    2006-03-01

    Recurrent angio-oedema is a sign of various acquired and inherited disease entities, including hereditary angio-oedema types I and II that result from a genetic deficiency of C1 inhibitor, and a recently described type of dominantly inherited angio-oedema, which does not show a deficiency of C1 inhibitor. Until now, this new type of hereditary angio-oedema, designated as hereditary angio-oedema type III, has been assumed to be a disorder specific to females. We now describe a four-generation family with dominantly inherited angio-oedema and normal C1 inhibitor in which, in contrast to all previous observations, not only five female but also three male family members were clinically affected. One male patient was mainly affected following the intake of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Our current observation leads to new considerations about the classification of hereditary angio-oedema with normal C1 inhibitor. Either hereditary angio-oedema with normal C1 inhibitor can be an entity affecting females predominantly, but not exclusively; in that case, men appear to have a much reduced chance of clinical manifestations. Alternatively, our present observation of hereditary angio-oedema with normal C1 inhibitor affecting both sexes may represent a new disease entity, presumably with a different underlying defect. PMID:16445789

  11. Complement Blockade with a C1 Esterase Inhibitor in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Uknis, Marc; Yuan, Xuan; Mukhina, Galina L; Varela, Juan; Saye, JoAnne; Pu, Jeffrey; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, clonal, hematopoietic stem cell disorder that manifests with a complement-mediated hemolytic anemia, bone marrow failure and a propensity for thrombosis. These patients experience both intra- and extravascular hemolysis in the context of underlying complement activation. Currently eculizumab effectively blocks the intravascular hemolysis PNH. There remains an unmet clinical need for a complement inhibitor with activity early in the complement cascade to block complement at the classical and alternative pathways. C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) is an endogenous human plasma protein that has broad inhibitory activity in the complement pathway through inhibition of the classical pathway by binding C1r and C1s and inhibits the mannose-binding lectin-associated serine proteases in the lectin pathway. In this study, we show that commercially available plasma derived C1INH prevents lysis induced by the alternative complement pathway, of PNH erythrocytes in human serum. Importantly, C1INH was able to block the accumulation of C3 degradation products on CD55 deficient erythrocytes from PNH patient on eculizumab therapy. This could suggest a role for inhibition of earlier phases of the complement cascade than that currently inhibited by eculizumab for incomplete or non-responders to that therapy. PMID:25034232

  12. High prevalence of splenic marginal zone lymphoma among patients with acquired C1 inhibtor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Roberto; Wu, Maddalena Alessandra; Arquati, Massimo; Zanichelli, Andrea; Suffritti, Chiara; Rossi, Davide; Cicardi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Marginal zone lymphoma represents about 10% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs). 33% of patients with acquired angioedema (AAE) due to acquired C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency (C1-INH-AAE) have or will develop NHLs. C1-INH-AAE is a rare condition. We report the follow-up of 72 C1-INH-AAE patients, followed for a median of 15 years (range 1-24). Median age was 71 (range 64-79) years; median age at onset of angioedema symptoms was 57·5 (range 50-66) years and it was 63 [range 45-80) years at diagnosis]. Twenty patients were diagnosed with low-grade non-follicular B-cell lymphomas (75% were splenic MZL), one with follicular and three with high-grade lymphomas (two diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and one mantle cell lymphoma). Fifteen NHLs were diagnosed at onset of AAE or thereafter (3 months to 7 years), eight had already been diagnosed at onset of angioedema. Two of 24 patients remain on watchful wait. Thirthen of 24 received chemotherapy, two received rituximab. Three underwent splenectomy. All 18 patients receiving therapy for NHL experienced post-treatment reduction in AAE symptoms. Our study suggests that clonal B-cell proliferation is the pathology underlying AAE leading to production of C1-INH-neutralizing autoantibodies and to NHLs. The post-germinal centre origin of NHL suggests that immune stimulation may contribute to lymphomagenesis. PMID:26728240

  13. The Use of Plasma-Derived Complement C1-Esterase Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) in the Treatment of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Related Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Hermanrud, Thorbjørn; Duus, Nicolaj; Bygum, Anette; Rasmussen, Eva Rye

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema of the upper airways is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence has been increasing in the past two decades, primarily due to pharmaceuticals influencing the generation or degradation of the vasoactive molecule bradykinin. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate is a well-established treatment option of hereditary and acquired complement C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency, which are also mediated by an increased level of bradykinin resulting in recurrent angioedema. We here present a case of severe angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor related angioedema (ACEi-AE) of the hypopharynx that completely resolved rapidly after the infusion of plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate adding to the sparse reports in the existing literature. PMID:27123347

  14. The Use of Plasma-Derived Complement C1-Esterase Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) in the Treatment of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Related Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hermanrud, Thorbjørn; Duus, Nicolaj; Bygum, Anette; Rasmussen, Eva Rye

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema of the upper airways is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence has been increasing in the past two decades, primarily due to pharmaceuticals influencing the generation or degradation of the vasoactive molecule bradykinin. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate is a well-established treatment option of hereditary and acquired complement C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency, which are also mediated by an increased level of bradykinin resulting in recurrent angioedema. We here present a case of severe angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor related angioedema (ACEi-AE) of the hypopharynx that completely resolved rapidly after the infusion of plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate adding to the sparse reports in the existing literature. PMID:27123347

  15. Hereditary angioedema and pregnancy: successful management of recurrent and frequent attacks of angioedema with C1-inhibitor concentrate, danazol and tranexamic acid – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Milingos, D S; Madhuvrata, P; Dean, J; Shetty, A; Campbell, D M

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition caused by deficiency of C1 esterase inhibitor. It is characterized by subcutaneous swelling in any part of the skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. We present the case of a pregnant woman with known HAE that deteriorated during pregnancy with frequent attacks that were managed successfully with danazol, tranexamic acid and regular intravenous administration of C1 esterase inhibitor.

  16. A common neoepitope is created when the reactive center of C1-inhibitor is cleaved by plasma kallikrein, activated factor XII fragment, C1 esterase, or neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed Central

    de Agostini, A; Patston, P A; Marottoli, V; Carrel, S; Harpel, P C; Schapira, M

    1988-01-01

    The reactive center of C1-inhibitor, a plasma protease inhibitor that belongs to the serpin superfamily, is located on a peptide loop which is highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. With plasma kallikrein, C1s and beta-Factor XIIa, this cleavage occurs at the reactive site residue P1 (Arg444); with neutrophil elastase, it takes place near P1, probably at residue P3 (Val442). After these cleavages, C1-inhibitor is inactivated and its conformation is modified. Moreover, in vivo, cleaved C1-inhibitor is removed from the blood stream more rapidly than the intact serpin, which suggests that proteolysis unmasks sites responsible for cellular recognition and the uptake of the cleaved inhibitor. In the study reported here, we show, using an MAb, that an identical neoepitope is created on C1-inhibitor after the cleavage of its exposed loop by plasma kallikrein, C1s, beta-Factor XIIa, and by neutrophil elastase. Images PMID:2457036

  17. CpG mutations in the reactive site of human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Skriver, K; Radziejewska, E; Silbermann, J A; Donaldson, V H; Bock, S C

    1989-02-25

    C1 inhibitor plays an important role in the regulation of vascular permeability through its ability to inactivate enzymes which release polypeptide kinins. Dysfunctional C1 inhibitor molecules are present in the plasma of affected members of the Da and Ri hereditary angioneurotic edema kindreds. We constructed genomic libraries from Da and Ri patient DNAs which had been cleaved with BclI to generate a fragment containing 21 kilobases of the C1 inhibitor locus. C1 inhibitor gene-containing recombinants originating from mutant Da and Ri alleles were differentiated from those derived from normal alleles by linkage analysis using the intragenic HgiAI restriction fragment length polymorphism. Nucleotide sequencing of the complete protein-coding regions of the mutant alleles identified two different mutations in a CpG dinucleotide corresponding to the first two bases of arginine codon 444. These single base mutations changed the identity of the functionally critical P1 reactive site residue from arginine to cysteine (Da) or histidine (Ri). The additional cysteine residue in C1 inhibitor Da suggests how it is covalently bound to albumin in plasma. The presence of CpG dinucleotides in the codons specifying the P1 arginines of C1 inhibitor and antithrombin III explains the high incidence of histidine and cysteine substitutions observed among dysfunctional mutants of these serine protease inhibitors. PMID:2563376

  18. Treatment of hereditary angioedema with plasma-derived C1 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Prematta, Michael J; Prematta, Tracy; Craig, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    Background: Plasma-derived C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate is a treatment option for acute hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and is considered the standard-of-care in many countries, although it is not yet available in the United States. Studies are still being conducted to establish its safety and efficacy as required by the FDA. Objective: To review the medical literature to determine if C1-INH concentrate is a safe and effective treatment for acute HAE attacks. Methods: The following keywords were searched in PubMed and OVID: C1 esterase inhibitor, C1-inhibitor, C1 inhibitor, and hereditary angioedema treatment. English-language articles were searched from 1966 to the present to look for studies demonstrating the efficacy and the safety of C1-INH concentrate. Results: The English-language literature search revealed several studies showing significantly improved relief of HAE symptoms with the administration of C1-INH concentrate – many studies demonstrated some improvement of symptoms within 30 minutes. Side effects have been similar to placebo, and no proven cases of viral transmission have occurred in over 20 years. Conclusion: C1-INH concentrate appears to be a very safe and effective treatment option for HAE. PMID:19209279

  19. Hereditary angioedema in a Jordanian family with a novel missense mutation in the C1-inhibitor N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Saied A; Caccia, Sonia; Rawashdeh, Rifaat; Melhem, Motasem; Al-Hawamdeh, Ali; Carzaniga, Thomas; Haddad, Hazem

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A Jordanian family, including 14 individuals with C1-INH-HAE clinical symptoms, was studied. In the propositus and his parents, SERPING1 had four mutations leading to amino acid substitutions. Two are known polymorphic variants (c.167T>C; p.Val34Ala and c.1438G>A; p.Val458Met), the others are newly described. One (c.203C>T; p.Thr46Ile) is located in the N-terminal domain of the C1-inhibitor protein and segregates with angioedema symptoms in the family. The other (c.800C>T; p.Ala245Val) belongs to the serpin domain, and derives from the unaffected father. DNA from additional 24 family members were screened for c.203C>T mutation in the target gene. All individuals heterozygous for the c.203C>T mutation had antigenic and functional plasma levels of C1-inhibitor below 50% of normal, confirming the diagnosis of type I C1-INH-HAE. Angioedema symptoms were present in 14 of 16 subjects carrier for the c.203T allele. Among these subjects, those carrying the c.800T variation had more severe and frequent symptoms than subjects without this mutation. This family-based study provides the first evidence that multiple amino acid substitutions in SERPING1 could influence C1-INH-HAE phenotype. PMID:26895475

  20. Presence of C1-Inhibitor Polymers in a Subset of Patients Suffering from Hereditary Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Daniel Elenius; Hansen, Søren; Gram, Jørgen; Bygum, Anette; Drouet, Christian; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor (C1-inh). The mutations cause decreased functional plasma levels of C1-inh, which triggers unpredictable recurrent edema attacks. Subjects suffering from HAE have been classified in type I patients with decreased functional and antigenic levels of C1-inh, and type II patients with decreased functional but normal antigenic C1-inh levels. However, a few reports have demonstrated that some mutations cause C1-inh polymerization in vitro, and it is speculated that C1-inh polymers may exist in patient plasma, challenging the current classification of HAE patients. To investigate the presence of C1-inh polymers in patient plasma samples, we developed an immunological method, where monoclonal antibodies produced against polymerized C1-inh were applied in native PAGE western blotting. Using this approach we analyzed genuine plasma samples from 31 Danish HAE families, and found that plasma samples from three genotypically distinct HAE type I families (classified upon C1-inh plasma concentrations) contained C1-inh polymers. Identical C1-inh polymerization phenotypes were observed in four affected family members from one of these families. Genotyping of the families revealed that the polymerogenic mutations of two families were located in proximity to the reactive center loop insertion site in C1-inh (p.Ile271Thr and p.Ser258_Pro260del),and one mutation affected helix C (p.Thr167Asn). In conclusion, we demonstrate that C1-inh polymers are present in the plasma of a subgroup of HAE type I patients. PMID:25369003

  1. [Acquired angioedema with C1-INH deficiency and accompanying chronic spontaneous urticaria in a patient with chronic lymphatic B cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Klossowski, N; Braun, S A; von Gruben, V; Losem, C; Plewe, D; Homey, B; Meller, S

    2015-10-01

    Acquired angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE) is characterized by recurrent edema of the subcutaneous and/or submucosal tissue without wheals and negative family history of angioedema. Here, we present the case of a patient with a chronic lymphatic B cell leukemia who suffered from both C1-INH-AAE and chronic spontaneous urticaria. Oral corticosteroids, antihistamines, and the anti-IgE antibody omalizumab were applied to treat the chronic urticaria in combination with the plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate Berinert® and the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant, but the symptoms did not improved significantly. Thus, polychemotherapy targeting the slow-growing lymphoproliferative disease including rituximab was initiated, which resulted in remission of both the urticaria and the angioedema. PMID:26335859

  2. Enzymatic pathways in the pathogenesis of hereditary angioedema: the role of C1 inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Allen P

    2010-11-01

    A functional abnormality of C1 inhibitor (C1INH) is present in types I and II hereditary angioedema (HAE), and normal C1INH may be rendered ineffective in the newly described type III HAE. C1INH inhibits factor XIIa, factor XII fragment (XIIf), kallikrein, and plasmin. Thus, in its absence, there is marked activation of the bradykinin-forming cascade resulting in severe angioedema. Factor XII may autoactivate on binding to endothelial cell surface gC1qR (receptor for the globular heads of C1q) thus initiating the cascade. Alternatively, stimuli that activate endothelial cells may liberate (or express at the cell surface) heat shock protein 90 or the enzyme prolylcarboxypeptidase, either of which can interact with the prekallikrein-high-molecular-weight kininogen complex to convert prekallikrein to kallikrein stoichiometrically. The kallikrein produced can cleave high-molecular-weight kininogen to produce bradykinin and also recruit factor XII by enzymatically activating it. Patients with type I or II HAE have mutant C1INH so that control of C1 activation is lost. Autoactivation of C1r in the absence of C1INH leads to C1s activation followed by C4 cleavage and depletion. An attack of swelling is accompanied by conversion of factor XIIa to factor XIIf and further enzymatic activation of C1r so that C4 levels drop further and C2 is depleted. New therapies for HAE focus on the bradykinin-forming cascade and include a kallikrein inhibitor and a bradykinin B-2 receptor antagonist in addition to administration of purified C1INH. PMID:20889195

  3. Purified human C1-esterase inhibitor is safe in acute relapses of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To minimize complement-mediated damage in acute relapses of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) by adding treatment with a complement inhibitor, purified C1-esterase inhibitor, to the current standard of care (high-dose glucocorticoids). Method: We conducted an open-label phase 1b safety and proof-of-concept trial in 10 patients with NMO–immunoglobulin G seropositive NMO or NMO spectrum disease (NMOSD) who presented with acute transverse myelitis and/or optic neuritis. In addition to treating with 1 g of daily IV methylprednisolone, we infused 2,000 units of C1-esterase inhibitor daily for 3 days, beginning on day 1 of hospitalization. The primary outcome measure was safety, and the secondary efficacy measure was change in Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores. Results: Ten patients with NMO/NMOSD were enrolled, 7 of whom presented with acute transverse myelitis and 3 with acute optic neuritis. C1-esterase inhibitor proved to be safe in all 10 patients, with no serious adverse events recorded. There were no thromboembolic events or related lab abnormalities in any of the subjects. EDSS scores dropped from a median of 4.5 on admission to 4.0 on discharge and then down to 2.5 on 30-day follow-up. All but 1 patient returned to preattack EDSS or better and only 2 patients required escalation to plasmapheresis. Conclusions: C1-esterase inhibitor is a safe add-on therapy for patients with NMO/NMOSD presenting with acute transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. Preliminary evidence suggests a promising benefit with C1-esterase inhibitor in reducing neurologic damage and improving outcomes. A placebo-controlled trial is necessary to confirm these findings. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with NMO with acute transverse myelitis or optic neuritis, C1-esterase inhibitor is safe and improves disability. PMID:25340061

  4. Complement C1q Reduces Early Atherosclerosis in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vinay K.; Yun, Sheng; Leung, Viola; Grimsditch, David C.; Benson, G. Martin; Botto, Marina B.; Boyle, Joseph J.; Haskard, Dorian O.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the role of the classic complement pathway in atherogenesis by intercrossing C1q-deficient mice (C1qa−/−) with low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice (Ldlr−/−). Mice were fed a normal rodent diet until 22 weeks of age. Aortic root lesions were threefold larger in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/− mice compared with Ldlr−/− mice (3.72 ± 1.0% aortic root versus 1.1 ± 0.4%; mean ± SEM, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the cellular composition of lesions in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/− was more complex, with an increase in vascular smooth muscle cells. The greater aortic root lesion size in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/− mice occurred despite a significant reduction in C5b-9 deposition per lesion unit area, suggesting the critical importance of proximal pathway activity. Apoptotic cells were readily detectable by cleaved caspase-3 staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and electron microscopy in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/−, whereas apoptotic cells were not detected in Ldlr−/− mice. This is the first direct demonstration of a role for the classic complement pathway in atherogenesis. The greater lesion size in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/− mice is consistent with the emerging homeostatic role for C1q in the disposal of dying cells. This study suggests the importance of effective apoptotic cell removal for containing the size and complexity of early lesions in atherosclerosis. PMID:17200212

  5. Treatment of type I and II hereditary angioedema with Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema are of outstanding clinical importance, as edematous attacks associated with these conditions can thrust afflicted patients into mortal danger. Currently, C1 inhibitor concentrate - a human blood product - is available as a replacement therapy. In view of the limited number of donors, as well as the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, it is a reasonable expectation to develop a therapeutic alternative based on recombinant technology, which would eliminate all these shortcomings. Pharming (Leiden, The Netherlands) has developed Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor, as a proprietary product, which is currently being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials. Ongoing studies conducted within the framework of the development program are almost complete and their interim findings are reassuring. This should facilitate successful regulatory approval in the near future, which is indispensable in order to make Rhucin available for patients with hereditary angioedema or other disorders amenable to C1 inhibitor replacement. PMID:20477114

  6. Cinryze as the first approved C1 inhibitor in the USA for the treatment of hereditary angioedema: approval, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Lunn, Michael; Santos, Carah; Craig, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a clinical disorder characterized by a deficiency of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). HAE has traditionally been divided into two subtypes. Unique among the inherited deficiencies of the complement system, HAE Types I and II are inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. The generation of an HAE attack is caused by the depletion and/or consumption of C1-inhibitor manifested as subcutaneous or submucosal edema of the upper airway, face, extremities, or gastrointestinal tract. Attacks can be severe and potentially life-threatening, particularly with laryngeal involvement. Despite the availability of C1-INH for the treatment of HAE since the 1980s in Europe and other countries, HAE treatment in the United States was limited to androgen therapy. The human plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor (Cinryze™), distributed by Lev Pharmaceuticals, was approved in October 2008 for the prevention of HAE attacks based on the results of a phase III clinical trial. This review aims to describe the history of C1-INH replacement in HAE as well as the pharmacology, efficacy and safety of C1-INH, concentrating on Cinryze as the first approved chronic replacement treatment for the prophylaxis of HAE attacks. PMID:22282695

  7. Rhucin, a recombinant C1 inhibitor for the treatment of hereditary angioedema and cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, Hilary

    2008-03-01

    Pharming NV and Esteve are developing Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor. Rhucin is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials in North America and is awaiting regulatory approval in Western Europe for the treatment of prophylactic and acute hereditary angioedema. Pharming is also investigating Rhucin for the potential treatment of cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:18311668

  8. New insight into the effects of heparinoids on complement inhibition by C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Poppelaars, F; Damman, J; de Vrij, E L; Burgerhof, J G M; Saye, J; Daha, M R; Leuvenink, H G; Uknis, M E; Seelen, M A J

    2016-06-01

    Complement activation is of major importance in numerous pathological conditions. Therefore, targeted complement inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy. C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) controls activation of the classical pathway (CP) and the lectin pathway (LP). However, conflicting data exist on inhibition of the alternative pathway (AP) by C1-INH. The inhibitory capacity of C1-INH for the CP is potentiated by heparin and other glycosaminoglycans, but no data exist for the LP and AP. The current study investigates the effects of C1-INH in the presence or absence of different clinically used heparinoids on the CP, LP and AP. Furthermore, the combined effects of heparinoids and C1-INH on coagulation were investigated. C1-INH, heparinoids or combinations were analysed in a dose-dependent fashion in the presence of pooled serum. Functional complement activities were measured simultaneously using the Wielisa(®) -kit. The activated partial thrombin time was determined using an automated coagulation analyser. The results showed that all three complement pathways were inhibited significantly by C1-INH or heparinoids. Next to their individual effects on complement activation, heparinoids also enhanced the inhibitory capacity of C1-INH significantly on the CP and LP. For the AP, significant potentiation of C1-INH by heparinoids was found; however, this was restricted to certain concentration ranges. At low concentrations the effect on blood coagulation by combining heparinoids with C1-INH was minimal. In conclusion, our study shows significant potentiating effects of heparinoids on the inhibition of all complement pathways by C1-INH. Therefore, their combined use is a promising and a potentially cost-effective treatment option for complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26874675

  9. Transinhibition of C1 inhibitor synthesis in type I hereditary angioneurotic edema.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, J; Rosen, F S; Colten, H R; Rajczy, K; Strunk, R C

    1993-01-01

    To ascertain the mechanism for decreased synthesis of C1 inhibitor (C1 INH) in certain patients with the autosomal dominant disorder hereditary angioneurotic edema, we studied expression of C1 INH in fibroblasts in which the mutant and wild type mRNA and protein could be distinguished because of deletion of exon 7 (delta Ex7). In the HANE delta Ex7 cells, the amount of wild type mRNA (2.1 kb) was expressed at 52 +/- 2% (n = 5) of normal, whereas the mutant mRNA was 17 +/- 1% (n = 5) of normal. Rates of synthesis of both wild type and mutant proteins (11 +/- 3 and 3 +/- 1% of normal, respectively) were lower than predicted from the mRNA levels. There was no evidence of increased C1 INH protein catabolism. These data indicate that there are multiple levels of control of C1 INH synthesis in type I hereditary angioneurotic edema. Pretranslational regulation results in < 50% of the mutant truncated 1.9-kb mRNA. In addition, translational regulation results in decreased synthesis of both wild type and mutatn C1 INH proteins. These data suggest a transinhibition of wild type C1 INH translation by mutant mRNA and/or protein. Images PMID:8450054

  10. Treatment response after repeated administration of C1 esterase inhibitor for successive acute hereditary angioedema attacks.

    PubMed

    Craig, Timothy J; Bewtra, Againdra K; Hurewitz, David; Levy, Robyn; Janss, Gerti; Jacobson, Kraig W; Packer, Flint; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Rojavin, Mikhail A; Machnig, Thomas; Keinecke, Heinz-Otto; Wasserman, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Placebo-controlled studies established the efficacy of replacement therapy with C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate for treating single acute hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks, but only limited data from prospective studies are available on repeated treatment of successive HAE attacks. This study evaluates the association between repeated treatments with 20 U/kg of C1-INH concentrate (Berinert; CSL Behring, Marburg, Germany) for HAE attacks at any body location and treatment response. In a post hoc analysis of an open-label extension study (International Multicenter Prospective Angioedema C1-INH Trial [I.M.P.A.C.T.2]), the association between repeated treatment with C1-INH and times to onset of symptom relief and complete resolution of HAE symptoms was assessed in patients who were treated for at least 15 attacks by linear regression on the ordinal attack number. Eighteen patients received C1-INH concentrate for at least 15 HAE attacks over a mean duration of 34 months. Demographic and baseline characteristics of these patients were similar to those of all patients in the study. The distribution of body locations and the intensity of HAE attacks were similar for each of the first 15 attacks and subsequent attacks. The extent of previous use of C1-INH concentrate had no effect on the time to onset of symptom relief, the time to complete resolution of HAE symptoms, or the time between attacks treated with C1-INH concentrate; the median of individual linear regression coefficients was not statistically significantly different from 0. Treatment with 20 U/kg of C1-INH concentrate provided consistent treatment response in patients treated for multiple successive HAE attacks at any body location. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00292981). PMID:22856636

  11. C1 Inhibitor Limits Organ Injury and Prolongs Survival in Swine Subjected to Battlefield Simulated Injury.

    PubMed

    Campbell, James C; Li, Yansong; van Amersfoort, Edwin; Relan, Anurag; Dubick, Michael; Sheppard, Forest; Pusateri, Anthony; Niemeyer, Debra; Tsokos, George C; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J

    2016-09-01

    Complement system activation is recognized as a deleterious component of the mammalian physiological response to traumatic injury with severe hemorrhage (TH). Female Yorkshire swine were subjected to a simulated austere prehospital battlefield scenario. Each animal underwent controlled hemorrhage of 22 mL/kg at 100 mL/min rate for approximately 10 min followed by soft tissue injury, femur fracture, and spleen injury. Subsequent blood loss was uncontrolled. Twenty-eight minutes postinjury the animals were randomized into treatment or no treatment with recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) (500 IU/kg, n = 11) and into receiving or not permissive hypotensive resuscitation (n = 14) with infusion of 45 mL/kg lactated Ringer's solution (2× blood lost). Observation and animal maintenance continued for 6 h at which time the animals had either expired or were euthanized. Heart, lung, and small intestine tissue samples were collected. Pharmacokinetic, hemodynamic, and metabolic parameters as well as survival time, plasma complement activity and tissue deposition, cytokine levels, and tissue injury were determined. We found that administration of C1INH protected tissues from damage, reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines, and improved blood chemistry. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that C1INH administration following TH markedly reduced complement activation and deposition in tissues. Importantly, C1INH administration prolonged survival of animals particularly in those which received resuscitation fluid infusion. Our data urge early administration of C1INH to limit organ damage and prolong survival of those injured in the battlefield. PMID:27405065

  12. C1-Inhibitor protects from focal brain trauma in a cortical cryolesion mice model by reducing thrombo-inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Albert-Weissenberger, Christiane; Mencl, Stine; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Salur, Irmak; Göb, Eva; Langhauser, Friederike; Hopp, Sarah; Hennig, Nelli; Meuth, Sven G.; Nolte, Marc W.; Sirén, Anna-Leena; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a strong inflammatory response which includes blood-brain barrier damage, edema formation and infiltration of different immune cell subsets. More recently, microvascular thrombosis has been identified as another pathophysiological feature of TBI. The contact-kinin system represents an interface between inflammatory and thrombotic circuits and is activated in different neurological diseases. C1-Inhibitor counteracts activation of the contact-kinin system at multiple levels. We investigated the therapeutic potential of C1-Inhibitor in a model of TBI. Male and female C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cortical cryolesion and treated with C1-Inhibitor after 1 h. Lesion volumes were assessed between day 1 and day 5 and blood-brain barrier damage, thrombus formation as well as the local inflammatory response were determined post TBI. Treatment of male mice with 15.0 IU C1-Inhibitor, but not 7.5 IU, 1 h after cryolesion reduced lesion volumes by ~75% on day 1. This protective effect was preserved in female mice and at later stages of trauma. Mechanistically, C1-Inhibitor stabilized the blood-brain barrier and decreased the invasion of immune cells into the brain parenchyma. Moreover, C1-Inhibitor had strong antithrombotic effects. C1-Inhibitor represents a multifaceted anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic compound that prevents traumatic neurodegeneration in clinically meaningful settings. PMID:25249935

  13. C1 Esterase Inhibitor Reduces Lower Extremity Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Associated Lung Damage

    PubMed Central

    Duehrkop, Claudia; Banz, Yara; Spirig, Rolf; Miescher, Sylvia; Nolte, Marc W.; Spycher, Martin; Smith, Richard A. G.; Sacks, Steven H.; Rieben, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemia/reperfusion injury of lower extremities and associated lung damage may result from thrombotic occlusion, embolism, trauma, or surgical intervention with prolonged ischemia and subsequent restoration of blood flow. This clinical entity is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. Deprivation of blood supply leads to molecular and structural changes in the affected tissue. Upon reperfusion inflammatory cascades are activated causing tissue injury. We therefore tested preoperative treatment for prevention of reperfusion injury by using C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH). Methods and Findings Wistar rats systemically pretreated with C1 INH (n = 6), APT070 (a membrane-targeted myristoylated peptidyl construct derived from human complement receptor 1, n = 4), vehicle (n = 7), or NaCl (n = 8) were subjected to 3h hind limb ischemia and 24h reperfusion. The femoral artery was clamped and a tourniquet placed under maintenance of a venous return. C1 INH treated rats showed significantly less edema in muscle (P<0.001) and lung and improved muscle viability (P<0.001) compared to controls and APT070. C1 INH prevented up-regulation of bradykinin receptor b1 (P<0.05) and VE-cadherin (P<0.01), reduced apoptosis (P<0.001) and fibrin deposition (P<0.01) and decreased plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas deposition of complement components was not significantly reduced in the reperfused muscle. Conclusions C1 INH reduced edema formation locally in reperfused muscle as well as in lung, and improved muscle viability. C1 INH did not primarily act via inhibition of the complement system, but via the kinin and coagulation cascade. APT070 did not show beneficial effects in this model, despite potent inhibition of complement activation. Taken together, C1 INH might be a promising therapy to reduce peripheral ischemia/reperfusion injury and distant lung damage in complex and prolonged surgical interventions requiring tourniquet application

  14. The functional integrity of the serpin domain of C1-inhibitor depends on the unique N-terminal domain, as revealed by a pathological mutant.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Roem, Dorina; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Hack, C Erik; Eldering, Eric

    2003-08-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) with a unique, non-conserved N-terminal domain of unknown function. Genetic deficiency of C1-Inh causes hereditary angioedema. A novel type of mutation (Delta 3) in exon 3 of the C1-Inh gene, resulting in deletion of Asp62-Thr116 in this unique domain, was encountered in a hereditary angioedema pedigree. Because the domain is supposedly not essential for inhibitory activity, the unexpected loss-of-function of this deletion mutant was further investigated. The Delta 3 mutant and three additional mutants starting at Pro76, Gly98, and Ser115, lacking increasing parts of the N-terminal domain, were produced recombinantly. C1-Inh76 and C1-Inh98 retained normal conformation and interaction kinetics with target proteases. In contrast, C1-Inh115 and Delta 3, which both lack the connection between the serpin and the non-serpin domain via two disulfide bridges, were completely non-functional because of a complex-like and multimeric conformation, as demonstrated by several criteria. The Delta 3 mutant also circulated in multimeric form in plasma from affected family members. The C1-Inh mutant reported here is unique in that deletion of an entire amino acid stretch from a domain not shared by other serpins leads to a loss-of-function. The deletion in the unique N-terminal domain results in a "multimerization phenotype" of C1-Inh, because of diminished stability of the central beta-sheet. This phenotype, as well as the location of the disulfide bridges between the serpin and the non-serpin domain of C1-Inh, suggests that the function of the N-terminal region may be similar to one of the effects of heparin in antithrombin III, maintenance of the metastable serpin conformation. PMID:12773530

  15. Recent developments in the treatment of acute abdominal and facial attacks of hereditary angioedema: focus on human C1 esterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Lourdes Pastó; Bellfill, Ramon Lleonart; Caus, Joaquim Marcoval

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially fatal genetic disorder typified by a deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) of the C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) and characterized by swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, abdominal viscera, and upper airway. Type III is normal estrogen-sensitive C1-INH HAE. Bradykinin, the main mediator of HAE, binds to endothelial B2 receptors, increasing vascular permeability and resulting in edema. HAE management includes short- and long-term prophylaxis. For treating acute episodes, C1-INH concentrate is recommended with regression of symptoms achieved in 30-90 min. Infusions of 500-1000 U have been used in Europe for years. Two plasma-derived C1-INH concentrates have been licensed recently in the United States: Berinert(®) for treating acute attacks and Cinryze(®) for prophylaxis in adolescent/adult patients. A recombinant C1-INH that is being considered for approval (conestat alfa) exhibited significant superiority versus placebo. Ecallantide (Kalbitor(®)) is a selective kallikrein inhibitor recently licensed in the United States for treating acute attacks in patients aged >16 years. It is administered in three 10-mg subcutaneous injections with the risk of anaphylactic reactions. Icatibant (Firazyr(®)) is a bradykinin B2 receptor competitor. It is administered subcutaneously as a 30-mg injection and approved in Europe but not in the United States. PMID:23776358

  16. The Levels of the Lectin Pathway Serine Protease MASP-1 and Its Complex Formation with C1 Inhibitor Are Linked to the Severity of Hereditary Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Cecilie Bo; Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette; Hansen, Karin Møller; Koch, Claus; Skjødt, Karsten; Garred, Peter; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2015-10-15

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is known to form complexes with the lectin complement pathway serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2. Deficiency of C1-INH is associated with hereditary angioedema (HAE), an autosomal inherited disease characterized by swelling attacks caused by elevated levels of bradykinin. MASP-1 was shown to cleave high m.w. kininogen into bradykinin; therefore, we hypothesized that MASP-1 levels and the quantity of MASP-1/C1-INH complexes might be associated with different paraclinical and clinical outcomes of HAE. We measured MASP-1 serum concentrations and endogenous MASP-1/C1-INH complex levels in 128 HAE patients and 100 controls. Relatively high levels of pre-existing MASP-1/C1-INH complexes were observed in normal serum, and we found that both the serum levels of MASP-1 and the complex formation between MASP-1 and C1-INH were significantly reduced in HAE patients compared with matched controls (p < 0.0001). The level of MASP-1 and MASP-1/C1-INH complexes in HE patients correlated with the level of C1-INH (p = 0.0009 and p = 0.0047, respectively), the level of C4 (p = 0.0084 and p < 0.0001, respectively), and the number of attacks in the year of blood sampling (p = 0.0075 and p = 0.0058, respectively). In conclusion, we show that MASP-1/C1-INH complexes circulate in normal human blood. The levels of MASP-1 and MASP-1/C1-INH complexes are reduced in HAE patients compared with controls. Both MASP-1 and MASP-1/C1-INH complexes are related to the degree of complement C4 consumption, as well as the severity of disease. These results suggest that MASP-1 may exert a previously unrecognized role in the pathophysiology of HAE. PMID:26371246

  17. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  18. Purification and characterization of two functionally distinct forms of C1 inhibitor from a patient with angioedema.

    PubMed Central

    Curd, J G; Yelvington, M; Ziccardi, R J; Mathison, D A; Griffin, J H

    1981-01-01

    A minority of patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) have normal concentrations of a dysfunctional C1 inhibitor protein (C1INH) in their plasmas. We purified C1INH from the plasmas of one such patient before and during treatment with the anabolic steroid stanozolol. Both the pretreatment plasma and plasma obtained during stanozolol treatment contained varying amounts of two extremely similar C1INH proteins that were functionally distinct. The pretreatment plasma contained primarily (94%) dysfunctional C1INH that did not inactivate or complex with either purified C1s, activated Hageman factor, or kallikrein and small amounts (6%) of functionally normal C1INH. Stanozolol treatment increased the plasma concentrations of both of these proteins as well as the proportion (23%) of functional C1INH in the plasma. The purified dysfunctional and functional C1INHs had identical or nearly identical molecular sizes, charges, amino acid compositions, and amino sugar contents, and could not be distinguished physicochemically from each other or from normal C1INH. From these studies of purified C1INH proteins we concluded that HAE associated with dysfunctional C1INH is due to a defect at the structural locus for one C1INH gene and that both the dysfunctional C1INH gene and the normal C1INH gene products are present in the plasma of the affected subject. Treatment with stanozolol comparably increased the synthesis of both C1INH proteins. The disproportionate rise in the level of the normal C1INH protein is consistent with the view that it is more rapidly catabolized as a consequence of its interaction with the proteases it inactivates. PMID:6976242

  19. Synthesis of C1 inhibitor in fibroblasts from patients with type I and type II hereditary angioneurotic edema.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, J; Katz, Y; Rosen, F S; Davis, A E; Strunk, R C

    1991-01-01

    Patients with hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) have serum levels of functionally active inhibitor of the first component of complement (C1 INH) between 5 and 30% of normal, instead of the 50% expected from the single normal allele. Increases in rates of catabolism have been documented in patients with HANE and certainly account for some of decrease in C1 INH level. A possible role for a decrease in synthesis of C1 INH in producing serum levels of C1 INH below the expected 50% of normal has not been well studied. We studied the synthesis of C1 INH in skin fibroblast lines, which produce easily detectable amounts of C1 INH. In type I HANE cells, C1 INH synthesis was 19.6 +/- 4.0% (mean +/- SD) of normal, much less than the 50% predicted. In type II HANE cells, the total amount of C1 INH synthesis (functional and dysfunctional) was 98.9 +/- 17% of normal; the functional protein comprised 43% of the total. Thus, type II HANE cells synthesized functional C1 INH at a much greater rate than for the type I cells. In both type I and II HANE cells, amounts of steady-state C1 INH mRNA levels paralleled rates of C1 INH synthesis, indicating that control of C1 INH synthesis occurred at pretranslational levels. Both type I and type II fibroblasts synthesized normal amounts of C1r and C1s. These data suggest that the lower than expected amounts of functionally active C1 INH in type I HANE may be due, in part, to a decrease in rate of synthesis of the protein, and that the expressions of the normal C1 INH allele in HANE is influenced by the type of abnormal allele present. Images PMID:1902490

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-induced angioedema treated by C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate (Berinert®): about one case and review of the therapeutic arsenal

    PubMed Central

    Lipski, Samuel Michael; Casimir, Georges; Vanlommel, Martine; Jeanmaire, Mathieu; Dolhen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert®) is generally used to treat severe attack of hereditary angioedema. We describe here the case of a patient who presented with a severe angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) endangering her life. It could be successfully treated with that medicine. PMID:25767713

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-induced angioedema treated by C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate (Berinert®): about one case and review of the therapeutic arsenal.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Samuel Michael; Casimir, Georges; Vanlommel, Martine; Jeanmaire, Mathieu; Dolhen, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert®) is generally used to treat severe attack of hereditary angioedema. We describe here the case of a patient who presented with a severe angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) endangering her life. It could be successfully treated with that medicine. PMID:25767713

  2. Mutations analysis of C1 inhibitor coding sequence gene among Portuguese patients with hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Martinho, A; Mendes, J; Simões, O; Nunes, R; Gomes, J; Dias Castro, E; Leiria-Pinto, P; Ferreira, M B; Pereira, C; Castel-Branco, M G; Pais, L

    2013-04-01

    Mutations that modify the amino acid sequence of C1-INH (except Val458Met) are associated with HAE. More than 200 different mutations scattering the entire C1-INH gene have been reported. The main objective of this study was to report the mutational findings in a HAE cohort of 138 Portuguese patients followed in specialized consultation all over the country. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood with QiaSymphony BioRobot (QIAGEN Portugal). The sequence reactions were performed by using a DNA sequencing kit (Big Dye terminator cycle sequencing v1.1/v3.1 from Applied Biosystems) and sequencing products were immediately submitted to direct sequencing on an Applied Biosystem 3130 DNA Analyser. DNA sequences were analyzed at four different stages. Raw data and sequence alignments of all 8 exons and intron-exon boundaries were performed for each patient individually with SeqScape software and using SERPING1 gene NG_009625 of 24,300 bp (12-March-2011) as reference sequence. Sequence comparisons among patients and controls were performed with software CodonCode Aligner v.3.7 from CodonCode Corp and with Geneious 4.5 from Biomatters Lda. A total of 94 point mutations were observed among patients, and 67% of them were located on exon 8. In addition, we noticed one not described stop codon at position c.1459 C>T in three different patients. Translation termination was also found on exon 3 and 7, as a result of mutations at positions c.481A>7, c.1174C>T. In this population, the prevalence of the missense mutation p.Arg444Cys was 39 out of 42. Mutational analysis revealed 22 different pathogenic mutations, of which 64% were not described on HAE database. Although identification of disease causing mutations is not necessary to establish HAE diagnosis, studies on gene expression and characterization of rearrangements in SERPING1 gene are suggested in order to get new insights on function and genetic tests of C1 inhibitor. PMID:23123409

  3. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor and factor XII mutation: a series of 57 patients from the French National Center of Reference for Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Deroux, A; Boccon-Gibod, I; Fain, O; Pralong, P; Ollivier, Y; Pagnier, A; Djenouhat, K; Du-Thanh, A; Gompel, A; Faisant, C; Launay, D; Bouillet, L

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disease associated with either a quantitative or qualitative deficiency in C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) or normal C1-INH. HAE with normal C1-INH is associated in 20% of cases with mutations in the gene for factor XII (FXII) or FXII-HAE. A recent review described 41 families, including 14 German and 15 Spanish families. We have constructed a register of French patients and their characteristics. A national survey was launched through the French National Center of Reference for Angioedema (CREAK) to study the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of patients with HAE linked to a mutation of FXII gene. Fifty-seven patients were identified from 24 different families. In most cases they were young women (mean age at diagnosis: 31 years, mean age at first symptom: 21 years, female/male ratio: 76%). Twenty-one per cent of the patients experienced angioedema attacks only during pregnancy or when on oestrogen contraception. Sixty-three per cent had attacks at all times, but they were more severe during these same periods. Male carriers of the mutation were more frequently asymptomatic than females (P = 0·003). C1-INH concentrate and icatibant were both effective for treating attacks. The prophylactic use of tranexamic acid led to a 64% decrease in the number of attacks. This is one of the largest series reported of HAE patients with FXII mutation. The therapeutic management appeared to be identical to that of HAE with C1-INH deficiency. PMID:27271546

  4. Recombinations between Alu repeat sequences that result in partial deletions within the C1 inhibitor gene.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Carter, P E; Davis, A E

    1990-12-01

    Genomic DNA sequence analysis was used to define the extent of deletions within the C1 inhibitor gene in two families with type I hereditary angioneurotic edema. Southern blot analysis initially indicated the presence of the partial deletions. One deletion was approximately 2 kb and included exon VII, whereas the other was approximately 8.5 kb and included exons IV-VI. Genomic libraries from an affected member of each family were constructed and clones containing the deletions were analyzed. Sequence analysis of the deletion joints of the mutants and corresponding regions of the normal gene in the two families demonstrated that both deletion joints resulted from recombination of two Alu repetitive DNA elements. Alu repeat sequences from introns VI and VII combined to make a novel Alu in family A, and Alu sequences in introns III and VI were spliced to make a new Alu in family B. The splice sites in the Alu sequences of both mutants were located in the left arm of the Alu element, and both recombination joints overlapped one of the RNA polymerase III promoter sequences. Because the involved Alu sequences, in both instances, were oriented in the same direction, unequal crossingover is the most likely mechanism to account for these mutations. PMID:2276734

  5. Peptide inhibitor of complement c1, a novel suppressor of classical pathway activation: mechanistic studies and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julia A; Whitley, Pamela H; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2014-01-01

    The classical pathway of complement plays multiple physiological roles including modulating immunological effectors initiated by adaptive immune responses and an essential homeostatic role in the clearance of damaged self-antigens. However, dysregulated classical pathway activation is associated with antibody-initiated, inflammatory diseases processes like cold agglutinin disease, acute intravascular hemolytic transfusion reaction (AIHTR), and acute/hyperacute transplantation rejection. To date, only one putative classical pathway inhibitor, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), is currently commercially available and its only approved indication is for replacement treatment in hereditary angioedema, which is predominantly a kinin pathway disease. Given the variety of disease conditions in which the classical pathway is implicated, development of therapeutics that specifically inhibits complement initiation represents a major unmet medical need. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement. In vitro studies have demonstrated that these peptide inhibitors of complement C1 (PIC1) bind to the collagen-like region of the initiator molecule of the classical pathway, C1q. PIC1 binding to C1q blocks activation of the associated serine proteases (C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s) and subsequent downstream complement activation. Rational design optimization of PIC1 has resulted in the generation of a highly potent derivative of 15 amino acids. PIC1 inhibits classical pathway mediated complement activation in ABO incompatibility in vitro and inhibiting classical pathway activation in vivo in rats. This review will focus on the pre-clinical development of PIC1 and discuss its potential as a therapeutic in antibody-mediated classical pathway disease, specifically AIHTR. PMID:25202312

  6. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1, a Novel Suppressor of Classical Pathway Activation: Mechanistic Studies and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Whitley, Pamela H.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2014-01-01

    The classical pathway of complement plays multiple physiological roles including modulating immunological effectors initiated by adaptive immune responses and an essential homeostatic role in the clearance of damaged self-antigens. However, dysregulated classical pathway activation is associated with antibody-initiated, inflammatory diseases processes like cold agglutinin disease, acute intravascular hemolytic transfusion reaction (AIHTR), and acute/hyperacute transplantation rejection. To date, only one putative classical pathway inhibitor, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), is currently commercially available and its only approved indication is for replacement treatment in hereditary angioedema, which is predominantly a kinin pathway disease. Given the variety of disease conditions in which the classical pathway is implicated, development of therapeutics that specifically inhibits complement initiation represents a major unmet medical need. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement. In vitro studies have demonstrated that these peptide inhibitors of complement C1 (PIC1) bind to the collagen-like region of the initiator molecule of the classical pathway, C1q. PIC1 binding to C1q blocks activation of the associated serine proteases (C1s–C1r–C1r–C1s) and subsequent downstream complement activation. Rational design optimization of PIC1 has resulted in the generation of a highly potent derivative of 15 amino acids. PIC1 inhibits classical pathway mediated complement activation in ABO incompatibility in vitro and inhibiting classical pathway activation in vivo in rats. This review will focus on the pre-clinical development of PIC1 and discuss its potential as a therapeutic in antibody-mediated classical pathway disease, specifically AIHTR. PMID:25202312

  7. 20 CFR 664.205 - How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How is the âdeficient in basic literacy... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy... documentation requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1)...

  8. 20 CFR 664.205 - How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How is the âdeficient in basic literacy... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy... documentation requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1)...

  9. 20 CFR 664.205 - How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) defined and documented?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How is the âdeficient in basic literacy... INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.205 How is the “deficient in basic literacy skills... requirements regarding the “deficient in basic literacy skills” criterion in § 664.200(c)(1) may be...

  10. The comparative pathology of the glycosidase inhibitors swainsonine, castanospermine, calystegines A3, B2 and C1 in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To characterize and compare the toxicity and pathology of glycosidase inhibitors swainsonine, castanospermine, calystegine A3, calystegine B2 and calystegine C1, 48 Swiss Webster, male mice were randomly divided into 16 groups of 3 animals each. All mice were implanted with subcutaneous osmotic min...

