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Sample records for c15 friauf-laves phase

  1. Site occupancies in ternary C15 ordered Laves phases

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, P.G.; Chu, F.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.; Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.

    1996-12-31

    Site occupancies in three C15-structured AB{sub 2}(X) Laves phases have been determined by Atom Location by CHanneling Enhanced MIcroanalysis (ALCHEMI). In NbCr{sub 2}(V), the results were consistent with exclusive site occupancies of Nb for the A sublattice and Cr and V for the B sublattice. The B-site occupancy of V is not expected from atom size effects alone. In NbCr{sub 2}(Ti), the results were consistent with Ti partitioning mostly to the A sites with some anti-site defects likely. In HfV{sub 2}(Nb), the results were consistent with Nb partitioning between the A and B sites. The results of the ALCHEMI analyses of these ternary C15 Laves phase materials will be discussed with respect to previously determined phase diagrams and first-principles total energy and electronic structure calculations.

  2. Stability of self-interstitial clusters with C15 Laves phase structure in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dézerald, L.; Marinica, M.-C.; Ventelon, Lisa; Rodney, D.; Willaime, F.

    2014-06-01

    The energetics and stability of self-interstitial clusters with C15 Laves phase structure in iron are investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. First, the properties of bulk C15 are examined. The C15 structure is shown to be mechanically and dynamically stable. Second, the influence of the calculation scheme on the energy difference between C15, ring and loop configurations of di-, tri-, tetra- and octa-interstitial clusters is studied. These calculations confirm that, according to DFT, the C15 structure has by far the lowest energy of all known configurations of tetra- and octa-interstitial clusters in bcc-Fe.

  3. Irradiation-Induced Formation of Nanocrystallites with C15 Laves Phase Structure in bcc Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinica, M.-C.; Willaime, F.; Crocombette, J.-P.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional periodic structure is proposed for self-interstitial clusters in body-centered-cubic metals, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional loop morphology. The underlying crystal structure corresponds to the C15 Laves phase. Using density functional theory and interatomic potential calculations, we demonstrate that in α-iron these C15 aggregates are highly stable and immobile and that they exhibit large antiferromagnetic moments. They form directly in displacement cascades, and they can grow by capturing self-interstitials. They thus constitute an important new element to account for when predicting the microstructural evolution of iron base materials under irradiation.

  4. Technetium Incorporation into C14 and C15 Laves Intermetallic Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Wierschke, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-23

    Laves-type intermetallics have been observed to be the dominant phases in a series of alloy compositions being designed for the immobilization technetium in a metallic waste form. The dominant metals in the alloy compositions were Fe-Mo and Fe-Mo-Zr. Alloy composition, Fe-Mo-Zr, also contained Pd, Zr, Cr, and Ni. Both non-radioactive rhenium-containing and radioactive technetium-bearing alloy compositions were investigated. In the Fe-Mo series, phases were observed Fe2Mo (C14 Laves phase) and ferrite in agreement with predictions. Both Tc and Re resided predominantly in the Laves phase. In the Fe-Mo-Zr system, the phases included hexagonal C14 with the composition (Fe,Cr)2Mo, cubic C15 phase with a (Fe,Ni)2Zr composition, and the hcp phase Pd2Zr.

  5. ALCHEMI of NbCr{sub 2}/V C15-structured Laves phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, P.G.; Chu, F.; Mitchell, T.E.; Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.