  11. Human C1-Inhibitor Suppresses Malaria Parasite Invasion and Cytoadhesion via Binding to Parasite Glycosylphosphatidylinositol and Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Pedro; Diez-Silva, Monica; Kamena, Faustin; Lu, Fengxin; Fernandes, Stacey M; Seeberger, Peter H; Davis, Alvin E; Mitchell, James R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-induced severe malaria remains a continuing problem in areas of endemicity, with elevated morbidity and mortality. Drugs targeting mechanisms involved in severe malaria pathology, including cytoadhesion of infected red blood cells (RBCs) to host receptors and production of proinflammatory cytokines, are still necessary. Human C1-inhibitor (C1INH) is a multifunctional protease inhibitor that regulates coagulation, vascular permeability, and inflammation, with beneficial effects in inflammatory disease models, including septic shock. We found that human C1INH, at therapeutically relevant doses, blocks severe malaria pathogenic processes by 2 distinct mechanisms. First, C1INH bound to glycan moieties within P. falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositol (PfGPI) molecules on the parasite surface, inhibiting parasite RBC invasion and proinflammatory cytokine production by parasite-stimulated monocytes in vitro and reducing parasitemia in a rodent model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in vivo. Second, C1INH bound to host CD36 and chondroitin sulfate A molecules, interfering with cytoadhesion of infected RBCs by competitive binding to these receptors in vitro and reducing sequestration in specific tissues and protecting against ECM in vivo. This study reveals that C1INH is a potential therapeutic antimalarial molecule able to interfere with severe-disease etiology at multiple levels through specific interactions with both parasite PfGPIs and host cell receptors. PMID:26347576

  12. Molecular basis for the deficiency of complement 1 inhibitor in type I hereditary angioneurotic edema.

    PubMed Central

    Cicardi, M; Igarashi, T; Rosen, F S; Davis, A E

    1987-01-01

    Hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) results from deficiency of complement 1 inhibitor (C1 INH). In type I HANE, C1 INH is present in serum at levels 5-30% of normals. Using cultured monocytes and biosynthetic labeling of proteins, C1 INH was detected in supernatants of cells from HANE patients at levels 20% of those detected in normals. The intracellular reduction of C1 INH in patients' monocytes approached 50%. The study of C1 INH messenger RNA (mRNA) by Northern blot analysis indicated that in HANE patients' monocytes a message of normal size is present at about half the concentration of that from normal cells. One of the patients analyzed showed the presence of a genetically inherited abnormal mRNA (1.9 kb) in addition to the normal mRNA (2.1 kb). Southern blot analysis of DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes did not show any difference in quantity or in sizes of endonuclease restriction fragments between patients and normals. The defect(s), therefore, in type I HANE is pretranslational, but is not due to a deletion or to a major chromosomal rearrangement. Images PMID:3818946

  13. Accumulation of Free Oligosaccharides and Tissue Damage in Cytosolic α-Mannosidase (Man2c1)-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Paciotti, Silvia; Persichetti, Emanuele; Klein, Katharina; Tasegian, Anna; Duvet, Sandrine; Hartmann, Dieter; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Beccari, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    Free Man7–9GlcNAc2 is released during the biosynthesis pathway of N-linked glycans or from misfolded glycoproteins during the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation process and are reduced to Man5GlcNAc in the cytosol. In this form, free oligosaccharides can be transferred into the lysosomes to be degraded completely. α-Mannosidase (MAN2C1) is the enzyme responsible for the partial demannosylation occurring in the cytosol. It has been demonstrated that the inhibition of MAN2C1 expression induces accumulation of Man8–9GlcNAc oligosaccharides and apoptosis in vitro. We investigated the consequences caused by the lack of cytosolic α-mannosidase activity in vivo by the generation of Man2c1-deficient mice. Increased amounts of Man8–9GlcNAc oligosaccharides were recognized in all analyzed KO tissues. Histological analysis of the CNS revealed neuronal and glial degeneration with formation of multiple vacuoles in deep neocortical layers and major telencephalic white matter tracts. Enterocytes of the small intestine accumulate mannose-containing saccharides and glycogen particles in their apical cytoplasm as well as large clear vacuoles in retronuclear position. Liver tissue is characterized by groups of hepatocytes with increased content of mannosyl compounds and glycogen, some of them undergoing degeneration by hydropic swelling. In addition, lectin screening showed the presence of mannose-containing saccharides in the epithelium of proximal kidney tubules, whereas scattered glomeruli appeared collapsed or featured signs of fibrosis along Bowman's capsule. Except for a moderate enrichment of mannosyl compounds and glycogen, heterozygous mice were normal, arguing against possible toxic effects of truncated Man2c1. These findings confirm the key role played by Man2c1 in the catabolism of free oligosaccharides. PMID:24550399

  14. Substrate properties of C1 inhibitor Ma (alanine 434----glutamic acid). Genetic and structural evidence suggesting that the P12-region contains critical determinants of serine protease inhibitor/substrate status.

    PubMed

    Skriver, K; Wikoff, W R; Patston, P A; Tausk, F; Schapira, M; Kaplan, A P; Bock, S C

    1991-05-15

    The serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor inactivates enzymes involved in the regulation of vascular permeability. A patient from the Ma family with the genetic disorder hereditary angioedema inherited a dysfunctional C1 inhibitor allele. Relative to normal plasma, the patients's plasma contained an additional C1 inhibitor immunoreactive band, which comigrated with normal C1 inhibitor cleaved by plasma kallikrein, C1s, or factor XIIa. C1 inhibitor Ma did not react with a monoclonal antibody to a neoepitope that is present in complexed and cleaved normal C1 inhibitor, suggesting conformational differences between cleaved normal C1- inhibitor and cleaved C1 inhibitor Ma. Molecular cloning and sequencing of exon 8 of the C1 inhibitor Ma allele revealed a single C to A mutation, changing alanine 434 to glutamic acid. Ala 434 of C1 inhibitor aligns with the P12 residue of the prototypical serpin alpha 1-antitrypsin. The P12 amino acid of all inhibitory serpins is alanine, and it is present in a highly conserved region on the amino-terminal side of the serpin-reactive center loop. Whereas normal C1 inhibitor expressed by transfected COS-1 cells formed complexes with and was cleaved by kallikrein, fXIIa, and C1s, COS-1-expressed Ala434---Glu C1 inhibitor was cleaved by these enzymes but did not form complexes with them. These results, together with evidence from other studies, suggest that serpin protease inhibitor activity is the result of protein conformational change that occurs when the P12 region of a serpin moves from a surface location, on the reactive site loop of the native molecule, to an internal location within sheet A of the complexed inhibitor. PMID:2026621

  15. C1 Inhibitor in Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Nonresponsive to Conventional Therapy in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Viglietti, D; Gosset, C; Loupy, A; Deville, L; Verine, J; Zeevi, A; Glotz, D; Lefaucheur, C

    2016-05-01

    Complement inhibitors have not been thoroughly evaluated in the treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). We performed a prospective, single-arm pilot study to investigate the potential effects and safety of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) Berinert added to high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the treatment of acute ABMR that is nonresponsive to conventional therapy. Kidney recipients with nonresponsive active ABMR and acute allograft dysfunction were enrolled between April 2013 and July 2014 and received C1-INH and IVIG for 6 months (six patients). The primary end point was the change in eGFR at 6 months after inclusion (M+6). Secondary end points included the changes in histology and DSA characteristics and adverse events as evaluated at M+6. All patients showed an improvement in eGFR between inclusion and M+6: from 38.7 ± 17.9 to 45.2 ± 21.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.0277). There was no change in histological features, except a decrease in the C4d deposition rate from 5/6 to 1/6 (p = 0.0455). There was a change in DSA C1q status from 6/6 to 1/6 positive (p = 0.0253). One deep venous thrombosis was observed. In a secondary analysis, C1-INH patients were compared with a similar historical control group (21 patients). C1-INH added to IVIG is safe and may improve allograft function in kidney recipients with nonresponsive acute ABMR. PMID:26693703

  16. Genetic deficiency of C4, C2 or C1q and lupus syndromes. Association with anti-Ro (SS-A) antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, O; Hauptmann, G; Tappeiner, G; Ochs, H D; Mascart-Lemone, F

    1985-01-01

    Sera from 15 patients with genetically determined complement component deficiencies were studied for the presence of antibodies to various nuclear antigens. One of three patients with C2 deficiency presented with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); all eight patients with C4 deficiency had either SLE or a lupus-like syndrome, and two of four patients with functional C1q deficiency had SLE. Five of nine complement deficiency patients with SLE studied had measurable antinuclear antibody titres, but only two had antibodies against native DNA. Precipitating antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens were found in sera from seven of the 11 complement deficient patients with SLE; one had only antibodies against antigens extracted from calf thymus (ECT), six patients (one with C2 deficiency, four with C4 deficiency and one with C1q deficiency) had anti-Ro (SS-A) antibodies with or without anti-ECT antibodies. The frequency of anti-Ro antibodies in the complement deficient population with SLE (55%) was significantly higher (P less than 0.02) than that of a control population of SLE patients without genetically determined complement deficiencies (27%). PMID:3878757

  17. COOH-terminal substitutions in the serpin C1 inhibitor that cause loop overinsertion and subsequent multimerization.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Verpy, E; Roem, D; Meo, T; Tosi, M

    1995-02-10

    The region COOH-terminal to the reactive center loop is highly conserved in the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) family. We have studied the structural consequences of three substitutions (Val451-->Met, Phe455-->Ser, and Pro476-->Ser) found in this region of C1 inhibitor in patients suffering from hereditary angioedema. Equivalent substitutions have been described in alpha 1-antitrypsin and antithrombin III. The mutant C1 inhibitor proteins were only partially secreted upon transient transfection into COS-7 cells and were found to be dysfunctional. Immunoprecipitation of conditioned media demonstrated that in the intact, uncleaved form they all bind to a monoclonal antibody which recognizes specifically the protease-complexed or reactive center-cleaved normal C1 inhibitor. A second indication for an intrinsic conformational change was the increased thermostability compared to the normal protein. Furthermore, gel filtration studies showed that the Val451-->Met and Pro476-->Ser mutant proteins, and to a lesser extent Phe455-->Ser, were prone to spontaneous multimerization. Finally, a reduced susceptibility to reactive center cleavage by trypsin was observed for all three mutants, and the cleaved Val451-->Met and Pro476-->Ser mutants failed to adopt the conformation recognized by a cleavage-specific monoclonal antibody. Investigation of plasmas of patients with the Val451-->Met or Pro476-->Ser substitutions showed that these dysfunctional proteins circulate at low levels and are recognized by the complex-specific antibody. These results strongly indicate a conformational change as a result of these carboxylterminal substitutions, such that anchoring of the reactive center loop at the COOH-terminal side is not achieved properly. We propose that this results in overinsertion of the loop into beta-sheet A, which subsequently leads to multimerization. PMID:7852321

  18. Molecular phylogeny of C1 inhibitor depicts two immunoglobulin-like domains fusion in fishes and ray-finned fishes specific intron insertion after separation from zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Sarde, Sandeep J.; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • C1 inhibitors of fishes have two Ig domains fused in the N-terminal end. • Spliceosomal introns gain in two Ig domains of selected ray-finned fishes. • C1 inhibitors gene is maintained from 450 MY on the same locus. • C1 inhibitors gene is missing in frog and lampreys. • C1 inhibitors of tetrapod and fishes differ in the RCL region. - Abstract: C1 inhibitor (C1IN) is a multi-facet serine protease inhibitor in the plasma cascades, inhibiting several proteases, notably, regulates both complement and contact system activation. Despite huge advancements in the understanding of C1IN based on biochemical properties and its roles in the plasma cascades, the phylogenetic history of C1IN remains uncharacterized. To date, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history of C1IN. Herein, we explored phylogenetic history of C1IN gene in vertebrates. Fishes have C1IN with two immunoglobulin like domains attached in the N-terminal region. The RCL regions of CIIN from fishes and tetrapod genomes have variations at the positions P2 and P1′. Gene structures of C1IN gene from selected ray-finned fishes varied in the Ig domain region with creation of novel intron splitting exon Im2 into Im2a and Im2b. This intron is limited to ray-finned fishes with genome size reduced below 1 Gb. Hence, we suggest that genome compaction and associated double-strand break repairs are behind this intron gain. This study reveals the evolutionary history of C1IN and confirmed that this gene remains the same locus for ∼450 MY in 52 vertebrates analysed, but it is not found in frogs and lampreys.

  19. Fibulin-1C, C1 Esterase Inhibitor and Glucose Regulated Protein 75 Interact with the CREC Proteins, Calumenin and Reticulocalbin

    PubMed Central

    Aune Westergaard Hansen, Gry; Ludvigsen, Maja; Jacobsen, Christian; Cangemi, Claudia; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars; Vorum, Henrik; Honoré, Bent

    2015-01-01

    Affinity purification, immunoprecipitation, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify fibulin-1C, C1 esterase inhibitor and glucose regulated protein 75, grp75, as binding partners of the CREC proteins, calumenin and reticulocalbin. Surface plasmon resonance was used to verify the interaction of all three proteins with each of the CREC proteins. Fibulin-1C interacts with calumenin and reticulocalbin with an estimated dissociation constant around 50-60 nM. The interaction, at least for reticulocalbin, was not dependent upon the presence of Ca2+. C1 esterase inhibitor interacted with both proteins with an estimated dissociation constant at 1 μM for reticulocalbin and 150 nM for calumenin. The interaction, at least for calumenin, was dependent upon the presence of Ca2+ with strong interaction at 3.5 mM while no detectable interaction could be found at 0.1 mM. Grp75 binds with an affinity of approximately 3-7 nM with reticulocalbin as well as with calumenin. These interactions suggest functional participation of the CREC proteins in chaperone activity, cell proliferation and transformation, cellular aging, haemostasis and thrombosis as well as modulation of the complement system in fighting bacterial infection. PMID:26161649

  20. A C1 inhibitor ortholog from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus): molecular perspectives of a central regulator in terms of its genomic arrangement, transcriptional profiles and anti-protease activities of recombinant peptide.

    PubMed

    Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Bathige, S D N K; Revathy, Kasthuri Saranya; Wickramaarachchi, W D N; Wan, Qiang; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Eunmi; Park, Myoung-Ae; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2014-02-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1Inh), a member of serpin superfamily, is a crucial regulator of the activation of various plasmatic cascades associated with immunity and inflammation. This study describes the identification and characterization of a C1Inh gene from rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus (OfC1Inh) at structural, expressional and functional levels. The cDNA-(2245bp) and corresponding gDNA-sequences (5.2kbp) of OfC1Inh were isolated from rock bream transcriptome- and BAC-libraries, respectively. Predicted amino acid sequence of OfC1Inh revealed a two-domain architecture composed of an N-terminal region with two Ig-like domains and a C-terminal region with a serpin domain. Tertiary model of OfC1Inh disclosed its active site topology. In the multi-exonic genomic arrangement of OfC1Inh, it consisted of eleven exons disjoined by ten introns as observed in few other fish homologs. Our comparative analysis indicated that the teleostean C1Inhs were distinct from their non-teleostean vertebrate counterparts in terms of their (1) extended N-terminal domains, (2) evolutionary divergence and (3) exon-intron distribution. The OfC1Inh had a TATA-deficient promoter with a putative initiator element, and two tandemly arranged downstream promoter elements. Several components associated with the immune and inflammatory transcriptional activation were also predicted to exist in 5' flanking region of OfC1Inh. The exclusive mRNA levels in liver and moderate levels in extra-hepatic tissues intimated the diversified importance of OfC1Inh in rock bream physiology. We also provide an evidence for the involvement of OfC1Inh in immune balance, based on its modulated transcription upon different PAMP (lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C)- or pathogen (Streptococcus iniae and rock bream irido virus)-challenges. A recombinantly expressed fusion protein [(r)OfC1Inh] was employed in demonstrating the anti-protease function of OfC1Inh. The (r)OfC1Inh exhibited detectable inhibitory activity against C1

  1. Feasibility of home infusion and self-administration of nanofiltered C1 esterase inhibitor for routine prophylaxis in patients with hereditary angioedema and characterization of a training and support program.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Cherylann; Landmesser, Ladonna M; Corrigan, Larry; Mariano, David

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare, chronic disease of C1 inhibitor deficiency. Study researchers evaluated the prevalence of home and self-administration of nanofiltered, human-derived C1 esterase inhibitor infusions and the implementation of a nursing training and support program. Home administration rate increased from 49.0% to 75.8%. The percentage who self-administered increased from 20.3% to 43.9%. Doses per week averaged 1.85 at home compared with 1.40 in infusion centers and physicians' offices. Patients required an average of 5 visits to be trained. Self-administration is a viable, feasible option in the management of HAE, which is facilitated by a nurse-managed training and support program. PMID:24384882

  2. Molecular phylogeny of C1 inhibitor depicts two immunoglobulin-like domains fusion in fishes and ray-finned fishes specific intron insertion after separation from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Sarde, Sandeep J; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-07-18

    C1 inhibitor (C1IN) is a multi-facet serine protease inhibitor in the plasma cascades, inhibiting several proteases, notably, regulates both complement and contact system activation. Despite huge advancements in the understanding of C1IN based on biochemical properties and its roles in the plasma cascades, the phylogenetic history of C1IN remains uncharacterized. To date, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history of C1IN. Herein, we explored phylogenetic history of C1IN gene in vertebrates. Fishes have C1IN with two immunoglobulin like domains attached in the N-terminal region. The RCL regions of CIIN from fishes and tetrapod genomes have variations at the positions P2 and P1'. Gene structures of C1IN gene from selected ray-finned fishes varied in the Ig domain region with creation of novel intron splitting exon Im2 into Im2a and Im2b. This intron is limited to ray-finned fishes with genome size reduced below 1 Gb. Hence, we suggest that genome compaction and associated double-strand break repairs are behind this intron gain. This study reveals the evolutionary history of C1IN and confirmed that this gene remains the same locus for ∼450 MY in 52 vertebrates analysed, but it is not found in frogs and lampreys. PMID:24878530

  3. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Pallera, Haree K.; Kumar, Parvathi S.; Mauriello, Clifford T.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Phelps, Cody A.; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M.; Pascal, Stephen M.; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  4. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julia A; Hair, Pamela S; Pallera, Haree K; Kumar, Parvathi S; Mauriello, Clifford T; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Phelps, Cody A; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M; Pascal, Stephen M; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M; Lattanzio, Frank A; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  5. TNT003, an inhibitor of the serine protease C1s, prevents complement activation induced by cold agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ju; Rose, Eileen L; Singh, Andrew; Hussain, Sami; Stagliano, Nancy E; Parry, Graham C; Panicker, Sandip

    2014-06-26

    Activation of the classical pathway (CP) of complement is often associated with autoimmune disorders in which disease pathology is linked to the presence of an autoantibody. One such disorder is cold agglutinin disease (CAD), an autoimmune hemolytic anemia in which autoantibodies (cold agglutinins) bind to red blood cells (RBCs) at low temperatures. Anemia occurs as a result of autoantibody-mediated CP activation on the surface of the erythrocyte, leading to the deposition of complement opsonins that drive extravascular hemolysis in the liver. Here we test the effects of TNT003, a mouse monoclonal antibody targeting the CP-specific serine protease C1s, on CP activity induced by cold agglutinins on human RBCs. We collected 40 individual CAD patient samples and showed that TNT003 prevented cold agglutinin-mediated deposition of complement opsonins that promote phagocytosis of RBCs. Furthermore, we show that by preventing CP activation, TNT003 also prevents cold agglutinin-driven generation of anaphylatoxins. Finally, we provide evidence that CP activity in CAD patients terminates prior to activation of the terminal cascade, supporting the hypothesis that the primary route of RBC destruction in these patients occurs via extravascular hemolysis. Our results support the development of a CP inhibitor for the treatment of CAD. PMID:24695853

  6. C1q protein binds to the apoptotic nucleolus and causes C1 protease degradation of nucleolar proteins.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yitian; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Yeo, Joo Guan; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-09-11

    In infection, complement C1q recognizes pathogen-congregated antibodies and elicits complement activation. Among endogenous ligands, C1q binds to DNA and apoptotic cells, but whether C1q binds to nuclear DNA in apoptotic cells remains to be investigated. With UV irradiation-induced apoptosis, C1q initially bound to peripheral cellular regions in early apoptotic cells. By 6 h, binding concentrated in the nuclei to the nucleolus but not the chromatins. When nucleoli were isolated from non-apoptotic cells, C1q also bound to these structures. In vivo, C1q exists as the C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2), and C1q binding to ligands activates the C1r/C1s proteases. Incubation of nucleoli with C1 caused degradation of the nucleolar proteins nucleolin and nucleophosmin 1. This was inhibited by the C1 inhibitor. The nucleoli are abundant with autoantigens. C1q binding and C1r/C1s degradation of nucleolar antigens during cell apoptosis potentially reduces autoimmunity. These findings help us to understand why genetic C1q and C1r/C1s deficiencies cause systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26231209

  7. Mutation of a Salmonella Serogroup-C1-Specific Gene Abrogates O7-Antigen Biosynthesis and Triggers NaCl-Dependent Motility Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiujuan; Liu, Bin; Shi, Chunlei; Shi, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Several molecular detection marker genes specific for a number of individual Salmonella serogroups have been recently identified in our lab by comparative genomics for the genotyping of diverse serogroups. To further understand the correlation between serotype and genotype, the function of a Salmonella serogroup-C1-specific gene (SC_2092) was analyzed in this study. It was indicated from the topological prediction using the deduced amino acid sequence of SC_2092 that this putative protein was highly similar to the confirmed Wzx flippases. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE revealed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, specifically O-antigen synthesis, was incomplete in an SC_2092 in-frame deletion mutant, and no agglutination reaction with the O7 antibody was exhibited in this mutant. Therefore, it was revealed that this Salmonella serogroup-C1-specific gene SC_2092 encoded a putative flippase, which was required for O7-polysaccharide biosynthesis, and was designated here as wzxC1. Subsequently, the effects of the deletion of wzxC1 on bacterial motility and sodium chloride (NaCl) tolerance were evaluated. The wzxC1 mutant lacked swarming motility on solid surfaces and was impaired in swimming motility in soft agar. Moreover, microscopic examination and RT-qPCR exhibited that an increased auto-aggregation and a strong defect in flagella expression, respectively, were responsible for the reduced motility in this mutant. In addition, the wzxC1 mutant was more sensitive than the wild-type strain to NaCl, and auto-aggregation of mutant cells was observed immediately up on the addition of 1% NaCl to the medium. Interestingly, the motility deficiency of the mutant strain, as well as the cell agglomeration and the decrease in flagellar expression, were relieved in a NaCl-free medium. This is the first study to experimentally demonstrate a connection between a Salmonella serogroup specific gene identified by comparative genomics with the synthesis of a specific O

  8. [A case report of hereditary angioedema and studies on the serum components of complement, C1-inactivator and proteinase inhibitors during edema attack].

    PubMed

    Mikami, A; Kohno, M

    1987-05-01

    Sixteen years old girl was admitted because of for the past ten years' frequent edema attack and abdominal pain. Laboratory examination revealed hypocomplementemia, marked depletion of the fourth component of complement and low level of C1-inactivator. Familial studies revealed that her mother was also hypocomplementemic and in low level of C1-inactivator. Serial studies performed on the alterlation of components of complement, C1-inactivator, alpha 1-antitrypsin, antithrombin III, and alpha 2-macroglobulin during edema attack. The fourth component of complement and C1-inactivator were markedly depleted in remission and attack. Remarkable depletion was found in antithrombin III and esterase inhibition activity of C1-inactivator during attack. In contrast, alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 2-macroglobulin did not change. The present study may explain that Hageman factor fragments, activated by C1s, promotes kinin generation via kalikrein activation. And the condition that complete functional deficiency of C1-inactivator was main role in this circuit. Fibrynolysis and late components of complement was less influence on edema attack. PMID:3610041

  9. Molecular basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, mucolipidosis II/III and Niemann-Pick C1 disease - Lysosomal storage disorders caused by defects of non-lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Schlotawa, Lars; Frese, Marc-André; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2009-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), mucolipidosis (ML) II/III and Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease are rare but fatal lysosomal storage disorders caused by the genetic defect of non-lysosomal proteins. The NPC1 protein mainly localizes to late endosomes and is essential for cholesterol redistribution from endocytosed LDL to cellular membranes. NPC1 deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of a broad range of lipids. The precise functional mechanism of this membrane protein, however, remains puzzling. ML II, also termed I cell disease, and the less severe ML III result from deficiencies of the Golgi enzyme N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphotransferase leading to a global defect of lysosome biogenesis. In patient cells, newly synthesized lysosomal proteins are not equipped with the critical lysosomal trafficking marker mannose 6-phosphate, thus escaping from lysosomal sorting at the trans Golgi network. MSD affects the entire sulfatase family, at least seven members of which are lysosomal enzymes that are specifically involved in the degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, sulfolipids or other sulfated molecules. The combined deficiencies of all sulfatases result from a defective post-translational modification by the ER-localized formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), which oxidizes a specific cysteine residue to formylglycine, the catalytic residue enabling a unique mechanism of sulfate ester hydrolysis. This review gives an update on the molecular bases of these enigmatic diseases, which have been challenging researchers since many decades and so far led to a number of surprising findings that give deeper insight into both the cell biology and the pathobiochemistry underlying these complex disorders. In case of MSD, considerable progress has been made in recent years towards an understanding of disease-causing FGE mutations. First approaches to link molecular parameters with clinical manifestation have been described and even therapeutical options have been

  10. Pyrazolo[4,3-c][1,2]benzothiazines 5,5-dioxide: a promising new class of Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Serritella, Serena; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Iraci, Nunzio; Brincat, Jean Pierre; Carosati, Emanuele; Villarini, Milena; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2012-04-12

    The increasing resistance to antibacterials commonly employed in the clinic and the growth of multidrug resistant strains suggest that the development of new therapeutic approaches should be of primary concern. In this context, EPIs may restore life to old drugs. In the present work, the EPI activity of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib was confirmed and a new class of pyrazolo[4,3-c][1,2]benzothiazine 5,5-dioxide analogues acting as inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus NorA multidrug efflux pump was identified. PMID:22432682

  11. Multi-kinase inhibitor C1 triggers mitotic catastrophe of glioma stem cells mainly through MELK kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Minata, Mutsuko; Gu, Chunyu; Joshi, Kaushal; Nakano-Okuno, Mariko; Hong, Christopher; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Kornblum, Harley I; Molla, Annie; Nakano, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly lethal brain tumor. Due to resistance to current therapies, patient prognosis remains poor and development of novel and effective GBM therapy is crucial. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have gained attention as a therapeutic target in GBM due to their relative resistance to current therapies and potent tumor-initiating ability. Previously, we identified that the mitotic kinase maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) is highly expressed in GBM tissues, specifically in GSCs, and its expression is inversely correlated with the post-surgical survival period of GBM patients. In addition, patient-derived GSCs depend on MELK for their survival and growth both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate evidence that the role of MELK in the GSC survival is specifically dependent on its kinase activity. With in silico structure-based analysis for protein-compound interaction, we identified the small molecule Compound 1 (C1) is predicted to bind to the kinase-active site of MELK protein. Elimination of MELK kinase activity was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay in nano-molar concentrations. When patient-derived GSCs were treated with C1, they underwent mitotic arrest and subsequent cellular apoptosis in vitro, a phenotype identical to that observed with shRNA-mediated MELK knockdown. In addition, C1 treatment strongly induced tumor cell apoptosis in slice cultures of GBM surgical specimens and attenuated growth of mouse intracranial tumors derived from GSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Lastly, C1 treatment sensitizes GSCs to radiation treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that targeting MELK kinase activity is a promising approach to attenuate GBM growth by eliminating GSCs in tumors. PMID:24739874

  12. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase. PMID:3016533

  13. Treatment of hereditary angioedema with nanofiltered C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate (Cetor®): multi-center phase II and III studies to assess pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, J J; Kleine Budde, I; van Twuyver, E; Choi, G; Levi, M; Leebeek, F W G; de Monchy, J G R; Ypma, P F; Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Strengers, P F W

    2012-03-01

    From 1997, plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate (Cetor®) has been available to HAE and AAE patients. Recently, a virus reducing 15 nm nanofiltration step has been introduced in the production process. A randomized, double-blind controlled cross-over study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of nanofiltered (C1-INH-NF) with conventional C1-inhibitor (C1-INH). Efficacy and safety were investigated in an open-label, on-demand and a prophylactic study. No differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between C1-INH and C1-INH-NF were found (13 non-symptomatic HAE patients). Both C1-inhibitor products equally increased plasma C4 levels. In the on-demand study, 14 acute angioedema attacks in 8 patients were analyzed. In the prophylactic study, 1 AAE and 5 HAE patients experienced in total 31 attacks during 748 observation days. In total 180,000 units of C1-INH-NF were administered. No product-related adverse events occurred, and no anti-C1-antibodies were induced. Nanofiltration in the production process of C1-inhibitor did not affect the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. PMID:22197071

  14. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15–3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations. PMID:26890881

  15. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15-3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations. PMID:26890881

  16. ARID1A Deficiency Impairs the DNA Damage Checkpoint and Sensitizes Cells to PARP Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianfeng; Peng, Yang; Wei, Leizhen; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Lin; Lan, Li; Kapoor, Prabodh; Ju, Zhenlin; Mo, Qianxing; Shih, Ie-Ming; Uray, Ivan P.; Wu, Xiangwei; Brown, Powel H.; Shen, Xuetong; Mills, Gordon B.; Peng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    ARID1A, a chromatin remodeler of the SWI/SNF family, is a recently identified tumor suppressor that is mutated in a broad spectrum of human cancers. Thus, it is of fundamental clinical importance to understand its molecular functions and determine whether ARID1A deficiency can be exploited therapeutically. In this manuscript, we report a key function of ARID1A in regulating the DNA damage checkpoint. ARID1A is recruited to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) via its interaction with the upstream DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATR. At the molecular level, ARID1A facilitates efficient processing of DSB to single strand ends, and sustains DNA damage signaling. Importantly, ARID1A deficiency sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibitors in vitro and in vivo providing a potential therapeutic strategy for patients with ARID1A-mutant tumors. PMID:26069190

  17. ATM deficiency sensitizes mantle cell lymphoma cells to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chris T; Muzik, Huong; Turhan, Ali G; Zamò, Alberto; O'Connor, Mark J; Bebb, D Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2010-02-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition is toxic to cells with mutations in the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, a concept termed synthetic lethality. However, whether this approach is applicable to other human cancers with defects in other DNA repair genes has yet to be determined. The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is altered in several human cancers including mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Here, we characterize a panel of MCL cell lines for ATM status and function and investigate the potential for synthetic lethality in MCL in the presence of small-molecule inhibitors of PARP-1. We show that Granta-519 and UPN2 cells have low levels of ATM protein, are defective in DNA damage-induced ATM-dependent signaling, are radiation sensitive, and have cell cycle checkpoint defects: all characteristics of defective ATM function. Significantly, Granta-519 and UPN2 cells were more sensitive to PARP-1 inhibition than were the ATM-proficient MCL cell lines examined. Furthermore, the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib (known previously as AZD2281/KU-0059436) significantly decreased tumor growth and increased overall survival in mice bearing s.c. xenografts of ATM-deficient Granta-519 cells while producing only a modest effect on overall survival of mice bearing xenografts of the ATM-proficient cell line, Z138. Thus, PARP inhibitors have therapeutic potential in the treatment of MCL, and the concept of synthetic lethality extends to human cancers with ATM alterations. PMID:20124459

  18. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (HAE type III).

    PubMed

    Riedl, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) with normal C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), also known as HAE type III, is a familial condition only clinically recognized within the past three decades. Similar to HAE from C1-INH deficiency (HAE types I and II), affected individuals experience unpredictable angioedema episodes of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and airway. Unique clinical features of HAE with normal C1-INH include the predominance of affected women, frequent exacerbation by estrogen, and a prominence of angioedema that involves the face and oropharynx. The underlying pathophysiology of HAE with normal C1-INH is poorly understood, but indirect evidence points to contact pathway dysregulation with bradykinin-mediated angioedema. Currently, evaluation is complicated by a lack of confirmatory laboratory testing such that clinical criteria must often be used to make the diagnosis of HAE with normal C1-INH. Factor XII mutations have been identified in only a minority of persons affected by HAE with normal C1-INH, limiting the utility of such analysis. To date, no controlled clinical studies have examined the efficacy of therapeutic agents for HAE with normal C1-INH, although published evidence supports frequent clinical benefit with medications shown effective in HAE due to C1-INH deficiency. PMID:24565612

  19. Magnesium Deficiency and Proton-Pump Inhibitor Use: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-06-01

    The association of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use and hypomagnesemia has garnered much attention over the last 5 years. A large body of observational data has linked chronic PPI use with hypomagnesemia, presumably due to decreased intestinal absorption and consequent magnesium deficiency. However, despite the increasing prevalence of this highly popular class of medicine, and despite potential significant risks associated with magnesium depletion, including cardiac arrhythmias and seizures, there are no well-designed studies to delineate the nature of this observed association. Consequently, providers must use best judgment to inform clinical decision making. This review summarizes the current body of evidence linking PPI use with hypomagnesemia, acknowledges the possibility of significant residual confounding in the observational data, explains potential physiologic mechanisms, and offers clinical recommendations. PMID:26582556

  20. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  1. Phosphomannose Isomerase Inhibitors Improve N-Glycosylation in Selected Phosphomannomutase-deficient Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vandana; Ichikawa, Mie; He, Ping; Bravo, Yalda; Dahl, Russell; Ng, Bobby G.; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are rare genetic disorders due to impaired glycosylation. The patients with subtypes CDG-Ia and CDG-Ib have mutations in the genes encoding phosphomannomutase 2 (PMM2) and phosphomannose isomerase (MPI or PMI), respectively. PMM2 (mannose 6-phosphate → mannose 1-phosphate) and MPI (mannose 6-phosphate ⇔ fructose 6-phosphate) deficiencies reduce the metabolic flux of mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) into glycosylation, resulting in unoccupied N-glycosylation sites. Both PMM2 and MPI compete for the same substrate, Man-6-P. Daily mannose doses reverse most of the symptoms of MPI-deficient CDG-Ib patients. However, CDG-Ia patients do not benefit from mannose supplementation because >95% Man-6-P is catabolized by MPI. We hypothesized that inhibiting MPI enzymatic activity would provide more Man-6-P for glycosylation and possibly benefit CDG-Ia patients with residual PMM2 activity. Here we show that MLS0315771, a potent MPI inhibitor from the benzoisothiazolone series, diverts Man-6-P toward glycosylation in various cell lines including fibroblasts from CDG-Ia patients and improves N-glycosylation. Finally, we show that MLS0315771 increases mannose metabolic flux toward glycosylation in zebrafish embryos. PMID:21949237

  2. Yeast Dun1 Kinase Regulates Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor Sml1 in Response to Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sanvisens, Nerea; Romero, Antonia M.; An, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Caiguo; de Llanos, Rosa; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Bañó, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox-active cofactor in many biological processes, including DNA replication and repair. Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are Fe-dependent enzymes that catalyze deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate (dNDP) synthesis. We show here that the levels of the Sml1 protein, a yeast RNR large-subunit inhibitor, specifically decrease in response to both nutritional and genetic Fe deficiencies in a Dun1-dependent but Mec1/Rad53- and Aft1-independent manner. The decline of Sml1 protein levels upon Fe starvation depends on Dun1 forkhead-associated and kinase domains, the 26S proteasome, and the vacuolar proteolytic pathway. Depletion of core components of the mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly leads to a Dun1-dependent diminution of Sml1 protein levels. The physiological relevance of Sml1 downregulation by Dun1 under low-Fe conditions is highlighted by the synthetic growth defect observed between dun1Δ and fet3Δ fet4Δ mutants, which is rescued by SML1 deletion. Consistent with an increase in RNR function, Rnr1 protein levels are upregulated upon Fe deficiency. Finally, dun1Δ mutants display defects in deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) biosynthesis under low-Fe conditions. Taken together, these results reveal that the Dun1 checkpoint kinase promotes RNR function in response to Fe starvation by stimulating Sml1 protein degradation. PMID:24958100

  3. Deficiency in Serine Protease Inhibitor Neuroserpin Exacerbates Ischemic Brain Injury by Increased Postischemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Peter; Bernreuther, Christian; Krasemann, Susanne; Arunachalam, Priyadharshini; Gerloff, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Magnus, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The only approved pharmacological treatment for ischemic stroke is intravenous administration of plasminogen activator (tPA) to re-canalize the occluded cerebral vessel. Not only reperfusion but also tPA itself can induce an inflammatory response. Microglia are the innate immune cells of the central nervous system and the first immune cells to become activated in stroke. Neuroserpin, an endogenous inhibitor of tPA, is up-regulated following cerebral ischemia. To examine neuroserpin-dependent mechanisms of neuroprotection in stroke, we studied neuroserpin deficient (Ns−/−) mice in an animal model of temporal focal ischemic stroke. Infarct size and neurological outcome were worse in neuroserpin deficient mice even though the fibrinolytic activity in the ischemic brain was increased. The increased infarct size was paralleled by a selective increase in proinflammatory microglia activation in Ns−/− mice. Our results show excessive microglial activation in Ns−/− mice mediated by an increased activity of tPA. This activation results in a worse outcome further underscoring the potential detrimental proinflammatory effects of tPA. PMID:23658802

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice. II. Effects on hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Carmeliet, P; Stassen, J M; Schoonjans, L; Ream, B; van den Oord, J J; De Mol, M; Mulligan, R C; Collen, D

    1993-01-01

    The effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene inactivation on hemostasis, thrombosis and thrombolysis were studied in homozygous PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1-/-) mice, generated by homologous recombination in D3 embryonic stem cells. Diluted (10-fold) whole blood clots from PAI-1-/- and from PAI-1 wild type (PAI-1+/+) mice underwent limited but significantly different (P < 0.001) spontaneous lysis within 3 h (6 +/- 1 vs 3 +/- 1%, respectively). A 25-microliters 125I-fibrin-labeled normal murine plasma clot, injected into a jugular vein, was lysed for 47 +/- 5, 66 +/- 3, and 87 +/- 7% within 8 h in PAI-1+/+, heterozygous PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1+/-), and PAI-1-/- mice, respectively (P = 0.002 for PAI-1+/+ vs PAI-1-/- mice). Corresponding values after pretreatment with 0.5 mg/kg endotoxin in PAI-1+/+ and PAI-1-/- mice, were 35 +/- 5 and 91 +/- 3% within 4 h, respectively (P < 0.001). 11 out of 26 PAI-1+/+ but only 1 out of 25 PAI-1-/- mice developed venous thrombosis (P = 0.004) within 6 d after injection of 10 or 50 micrograms endotoxin in the footpad. Spontaneous bleeding or delayed rebleeding could not be documented in PAI-1-/- mice after partial amputation of the tail or of the caecum. Thus, disruption of the PAI-1 gene in mice appears to induce a mild hyperfibrinolytic state and a greater resistance to venous thrombosis but not to impair hemostasis. Images PMID:8254029

  5. Bortezomib, C1-inhibitor and plasma exchange do not prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO pig kidney xenografts in baboons.

    PubMed

    Le Bas-Bernardet, S; Tillou, X; Branchereau, J; Dilek, N; Poirier, N; Châtelais, M; Charreau, B; Minault, D; Hervouet, J; Renaudin, K; Crossan, C; Scobie, L; Takeuchi, Y; Diswall, M; Breimer, M E; Klar, N; Daha, M R; Simioni, P; Robson, S C; Nottle, M B; Salvaris, E J; Cowan, P J; d'Apice, A J F; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K; Lagutina, I; Duchi, R; Perota, A; Lazzari, G; Galli, C; Cozzi, E; Soulillou, J-P; Vanhove, B; Blancho, G

    2015-02-01

    Galactosyl-transferase KO (GalT-KO) pigs represent a potential solution to xenograft rejection, particularly in the context of additional genetic modifications. We have performed life supporting kidney xenotransplantation into baboons utilizing GalT-KO pigs transgenic for human CD55/CD59/CD39/HT. Baboons received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids and recombinant human C1 inhibitor combined with cyclophosphamide or bortezomib with or without 2-3 plasma exchanges. One baboon received a control GalT-KO xenograft with the latter immunosuppression. All immunosuppressed baboons rejected the xenografts between days 9 and 15 with signs of acute humoral rejection, in contrast to untreated controls (n = 2) that lost their grafts on days 3 and 4. Immunofluorescence analyses showed deposition of IgM, C3, C5b-9 in rejected grafts, without C4d staining, indicating classical complement pathway blockade but alternate pathway activation. Moreover, rejected organs exhibited predominantly monocyte/macrophage infiltration with minimal lymphocyte representation. None of the recipients showed any signs of porcine endogenous retrovirus transmission but some showed evidence of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) replication within the xenografts. Our work indicates that the addition of bortezomib and plasma exchange to the immunosuppressive regimen did not significantly prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO renal xenografts. Non-Gal antibodies, the alternative complement pathway, innate mechanisms with monocyte activation and PCMV replication may have contributed to rejection. PMID:25612490

  6. Bortezomib, C1-inhibitor and Plasma Exchange Do Not Prolong the Survival of Multi-transgenic GalT-KO Pig Kidney Xenografts in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Le, Bas-Bernardet S.; Tillou, X.; Branchereau, J.; Dilek, N.; Poirier, N.; Châtelais, M.; Charreau, B.; Minault, D.; Hervouet, J.; Renaudin, K.; Crossan, C.; Scobie, L.; Takeuchi, Y.; Diswall, M.; Breimer, M.E.; Klar, N.; Daha, M.R.; Simioni, P.; Robson, S.C.; Nottle, M.B.; Salvaris, E.J.; Cowan, P.J.; d’Apice, A.J.F.; Sachs, D.H.; Yamada, K.; Lagutina, I.; Duchi, R.; Perota, A.; Lazzari, G.; Galli, C.; Cozzi, E.; Soulillou, J.-P.; B., Vanhove; Blancho, G.

    2014-01-01

    Galactosyl-transferase knock-out (GalT-KO) pigs represent a potential solution to xenograft rejection, particularly in the context of additional genetic modifications. We have performed life supporting kidney xenotransplantation into baboons utilizing GalT-KO pigs transgenic for human CD55/CD59/CD39/HT. Baboons received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids and recombinant human C1 Inhibitor combined with cyclophosphamide or bortezomib with or without 2–3 plasma exchanges. One baboon received a control GalT-KO xenograft with the latter immunosuppression. All immunosuppressed baboons rejected the xenografts between days 9 to 15 with signs of acute humoral rejection, in contrast to untreated controls (n=2) which lost their grafts on day 3 and 4. Immunofluorescence analyses showed deposition of IgM, C3, C5b-9 in rejected grafts, without C4d staining, indicating classical complement pathway blockade but alternate pathway activation. Moreover, rejected organs exhibited predominantly monocyte/macrophage infiltration with minimal lymphocyte representation. None of the recipients showed any signs of PERV transmission but some showed evidence of PCMV replication within the xenografts. Our work indicates that the addition of bortezomib and plasma exchange to the immunosuppressive regimen did not significantly prolong the survival of multi-transgenic GalT-KO renal xenografts. Non-Gal antibodies, the alternative complement pathway, innate mechanisms with monocyte activation and PCMV replication may have contributed to rejection. PMID:25612490

  7. ASK1 Inhibitor Halts Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy in Nos3-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Greg H; Ma, Frank Y; Han, Yingjie; Liles, John T; Breckenridge, David G; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2015-11-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling promotes diabetic kidney injury. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK)1 is one of the upstream kinases in the p38 MAPK-signaling pathway, which is activated by inflammation and oxidative stress, suggesting a possible role for ASK1 in diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we examined whether a selective ASK1 inhibitor can prevent the induction and progression of diabetic nephropathy in mice. Diabetes was induced in hypertensive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (Nos3)-deficient mice by five low-dose streptozotocin (STZ) injections. Groups of diabetic Nos3(-/-) mice received ASK1 inhibitor (GS-444217 delivered in chow) as an early intervention (2-8 weeks after STZ) or late intervention (weeks 8-15 after STZ). Control diabetic and nondiabetic Nos3(-/-) mice received normal chow. Treatment with GS-444217 abrogated p38 MAPK activation in diabetic kidneys but had no effect upon hypertension in Nos3(-/-) mice. Early intervention with GS-444217 significantly inhibited diabetic glomerulosclerosis and reduced renal dysfunction but had no effect on the development of albuminuria. Late intervention with GS-444217 improved renal function and halted the progression of glomerulosclerosis, renal inflammation, and tubular injury despite having no effect on established albuminuria. In conclusion, this study identifies ASK1 as a new therapeutic target in diabetic nephropathy to reduce renal inflammation and fibrosis independent of blood pressure control. PMID:26180085

  8. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M.; Wang, Charles X.; An, W. Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A.; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  9. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M; Wang, Charles X; An, W Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V

    2016-05-19

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  10. High-fat diet enhances and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency attenuates bone loss in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1-/-) on bone structure in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) by 22% and 21%, trabecular number (Tb.N) by 8% and 4% and bone mineral de...

  11. The Elephant and the Blind Men: Making Sense of PARP Inhibitors in Homologous Recombination Deficient Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Silvana B; Patel, Anand G; Hurley, Rachel M; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is an important component of the base excision repair (BER) pathway as well as a regulator of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Previous studies have demonstrated that treatment of HR-deficient cells with PARP inhibitors results in stalled and collapsed replication forks. Consequently, HR-deficient cells are extremely sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Several explanations have been advanced to explain this so-called synthetic lethality between HR deficiency and PARP inhibition: (i) reduction of BER activity leading to enhanced DNA double-strand breaks, which accumulate in the absence of HR; (ii) trapping of inhibited PARP1 at sites of DNA damage, which prevents access of other repair proteins; (iii) failure to initiate HR by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer-dependent BRCA1 recruitment; and (iv) activation of the NHEJ pathway, which selectively induces error-prone repair in HR-deficient cells. Here we review evidence regarding these various explanations for the ability of PARP inhibitors to selectively kill HR-deficient cancer cells and discuss their potential implications. PMID:24062981

  12. Plasminogen activator inhibitor with very long half-life (VLHL PAI-1) can reduce bleeding in PAI-1-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Jankun, Jerzy; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) deficiency and proposes some novel treatments for this condition. PAI-1 is a fast acting inhibitor of tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA). PAI-1 controls/slows clot lysis triggered by tPA activated plasminogen. PAI-1 deficiency was once considered to be an extremely rare disorder characterized by frequent and prolonged bleeding episodes. PAI-1 deficiency is now thought to be more frequent than initially reported and is known to be caused by mutations in the PAI-1 gene that produce a dysfunctional PAI-1 protein or slow the secretion of PAI-1 into the circulation. PAI-1 deficiency is characterized by hyperfibrinolysis that results in frequent bleeding episodes. Patients with this condition form normal blood clots that are quickly lysed by unopposed tPA-activated plasmin. Spontaneous bleeding is rare in PAI-1 deficient patients, but moderate hemorrhaging of the knees, elbows, nose, and gums can be triggered by mild trauma. Additionally, prolonged bleeding after surgery is common and menstrual bleeding may be severe. Moderate PAI-1 deficiency is associated with a lifelong bleeding tendency, but severe deficiencies can be life-threatening. The diagnosis of this disorder remains challenging due to the lack of a clear definition of PAI-1 deficiency as well as a lack of standardized tests. Patients with mild PAI-1 deficiency may be treated with antifibrinolytic agents (ε-aminocaproic acid or tranexamic acid); however, not all patients respond well to these treatments. These patients may be treated with wild-type PAI-1; however, this molecule quickly converts into its inactive form. We propose to use PAI-1 with an extended half-life to treat these patients. PMID:23988002

  13. Response of protein C and protein C inhibitor to warfarin therapy in patient with combined deficiency of Factors V and VIII.

    PubMed

    Bern, M M; Suzuki, K; Mann, K; Tracy, P; Hoyer, L; Jensen, W; Gallivan, M; Arkin, C; Davis, G

    1984-12-15

    The role of Protein C in combined factor V/VIII deficiency was examined by reducing the Protein C concentration using warfarin therapy in a patient with the combined deficiency. The factor VIII deficiency was like Hemophilia-A, with deficiency of VIII:C and VIII:C(Ag), but normal VIIIR:Ag and VIIIR:cof. The factor V deficiency was due to loss of the V antigen. During warfarin therapy the Protein C level was reduced, but concentrations of factors V and VIII did not change. Protein C Inhibitor was normal throughout. Thus combined factor V/VIII deficiency is not related to Protein C levels. PMID:6098970

  14. Lhx4 Deficiency: Increased Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Expression and Pituitary Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gergics, Peter; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the Lhx4, Lhx3, and Pitx2 genes can cause combined pituitary hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia in both humans and mice. Not much is known about the mechanism underlying hypoplasia in these mutants beyond generally increased cell death and poorly maintained proliferation. We identified both common and unique abnormalities in developmental regulation of key cell cycle regulator gene expression in each of these three mutants. All three mutants exhibit reduced expression of the proliferative marker Ki67 and the transitional marker p57. We discovered that expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) is expanded dorsally in the pituitary primordium of both Lhx3 and Lhx4 mutants. Uniquely, Lhx4 mutants exhibit reduced cyclin D1 expression and have auxiliary pouch-like structures. We show evidence for indirect and direct effects of LHX4 on p21 expression in αT3-1 pituitary cells. In summary, Lhx4 is necessary for efficient pituitary progenitor cell proliferation and restriction of p21 expression. PMID:25668206

  15. Deficiency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Akyuerek, Levent M.; Boehm, Manfred; Olive, Michelle; Zhou, Alex-Xianghua; San, Hong; Nabel, Elizabeth G.

    2010-05-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, are upregulated during vascular cell proliferation and negatively regulate growth of vascular cells. We hypothesized that absence of either p21{sup Cip1} or p27{sup Kip1} in apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficiency may increase atherosclerotic plaque formation. Compared to apoE{sup -/-} aortae, both apoE{sup -/-}/p21{sup -/-} and apoE{sup -/-}/p27{sup -/-} aortae exhibited significantly more atherosclerotic plaque following a high-cholesterol regimen. This increase was particularly observed in the abdominal aortic regions. Deficiency of p27{sup Kip1} accelerated plaque formation significantly more than p21{sup -/-} in apoE{sup -/-} mice. This increased plaque formation was in parallel with increased intima/media area ratios. Deficiency of p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} accelerates atherogenesis in apoE{sup -/-} mice. These findings have significant implications for our understanding of the molecular basis of atherosclerosis associated with excessive proliferation of vascular cells.

  16. Successful use of daily intravenous infusion of C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate in the treatment of a hereditary angioedema patient with ascites, hypovolemic shock, sepsis, renal and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoang; Santucci, Stephanie; Yang, William H

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease most commonly associated with defects in C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). HAE manifests as recurrent episodes of edema in various body locations. Atypical symptoms, such as ascites, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and hypovolemic shock, have also been reported. Management of HAE conventionally involves the treatment of acute attacks, as well as short- and long-term prophylaxis. Since attacks can be triggered by several factors, including stress and physical trauma, prophylactic therapy is recommended for patients undergoing surgery. Human plasma-derived C1-INH (pdC1-INH) concentrate is indicated for the treatment of both acute HAE attacks and pre-procedure prevention of HAE episodes in patients undergoing medical, dental, or surgical procedures. We report the first case of a patient with HAE who experienced an abdominal attack precipitated by a retroperitoneal bleed while being converted from warfarin to heparin in preparation for surgery. Subsequently, the patient had a protracted course in hospital with other complications, which included hypovolemic shock, ascites, severe sepsis from nosocomial pneumonia, renal and respiratory failure. Despite intensive interventions, the patient remained in a critical state for months; however, after a trial of daily intravenous infusion of pdC1-INH concentrate (Berinert®, CSL Behring GmbH, Marburg, Germany), clinical status improved, particularly renal function. Therefore, pdC1-INH concentrate may be an effective treatment option to consider for critically-ill patients with HAE. PMID:25520740

  17. Effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient and wild-type mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1-/-) and wildtype mice (C57BL/6J background) fed the AIN93G diet or that diet modified with 45% calories from fat. The high-fat diet i...

  18. Normalization of Cholesterol Homeostasis by 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in Neurons and Glia from Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Peake, Kyle B.; Vance, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is an inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 gene that result in an accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/L) and impaired export of cholesterol from LE/L to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recent studies demonstrate that administration of cyclodextrin (CD) to Npc1−/− mice eliminates cholesterol sequestration in LE/L of many tissues, including the brain, delays neurodegeneration, and increases lifespan of the mice. We have now investigated cholesterol homeostasis in NPC1-deficient cells of the brain in response to CD. Primary cultures of neurons and glial cells from Npc1−/− mice were incubated for 24 h with 0.1 to 10 mm CD after which survival and cholesterol homeostasis were monitored. Although 10 mm CD was profoundly neurotoxic, and altered astrocyte morphology, 0.1 and 1 mm CD were not toxic but effectively mobilized stored cholesterol from the LE/L as indicated by filipin staining. However, 0.1 and 1 mm CD altered cholesterol homeostasis in opposite directions. The data suggest that 0.1 mm CD releases cholesterol trapped in LE/L of neurons and astrocytes and increases cholesterol availability at the ER, whereas 1 mm CD primarily extracts cholesterol from the plasma membrane and reduces ER cholesterol. These studies in Npc1−/− neurons and astrocytes establish a dose of CD (0.1 mm) that would likely be beneficial in NPC disease. The findings are timely because treatment of NPC disease patients with CD is currently being initiated. PMID:22277650

  19. Deficiency of a Niemann-Pick, Type C1-related Protein in Toxoplasma Is Associated with Multiple Lipidoses and Increased Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lige, Bao; Romano, Julia D.; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Ehrenman, Karen; Levitskaya, Jelena; Sampels, Vera; Haughey, Norman J.; Coppens, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Several proteins that play key roles in cholesterol synthesis, regulation, trafficking and signaling are united by sharing the phylogenetically conserved ‘sterol-sensing domain’ (SSD). The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma possesses at least one gene coding for a protein containing the canonical SSD. We investigated the role of this protein to provide information on lipid regulatory mechanisms in the parasite. The protein sequence predicts an uncharacterized Niemann-Pick, type C1-related protein (NPC1) with significant identity to human NPC1, and it contains many residues implicated in human NPC disease. We named this NPC1-related protein, TgNCR1. Mammalian NPC1 localizes to endo-lysosomes and promotes the movement of sterols and sphingolipids across the membranes of these organelles. Miscoding patient mutations in NPC1 cause overloading of these lipids in endo-lysosomes. TgNCR1, however, lacks endosomal targeting signals, and localizes to flattened vesicles beneath the plasma membrane of Toxoplasma. When expressed in mammalian NPC1 mutant cells and properly addressed to endo-lysosomes, TgNCR1 restores cholesterol and GM1 clearance from these organelles. To clarify the role of TgNCR1 in the parasite, we genetically disrupted NCR1; mutant parasites were viable. Quantitative lipidomic analyses on the ΔNCR1 strain reveal normal cholesterol levels but an overaccumulation of several species of cholesteryl esters, sphingomyelins and ceramides. ΔNCR1 parasites are also characterized by abundant storage lipid bodies and long membranous tubules derived from their parasitophorous vacuoles. Interestingly, these mutants can generate multiple daughters per single mother cell at high frequencies, allowing fast replication in vitro, and they are slightly more virulent in mice than the parental strain. These data suggest that the ΔNCR1 strain has lost the ability to control the intracellular levels of several lipids, which subsequently results in the stimulation of lipid

  20. The PARP inhibitors, veliparib and olaparib, are effective chemopreventive agents for delaying mammary tumor development in BRCA1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    To, Ciric; Kim, Eun-Hee; Royce, Darlene B.; Williams, Charlotte R.; Collins, Ryan M.; Risingsong, Renee; Sporn, Michael B.; Liby, Karen T.

    2014-01-01

    Poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are effective for the treatment of BRCA-deficient tumors. Women with these mutations have an increased risk of developing breast cancer and would benefit from effective chemoprevention. This study examines whether the PARP inhibitors, veliparib and olaparib, are effective for delaying mammary gland tumor development in a BRCA1-deficient (BRCA1Co/Co; MMTV-Cre; p53+/−) mouse model. In dose de-escalation studies, mice were fed control, veliparib (100 mg/kg diet) or olaparib (200, 100, 50 or 25 mg/kg diet) continuously for up to 43 weeks. For intermittent dosing studies, mice cycled through olaparib (200 mg/kg diet) for 2 weeks followed by a 4-week rest period on control diet. To examine biomarkers, mice were fed olaparib using the intermittent dosing regimen and mammary glands were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In mice treated with veliparib or olaparib (200 mg/kg diet), the average age of the first detectable tumor was delayed by 2.4 weeks and 6.5 weeks, respectively, compared to controls. Olaparib also increased the average lifespan of mice by 7 weeks. In dose de-escalation studies, lower concentrations of olaparib delayed tumor development but were less effective than the highest dose. When fed intermittently, olaparib delayed the onset of the first palpable tumor by 5.7 weeks and significantly reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis in hyperplastic mammary glands. In summary, veliparib and olaparib are effective for delaying tumor development and extending the lifespan of Brca1-deficient mice, and intermittent dosing with olaparib was as effective as continuous dosing. These results suggest that the use of PARP inhibitors is a promising chemopreventive option. PMID:24817481

  1. Evidence of normal functional levels of activated protein C inhibitor in combined Factor V/VIII deficiency disease.

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, W M; Kisiel, W

    1982-01-01

    Human activated protein C (APC) is a plasma serine protease that possesses amidolytic and anticoagulant activity. The rate at which the amidolytic and anticoagulant activity of APC was neutralized in normal plasma was essentially identical to that observed in plasma obtained from four individuals with combined Factor V/VIII deficiency disease. Incubation of radioiodinated APC with either normal human plasma or the combined Factor V/VIII-deficient plasmas resulted in the formation of a stable complex (Mr = 96,000) of the enzyme and a plasma protein as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pretreatment of the radiolabeled APC with diisopropyl fluorophosphate prevented the formation of the enzyme-protein complex. On the basis of its ability to form a complex with radiolabeled APC, the APC-binding protein was purified to homogeneity from normal human plasma by ammonium sulfate fractionation, heparin-agarose chromatography, and QAE-Sephadex A-50 chromatography. The APC-binding protein (Mr = 54,000) is a glycoprotein, and possesses an amino-terminal sequence of Gly-Arg-Thr-Cys-Pro-Lys-Pro-Asp. The amino-terminal sequence of the APC-binding protein exhibited considerable homology with bovine colostrum inhibitor and pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, but no apparent sequence homology with the plasma serine protease inhibitors. Affinity-purified antibody against APC-binding protein immunoprecipitated a complex of radiolabeled APC and native APC-binding protein from normal human plasma. Complex formation was virtually eliminated in plasma immunodepleted of the APC-binding protein. Quantitative electroimmunoassay indicated essentially equal levels of APC-binding protein antigen in normal plasma compared with plasma from four patients with combined Factor V/VIII deficiency disease. Images PMID:6294139

  2. 4,5-Disubstituted 6-Aryloxy-1,3-dihydrobenzo[c][1,2]oxaboroles Are Broad-Spectrum Serine β-Lactamase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David C; Zhou, Fei; Eyermann, Charles J; Ferguson, Andrew D; Prince, D Bryan; Breen, John; Giacobbe, Robert A; Lahiri, Sushmita; Verheijen, Jeroen C

    2015-07-10

    Bacterially expressed β-lactamases are rapidly eroding the clinical utility of the important β-lactam class of antibacterials, significantly impairing our ability to fight serious bacterial infections. This paper describes a study of oxaborole-derived β-lactamase inhibitors in which crystal structures and computational modeling aided in the rational design of analogues with improved spectrum of activity against class A, C, and D enzymes. Crystal structures of two of these inhibitors covalently bound to two different serine β-lactamases, class C Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpC and class D OXA-10, are described herein. Improved physicochemical properties as well as increased activity against an array of β-lactamases resulted in substantial restoration of susceptibility to ceftazidime in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:27622821

  3. Identification of amylase inhibitor deficient mutants in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millisp.).

    PubMed

    Chougule, N P; Giri, A P; Hivrale, V K; Chhabda, P J; Kachole, M S

    2004-06-01

    We have developed and analyzed several mutant lines (M6 generation) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) for the content of defensive proteins and antinutritional factors. Inhibitors of proteinase and of amylase, lectins, and raffinose family oligosaccharides were analyzed in mature seeds of different pigeonpea accessions (untreated) and compared with mutant lines. Proteinase inhibitor profiles were similar in terms of number and intensities of activity bands but they differ marginally in the activity units in pigeonpea accessions and mutants. Pigeonpea mutants showed significant differences in amylase inhibitor profiles as well as activity units from those of pigeonpea accessions. Interestingly, two mutants (A6-5-1 and A7-3-2) were identified to have absence of amylase inhibitor isoforms. Hemagglutinating activity and raffinose family oligosaccharides content were found to be significantly higher in mutants than in accessions. It is evident from the results that proteinase inhibitors of pigeonpea are stable while amylase inhibitors, lectins, and raffinose family oligosaccharides show altered expression upon mutagen treatments. These mutants will be ideal candidates for further evaluation. PMID:15260142

  4. Vitamin K deficiency amplifies anticoagulation response to ximelagatran: possible implications for direct thrombin inhibitors and their clinical safety.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Farhad; Wood, Peter; Ward, Alan

    2009-02-01

    Dietary vitamin K is known to influence the anticoagulation response to warfarin. It is possible that dietary vitamin K availability also influences the pharmacological activity of other oral anticoagulants, which target the vitamin-K dependent clotting proteins in the coagulation cascade. This study examined whether vitamin K insufficiency affected anticoagulation response to the direct thrombin inhibitor, ximelagatran. Anticoagulation response to ximelagatran and warfarin in rats on a normal diet was compared to those on a vitamin K deficient diet. Ximelagatran and warfarin increased prothrombin time (PT) by 1.4- and 1.3-fold, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) by 1.8- and 1.4-fold and ecarin clotting time (ECT) by 6.8- and 1.2-fold, respectively, in rats on normal diet. Vitamin K deficient diet alone caused modest increases in PT, APTT and ECT. The anticoagulant activity of both ximelagatran and warfarin was significantly greater in rats on vitamin K deficient diet (6.1- and 12.3-fold for PT, 2.6- and 5.1-fold for APTT and 2.9- and 1.6-fold for ECT, respectively) compared to those on normal diet. Factor II activity was reduced by both ximelagatran (58%) and warfarin (44%) in rats on normal diet. However, factor II activity was virtually abolished (<0.1%) by both drugs in rats on vitamin K deficient diet. The results suggest that oral anticoagulant drugs, whose primary site of action is not within the vitamin K cycle, may also exhibit variability in clinical response due to dietary variation as the established coumarin drugs such as warfarin. PMID:18716776

  5. C1q and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Walport, M J; Davies, K A; Botto, M

    1998-08-01

    In this chapter we review the association between SLE and C1q. In the first part of the chapter we discuss the clinical associations of C1q deficiency, and tabulate the available information in the literature relating to C1q deficiency and autoimmune disease. Other clinical associations of C1q deficiency are then considered, and we mention briefly the association between other genetically determined complement deficiencies and lupus. In the review we explore the relationship between C1q consumption and lupus and we discuss the occurrence of low molecular weight (7S) C1q in lupus, which raises the possibility that increased C1q turnover in the disease may result in unbalanced chain synthesis of the molecule. Anti-C1q antibodies are also strongly associated with severe SLE affecting the kidney, and with hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis, and these associations are also examined. We address the question of how C1q deficiency may cause SLE, discussing the possibility that this may be due to abnormalities of immune complex processing, which have been well characterised in a umber of different human models. There is clear evidence that immune complex processing is abnormal in patients with hypocomplementaemia, and this is compatible with the hypothesis that ineffective immune complex clearance could cause tissue injury, and this may in turn stimulate an autoantibody response. We have also considered the possibility that C1q-C1q receptor interactions are critical in the regulation of apoptosis, and we explore the hypothesis that dysregulation of apoptosis could explain important features in the development of autoimmune disease associated with C1q deficiency. An abnormally high rate of apoptosis, or defective clearance of apoptotic cells, could promote the accumulation of abnormal cellular products that might drive an autoimmune response. Anti-C1q antibodies have been described in a number of murine models of lupus, and these are also briefly discussed. We focus

  6. Desensitization and immune tolerance induction in children with severe factor IX deficiency; inhibitors and adverse reactions to replacement therapy: a case-report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bon, Andrea; Morfini, Massimo; Dini, Alessandro; Mori, Francesca; Barni, Simona; Gianluca, Sottilotta; de Martino, Maurizio; Novembre, Elio

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia B is a rare X-linked recessive disorder with plasma factor IX (FIX) deficiency. 1-3% of patients treated with exogenous FIX-containing products develop inhibitors (i.e. polyclonal high affinity immunoglobulins) that neutralize the procoagulant activity of a specific coagulation factor. Although the incidence of inhibitors in hemophilia B patients is low, most are "high titer" and frequently associated with the development of severe allergic or anaphylactic reactions. Immune tolerance induction as a strategy for inhibitor eradication was first described in 1984. Unfortunately, the overall reported success of immune tolerance induction in FIX deficiency with inhibitors is approximately 25-40%.We report the case of a 2-year-old boy with hemophilia B severe FIX deficiency (<1%), inhibitor antibodies to FIX development, and a history of adverse reactions to FIX infusions, who underwent a successful desensitization and immune tolerance induction with a daily FIX infusion. With this regimen the inhibitor titer decreased with effective bleeding prevention. PMID:25887512

  7. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1{sup -/-} knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1{sup -/-} mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  8. Effects of the multikinase inhibitors Sorafenib and Regorafenib in PTEN deficient neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Mirantes, Cristina; Dosil, Maria Alba; Eritja, Núria; Felip, Isidre; Gatius, Sònia; Santacana, Maria; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) axis is frequently dysregulated in cancer due to mutations in different nodes of the pathway or constitutive activation of receptor tyrosine kinases. Multikinase inhibitors as sorafenib and regorafenib represent a therapeutic approach for the treatment of these types of tumours. In the present study, we have evaluated the anti-tumoural effects of Sorafenib and Regorafenib on endometrial, prostate and thyroid neoplasias. Both inhibitors reduced cell viability in vitro and lead to a disruption of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. In vivo, we have demonstrated that Sorafenib and Regorafenib reduce thyroid hyperplasias induced by the loss of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), although none of the treatments eliminated the disease. Altogether, we present the first study that correlates the response to multikinase inhibitors with a specific mutation. Moreover, this is the first report characterising the response to Regorafenib in thyroid, prostate and endometrial neoplasias. PMID:27288872

  9. Myelin from MAG-deficient mice is a strong inhibitor of neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Ng, W P; Cartel, N; Li, C; Roder, J; Lozano, A

    1996-03-22

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) has potent neurite outgrowth inhibitory activity in vitro. To assess the importance of MAG in the neurite outgrowth inhibitory activity in CNS myelin, we used an in vitro bioassay to characterize neurite growth on CNS myelin derived from mice carrying a null mutation of the MAG gene. Myelin proteins from MAG-deficient mice inhibited neurite outgrowth to a similar degree to the wild-type CNS myelin. These results suggest that CNS myelin molecules other than MAG exert strong inhibitory effects on the growth of neurites. PMID:8724661

  10. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a boy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis deficiency presenting with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming-Yan; Guo, Xia; Sun, Shu-Wen; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency, also known as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2 (XLP2), is a rare inherited primary immunodeficiency resulting from the XIAP (also known as BIRC4) mutation. XIAP deficiency is mainly associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) phenotypes, and genetic testing is crucial in diagnosing this syndrome. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only successful strategy for the treatment of this disease; however, a limited number of studies has been published concerning the outcomes of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. The present study reported a successful allogeneic HSCT performed to treat XIAP deficiency in a Chinese boy presenting with HLH. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing were performed to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency, and allogeneic HSCT was performed. Genetic tests revealed a two-nucleotide deletion (c.1021_1022delAA) in the patient, which was inherited from his mother, and resulted in frameshift mutation and premature stop codon (p.N341fsX348); this is considered to be a disease-causing mutation. The XIAP deficiency patient underwent allogeneic HSCT, receiving busulfan-containing reduced intensity myeloablative conditioning regimen, with a good intermediate follow-up result obtained. Therefore, genetic testing is essential to confirm the diagnosis of XIAP deficiency and detect the carrier of mutation. The present case study may promote the investigation of allogeneic HSCT in patients with XIAP deficiency. PMID:27602064

  11. Proteasome inhibitors MG-132 and bortezomib induce AKR1C1, AKR1C3, AKR1B1, and AKR1B10 in human colon cancer cell lines SW-480 and HT-29.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bettina; Kisiela, Michael; Wsól, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2011-05-30

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play central roles in the reductive metabolism of endogenous signaling molecules and in the detoxification of xenobiotics. AKRC1-1C3, AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 have been shown to be regulated via nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that is activated upon oxidative stress. Proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and MG-132 produce mild oxidative stress that activates Nrf2-mediated gene expression that in turn may have cytoprotective effects. Bortezomib is clinically approved to treat haematological malignancies and it has also proven activity in solid tumors such as colon cancer. The present study investigated the effect of bortezomib and MG-132 on the expression of AKR1C1-1C4, AKR1B1, and AKR1B10 in colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and SW-480. Human cancer cell lines derived from different organs (lung, colon, pancreas, skin, liver, ovary) were initially assayed for the expression of the AKRs, showing a very unequal distribution. Even among the colon cell lines HT-29, Caco-2, HCT116 and SW-480, the AKRs were expressed quite non-uniformly. HT-29 cells expressed all AKRs on the mRNA level including liver-specific AKR1C4, but AKR1B1 was almost undetectable. In SW-480 cells, treatment with bortezomib (50 nM, 48 h) dramatically increased mRNA levels of AKR1B10 (32-fold), AKR1B1 (5.5-fold), and, to a lesser extent, AKR1C1 and AKR1C3. Drug-efflux transporter MRP2 (ABCC2) and Cox-2 were induced as well. AKR1C2 mRNA was down-regulated in SW-480 but induced in HT-29 cells. MG-132 increased mRNA amounts of AKR1C1, 1C3, 1B1, and 1B10 in a concentration-dependent manner. AKR1B10 and AKR1B1 protein expression was inducible by bortezomib in HT-29 cells, but not detectable in SW-480 cells. In conclusion, treatment with proteasome inhibitors increased the expression of several AKRs as well as of MRP2. It remains to be investigated whether this enzyme induction may contribute to enhanced cell survival and thereby supporting the

  12. Hyperphagia and leptin resistance in Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Stradecki, Holly M.; Jaworski, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a complex genetic and behavioral disorder arising from improper integration of peripheral signals at central autonomic centers. For the hypothalamus to respond to dynamic physiological alterations, it must retain a degree of plasticity throughout life. Evidence is mounting that an intricate balance between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated extracellular matrix proteolysis and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-mediated proteolysis inhibition contributes to tissue remodeling. However, few studies have examined the role of MMPs/TIMPs in hypothalamic remodeling and energy homeostasis. To determine TIMP-2’s contribution to hypothalamic regulation of feeding, body mass and food consumption was monitored in TIMP-2 knockout (KO) mice fed a standard chow or high fat diet (HFD). TIMP-2 KO mice of both sexes gained more weight than wild-type (WT) mice even when fed the chow diet. Prior to obesity onset, TIMP-2 KO mice were hyperphagic, without increased orexigenic or decreased anorexigenic neuropeptide expression, but leptin resistant (i.e. reduced leptin-induced anorexigenic response and STAT3 activation). HFD exacerbated weight gain and hyperleptinemia. In addition, proteolysis was increased in the arcuate nucleus of TIMP-2 KO mice. These data suggest a role for TIMP-2 in hypothalamic control of feeding and energy homeostasis. PMID:21175899

  13. Plasma levels of alpha1-antichymotrypsin and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subjects with and without severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Camilla; Westin, Ulla; Wallmark, Anders; Piitulainen, Eeva; Sveger, Tomas; Janciauskiene, Sabina M

    2007-01-01

    Background Individuals with severe Z α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency have a considerably increased risk of developing chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). It has been hypothesized that compensatory increases in levels of other protease inhibitors mitigate the effects of this AAT deficiency. We analysed plasma levels of AAT, α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in healthy (asymptomatic) and COPD subjects with and without AAT deficiency. Methods Studied groups included: 71 asymptomatic AAT-deficient subjects (ZZ, n = 48 and SZ, n = 23, age 31 ± 0.5) identified during Swedish neonatal screening for AAT deficiency between 1972 and 1974; age-matched controls (MM, n = 57, age 30.7 ± 0.6); older asymptomatic ZZ (n = 10); healthy MM (n = 20, age 53 ± 9.6); and COPD patients (ZZ, n = 10, age 47.4 ± 11 and MM, n = 10, age 59.4 ± 6.7). Plasma levels of SLPI, AAT and ACT were analysed using ELISA and immunoelectrophoresis. Results No significant difference was found in plasma ACT and SLPI levels between the healthy MM and the ZZ or SZ subjects in the studied groups. Independent of the genetic variant, subjects with COPD (n = 19) had elevated plasma levels of SLPI and ACT relative to controls (n = 153) (49.5 ± 7.2 vs 40.7 ± 9.1 ng/ml, p < 0.001 and 0.52 ± 0.19 vs 0.40 ± 0.1 mg/ml, p < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion Our findings show that plasma levels of ACT and SLPI are not elevated in subjects with genetic AAT deficiency compared MM controls and do not appear to compensate for the deficiency of plasma AAT. PMID:17261175

  14. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  15. BRCA1-deficient mammary tumor cells are dependent on EZH2 expression and sensitive to Polycomb Repressive Complex 2-inhibitor 3-deazaneplanocin A

    PubMed Central

    Puppe, Julian; Drost, Rinske; Liu, Xiaoling; Joosse, Simon A; Evers, Bastiaan; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Nederlof, Petra; Yu, Qiang; Jonkers, Jos; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Pietersen, Alexandra M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of breast cancer is becoming more individualized with the recognition of tumor subgroups that respond differently to available therapies. Breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1)-deficient tumors are usually of the basal subtype and associated with poor survival rates, highlighting the need for more effective therapy. Methods We investigated a mouse model that closely mimics breast cancer arising in BRCA1-mutation carriers to better understand the molecular mechanism of tumor progression and tested whether targeting of the Polycomb-group protein EZH2 would be a putative therapy for BRCA1-deficient tumors. Results Gene expression analysis demonstrated that EZH2 is overexpressed in BRCA1-deficient mouse mammary tumors. By immunohistochemistry we show that an increase in EZH2 protein levels is also evident in tumors from BRCA1-mutation carriers. EZH2 is responsible for repression of genes driving differentiation and could thus be involved in the undifferentiated phenotype of these tumors. Importantly, we show that BRCA1-deficient cancer cells are selectively dependent on their elevated EZH2 levels. In addition, a chemical inhibitor of EZH2, 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep), is about 20-fold more effective in killing BRCA1-deficient cells compared to BRCA1-proficient mammary tumor cells. Conclusions We demonstrate by specific knock-down experiments that EZH2 overexpression is functionally relevant in BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells. The effectiveness of a small molecule inhibitor indicates that EZH2 is a druggable target. The overexpression of EZH2 in all basal-like breast cancers warrants further investigation of the potential for targeting the genetic make-up of this particular breast cancer type. PMID:19709408

  16. E7449: A dual inhibitor of PARP1/2 and tankyrase1/2 inhibits growth of DNA repair deficient tumors and antagonizes Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiayi; Chang, Paul; Kolber-Simonds, Donna; Ackermann, Karen; Twine, Natalie C.; Shie, Jue-Lon; Miu, Jingzang Tao; Huang, Kuan-Chun; Moniz, George A.; Nomoto, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase1 (PARP1) impairs DNA damage repair, and early generation PARP1/2 inhibitors (olaparib, niraparib, etc.) have demonstrated clinical proof of concept for cancer treatment. Here, we describe the development of the novel PARP inhibitor E7449, a potent PARP1/2 inhibitor that also inhibits PARP5a/5b, otherwise known as tankyrase1 and 2 (TNKS1 and 2), important regulators of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. E7449 inhibits PARP enzymatic activity and additionally traps PARP1 onto damaged DNA; a mechanism previously shown to augment cytotoxicity. Cells deficient in DNA repair pathways beyond homologous recombination were sensitive to E7449 treatment. Chemotherapy was potentiated by E7449 and single agent had significant antitumor activity in BRCA-deficient xenografts. Additionally, E7449 inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colon cancer cell lines, likely through TNKS inhibition. Consistent with this possibility, E7449 stabilized axin and TNKS proteins resulting in β-catenin de-stabilization and significantly altered expression of Wnt target genes. Notably, hair growth mediated by Wnt signaling was inhibited by E7449. A pharmacodynamic effect of E7449 on Wnt target genes was observed in tumors, although E7449 lacked single agent antitumor activity in vivo, a finding typical for selective TNKS inhibitors. E7449 antitumor activity was increased through combination with MEK inhibition. Particularly noteworthy was the lack of toxicity, most significantly the lack of intestinal toxicity reported for other TNKS inhibitors. E7449 represents a novel dual PARP1/2 and TNKS1/2 inhibitor which has the advantage of targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling addicted tumors. E7449 is currently in early clinical development. PMID:26513298

  17. E7449: A dual inhibitor of PARP1/2 and tankyrase1/2 inhibits growth of DNA repair deficient tumors and antagonizes Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, Sharon; Chen, Zhihong; Wu, Jiayi; Chang, Paul; Kolber-Simonds, Donna; Ackermann, Karen; Twine, Natalie C; Shie, Jue-Lon; Miu, Jingzang Tao; Huang, Kuan-Chun; Moniz, George A; Nomoto, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase1 (PARP1) impairs DNA damage repair, and early generation PARP1/2 inhibitors (olaparib, niraparib, etc.) have demonstrated clinical proof of concept for cancer treatment. Here, we describe the development of the novel PARP inhibitor E7449, a potent PARP1/2 inhibitor that also inhibits PARP5a/5b, otherwise known as tankyrase1 and 2 (TNKS1 and 2), important regulators of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. E7449 inhibits PARP enzymatic activity and additionally traps PARP1 onto damaged DNA; a mechanism previously shown to augment cytotoxicity. Cells deficient in DNA repair pathways beyond homologous recombination were sensitive to E7449 treatment. Chemotherapy was potentiated by E7449 and single agent had significant antitumor activity in BRCA-deficient xenografts. Additionally, E7449 inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colon cancer cell lines, likely through TNKS inhibition. Consistent with this possibility, E7449 stabilized axin and TNKS proteins resulting in β-catenin de-stabilization and significantly altered expression of Wnt target genes. Notably, hair growth mediated by Wnt signaling was inhibited by E7449. A pharmacodynamic effect of E7449 on Wnt target genes was observed in tumors, although E7449 lacked single agent antitumor activity in vivo, a finding typical for selective TNKS inhibitors. E7449 antitumor activity was increased through combination with MEK inhibition. Particularly noteworthy was the lack of toxicity, most significantly the lack of intestinal toxicity reported for other TNKS inhibitors. E7449 represents a novel dual PARP1/2 and TNKS1/2 inhibitor which has the advantage of targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling addicted tumors. E7449 is currently in early clinical development. PMID:26513298

  18. Isolation and function of a human endothelial cell C1q receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, L.; Berg, R. van den; Lange, Y. Muizert-de; Gerritsen, A.; Es, L. A. van

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cultured human venous and arterial endothelial cells (EC) bind C1q in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cultured human endothelial cells express an average number of 5.2 × 105 binding sites/cell. In the present study the putative receptor for C1q (C1qR) was isolated from the membranes of 1–5 × 109 human umbilical cord EC by affinity chromatography on C1q–Sepharose. During isolation, C1qR was detected by its capacity to inhibit the lysis of EAC1q in C1q-deficient serum. The eluate from C1q–Sepharose was concentrated, dialysed and subjected to QAE-A50 chromatography and subsequently to gel filtration on HPLC–TSK 3000. C1qR filtered at an apparent molecular weight of 60 kDa. Purified C1qR exhibited an apparent molecular weight of 55–62 kDa in the unreduced state and a molecular weight of 64–68 kDa in reduced form. Two IgM monoclonal antibodies (mAb) D3 and D5 were raised following immunization of mice with purified receptor preparations. Both monoclonal antibodies increased the binding of 125I-C1q to endothelial cells but F(ab')2 anti-C1qR mAb inhibited the binding of a125I-C1q to EC in a dosedependent manner. The D3 mAb recognized a band of 54–60 kDa in Western blots of membranes of human EC and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Previously, the authors showed that C1q induces the binding of IgM-containing immune complexes to EC. Therefore, it was hypothesized that during a primary immune response generation of IgM-IC may occur, resulting in binding and activation of C1, dissociation of activated C1 by C1 inhibitor and subsequent interaction of IgM-IC bearing C1q with EC–C1qR. PMID:18475561

  19. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14740.001 PMID:27434671

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors identify the RAD52-ssDNA interaction as critical for recovery from replication stress and for survival of BRCA2 deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Sarah R; Malacaria, Eva; Folly da Silva Constantino, Laura; Bain, Fletcher E; Diaz, Andrea; Koch, Brandon G; Yu, Liping; Wu, Meng; Pichierri, Pietro; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein RAD52 is an emerging therapeutic target of high importance for BRCA-deficient tumors. Depletion of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with defects in tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. RAD52 also participates in the recovery of the stalled replication forks. Anticipating that ssDNA binding activity underlies the RAD52 cellular functions, we carried out a high throughput screening campaign to identify compounds that disrupt the RAD52-ssDNA interaction. Lead compounds were confirmed as RAD52 inhibitors in biochemical assays. Computational analysis predicted that these inhibitors bind within the ssDNA-binding groove of the RAD52 oligomeric ring. The nature of the inhibitor-RAD52 complex was validated through an in silico screening campaign, culminating in the discovery of an additional RAD52 inhibitor. Cellular studies with our inhibitors showed that the RAD52-ssDNA interaction enables its function at stalled replication forks, and that the inhibition of RAD52-ssDNA binding acts additively with BRCA2 or MUS81 depletion in cell killing. PMID:27434671

  1. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation. PMID:26330291

  2. An inhibitor of transforming growth factor beta type I receptor ameliorates muscle atrophy in a mouse model of caveolin 3-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Yutaka; Okada, Tadashi; Nishimatsu, Shin-Ichiro; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Suga, Tomohiro; Fujino, Masahiro; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Uchino, Makoto; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Noji, Sumihare; Hinohara, Atsushi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Kiyoshi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2012-08-01

    Skeletal muscle expressing Pro104Leu mutant caveolin 3 (CAV3(P104L)) in mouse becomes atrophied and serves as a model of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C. We previously found that caveolin 3-deficient muscles showed activated intramuscular transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signals. However, the cellular mechanism by which loss of caveolin 3 leads to muscle atrophy is unknown. Recently, several small-molecule inhibitors of TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) kinase have been developed as molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy by suppressing intracellular TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3 signaling. Here, we show that a TβRI kinase inhibitor, Ki26894, restores impaired myoblast differentiation in vitro caused by activin, myostatin, and TGF-β1, as well as CAV3(P104L). Oral administration of Ki26894 increased muscle mass and strength in vivo in wild-type mice, and improved muscle atrophy and weakness in the CAV3(P104L) mice. The inhibitor restored the number of satellite cells, the resident stem cells of adult skeletal muscle, with suppression of the increased phosphorylation of Smad2, an effector, and the upregulation of p21 (also known as Cdkn1a), a target gene of the TGF-β family members in muscle. These data indicate that both TGF-β-dependent reduction in satellite cells and impairment of myoblast differentiation contribute to the cellular mechanism underlying caveolin 3-deficient muscle atrophy. TβRI kinase inhibitors could antagonize the activation of intramuscular anti-myogenic TGF-β signals, thereby providing a novel therapeutic rationale for the alternative use of this type of anticancer drug in reversing muscle atrophy in various clinical settings. PMID:22584670

  3. The Small Molecule GMX1778 Is a Potent Inhibitor of NAD+ Biosynthesis: Strategy for Enhanced Therapy in Nicotinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase 1-Deficient Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Mark; Roulston, Anne; Bélec, Laurent; Billot, Xavier; Marcellus, Richard; Bédard, Dominique; Bernier, Cynthia; Branchaud, Stéphane; Chan, Helen; Dairi, Kenza; Gilbert, Karine; Goulet, Daniel; Gratton, Michel-Olivier; Isakau, Henady; Jang, Anne; Khadir, Abdelkrim; Koch, Elizabeth; Lavoie, Manon; Lawless, Michael; Nguyen, Mai; Paquette, Denis; Turcotte, Émilie; Berger, Alvin; Mitchell, Matthew; Shore, Gordon C.; Beauparlant, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    GMX1777 is a prodrug of the small molecule GMX1778, currently in phase I clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. We describe findings indicating that GMX1778 is a potent and specific inhibitor of the NAD+ biosynthesis enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). Cancer cells have a very high rate of NAD+ turnover, which makes NAD+ modulation an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Selective inhibition by GMX1778 of NAMPT blocks the production of NAD+ and results in tumor cell death. Furthermore, GMX1778 is phosphoribosylated by NAMPT, which increases its cellular retention. The cytotoxicity of GMX1778 can be bypassed with exogenous nicotinic acid (NA), which permits NAD+ repletion via NA phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (NAPRT1). The cytotoxicity of GMX1778 in cells with NAPRT1 deficiency, however, cannot be rescued by NA. Analyses of NAPRT1 mRNA and protein levels in cell lines and primary tumor tissue indicate that high frequencies of glioblastomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas are deficient in NAPRT1 and not susceptible to rescue with NA. As a result, the therapeutic index of GMX1777 can be widended in the treatment animals bearing NAPRT1-deficient tumors by coadministration with NA. This provides the rationale for a novel therapeutic approach for the use of GMX1777 in the treatment of human cancers. PMID:19703994

  4. Effects of MK-886, a 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) inhibitor, and 5-lipoxygenase deficiency on the forced swimming behavior of mice.

    PubMed

    Uz, Tolga; Dimitrijevic, Nikola; Imbesi, Marta; Manev, Hari; Manev, Radmila

    2008-05-01

    A common biological pathway may contribute to the comorbidity of atherosclerosis and depression. Increased activity of the enzymatic 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX, 5LO) pathway is a contributing factor in atherosclerosis and a 5-LOX inhibitor, MK-886, is beneficial in animal models of atherosclerosis. In the brain, MK-886 increases phosphorylation of the glutamate receptor subunit GluR1, and the increased phosphorylation of this receptor has been associated with antidepressant treatment. In this work, we evaluated the behavioral effects of MK-886 in an automated assay of mouse forced swimming, which identifies antidepressant activity as increased climbing behavior and/or decreased rest time. Whereas a single injection of MK-886 (3 and 10 mg/kg) did not affect forced swimming behaviors assayed 30 min later, six daily injections of 3 mg/kg MK-886 slightly increased climbing and significantly reduced rest time in wild-type mice but not in 5-LOX-deficient mice. A diet delivery of MK-886, 4 micro/(100 mg(body-weight)day), required 3 weeks to affect forced swimming; it increased climbing behavior. Climbing behavior was also increased in naive 5-LOX-deficient mice compared to naive wild-type controls. These results suggest that 5-LOX inhibition and deficiency may be associated with antidepressant activity. Increased climbing in a forced swimming assay is a typical outcome of antidepressants that increase noradrenergic and dopaminergic activity. Interestingly, 5-LOX deficiency and MK-886 treatment have been shown to be capable of increasing the behavioral effects of a noradrenaline/dopamine-potentiating drug, cocaine. Future research is needed to evaluate the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:18403121

  5. Concomitant Inhibition of PI3Kβ and BRAF or MEK in PTEN-Deficient/BRAF-Mutant Melanoma Treatment: Preclinical Assessment of SAR260301 Oral PI3Kβ-Selective Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bonnevaux, Hélène; Lemaitre, Olivier; Vincent, Loic; Levit, Mikhail N; Windenberger, Fanny; Halley, Frank; Delorme, Cécile; Lengauer, Christoph; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Virone-Oddos, Angela

    2016-07-01

    Class IA PI3K pathway activation resulting from PTEN deficiency has been associated with lack of sensitivity of melanoma to BRAF kinase inhibitors. Although previous studies have shown synergistic activity when pan-PI3K inhibitors were combined with MAPK inhibitors in the treatment of melanoma exhibiting concurrent genetic abnormalities, overlapping adverse events in patients limit optimal dosing and clinical application. With the aim of specifically targeting PTEN-deficient cancers and minimizing the potential for on-target toxicity when inhibiting multiple PI3K isoforms, we developed a program to discover PI3Kβ-selective kinase inhibitors and identified SAR260301 as a potent PI3Kβ-selective, orally available compound, which is now in clinical development. Herein, we provide a detailed biological characterization of SAR260301, and show that this compound has outstanding biochemical and cellular selectivity for the PI3Kβ isoform versus the α, δ, and γ isoforms and a large panel of protein and lipid kinases. We demonstrate that SAR260301 blocks PI3K pathway signaling preferentially in PTEN-deficient human tumor models, and has synergistic antitumor activity when combined with vemurafenib (BRAF inhibitor) or selumetinib (MEK inhibitor) in PTEN-deficient/BRAF-mutated human melanoma tumor models. Combination treatments were very well tolerated, suggesting the potential for a superior safety profile at optimal dosing using selective compounds to inhibit multiple signaling pathways. Together, these experiments provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for safely combining inhibitors of PI3Kβ and BRAF or MEK kinase modulators to improve antitumor activity in PTEN-deficient/BRAF-mutant melanoma, and support the evaluation of SAR260301-based combinations in clinical studies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1460-71. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196754

  6. Complete cDNA sequence of human complement C1s and close physical linkage of the homologous genes C1s and C1r

    SciTech Connect

    Tosi, M.; Duponchel, C.; Meo, T.; Julier, C.

    1987-12-29

    Overlapping molecular clones encoding the complement subcomponent C1s were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence reconstructed from these clones spans about 85% of the length of the liver C1s messenger RNAs, which occur in three distinct size classes around 3 kilobases in length. Comparisons with the sequence of C1r, the other enzymatic subcomponent of C1, reveal 40% amino acid identity and conservation of all the cysteine residues. Beside the serine protease domain, the following sequence motifs, previously described in C1r, were also found in C1s: (a) two repeats of the type found in the Ba fragment of complement factor B and in several other complement but also noncomplement proteins, (b) a cysteine-rich segment homologous to the repeats of epidermal growth factor precursor, and (c) a duplicated segment found only in C1r and C1s. Differences in each of these structural motifs provide significant clues for the interpretation of the functional divergence of these interacting serine protease zymogens. Hybridizations of C1r and C1s probes to restriction endonuclease fragments of genomic DNA demonstrate close physical linkage of the corresponding genes. The implications of this finding are discussed with respect to the evolution of C1r and C1s after their origin by tandem gene duplication and to the previously observed combined hereditary deficiencies of Clr and Cls.

  7. Omapatrilat, an Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitor, Attenuates Early Atherosclerosis in Diabetic and in Nondiabetic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Zohar; Dvir, Ayana; Shaish, Aviv; Trestman, Svetlana; Cohen, Hofit; Levkovietz, Hana; Rhachmani, Rita; Harats, Dror

    2003-01-01

    Omapatrilat inhibits both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP). ACE inhibitors have been shown to inhibit atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice and in several other animal models but failed in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor– deficient mice despite effective inhibition of the reninangiotensin- aldosterone system. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of omapatrilat on atherogenesis in diabetic and nondiabetic LDL receptor–deficient mice. LDL receptor–deficient male mice were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 11 each). Diabetes was induced in 2 groups by low-dose STZ, the other 2 groups served as nondiabetic controls. Omapatrilat (70 mg/kg/day) was administered to one of the diabetic and to one of the nondiabetic groups. The diabetic and the nondiabetic mice were sacrificed after 3 and 5 weeks, respectively. The aortae were examined and the atherosclerotic plaque area was measured. The atherosclerotic plaque area was significantly smaller in the omapatrilat-treated mice, both diabetic and nondiabetic, as compared to nontreated controls. The mean plaque area of omapatrilattreated nondiabetic mice was 9357 ± 7293 μm2, versus 71977 ± 34610 μm2 in the nontreated mice (P = .002). In the diabetic animals, the plaque area was 8887 ± 5386 μm2 and 23220 ± 10400 μm2, respectively for treated and nontreated mice (P = .001). Plasma lipids were increased by omapatrilat: Meanplasma cholesterol in treated mice, diabetic and nondiabetic combined, was 39.31 ± 6.00 mmol/L, versus 33.12 ± 7.64 mmol/L in the nontreated animals (P = .008). The corresponding combined mean values of triglycerides were 4.83 ± 1.93 versus 3.00 ± 1.26 mmol/L (P = .02). Omapatrilat treatment did not affect weight or plasma glucose levels. Treatment with omapatrilat inhibits atherogenesis in diabetic as well as nondiabetic LDL receptor–deficient mice despite an increase in plasma lipids, suggesting a direct effect on the arterial

  8. Treatment of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice with 4-(3-Bromobenzoyl)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline (WHI-P164), a potent inhibitor of triglyceride synthesis.

    PubMed

    Trieu, V N; Liu, X P; Chen, C L; Uckun, F M

    2000-02-01

    We identified a novel organic compound, 4-(3'-bromobenzoyl)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline (compound WHI-P164), as a potent inhibitor of triglyceride (TG) synthesis. In an in vitro model of lipid synthesis, WHI-P164 (but not any one of the three structurally similar control dimethoxyquinazoline compounds) inhibited the accumulation of TG-rich intracellular lipid droplets in Caco-2 human intestinal cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. WHI-P164 caused no acute toxicity associated with morbidity or mortality in mice when administered at dose levels ranging from 0.5 to 80 mg/kg. In pharmacokinetic studies in mice, WHI-P164 was rapidly eliminated from plasma with a terminal elimination half-life of 26.1 +/- 1.3 min after intraperitoneal administration and 33.3 +/- 11.3 min after intravenous administration. Treatment with 40 mg/kg WHI-P164 (but not one of three structurally similar control dimethoxyquinazoline compounds) administered intraperitoneally once daily for 7 consecutive treatment days blocked the in vivo hepatic TG synthesis in both apoE-deficient and wild-type C57B1/6 mice. In apoE-deficient mice maintained on a high-fat/high-cholesterol Western diet, WHI-P164 substantially reduced the lipid accumulation in the liver after 7 days of treatment and the lipid accumulation in the aorta after 1 month of treatment. Our results in apoE-deficient mice show that lipid accumulation in hepatocytes and foam cells are related events, and inhibiting TG synthesis with WHI-P164 offers an effective means to treat atherosclerosis. PMID:10672848

  9. An oral high dose of cholecalciferol restores vitamin D status in deficient postmenopausal HIV-1-infected women independently of protease inhibitors therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Jessica; Mezzaroma, Ivano; Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Falciano, Mario; Salotti, Alessandra; Di Traglia, Mario; Diacinti, Daniele; Biondi, Piergianni; Cipriani, Cristiana; Cilli, Mirella; Minisola, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    The best repletion and maintenance dosing regimens with cholecalciferol in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1 patients remain unknown. Protease inhibitors (PIs) have been shown to inhibit vitamin D 1α- and 25α-hydroxylation in hepatocyte and monocyte cultures. We therefore evaluated the effect of a single high dose of cholecalciferol in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1 postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (cART), with and without PIs. Forty HIV-1 postmenopausal women treated with cART, with hypovitaminosis D (<20 ng/ml), were enrolled. We measured serum changes of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum calcium, and urinary calcium excretion following a loading dose of 600,000 IU of cholecalciferol after 3, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. Patients were divided into two groups, whether or not they were taking PI. A significant increase in mean 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels at day 3 and throughout the entire observation period was found in both groups (p < 0.001). PTH levels concomitantly decreased in both groups (p < 0.001). Mean albumin-adjusted serum calcium increases with respect to baseline were significant only at day 3 and day 30 for both groups (p < 0.01). Considering remaining parameters, there were no significant differences between the groups at any time, by two-way RM ANOVA. An oral dose of 600,000 IU of cholecalciferol in HIV-1 postmenopausal women rapidly increases 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels reducing PTH levels, regardless of the presence of PIs in the cART scheme. PMID:26254790

  10. BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cell lines are resistant to MEK inhibitors and show distinct sensitivities to 6-thioguanine

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuexi; Helenius, Mikko; Väänänen, Kristiina; Bulanova, Daria; Saarela, Jani; Sokolenko, Anna; Martens, John; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Germ-line or somatic inactivation of BRCA1 is a defining feature for a portion of human breast cancers. Here we evaluated the anti-proliferative activity of 198 FDA-approved and experimental drugs against four BRCA1-mutant (HCC1937, MDA-MB-436, SUM1315MO2, and SUM149PT) and four BRCA1-wild-type (MDA-MB-231, SUM229PE, MCF10A, and MCF7) breast cancer cell lines. We found that all BRCA1-mutant cell lines were insensitive to inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) Selumetinib and Pimasertib in contrast to BRCA1-wildtype control cell lines. However, unexpectedly, only two BRCA1-mutant cell lines, HCC1937 and MDA-MB-436, were hypersensitive to a nucleotide analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG). SUM149PT cells readily formed radiation-induced RAD51-positive nuclear foci indicating a functional homologous recombination, which may explain their resistance to 6-TG. However, the reason underlying 6-TG resistance of SUM1315MO2 cells remains unclear. Our data reveal a remarkable heterogeneity among BRCA1-mutant cell lines and provide a reference for future studies. PMID:27313062

  11. BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cell lines are resistant to MEK inhibitors and show distinct sensitivities to 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuexi; Helenius, Mikko; Väänänen, Kristiina; Bulanova, Daria; Saarela, Jani; Sokolenko, Anna; Martens, John; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Germ-line or somatic inactivation of BRCA1 is a defining feature for a portion of human breast cancers. Here we evaluated the anti-proliferative activity of 198 FDA-approved and experimental drugs against four BRCA1-mutant (HCC1937, MDA-MB-436, SUM1315MO2, and SUM149PT) and four BRCA1-wild-type (MDA-MB-231, SUM229PE, MCF10A, and MCF7) breast cancer cell lines. We found that all BRCA1-mutant cell lines were insensitive to inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) Selumetinib and Pimasertib in contrast to BRCA1-wildtype control cell lines. However, unexpectedly, only two BRCA1-mutant cell lines, HCC1937 and MDA-MB-436, were hypersensitive to a nucleotide analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG). SUM149PT cells readily formed radiation-induced RAD51-positive nuclear foci indicating a functional homologous recombination, which may explain their resistance to 6-TG. However, the reason underlying 6-TG resistance of SUM1315MO2 cells remains unclear. Our data reveal a remarkable heterogeneity among BRCA1-mutant cell lines and provide a reference for future studies. PMID:27313062

  12. Angiotensin type 1a receptor-deficient mice develop diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction, which is prevented by renin-angiotensin system inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes-induced organ damage is significantly associated with the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Recently, several studies have demonstrated a change in the RAS from an extracellular to an intracellular system, in several cell types, in response to high ambient glucose levels. In cardiac myocytes, intracellular angiotensin (ANG) II synthesis and actions are ACE and AT1 independent, respectively. However, a role of this system in diabetes-induced organ damage is not clear. Methods To determine a role of the intracellular ANG II in diabetic cardiomyopathy, we induced diabetes using streptozotocin in AT1a receptor deficient (AT1a-KO) mice to exclude any effects of extracellular ANG II. Further, diabetic animals were treated with a renin inhibitor aliskiren, an ACE inhibitor benazeprilat, and an AT1 receptor blocker valsartan. Results AT1a-KO mice developed significant diastolic and systolic dysfunction following 10 wks of diabetes, as determined by echocardiography. All three drugs prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction in these animals, without affecting blood pressure or glucose levels. A significant down regulation of components of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) was observed in diabetic animals, which was largely prevented by benazeprilat and valsartan, while aliskiren normalized kininogen expression. Conclusions These data indicated that the AT1a receptor, thus extracellular ANG II, are not required for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The KKS might contribute to the beneficial effects of benazeprilat and valsartan in diabetic cardiomyopathy. A role of intracellular ANG II is suggested by the inhibitory effects of aliskiren, which needs confirmation in future studies. PMID:24215514

  13. Effect of the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban on arterial thrombosis in wild-type and apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nana-Maria; Dressel, Tobias; Schäfer, Katrin; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2012-11-01

    Rivaroxaban is a potent and specific direct inhibitor of coagulation factor Xa. Recent studies have highlighted its effectiveness in the prevention of venous thrombosis and embolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation. To evaluate the antithrombotic effects of rivaroxaban in an in vivo model of arterial thrombosis, photochemical vascular injury was induced in wild-type mice by intravenous rose bengal (50 mg/kg body weight [BW]) followed by illumination of the left common carotid artery using a 543 nm helium-neon laser beam. Rivaroxaban, injected concomitantly with rose bengal at doses of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mg/kg BW, dose-dependently prolonged the times to first thrombotic occlusion and stable thrombosis. Quantitative analysis of carotid flow curves revealed higher blood volumes passing through the injured artery with increasing rivaroxaban doses (P<0.01 and P<0.001 vs. vehicle for 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg , respectively), suggesting a dose-dependent effect on vascular patency. Consistently, a significantly higher proportion of mice that received 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban exhibited patent carotid arteries at the end of the flow monitoring period compared to vehicle alone (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). Histological analysis showed complete thrombotic arterial occlusion in vehicle-treated mice compared to less thrombotic material in mice injected with 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban (P<0.05). Rivaroxaban also prolonged the time to cessation of tail bleeding in a dose-dependent manner, starting at 1.5 mg/kg. Similar findings were obtained in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. Rivaroxaban may exert beneficial effects by preventing arterial thrombosis and vascular occlusion after endothelial injury. PMID:22281071

  14. Discovery of Methyl 4′-Methyl-5-(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-[1,1′-biphenyl]-3-carboxylate, an Improved Small-Molecule Inhibitor of c-Myc–Max Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Jeremy L.; Sabato, Philip E.; Hu, Angela; Prochownik, Edward V.; Fletcher, Steven

    2014-01-01

    c-Myc is a bHLH-ZIP transcription factor that is responsible for the transcription of a wide range of target genes involved in many cancer-related cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and metabolism. Over-expression of c-Myc has been observed in, and directly contributes to, a variety of human cancers including those of the hematopoietic system, lung, prostate and colon. To become transcriptionally active, c-Myc must first dimerize with Max via its own bHLH-ZIP domain. A proven strategy towards the inhibition of c-Myc oncogenic activity is to interfere with the structural integrity of the c-Myc–Max heterodimer. The small-molecule 10074-G5 is an inhibitor of c-Myc–Max dimerization (IC50 = 146 μM) that operates by binding and stabilizing c-Myc in its monomeric form. Herein, we report on our on-going efforts to optimize the c-Myc–Max inhibitory activity of 10074-G5-related molecules in vitro and in cancer cells that over-express c-Myc. Specifically, we have identified a congener of 10074-G5, termed 3jc48-3, that is about five times as potent (IC50 = 34 μM) at inhibiting c-Myc–Max dimerization as the parent compound. In addition, 3jc48-3 exhibited an approximate two-fold selectivity for c-Myc–Max heterodimers over Max–Max dimers, suggesting that, like its predecessor, its mode of action is through binding c-Myc. 3jc48-3 inhibited the proliferation of c-Myc-over-expressing HL60 and Daudi cells with single-digit micromolar IC50 values by causing growth arrest at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that 3jc48-3 inhibits c-Myc–Max dimerization in cells, which was further substantiated by the specific silencing of a c-Myc-driven luciferase reporter gene. Finally, unlike previously described 10074-G5 analogues, which are rapidly released and/or metabolized by cells following their uptake, 3jc48-3’s intracellular half-life was >17 h. Collectively, these data demonstrate 3jc48-3 to be one of

  15. The Niemann-Pick C1 like 1 (NPC1L1) inhibitor ezetimibe improves metabolic disease via decreased liver X receptor (LXR) activity in liver of obese male mice.

    PubMed

    Sugizaki, Taichi; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Horai, Yasushi; Kaneko-Iwasaki, Nao; Arita, Eri; Miyazaki, Teruo; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Honda, Akira; Irie, Junichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Dyslipidemic patients with diabetes mellitus, including metabolic syndrome, are at increased risk of coronary heart disease. It has been reported that ezetimibe, a cholesterol absorption inhibitor, improves metabolic diseases in mice and humans. However, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. Here we explored the effects of ezetimibe on lipid and glucose homeostasis. Male KK-A(y) mice were fed a high-fat diet, which is the mouse model of metabolic syndrome, with or without ezetimibe for 14 weeks. Ezetimibe improved dyslipidemia, steatosis, and insulin resistance. Ezetimibe decreased hepatic oxysterols, which are endogenous agonists of liver X receptor (LXR), to decrease hepatic lipogenic gene expressions, especially in stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), leading to a remarkable reduction of hepatic oleate content that would contribute to the improvement of steatosis by reducing triglycerides and cholesterol esters. Simultaneously, hepatic β-oxidation, NADPH oxidase and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were reduced, and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory cytokines were also decreased. Consistent with these changes, ezetimibe diminished c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and improved insulin signaling in the liver. In vitro study using primary hepatocytes obtained from male SD rats, treated with oleate and LXR agonist, showed excess lipid accumulation, increased oxidative stress and impaired insulin signaling. Therefore, in obese subjects, ezetimibe reduces hepatic LXR activity by reducing hepatic oxysterols to lower hepatic oleate content. This improves steatosis and reduces oxidative stress, and this reduction improves insulin signaling in the liver. These results provide insight into pathogenesis and strategies for treatment of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24773344

  16. Studies on human plasma C1 inactivator-enzyme interactions. I. Mechanisms of interaction with C1s, plasmin, and trypsin.

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, P C; Cooper, N R

    1975-01-01

    This study has explored the nature of the molecular events which occur when C1 inactivator, a human plasma inhibitor of the complement, kinin-forming, coagulation, and fibrinolytic enzyme systems, interacts with C1s, plasmin, and trypsin. Purified inhibitor preparations demonstrated two bands, when examined by acrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The molecular weights of the major and minor bands were 105,000 and 96,000 daltons, respectively. The minor component appeared to be immunologically and functionally identical to the main C1 inactivator component. Loss of C1s and plasmin functional activity was associated with the formation of a 1:1 molar complex between the inhibitor and each enzyme. These complexes were stable in the presence of SDS and urea. The light chain of both these enzymes provided the binding site for C1 inactivator. Complex formation and enzyme inhibition occurred only with native and not with an inhibitor preparation denatured by acid treatment, thereby demonstrating the importance of conformational factors in the enzyme-inhibitor reaction. Although peptide bond cleavage of the C1 inactivator molecule by C1s was not documented, plasmin was found to degrade the inhibitor with the production of several characteristic derivatives. At least one of these products retained the ability to complex with C1s and plasmin. Trypsin, which failed to form a complex with C1 inactivator, degraded the inhibitor in a limited and sequential manner with the production of nonfunctional derivatives one of which appeared structurally similar to a plasmin-induced product. These studies therefore, provide new information concerning the molecular interactions between C1 inactivator and several of the proteases which it inhibits. Images PMID:123251

  17. The orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor AZD6738 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin to resolve ATM-deficient non-small cell lung cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vendetti, Frank P.; Lau, Alan; Schamus, Sandra; Conrads, Thomas P.; O'Connor, Mark J.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    ATR and ATM are DNA damage signaling kinases that phosphorylate several thousand substrates. ATR kinase activity is increased at damaged replication forks and resected DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM kinase activity is increased at DSBs. ATM has been widely studied since ataxia telangiectasia individuals who express no ATM protein are the most radiosensitive patients identified. Since ATM is not an essential protein, it is widely believed that ATM kinase inhibitors will be well-tolerated in the clinic. ATR has been widely studied, but advances have been complicated by the finding that ATR is an essential protein and it is widely believed that ATR kinase inhibitors will be toxic in the clinic. We describe AZD6738, an orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor. AZD6738 induces cell death and senescence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. AZD6738 potentiates the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and gemcitabine in NSCLC cell lines with intact ATM kinase signaling, and potently synergizes with cisplatin in ATM-deficient NSCLC cells. In contrast to expectations, daily administration of AZD6738 and ATR kinase inhibition for 14 consecutive days is tolerated in mice and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in xenograft models. Remarkably, the combination of cisplatin and AZD6738 resolves ATM-deficient lung cancer xenografts. PMID:26517239

  18. Discovery of a series of 8-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzoxazin-4-ylmethyl)-2-morpholino-4-oxo-chromene-6-carboxamides as PI3Kβ/δ inhibitors for the treatment of PTEN-deficient tumours.

    PubMed

    Barlaam, Bernard; Cosulich, Sabina; Degorce, Sébastien; Fitzek, Martina; Green, Stephen; Hancox, Urs; Lambert-van der Brempt, Christine; Lohmann, Jean-Jacques; Maudet, Mickaël; Morgentin, Rémy; Péru, Aurélien; Plé, Patrick; Saleh, Twana; Ward, Lara; Warin, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery and optimisation of a series of 8-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzoxazin-4-ylmethyl)-2-morpholino-4-oxo-chromene-6-carboxamides, leading to compound 16 as a potent and selective PI3Kβ/δ inhibitor: PI3Kβ cell IC50 0.012μM (in PTEN null MDA-MB-468 cell) and PI3Kδ cell IC50 0.047μM (in Jeko-1 B-cell), with good pharmacokinetics and physical properties. In vivo, 16 showed profound pharmacodynamic modulation of AKT phosphorylation in a mouse PTEN-deficient PC3 prostate tumour xenograft after a single oral dose and gave excellent tumour growth inhibition in the same model after chronic oral dosing. Compound 16 was selected as a preclinical candidate for the treatment of PTEN-deficient tumours. PMID:26996374

  19. Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lin; Betters, Jenna L.; Yu, Liqing

    2014-01-01

    Increased blood cholesterol is an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Cholesterol homeostasis in the body is controlled mainly by endogenous synthesis, intestinal absorption, and hepatic excretion. Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) is a polytopic transmembrane protein localized at the apical membrane of enterocytes and the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. It functions as a sterol transporter to mediate intestinal cholesterol absorption and counterbalances hepatobiliary cholesterol excretion. NPC1L1 is the molecular target of ezetimibe, a potent cholesterol absorption inhibitor that is widely used in treating hypercholesterolemia. Recent findings suggest that NPC1L1 deficiency or ezetimibe treatment also prevents diet-induced hepatic steatosis and obesity in addition to reducing blood cholesterol. Future studies should focus on molecular mechanisms underlying NPC1L1-dependent cholesterol transport and elucidation of how a cholesterol transporter modulates the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. PMID:20809793

  20. Characterization of a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor-deficient subline of Raji cells. An analysis of the functional importance of complement inhibitors on the Raji cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C L; Morgan, B P

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of complement inhibitory proteins present on the surface of Raji cells (obtained from the European Collection of Animal Cell Cultures; originally established from human Burkitt's lymphoma) revealed two populations of cells. These populations differed in their expression of the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored inhibitors CD59 and decay-accelerating factor (DAF). Two stable clones were established by limiting dilution of the original cell culture. Raji+3 expressed CD59 and DAF whereas Raji-26 expressed neither inhibitor. Both clones expressed membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Analyses of other cell surface proteins (CD19, CD35, CD48 and CD58 (transmembrane form)) revealed similar levels of expression of transmembrane proteins by both clones. However, CD48 was expressed only by Raji+3. As CD48, DAF and CD59 are all GPI-anchored molecules it is likely that a defect in the GPI-anchoring mechanism is responsible for the generation of the second population of cells. The two clones demonstrated markedly different sensitivities to complement. When equally sensitized cells from both clones were treated with normal human serum (12.5%) for 1 hr at 37 degrees, the Raji+3 clone was resistant to complement-mediated lysis, whereas approximately 70% of the Raji-26 cells were lysed. However, by using specific antibody to block the function of membrane-bound complement inhibitors, lysis of Raji+3 was demonstrated. Whilst blocking of one inhibitor only on the cell had little effect on cell killing, blocking of two or more inhibitors significantly increased cell lysis. Our results demonstrated that all three inhibitors expressed by these cells contributed to protection against classical pathway-mediated complement activation. However, whilst a limited protective role was seen for MCP, CD59 and DAF appeared to be of far more importance for protection from complement-mediated lysis via the classical pathway. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7490134

  1. Emerging and Novel Functions of Complement Protein C1q

    PubMed Central

    Kouser, Lubna; Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Shastri, Abhishek; Saraon, Anuvinder; Ferluga, Janez; Al-Mozaini, Maha; Kishore, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Complement protein C1q, the recognition molecule of the classical pathway, performs a diverse range of complement and non-complement functions. It can bind various ligands derived from self, non-self, and altered self and modulate the functions of immune and non-immune cells including dendritic cells and microglia. C1q involvement in the clearance of apoptotic cells and subsequent B cell tolerance is more established now. Recent evidence appears to suggest that C1q plays an important role in pregnancy where its deficiency and dysregulation can have adverse effects, leading to preeclampsia, missed abortion, miscarriage or spontaneous loss, and various infections. C1q is also produced locally in the central nervous system, and has a protective role against pathogens and possible inflammatory functions while interacting with aggregated proteins leading to neurodegenerative diseases. C1q role in synaptic pruning, and thus CNS development, its anti-cancer effects as an immune surveillance molecule, and possibly in aging are currently areas of extensive research. PMID:26175731

  2. Effects of Lewis lung carcinoma on trabecular microstructural changes in wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone is a major target organ of metastasis. The present study investigated the effects of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) on trabecular microstructural changes, using tomographic analysis, in distal femur and lumbar 4 vertebra from LLC-bearing wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) defi...

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Isebaert, Sofie F.; Swinnen, Johannes V.; McBride, William H.; Haustermans, Karin M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  4. Molecular characterization of a gene encoding extracellular serine protease isolated from a subtilisin inhibitor-deficient mutant of Streptomyces albogriseolus S-3253.

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, S; Odaka, A; Watanabe, Y; Momose, H

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine protease produced by a mutant, M1, derived from Streptomyces albogriseolus S-3253 that no longer produces a protease inhibitor (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor [SSI]) was isolated. A 20-kDa protein was purified by its affinity for SSI and designated SAM-P20. The amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal region of SAM-P20 revealed high homology with the sequences of Streptomyces griseus proteases A and B, and the gene sequence confirmed the relationships. The sequence also revealed a putative amino acid signal sequence for SAM-P20 that apparently functioned to allow secretion of SAM-P20 from Escherichia coli carrying the recombinant gene. SAM-P20 produced by E. coli cells was shown to be sensitive to SSI inhibition. PMID:7887600

  5. The HDAC inhibitor SAHA improves depressive-like behavior of CRTC1-deficient mice: Possible relevance for treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Meylan, Elsa M; Halfon, Olivier; Magistretti, Pierre J; Cardinaux, Jean-René

    2016-08-01

    Major depression is a highly complex disabling psychiatric disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, a substantial percentage of patients are unresponsive to these medications. A better understanding of the neurobiology of depression and the mechanisms underlying antidepressant response is thus critically needed. We previously reported that mice lacking CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) exhibit a depressive-like phenotype and a blunted antidepressant response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. In this study, we similarly show that Crtc1(-/-) mice are resistant to the antidepressant effect of chronic desipramine in a behavioral despair paradigm. Supporting the blunted response to this tricyclic antidepressant, we found that desipramine does not significantly increase the expression of Bdnf and Nr4a1-3 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of Crtc1(-/-) mice. Epigenetic regulation of neuroplasticity gene expression has been associated with depression and antidepressant response, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to have antidepressant-like properties. Here, we show that unlike conventional antidepressants, chronic systemic administration of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA partially rescues the depressive-like behavior of Crtc1(-/-) mice. This behavioral effect is accompanied by an increased expression of Bdnf, but not Nr4a1-3, in the prefrontal cortex of these mice, suggesting that this epigenetic intervention restores the expression of a subset of genes by acting downstream of CRTC1. These findings suggest that CRTC1 alterations may be associated with treatment-resistant depression, and support the interesting possibility that targeting HDACs may be a useful therapeutic strategy in antidepressant development. PMID:26970016

  6. Autoantibodies against complement C1q specifically target C1q bound on early apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Cornelia; Schaller, Monica; Perahud, Iryna; Osthoff, Michael; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2009-09-01

    Autoantibodies against complement C1q (anti-C1q) are frequently found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). They strongly correlate with the occurrence of severe lupus nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic role in SLE. Because anti-C1q are known to recognize a neoepitope on bound C1q, but not on fluid-phase C1q, the aim of this study was to clarify the origin of anti-C1q by determining the mechanism that renders C1q antigenic. We investigated anti-C1q from serum and purified total IgG of patients with SLE and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis as well as two monoclonal human anti-C1q Fab from a SLE patient generated by phage display. Binding characteristics, such as their ability to recognize C1q bound on different classes of Igs, on immune complexes, and on cells undergoing apoptosis, were analyzed. Interestingly, anti-C1q did not bind to C1q bound on Igs or immune complexes. Neither did we observe specific binding of anti-C1q to C1q bound on late apoptotic/necrotic cells when compared with binding in the absence of C1q. However, as shown by FACS analysis and confocal microscopy, anti-C1q specifically targeted C1q bound on early apoptotic cells. Anti-C1q were found to specifically target C1q bound on cells undergoing apoptosis. Our observations suggest that early apoptotic cells are a major target of the autoimmune response in SLE and provide a direct link between human SLE, apoptosis, and C1q. PMID:19648280

  7. C1 neurons: the body's EMTs.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Depuy, Seth D; Burke, Peter G R; Abbott, Stephen B G

    2013-08-01

    The C1 neurons reside in the rostral and intermediate portions of the ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, IVLM). They use glutamate as a fast transmitter and synthesize catecholamines plus various neuropeptides. These neurons regulate the hypothalamic pituitary axis via direct projections to the paraventricular nucleus and regulate the autonomic nervous system via projections to sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons. The presympathetic C1 cells, located in the RVLM, are probably organized in a roughly viscerotopic manner and most of them regulate the circulation. C1 cells are variously activated by hypoglycemia, infection or inflammation, hypoxia, nociception, and hypotension and contribute to most glucoprivic responses. C1 cells also stimulate breathing and activate brain stem noradrenergic neurons including the locus coeruleus. Based on the various effects attributed to the C1 cells, their axonal projections and what is currently known of their synaptic inputs, subsets of C1 cells appear to be differentially recruited by pain, hypoxia, infection/inflammation, hemorrhage, and hypoglycemia to produce a repertoire of stereotyped autonomic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses that help the organism survive physical injury and its associated cohort of acute infection, hypoxia, hypotension, and blood loss. C1 cells may also contribute to glucose and cardiovascular homeostasis in the absence of such physical stresses, and C1 cell hyperactivity may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity associated with diseases such as hypertension. PMID:23697799

  8. 42 CFR 52c.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applicability. 52c.1 Section 52c.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH... Biomedical Research Support Program) awarded in accordance with section 301(a)(3) of the Public...

  9. 42 CFR 52c.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability. 52c.1 Section 52c.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS MINORITY BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH... Biomedical Research Support Program) awarded in accordance with section 301(a)(3) of the Public...

  10. C1 neurons: the body's EMTs

    PubMed Central

    Stornetta, Ruth L.; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; DePuy, Seth D.; Burke, Peter G. R.; Abbott, Stephen B. G.

    2013-01-01

    The C1 neurons reside in the rostral and intermediate portions of the ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, IVLM). They use glutamate as a fast transmitter and synthesize catecholamines plus various neuropeptides. These neurons regulate the hypothalamic pituitary axis via direct projections to the paraventricular nucleus and regulate the autonomic nervous system via projections to sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons. The presympathetic C1 cells, located in the RVLM, are probably organized in a roughly viscerotopic manner and most of them regulate the circulation. C1 cells are variously activated by hypoglycemia, infection or inflammation, hypoxia, nociception, and hypotension and contribute to most glucoprivic responses. C1 cells also stimulate breathing and activate brain stem noradrenergic neurons including the locus coeruleus. Based on the various effects attributed to the C1 cells, their axonal projections and what is currently known of their synaptic inputs, subsets of C1 cells appear to be differentially recruited by pain, hypoxia, infection/inflammation, hemorrhage, and hypoglycemia to produce a repertoire of stereotyped autonomic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses that help the organism survive physical injury and its associated cohort of acute infection, hypoxia, hypotension, and blood loss. C1 cells may also contribute to glucose and cardiovascular homeostasis in the absence of such physical stresses, and C1 cell hyperactivity may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity associated with diseases such as hypertension. PMID:23697799

  11. Molecular Determinants of the Substrate Specificity of the Complement-initiating Protease, C1r*

    PubMed Central

    Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Yongqing, Tang; Tran, Thuy P.; Thompson, Phillip E.; Viljoen, Jacqueline E.; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Duncan, Renee C.; Kass, Itamar; Buckle, Ashley M.; Pike, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease, C1r, initiates activation of the classical pathway of complement, which is a crucial innate defense mechanism against pathogens and altered-self cells. C1r both autoactivates and subsequently cleaves and activates C1s. Because complement is implicated in many inflammatory diseases, an understanding of the interaction between C1r and its target substrates is required for the design of effective inhibitors of complement activation. Examination of the active site specificity of C1r using phage library technology revealed clear specificity for Gln at P2 and Ile at P1′, which are found in these positions in physiological substrates of C1r. Removal of one or both of the Gln at P2 and Ile at P1′ in the C1s substrate reduced the rate of C1r activation. Substituting a Gln residue into the P2 of the activation site of MASP-3, a protein with similar domain structure to C1s that is not normally cleaved by C1r, enabled efficient activation of this enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations and structural modeling of the interaction of the C1s activation peptide with the active site of C1r revealed the molecular mechanisms that particularly underpin the specificity of the enzyme for the P2 Gln residue. The complement control protein domains of C1r also made important contributions to efficient activation of C1s by this enzyme, indicating that exosite interactions were also important. These data show that C1r specificity is well suited to its cleavage targets and that efficient cleavage of C1s is achieved through both active site and exosite contributions. PMID:23589288

  12. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecific potassium channel blocker (tetraethylammonium chloride [TEA]), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine [L-NMMA]), and a store-operated calcium entry inhibitor (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-APB]). Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation was also completely abolished by an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase, which suggests that the Pro C1 effects observed involved cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. Interestingly, Pro C1 significantly enhanced basal cGMP levels. Taken together, these results indicate that Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation is associated with the activation of the calcium-dependent NO/cGMP pathway, involving potassium channel activation. Thus, Pro C1 may represent a novel and potentially therapeutically relevant compound for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24971771

  13. Procyanidin C1 causes vasorelaxation through activation of the endothelial NO/cGMP pathway in thoracic aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecific potassium channel blocker (tetraethylammonium chloride [TEA]), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine [L-NMMA]), and a store-operated calcium entry inhibitor (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-APB]). Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation was also completely abolished by an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase, which suggests that the Pro C1 effects observed involved cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. Interestingly, Pro C1 significantly enhanced basal cGMP levels. Taken together, these results indicate that Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation is associated with the activation of the calcium-dependent NO/cGMP pathway, involving potassium channel activation. Thus, Pro C1 may represent a novel and potentially therapeutically relevant compound for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24971771

  14. Anxiety and depression with neurogenesis defects in exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2-deficient mice are ameliorated by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Prozac.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Ma, S L; Yeung, P K K; Wong, Y H; Tsim, K W K; So, K F; Lam, L C W; Chung, S K

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular cAMP and serotonin are important modulators of anxiety and depression. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) also known as Prozac, is widely used against depression, potentially by activating cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through protein kinase A (PKA). However, the role of Epac1 and Epac2 (Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors, RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4, respectively) as potential downstream targets of SSRI/cAMP in mood regulations is not yet clear. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of Epac1 (Epac1(-/-)) or Epac2 (Epac2(-/-)) knockout mice by comparing them with their wild-type counterparts. Surprisingly, Epac2(-/-) mice exhibited a wide range of mood disorders, including anxiety and depression with learning and memory deficits in contextual and cued fear-conditioning tests without affecting Epac1 expression or PKA activity. Interestingly, rs17746510, one of the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in RAPGEF4 associated with cognitive decline in Chinese Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, was significantly correlated with apathy and mood disturbance, whereas no significant association was observed between RAPGEF3 SNPs and the risk of AD or neuropsychiatric inventory scores. To further determine the detailed role of Epac2 in SSRI/serotonin/cAMP-involved mood disorders, we treated Epac2(-/-) mice with a SSRI, Prozac. The alteration in open field behavior and impaired hippocampal cell proliferation in Epac2(-/-) mice were alleviated by Prozac. Taken together, Epac2 gene polymorphism is a putative risk factor for mood disorders in AD patients in part by affecting the hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27598965

  15. Posterior osseous bridging of C1.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Serkan; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Comert, Ayhan; Acar, Halil I; Seckin, Hakan; Er, Uygur; Belen, Deniz; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Elhan, Alaittin

    2008-06-01

    The sulcus of the vertebral artery is located behind the lateral mass of the atlas and in some cases is converted into a foramen by anomalous ossification known as the posterior ponticulus (osseous bridge). This study involved anatomical observations of 158 isolated anatomical specimens of dry C1 vertebrae. The incidence and types of posterior osseous bridging were identified for the 158 dry samples of atlas vertebrae. In nine (5.6%) dry C1 vertebrae, partial osseous bridging was detected (bilaterally in eight vertebrae and unilaterally on the left in one). Complete osseous bridging (arcuate foramen) was observed in six (3.8%) dry C1 vertebrae (bilaterally in one vertebra, unilaterally on the left in three, and on the right in two). Awareness of the types of posterior osseous bridging of C1 in craniocervical junction surgery is essential, and may be helpful in surgical interventions in this region. PMID:18378457

  16. Anti-C1q autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies to complement components are associated with various diseases. Anti-C1q antibodies are present in all patients with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, but also, with varying prevalence, in other conditions. In SLE, these antibodies are neither sensitive nor specific for this condition. They occur, however, more frequently in (proliferative) lupus nephritis, particularly during active disease. Furthermore, levels of anti-C1q rise, in many cases, prior to a relapse of lupus nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic role for the autoantibodies. Indeed, experimental studies strongly support a pathogenic role for anti-C1q in immune complex-mediated renal disease. In addition, anti-C1q may interfere with the clearance of apoptotic cells, so influencing induction and expression of autoimmunity. PMID:18606253

  17. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C 2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the complement C1 inhibitor (a plasma protein) in serum. Complement C1 inhibitor occurs normally in plasma and blocks the action of the...

  1. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world. PMID:1745900

  2. Complimentary action: C1q increases ganglion cell survival in an in vitro model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Blom, Anna M; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2016-09-15

    Using a previously described retinal explant culture system as an acute injury model, we here explore the role of C1q, the initiator of the classical complement pathway, in neuronal cell survival and retinal homeostasis. Full-thickness adult rat retinal explants were divided into four groups, receiving the following supplementation: C1q (50nM), C1-inhibitor (C1-inh; Berinert; 500mg/l), C1q+C1-inh, and no supplementation (culture controls). Explants were kept for 12h or 2days after which they were examined morphologically and with a panel of immunohistochemical markers. C1q supplementation protects ganglion cells from degeneration within the explant in vitro system. This effect is correlated to an attenuated endogenous production of C1q, and a quiesced gliotic response. PMID:27609284

  3. C1q acts in the tumour microenvironment as a cancer-promoting factor independently of complement activation

    PubMed Central

    Bulla, Roberta; Tripodo, Claudio; Rami, Damiano; Ling, Guang Sheng; Agostinis, Chiara; Guarnotta, Carla; Zorzet, Sonia; Durigutto, Paolo; Botto, Marina; Tedesco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Complement C1q is the activator of the classical pathway. However, it is now recognized that C1q can exert functions unrelated to complement activation. Here we show that C1q, but not C4, is expressed in the stroma and vascular endothelium of several human malignant tumours. Compared with wild-type (WT) or C3- or C5-deficient mice, C1q-deficient (C1qa−/−) mice bearing a syngeneic B16 melanoma exhibit a slower tumour growth and prolonged survival. This effect is not attributable to differences in the tumour-infiltrating immune cells. Tumours developing in WT mice display early deposition of C1q, higher vascular density and an increase in the number of lung metastases compared with C1qa−/− mice. Bone marrow (BM) chimeras between C1qa−/− and WT mice identify non-BM-derived cells as the main local source of C1q that can promote cancer cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. Together these findings support a role for locally synthesized C1q in promoting tumour growth. PMID:26831747

  4. Congenital factor XI deficiency in a domestic shorthair cat.

    PubMed

    Troxel, Mark T; Brooks, Marjory B; Esterline, Meredith L

    2002-01-01

    A 6-month-old, female, domestic shorthair cat was examined after onychectomy and ovariohysterectomy because of bleeding from the paws. Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time was discovered, Coagulation factor analyses revealed deficiency of factor XI coagulant activity. Plasma mixing studies indicated factor deficiency or dysfunction rather than factor inhibition. Feline factor XI deficiency in one adult cat has been previously reported but was attributed to factor XI inhibitors. The signalment, lack of primary disease, and the finding of persistent factor XI deficiency in the absence of coagulation inhibitors were considered compatible with congenital factor XI deficiency in the cat of this report. PMID:12428887

  5. Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2000-10-27

    C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F

  6. Loss of Cellular Sialidases Does Not Affect the Sialylation Status of the Prion Protein but Increases the Amounts of Its Proteolytic Fragment C1

    PubMed Central

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Klimova, Nina; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Pan, Xuefang; Annunziata, Ida; Takahashi, Kohta; Miyagi, Taeko; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2015-01-01

    The central molecular event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC), which is a sialoglycoprotein, into the disease-associated, transmissible form denoted PrPSc. Recent studies revealed a correlation between the sialylation status of PrPSc and incubation time to disease and introduced a new hypothesis that progression of prion diseases could be controlled or reversed by altering the sialylation level of PrPC. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, the enzymes that cleave off sialic acid residues, only NEU1, NEU3 and NEU4 are expressed in the brain. To test whether cellular sialidases control the steady-state sialylation level of PrPC and to identify the putative sialidase responsible for desialylating PrPC, we analyzed brain-derived PrPC from knockout mice deficient in Neu1, Neu3, Neu4, or from Neu3/Neu4 double knockouts. Surprisingly, no differences in the sialylation of PrPC or its proteolytic product C1 were noticed in any of the knockout mice tested as compared to the age-matched controls. However, significantly higher amounts of the C1 fragment relative to full-length PrPC were detected in the brains of Neu1 knockout mice as compared to WT mice or to the other knockout mice. Additional experiments revealed that in neuroblastoma cell line the sialylation pattern of C1 could be changed by an inhibitor of sialylatransferases. In summary, this study suggests that targeting cellular sialidases is apparently not the correct strategy for altering the sialylation levels of PrPC, whereas modulating the activity of sialylatransferases might offer a more promising approach. Our findings also suggest that catabolism of PrPC involves its α-cleavage followed by desialylation of the resulting C1 fragments by NEU1 and consequent fast degradation of the desialylated products. PMID:26569607

  7. COOPERATIVE RESEARCH IN C1 CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2001-04-30

    Faculty and students from five universities (Kentucky, West Virginia, Utah, Pittsburgh and Auburn) are collaborating on a basic research program to develop novel C1 chemistry processes for the production of clean, high quality transportation fuel. An Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) with members from Chevron, Eastman Chemical, Energy International, Teir Associates, and the Department of Defense has been formed to provide practical guidance to the program. The program has two principal objectives. (1) Develop technology for conversion of C1 source materials (natural gas, synthesis gas, carbon dioxide and monoxide, and methanol) into clean, high efficiency transportation fuel. (2) Develop novel processes for producing hydrogen from natural gas and other hydrocarbons. Some of the principal accomplishments of the program in its first two years are: (1) The addition of acetylenic compounds in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is found to produce significant amounts of oxygenated products in FT diesel fuels. Such oxygenated products should decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. (2) Nanoscale, binary, Fe-based catalysts supported on alumina have been shown to have significant activity for the decomposition of methane into pure hydrogen and potentially valuable multi-walled carbon nanotubes. (3) Catalytic synthesis processes have been developed for synthesis of diethyl carbonate, higher ethers, and higher alcohols from C1 source materials. Testing of the effect of adding these oxygenates to diesel fuel on PM emissions has begun using a well-equipped small diesel engine test facility. (4) Supercritical fluid (SCF) FT synthesis has been conducted under SCF hexane using both Fe and Co catalysts. There is a marked effect on the hydrocarbon product distribution, with a shift to higher carbon number products. These and other results are summarized.

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  9. Microbial growth on C1 compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, M. B.; Quayle, J. R.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the incorporation of carbon from [14C]formaldehyde and [14C]formate by cultures of Pseudomonas methanica growing on methane. 2. The distribution of radioactivity within the non-volatile constituents of the ethanol-soluble fractions of the cells, after incubation with labelled compounds for periods of up to 1min., has been analysed by chromatography and radioautography. 3. Radioactivity was fixed from [14C]formaldehyde mainly into the phosphates of the sugars, glucose, fructose, sedoheptulose and allulose. 4. Very little radioactivity was fixed from [14C]formate; after 1min. the only products identified were serine and malate. 5. The distribution of radioactivity within the carbon skeleton of glucose, obtained from short-term incubations with [14C]methanol of Pseudomonas methanica growing on methane, has been investigated. At the earliest time of sampling over 70% of the radioactivity was located in C-1; as the time increased the radioactivity spread throughout the molecule. 6. The results have been interpreted in terms of a variant of the pentose phosphate cycle, involving the condensation of formaldehyde with C-1 of ribose 5-phosphate to give allulose phosphate. PMID:6030306

  10. Role of complement component C1q in phagocytosis of Listeria monocytogenes by murine macrophage-like cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Dominguez, C; Carrasco-Marin, E; Leyva-Cobian, F

    1993-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen of a great variety of cells. Among them, macrophages constitute the major effector cells of listerial immunity during the course of an infection. Although the molecular bases of L. monocytogenes attachment and entry to phagocytes are not completely understood, it has been demonstrated that C3b significantly increases L. monocytogenes uptake by macrophages via complement receptor type 3. The first component of complement, C1q, is present in organic fluids at a relatively high concentration, and C1q receptor sites in macrophages are also abundant. In the present report, results of studies on the role of C1q in the internalization and infectivity of L. monocytogenes by macrophages are presented. L. monocytogenes uptake is enhanced by prior treatment of bacteria with normal sera. Heated serum or C1q-deficient serum abrogates this enhancement. Purified C1q specifically restored uptake. This effect was blocked by the addition of F(ab')2 anti-C1q antibody but not by an irrelevant matched antibody. Direct binding of C1q to L. monocytogenes was specific, saturable, and dose dependent with both fluorescent and radiolabeled C1q. N-Acetyl-D-alanyl-L-isoglutamine, diaminopimelic acid, and L-rhamnose caused a significant dose-dependent inhibition of C1q binding to bacteria, suggesting that these molecules, at least, are involved in the attachment of C1q to L. monocytogenes cell wall. When C1q binding structures on macrophage-like cells were blocked with saturating concentrations of C1q, the uptake of C1q-opsonized bacteria was less than in untreated cells. These experiments demonstrate that, in addition to other reported mechanisms, L. monocytogenes binds C1q, which mediates enhanced uptake by macrophages through C1q binding structures. Images PMID:8359889

  11. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  12. Acquired coagulation factor XIII deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yongqing; Hu, Huixian; Wei, Bin

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of the study is to summarize the clinical characteristics of acquired factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency caused by a spontaneous FXIII inhibitor. Here we report a new case of acquired FXIII deficiency caused by FXIII inhibitor and review the medical literature regarding the characteristics and treatment of this disorder. FXIII deficiency caused by FXIII inhibitors is rare and of uncertain pathogenesis. Experience with therapeutic measures is limited to data from case reports. Immunosuppressive drugs may reduce autoantibodies or inhibit the cell clone generating the antibodies and may have been of benefit in our patient. The impact of such therapy on patient prognosis is incompletely known. PMID:26588447

  13. Netherton syndrome associated with growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Banu Küçükemre; Baş, Firdevs; Tamay, Zeynep; Kılıç, Gürkan; Süleyman, Ayşe; Bundak, Rüveyde; Saka, Nurçin; Özkaya, Esen; Güler, Nermin; Darendeliler, Feyza

    2014-01-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ichthyosiform scaling, hair abnormalities, and variable atopic features. Mutations in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 5 (SPINK5) gene leading to lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI) deficiency cause NS. Growth retardation is a classic feature of NS, but growth hormone (GH) deficiency with subsequent response to GH therapy is not documented in the literature. It is proposed that a lack of inhibition of proteases due to a deficiency of LEKTI in the pituitary gland leads to the overprocessing of human GH in NS. Herein we report three patients with NS who had growth retardation associated with GH deficiency and responded well to GH therapy. PMID:24015757

  14. PGK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is one of the relatively uncommon causes of hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (HNSHA). The gene encoding the erythrocyte enzyme PGK1, is X-linked. Mutations of this gene may cause chronic haemolysis with or without mental retardation and they may cause myopathies, often with episodes of myoglobinuria, or a combination of these clinical manifestations. Twenty-six families have been described and in 20 of these the mutations are known. The reason for different clinical manifestations of mutations of the same gene remains unknown. PMID:17222195

  15. A Dramatic Increase of C1q Protein in the CNS during Normal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Daniel V.; Mateos, José María; Fraser, Deborah A.; Lovelett, Emilie A.; Coutellier, Laurence; Kim, Leo; Tsai, Hui-Hsin; Huang, Eric J.; Rowitch, David H.; Berns, Dominic S.; Tenner, Andrea J.; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Barres, Ben A.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of cognitive function has emerged as one of the greatest health threats of old age. Age-related cognitive decline is caused by an impacted neuronal circuitry, yet the molecular mechanisms responsible are unknown. C1q, the initiating protein of the classical complement cascade and powerful effector of the peripheral immune response, mediates synapse elimination in the developing CNS. Here we show that C1q protein levels dramatically increase in the normal aging mouse and human brain, by as much as 300-fold. This increase was predominantly localized in close proximity to synapses and occurred earliest and most dramatically in certain regions of the brain, including some but not all regions known to be selectively vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, i.e., the hippocampus, substantia nigra, and piriform cortex. C1q-deficient mice exhibited enhanced synaptic plasticity in the adult and reorganization of the circuitry in the aging hippocampal dentate gyrus. Moreover, aged C1q-deficient mice exhibited significantly less cognitive and memory decline in certain hippocampus-dependent behavior tests compared with their wild-type littermates. Unlike in the developing CNS, the complement cascade effector C3 was only present at very low levels in the adult and aging brain. In addition, the aging-dependent effect of C1q on the hippocampal circuitry was independent of C3 and unaccompanied by detectable synapse loss, providing evidence for a novel, complement- and synapse elimination-independent role for C1q in CNS aging. PMID:23946404

  16. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    PubMed

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation. PMID:25762996

  17. Mutation of the Conserved Calcium-Binding Motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 Impacts Adhesion but Not Piliation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, James E.; Garrett, Christopher K.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we produced recombinant full-length PilC1 and a PilC1 C-terminal domain fragment. We show that, while alterations of the calcium-binding motif disrupted the ability of PilC1 to bind calcium, they did not grossly affect the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both full-length wild-type PilC1 and full-length calcium-binding-deficient PilC1 inhibited gonococcal adherence to cultured human cervical epithelial cells, unlike the truncated PilC1 C-terminal domain. Similar to PilC1 in K. kingae, but in contrast to the calcium-binding mutant of P. aeruginosa PilY1, an equivalent mutation in N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 produced normal amounts of pili. However, the N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 calcium-binding mutant still had partial defects in gonococcal adhesion to ME180 cells and genetic transformation, which are both essential virulence factors in this human pathogen. Thus, we conclude that calcium binding to PilC1 plays a critical role in pilus function in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:24002068

  18. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    PubMed

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  19. Molecular analysis of the maize anthocyanin regulatory locus C1.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, K C; Burr, F A; Burr, B

    1986-01-01

    The C1 gene of maize plays a regulatory role in the production of anthocyanin pigments in the aleurone layer of the endosperm. As an initial step toward understanding the molecular details of how C1 controls pigment biosynthesis, we cloned the C1 gene. This was accomplished by first cloning a mutable allele of C1, c1-m5, which contains the transposable element Spm. A combination of molecular and genetic analysis was used to identify the Spm at the C1 locus. Individual genomic DNAs from a population in which the c1-mutable phenotype was segregating with the recessive c1 phenotype were digested with methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes and probed with a small DNA fragment derived from a defective Spm. One Sal I restriction fragment complementary to the Spm probe was shown to be present in the DNA of individuals with the c1-m5 phenotype but absent from DNA of individuals with a recessive c1 phenotype. Subsequent cloning and restriction analysis of this fragment revealed sequences flanking the Spm that proved to be C1-specific. A DNA fragment derived from the flanking sequences was then used as a probe to clone the wild-type C1 gene and several additional alleles of C1, including one stable recessive, two mutations caused by Ds insertions, one mutation induced by insertion of a defective Spm, and two dominant mutations, C1-S and C1-I. RNA blot hybridization analysis of three C1 alleles indicates that C1 regulation of the Bz1 and A1 structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway is at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:3025847

  20. Interaction between complement subcomponent C1q and bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Zohair, A; Chesne, S; Wade, R H; Colomb, M G

    1989-02-01

    The heptose-less mutant of Escherichia coli, D31m4, bound complement subcomponent C1q and its collagen-like fragments (C1qCLF) with Ka values of 1.4 x 10(8) and 2.0 x 10(8) M-1 respectively. This binding was suppressed by chemical modification of C1q and C1qCLF using diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC). To investigate the role of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in this binding, biosynthetically labelled [14C]LPS were purified from E. coli D31m4 and incorporated into liposomes prepared from phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) [PC/PE/LPS, 2:2:1, by wt.]. Binding of C1q or its collagen-like fragments to the liposomes was estimated via a flotation test. These liposomes bound C1q and C1qCLF with Ka values of 8.0 x 10(7) and 2.0 x 10(7) M-1; this binding was totally inhibited after chemical modification of C1q and C1qCLF by DEPC. Liposomes containing LPS purified from the wild-strain E. coli K-12 S also bound C1q and C1qCLF, whereas direct binding of C1q or C1qCLF to the bacteria was negligible. Diamines at concentrations which dissociate C1 into C1q and (C1r, C1s)2, strongly inhibited the interaction of C1q or C1qCLF with LPS. Removal of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (2-keto-3-deoxyoctonic acid; KDO) from E. coli D31m4 LPS decreases the binding of C1qCLF to the bacteria by 65%. When this purified and modified LPS was incorporated into liposomes, the C1qCLF binding was completely abolished. These results show: (i) the essential role of the collagen-like moiety and probably its histidine residues in the interaction between C1q and the mutant D31m4; (ii) the contribution of LPS, particularly the anionic charges of KDO, to this interaction. PMID:2649081

  1. 26 CFR 1.1092(c)-1 - Qualified covered calls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Qualified covered calls. 1.1092(c)-1 Section 1.1092(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Wash Sales of Stock Or Securities § 1.1092(c)-1 Qualified covered calls. (a)...

  2. 26 CFR 49.4262(c)-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Definitions. 49.4262(c)-1 Section 49.4262(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Transportation of Persons § 49.4262(c)-1 Definitions. (a) The continental United States. For purposes...

  3. 26 CFR 31.3401(c)-1 - Employee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 31.3401(c)-1 Section 31.3401(c)-1... Income Tax at Source § 31.3401(c)-1 Employee. (a) The term employee includes every individual performing... relationship of employer and employee. The term includes officers and employees, whether elected or...

  4. 26 CFR 1.1092(c)-1 - Qualified covered calls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Qualified covered calls. 1.1092(c)-1 Section 1.1092(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Wash Sales of Stock Or Securities § 1.1092(c)-1 Qualified covered...

  5. Revisiting the mechanism of the autoactivation of the complement protease C1r in the C1 complex: structure of the active catalytic region of C1r.

    PubMed

    Kardos, József; Harmat, Veronika; Palló, Anna; Barabás, Orsolya; Szilágyi, Katalin; Gráf, László; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Goto, Yuji; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter

    2008-03-01

    C1r is a modular serine protease which is the autoactivating component of the C1 complex of the classical pathway of the complement system. We have determined the first crystal structure of the entire active catalytic region of human C1r. This fragment contains the C-terminal serine protease (SP) domain and the preceding two complement control protein (CCP) modules. The activated CCP1-CCP2-SP fragment makes up a dimer in a head-to-tail fashion similarly to the previously characterized zymogen. The present structure shows an increased number of stabilizing interactions. Moreover, in the crystal lattice there is an enzyme-product relationship between the C1r molecules of neighboring dimers. This enzyme-product complex exhibits the crucial S1-P1 salt bridge between Asp631 and Arg446 residues, and intermolecular interaction between the CCP2 module and the SP domain. Based on these novel structural information we propose a new split-and-reassembly model for the autoactivation of the C1r. This model is consistent with experimental results that have not been explained adequately by previous models. It allows autoactivation of C1r without large-scale, directed movement of C1q arms. The model is concordant with the stability of the C1 complex during activation of the next complement components. PMID:17996945

  6. Mini-dystrophin Expression Down-regulates IP3-mediated Calcium Release Events in Resting Dystrophin-deficient Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balghi, Haouaria; Sebille, Stéphane; Mondin, Ludivine; Cantereau, Anne; Constantin, Bruno; Raymond, Guy; Cognard, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We present here evidence for the enhancement, at rest, of an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)–mediated calcium signaling pathway in myotubes from dystrophin-deficient cell lines (SolC1(−)) as compared to a cell line from the same origin but transfected with mini-dystrophin (SolD(+)). With confocal microscopy, the number of sites discharging calcium (release site density [RSD]) was quantified and found more elevated in SolC1(−) than in SolD(+) myotubes. Variations of membrane potential had no significant effect on this difference, and higher resting [Ca2+]i in SolC1(−) (Marchand, E., B. Constantin, H. Balghi, M.C. Claudepierre, A. Cantereau, C. Magaud, A. Mouzou, G. Raymond, S. Braun, and C. Cognard. 2004. Exp. Cell Res. 297:363–379) cannot explain alone higher RSD. The exposure with SR Ca2+ channel inhibitors (ryanodine and 2-APB) and phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) significantly reduced RSD in both cell types but with a stronger effect in dystrophin-deficient SolC1(−) myotubes. Immunocytochemistry allowed us to localize ryanodine receptors (RyRs) as well as IP3 receptors (IP3Rs), IP3R-1 and IP3R-2 isoforms, indicating the presence of both RyRs-dependent and IP3-dependent release systems in both cells. We previously reported evidence for the enhancement, through a Gi protein, of the IP3-mediated calcium signaling pathway in SolC1(−) as compared to SolD(+) myotubes during a high K+ stimulation (Balghi, H., S. Sebille, B. Constantin, S. Patri, V. Thoreau, L. Mondin, E. Mok, A. Kitzis, G. Raymond, and C. Cognard. 2006. J. Gen. Physiol. 127:171–182). Here we show that, at rest, these regulation mechanisms are also involved in the modulation of calcium release activities. The enhancement of resting release activity may participate in the calcium overload observed in dystrophin-deficient myotubes, and our findings support the hypothesis of the regulatory role of mini-dystrophin on intracellular signaling. PMID:16847098

  7. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  8. Skin wound healing in MMP2-deficient and MMP2 / plasminogen double-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Frøssing, Signe; Rønø, Birgitte; Hald, Andreas; Rømer, John; Lund, Leif R

    2010-08-01

    During healing of incisional skin wounds, migrating keratinocytes dissect their way under the crust to re-epithelialize the wounded area. The efficiency of this tissue remodelling process depends on the concomitant activity of several extracellular proteases, including members of the plasminogen activation (PA) system and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family. Treatment with the broad spectrum MMP inhibitor, galardin, delays wound healing in wildtype mice and completely arrest wound healing in plasminogen (Plg)-deficient mice, indicating a functional overlap between plasmin- and galardin-sensitive MMPs during wound healing. To address whether MMP2 is accountable for the galardin-induced healing deficiency in wildtype and Plg-deficient mice, incisional skin wounds were generated in MMP2 single-deficient mice and in MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice and followed until healed. Alternatively, tissue was isolated 7 days post wounding for histological and biochemical analyses. No difference was found in the time from wounding to overt gross restoration of the epidermal surface between MMP2-deficient and wildtype control littermate mice. MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice were viable and fertile, and displayed an unchallenged general phenotype resembling that of Plg-deficient mice, including development of rectal prolapses. MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice displayed a slight increase in the wound length throughout the healing period compared with Plg-deficient mice. However, the overall time to complete healing was not significantly different between Plg-deficient and MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice. These results show that MMP2 activity is not essential for wound healing and indicate that lack of MMP2 only marginally potentiates the effect of Plg deficiency. PMID:20163454

  9. Transcriptional activator elements for curtovirus C1 expression reside in the 3' coding region of ORF C1.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jingyung; Buckley, Kenneth; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith

    2007-02-28

    Beet curly top virus (BCTV) and Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV), members of curtoviruses, encode seven open reading frames (ORFs) within a approximately 3 kb genome. One of these viral ORFs, C1, is known to play an important role in the early stage of viral infection in plants during initiation of viral DNA replication. We used promoter:: reporter (beta-glucuronidase) gene fusions in transgenic Ara-bidopsis to identify the putative promoter region of BCTV ORF C1. Unlike other geminiviruses, the intergenic region of BCTV was not sufficient to promote C1 expression in transgenic plants. When sequences extending into the coding region of C1 were tested, strong expression of the reporter protein was observed in vascular tissues of transgenic plants. This expression was not dependent on the presence of the intergenic regions or proximal 5' portions of the C1 coding region. Transgenic plants expressing a reporter gene under control of the putative complete C1 promoter were inoculated with virus to determine if any viral transcript affected C1 expression. Virus inoculated plants did not show any altered pattern or change in of reporter gene expression level. These results suggest that (1) important transcriptional activator elements for C1 expression reside in the 3' portion of C1 coding area itself, (2) C1 protein does not auto-regulate its own expression and (3) C1 expression of two curtoviruses is controlled differently compared to other geminiviruses. PMID:17464215

  10. Synthesis of [1,2-3H2]cholecalciferol and metabolism of [4-14C,1,2-3H2]- and [4-14C,1-3H]-cholecalciferol in rachitic rats and chicks

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, D. E. M.; Pelc, B.; Bell, P. A.; Wilson, P. W.; Kodicek, E.

    1971-01-01

    [1,2-3H2]Cholecalciferol has been synthesized with a specific radioactivity of 508mCi/mmol by using tristriphenylphosphinerhodium chloride, the homogeneous hydrogen catalyst. With doses of 125ng (5i.u.) of [4-14C,1-3H2]cholecalciferol the tissue distribution in rachitic rats of cholecalciferol and its metabolites (25-hydroxycholecalciferol and peak P material) was similar to that found in chicken with 500ng doses of the double-labelled vitamin. The only exceptions were rat kidney, with a very high concentration of vitamin D, and rat blood, with a higher proportion of peak P material, containing a substance formed from vitamin D with the loss of hydrogen from C-1. Substance P formed from [4-14C,1,2-3H2]cholecalciferol retained 36% of 3H, the amount expected from its distribution between C-1 and C-2, the 3H at C-1 being lost. 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol does not seem to have any specific intracellular localization within the intestine of rachitic chicks. The 3H-deficient substance P was present in the intestine and bone 1h after a dose of vitamin D and 30min after 25-hydroxycholecalciferol. There was very little 25-hydroxycholecalciferol in intestine at any time-interval, but bone and blood continued to take it up over the 8h experimental period. It is suggested that the intestinal 3H-deficient substance P originates from outside this tissue. The polar metabolite found in blood and which has retained its 3H at C-1 is not a precursor of the intestinal 3H-deficient substance P. PMID:4329870

  11. Fundamental role of C1q in autoimmunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Son, Myoungsun; Santiago-Schwarz, Frances

    2016-01-01

    C1q, historically viewed as the initiating component of the classical complement pathway, also exhibits a variety of complement-independent activities in both innate and acquired immunity. Recent studies focusing on C1q’s suppressive role in the immune system have provided new insight into how abnormal C1q expression and bioactivity may contribute to autoimmunity. In particular, molecular networks involving C1q interactions with cell surface receptors and other ligands are emerging as mechanisms involved in C1q’s modulation of immunity. Here, we discuss the role of C1q in controlling immune cell function, including recently elucidated mechanisms of action, and suggest how these processes are critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis under steady-state conditions and in preventing autoimmunity. PMID:26410546

  12. C1q Modulates the Response to TLR7 Stimulation by Pristane-Primed Macrophages: Implications for Pristane-Induced Lupus.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, Francesco; Ishaque, Attia; Ling, Guang Sheng; Szajna, Marta; Sandison, Ann; Donatien, Philippe; Cook, H Terence; Botto, Marina

    2016-02-15

    The complement component C1q is known to play a controversial role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Intraperitoneal injection of pristane induces a lupus-like syndrome whose pathogenesis implicates the secretion of type I IFN by CD11b(+) Ly6C(high) inflammatory monocytes in a TLR7-dependent fashion. C1q was also shown to influence the secretion of IFN-α. In this study, we explored whether C1q deficiency could affect pristane-induced lupus. Surprisingly, C1qa(-/-) mice developed lower titers of circulating Abs and milder arthritis compared with the controls. In keeping with the clinical scores, 2 wk after pristane injection the peritoneal recruitment of CD11b(+) Ly6C(high) inflammatory monocytes in C1qa(-/-) mice was impaired. Furthermore, C1q-deficient pristane-primed resident peritoneal macrophages secreted significantly less CCL3, CCL2, CXCL1, and IL-6 when stimulated in vitro with TLR7 ligand. Replenishing C1q in vivo during the pristane-priming phase rectified this defect. Conversely, pristane-primed macrophages from C3-deficient mice did not show impaired cytokine production. These findings demonstrate that C1q deficiency impairs the TLR7-dependent chemokine production by pristane-primed peritoneal macrophages and suggest that C1q, and not C3, is involved in the handling of pristane by phagocytic cells, which is required to trigger disease in this model. PMID:26773156

  13. 21 CFR 866.5250 - Complement C2 inhibitor (inactivator) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... component of complement (a group of serum proteins which destroy infectious agents). Measurement of complement C1 inhibitor aids in the diagnosis of hereditary angioneurotic edema (increased blood...

  14. 26 CFR 1.661(c)-1 - Limitation on deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitation on deduction. 1.661(c)-1 Section 1... Corpus § 1.661(c)-1 Limitation on deduction. An estate or trust is not allowed a deduction under section..., a trust, which reports on the calendar year basis, has distributable net income of $20,000, which...

  15. 26 CFR 31.6413(c)-1 - Special refunds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special refunds. 31.6413(c)-1 Section 31.6413(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES... Administrative Provisions of Special Application to Employment Taxes (Selected Provisions of Subtitle F,...

  16. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Trusts Which Distribute Current Income Only § 1.652(c)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable...

  17. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.662(c)-1 Section 1... Corpus § 1.662(c)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of an estate or trust, the amount he is required to include...

  18. Anti-C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Stojan, G; Petri, M

    2016-07-01

    C1q is the first component of the classical complement pathway. Both clinically validated in-house ELISA assays as well as commercial ELISA kits are used for detection of anti-C1q antibodies. Anti-C1q autoantibodies can be detected in a wide range of autoimmune diseases and are highly sensitive for hypocomplementemic uticarial vasculitis. In SLE, anti-C1q are strongly associated with proliferative lupus nephritis, and their absence carries a negative predictive value for development of lupus nephritis of close to 100%. Anti-C1q in combination with anti-dsDNA and low complement has the strongest serological association with renal involvement. The anti-C1q titers correlate with global disease activity scores in patients with renal involvement, and higher titers seem to precede renal flares. After the successful treatment of a renal flare, anti-C1q has the tendency to decrease or even become undetectable. The main obstacle to the inclusion of anti-C1q in the classification criteria and clinical management of SLE is the lack of standardized laboratory assays. PMID:27252264

  19. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  20. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  1. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  2. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  3. 17 CFR 240.14c-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 240.14c-1 Section 240.14c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL... Exchange Act of 1934 Regulation 14c: Distribution of Information Pursuant to Section 14(c) §...

  4. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.662(c)-1 Section 1... Corpus § 1.662(c)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of an estate or trust, the amount he is required to include...

  5. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.662(c)-1 Section 1... Corpus § 1.662(c)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of an estate or trust, the amount he is required to include...

  6. CFTR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Synder, David; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel whose major function is to facilitate epithelial fluid secretion. Loss-of-function mutations in CFTR cause the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is required for transepithelial fluid transport in certain secretory diarrheas, such as cholera, and for cyst expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. High-throughput screening has yielded CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone, glycine hydrazide and quinoxalinedione chemical classes. The glycine hydrazides target the extracellular CFTR pore, whereas the thiazolidinones and quinoxalinediones act at the cytoplasmic surface. These inhibitors have been widely used in cystic fibrosis research to study CFTR function at the cell and organ levels. The most potent CFTR inhibitor has IC50 of approximately 4 nM. Studies in animal models support the development of CFTR inhibitors for antisecretory therapy of enterotoxin-mediated diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23331030

  7. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  8. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  9. A shift towards a T cell cytokine deficiency along with an anti-inflammatory/regulatory microenvironment may enable the synthesis of anti-FVIII inhibitors in haemophilia A patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, D G; Velloso-Rodrigues, C; Oliveira, C A; Teixeira-Carvalho, A; Santoro, M M; Martins-Filho, O A

    2010-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies (anti-FVIII inhibitors) impairing haemostatic activity of haemophilia A (HA) patients, the immunological mechanisms underlying their production are unknown. Aiming to understand more clearly the immune response in patients with [HAα-FVIII(+)] and without [HAα-FVIII(−)] anti-FVIII inhibitors, we have characterized the cytokine pattern of peripheral blood leucocytes, using an in vitro stimulation of whole blood samples with plasma-derived (pFVIII) or recombinant FVIII (rFVIII). The results highlighted decreased levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ neutrophils with higher interleukin (IL)-5/TNF-α ratio in HAα-FVIII(+). All HA samples displayed decreased levels of IL-10+ monocytes when compared to the blood donor (BD) samples. HAα-FVIII(+) showed lower levels of TNF-α+ monocytes and increased IL-10/TNF-α ratio. Analysis of adaptive immunity revealed increased levels of interferon (IFN)-γ+, TNF-α+ and IL-4+ T-cells, from both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, in HAα-FVIII(−) when compared to BD. Moreover, increased frequency of IL-10+ B cells and higher levels of α-FVIII IgG1 were observed in HAα-FVIII(−). Basal levels of cytokine+ B-cells, similar to BD, and higher levels of α-FVIII IgG4 are major features in HAα-FVIII(+). The global cytokine profile demonstrated a major anti-inflammatory/regulatory pattern in HAα-FVIII(+), confirmed by the in vitro stimuli with pFVIII or rFVIII. The polarized anti-inflammatory/regulatory immune response in HAα-FVIII(+) and the mixed pattern with a bias towards an inflammatory cytokine profile, modulated by IL-4 in HAα-FVIII(−), may be the key element to drive the development of distinct subclasses of anti-FVIII antibodies. These finding have implications for the design of safe and effective therapeutic protocols to control inhibitors synthesis in HA patients. PMID:20846164

  10. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System ​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned ... Scientists Identify Genetic Cause of Previously Undefined Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Signs and Symptoms DOCK8 deficiency causes persistent skin ...

  11. Ophthalmic manifestation of congenital protein C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hattenbach, L O; Beeg, T; Kreuz, W; Zubcov, A

    1999-06-01

    Under normal conditions activated protein C is a natural anticoagulant that cleaves 2 activated coagulation factors, factor Va and factor VIIIa, thereby inhibiting the conversion of factor X to factor Xa and of prothrombin to thrombin. Additionally, activated protein C enhances tissue-plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis by inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. This results in an increase in circulatory plasminogen activator levels. Protein C deficiency, a genetic or acquired thrombophilic abnormality, has been demonstrated to predispose to episodes of potentially blinding and lethal thromboembolic events. Heterozygous-deficient subjects usually remain asymptomatic until adolescence or adulthood. In homozygous-deficient patients, protein C activity is usually less than 1% (reference range, 70%-140%), resulting in thromboembolism as early as in the neonatal period. The major clinical symptoms in affected newborn infants have been purpura fulminans, vitreous hemorrhage, and central nervous system thrombosis. The age of onset of the first symptoms has ranged from a few hours to 2 weeks after birth, usually after an uncomplicated full-term pregnancy and delivery. In contrast to the genetic form, acquired neonatal protein C deficiency occurs particularly in ill preterm babies. Typical complications of prematurity such as respiratory distress syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis, and neonatal sepsis may also be present. In the medical literature, there are only a few reports of homozygous protein C deficiency in neonates. We present 2 cases of homozygous protein C deficiency with ocular and extraocular manifestation. PMID:10428594

  12. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  13. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  14. Vein formation in the C1 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    Veins in the C1 chondrites Orgueil, Alais, and Ivuna have been deposited during an extended period of impact brecciation and leaching. At least three generations of mineralization, dominated successively by carbonates, calcium sulfate, and magnesium sulfate, can be recognized. Vein minerals are derived locally by closed-system reactions between matrix phyllosilicates and an aqueous fluid, with the result that few, if any, primitive mineral phases still exist in the C1s.

  15. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...)-7, inclusive, the term “trade or business”, for the purpose of the tax on self-employment income... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for...

  16. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or...

  17. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or...

  18. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or...

  19. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or...

  20. [Vitamin K: biochemistry, function, and deficiency. Review].

    PubMed

    Mijares, M E; Nagy, E; Guerrero, B; Arocha-Piñango, C L

    1998-09-01

    Vitamin K is a cofactor for the synthesis of blood coagulation Factors II, VII, IX and X, and inhibitors such as Protein C and S and bone matrix protein. Its active form is a coenzyme in the glutamic acid carboxylation. Vitamin K-dependent factors form enzymatic complexes with calcium and membrane phospholipids. The insufficiency of gamma glutamic carboxylation impairs the hemostatic function. Hereditary deficiencies, antibiotics and oral anticoagulants, decrease the capacity of complex formation giving way to hemorrhage or thrombosis, or bone mass disturbances which are easily treated with administration of Vitamin K. The main causes of Vitamin K deficiency are lack of hepatic storage in newborns, liver insufficiency, malabsorption, dietetic deficiency, therapy with the antibiotics and coumarin administration. For the study of Vitamin K there are methods to measure the Vit K dependent proteins and as well methods to measure specifically the quinonas. PMID:9780555

  1. Mapping Surface Accessibility of the C1r/C1s Tetramer by Chemical Modification and Mass Spectrometry Provides New Insights into Assembly of the Human C1 Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Brier, Sébastien; Pflieger, Delphine; Le Mignon, Maxime; Bally, Isabelle; Gaboriaud, Christine; Arlaud, Gérard J.; Daniel, Régis

    2010-01-01

    C1, the complex that triggers the classic pathway of complement, is a 790-kDa assembly resulting from association of a recognition protein C1q with a Ca2+-dependent tetramer comprising two copies of the proteases C1r and C1s. Early structural investigations have shown that the extended C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s tetramer folds into a compact conformation in C1. Recent site-directed mutagenesis studies have identified the C1q-binding sites in C1r and C1s and led to a three-dimensional model of the C1 complex (Bally, I., Rossi, V., Lunardi, T., Thielens, N. M., Gaboriaud, C., and Arlaud, G. J. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 19340–19348). In this study, we have used a mass spectrometry-based strategy involving a label-free semi-quantitative analysis of protein samples to gain new structural insights into C1 assembly. Using a stable chemical modification, we have compared the accessibility of the lysine residues in the isolated tetramer and in C1. The labeling data account for 51 of the 73 lysine residues of C1r and C1s. They strongly support the hypothesis that both C1s CUB1-EGF-CUB2 interaction domains, which are distant in the free tetramer, associate with each other in the C1 complex. This analysis also provides the first experimental evidence that, in the proenzyme form of C1, the C1s serine protease domain is partly positioned inside the C1q cone and yields precise information about its orientation in the complex. These results provide further structural insights into the architecture of the C1 complex, allowing significant improvement of our current C1 model. PMID:20592021

  2. The Crystal Structure Analysis of Group B Streptococcus Sortase C1: A Model for the ;Lid; Movement upon Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Baldeep; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Huang, I-Hsiu; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V.L.

    2012-02-07

    A unique feature of the class-C-type sortases, enzymes essential for Gram-positive pilus biogenesis, is the presence of a flexible 'lid' anchored in the active site. However, the mechanistic details of the 'lid' displacement, suggested to be a critical prelude for enzyme catalysis, are not yet known. This is partly due to the absence of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor complex crystal structures. We have recently described the crystal structures of the Streptococcus agalactiae SAG2603 V/R sortase SrtC1 in two space groups (type II and type III) and that of its 'lid' mutant and proposed a role of the 'lid' as a protector of the active-site hydrophobic environment. Here, we report the crystal structures of SAG2603 V/R sortase C1 in a different space group (type I) and that of its complex with a small-molecule cysteine protease inhibitor. We observe that the catalytic Cys residue is covalently linked to the small-molecule inhibitor without lid displacement. However, the type I structure provides a view of the sortase SrtC1 lid displacement while having structural elements similar to a substrate sorting motif suitably positioned in the active site. We propose that these major conformational changes seen in the presence of a substrate mimic in the active site may represent universal features of class C sortase substrate recognition and enzyme activation.

  3. Creatine deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Andreas

    2003-02-01

    Since the first description of a creatine deficiency syndrome, the guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency, in 1994, the two further suspected creatine deficiency syndromes--the creatine transporter (CrT1) defect and the arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency were disclosed. GAMT and AGAT deficiency have autosomal-recessive traits, whereas the CrT1 defect is a X-linked disorder. All patients reveal developmental delay/regression, mental retardation, and severe disturbance of their expressive and cognitive speech. The common feature of all creatine deficiency syndromes is the severe depletion of creatine/phosphocreatine in the brain. Only the GAMT deficiency is in addition characterized by accumulation of guanidinoacetic acid in brain and body fluids. Guanidinoacetic acid seems to be responsible for intractable seizures and the movement disorder, both exclusively found in GAMT deficiency. Treatment with oral creatine supplementation is in part successful in GAMT and AGAT deficiency, whereas in CrT1 defect it is not able to replenish creatine in the brain. Treatment of combined arginine restriction and ornithine substitution in GAMT deficiency is capable to decrease guanidinoacetic acid permanently and improves the clinical outcome. The lack of the creatine/phosphocreatine signal in the patient's brain by means of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the common finding and the diagnostic clue in all three diseases. In AGAT deficiency guanidinoacetic acid is decreased, whereas creatine in blood was found to be normal. On the other hand the CrT1 defect is characterized by an increased concentration of creatine in blood and urine whereas guanidinoacetic acid concentration is normal. The increasing number of patients detected very recently suffering from a creatine deficiency syndrome and the unfavorable outcome highlights the need of further attempts in early recognition of affected individuals and in optimizing its treatment

  4. In silico structural characteristics and α-amylase inhibitory properties of Ric c 1 and Ric c 3, allergenic 2S albumins from Ricinus communis seeds.

    PubMed

    Do Nascimento, Viviane Veiga; Castro, Helena Carla; Abreu, Paula Alvarez; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amâncio; Fernandez, Jorge Hernandez; Araújo, Jucélia Da Silva; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares

    2011-05-11

    The major Ricinus communis allergens are the 2S albumins, Ric c 1 and Ric c 3. These proteins contain a trypsin/α-amylase inhibitor family domain, suggesting that they have a role in insect resistance. In this study, we verified that Ric c 1 and Ric c 3 inhibited the α-amylase activity of Callosobruchus maculatus, Zabrotes subfasciatus, and Tenebrio molitor (TMA) larvae as well as mammalian α-amylase. The toxicity of 2S albumin was determined through its incorporation in C. maculatus larvae as part of an artificial diet. Bioassays revealed that 2S albumin reduced larval growth by 20%. We also analyzed the tridimensional structures of Ric c 1 and Ric c 3 by (a) constructing a comparative model of Ric c 1 based on Ric c 3 NMR structure and (b) constructing the theoretical structure of the Ric c 1-TMA and Ric c 3-TMA complexes. Our biological and theoretical results revealed that Ric c 1 and Ric c 3 are a new class of α-amylase inhibitors. They could potentially be used to help design inhibitors that would be useful in diverse fields, ranging from diabetes treatment to crop protection. PMID:21425874

  5. TGF-beta inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Lahn, Michael; Kloeker, Susanne; Berry, Brandi S

    2005-06-01

    Advances in understanding the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta in tumorigenesis have led to the development of TGF-beta inhibitors for cancer treatment. Three platforms of TGF-beta inhibitors have evolved: antisense oligonucleotides, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules. In this review, the current stage of development of each known TGF-beta inhibitor will be discussed. As part of the risk/benefit assessment of TGF-beta inhibitors, the known effects of TGF-beta deficiency in mice, non-clinical toxicology studies with TGF-beta inhibitors in rats, and the clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies against TGF-beta will be summarised. PMID:16004592

  6. PRD125, a potent and selective inhibitor of sterol O-acyltransferase 2 markedly reduces hepatic cholesteryl ester accumulation and improves liver function in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Adam M; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Posey, Kenneth S; Ohshiro, Taichi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Rudel, Lawrence L; Turley, Stephen D

    2015-11-01

    In most organs, the bulk of cholesterol is unesterified, although nearly all possess a varying capability of esterifying cholesterol through the action of either sterol O-acyltransferase (SOAT) 1 or, in the case of hepatocytes and enterocytes, SOAT2. Esterified cholesterol (EC) carried in plasma lipoproteins is hydrolyzed by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) when they are cleared from the circulation. Loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene that encodes LAL, result in Wolman disease or cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). Hepatomegaly and a massive increase in tissue EC levels are hallmark features of both disorders. While these conditions can be corrected with enzyme replacement therapy, the question arose as to whether pharmacological inhibition of SOAT2 might reduce tissue EC accretion in CESD. When weaned at 21 days, Lal(-/-) mice, of either gender, had a whole liver cholesterol content that was 12- to 13-fold more than that of matching Lal(+/+) littermates (23 versus 1.8 mg, respectively). In Lal(-/-) males given the selective SOAT2 inhibitor PRD125 1,11-O-o-methylbenzylidene-7-O-p-cyanobenzoyl-1,7,11-trideacetylpyripyropene A in their diet (∼10 mg/day per kg body weight) from 21 to 53 days, whole liver cholesterol content was 48.6 versus 153.7 mg in untreated 53-day-old Lal(-/-) mice. This difference reflected a 59% reduction in hepatic EC concentration (mg/g), combined with a 28% fall in liver mass. The treated mice also showed a 63% reduction in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, in parallel with decisive falls in hepatic mRNA expression levels for multiple proteins that reflect macrophage presence and inflammation. These data implicate SOAT2 as a potential target in CESD management. PMID:26283692

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 Inhibits the Classical Pathway by Blocking Activation of the C1 Complement Complex.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zhi, Hui; Wager, Beau; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens that traffic in blood, lymphatics, or interstitial fluids must adopt strategies to evade innate immune defenses, notably the complement system. Through recruitment of host regulators of complement to their surface, many pathogens are able to escape complement-mediated attack. The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces a number of surface proteins that bind to factor H related molecules, which function as the dominant negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement. Relatively less is known about how B. burgdorferi evades the classical pathway of complement despite the observation that some sensu lato strains are sensitive to classical pathway activation. Here we report that the borrelial lipoprotein BBK32 potently and specifically inhibits the classical pathway by binding with high affinity to the initiating C1 complex of complement. In addition, B. burgdorferi cells that produce BBK32 on their surface bind to both C1 and C1r and a serum sensitive derivative of B. burgdorferi is protected from killing via the classical pathway in a BBK32-dependent manner. Subsequent biochemical and biophysical approaches localized the anti-complement activity of BBK32 to its globular C-terminal domain. Mechanistic studies reveal that BBK32 acts by entrapping C1 in its zymogen form by binding and inhibiting the C1 subcomponent, C1r, which serves as the initiating serine protease of the classical pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of a spirochetal protein acting as a direct inhibitor of the classical pathway and is the only example of a biomolecule capable of specifically and noncovalently inhibiting C1/C1r. By identifying a unique mode of complement evasion this study greatly enhances our understanding of how pathogens subvert and potentially manipulate host innate immune systems. PMID:26808924

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi BBK32 Inhibits the Classical Pathway by Blocking Activation of the C1 Complement Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Beau; Höök, Magnus; Skare, Jon T.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens that traffic in blood, lymphatics, or interstitial fluids must adopt strategies to evade innate immune defenses, notably the complement system. Through recruitment of host regulators of complement to their surface, many pathogens are able to escape complement-mediated attack. The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, produces a number of surface proteins that bind to factor H related molecules, which function as the dominant negative regulator of the alternative pathway of complement. Relatively less is known about how B. burgdorferi evades the classical pathway of complement despite the observation that some sensu lato strains are sensitive to classical pathway activation. Here we report that the borrelial lipoprotein BBK32 potently and specifically inhibits the classical pathway by binding with high affinity to the initiating C1 complex of complement. In addition, B. burgdorferi cells that produce BBK32 on their surface bind to both C1 and C1r and a serum sensitive derivative of B. burgdorferi is protected from killing via the classical pathway in a BBK32-dependent manner. Subsequent biochemical and biophysical approaches localized the anti-complement activity of BBK32 to its globular C-terminal domain. Mechanistic studies reveal that BBK32 acts by entrapping C1 in its zymogen form by binding and inhibiting the C1 subcomponent, C1r, which serves as the initiating serine protease of the classical pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of a spirochetal protein acting as a direct inhibitor of the classical pathway and is the only example of a biomolecule capable of specifically and noncovalently inhibiting C1/C1r. By identifying a unique mode of complement evasion this study greatly enhances our understanding of how pathogens subvert and potentially manipulate host innate immune systems. PMID:26808924

  9. α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Umur; Stoller, James K

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant condition that predisposes to emphysema and cirrhosis. The condition is common but grossly under-recognized. Identifying patients' α1-antitrypsin deficiency has important management implications (ie, smoking cessation, genetic and occupational counseling, and specific treatment with the infusion of pooled human plasma α1-antitrypsin). The weight of evidence suggests that augmentation therapy slows the progression of emphysema in individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27514595

  10. On trigonometric basis functions for C1 curved beam finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimaraes, J. E. F.; Heppler, G. R.

    1992-10-01

    The formulation of a finite element model for a thin curved beam which is described by the Winkler beam model is presented. A review and discussion of the literature that pertains to this type of element is included with special attention being paid to the need to be able to recover incremental rigid body motions. Three different C1 trigonometric trial functions that allow the recovery of incremental rigid body motions are investigated. The attributes and deficiencies of the various elements are examined and discussed via several problems which have been designed to evaluate the performance of the element. The 4U4W element is shown to be the best choice of those elements considered here.

  11. Biomechanical characteristics of C1-2 cable fixations.

    PubMed

    Dickman, C A; Crawford, N R; Paramore, C G

    1996-08-01

    The biomechanical characteristics of four different methods of C1-2 cable fixation were studied to assess the effectiveness of each technique in restoring atlantoaxial stability. Biomechanical testing was performed on the upper cervical spines of four human cadaveric specimens. Physiological range loading was applied to the atlantoaxial specimens and three-dimensional motion was analyzed with stereophotogrammetry. The load-deformation relationships and kinematics were measured, including the stiffness, the angular ranges of motion, the linear ranges of motion, and the axes of rotation. Specimens were nondestructively tested in the intact state, after surgical destabilization, and after each of four different methods of cable fixation. Cable fixation techniques included the interspinous technique, the Brooks technique, and two variants of the Gallie technique. All specimens were tested immediately after fixation and again after the specimen was fatigued with 6000 cycles of physiological range torsional loading. All four cable fixation methods were moderately flexible immediately; the different cable fixations allowed between 5 degrees and 40 degrees of rotational motion and between 0.6 and 7 mm of translational motion to occur at C1-2. The Brooks and interspinous methods controlled C1-2 motion significantly better than both of the Gallie techniques. The motion allowed by one of the Gallie techniques did not differ significantly from the motion of the unfixed destabilized specimens. All cable fixation techniques loosened after cyclic loading and demonstrated significant increases in C1-2 rotational and translational motions. The bone grafts shifted during cyclic loading, which reduced the effectiveness of the fixation. The locations of the axes of rotation, which were unconstrained and mobile in the destabilized specimens, became altered with cable fixation. The C1-2 cables constrained motion by shifting the axes of rotation so that C-1 rotated around the fixed cable

  12. The Enteropathy of Prostaglandin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Phillips, John A.; Cogan, Joy D.; Iverson, Tina M.; Stein, Jeffrey A.; Brenner, David A.; Morrow, Jason D.; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Small intestinal ulcers are frequent complications of therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We present here a genetic deficiency of eicosanoid biosynthesis that illuminates the mechanism of NSAID-induced ulcers of the small intestine. Methods Eicosanoids and metabolites were measured by isotope-dilution with mass spectrometry. cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription and sequenced following amplification with RT-PCR. Results We investigated the cause of chronic recurrent small intestinal ulcers, small bowel perforations, and gastrointestinal blood loss in a 45 year old male who was not taking any cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Prostaglandin metabolites in urine were significantly depressed. Serum thromboxane B2 (TxB2) production was 4.6% of normal controls (p<0.006) and serum 12-HETE was 1.3% of controls (p<0.005). Optical platelet aggregation with simultaneous monitoring of ATP release demonstrated absent granule secretion in response to ADP and a blunted aggregation response to ADP and collagen, but normal response to arachidonic acid (AA). LTB4 biosynthesis by ionophore activated leukocytes was only 3% of controls and urinary LTE4 was undetectable. These findings suggested deficient AA release from membrane phospholipids by cytosolic phospholipase A2-α (cPLA2-α) which regulates cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase mediated eicosanoid production by catalyzing the release of their substrate, AA. Sequencing of cPLA2-α cDNA demonstrated 2 heterozygous non-synonymous single base pair mutations: Ser111Pro (S111P) and Arg485His (R485H), as well as a known SNP: Lys651Arg (K651R). Conclusion Characterization of this cPLA2-α deficiency provides support for the importance of prostaglandins in protecting small intestinal integrity, and indicates that loss of prostaglandin biosynthesis is sufficient to produce small intestinal ulcers. PMID:19148786

  13. 75 FR 57846 - Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Airworthiness Directive 2010-18-12, amendment 39-16426 (75 FR 53861.... Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk 22, and DH.C1 Chipmunk 22A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal...Havilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk 22, and DH.C1 Chipmunk 22A airplanes. As published, the...

  14. Update on vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Langan, Robert C; Zawistoski, Kimberly J

    2011-06-15

    Vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia, a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, and elevated serum homocysteine levels, especially in older persons. There are a number of risk factors for vitamin B(12) deficiency, including prolonged use of metformin and proton pump inhibitors. No major medical organizations, including the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, have published guidelines on screening asymptomatic or low-risk adults for vitamin B(12) deficiency, but high-risk patients, such as those with malabsorptive disorders, may warrant screening. The initial laboratory assessment of a patient with suspected vitamin B(12) deficiency should include a complete blood count and a serum vitamin B(12) level. Measurements of serum vitamin B(12) may not reliably detect deficiency, and measurement of serum homocysteine and/or methylmalonic acid should be used to confirm deficiency in asymptomatic high-risk patients with low normal levels of vitamin B(12). Oral administration of high-dose vitamin B(12) (1 to 2 mg daily) is as effective as intramuscular administration in correcting the deficiency, regardless of etiology. Because crystalline formulations are better absorbed than naturally occurring vitamin B(12), patients older than 50 years and strict vegetarians should consume foods fortified with vitamin B(12) and vitamin B(12) supplements, rather than attempting to get vitamin B(12) strictly from dietary sources. Administration of vitamin B(12) to patients with elevated serum homocysteine levels has not been shown to reduce cardiovascular outcomes in high-risk patients or alter the cognitive decline of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. PMID:21671542

  15. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  16. Complement Component C1q Programs a Pro-Efferocytic Phenotype while Limiting TNFα Production in Primary Mouse and Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hulsebus, Holly J.; O’Conner, Sean D.; Smith, Emily M.; Jie, Chunfa; Bohlson, Suzanne S.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency in complement component C1q is associated with an inability to clear apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and aberrant inflammation in lupus, and identification of the pathways involved in these processes should reveal important regulatory mechanisms in lupus and other autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In this study, C1q-dependent regulation of TNFα/IL-6 expression and efferocytosis was investigated using primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. C1q downregulated LPS-dependent TNFα production in mouse and human macrophages. While prolonged stimulation with C1q (18 h) was required to elicit a dampening of TNFα production from mouse macrophages, the human macrophages responded to C1q with immediate downregulation of TNFα. IL-6 production was unchanged in mouse and upregulated by human macrophages following prolonged stimulation with C1q. Our previous studies indicated that C1q programmed enhanced efferocytosis in mouse macrophages by enhancing expression of Mer tyrosine kinase and its ligand Gas6, a receptor–ligand pair that also inhibits proinflammatory signaling. Here, we demonstrated that C1q-dependent programming of human macrophage efferocytosis required protein synthesis; however, neither Mer nor the related receptor Axl was upregulated in human cells. In addition, while the C1q-collagen-like tails are sufficient for promoting C1q-dependent phagocytosis of antibody-coated targets, the C1q-tails failed to program enhanced efferocytosis or dampen TNFα production. These data further elucidate the mechanisms by which C1q regulates proinflammatory signaling and efferocytosis in macrophages, functions that are likely to influence the progression of autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. PMID:27379094

  17. Niemann-Pick C1 Affects the Gene Delivery Efficacy of Degradable Polymeric Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite intensive research effort, the rational design of improved nanoparticulate drug carriers remains challenging, in part due to a limited understanding of the determinants of nanoparticle entry and transport in target cells. Recent studies have shown that Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), the lysosome membrane protein that mediates trafficking of cholesterol in cells, is involved in the endosomal escape and subsequent infection caused by filoviruses, and that its absence promotes the retention and efficacy of lipid nanoparticles encapsulating siRNA. Here, we report that NPC1 deficiency results in dramatic reduction in internalization and transfection efficiency mediated by degradable cationic gene delivery polymers, poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs). PBAEs utilized cholesterol and dynamin-dependent endocytosis pathways, and these were found to be heavily compromised in NPC1-deficient cells. In contrast, the absence of NPC1 had minor effects on DNA uptake mediated by polyethylenimine or Lipofectamine 2000. Strikingly, stable overexpression of human NPC1 in chinese hamster ovary cells was associated with enhanced gene uptake (3-fold) and transfection (10-fold) by PBAEs. These findings reveal a role of NPC1 in the regulation of endocytic mechanisms affecting nanoparticle trafficking. We hypothesize that in-depth understanding sites of entry and endosomal escape may lead to highly efficient nanotechnologies for drug delivery. PMID:25010491

  18. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.662(c)-1 Section 1...)-1 Different taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of an estate or trust, the amount he is required to include in...

  19. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of the trust, the amount he is required to include in gross income in accordance with...

  20. C1q Nephropathy: The Unique Underrecognized Pathological Entity.

    PubMed

    Devasahayam, Joe; Erode-Singaravelu, Gowrishankar; Bhat, Zeenat; Oliver, Tony; Chandran, Arul; Zeng, Xu; Dakshinesh, Paramesh; Pillai, Unni

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy is a rare glomerular disease with characteristic mesangial C1q deposition noted on immunofluorescence microscopy. It is histologically defined and poorly understood. Light microscopic features are heterogeneous and comprise minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and proliferative glomerulonephritis. Clinical presentation is also diverse, and ranges from asymptomatic hematuria or proteinuria to frank nephritic or nephrotic syndrome in both children and adults. Hypertension and renal insufficiency at the time of diagnosis are common findings. Optimal treatment is not clear and is usually guided by the underlying light microscopic lesion. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment, with immunosuppressive agents reserved for steroid resistant cases. The presence of nephrotic syndrome and FSGS appear to predict adverse outcomes as opposed to favorable outcomes in those with MCD. Further research is needed to establish C1q nephropathy as a universally recognized distinct clinical entity. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of pathogenesis, histopathology, clinical features, therapeutic options, and outcomes of C1q nephropathy. PMID:26640759

  1. 26 CFR 1.514(c)-1 - Acquisition indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(c)-1... where State law provides that a tax lien attaches to property prior to the time when such lien becomes... and payable and the organization has had an opportunity to pay such lien in accordance with State...

  2. 26 CFR 53.4941(c)-1 - Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of private foundation X, lend one of the foundation's paintings to G, a disqualified person, for... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Self-Dealing § 53.4941(c)-1 Special...) (relating to tax on foundation managers). An initial tax is imposed on both A and B with respect to the...

  3. 26 CFR 53.4941(c)-1 - Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of private foundation X, lend one of the foundation's paintings to G, a disqualified person, for... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Self-Dealing § 53.4941(c)-1 Special...) (relating to tax on foundation managers). An initial tax is imposed on both A and B with respect to the...

  4. 26 CFR 53.4941(c)-1 - Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of private foundation X, lend one of the foundation's paintings to G, a disqualified person, for... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Self-Dealing § 53.4941(c)-1 Special...) (relating to tax on foundation managers). An initial tax is imposed on both A and B with respect to the...

  5. 26 CFR 53.4941(c)-1 - Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of private foundation X, lend one of the foundation's paintings to G, a disqualified person, for... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Self-Dealing § 53.4941(c)-1 Special...) (relating to tax on foundation managers). An initial tax is imposed on both A and B with respect to the...

  6. 26 CFR 53.4941(c)-1 - Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of private foundation X, lend one of the foundation's paintings to G, a disqualified person, for... EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Self-Dealing § 53.4941(c)-1 Special...) (relating to tax on foundation managers). An initial tax is imposed on both A and B with respect to the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of the trust, the amount he is required to include in gross income in accordance with...

  8. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-1 - Different taxable years.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Different taxable years. 1.652(c)-1 Section 1... taxable years. If a beneficiary has a different taxable year (as defined in section 441 or 442) from the taxable year of the trust, the amount he is required to include in gross income in accordance with...

  9. Micronutrient deficiencies in pediatric and young adult intestinal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Ubesie, Agozie C; Cole, Conrad R; Nathan, Jaimie D; Tiao, Greg M; Alonso, Maria H; Mezoff, Adam G; Henderson, Carol J; Kocoshis, Samuel A

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal transplant recipients are at risk for micronutrient deficiency due to the slow process of post-transplant adaptation. Another contributing factor is calcineurin inhibitor-induced renal tubular dysfunction. Patients are typically supplemented with micronutrients during parenteral nutrition; however the risk of deficiency may persist even after a successful transition to full enteral nutrition. Objective To determine the prevalence of, and associated risk factors for, iron, zinc, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, copper, folate, vitamins A, D, E and B12 deficiency in pediatric intestinal transplant recipients after successful transition to full enteral nutrition. Method A retrospective review of prospectively collected data from children who underwent intestinal transplantation at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Deficiencies of various micronutrients were defined using the hospital reference values. Results Twenty-one intestinal transplant recipients, aged one to 23 years that were successfully transitioned to full enteral nutrition were included in the study. The prevalence of micronutrient deficiency was 95.2%. The common deficient micronutrients were iron (94.7%) and magnesium (90.5%). Age ≤10 years (P=0.002) and tube feeding (P= 0.02) were significant risk factors for micronutrient deficiencies. Conclusion Pediatric intestinal transplant recipients have a high risk of micronutrient and mineral deficiencies. These deficiencies were more common among younger patients and those who received jejunal feeding. PMID:23919810

  10. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. PMID:26497555

  11. Iodine-deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Jooste, Pieter L; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2008-10-01

    2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. Assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goitre, newborn thyroid-stimulating hormone, and blood thyroglobulin. In nearly all countries, the best strategy to control iodine deficiency is iodisation of salt, which is one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When iodisation of salt is not possible, iodine supplements can be given to susceptible groups. Introduction of iodised salt to regions of chronic iodine-deficiency disorders might transiently increase the proportion of thyroid disorders, but overall the small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. International efforts to control iodine-deficiency disorders are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges. PMID:18676011

  12. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  13. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  14. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  15. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  16. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  17. Factor X deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Factor X (ten) deficiency is a disorder caused by a lack of a protein called factor X in the blood. It leads to problems with ... or are not functioning like they should. Factor X is one such coagulation factor. Factor X deficiency ...

  18. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  19. G6PD Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  20. Isolation and mode of action of bacteriocin BacC1 produced by nonpathogenic Enterococcus faecium C1.

    PubMed

    Goh, H F; Philip, K

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are present in fermented food products and help to improve shelf life and enhance the flavor of the food. They also produce metabolites such as bacteriocins to prevent the growth of undesirable or pathogenic bacteria. In this study, Enterococcus faecium C1 isolated from fermented cow milk was able to produce bacteriocin BacC1 and inhibit the growth of selected food-spoilage bacteria. The bacteriocin was purified through 4 steps: ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydrophobic interaction column, a series of centrifugal steps, and finally reversed-phase HPLC. A membrane permeability test using SYTOX green dye (Invitrogen, Grand Island, NY) showed that the bacteriocin caused significant disruptions to the test bacterial membrane, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. The molecular weight of the BacC1 obtained from SDS-PAGE was around 10kDa, and N-terminal sequencing revealed a partial amino acid sequence of BacC1: GPXGPXGP. The bacterial strain was nonhemolytic and not antibiotic resistant. Therefore, it has high potential for application in the food industry as an antimicrobial agent to extend the shelf life of food products. PMID:26004828

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Churchill Livingston; 2008:chap 45. Golan DER. Hemolytic anemias: red cell membrane and metabolic defects. In: Goldman ...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as hemophilia and the corresponding normal gene). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  3. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as hemophilia and the corresponding normal gene). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  4. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as hemophilia and the corresponding normal gene). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  5. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as hemophilia and the corresponding normal gene). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  6. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as hemophilia and the corresponding normal gene). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  7. Betaine deficiency in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Lerma, C. ); Rich, P.J.; Ju, G.C.; Yang, Wenju; Rhodes, D. ); Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline {r arrow} betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde.

  8. C1 Hermite shape preserving polynomial splines in R3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielides, Nikolaos C.

    2012-06-01

    The C 2 variable degree splines1-3 have been proven to be an efficient tool for solving the curve shape-preserving interpolation problem in two and three dimensions. Based on this representation, the current paper proposes a Hermite interpolation scheme, to construct C 1 shape-preserving splines of variable degree. After this, a slight modification of the method leads to a C 1 shape-preserving Hermite cubic spline. Both methods can easily be developed within a CAD system, since they compute directly (without iterations) the B-spline control polygon. They have been implemented and tested within the DNV Software CAD/CAE system GeniE. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Ceramide 1-phosphate enhances calcium entry through voltage-operated calcium channels by a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism in GH4C1 rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Törnquist, Kid; Blom, Tomas; Shariatmadari, Ramin; Pasternack, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Sphingomyelin derivatives modulate a multitude of cellular processes, including the regulation of [Ca2+]i (the intracellular free calcium concentration). Previous studies have shown that these metabolites often inhibit calcium entry through VOCCs (voltage-operated calcium channels). In the present study, we show that, in pituitary GH4C1 cells, C1P (C2-ceramide 1-phosphate) enhances calcium entry in a dose-dependent manner. The phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 attenuated the response. C1P invoked a small, but significant, increase in the formation of inositol phosphates. Pre-treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin was without an effect on the C1P-evoked increase in [Ca2+]i. The effect of C1P was critically dependent on extracellular calcium, since no increase in [Ca2+]i was observed when cells in a calcium-free buffer were stimulated with C1P. Furthermore, if the cells were retreated with 300 nM of the VOCC inhibitor nimodipine, the effect of C1P was almost totally abolished. In addition, ceramide C8-1-phosphate evoked an increase in [Ca2+]i, but the onset of the response was slow compared with that of C1P. In cells treated with 1 mM thapsigargin for 15 min, C1P still evoked an increase in [Ca2+]i. In patch-clamp experiments in the whole-cell mode, C1P enhanced calcium entry through the VOCCs compared with vehicle-treated cells. Dialysis of the cells with C1P did not enhance the calcium current. On-cell patch-clamp experiments showed an enhanced probability of the VOCCs being open (P(open)) in the presence of C1P. Inhibition of PKC (protein kinase C) with GF109203X and down-regulation of PKC with PMA attenuated the C1P-evoked increase in [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, down-regulation of PKC abolished the effect of C1P on P(open). This is the first report showing that a sphingomyelin derivative enhances calcium entry through VOCCs. PMID:15018614

  10. The C1s core line in irradiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giorgio; Minati, Luca; Anderle, Mariano

    2007-08-15

    Recently, plasma deposited amorphous carbon films have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations aimed at correlating their electronic, structural, and mechanical properties to growth parameters. To investigate these properties, different spectral parameters reflecting the electronic structure of carbon-based materials are proposed in literature. The effects of various electronic configurations on the carbon photoelectron spectra are analyzed here with particular attention to C1s core line with the aim to better interpret its structure. The latter is commonly fitted under the assumption that it can be described by using just two spectral components related to sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybrids. Their relative intensities are then used to estimate the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} phases. We show that, in the presence of an amorphous network, the C1s line shape is the result of a more complex mixture of electronic states. Ar{sup +} irradiated graphite and successive oxidation was used to identify spectral features to better describe the C1s line shape.

  11. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  12. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  13. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    PubMed

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  14. C1GALT1 overexpression promotes the invasive behavior of colon cancer cells through modifying O-glycosylation of FGFR2.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ji-Shiang; Huang, John; Lin, Yo-Chuen; Huang, Miao-Juei; Lee, Po-Huang; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Liang, Jin-Tung; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-04-30

    Core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) transfers galactose (Gal) to N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to form Galβ1,3GalNAc (T antigen). Aberrant O-glycans, such as T antigen, are commonly found in colorectal cancer. However, the role of C1GALT1 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we showed that C1GALT1 was frequently overexpressed in colorectal tumors and is associated with poor survival. C1GALT1 overexpression promoted cell survival, migration, invasion, and sphere formation as well as tumor growth and metastasis of colon cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of C1GALT1 with small interference (si) RNA was sufficient to suppress these malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we are the first to show that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 2 carried O-glycans in colon cancer cells. Mechanistic investigations showed that C1GALT1 modified the O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhanced bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 as well as increased bFGF-mediated malignant phenotypes. In addition, BGJ398, a selective inhibitor of FGFR, blocked the effects of C1GALT1. These findings suggest that C1GALT1 overexpression modifies O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhances its phosphorylation to promote the invasive behavior and cancer stem-like property in colon cancer cells, indicating a critical role of O-glycosylation in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:24758762

  15. Solid-phase C1q-directed bacterial capture followed by PCR for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Herbrink, P; van den Munckhof, H A; Niesters, H G; Goessens, W H; Stolz, E; Quint, W G

    1995-01-01

    An antigen capture system based on the binding of bacteria to solid-phase immobilized complement C1q followed by PCR for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in clinical samples was developed and clinically evaluated. Comparison of C1q-directed antigen capture PCR with cell culture and direct PCR on 71 consecutive clinical specimens revealed an identical sensitivity. In this group, all 11 cell culture-positive samples were positive by direct PCR and C1q-directed antigen capture PCR. In addition, two samples found negative by cell culture were found positive by both direct PCR and C1q-directed antigen capture PCR. To further assess the sensitivity of C1q-directed antigen capture PCR, 20 clinical samples with one to five inclusions in cell culture and 20 clinical samples with 6 to 20 inclusions in cell culture were tested. Results obtained showed sensitivities of 95 and 90% for clinical samples with 6 to 20 and 1 to 5 inclusions in cell culture, respectively. Using C1q-coated solid phases, C1q-binding Chlamydia particles can be concentrated from large volumes with concomitant removal of inhibitors of PCR, allowing the use of large volumes of clinical samples for clinical testing. Since C1q has been shown to bind to a range of gram-negative bacteria, the newly developed technique has utility for a broad range of bacteria. PMID:7714179

  16. C1GALT1 overexpression promotes the invasive behavior of colon cancer cells through modifying O-glycosylation of FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ji-Shiang; Huang, John; Lin, Yo-Chuen; Huang, Miao-Juei; Lee, Po-Huang; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Liang, Jin-Tung; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) transfers galactose (Gal) to N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to form Galβ1,3GalNAc (T antigen). Aberrant O-glycans, such as T antigen, are commonly found in colorectal cancer. However, the role of C1GALT1 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we showed that C1GALT1 was frequently overexpressed in colorectal tumors and is associated with poor survival. C1GALT1 overexpression promoted cell survival, migration, invasion, and sphere formation as well as tumor growth and metastasis of colon cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of C1GALT1 with small interference (si) RNA was sufficient to suppress these malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we are the first to show that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 2 carried O-glycans in colon cancer cells. Mechanistic investigations showed that C1GALT1 modified the O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhanced bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 as well as increased bFGF-mediated malignant phenotypes. In addition, BGJ398, a selective inhibitor of FGFR, blocked the effects of C1GALT1. These findings suggest that C1GALT1 overexpression modifies O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhances its phosphorylation to promote the invasive behavior and cancer stem-like property in colon cancer cells, indicating a critical role of O-glycosylation in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:24758762

  17. Deficiency of Lipocalin-2 Promotes Proliferation and Differentiation of Osteoclast Precursors via Regulation of c-Fms Expression and Nuclear Factor-kappa B Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ohk, Boram; Kang, Woo Youl; Seong, Sook Jin; Suk, Kyoungho; Lim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Shin-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), a small glycoprotein, has a pivotal role in diverse biological processes such as cellular proliferation and differentiation. We previously reported that LCN2 is implicated in osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). In the present study, we used a knockout mouse model to further investigate the role of LCN2 in osteoclast development. Methods Osteoclastogenesis was assessed using primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. RANKL and M-CSF signaling was determined by immunoblotting, cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and apoptosis by cell death detection ELISA. Bone morphometric parameters were determined using a micro-computed tomography system. Results Our results showed that LCN2 deficiency increases tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated osteoclast formation in vitro, a finding that reflects enhanced proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. LCN2 deficiency promotes M-CSF-induced proliferation of bone marrow macrophages (BMMs), osteoclast precursors, without altering their survival. The accelerated proliferation of LCN2-deficient precursors is associated with enhanced expression and activation of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms. Furthermore, LCN2 deficiency stimulates the induction of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), key transcription factors for osteoclastogenesis, and promotes RANKL-induced inhibitor of kappa B (IκBα) phosphorylation. Interestingly, LCN2 deficiency does not affect basal osteoclast formation in vivo, suggesting that LCN2 might play a role in the enhanced osteoclast development that occurs under some pathological conditions. Conclusions Our study establishes LCN2 as a negative modulator of osteoclast formation, results that are in accordance with our previous findings. PMID:26981515

  18. Progress and prospects on DENV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Timiri, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-07-19

    New treatments are desperately required to combat increasing rate of dengue fever cases reported in tropical and sub-tropical parts of the world. Among the ten proteins (structural and non-structural) encoded by dengue viral genome, NS2B-NS3 protease is an ideal target for drug discovery. It is responsible for the processing of poly protein that is required for genome replication of the virus. Moreover, inhibitors designed against proteases were found successful in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Complete molecular mechanism and a survey of inhibitors reported against dengue protease will be helpful in designing effective and potent inhibitors. This review provides an insight on molecular mechanism of dengue virus protease and covers up-to-date information on different inhibitors reported against dengue proteases with medicinal chemistry perspective. PMID:27092412

  19. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  20. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency can lead to a loss of bone density (size and strength), broken bones (fractures), muscle weakness, ... get too much calcium in their blood or urine. Careful monitoring of blood vitamin D levels will ...

  2. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor ... You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions ... These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

  3. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  4. C-23 Hydroxylation by Arabidopsis CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 Reveals a Novel Shortcut in Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis[W

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Szatmari, Anna-Maria; Watanabe, Bunta; Fujita, Satomi; Bancos, Simona; Koncz, Csaba; Lafos, Marcel; Shibata, Kyomi; Yokota, Takao; Sakata, Kanzo; Szekeres, Miklos; Mizutani, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are biosynthesized from campesterol via several cytochrome P450 (P450)–catalyzed oxidative reactions. We report the functional characterization of two BR-biosynthetic P450s from Arabidopsis thaliana: CYP90C1/ROTUNDIFOLIA3 and CYP90D1. The cyp90c1 cyp90d1 double mutant exhibits the characteristic BR-deficient dwarf phenotype, although the individual mutants do not display this phenotype. These data suggest redundant roles for these P450s. In vitro biochemical assays using insect cell-expressed proteins revealed that both CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 catalyze C-23 hydroxylation of various 22-hydroxylated BRs with markedly different catalytic efficiencies. Both enzymes preferentially convert 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone, (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5α-ergostan-3-one, and (22S,24R)-22-hydroxyergost-4-en-3-one to 23-hydroxylated products, whereas they are less active on 6-deoxocathasterone. Likewise, cyp90c1 cyp90d1 plants were deficient in 23-hydroxylated BRs, and in feeding experiments using exogenously supplied intermediates, only 23-hydroxylated BRs rescued the growth deficiency of the cyp90c1 cyp90d1 mutant. Thus, CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 are redundant BR C-23 hydroxylases. Moreover, their preferential substrates are present in the endogenous Arabidopsis BR pool. Based on these results, we propose C-23 hydroxylation shortcuts that bypass campestanol, 6-deoxocathasterone, and 6-deoxoteasterone and lead directly from (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5α-ergostan-3-one and 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone to 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone and 6-deoxotyphasterol. PMID:17138693

  5. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26658914

  6. [Prevention of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in tropical areas].

    PubMed

    Dillon, J C

    2000-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most widespread nutritional disease in the World. It is prevalent in tropical areas especially in pregnant women and children. The main cause in these areas is consumption of foods containing inhibitors of iron absorption resulting in insufficient bioavailability. In advanced stages of iron deficiency, low hemoglobin levels lead to anemia. Functional consequences of anemia depend on age including mental and physical retardation in children and work disability in adults. Although other disorders including parasitic, infectious, genetic, and nutritional diseases may be involved in anemia in tropical areas, iron deficiency is always a factor because of nutritional conditions. The WHO has proposed laboratory criteria for use in establishing the incidence of iron deficiency and related anemia in a given population. Based on several surveys, four preventive strategies have been developed, i.e., dietary diversification, iron supplementation, general public health measures, and food fortification. Each of these strategies has advantages and disadvantages. The prevailing consensus is that coordinated use of these approaches holds forth the only hope of impacting the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in tropical regions. PMID:10989795

  7. Linearization of class C1 for contractions on Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hildebrando M.; Solà-Morales, J.

    In this work we prove a C1-linearization result for contraction diffeomorphisms, near a fixed point, valid in infinite-dimensional Banach spaces. As an intermediate step, we prove a specific result of existence of invariant manifolds, which can be interesting by itself and that was needed on the proof of our main theorem. Our results essentially generalize some classical results by P. Hartman in finite dimensions, and a result of Mora-Sola-Morales in the infinite-dimensional case. It is shown that the result can be applied to some abstract systems of semilinear damped wave equations.

  8. Reduction of CO2 to C1 products and fuel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mill, T.; Ross, D.

    2002-01-01

    Photochemical semiconductor processes readily reduced CO2 to a broad range of C1 products. However the intrinsic and solar efficiencies for the processes were low. Improved quantum efficiencies could be realized utilizing quantum-sized particles, but at the expense of using less of the visible solar spectrum. Conversely, semiconductors with small bandgaps used more of the visible solar spectrum at the expense of quantum efficiency. Thermal reduction of CO2 with Fe(II) was thermodynamically favored for forming many kinds of organic compounds and occurred readily with olivine and other Fe(II) minerals above 200??C to form higher alkanes and alkenes. No added hydrogen was required.

  9. C1-Cx revisited: intramolecular synergism in a cellulase.

    PubMed Central

    Din, N; Damude, H G; Gilkes, N R; Miller, R C; Warren, R A; Kilburn, D G

    1994-01-01

    Endoglucanase A (CenA) from the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi is composed of a catalytic domain and a nonhydrolytic cellulose-binding domain that can function independently. The individual domains interact synergistically in the disruption and hydrolysis of cellulose fibers. This intramolecular synergism is distinct from the well-known intermolecular synergism between individual cellulases. The catalytic domain corresponds to the hydrolytic Cx system and the cellulose-binding domain corresponds to the nonhydrolytic C1 system postulated by Reese et al. [Reese, E. T., Sui, R. G. H. & Levinson, H. S. (1950) J. Bacteriol. 59, 485-497] to be required for the hydrolysis of cellulose. PMID:7972069

  10. Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, also known as alpha 1-antiprotease inhibitor deficiency, is a disease caused by genetically determined AAT deficiency. It occurs as a result of inheritance of two protease inhibitor (PI) deficiency alleles from the AAT gene locus (designated PI) on chromosomal segment 14q32.1. The most common deficiency allele is PI*Z and a large majority of individuals with severe AAT deficiency are PI type ZZ. The disease occurs predominantly in white persons of European origin and its frequency in Europe and North America is comparable to that of cystic fibrosis (1 in 2000 to 1 in 7000.) Persons with AAT deficiency may have no clinical manifestations. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a high frequency of panacinar emphysema is the most prevalent clinical disorder associated with AAT deficiency and the most frequent cause of disability and death. Tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for developing COPD, which generally begins by the third decade of life, much earlier than "usual" COPD that occurs in AAT-replete individuals. Liver disease, the second most frequent clinical manifestation of AAT deficiency, typically presents as cholestasis in infancy but is usually not severe and generally remits by adolescence. Chronic liver disease develops infrequently, although AAT deficiency is the commonest cause of chronic liver disease in childhood. Cirrhosis and carcinoma of the liver affect at least 25% of AAT-deficient adults over the age of 50 years. AAT deficiency appears to be widely underdiagnosed and based on predicted gene frequencies even in the most intensely studied populations, only a small proportion of those predicted to have AAT deficiency have been diagnosed. Human AAT is available in limited quantity for augmentation therapy. This Memorandum summarizes the discussions and recommendations made by participants at a WHO meeting held in Geneva on 18-20 March 1996 to review existing knowledge about this highly prevalent

  11. VERMILION-DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C B

    1919-07-20

    In May, 1916, a culture of Drosophila melanogaster showed that a new sex-linked lethal had arisen. The linkage relations indicated that the position of the lethal was in the neighborhood of the sex-linked recessive "vermilion," whose locus in the X chromosome is at 33.0. When females heterozygous for the lethal were outcrossed to vermilion males, all the daughters that received the lethal-bearing chromosome showed vermilion eye-color, though, from the pedigree, vermilion was known to be absent from the ancestry of the mother. The lethal action and the unexpected appearance of vermilion both suggested that this was another instance of the phenomenon called "deficiency;" that is, the loss or "inactivation" of the genes of a section of the X chromosome. The lethal action would then be due to the deficient region including one or more genes necessary for the life of the individual. The appearance of vermilion in females carrying only one vermilion gene would be explainable on the ground that the deficient-bearing females are virtually haploid for the region including the vermilion locus. Linkage tests showed that the amount of crossing over in the neighborhood of the deficiency was cut down by about five units. Part of this may be attributed to the actual length of the "deficient" region, within which it is probable that no crossing over occurs, and part (probably most) to an alteration in the synaptic relations in the regions immediately adjacent. In more remote regions there was no disturbance or perhaps a slight rise in the frequency of crossing over. Both the local fall and the possible rise in more distant regions would seem to argue that a "pucker" at synapsis had been caused by an actual shortening of the deficient chromosome. That the deficient region extends to the left of the locus of vermilion was indicated by a test in which it was observed that the presence of an extra piece of chromosome including the loci for vermilion and sable ("vermilion

  12. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  13. Ecallantide: a plasma kallikrein inhibitor for the treatment of acute attacks of hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Stolz, L E; Horn, P T

    2010-08-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a debilitating, potentially fatal disease characterized by variable and unpredictable acute attacks of swelling affecting the subcutaneous tissue and mucosa. It is an autosomal dominant disorder resulting from a genetic deficiency of functional C1-esterase inhibitor. Available treatments include long-term prophylaxis, short-term prophylaxis and treatment of acute attacks. Ecallantide is a novel, specific and potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein that was recently approved in the United States for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE in patients aged 16 years and older. In two phase III clinical trials, the subcutaneous administration of 30 mg ecallantide resulted in significantly greater symptom improvement than placebo for acute attacks of HAE. Ecallantide was generally well tolerated throughout the clinical development program. The main safety concern following ecallantide treatment is hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. A Risk Evaluation and Management Strategy (REMS) has been implemented to minimize this risk and a long-term observational safety study is currently under way to collect more information about hypersensitivity and immunogenicity. Ecallantide represents a novel treatment option for patients with HAE. PMID:20830315

  14. Land validation for GCOM-C1/SGLI using UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Yhosiaki; Kajiwara, Koji; Sharma, Ram; Ono, Akiko; Imaoka, Keiji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Hori, Masahiro; Ono, Yusaku; Rostand, Dim

    2012-09-01

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is going to launch new Earth observation satellite GCOM-C1 in near future. The core sensor of GCOM-C1, Second Generation Global Imager (SGLI) has a set of along track slant viewing Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer (VNR). These multi-angular views aim to detect the structural information from vegetation canopy, especially forest canopy, for estimating productivity of the vegetation. SGLI Land science team has been developing the algorithm for above ground biomass, canopy roughness index, shadow index, etc. In this paper, we introduce the ground observation method developed by using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in order to contribute the algorithm development and its validation. Mainly, multi-angular spectral observation method and simple BRF model have been developed for estimating slant view response of forest canopy. The BRF model developed by using multi-angular measurement has been able to obtain structural information from vegetation canopy. In addition, we have conducted some observation campaigns on typical forest in Japan in collaboration with other science team experienced with vegetation phenology and carbon flux measurement. Primary results of these observations are also be demonstrated.

  15. Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c1 gene replacement mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhus, E; Steinrücke, P; Ludwig, B

    1990-01-01

    We describe the construction and characterization of gene replacement mutants for the respiratory chain component cytochrome c1 in the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans. Its structural gene (fbcC) was inactivated by insertion of the kanamycin resistance gene, introduced into a suicide vector, and conjugated into Paracoccus; chromosomal mutants obtained by homologous recombination were selected by antibiotic resistance screening and further characterized biochemically. They showed the complete spectral, enzymatic, and immunological loss of the fbcC gene product together with a serious defect in the assembly of the two other gene products of the fbc operon, cytochrome b and the FeS protein. A possible role of the cytochrome c1 in the assembly process for the enzyme complex is discussed. A functional restoration to wild-type phenotype was achieved by complementing in trans with a newly constructed broad-host-range vector carrying the fbcC gene cassette. When the complete fbc operon was present on this vector, overexpression of complex III subunits was observed. Apart from their physiological significance, such mutants are a prerequisite for probing structure-function relationships by site-directed mutagenesis in order to understand molecular details of electron transport and energy transduction processes of this respiratory enzyme in bacteria and in mitochondria. Images PMID:2158969

  16. A comparison of the effects of factor XII deficiency and prekallikrein deficiency on thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Kokoye, Yasin; Ivanov, Ivan; Cheng, Qiufang; Matafonov, Anton; Dickeson, S Kent; Mason, Shauna; Sexton, Daniel J; Renné, Thomas; McCrae, Keith; Feener, Edward P; Gailani, David

    2016-04-01

    Studies with animal models implicate the plasma proteases factor XIIa (FXIIa) and α-kallikrein in arterial and venous thrombosis. As congenital deficiencies of factor XII (FXII) or prekallikrein (PK), the zymogens of FXIIa and α-kallikrein respectively, do not cause bleeding disorders, inhibition of these enzymes may have therapeutic benefit without compromising hemostasis. The relative contributions of FXIIa and α-kallikrein to thrombosis in animal models are not clear. We compared mice lacking FXII or PK to wild type mice in established models of arterial thrombosis. Wild type mice developed carotid artery occlusion when the vessel was exposed to a 3.5% solution of ferric chloride (FeCl3). FXII-deficient mice were resistant to occlusion at 5% FeCl3 and partially resistant at 10% FeCl3. PK-deficient mice were resistant at 3.5% FeCl3 and partially resistant at 5% FeCl3. Mice lacking high molecular weight kininogen, a cofactor for PK activation and activity, were also partially resistant to thrombosis at 5% FeCl3. Induction of carotid artery thrombosis with Rose Bengal was delayed in FXII-deficient mice compared to wild type or PK-deficient animals. In human plasma supplemented with silica, DNA or collagen to induce contact activation, an antibody to the FXIIa active site was more effective at preventing thrombin generation than an antibody to the α-kallikrein active site. Similarly, the FXIIa antibody was more effective at reducing fibrin formation in human blood flowing through collagen coated-tubes. The findings suggest that inhibitors of FXIIa will have more potent anti-thrombotic effects than inhibitors of α-kallikrein. PMID:26950760

  17. Prostaglandin E₂ is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation. PMID:24131900

  18. Interaction of HmC1q with leech microglial cells: involvement of C1qBP-related molecule in the induction of cell chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In invertebrates, the medicinal leech is considered to be an interesting and appropriate model to study neuroimmune mechanisms. Indeed, this non-vertebrate animal can restore normal function of its central nervous system (CNS) after injury. Microglia accumulation at the damage site has been shown to be required for axon sprouting and for efficient regeneration. We characterized HmC1q as a novel chemotactic factor for leech microglial cell recruitment. In mammals, a C1q-binding protein (C1qBP alias gC1qR), which interacts with the globular head of C1q, has been reported to participate in C1q-mediated chemotaxis of blood immune cells. In this study, we evaluated the chemotactic activities of a recombinant form of HmC1q and its interaction with a newly characterized leech C1qBP that acts as its potential ligand. Methods Recombinant HmC1q (rHmC1q) was produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Chemotaxis assays were performed to investigate rHmC1q-dependent microglia migration. The involvement of a C1qBP-related molecule in this chemotaxis mechanism was assessed by flow cytometry and with affinity purification experiments. The cellular localization of C1qBP mRNA and protein in leech was investigated using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization techniques. Results rHmC1q-stimulated microglia migrate in a dose-dependent manner. This rHmC1q-induced chemotaxis was reduced when cells were preincubated with either anti-HmC1q or anti-human C1qBP antibodies. A C1qBP-related molecule was characterized in leech microglia. Conclusions A previous study showed that recruitment of microglia is observed after HmC1q release at the cut end of axons. Here, we demonstrate that rHmC1q-dependent chemotaxis might be driven via a HmC1q-binding protein located on the microglial cell surface. Taken together, these results highlight the importance of the interaction between C1q and C1qBP in microglial activation leading to nerve repair in the medicinal leech. PMID:22356764

  19. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  20. Scrapie pathogenesis: the role of complement C1q in scrapie agent uptake by conventional dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Sebti, Yasmine; Mitchell, Daniel A; Sim, Robert B; MacPherson, Gordon G

    2009-02-01

    Mice lacking complement components show delayed development of prion disease following peripheral inoculation. The delay could relate to reduced scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)) accumulation on follicular dendritic cells (DCs). However conventional DCs (cDCs) play a crucial role in the early pathogenesis of prion diseases and complement deficiency could result in decreased PrP(Sc) uptake by cDCs in the periphery. To explore this possibility, we cultured murine splenic or gut-associated lymph node cDCs with scrapie-infected whole brain homogenate in the presence or absence of complement. Uptake decreased significantly if the serum in the cultures was heat-inactivated. Because heat inactivation primarily denatures C1q, we used serum from C1q(-/-) mice and showed that PrP(Sc) uptake was markedly decreased. PrP(Sc) internalization was saturable and temperature-dependent, suggesting receptor-mediated uptake. Furthermore, uptake characteristics differed from fluid-phase endocytosis. Immunofluorescence showed colocalization of C1q and PrP(Sc), suggesting interaction between these molecules. We evaluated the expression of several complement receptors on cDCs and confirmed that cDCs that take up PrP(Sc) express one of the C1q receptors, calreticulin. Our results show that C1q participates in PrP(Sc) uptake by cDCs, revealing a critical role for cDCs in initial prion capture, an event that takes place before the PrP(Sc) accumulation within the follicular DC network. PMID:19155476

  1. Targeting Atp6v1c1 Prevents Inflammation and Bone Erosion Caused by Periodontitis and Reveals Its Critical Function in Osteoimmunology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Lu, Yun; Li, Qian; Zhu, Zheng; Shao, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (Periodontitis) is a serious disease that affects a majority of adult Americans and is associated with other systemic diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this pervasive and destructive disease. In this study, we utilized novel adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown gene therapy to treat bone erosion and inflammatory caused by periodontitis in mouse model. Atp6v1c1 is a subunit of the V-ATPase complex and regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex. We demonstrated previously that Atp6v1c1 has an essential function in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. We hypothesized that Atp6v1c1 may be an ideal target to prevent the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis. To test the hypothesis, we employed AAV RNAi knockdown of Atp6v1c1 gene expression to prevent bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously. We found that lesion-specific injection of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 into the periodontal disease lesions protected against bone erosion (>85%) and gingival inflammation caused by P. gingivalis W50 infection. AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown dramatically reduced osteoclast numbers and inhibited the infiltration of dendritic cells and macrophages in the bacteria-induced inflammatory lesions in periodontitis. Silencing of Atp6v1c1 expression also prevented the expressions of osteoclast-related genes and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Our data suggests that AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 treatment can significantly attenuate the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis, indicating the dual function of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 as an inhibitor of bone erosion mediated by osteoclasts, and as an inhibitor of inflammation through down-regulation of pro

  2. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  3. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  4. Natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer, and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of individuals who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically-defined congenital immunodeficiency of which there are over forty presently known to impair NK cells. The abnormality of NK cells, however, in certain cases represents the majority immunological defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in three different genes that can cause NK cell deficiency as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation. PMID:23993353

  5. Thiamine Deficiency and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C.; Barker, Narviar C.; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  6. C1,1 regularity for degenerate elliptic obstacle problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalopoulos, Panagiota; Feehan, Paul M. N.

    2016-03-01

    The Heston stochastic volatility process is a degenerate diffusion process where the degeneracy in the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the square root of the distance to the boundary of the half-plane. The generator of this process with killing, called the elliptic Heston operator, is a second-order, degenerate-elliptic partial differential operator, where the degeneracy in the operator symbol is proportional to the distance to the boundary of the half-plane. In mathematical finance, solutions to the obstacle problem for the elliptic Heston operator correspond to value functions for perpetual American-style options on the underlying asset. With the aid of weighted Sobolev spaces and weighted Hölder spaces, we establish the optimal C 1 , 1 regularity (up to the boundary of the half-plane) for solutions to obstacle problems for the elliptic Heston operator when the obstacle functions are sufficiently smooth.

  7. [C1Q NEPHROPATHY: CASE REPORTS AND LITERATURE REVIEW].

    PubMed

    Galešić, Krešimir; Horvatić, Ivica; Batinić, Danica; Milošević, Danko; Saraga, Marijan; Durdov, Merica Glavina; Ljubanović, Danica Galešić

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy is considered a form of glomerulonephritis, defined by histological findings of dominant Clq immune deposits in renal biopsy. It is a rare disease, most often manifested in children and young adults. The most common clinical manifestation of the disease is nephrotic syndrome, but other renal syndromes could also be found. The cause of the disease is not known, but the immune pathogenesis could be assumed. Often, resistance to glucocorticoid or other immunosuppressive therapy is present, potentially leading to chronic renal insufficiency. We present ten patients with renal biopsy and clinical findings of Clq nephropathy. None of the patients had clinical or serological manifestations of systemic lupus. All patients had normal findings of C3 and C4 components of complement, as well as normal ANF, anti-dsD-NA and ANCA antibodies. PMID:26749950

  8. A Selection of Recent Advances in C1 Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mesters, Carl

    2016-06-01

    This review presents a selection of recent publications related to the chemistry and catalysis of C1 molecules, including methane, methanol, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. These molecules play an important role in the current supply of energy and chemicals and will likely become even more relevant because of the need to decarbonize fuels (shift from coal to natural gas) in line with CO2 capture and use to mitigate global warming, as well as a gradual shift on the supply side from crude oil to natural gas. This review includes both recent industrial developments, such as the huge increase in methanol-to-olefins-capacity build in China and the demonstration of oxidative coupling of methane, and scientific developments in these chemistries facilitated by improved capabilities in, for example, analytical tools and computational modeling. PMID:27276549

  9. Plasma enhanced C1 chemistry for green technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2013-09-01

    Plasma catalysis is one of the innovative next generation green technologies that meet the needs for energy and materials conservation as well as environmental protection. Non-thermal plasma uniquely generates reactive species independently of reaction temperature, and these species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than normal thermochemical reactions. Non-thermal plasma thus broadens the operation window of existing chemical conversion processes, and ultimately allows modification of the process parameters to minimize energy and material consumption. We have been specifically focusing on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) as one of the viable non-thermal plasma sources for practical fuel reforming. In the presentation, room temperature one-step conversion of methane to methanol and hydrogen using a miniaturized DBD reactor (microplasma reactor) is highlighted. The practical impact of plasma technology on existing C1-chemistry is introduced, and then unique characteristics of plasma fuel reforming such as non-equilibrium product distribution is discussed.

  10. C(1) metabolism and CVD outcomes in older adults.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Helene; Strain, J J; Pentieva, Kristina; Ward, Mary

    2012-05-01

    CVD is the most common cause of death in people over 65 years. This review considers the latest evidence for a potential protective effect of C(1) donors (folate and the metabolically related B-vitamins) in CVD. Such an effect may or may not be mediated via the role of these nutrients in maintaining plasma homocysteine concentrations within a desirable range. Despite predictions from epidemiological studies that lowering plasma homocysteine would reduce cardiovascular risk, several secondary prevention trials in at-risk patients published since 2004 have failed to demonstrate a benefit of homocysteine-lowering therapy with B-vitamins on CVD events generally. All these trials were performed in CVD patients with advanced disease; thus current evidence suggests that intervention with high-dose folic acid is of no benefit in preventing another event, at least in the case of heart disease. The evidence at this time, however, is stronger for stroke, with meta-analyses of randomised trials showing that folic acid reduces the risk of stroke, particularly in people with no history of stroke. Genetic studies provide convincing evidence to support a causal relationship between sub-optimal B-vitamin status and CVD. People homozygous for the common C677T variant in the gene encoding the folate-metabolising enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), typically have a 14-21% higher risk of CVD. Apart from folate, riboflavin is required as a co-factor for MTHFR. New evidence shows that riboflavin intervention results in marked lowering of blood pressure, specifically in patients with the MTHFR 677TT genotype. This novel gene-nutrient interaction may provide insights as to the mechanism that links C(1) metabolism with CVD outcomes. PMID:22152927

  11. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Ray Chaudhuri, Arnab; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia; Gogola, Ewa; Duarte, Alexandra A; Lee, Ji-Eun; Wong, Nancy; Lafarga, Vanessa; Calvo, Jennifer A; Panzarino, Nicholas J; John, Sam; Day, Amanda; Crespo, Anna Vidal; Shen, Binghui; Starnes, Linda M; de Ruiter, Julian R; Daniel, Jeremy A; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Cortez, David; Cantor, Sharon B; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Ge, Kai; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Sharan, Shyam K; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-07-21

    Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3/4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11 nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations. Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of replication fork protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumour cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance. PMID:27443740

  12. Prophylaxe beim hereditären Angioödem (HAE) mit C1-Inhibitormangel.

    PubMed

    Greve, Jens; Strassen, Ulrich; Gorczyza, Marina; Dominas, Nina; Frahm, Uta-Marie; Mühlberg, Heike; Wiednig, Michaela; Zampeli, Vasiliki; Magerl, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Das hereditäre Angioödem (engl.: hereditary angioedema, HAE) ist eine seltene angeborene Erkrankung, die durch wiederkehrende Episoden subkutaner oder submuköser Ödeme charakterisiert ist. Kehlkopf-Manifestationen können lebensbedrohlich sein. In den meisten Fällen kann die Erkrankung mit einem On-Demand-Ansatz angemessen behandelt werden - in einigen Fällen ist jedoch eine Kurz- oder Langzeitprophylaxe angebracht. Attenuierte Androgene waren einmal das Standardmedikament; sie werden jedoch mit erheblichen Nebenwirkungen in Verbindung gebracht und sind in den deutschsprachigen Ländern der EU nicht mehr kommerziell erhältlich. Zurzeit werden sie von wirksameren und besser verträglichen Therapien wie C1-Esterase-Inhibitoren, dem Kallikrein-Inhibitor Ecallantid und dem B2-Rezeptorantagonisten Icatibant verdrängt, welche kürzlich auf dem Markt zugelassen wurden. Diese neuen Medikamente hatten einen erheblichen Einfluss, insbesondere auf die Indikationsstellung und das Vorgehen bei einer Langzeitprophylaxe. Nach den neuesten internationalen Konsenspapieren und unserer eigenen Erfahrung sind selbstverabreichte C1-Inhibitoren nun die erste Option bei der Langzeitprophylaxe. Die Entscheidung für eine Prophylaxe sollte nicht länger auf der Grundlage einzelner Parameter wie der Häufigkeit der Anfälle getroffen werden, sondern auf einer adäquaten allgemeinen Krankheitskontrolle, einschließlich der Lebensqualität. Zurzeit werden weitere Medikamente entwickelt, welche zu weiteren Veränderungen bei den Behandlungsalgorithmen des HAE führen könnten. PMID:26972190

  13. Structural Insights into the C1q Domain of Caprin-2 in Canonical Wnt Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Haofei; Jia, Yingying; Xie, Sichun; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Jianfei; Chu, Youjun; Zhou, Zhilei; Shi, Zhubing; Song, Xiaomin; Li, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have identified Caprin-2 as a new regulator in canonical Wnt signaling through a mechanism of facilitating LRP5/6 phosphorylation; moreover, we found that its C-terminal C1q-related domain (Cap2_CRD) is required for this process. Here, we determined the crystal structures of Cap2_CRD from human and zebrafish, which both associate as a homotrimer with calcium located at the symmetric center. Surprisingly, the calcium binding-deficient mutant exists as a more stable trimer than its wild-type counterpart. Further studies showed that this Caprin-2 mutant disabled in binding calcium maintains the activity of promoting LRP5/6 phosphorylation, whereas the mutations disrupting Cap2_CRD homotrimer did impair such activity. Together, our findings suggested that the C-terminal CRD domain of Caprin-2 forms a flexible homotrimer mediated by calcium and that such trimeric assembly is required for Caprin-2 to regulate canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25331957

  14. C1-Ten Is a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase of Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 (IRS-1), Regulating IRS-1 Stability and Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ara; Lee, Mi Nam; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Jeong, Heeyoon; Ghim, Jaewang; Noh, Jeongeun; Kim, Jaeyoon; Ryu, Dongryeol; Park, Sehoon; Song, Parkyong; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Leslie, Nick R.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Choi, Jang Hyun; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2013-01-01

    Muscle atrophy occurs under various catabolic conditions, including insulin deficiency, insulin resistance, or increased levels of glucocorticoids. This results from reduced levels of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), leading to decreased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and thereby activation of FoxO transcription factors. However, the precise mechanism of reduced IRS-1 under a catabolic condition is unknown. Here, we report that C1-Ten is a novel protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) of IRS-1 that acts as a mediator to reduce IRS-1 under a catabolic condition, resulting in muscle atrophy. C1-Ten preferentially dephosphorylated Y612 of IRS-1, which accelerated IRS-1 degradation. These findings suggest a novel type of IRS-1 degradation mechanism which is dependent on C1-Ten and extends our understanding of the molecular mechanism of muscle atrophy under catabolic conditions. C1-Ten expression is increased by catabolic glucocorticoid and decreased by anabolic insulin. Reflecting these hormonal regulations, the muscle C1-Ten is upregulated in atrophy but downregulated in hypertrophy. This reveals a previously unidentified role of C1-Ten as a relevant PTPase contributing to skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:23401856

  15. Comparative microarray analysis of basal gene expression in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 wild-type and mutant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fong, C J; Burgoon, L D; Zacharewski, T R

    2005-08-01

    Hepa-1c1c7 wild-type and benzo[a]pyrene-resistant derived mutant cell lines have been used to elucidate pathways and mechanisms involving the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). However, there has been little focus on other biological processes which may differ between the isolated lines. In this study, mouse cDNA microarrays representing 4858 genes were used to examine differences in basal gene expression between mouse Hepa-1c1c7 wild-type and c1 (truncated Cyp1a1 protein), c4 (AhR nuclear translocator, ARNT, deficient), and c12 (low AhR levels) mutant cell lines. Surprisingly, c1 mutants exhibited the greatest number of gene expression changes compared to wild-type cells, followed by c4 and c12 lines, respectively. Differences in basal gene expression were consistent with cell line specific variations in morphology, mitochondrial activity, and proliferation rate. MTT and direct cell count assays indicate both c4 and c12 mutants exhibit increased proliferative activity when compared to wild-type cells, while the c1 mutants exhibited decreased activity. This study further characterizes Hepa-1c1c7 wild-type and mutant cells and identifies significant differences in biological processes that should be considered when conducting comparative mechanistic studies with these lines. PMID:15888666

  16. Homologous recombination deficiency: Exploiting the fundamental vulnerability of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) exhibit defective DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR) due to genetic and epigenetic alterations of HR pathway genes. Defective HR is an important therapeutic target in EOC as exemplified by the efficacy of platinum analogues in this disease, as well as the advent of poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors which exhibit synthetic lethality when applied to HR deficient cells. Here, we describe the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of HR deficient EOCs, discuss current and emerging approaches for targeting these tumors, and present challenges associated with these approaches focusing on development and overcoming resistance. PMID:26463832

  17. Inhibition of Ebola Virus Infection: Identification of Niemann-Pick C1 as the Target by Optimization of a Chemical Probe

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A high-throughput screen identified adamantane dipeptide 1 as an inhibitor of Ebola virus (EboV) infection. Hit-to-lead optimization to determine the structure–activity relationship (SAR) identified the more potent EboV inhibitor 2 and a photoaffinity labeling agent 3. These antiviral compounds were employed to identify the target as Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a host protein that binds the EboV glycoprotein and is essential for infection. These studies establish NPC1 as a promising target for antiviral therapy. PMID:23526644

  18. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  19. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes. PMID:26467175

  20. L-C1qDC-1, a novel C1q domain-containing protein from Lethenteron camtschaticum that is involved in the immune response.

    PubMed

    Pei, Guangying; Liu, Ge; Pan, Xiong; Pang, Yue; Li, Qingwei

    2016-01-01

    The C1q domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins are a family of proteins characterized by a globular C1q (gC1q) domain at their C-terminus. These proteins are involved in various processes in vertebrates and are assumed to serve as important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity in invertebrates. Here, a novel C1qDC protein from Lethenteron camtschaticum was identified and characterized (designated as L-C1qDC-1). After a partial cDNA sequence of L-C1qDC-1 was identified in a L. camtschaticum liver cDNA library, the full-length cDNA was obtained using 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). L-C1qDC-1 encodes 236 amino acids and contains a signal peptide, a collagen-like sequence with Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and a C-terminal gC1q domain. The L-C1qDC-1 protein was primarily distributed in the gut, liver and supraneural body of L. camtschaticum and was also marginally detectable in leukocytes via real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assays. Furthermore, both immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence results showed that in L. camtschaticum serum, L-C1qDC-1 could interact with variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) B and displayed strong colocalization with cancer cell immune responses. These results indicated that the L-C1qDC-1 gene encodes a novel C1qDC protein that may play an important role in the immune responses of L. camtschaticum, providing clues for understanding the universal functions of C1qDC proteins in other species and suggesting that these proteins could serve as pattern recognition molecules in immunotherapy. PMID:26342581

  1. Inhibitors of Kallikrein in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, David J.

    1972-01-01

    Human plasma was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration to determine which method would give the greatest number of clearly separable kallikrein inhibitory peaks. With G-200 gel filtration three peaks could be separated which were demonstrated to contain α2-macroglobulin, C1̄ inactivator, and α1-antitrypsin. No other kallikrein inhibitors could be identified. The fractions containing C1̄ inactivator and α2-macroglobulin appeared to be more effective against kallikrein than that containing α1-antitrypsin. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema was shown to have an abnormal C1̄ inactivator protein capable of interfering with kallikrein's biologic, but not its esterolytic activity. Heat-treated human plasma, a commonly used source of kininogen for experiments with kallikrein, was shown to have kallikrein inhibitory activity. PMID:4113391

  2. Anatomic Consideration of the C1 Laminar Arch for Lateral Mass Screw Fixation via C1 Lateral Lamina : A Landmark between the Lateral and Posterior Lamina of the C1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Han, Seung-Ho; Cho, Sung-Min; You, Seung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To clarify the landmark for deciding the entry point for C1 lateral mass screws via the posterior arch by using 3-dimensional (3D) computed images. Methods Resnick insisted that the C1 posterior arch could be divided into pure posterior and lateral lamina (C1 pedicle). Authors studied where this transition point (TP) is located between the posterior lamina and the C1 pedicle and how it can be recognized. The 3D computed images of 86 cadaver C1s (M : F=45 : 41) were used in this study. Results The superior ridge of the C1 posterior arch had 2 types of orientation. One was in the vertical direction in the C1 posterior lamina and the other was in the horizontal direction in the C1 pedicle. The TP was located at the border between the 2 areas, the same site as the posterior end of the groove of the vertebral artery. On posterior-anterior projection, the posterior arch was sharpened abruptly at TP. We were unable to identify the TP in 6.4% of specimens due to complete or partial osseous bridges. A total of 93.8% of the TP were located between the most enlarged point of the spinal canal and the medial wall of the vertebral artery. Conclusion The anatomic entry zone of C1 lateral laminar screws was clarified and identified based on the TP by using preoperative 3D computed images. PMID:24044076

  3. FERRITIN H INDUCTION BY HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Di, Xiumin; Torti, Suzy V.; Torti, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Because both iron deficiency and iron excess are deleterious to normal cell function, the intracellular level of iron must be tightly controlled. Ferritin, an iron binding protein, regulates iron balance by storing iron in a bioavailable but non-toxic form. Ferritin protein comprises two subunits: ferritin H, which contains ferroxidase activity, and ferritin L. Here we demonstrate that ferritin H mRNA and protein are induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC inhibitors), a promising class of anti-cancer drugs, in cultured human cancer cells. Deletion analysis and EMSA assays reveal that the induction of ferritin H occurs at a transcriptional level via Sp1 and NF-Y binding sites near the transcriptional start site of the human ferritin H promoter. Classically, HDAC inhibitors modulate gene expression by increasing histone acetylation. However, ChIP assays demonstrate that HDAC inhibitors induce ferritin H transcription by increasing NF-Y binding to the ferritin H promoter without changes in histone acetylation. These results identify ferritin H as a new target of HDAC inhibitors, and recruitment of NF-Y as a novel mechanism of action of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:20385107

  4. Radiation damage of the HEAO C-1 germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, W. A.; Ling, J. C.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage from proton bombardment of the four HEAO C-1 high purity germanium detectors have been measured and compared to predictions. Because of the presence of numerous gamma-ray lines in the detector background spectra and because of the relatively long exposure time of the HEAO 3 satellite to cosmic-ray and trapped protons, it has been possible to measure both the energy and time dependence of radiation damage. After 100 d in orbit, each of the four detectors has been exposed to approximately 3 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm, and the average energy resolution at 1460 keV had degraded from 3.2 keV fwhm to 8.6 keV fwhm. The lines were all broadened to the low energy side although the line profile was different for each of the four detectors. The damage-related contribution to the degradation in energy resolution was found to be linear in energy and proton influence.

  5. Near-ultraviolet spectroscopy of Comet Austin (1989c1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valk, Jacobus H.; O'Dell, C. R.; Cochran, Anita L.; Cochran, William D.; Opal, Chet B. S.; Barker, Edwin S.

    1992-01-01

    Comet Austin (1989c1) was observed post-perihelion at a heliocentric distance near 1.25 AU. The wavelength range was from the atmospheric cutoff at 3000 to 4000 A. The coma spectra were calibrated into flux units and the contaminating sky spectrum and solar scattered light continuum were subtracted, leaving an ultraviolet spectrum of about 1.5-A resolution and excellent signal-to-noise ratio. The spectrum is dominated by emissions from OH, NH, CH, C3, and CN, some of the weaker emissions of which are seen here for the first time. More bands of CO(2+) were found than in any previous investigation and several intensity anomalies were noted; H2CO, OH(+), NCN, N(2+), and CN(+) may be present. Several emission features well above the noise level remain unidentified. The relative intensities of the OH and CN bands agree with the predictions of resonance fluorescence when one considers the potential effects of contamination by other molecules. The effects of the ozone absorption spectrum are not fully removed by the data-reduction process, although this does not affect these results.

  6. Structure of human Niemann-Pick C1 protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Jiawei; Coutavas, Elias; Shi, Hang; Hao, Qi; Blobel, Günter

    2016-07-19

    Niemann-Pick C1 protein (NPC1) is a late-endosomal membrane protein involved in trafficking of LDL-derived cholesterol, Niemann-Pick disease type C, and Ebola virus infection. NPC1 contains 13 transmembrane segments (TMs), five of which are thought to represent a "sterol-sensing domain" (SSD). Although present also in other key regulatory proteins of cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and signaling, the structure and mechanism of action of the SSD are unknown. Here we report a crystal structure of a large fragment of human NPC1 at 3.6 Å resolution, which reveals internal twofold pseudosymmetry along TM 2-13 and two structurally homologous domains that protrude 60 Å into the endosomal lumen. Strikingly, NPC1's SSD forms a cavity that is accessible from both the luminal bilayer leaflet and the endosomal lumen; computational modeling suggests that this cavity is large enough to accommodate one cholesterol molecule. We propose a model for NPC1 function in cholesterol sensing and transport. PMID:27307437

  7. Structure of human Niemann–Pick C1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Jiawei; Coutavas, Elias; Shi, Hang; Hao, Qi; Blobel, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick C1 protein (NPC1) is a late-endosomal membrane protein involved in trafficking of LDL-derived cholesterol, Niemann–Pick disease type C, and Ebola virus infection. NPC1 contains 13 transmembrane segments (TMs), five of which are thought to represent a “sterol-sensing domain” (SSD). Although present also in other key regulatory proteins of cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and signaling, the structure and mechanism of action of the SSD are unknown. Here we report a crystal structure of a large fragment of human NPC1 at 3.6 Å resolution, which reveals internal twofold pseudosymmetry along TM 2–13 and two structurally homologous domains that protrude 60 Å into the endosomal lumen. Strikingly, NPC1's SSD forms a cavity that is accessible from both the luminal bilayer leaflet and the endosomal lumen; computational modeling suggests that this cavity is large enough to accommodate one cholesterol molecule. We propose a model for NPC1 function in cholesterol sensing and transport. PMID:27307437

  8. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aydin HI, Sennaroğlu L, Belgin E, Jensen K, Wolf B. Hearing loss in biotinidase deficiency: genotype-phenotype ... corrected to Aydin, Halil Ibrahim]. Citation on PubMed Wolf B. Biotinidase deficiency: "if you have to have ...

  9. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube. Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Exams and Tests Factor XII deficiency is most often found when ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: pseudocholinesterase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is a condition that results in increased sensitivity to certain muscle relaxant drugs used during general ... People with pseudocholinesterase deficiency may also have increased sensitivity to certain other drugs, including the local anesthetic ...

  11. Alteration of drug metabolizing enzymes in sulphite oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncu, Begum; Kuçukatay, Vural; Arslan, Sevki; Sahin, Barbaros; Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of sulphite oxidase (SOX, E.C. 1.8.3.1) deficiency on xenobiotic metabolism. For this purpose, SOX deficiency was produced in rats by the administration of a low molybdenum diet with concurrent addition of 200 ppm tungsten to their drinking water. First, hepatic SOX activity in deficient groups was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. Then, aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline 4-hydroxylase, aromatase, caffeine N-demethylase, cytochrome b5 reductase, erythromycin N-demethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, glutathione S-transferase, N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase and penthoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities were determined to follow changes in the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in SOX-deficient rats. Our results clearly demonstrated that SOX deficiency significantly elevated A4H, caffeine N-demethylase, erythromycin N-demethylase and N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase activities while decreasing ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aromatase activities. These alterations in drug metabolizing enzymes can contribute to the varying susceptibility and response of sulphite-sensitive individuals to different drugs and/or therapeutics used for treatments. PMID:22798713

  12. Necroptosis in Niemann-Pick disease, type C1: a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Cougnoux, A; Cluzeau, C; Mitra, S; Li, R; Williams, I; Burkert, K; Xu, X; Wassif, C A; Zheng, W; Porter, F D

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder due to mutation of the NPC1 gene. The NPC1 phenotype is characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction, including cerebellar ataxia and dementia. There is histological evidence of neuroinflammation and progressive neuronal loss, with cerebellar Purkinje cells particularly vulnerable to loss of NPC1 function. Necroptosis was evaluated as a mechanism of neuronal loss. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) and RIP3 are key components of the necrosomal complex that regulates necroptotic cell death. We report increased expression of RIP1 and RIP3 in NPC1 fibroblasts, NPC1 iPS cell-derived neuronal precursors, and in cerebellar tissue from both NPC1 mice and patients. Our data suggest a positive correlation between NPC1 neurological disease severity and assembly of the necrosome complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 decreases cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of Npc1-mutant mice with necrostatin-1, an allosteric inhibitor of RIP1, significantly delayed cerebellar Purkinje cell loss, progression of neurological symptoms, and death. Collectively, our data identified necroptosis as a key component of the molecular network that contributes to neuronal loss in NPC1 and establish that inhibition of necroptosis is a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:26986514

  13. Ebola Viral Glycoprotein Bound to Its Endosomal Receptor Niemann-Pick C1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Shi, Yi; Song, Jian; Qi, Jianxun; Lu, Guangwen; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2016-01-14

    Filoviruses, including Ebola and Marburg, cause fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and primates. Understanding how these viruses enter host cells could help to develop effective therapeutics. An endosomal protein, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), has been identified as a necessary entry receptor for this process, and priming of the viral glycoprotein (GP) to a fusion-competent state is a prerequisite for NPC1 binding. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of the primed GP (GPcl) of Ebola virus bound to domain C of NPC1 (NPC1-C) at a resolution of 2.3 Å. NPC1-C utilizes two protruding loops to engage a hydrophobic cavity on head of GPcl. Upon enzymatic cleavage and NPC1-C binding, conformational change in the GPcl further affects the state of the internal fusion loop, triggering membrane fusion. Our data therefore provide structural insights into filovirus entry in the late endosome and the molecular basis for design of therapeutic inhibitors of viral entry. PMID:26771495

  14. Necroptosis in Niemann–Pick disease, type C1: a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Cougnoux, A; Cluzeau, C; Mitra, S; Li, R; Williams, I; Burkert, K; Xu, X; Wassif, C A; Zheng, W; Porter, F D

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder due to mutation of the NPC1 gene. The NPC1 phenotype is characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction, including cerebellar ataxia and dementia. There is histological evidence of neuroinflammation and progressive neuronal loss, with cerebellar Purkinje cells particularly vulnerable to loss of NPC1 function. Necroptosis was evaluated as a mechanism of neuronal loss. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) and RIP3 are key components of the necrosomal complex that regulates necroptotic cell death. We report increased expression of RIP1 and RIP3 in NPC1 fibroblasts, NPC1 iPS cell-derived neuronal precursors, and in cerebellar tissue from both NPC1 mice and patients. Our data suggest a positive correlation between NPC1 neurological disease severity and assembly of the necrosome complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 decreases cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of Npc1-mutant mice with necrostatin-1, an allosteric inhibitor of RIP1, significantly delayed cerebellar Purkinje cell loss, progression of neurological symptoms, and death. Collectively, our data identified necroptosis as a key component of the molecular network that contributes to neuronal loss in NPC1 and establish that inhibition of necroptosis is a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:26986514

  15. Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) Inhibition and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pirillo, A; Catapano, A L; Norata, G D

    2016-01-01

    Circulating levels of cholesterol are derived from either endogenous production or intestinal absorption of dietary and biliary cholesterol. Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) is a transmembrane protein that plays a key role in the intestinal absorption of cholesterol by facilitating its uptake through vesicular endocytosis. NPC1L1 is the molecular target of ezetimibe which binds its extracellular loop and inhibits sterol absorption without affecting the absorption of other molecules. Ezetimibe significantly reduces plasma levels of total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as monotherapy or when added to statins, the association with a low dose of statin is of particular interest for patients experiencing statin-related side effects. The recent results of the IMPROVE-IT study, which evaluated the cardiovascular effect of ezetimibe added to simvastatin therapy in subjects who had had an acute coronary syndrome and with LDL-C levels within the recommended range, showed that a further LDL-C lowering reduced the incidence of cardiovascular events. To date, ezetimibe represents the only inhibitor of NPC1L1 available for clinical use, however, novel aminoß- lactam ezetimibe derivatives have been synthesized and their efficacy to inhibit NPC1L1 protein and decrease plasma cholesterol levels is under evaluation. PMID:26923679

  16. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz ...

  18. Studies on contact activation: effects of surface and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C L; Fisslthaler, B; Sherman, A; Reddigari, S; Silverberg, M

    1989-01-01

    Contact activation is initiated when the plasma proteins, Hageman factor (factor XII), prekallikrein and high molecular weight kininogen interact with negatively charged materials. The activation of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation and the production of bradykinin are among the sequelae of contact activation. The kinetics of the activation of the contact system are modified by plasma inhibitors, C1 inhibitor being quantitatively the most important. We propose that the activation of the system requires that the stimulus provided by the surface must be greater than a threshold value to overcome the effects of the inhibitors. We show in this paper that the amount of surface required for activation is much reduced in the absence of C1 inhibitor (Hereditary Angioedema) or in the cold where the inhibitor loses much of its effectiveness. Antithrombin III inhibition of activated Hageman factor is augmented by heparin which is also an activator of Hageman factor. The rate constants for inhibition remain much lower than for C1 inhibitor, however. PMID:2530427

  19. Acquired antithrombin III deficiency: laboratory diagnosis, incidence, clinical implications, and treatment with antithrombin III concentrate.

    PubMed

    Büller, H R; ten Cate, J W

    1989-09-11

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is the predominant naturally occurring inhibitor of serine proteases generated during blood coagulation [Rosenberg RD: Annu Rev Med 1978; 29: 367-378]. Since 1965, several assays have been developed that allow rapid and precise determination of ATIII in plasma. As a consequence, the existence of acquired ATIII deficiency in many pathologic conditions has been described. Acquired ATIII deficiency is based on decreased synthesis, increased loss or increased consumption, or induced by drugs. An inherited ATIII deficiency is associated with a lifelong tendency to venous thromboembolism. In contrast, the clinical significance of acquired ATIII deficiency has been less well defined. A precise estimate of the risk of thromboembolism in the acquired ATIII deficiency state cannot easily be provided, owing to the lack of studies in consecutive patients. In 1978, a purified human ATIII concentrate became available for clinical investigation. Despite numerous small studies, the value of ATIII replacement therapy in patients with acquired deficiency remains to be demonstrated. PMID:2679070

  20. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1. PMID:26653176

  1. Decorin deficiency promotes hepatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Zsolt; Kovalszky, Ilona; Fullár, Alexandra; Kiss, Katalin; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Iozzo, Renato V.; Baghy, Kornélia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma represents one of the most-rapidly spreading cancers in the world. In the majority of cases, an inflammation-driven fibrosis or cirrhosis precedes the development of the tumor. During malignant transformation, the tumor microenvironment undergoes qualitative and quantitative changes that modulate the behavior of the malignant cells. A key constituent for the hepatic microenvironment is the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin, known to interfere with cellular events of tumorigenesis mainly by blocking various receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) such as EGFR, Met, IGF-IR, PDGFR and VEGFR2. In this study, we characterized cell signaling events evoked by decorin deficiency in two experimental models of hepatocarcinogenesis using thioacetamide or diethyl nitrosamine as carcinogens. Genetic ablation of decorin led to enhanced tumor occurrence as compared to wild-type animals. These findings correlated with decreased levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and a concurrent elevation in retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation via cyclin dependent kinase 4. Decreased steady state p21Waf1/Cip1 levels correlated with enhanced expression of transcription factor AP4, a known transcriptional repressor of p21Waf1/Cip1, and enhanced c-Myc protein levels. In addition, translocation of β-catenin was a typical event in diethyl nitrosamine-evoked tumors. In parallel, decreased phosphorylation of both c-Myc and β-catenin was observed in Dcn−/− livers likely due to the hindered GSK3β-mediated targeting of these proteins to proteasomal degradation. We discovered that in a genetic background lacking decorin, four RTKs were constitutively activated (phosphorylated), including three known targets of decorin such as PDGFRα, EGFR, IGF-IR, and a novel RTK MSPR/RON. Our findings provide powerful genetic evidence for a crucial in vivo role of decorin during hepatocarcinogenesis as lack of decorin in the liver and hepatic stroma facilitates

  2. Update on alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: New therapies.

    PubMed

    Lomas, David A; Hurst, John R; Gooptu, Bibek

    2016-08-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is characterised by the misfolding and intracellular polymerisation of mutant α1-antitrypsin within the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes. The retention of mutant protein causes hepatic damage and cirrhosis whilst the lack of an important circulating protease inhibitor predisposes the individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency to early onset emphysema. Our work over the past 25years has led to new paradigms for the liver and lung disease associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency. We review here the molecular pathology of the cirrhosis and emphysema associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency and show how an understanding of this condition provided the paradigm for a wider group of disorders that we have termed the serpinopathies. The detailed understanding of the pathobiology of α1-antitrypsin deficiency has identified important disease mechanisms to target. As a result, several novel parallel and complementary therapeutic approaches are in development with some now in clinical trials. We provide an overview of these new therapies for the liver and lung disease associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27034252

  3. Molecular characterization of the complement C1q, C2 and C4 genes in Brazilian patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liphaus, Bernadete L; Umetsu, Natalia; Jesus, Adriana A; Bando, Silvia Y; Silva, Clovis A; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a molecular characterization of the C1q, C2 and C4 genes in patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: Patient 1 (P1) had undetectable C1q, patient 2 (P2) and patient 3 (P3) had decreased C2 and patient 4 (P4) had decreased C4 levels. All exons and non-coding regions of the C1q and C2 genes were sequenced. Mononuclear cells were cultured and stimulated with interferon gamma to evaluate C1q, C2 and C4 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: C1q sequencing revealed heterozygous silent mutations in the A (c.276 A>G Gly) and C (c.126 C>T Pro) chains, as well as a homozygous single-base change in the 3′ non-coding region of the B chain (c*78 A>G). C1qA mRNA expression without interferon was decreased compared with that of healthy controls (p<0.05) and was decreased after stimulation compared with that of non-treated cells. C1qB mRNA expression was decreased compared with that of controls and did not change with stimulation. C1qC mRNA expression was increased compared with that of controls and was even higher after stimulation. P2 and P3 had Type I C2 deficiency (heterozygous 28 bp deletion at exon 6). The C2 mRNA expression in P3 was 23 times lower compared with that of controls and did not change after stimulation. The C4B mRNA expression of P4 was decreased compared with that of controls and increased after stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Silent mutations and single-base changes in the 3′ non-coding regions may modify mRNA transcription and C1q production. Type I C2 deficiency should be evaluated in JSLE patients with decreased C2 serum levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of decreased C4B mRNA expression in JSLE pathogenesis. PMID:26017655

  4. Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Erin K; Colman, Roberta F; Patterson, David

    2006-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency is a disease of purine metabolism which affects patients both biochemically and behaviorally. The symptoms are variable and include psychomotor retardation, autistic features, hypotonia, and seizures. Patients also accumulate the substrates of ADSL in body fluids. Both the presence of normal levels of ADSL enzyme activities in some patient tissues and the absence of a clear correlation between mutations, biochemistry, and behavior show that the system has unexplored biochemical and/or genetic complexity. It is unclear whether the pathological mechanisms of this disease result from a deficiency of purines, a toxicity of intermediates, or perturbation of another pathway or system. A patient with autistic features and mild psychomotor delay carries two novel mutations in this gene, E80D and D87E. The creation of a mouse model of this disease will be an important step in elucidating the in vivo mechanisms of the disease. Mice carrying mutations that cause ADSL deficiency in humans will be informative as to the effects of these mutations both during embryogenesis and on the brain, possibly leading to therapies for this disease in the future. PMID:16839792

  5. Primary antibody deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wood, P

    2009-03-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a group of rare disorders characterized by an inability to produce clinically effective immunoglobulin responses. Some of these disorders result from genetic mutations in genes involved in B cell development, whereas others appear to be complex polygenic disorders. They most commonly present with recurrent infections due to encapsulated bacteria, although in the most common antibody deficiency, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity can be a presenting feature. Diagnostic delay in this group of disorders remains a problem, and the laboratory has a vital role in the detection of abnormalities in immunoglobulin concentration and function. It is critical to distinguish this group of disorders from secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinaemia, in particular lymphoid malignancy, and appropriate laboratory investigations are of critical importance. Treatment of primary antibody deficiencies involves immunoglobulin replacement therapy, either via the intravenous or subcutaneous route. Patients remain at risk of a wide variety of complications, not all linked to diagnostic delay and inadequate therapy. In common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in particular, patients remain at significantly increased risk of lymphoid malignancy, and regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is required. This review aims to give an overview of these conditions for the general reader, covering pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigation, therapy and clinical management. PMID:19151170

  6. On the selectivity of neuronal NOS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, B; Bartus, K; Garthwaite, J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Isoform-selective inhibitors of NOS enzymes are desirable as research tools and for potential therapeutic purposes. Vinyl-l-N-5-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine (l-VNIO) and Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA) purportedly have good selectivity for neuronal over endothelial NOS under cell-free conditions, as does N-[(3-aminomethyl)benzyl]acetamidine (1400W), which is primarily an inducible NOS inhibitor. Although used in numerous investigations in vitro and in vivo, there have been surprisingly few tests of the potency and selectivity of these compounds in cells. This study addresses this deficiency and evaluates the activity of new and potentially better pyrrolidine-based compounds. Experimental Approach The inhibitors were evaluated by measuring their effect on NMDA-evoked cGMP accumulation in rodent hippocampal slices, a response dependent on neuronal NOS, and ACh-evoked cGMP synthesis in aortic rings of the same animals, an endothelial NOS-dependent phenomenon. Key Results l-VNIO, NPA and 1400W inhibited responses in both tissues but all showed less than fivefold higher potency in the hippocampus than in the aorta, implying useless selectivity for neuronal over endothelial NOS at the tissue level. In addition, the inhibitors had a 25-fold lower potency in the hippocampus than reported previously, the IC50 values being approximately 1 μM for l-VNIO and NPA, and 150 μM for 1400W. Pyrrolidine-based inhibitors were similarly weak and nonselective. Conclusion and Implications The results suggest that l-VNIO, NPA and 1400W, as well as the newer pyrrolidine-type inhibitors, cannot be used as neuronal NOS inhibitors in cells without stringent verification. The identification of inhibitors with useable selectivity in cells and tissues remains an important goal. PMID:23072468

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  8. Iatrogenic angioedema associated with ACEi, sitagliptin, and deficiency of 3 enzymes catabolizing bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Beaudouin, E; Defendi, F; Picaud, J; Drouet, C; Ponard, D; Moneret-Vautrin, D A

    2014-05-01

    New concepts of idiopathic and iatrogenic angioedema underline the role of bradykinin, and the importance of catabolizing enzymes. A case is described of Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) and sitagliptin induced angioedema, where AO attacks decreased after the withdrawal of lisinopril but resolved only after the withdrawal of sitagliptin, an inhibitor of dipeptylpeptidase IV. ACE, aminopeptidase P and carboxypeptidase N were decreased down to 17%, 42%, 64% of median references values, and remained low one year after the interruption of these drugs: 56%, 28% and 50%, respectively. The combined deficiency of APP and CPN might enhance the inhibiting effect of the DPP IV inhibitor. The fact that this triple deficiency remained latent before and after the treatment indicates that searching for latent enzyme deficiencies should be carried out when there is intention to treat with a combination of drugs interfering with the bradykinin metabolism. PMID:24853572

  9. Deficient DNA repair capacity, a predisposing factor in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Parshad, R.; Price, F. M.; Bohr, V. A.; Cowans, K. H.; Zujewski, J. A.; Sanford, K. K.

    1996-01-01

    Women with breast cancer and a family history of breast cancer and some with sporadic breast cancer are deficient in the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage compared with normal donors with no family history of breast cancer. DNA repair was measured indirectly by quantifying chromatid breaks in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blood lymphocytes after either X-irradiation or UV-C exposure, with or without post treatment with the DNA repair inhibitor, 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). We have correlated chromatid breaks with unrepaired DNA strand breaks using responses to X-irradiation of cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients with well-characterised DNA repair defects or responses of repair-deficient mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with or without transfected human DNA repair genes. Deficient DNA repair appears to be a predisposing factor in familial breast cancer and in some sporadic breast cancers. PMID:8679441

  10. Chk'ing p53-deficient breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Schoppy, David W; Brown, Eric J

    2012-04-01

    Loss or functional impairment of p53 occurs in many human cancers, and its absence is often associated with a poor response to conventional chemotherapy. Hence, much effort is currently devoted to developing novel treatments for p53-deficient malignancies. One approach is to target pathways that are selectively required for the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells, thus exploiting a synthetic lethal interaction. Previous studies have demonstrated that inhibition of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) pathway in p53-deficient cells can induce such a synthetic lethal outcome. In this issue of the JCI, Ma et al. take these findings a step closer to the clinic by demonstrating that highly specific inhibitors of Chk1 synergize with chemotherapy to stem progression of p53-deficient triple-negative breast cancers in a xenotransplant model of this disease. Together with other recent studies, this report highlights the promise of ATR and Chk1 inhibitors in targeted cancer treatment. PMID:22446183

  11. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  12. Human diploid fibroblasts have receptors for the globular domain of C1Q

    SciTech Connect

    Bordin, S.; Page, R.C.

    1986-03-01

    The authors showed that mass cultures of fibroblasts grown from gingival explants in DB medium with 10% human serum are enriched in a phenotype that binds C1q with an affinity much higher than the rest of the population. Because of potential biologic importance of C1q receptors, the authors studied whether the interaction between C1q and this phenotype was mediated by the globular or collagenous domains of the molecule. Globular fragments were prepared by digesting C1q with collagenase, and collagenous fragments obtained after pepsin treatment. C1q binding on cells in suspension was determined by reaction with /sup 125/I-C1q as reported. Competition experiments were performed under conditions in which intact /sup 125/I-C1q binding saturated all available receptors. The results showed that collagenous fragments inhibited 20% of the /sup 125/I-C1q binding to high affinity receptors, whereas inhibition by globular fragments was 70%. Unlabeled intact C1q and collagen type 1 were used as controls, and inhibited 92% and 17% of C1q binding, respectively. These studies show that C1q interacts with the fibroblast phenotype expressing high affinity receptors through its globular domain. The authors suggest that at sites of trauma, native C1 may bind to the surface of these cells via the globular domain of C1q, and that this unique phenotype may play an important role in tissue repair.

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Congenital and Acquired FXIII Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Muszbek, László; Katona, Éva

    2016-06-01

    Inherited deficiency of FXIII A subunit (FXIII-A) is a rare (1:2,000,000) but very severe bleeding diathesis. The incidence is much higher in communities where the practice of consanguineous marriage is combined with founder effect mutation. Because of the high risk of intracranial bleeding, life-long prophylaxis, preferably using FXIII concentrate, is mandatory. In FXIII-B subunit deficiency the bleeding diathesis is mild to moderate. FXIII deficiency is frequently associated with impaired wound healing. Women suffering from FXIII deficiency cannot carry pregnancies to term; in severe cases spontaneous abortion occurs in the first trimester. Plasma-derived heat-inactivated FXIII concentrate and recombinant FXIII-A are available for prophylaxis; a 4 weekly dose of 35 to 40 U/kg is recommended and a trough level of greater than 5% FXIII activity should be aimed for. During pregnancy, 2 weekly prophylaxis with a target trough level of greater than 10% is recommended, and during labor FXIII activity should exceed 30%. During surgical procedures, the target should be higher than 50% FXIII activity. Alloantibodies make FXIII deficiency difficult to manage, but fortunately they are extremely rare. Acquired FXIII deficiency may involve both subunits. Autoantibodies against FXIII subunits also manifest in severe bleeding complication with a relatively high mortality rate. The first-line test in the diagnosis of FXIII deficiency should be a quantitative functional assay based on the measurement of ammonia release or amine incorporation. The sensitivity of the traditional clot solubility assay is not sufficiently robust to enable proper screening. Antigen assays are needed for the classification of FXIII deficiencies. In the case of anti-FXIII antibodies, the diagnostic armory should be supplemented by a mixing test/Bethesda-type inhibitor assay and by assays that detect/measure the binding of antibodies to FXIII and to its subunits. PMID:27071048

  14. Proton pump inhibitors and pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Howard S; Dhingra, Reena; Ryckewaert, Lori; Bonner, Dave

    2009-01-01

    There may be a relationship between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and iron absorption. PPIs may decrease the amount of iron absorbed gastrointestinally specifically due to alteration of the pH in the duodenum. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder that includes an urge to move legs, accompanied or caused by uncomfortable and unpleasant sensations in the legs; the urge to move begins or worsens during periods of rest or inactivity, the urge to move is partially or totally relieved by movement, and the urge is worse or only occurs at night. In the majority of the restless leg syndrome population, the sensation is deep seated, often described as being in the shin bones, and most commonly felt between the knee and ankle. It may be described as a creepy, shock-like, tense, electric, buzzing, itchy, or even numb sensation. A subpopulation of this restless leg syndrome patient population experiences restless leg syndrome associated pain (RLSAP) that has been described as a deep "achy pain." This pain has not been found to be relieved by many of the typical over the counter analgesics. Often, constant movement of the legs appears to be the only remedy, as these sensations usually appear during periods of rest. Furthermore, there appears to be an association between iron deficiency and those suffering from Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS). The authors theorize that there may be a possible correlation between PPIs and the symptoms (e.g. pain) associated with RLS. The authors propose that PPIs, such as omeprazole, may interfere with iron absorption in certain patients and that a subpopulation of patients who develop significant iron deficiency characterized by low serum ferritin levels while on PPIs may also develop RLS-like symptoms (including RLSAP). While there is no robust direct evidence to support any associations of PPIs and iron deficiency or PPIs associated with RLS-like symptoms (including RLSAP), it is hoped that this manuscript may spark research

  15. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  16. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  17. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  18. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  19. Suppression of methylation-mediated transcriptional gene silencing by βC1-SAHH protein interaction during geminivirus-betasatellite infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuling; Xie, Yan; Raja, Priya; Li, Sizhun; Wolf, Jamie N; Shen, Qingtang; Bisaro, David M; Zhou, Xueping

    2011-10-01

    DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression and represses endogenous transposons and invading DNA viruses. As a counter-defense, the geminiviruses encode proteins that inhibit methylation and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Some geminiviruses have acquired a betasatellite called DNA β. This study presents evidence that suppression of methylation-mediated TGS by the sole betasatellite-encoded protein, βC1, is crucial to the association of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) with its betasatellite (TYLCCNB). We show that TYLCCNB complements Beet curly top virus (BCTV) L2⁻ mutants deficient for methylation inhibition and TGS suppression, and that cytosine methylation levels in BCTV and TYLCCNV genomes, as well as the host genome, are substantially reduced by TYLCCNB or βC1 expression. We also demonstrate that while TYLCCNB or βC1 expression can reverse TGS, TYLCCNV by itself is ineffective. Thus its AC2/AL2 protein, known to have suppression activity in other geminiviruses, is likely a natural mutant in this respect. A yeast two-hybrid screen of candidate proteins, followed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis, revealed that βC1 interacts with S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), a methyl cycle enzyme required for TGS. We further demonstrate that βC1 protein inhibits SAHH activity in vitro. That βC1 and other geminivirus proteins target the methyl cycle suggests that limiting its product, S-adenosyl methionine, may be a common viral strategy for methylation interference. We propose that inhibition of methylation and TGS by βC1 stabilizes geminivirus/betasatellite complexes. PMID:22028660

  20. Suppression of Methylation-Mediated Transcriptional Gene Silencing by βC1-SAHH Protein Interaction during Geminivirus-Betasatellite Infection

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Priya; Li, Sizhun; Wolf, Jamie N.; Shen, Qingtang; Bisaro, David M.; Zhou, Xueping

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression and represses endogenous transposons and invading DNA viruses. As a counter-defense, the geminiviruses encode proteins that inhibit methylation and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Some geminiviruses have acquired a betasatellite called DNA β. This study presents evidence that suppression of methylation-mediated TGS by the sole betasatellite-encoded protein, βC1, is crucial to the association of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) with its betasatellite (TYLCCNB). We show that TYLCCNB complements Beet curly top virus (BCTV) L2- mutants deficient for methylation inhibition and TGS suppression, and that cytosine methylation levels in BCTV and TYLCCNV genomes, as well as the host genome, are substantially reduced by TYLCCNB or βC1 expression. We also demonstrate that while TYLCCNB or βC1 expression can reverse TGS, TYLCCNV by itself is ineffective. Thus its AC2/AL2 protein, known to have suppression activity in other geminiviruses, is likely a natural mutant in this respect. A yeast two-hybrid screen of candidate proteins, followed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis, revealed that βC1 interacts with S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), a methyl cycle enzyme required for TGS. We further demonstrate that βC1 protein inhibits SAHH activity in vitro. That βC1 and other geminivirus proteins target the methyl cycle suggests that limiting its product, S-adenosyl methionine, may be a common viral strategy for methylation interference. We propose that inhibition of methylation and TGS by βC1 stabilizes geminivirus/betasatellite complexes. PMID:22028660

  1. Identification of functional elements of the GDP-fucose transporter SLC35C1 using a novel Chinese hamster ovary mutant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiqing; Haryadi, Ryan; Chan, Kah Fai; Teo, Gavin; Goh, John; Pereira, Natasha Ann; Feng, Huatao; Song, Zhiwei

    2012-07-01

    The GDP-fucose transporter SLC35C1 critically regulates the fucosylation of glycans. Elucidation of its structure-function relationships remains a challenge due to the lack of an appropriate mutant cell line. Here we report a novel Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant, CHO-gmt5, generated by the zinc-finger nuclease technology, in which the Slc35c1 gene was knocked out from a previously reported CHO mutant that has a dysfunctional CMP-sialic acid transporter (CST) gene (Slc35a1). Consequently, CHO-gmt5 harbors double genetic defects in Slc35a1 and Slc35c1 and produces N-glycans deficient in both sialic acid and fucose. The structure-function relationships of SLC35C1 were studied using CHO-gmt5 cells. In contrast to the CST and UDP-galactose transporter, the C-terminal tail of SLC35C1 is not required for its Golgi localization but is essential for generating glycans that are recognized by a fucose-binding lectin, Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), suggesting an important role in the transport activity of SLC35C1. Furthermore, we found that this impact can be independently contributed by a cluster of three lysine residues and a Glu-Met (EM) sequence within the C terminus. We also showed that the conserved glycine residues at positions 180 and 277 of SLC35C1 have significant impacts on AAL binding to CHO-gmt5 cells, suggesting that these conserved glycine residues are required for the transport activity of Slc35 proteins. The absence of sialic acid and fucose on Fc N-glycan has been independently shown to enhance the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effect. By combining these features into one cell line, we postulate that CHO-gmt5 may represent a more advantageous cell line for the production of recombinant antibodies with enhanced ADCC effect. PMID:22492235

  2. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  3. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  4. Disialotransferrin developmental deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansson, B; Andersson, M; Tonnby, B; Hagberg, B

    1989-01-01

    Seven mentally deficient children and adolescents (three pairs of siblings and one singleton) were studied. A peculiar external appearance, a characteristic neurohepatosubcutaneous tissue impairment syndrome and, as a biological marker, an abnormal sialic acid transferrin pattern were characteristic features. All seven seemed odd from birth and prone to acute cerebral dysfunction during catabolic states. Abnormal lower neurone, cerebellar, and retinal functions dominated from later childhood. The disialotransferrin pattern found in serum and cerebrospinal fluid is thought to be the biological marker of a newly discovered inborn error of glycoprotein metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 p74-b PMID:2466439

  5. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies. PMID:8427203

  6. Prostaglandin E2 is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three ``D's'': diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation.

  7. 26 CFR 31.3302(c)-1 - Limit on total credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

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  8. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1A - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(c)-1A Section 1.666(c)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1A Pro rata portion of taxes deemed...

  9. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1 - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(c)-1 Section 1.666(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1 Pro rata portion of taxes deemed...

  10. 17 CFR 270.18c-1 - Exemption of privately held indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption of privately held indebtedness. 270.18c-1 Section 270.18c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.18c-1 Exemption of privately held indebtedness. The issuance or...

  11. 26 CFR 1.503(c)-1 - Future status of organizations denied exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Future status of organizations denied exemption. 1.503(c)-1 Section 1.503(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.503(c)-1 Future status of organizations denied exemption. (a)...

  12. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1 - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....666(c)-1 Section 1.666(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1 Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. (a) If an accumulation distribution is deemed under § 1.666(a)-1 to be distributed on the...

  13. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1A - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....666(c)-1A Section 1.666(c)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1A Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. (a) If an accumulation distribution is deemed under § 1.666(a)-1A to be distributed on the...

  14. 26 CFR 1.673(c)-1 - Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. 1.673(c)-1 Section 1.673(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Substantial Owners § 1.673(c)-1 Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. The subject matter...

  15. 26 CFR 1.673(c)-1 - Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. 1.673(c)-1 Section 1.673(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Substantial Owners § 1.673(c)-1 Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. The subject matter...

  16. 26 CFR 1.673(c)-1 - Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. 1.673(c)-1 Section 1.673(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Substantial Owners § 1.673(c)-1 Reversionary interest after income beneficiary's death. The subject matter...

  17. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.509(c)-1 Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. (a) In...

  18. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.509(c)-1 Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. (a) In...

  19. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.509(c)-1 Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. (a) In...

  20. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Private Foundations § 1.509(c)-1 Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. (a) In...

  1. 26 CFR 1.1244(c)-1 - Section 1244 stock defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Section 1244 stock defined. 1.1244(c)-1 Section 1.1244(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1244(c)-1 Section 1244 stock defined. (a)...

  2. 26 CFR 1.503(c)-1 - Future status of organizations denied exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Future status of organizations denied exemption. 1.503(c)-1 Section 1.503(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.503(c)-1 Future...

  3. 26 CFR 1.503(c)-1 - Future status of organizations denied exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Future status of organizations denied exemption. 1.503(c)-1 Section 1.503(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.503(c)-1 Future...

  4. 26 CFR 1.503(c)-1 - Future status of organizations denied exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

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  5. 26 CFR 1.860C-1 - Taxation of holders of residual interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxation of holders of residual interests. 1.860C-1 Section 1.860C-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860C-1 Taxation of...

  6. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1A - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....666(c)-1A Section 1.666(c)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1A Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. (a) If an accumulation distribution is deemed under § 1.666(a)-1A to be distributed on the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1 - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....666(c)-1 Section 1.666(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1 Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. (a) If an accumulation distribution is deemed under § 1.666(a)-1 to be distributed on the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1A - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....666(c)-1A Section 1.666(c)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1A Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. (a) If an accumulation distribution is deemed under § 1.666(a)-1A to be distributed on the...

  9. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1A - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....666(c)-1A Section 1.666(c)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1A Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. (a) If an accumulation distribution is deemed under § 1.666(a)-1A to be distributed on the...

  10. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1 - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....666(c)-1 Section 1.666(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1 Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. (a) If an accumulation distribution is deemed under § 1.666(a)-1 to be distributed on the...

  11. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1 - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....666(c)-1 Section 1.666(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1 Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. (a) If an accumulation distribution is deemed under § 1.666(a)-1 to be distributed on the...

  12. Serum IgG antibodies to C1q in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, J J; Naff, G B

    1989-09-01

    Urticaria, angioedema, and arthritis are cardinal features of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS). Considered to be an immune complex-mediated disorder, HUVS has been differentiated from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), based on its clinical manifestations and the C1q precipitin (C1q-p) reaction, which is manifested as gel precipitation of C1q by a small percentage of HUVS IgG molecules. This phenomenon has been attributed to an Fc region abnormality, and the responsible IgG molecules are said to possess C1q-p activity. We purified IgG from 4 HUVS patients and confirmed that HUVS IgG contains C1q binding activity. F(ab')2 fragments from these patients also bound to C1q, as measured by 2 different C1q binding methods at physiologic ionic strength; HUVS IgG Fc fragments did not bind to C1q. Preincubation of HUVS F(ab')2 fragments with antibody to human F(ab')2 prevented subsequent binding to C1q. We conclude that IgG antibodies to C1q are present in HUVS serum, and it is likely that these antibodies are C1q-p. Because the clinical manifestations of HUVS and the presence of anti-C1q antibodies have been described in patients with SLE, our findings support the concept that HUVS is an autoimmune syndrome related to SLE. PMID:2528353

  13. 26 CFR 1.674(c)-1 - Excepted powers exercisable only by independent trustees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excepted powers exercisable only by independent trustees. 1.674(c)-1 Section 1.674(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... § 1.674(c)-1 Excepted powers exercisable only by independent trustees. Section 674(c) provides...

  14. Iron deficiency in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Lawrence P

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) and related anaemia (IDA) during pregnancy are highly prevalent worldwide in both developed and developing nations although the causes are often different. At conception, many women lack sufficient iron stores to meet the increased requirements of pregnancy, which are calculated at approximately 1200 mg. Appraisal of iron status in pregnant women is problematic, however the most reliable available diagnostic test is a serum ferritin < 20 µg/L. ID is often associated with other nutritional disorders, and there is frequently a secondary cause or association. A greater oral intake is usually insufficient to meet the increased demands of pregnancy, however regular oral supplements (given either daily or intermittently) can often meet maternal needs and avoid associated neonatal complications of IDA. Over-treatment with iron should be avoided, but intravenous administration is useful when deficiency is discovered late, is severe, or if the woman is intolerant of oral formulations. This paper reviews the current literature, and addresses differences in the prevalence and causes of ID betwen developed and developing nations. It examines gestational iron requirements, distinguishes between ID and IDA, and highlights difficulties in diagnostic testing. Finally, it appraises the evidence for and against different treatment regimens, ranging from food fortification to intravenous iron infusions, according to availability and to need.

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Alshishtawy, Moeness Moustafa

    2012-01-01

    Recently, scientists have generated a strong body of evidence providing new information about the preventive effect of vitamin D on a broad range of disorders. This evidence suggests that vitamin D is much more than a nutrient needed for bone health; it is an essential hormone required for regulation of a large number of physiological functions. Sufficient concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is essential for optimising human health. This article reviews the present state-of-the-art knowledge about vitamin D’s status worldwide and refers to recent articles discussing some of the general background of vitamin D, including sources, benefits, deficiencies, and dietary requirements, especially in pregnancy. They offer evidence that vitamin D deficiency could be a major public health burden in many parts of the world, mostly because of sun deprivation. The article also discusses the debate about optimal concentration of circulating serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and explores different views on the amount of vitamin D supplementation required to achieve and maintain this concentration. PMID:22548132

  16. Potent inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by a novel C1q-binding peptide derived from the human astrovirus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Gronemus, Jenny Q; Hair, Pamela S; Crawford, Katrina B; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2010-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratories has demonstrated that purified, recombinant human astrovirus coat protein (HAstV CP) binds C1q and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. Analysis of the 787 amino acid CP molecule revealed that residues 79-139 share limited sequence homology with human neutrophil defensin-1 (HNP-1), a molecule previously demonstrated to bind C1q and MBL, inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. A 30 amino acid peptide derived from this region of the CP molecule competitively inhibited the binding of wild-type CP to C1q. The parent peptide and various derivatives were subsequently assayed for C1q binding, inhibition of C1 and C4 activation as well as suppression of complement activation in hemolytic assays. The parent peptide and several derivatives inhibited complement activation in these functional assays to varying degrees. One peptide derivative in particular (E23A) displayed superior inhibition of complement activation in multiple assays of classical complement pathway activation. Further analysis revealed homology to a plant defensin allowing development of a proposed structural model for E23A. Based upon these findings, we hypothesize that further rationale optimization of E23A may result in a promising therapeutic inhibitor for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in which dysregulated activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:20728940

  17. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  18. Chemical characterization and location of ionic interactions involved in the assembly of the C1 complex of human complement.

    PubMed

    Illy, C; Thielens, N M; Arlaud, G J

    1993-12-01

    The C1 complex of human complement comprises two loosely interacting subunits, C1q and the Ca(2+)-dependent C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s tetramer. With a view to gain information on the nature of the ionic interactions involved in C1 assembly, we have studied the effects of the chemical modifications of charged residues of C1q or the tetramer on their ability to reconstitute the C1 complex. Treatment of C1q with pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, acetic anhydride, and citraconic anhydride, as well as with cyclohexanedione and diethylpyrocarbonate, inhibited its ability to associate with C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s. Treatment of the collagen-like fragments of C1q with the same reagents yielded the same effects. Treatment of C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s with 1-ethyl-3-[-3-(dimethylamino) propyl] carbodiimide also prevented C1 assembly, through modification of acidic amino acids which were shown to be located in C1r. Further studies on the location of the interaction sites within C1q, using ligand-blotting and competition experiments with synthetic peptides, were unsuccessful, suggesting that these sites are contributed to by two or three of the C1q chains. It is concluded that C1 assembly involves interactions between acidic amino acids of C1r and lysine (hydroxylysine) and arginine residues located within the collagen-like region of C1q. Sequence comparison with mannan binding protein, another collagen-like molecule which binds the C1s-C1r-C1r-C1s tetramer, suggests Arg A38, and HyL B32, B65, and C29 of C1q as possible interaction sites. PMID:8136028

  19. Zinc deficiency and eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Humphries, L; Vivian, B; Stuart, M; McClain, C J

    1989-12-01

    Decreased food intake, a cyclic pattern of eating, and weight loss are major manifestations of zinc deficiency. In this study, zinc status was evaluated in 62 patients with bulimia and 24 patients with anorexia nervosa. Forty percent of patients with bulimia and 54% of those with anorexia nervosa had biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. The authors suggest that for a variety of reasons, such as lower dietary intake of zinc, impaired zinc absorption, vomiting, diarrhea, and binging on low-zinc foods, patients with eating disorders may develop zinc deficiency. This acquired zinc deficiency could then add to the chronicity of altered eating behavior in those patients. PMID:2600063

  20. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Deficiencies of Early Components of the Complement Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Catarina Lunz; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the innate and acquired immune response against pathogens. It consists of more than 30 proteins found in soluble form or attached to cell membranes. Most complement proteins circulate in inactive forms and can be sequentially activated by the classical, alternative, or lectin pathways. Biological functions, such as opsonization, removal of apoptotic cells, adjuvant function, activation of B lymphocytes, degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and solubilization and clearance of immune complex and cell lysis, are dependent on complement activation. Although the activation of the complement system is important to avoid infections, it also can contribute to the inflammatory response triggered by immune complex deposition in tissues in autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, the deficiency of early complement proteins from the classical pathway (CP) is strongly associated with development of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) – mainly C1q deficiency (93%) and C4 deficiency (75%). The aim of this review is to focus on the deficiencies of early components of the CP (C1q, C1r, C1s, C4, and C2) proteins in SLE patients. PMID:26941740

  1. Cytokine-mediated induction of metallothionein in Hepa-1c1c7 cells by oleanolic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Dong Hee; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Choi, Young Muk; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2004-12-17

    Oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpene acid, has been reported to possess inducing activity of hepatic metallothionein (MT). However, the mechanism underlying its effects is unknown. This study investigated the effects of OA on the regulation of MT expression in an in vitro model. OA that was added directly to Hepa-1c1c7 cells had no effect on MT induction. However, MT and its mRNA levels increased markedly when the Hepa-1c1c7 cells were cultured with the OA-treated conditioned media from the RAW 264.7 cells. Co-treating the RAW 264.7 cells with OA and pentoxifylline, a TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitor, resulted in a decrease in the effects of OA on the MT induction. In the OA-exposed RAW 264.7 cell cultures, production and mRNA levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 were increased. However, the MT induction activity was inhibited when antibodies to TNF-alpha and/or IL-6 were added to the OA-treated conditioned media from the RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that the up-regulation of MT expression by OA was mediated by the TNF-alpha and IL-6 released from UA-activated macrophages. PMID:15541359

  2. Mobilization of late-endosomal cholesterol is inhibited by Rab guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hölttä-Vuori, M; Määttä, J; Ullrich, O; Kuismanen, E; Ikonen, E

    2000-01-27

    Cholesterol entering cells in low-density lipoproteins (LDL) via receptor-mediated endocytosis is transported to organelles of the late endocytic pathway for degradation of the lipoprotein particles. The fate of the free cholesterol released remains poorly understood, however. Recent observations suggest that late-endosomal cholesterol sequestration is regulated by the dynamics of lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)-rich membranes [1]. Genetic studies have pinpointed a protein, Niemann-Pick C-1 (NPC-1), that is required for the mobilization of late-endosomal/lysosomal cholesterol by an unknown mechanism [2]. Here, we report the removal of accumulated cholesterol by overexpression of the NPC-1 protein in NPC-1-deficient fibroblasts from patients with Niemann-Pick disease, and in normal fibroblasts upon release of a progesterone-induced block of cholesterol transport. We show that late-endosomal/lysosomal cholesterol mobilization is specifically inhibited by microinjection of Rab GDP-dissociation inhibitor (Rab-GDI). Moreover, clearance of the cholesterol deposits by NPC-1 in patients' fibroblasts is accompanied by the redistribution of LBPA and of a lysosomal hydrolase that utilizes the mannose-6-phosphate receptor. Our results reveal, for the first time, the involvement of a specific molecular component of the membrane-trafficking machinery in cholesterol transport and the coupling of late-endosomal cholesterol egress to the trafficking of other lipid and protein cargo. PMID:10662671

  3. CT-based morphometric analysis of C1 laminar dimensions: C1 translaminar screw fixation is a feasible technique for salvage of atlantoaxial fusions

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Andrew; Lu, Derek; Lu, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Translaminar screw fixation has become an alternative in the fixation of the axial and subaxial cervical spine. We report utilization of this approach in the atlas as a salvage technique for atlantoaxial stabilization when C1 lateral mass screws are precluded. To assess the feasibility of translaminar fixation at the atlas, we have characterized the dimensions of the C1 lamina in the general adult population using computed tomography (CT)-based morphometry. Methods: A 46-year-old male with symptomatic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum underwent bilateral C1 and C2 translaminar screw/rod fixation as C1 lateral mass fixation was precluded by an anomalous vertebral artery. The follow-up evaluation 2½ years postoperatively revealed an asymptomatic patient without recurrent neck/shoulder pain or clinical signs of instability. To better assess the feasibility of utilizing this approach in the general population, we retrospectively analyzed 502 consecutive cervical CT scans performed over a 3-month period in patients aged over 18 years at a single institution. Measurements of C1 bicortical diameter, bilateral laminar length, height, and angulation were performed. Laminar and screw dimensions were compared to assess instrumentation feasibility. Results: Review of CT imaging found that 75.9% of C1 lamina had a sufficient bicortical diameter, and 63.7% of C1 lamina had sufficient height to accept bilateral translaminar screw placement. Conclusions: CT-based measurement of atlas morphology in the general population revealed that a majority of C1 lamina had sufficient dimensions to accept translaminar screw placement. Although these screws appear to be a feasible alternative when lateral mass screws are precluded, further research is required to determine if they provide comparable fixation strength versus traditional instrumentation methods. PMID:26005585

  4. Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and basic skills deficiencies are discussed in 12 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching. Titles and authors are as follows: "Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies" (Susanne D. Roueche, with responses by Gary B. Donart, Betty Harris, and James Nordyke); "Is Higher Education an…

  5. Structure-activity relationships of C1 and C6 side chains of zaragozic acid A derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ponpipom, M M; Girotra, N N; Bugianesi, R L; Roberts, C D; Berger, G D; Burk, R M; Marquis, R W; Parsons, W H; Bartizal, K F; Bergstom, J D

    1994-11-11

    Systematic modification of the C6 acyl side chain of zaragozic acid A, a potent squalene synthase inhibitor, was undertaken to improve its biological activity. Simplification of the C6 side chain to the octanoyl ester has deleterious effects; increasing the linear chain length improves the in vitro activity up to the tetradecanoyl ester. An omega-phenoxy group is a better activity enhancer than an omega-phenyl group. A number of C6 carbamates, ethers, and carbonates were prepared and found to have similar activity profiles as the C6 esters. In the preparation of C6 ethers, C4 and C4,6 bisethers were also isolated; their relative activity is: C6 > C4 > C4,6. These C6 long-chain derivatives are subnanomolar squalene synthase inhibitors; they are, however, only weakly active in inhibiting hepatic cholesterol synthesis in mice. The C6 short-chain derivatives are much less active in vitro, but they all have improved oral activity in mice. Modification of the C1 alkyl side chain of the n-butanoyl analogue (ED50 4.5 mg/kg) did not improve the po activity further. A number of these C6 long-chain derivatives are also potent antifungal agents in vitro. PMID:7966163

  6. C1q component of complement binds to fibrinogen and fibrin

    SciTech Connect

    Entwistle, R.A.; Furcht, L.T.

    1988-01-12

    The interaction of complement component C1q with fibrinogen and fibrin was studied by using a solid-phase direct binding assay. Scatchard analysis of radioiodinated fibrinogen binding to C1q indicated at least two high-affinity binding constants (Kd) calculated as 8.5 and 120 nM. In contrast, binding of radioiodinated fibrin to C1q showed only a single class of binding sites with a calculated Kd of 600 nM. Fibrinogen-C1q binding was shown to decrease as a function of increasing salt concentrations, indicating either the presence of charged amino acids in the binding sites or an ionic strength induced conformational dependency of the binding. In direct binding studies using isolated fragments of C1q, both the collagen-like domain of C1q and the globular domains of C1q were shown to bind fibrinogen, indicating at least one binding site for fibrinogen is located in each of the major domains of C1q. Addition of the thrombin-generated peptides of fibrinogen, fibrinopeptides A and B, enhanced C1q-fibrinogen binding, again indicating a complex binding interaction. These results indicate that C1q and fibrinogen are capable of high-affinity interactions that may serve to sequester these complexes in areas of tumors, immune complex deposition, or wounds.

  7. Colonizing populations of Candida albicans are clonal in origin but undergo microevolution through C1 fragment reorganization as demonstrated by DNA fingerprinting and C1 sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, S R; Fritch, J J; Meier, A S; Schröppel, K; Srikantha, T; Galask, R; Soll, D R

    1995-01-01

    The genetic homogeneity of nine commensal and infecting populations of Candida albicans has been assessed by fingerprinting multiple isolates from each population by Southern blot hybridization first with the Ca3 probe and then with the 0.98-kb C1 fragment of the Ca3 probe. The isolates from each population were highly related, demonstrating the clonal origin of each population, but each population contained minor variants, demonstrating microevolution. Variation in each case was limited to bands of the Ca3 fingerprint pattern which hybridized with the 0.98-kb C1 fragment. The C1 fragment was therefore sequenced and demonstrated to contain an RPS repetitive element. The C1 fragment also contained part or all of a true end of the RPS element. These results, therefore, demonstrate that most colonizing C. albicans populations in nonimmuno-suppressed patients are clonal, that microevolution can be detected in every colonizing population by C1 hybridization, and that C1 contains the repeat RPS element. PMID:7650175

  8. Increased Complement C1q Level Marks Active Disease in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxia; Liu, Haiying; Zhang, Guoliang; Deng, Qunyi; Huang, Jian; Gao, Zhiliang; Zhou, Boping; Feng, Carl G.; Chen, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    Background Complement functions as an important host defense system and complement C5 and C7 have been implicated in immunopathology of tuberculosis. However, little is known about the role of other complement components in tuberculosis. Methods Complement gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of tuberculosis patients and controls were determined using whole genome transcriptional microarray assays. The mRNA and protein levels of three C1q components, C1qA, C1qB, and C1qC, were further validated by qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The percentages of C1q expression in CD14 positive cells were determined by flow cytometry. Finally, C1qC protein level was quantified in the pleural fluid of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis pleurisy. Results C1q expression increases significantly in the peripheral blood of patients with active tuberculosis compared to healthy controls and individuals with latent TB infection. The percentage of C1q-expressing CD14 positive cells is significantly increased in active TB patients. C1q expression in the peripheral blood correlates with sputum smear positivity in tuberculosis patients and is reduced after anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Notably, receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that C1qC mRNA levels in peripheral blood efficiently discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection and healthy controls. Additionally, C1qC protein level in pleural effusion shows improved power in discriminating tuberculosis from non-tuberculosis pleurisy when compared to other inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. Conclusions C1q expression correlates with active disease in human tuberculosis. C1q could be a potential diagnostic marker to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection as well as tuberculosis pleurisy from non-tuberculosis pleurisy. PMID:24647646

  9. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  10. The importance of polarizability: comparison of models of carbon disulphide in the ionic liquids [C1C1im][NTf2] and [C4C1im][NTf2].

    PubMed

    Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Quitevis, Edward L

    2016-06-28

    The local environment of CS2 and in solution in two ionic liquids ([C1C1im][NTf2] and [C4C1im][NTf2]) are investigated by atomistic simulation and compared with that in neat CS2. The intermolecular vibrational densities of states of CS2 are calculated and compared with experimental OHD-RIKES spectra. The fair agreement of the results from solutions but poor agreement of the results from neat CS2 suggest that while collective effects are unimportant in solutions, they have a major effect on the OHD-RIKES spectrum of neat CS2. Comparing polarizable and unpolarizable models for CS2 emphasizes the importance of polarizability in determining local structure. PMID:27273458

  11. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526

  12. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. )

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  13. Committee Opinion No. 663: Aromatase Inhibitors in Gynecologic Practice.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, ovulation induction, endometriosis, and other estrogen-modulated conditions. For women with breast cancer, bone mineral density screening is recommended with long-term aromatase inhibitor use because of risk of osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency. Based on long-term adverse effects and complication safety data, when compared with tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors are associated with a reduced incidence of thrombosis, endometrial cancer, and vaginal bleeding. For women with polycystic ovary syndrome and a body mass index greater than 30, letrozole should be considered as first-line therapy for ovulation induction because of the increased live birth rate compared with clomiphene citrate. Lifestyle changes that result in weight loss should be strongly encouraged. Aromatase inhibitors are a promising therapeutic option that may be helpful for the management of endometriosis-associated pain in combination therapy with progestins. PMID:27214191

  14. Committee Opinion No. 663 Summary: Aromatase Inhibitors in Gynecologic Practice.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, ovulation induction, endometriosis, and other estrogen-modulated conditions. For women with breast cancer, bone mineral density screening is recommended with long-term aromatase inhibitor use because of risk of osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency. Based on long-term adverse effects and complication safety data, when compared with tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors are associated with a reduced incidence of thrombosis, endometrial cancer, and vaginal bleeding. For women with polycystic ovary syndrome and a body mass index greater than 30, letrozole should be considered as first-line therapy for ovulation induction because of the increased live birth rate compared with clomiphene citrate. Lifestyle changes that result in weight loss should be strongly encouraged. Aromatase inhibitors are a promising therapeutic option that may be helpful for the management of endometriosis-associated pain in combination therapy with progestins. PMID:27214185

  15. Urease Inhibitor Drug Treatment for Urea Cycle Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency; Argininosuccinate Synthetase Deficiency (Citrullinemia); Argininosuccinic Acid Lyase Deficiency (Argininosuccinic Aciduria); Carbamyl-Phosphate Synthase I Deficiency

  16. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  18. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an inherited disease. "Inherited" ... have AAT deficiency inherit two faulty AAT genes, one from each parent. These genes tell cells in ...

  19. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein C deficiency protein C deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein C deficiency is a disorder that increases the ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: protein S deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein S deficiency protein S deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein S deficiency is a disorder of blood clotting. People ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions factor V deficiency factor V deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Factor V deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. The signs ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  4. Mechanisms involved in calcium deficiency development in tomato fruit in response to gibberellins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although gibberellins (GAs) have been shown to induce the calcium deficiency disorder, blossom-end rot (BER), development in tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum), the mechanisms involved remain largely unexplored. Our objectives were to better understand how GAs and a GA biosynthesis inhibitor affect...

  5. Placement of C1 Pedicle Screws Using Minimal Exposure: Radiographic, Clinical, and Literature Validation

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Christopher M.; Nixon, Menarvia K.C.; Haydel, Justin; Nanda, Anil; Sin, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional C1-2 fixation involves placement of C1 lateral mass screws. Evolving techniques have led to the placement of C1 pedicle screws to avoid exposure of the C1-C2 joint capsule. Our minimal dissection technique utilizes anatomical landmarks with isolated exposure of C2 and the inferior posterior arch of C1. We evaluate this procedure clinically and radiographically through a technical report. Methods Consecutive cases of cranial-vertebral junction surgery were reviewed for one fellowship trained spinal surgeon from 2008-2014. Information regarding sex, age, indication for surgery, private or public hospital, intra-operative complications, post-operative neurological deterioration, death, and failure of fusion was extracted. Measurement of pre-operative axial and sagittal CT scans were performed for C1 pedicle width and C1 posterior arch height respectively. Results 64 patients underwent posterior cranio-vertebral junction fixation surgery. 40 of these patients underwent occipital-cervical fusion procedures. 7/9 (77.8%) C1 instrumentation cases were from trauma with the remaining two (22.2%) from oncologic lesions. The average blood loss among isolated C1-C2 fixation was 160cc. 1/9 patients (11.1%) suffered pedicle breech requiring sub-laminar wiring at the C1 level. On radiographic measurement, the average height of the C1 posterior arch was noted at 4.3mm (range 3.8mm to 5.7mm). The average width of the C1 pedicle measured at 5.3mm (range 2.8 to 8.7mm). The patient with C1 pedicle screw failure had a pedicle width of 2.78mm on pre-operative axial CT imaging. Conclusion Our study directly adds to the literature with level four evidence supporting a minimal dissection of C1 arch in the placement of C1 pedicle screws with both radiographic and clinical validation. Clinical Relevance Justification of this technique avoids C2 nerve root manipulation or sacrifice, reduces bleeding associated with the venous plexus, and leaves the third segment of the

  6. [Physiopathology of iodine deficiency].

    PubMed

    Pinchera, A; Rago, T; Vitti, P

    1998-01-01

    The process of goitrogenesis is likely to be the consequence of an increased TSH stimulation linked to an initial reduction of circulating thyroid hormone caused by iodine deficiency (ID). Other growth factors associated to TSH may have a role in the pathogenesis of goiter. Natural history of goiter is the evolution towards nodularity and functional autonomy. This phenomenon is due to the heterogeneity of thyroid follicular cells, some of which, with an intrinsic elevated growth rate, under the stimulation of ID progress to nodule formation and hyperfunction. In multinodular goiter TSH receptor mutations activating adenylate cyclase-cAMP pathway were found. In a recent epidemiological survey it was shown that nodular goiter increased with the age, being about 1% in schoolchildren and 23% in the adults (56-75 years). Also nodular autonomy and hyperthyroidism were more frequent in the 36-75 year age group. Severe ID is also cause of endemic cretinism. In Europe minor neuropsychological impairments and cognitive deficits were described in areas of moderate ID. The exposure to a mild ID during fetal life causes minor neuropsychological damage. In conclusion, ID is responsible of goiter and its evolution towards nodularity and functional autonomy. Severe ID is also cause of endemic cretinism, while cognitive deficits and minor neuropsychological impairments were found in mild to moderate ID. PMID:10052165

  7. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  8. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Greene, Catherine M; Marciniak, Stefan J; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Brantly, Mark L; Lomas, David A; Stoller, James K; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in SERPINA1, leading to liver and lung disease. It is not a rare disorder but frequently goes underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or cryptogenic liver disease. The most frequent disease-associated mutations include the S allele and the Z allele of SERPINA1, which lead to the accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin in hepatocytes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, low circulating levels of α1-antitrypsin and liver disease. Currently, there is no cure for severe liver disease and the only management option is liver transplantation when liver failure is life-threatening. A1ATD-associated lung disease predominately occurs in adults and is caused principally by inadequate protease inhibition. Treatment of A1ATD-associated lung disease includes standard therapies that are also used for the treatment of COPD, in addition to the use of augmentation therapy (that is, infusions of human plasma-derived, purified α1-antitrypsin). New therapies that target the misfolded α1-antitrypsin or attempt to correct the underlying genetic mutation are currently under development. PMID:27465791

  9. Betaine Deficiency in Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Lerma, Claudia; Rich, Patrick J.; Ju, Grace C.; Yang, Wen-Ju; Hanson, Andrew D.; Rhodes, David

    1991-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency (D Rhodes, PJ Rich [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 102-108). This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline → betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde. PMID:16668098

  10. Effectiveness and safety of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in cancer therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhengqiang; Cao, Chao; Geng, Xinwei; Tian, Baoping; Wu, Yanping; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-02-16

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are a class of small-molecule drugs suppressing PARP enzymes activity, inducing the death of cells deficient in homologous recombination repair (HRR). HRR deficiency is common in tumor cells with BRCA gene mutation. Since their first clinical trial in 2003, PARP inhibitors have shown benefit in the treatment of HRR-deficient tumors. Recently, several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to investigate the potential benefit of administration of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. However, the results remain controversial. To evaluate the efficiency and safety of PARP inhibitors in patients with cancer, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of RCTs. According to our study, PARP inhibitors could clearly improve progression-free survival (PFS), especially in patients with BRCA mutation. However, our study showed no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between the PARP inhibitors and controls, even in the BRCA mutation group. Little toxicity was reported in the rate of treatment correlated adverse events (AEs) in PARP inhibitor group compared with controls. In conclusion, PARP inhibitors do well in improving PFS with little toxicity, especially in patients with BRCA deficiency. PMID:26399274

  11. Effectiveness and safety of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in cancer therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xinwei; Tian, Baoping; Wu, Yanping; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are a class of small-molecule drugs suppressing PARP enzymes activity, inducing the death of cells deficient in homologous recombination repair (HRR). HRR deficiency is common in tumor cells with BRCA gene mutation. Since their first clinical trial in 2003, PARP inhibitors have shown benefit in the treatment of HRR-deficient tumors. Recently, several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to investigate the potential benefit of administration of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. However, the results remain controversial. To evaluate the efficiency and safety of PARP inhibitors in patients with cancer, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of RCTs. According to our study, PARP inhibitors could clearly improve progression-free survival (PFS), especially in patients with BRCA mutation. However, our study showed no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between the PARP inhibitors and controls, even in the BRCA mutation group. Little toxicity was reported in the rate of treatment correlated adverse events (AEs) in PARP inhibitor group compared with controls. In conclusion, PARP inhibitors do well in improving PFS with little toxicity, especially in patients with BRCA deficiency. PMID:26399274

  12. Mutations in the membrane anchor of yeast cytochrome c1 compensate for the absence of Oxa1p and generate carbonate-extractable forms of cytochrome c1.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, P; Lemaire, C; Bonnefoy, N; Brivet-Chevillotte, P; Dujardin, G

    1998-01-01

    Oxa1p is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein that is mainly required for the insertion/assembly of complex IV and ATP synthase and is functionally conserved in yeasts, humans, and plants. We have isolated several independent suppressors that compensate for the absence of Oxa1p. Molecular cloning and sequencing reveal that the suppressor mutations (CYT1-1 to -6) correspond to amino acid substitutions that are all located in the membrane anchor of cytochrome c1 and decrease the hydrophobicity of this anchor. Cytochrome c1 is a catalytic subunit of complex III, but the CYT1-1 mutation does not seem to affect the electron transfer activity. The double-mutant cyt1-1,164, which has a drastically reduced electron transfer activity, still retains the suppressor activity. Altogether, these results suggest that the suppressor function of cytochrome c1 is independent of its electron transfer activity. In addition to the membrane-bound cytochrome c1, carbonate-extractable forms accumulate in all the suppressor strains. We propose that these carbonate-extractable forms of cytochrome c1 are responsible for the suppressor function by preventing the degradation of the respiratory complex subunits that occur in the absence of Oxa1p. PMID:9755193

  13. "Myelodysplasia," myeloneuropathy, and copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Elliott, Michelle A; Hoyer, James D; Harper, Charles M; Ahlskog, J Eric; Phyliky, Robert L

    2005-07-01

    We describe a patient with a suspected myelodysplastic syndrome that developed in association with a neurologic disorder resembling subacute combined degeneration but without vitamin B12 deficiency. Ultimately, the hematologic manifestations and the neurologic syndrome were linked to severe copper deficiency. Prompt and complete reversal of the hematologic abnormalities occurred with copper replacement. Serum copper determination should be included in the work-up of patients with anemia and leukopenia of unclear etiology who have associated myeloneuropathy. The hematologic picture can resemble sideroblastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Hyperzincemia can be an accompanying abnormality even without exogenous zinc ingestion. The reason for the copper deficiency may not be evident. PMID:16007901

  14. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  15. Genetics of growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mullis, Primus E

    2007-03-01

    When a child is not following the normal, predicted growth curve, an evaluation for underlying illness and central nervous system abnormalities is required and appropriate consideration should be given to genetic defects causing growth hormone (GH) deficiency. This article focuses on the GH gene, the various gene alterations, and their possible impact on the pituitary gland. Transcription factors regulating pituitary gland development may cause multiple pituitary hormone deficiency but may present initially as GH deficiency. The role of two most important transcription factors, POU1F1 (Pit-1) and PROP 1, is discussed. PMID:17336732

  16. [Immune deficiencies in nutritional anemias].

    PubMed

    Bonnet Gajdos, M; Navarro, J; Belas, F; Traineau, R

    1982-12-16

    A transient cellular immunologic defect caused by folic acid deficiency was seen in a goat-milk-fed infant with severe enterocolitis. Data on the immunologic consequences of folic acid, protein and iron deficiencies were reviewed in the medical literature. Investigations are difficult because of the patients' poor general condition. Results are difficult to interpret as many etiologic factors are often combined and mechanisms of immunologic responses are complex. Attention is drawn to the danger of iron therapy in patients with transferrin deficiency. PMID:6297076

  17. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  18. Functional C1q is present in the skin mucus of Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunxin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xuguang; Song, Jiakun

    2015-01-01

    The skin mucus of fish acts as the first line of self-protection against pathogens in the aquatic environment and comprises a number of innate immune components. However, the presence of the critical classical complement component C1q, which links the innate and adaptive immune systems of mammalians, has not been explored in a primitive actinopterygian fish. In this study, we report that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii). The skin mucus was able to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli. The bacteriostatic activity of the skin mucus was reduced by heating and by pre-incubation with EDTA or mouse anti-human C1q antibody. We also detected C1q protein in skin mucus using the western blot procedure and isolated a cDNA that encodes the Siberian sturgeon C1qC, which had 44.7-51.4% identity with C1qCs in teleosts and tetrapods. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that Siberian sturgeon C1qC lies at the root of the actinopterygian branch and is separate from the tetrapod branch. The C1qC transcript was expressed in many tissues as well as in skin. Our data indicate that C1q is present in the skin mucus of the Siberian sturgeon to protect against water-borne bacteria, and the C1qC found in the sturgeon may represent the primitive form of teleost and tetrapod C1qCs. PMID:24920077

  19. Receptor-mediated binding of C1 q on pulmonary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.C.; Schultz, D.; Ryan, U.

    1986-03-01

    Normal undamaged pulmonary endothelial cells (EC) do not express receptors for C3b or the Fc portion of IgG, but both receptors become unmasked after viral infection or exposure to white cell lysates. Here, highly purified human C1q was labeled with /sup 125/I, and the globular subunits were separated from the collagenous portion by collagenase digestion and chromatography. Bovine pulmonary artery EC were cultured without exposure to proteolytic enzymes. Binding assays were carried out at 0/sup 0/C, pH 7.4, ..mu.. = 0.15. Results showed that /sup 125/I-C1q binds to EC, the binding is dose-dependent, and the receptor is saturable. Saturation was approached at a C1q concentration of ca 0.1 ug. By Scatchard analysis, maximum binding was 0.219 pmoles in a volume of 250 ..mu..l for 7 x 10/sup 5/ cells, and the average number of binding sites per cell was 1.88 x 10/sup 5/. Isolated /sup 125/I-C1q heads do not bind, and when native /sup 125/I-C1q was bound to EC radioactivity was eliminated after collagenase treatment for 4 h at 37/sup 0/C. Thus, C1q binds to EC via the collagenous portion. That Fc receptors (globular heads) are exposed was shown by rosette formation with EA and EC bound C1q. Using similar conditions, native C1(C1w x 2C1r x 2C1s) did not bind to EC. These results suggest a mechanism for localizing immune complexes on undamaged pulmonary vessels which may be important for initiation of the inflammatory response.

  20. Spinolaminar Line Test as a Screening Tool for C1 Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yasushi; Kelly, Michael P; Song, Kwang-Sup; Park, Moon Soo; Chuntarapas, Tapanut; Vo, Katie D; Yeom, Jin S; Takeshita, Katsushi; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort. Objective To clarify the sensitivity of C3-C2 spinolaminar line test as a screening tool for the stenosis of C1 space available for the cord (SAC). Methods Spine clinic records from April 2005 to August 2011 were reviewed. The C1 SAC was measured on lateral radiographs, and the relative positions between a C1 posterior arch and the C3-C2 spinolaminar line were examined and considered "positive" when the C1 ring lay ventral to the line. Computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were utilized to measure precise diameters of C1 and C2 SAC and to check the existence of spinal cord compression. Results Four hundred eighty-seven patients were included in this study. There were 246 men and 241 women, with an average age of 53 years (range: 18 to 86). The mean SAC at C1 on radiographs was 21.2 mm (range: 13.5 to 28.2). Twenty-one patients (4.3%) were positive for the spinolaminar line test; all of these patients had C1 SAC of 19.4 mm or less. Eight patients (1.6%) had C1 SAC smaller than C2 on CT examination; all of these patients had a positive spinolaminar test, with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (97%). MRI analysis revealed that two of the eight patients with a smaller C1 SAC had spinal cord compression at the C1 level. Conclusion Although spinal cord compression at the level of atlas without instability is a rare condition, the spinolaminar line can be used as a screening of C1 stenosis. PMID:27190740

  1. Spinolaminar Line Test as a Screening Tool for C1 Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Yasushi; Kelly, Michael P.; Song, Kwang-Sup; Park, Moon Soo; Chuntarapas, Tapanut; Vo, Katie D.; Yeom, Jin S.; Takeshita, Katsushi; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort. Objective To clarify the sensitivity of C3–C2 spinolaminar line test as a screening tool for the stenosis of C1 space available for the cord (SAC). Methods Spine clinic records from April 2005 to August 2011 were reviewed. The C1 SAC was measured on lateral radiographs, and the relative positions between a C1 posterior arch and the C3–C2 spinolaminar line were examined and considered “positive” when the C1 ring lay ventral to the line. Computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were utilized to measure precise diameters of C1 and C2 SAC and to check the existence of spinal cord compression. Results Four hundred eighty-seven patients were included in this study. There were 246 men and 241 women, with an average age of 53 years (range: 18 to 86). The mean SAC at C1 on radiographs was 21.2 mm (range: 13.5 to 28.2). Twenty-one patients (4.3%) were positive for the spinolaminar line test; all of these patients had C1 SAC of 19.4 mm or less. Eight patients (1.6%) had C1 SAC smaller than C2 on CT examination; all of these patients had a positive spinolaminar test, with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (97%). MRI analysis revealed that two of the eight patients with a smaller C1 SAC had spinal cord compression at the C1 level. Conclusion Although spinal cord compression at the level of atlas without instability is a rare condition, the spinolaminar line can be used as a screening of C1 stenosis. PMID:27190740

  2. The C1q Family of Proteins: Insights into the Emerging Non-Traditional Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage-modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders – including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia, and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh et al. (2011) showing that pregnant C1q−/− mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q−/− mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al. (2009) which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1) and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand, enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNF-α-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the tumor necrosis factor family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral “cytokine-like” activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions. PMID:22536204

  3. Structure activity relationships of human galactokinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Tang, Manshu; Walsh, Martin J; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Pragani, Rajan; Tanega, Cordelle; Rohde, Jason M; Baker, Heather L; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Blackman, Burchelle; Bougie, James M; Leister, William H; Auld, Douglas S; Shen, Min; Lai, Kent; Boxer, Matthew B

    2015-02-01

    Classic Galactosemia is a rare inborn error of metabolism that is caused by deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), an enzyme within the Leloir pathway that is responsible for the conversion of galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1-p) and UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose. This deficiency results in elevated intracellular concentrations of its substrate, gal-1-p, and this increased concentration is believed to be the major pathogenic mechanism in Classic Galactosemia. Galactokinase (GALK) is an upstream enzyme of GALT in the Leloir pathway and is responsible for conversion of galactose and ATP to gal-1-p and ADP. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the identification of a small-molecule inhibitor of human GALK would act to prevent the accumulation of gal-1-p and offer a novel entry therapy for this disorder. Herein we describe a quantitative high-throughput screening campaign that identified a single chemotype that was optimized and validated as a GALK inhibitor. PMID:25553891

  4. Purine nucleoside metabolism in the erythrocytes of patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, R P; Crabtree, G W; Parks, R E; Nelson, J A; Keightley, R; Parkman, R; Rosen, F S; Stern, R C; Polmar, S H

    1976-01-01

    Deficiency of erythrocytic and lymphocytic adenosine deaminase (ADA) occurs in some patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). SCID with ADA deficiency is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. ADA is markedly reduced or undetectable in affected patients (homozygotes), and approximately one-half normal levels are found in individuals heterozygous for ADA deficiency. The metabolism of purine nucleosides was studied in erythrocytes from normal individuals, four ADA-deficiency patients, and two heterozygous individuals. ADA deficiency in intake erythrocytes was confirmed by a very sensitive ammonia-liberation technique. Erythrocytic ADA activity in three heterozygous individuals (0.07,0.08, and 0.14 mumolar units/ml of packed cells) was between that of the four normal controls (0.20-0.37 mumol/ml) and the ADA-deficient patients (no activity). In vitro, adenosine was incorporated principally into IMP in the heterozygous and normal individuals but into the adenosine nucleotides in the ADa-deficient patients. Coformycin (3-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-6,7,8-trihydroimidazo[4,5-4] [1,3] diazepin-8 (R)-ol), a potent inhibitor of ADA, made possible incorporation of adenosine nucleotides in the ADA-deficient patients... PMID:947948

  5. Developmental delay in motor skill acquisition in Niemann-Pick C1 mice reveals abnormal cerebellar morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Paola; Bruno, Francesco; Palladino, Giampiero; Dragotto, Jessica; Petrosini, Laura; Mangia, Franco; Erickson, Robert P; Canterini, Sonia; Fiorenza, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by defective intracellular trafficking of exogenous cholesterol. Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration is the main sign of cerebellar dysfunction in both NPC1 patients and animal models. It has been recently shown that a significant decrease in Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression reduces the proliferative potential of granule neuron precursors in the developing cerebellum of Npc1 (-/-) mice. Pursuing the hypothesis that this developmental defect translates into functional impairments, we have assayed Npc1-deficient pups belonging to the milder mutant mouse strain Npc1 (nmf164) for sensorimotor development from postnatal day (PN) 3 to PN21. Npc1 (nmf164) / Npc1 (nmf164) pups displayed a 2.5-day delay in the acquisition of complex motor abilities compared to wild-type (wt) littermates, in agreement with the significant disorganization of cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture observed between PN11 and PN15. Compared to wt, Npc1 (nmf164) homozygous mice exhibited a poorer morphological differentiation of Bergmann glia (BG), as indicated by thicker radial shafts and less elaborate reticular pattern of lateral processes. Also BG functional development was defective, as indicated by the significant reduction in GLAST and Glutamine synthetase expression. A reduced VGluT2 and GAD65 expression also indicated an overall derangement of the glutamatergic/GABAergic stimulation that PCs receive by climbing/parallel fibers and basket/stellate cells, respectively. Lastly, Npc1-deficiency also affected oligodendrocyte differentiation as indicated by the strong reduction of myelin basic protein. Two sequential 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin administrations at PN4 and PN7 counteract these defects, partially preventing functional impairment of BG and fully restoring the normal patterns of glutamatergic/GABAergic stimulation to PCs.These findings indicate that in Npc1 (nmf164) homozygous mice the derangement of synaptic

  6. SIRT6 deficiency culminates in low-turnover osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Sugatani, Toshifumi; Agapova, Olga; Malluche, Hartmut H; Hruska, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    Deficiency of Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a chromatin-related deacetylase, in mice reveals severe premature aging phenotypes including osteopenia. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of SIRT6 in bone metabolism are unknown. Here we show that SIRT6 deficiency in mice produces low-turnover osteopenia caused by impaired bone formation and bone resorption, which are mechanisms similar to those of age-related bone loss. Mechanistically, SIRT6 interacts with runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osterix (Osx), which are the two key transcriptional regulators of osteoblastogenesis, and deacetylates histone H3 at Lysine 9 (H3K9) at their promoters. Hence, excessively elevated Runx2 and Osx in SIRT6(-/-) osteoblasts lead to impaired osteoblastogenesis. In addition, SIRT6 deficiency produces hyperacetylation of H3K9 in the promoter of dickkopf-related protein 1 (Dkk1), a potent negative regulator of osteoblastogenesis, and osteoprotegerin, an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the resulting up-regulation of Dkk1 and osteoprotegerin levels contribute to impaired bone remodeling, leading to osteopenia with a low bone turnover in SIRT6-deficient mice. These results establish a new link between SIRT6 and bone remodeling that positively regulates osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26189760

  7. Hereditary cancer syndromes: utilizing DNA repair deficiency as therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Fan, Tiffany; Silberstein, Peter Todd

    2016-07-01

    Human cells have numerous repair mechanisms to counteract various insults incurred on the DNA. Any mutation in these repair mechanisms can lead to accumulation of DNA errors and carcinogenesis. This review aims to discuss the therapeutic options in the two most common DNA repair deficient cancer syndromes, namely Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) and breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA) associated ovarian and breast cancer. Deficiency in DNA repair mechanisms renders these tumors with increased sensitivity to platinum agents. There has been increasing amount of information on the utility of the defects in DNA repair as targets for cancer therapy in these syndromes. Novel therapies like poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are one of such example where the induction of double stranded breaks in DNA leads to tumoricidal effect in patients with homologous DNA repair deficiency. Interestingly, patients with DNA repair deficiencies tend to have a more favorable prognosis than sporadic malignancies. In microsatellite high colorectal cancer patients, this has been attributed to increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes in tumor microenvironment. However, these tumors are able to limit the host immune response by activation of immune checkpoints that seem like attractive targets of therapy in the future. PMID:26873719

  8. MafB deficiency accelerates the development of obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mai Thi Nhu; Hamada, Michito; Nakamura, Megumi; Jeon, Hyojung; Kamei, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Kulathunga, Kaushalya; Lin, Yuan-Yu; Fujisawa, Kumiko; Kudo, Takashi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    MafB, a transcription factor expressed selectively in macrophages, has important roles in some macrophage-related diseases, especially in atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which hematopoietic-specific MafB deficiency induces the development of obesity. Wild-type and hematopoietic cell-specific Mafb-deficient mice were fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks. The Mafb-deficient mice exhibited higher body weights and faster rates of body weight increase than control mice. The Mafb-deficient mice also had a higher percentage of body fat than the wild-type mice, due to increased adipocyte size and serum cholesterol levels. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed a reduction in apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) in Mafb-deficient adipose tissue. AIM is known as an inhibitor of lipogenesis in adipocytes and is expressed in adipose tissue macrophages. Collectively, our data suggest that Mafb deficiency in hematopoietic cells accelerates the development of obesity. PMID:27419056

  9. Fibrin-Induced Skin Fibrosis in Mice Deficient in Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    de Giorgio-Miller, Alexander; Bottoms, Steve; Laurent, Geoffrey; Carmeliet, Peter; Herrick, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    The deposition of fibrin is an integral part of the tissue repair process, but its persistence is also associated with a number of fibrotic conditions. This study addressed the hypothesis that reduced fibrinolysis and fibrin persistence are associated with an enhanced accumulation of collagen and the development of skin fibrosis. Decreased fibrinolysis was confirmed in fibrin gel cultures that contained human dermal fibroblasts plus the specific plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin or dermal fibroblasts isolated from plasminogen activator (PA)-deficient mice. Collagen accumulation was significantly increased in the presence of inhibitor and in tPA-deficient, but not uPA-deficient, fibroblasts compared with controls. These findings were also confirmed using a skin fibrosis model in which multiple injections of fibrin were given subcutaneously to PA-deficient mice. Injection sites from tPA-deficient mice displayed significantly increased collagen levels compared with uPA-deficient mice and wild-type controls. Up-regulation of fibroblast procollagen gene expression and reduced activation of pro-MMP-1 appeared to mediate the increase in collagen by human dermal fibroblasts in the presence of α2-antiplasmin. These findings suggest that persistent fibrin is associated with enhanced collagen accumulation that may result in the development of fibrotic skin disorders in which reduced fibrinolysis is a feature. PMID:16127152

  10. Genetics Home Reference: tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3. Citation on PubMed Liu TT, Chiang SH, Wu SJ, Hsiao KJ. Tetrahydrobiopterin-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia in the ... Citation on PubMed Wang L, Yu WM, He C, Chang M, Shen M, Zhou Z, Zhang Z, ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes the amino acid arginine (a building block of proteins) and ammonia ... links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders Health ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: prekallikrein deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... a role in a process called the intrinsic coagulation pathway (also called the contact activation pathway). This ... functional plasma kallikrein, which likely impairs the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Researchers suggest that this lack (deficiency) of ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... An abnormally small head size ( microcephaly ) and autistic behaviors that affect communication and social interaction also occur ... deficiency MalaCards: dihydropyrimidinuria Merck Manual Professional Version: Pyrimidine ... Dihydropyrimidinuria Patient Support and Advocacy Resources ( ...

  14. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  15. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  16. Detecting Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a widely underrecognized condition, with evidence of persisting long diagnostic delays and patients' frequent need to see multiple physicians before initial diagnosis. Reasons for underrecognition include inadequate understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency by physicians and allied health care providers; failure to implement available, guideline-based practice recommendations; and the belief that effective therapy is unavailable. Multiple studies have described both the results of screening and targeted detection of individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, with both varying strategies employed to identify at-risk individuals and varying results of testing. Also, various strategies to enhance detection of affected individuals have been examined, including use of the electronic medical record to prompt testing and empowerment of allied health providers, especially respiratory therapists, to promote testing for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Such efforts are likely to enhance detection with the expected result that the harmful effects of delayed diagnosis can be mitigated. PMID:27564667

  17. Genetics Home Reference: prothrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients and Caregivers: How Blood Clots Orphanet: Congenital factor II deficiency University of Iowa Health Care: Prothrombin Gene Mutation Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Canadian Hemophilia Society National Hemophilia Foundation: Factor II ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Prothrombin ...

  18. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    PubMed

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671

  19. Numb-deficient satellite cells have regeneration and proliferation defects.

    PubMed

    George, Rajani M; Biressi, Stefano; Beres, Brian J; Rogers, Erik; Mulia, Amanda K; Allen, Ronald E; Rawls, Alan; Rando, Thomas A; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne

    2013-11-12

    The adaptor protein Numb has been implicated in the switch between cell proliferation and differentiation made by satellite cells during muscle repair. Using two genetic approaches to ablate Numb, we determined that, in its absence, muscle regeneration in response to injury was impaired. Single myofiber cultures demonstrated a lack of satellite cell proliferation in the absence of Numb, and the proliferation defect was confirmed in satellite cell cultures. Quantitative RT-PCR from Numb-deficient satellite cells demonstrated highly up-regulated expression of p21 and Myostatin, both inhibitors of myoblast proliferation. Transfection with Myostatin-specific siRNA rescued the proliferation defect of Numb-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, overexpression of Numb in satellite cells inhibited Myostatin expression. These data indicate a unique function for Numb during the initial activation and proliferation of satellite cells in response to muscle injury. PMID:24170859

  20. Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, characterized by low plasma levels of the serine protease inhibitor AAT, is associated with emphysema secondary to insufficient protection of the lung from neutrophil proteases. Although AAT augmentation therapy with purified AAT protein is efficacious, it requires weekly to monthly intravenous infusion of AAT purified from pooled human plasma, has the risk of viral contamination and allergic reactions, and is costly. As an alternative, gene therapy offers the advantage of single administration, eliminating the burden of protein infusion, and reduced risks and costs. The focus of this review is to describe the various strategies for AAT gene therapy for the pulmonary manifestations of AAT deficiency and the state of the art in bringing AAT gene therapy to the bedside. PMID:27564673

  1. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Beyond the Protease/Antiprotease Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cosio, Manuel G; Bazzan, Erica; Rigobello, Chiara; Tinè, Mariaenrica; Turato, Graziella; Baraldo, Simonetta; Saetta, Marina

    2016-08-01

    From the discovery that alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) was an effective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase originated the classic paradigm of protease/antiprotease imbalance, linking lung destruction to the unopposed effect of proteases in patients with the deficiency. Notwithstanding its importance as an antiprotease, it has become evident that alpha-1 antitrypsin has important antiinflammatory and immune-regulatory activities, which may be critically involved in lung destruction. We review here recent evidence showing that, indeed, an important adaptive immune reaction is present in lungs with AAT deficiency, similar to the one seen in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with normal AAT. On the basis of recent evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and pathogenetic studies, it is likely time to move on from the original protease/antiprotease hypothesis for the production of emphysema toward a more complex paradigm, involving the antiinflammatory and immune modulating functions of AAT. PMID:27564665

  2. Transsynaptic Modulation of Kainate Receptor Functions by C1q-like Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Keiko; Budisantoso, Timotheus; Mitakidis, Nikolaos; Sugaya, Yuki; Miura, Eriko; Kakegawa, Wataru; Yamasaki, Miwako; Konno, Kohtarou; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Abe, Manabu; Watanabe, Izumi; Kano, Masanobu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Aricescu, A Radu; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2016-05-18

    Postsynaptic kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) regulate synaptic network activity through their slow channel kinetics, most prominently at mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses in the hippocampus. Nevertheless, how KARs cluster and function at these synapses has been unclear. Here, we show that C1q-like proteins C1ql2 and C1ql3, produced by MFs, serve as extracellular organizers to recruit functional postsynaptic KAR complexes to the CA3 pyramidal neurons. C1ql2 and C1ql3 specifically bound the amino-terminal domains of postsynaptic GluK2 and GluK4 KAR subunits and the presynaptic neurexin 3 containing a specific sequence in vitro. In C1ql2/3 double-null mice, CA3 synaptic responses lost the slow, KAR-mediated components. Furthermore, despite induction of MF sprouting in a temporal lobe epilepsy model, KARs were not recruited to postsynaptic sites in C1ql2/3 double-null mice, leading to reduced recurrent circuit activities. C1q family proteins, broadly expressed, are likely to modulate KAR function throughout the brain and represent promising antiepileptic targets. PMID:27133466

  3. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart C of... - Figures C-1 through C-16

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures C-1 through C-16 B Appendix B to Subpart C of Part 1928 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Structures Pt. 1928, Subpt. C, App. B Appendix B to Subpart C of Part 1928—Figures C-1 through C-16...

  4. 26 CFR 1.503(c)-1 - Future status of organizations denied exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Future status of organizations denied exemption. 1.503(c)-1 Section 1.503(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... notified the Commissioner that it is applying for recognition of its exempt status under section 508(a)...

  5. 26 CFR 1.475(c)-1 - Definitions-dealer in securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions-dealer in securities. 1.475(c)-1 Section 1.475(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... a manner that allows recognition of unrealized gains or losses or deductions for additions to...

  6. 26 CFR 1.509(c)-1 - Status of organization after termination of private foundation status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Status of organization after termination of private foundation status. 1.509(c)-1 Section 1.509(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... recognition of section 501(c)(3) status pursuant to the provisions of section 508(a). (b) Effect upon...

  7. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-1 - Electing small business trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electing small business trust. 1.641(c)-1... small business trust. (a) In general. An electing small business trust (ESBT) within the meaning of... meaning of section 642(c)(1). The limitations of section 681, regarding unrelated business income,...

  8. 26 CFR 25.2523(c)-1 - Interest in unidentified assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interest in unidentified assets. 25.2523(c)-1 Section 25.2523(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... from the trust and at the termination of the trust the trustee is to turn over to H's wife, W,...

  9. 26 CFR 1.267(c)-1 - Constructive ownership of stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constructive ownership of stock. 1.267(c)-1 Section 1.267(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... the outstanding stock of the M Corporation. The M Corporation in turn owned 80 percent of...

  10. 26 CFR 1.267(c)-1 - Constructive ownership of stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Constructive ownership of stock. 1.267(c)-1 Section 1.267(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... 25 percent, of the outstanding stock of the M Corporation. The M Corporation in turn owned 80...

  11. 26 CFR 1.267(c)-1 - Constructive ownership of stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Constructive ownership of stock. 1.267(c)-1 Section 1.267(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... 25 percent, of the outstanding stock of the M Corporation. The M Corporation in turn owned 80...

  12. 26 CFR 1.267(c)-1 - Constructive ownership of stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Constructive ownership of stock. 1.267(c)-1 Section 1.267(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... 25 percent, of the outstanding stock of the M Corporation. The M Corporation in turn owned 80...

  13. 26 CFR 25.2523(c)-1 - Interest in unidentified assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interest in unidentified assets. 25.2523(c)-1 Section 25.2523(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... from the trust and at the termination of the trust the trustee is to turn over to H's wife, W,...

  14. 26 CFR 1.267(c)-1 - Constructive ownership of stock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Constructive ownership of stock. 1.267(c)-1 Section 1.267(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... 25 percent, of the outstanding stock of the M Corporation. The M Corporation in turn owned 80...

  15. 26 CFR 25.2523(c)-1 - Interest in unidentified assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Interest in unidentified assets. 25.2523(c)-1 Section 25.2523(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... from the trust and at the termination of the trust the trustee is to turn over to H's wife, W,...

  16. 17 CFR 240.24c-1 - Access to nonpublic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Access to nonpublic information. (a) For purposes of this section, the term “nonpublic information” means... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to nonpublic information. 240.24c-1 Section 240.24c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...

  17. Generalized van der Waals Hamiltonian: periodic orbits and C1 nonintegrability.

    PubMed

    Guirao, Juan L G; Llibre, Jaume; Vera, Juan A

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the periodic orbits of the generalized van der Waals Hamiltonian system. The tool for studying such periodic orbits is the averaging theory. Moreover, for this Hamiltonian system we provide information on its C(1) nonintegrability, i.e., on the existence of a second first integral of class C(1). PMID:22587198

  18. 26 CFR 31.3406(c)-1 - Notified payee underreporting of reportable interest or dividend payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Notified payee underreporting of reportable interest or dividend payments. 31.3406(c)-1 Section 31.3406(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX...

  19. 26 CFR 48.4216(c)-1 - Computation of tax on leases and installment sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Computation of tax on leases and installment sales. 48.4216(c)-1 Section 48.4216(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Special Provisions Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes §...

  20. 26 CFR 40.6302(c)-1 - Use of Government depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 40.6302(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6302(c)-1 Use of Government depositaries. (a... deposit of tax for each semimonthly period (as defined in § 40.0-1(c)) in which tax liability is...