    1996-05-01

    Laves-phase intermetallics are of potential interest for use as high temperature structural materials, of which NbCr{sub 2}-based C15- structured Laves phases are particularly attractive. Vanadium-alloyed NbCr{sub 2} Laves phases have been studies. The defect mechanism of a ternary Laves phase is crucial to understanding its physical metallurgy and deformation behavior. It is suggested based on the Nb- Cr-V phase diagram and first-principles total energy and electronic structure calculations for NbCr{sub 2} that V should occupy the B sites in C15-structured AB{sub 2}. In this paper, ALCHEMI is employed to examine this assumption for one composition of a V- alloyed NbCr{sub 2} C15 Laves phase. A Nb-Cr-V alloy of composition Nb{sub 33}Cr{sub 42}V{sub 25} was prepared by arc-melting followed by annealing at 1400{degrees}C for 120 h. Specimens were prepared for microanalysis by cutting 3 mm discs followed by dimpling and ion milling. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra were acquired with a Philips CM30 operating at 300 kV and equipped with a Kevex Quantum detector. Fourteen spectra were collected near <014> over a range of [400] excitations between symmetry and beyond [12 0 0]. Owing to the high accelerating voltage (and therefore relatively flat Ewald sphere) used for these experiments, it was difficult to eliminate non- systematic reflections, although attempts were made to minimize this effect. Spectra were also acquired with a Philips CM12 operating at 120 kV and equipped with an EDAX superUTW detector. Nine spectra were collected near <334> over a range of [440] excitations between symmetry and [880]. Site-distributions were extracted from the data by multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) with delocalization correction as described elsewhere.

  6. Defects and site occupancies in Nb-Cr-Ti C15 Laves phase alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, P.G.; Carter, C.B.; Chen, K.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Chu, F.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    A multiply-faulted dipole in the C15 Laves phase of composition Nb{sub 15}Cr{sub 68}Ti{sub 17} has been characterized. The dislocations all lie along [011] and show no residual contrast when imaged edge-on at B = [0{bar 1}{bar 1}] indicating that they are edge in character. Given this, the Burgers vectors for the Shockley partials are {+-} 1/6[2{bar 1}1] and those of the stair-rods are {+-} 1/6[0{bar 1}1]. This is consistent with a g {center_dot} b analysis which was performed. The stacking fault energy was determined to be 35 mJ/m{sup 2} which is higher than the experimental value of 25 mJ/m{sup 2} from NbCr{sub 2}. Simulations are currently underway to understand, given the site occupancies and observed trend in stacking fault energy, whether Ti would be expected to raise the stacking fault energy of the C15 Laves phase.

  7. Formation of prismatic loops from C15 Laves phase interstitial clusters in body-centered cubic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Bai, Xian-Ming; Tonks, Michael R.; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-03-01

    This Letter reports the transition of C15 phase self-interstitial clusters to loops in body-centered-cubic Iron. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the relative stabilities of difference interstitial cluster configurations including C15 phase structure and <100> and <111>/2 loops. Within a certain size range, C15 cluster are found more stable than loops, and the relative stabilities are reversed beyond that range. In accordance to the crossover in relative stabilities, C15 clusters may grow by absorbing individual interstitials at small sizes and transitions into loops eventually. The transition takes place by nucleation and reaction of <111>/2 loop segments. These observations explain the absence of C15 phase interstitial clusters predicted by density-functional-theory calculations in previous experimental observations. More importantly, the current results provide a new formation mechanism of <100> loops which requires no interaction of loops.

  8. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ormeci, A. |; Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1997-04-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr{sub 2} have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson`s ratio and the direction dependence of Young`s modulus.

  9. Comparison of NbCr{sub 2} and HfV{sub 2} C15 Laves phases

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, D.J.; Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1997-12-31

    The elastic properties, phase stability, and alloying behavior of NbCr{sub 2} and HfV{sub 2} C15 Laves phases have been investigated with a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Experimental results indicate that HfV{sub 2} has anomalous elastic properties as well as a structural instability, but NbCr{sub 2} does not. In addition, ternary phase fields of NbCr{sub 2} with V and HfV{sub 2} with Nb were examined experimentally, and they have substantially different alloying behavior. In order to understand these experimental phenomena, the total energy and electronic structure of C15 NbCr{sub 2} and HfV{sub 2} were calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital method with the atomic sphere approximation. Calculation results suggest that the phase instability of HfV{sub 2} is induced by phonon softening, and the anomalous elastic properties of HfV{sub 2} appear to be attributed to a doubly degenerate electronic energy level with a linear dispersion relation very close to the Fermi level. Finally, density of states plots indicate that for HfV{sub 2}, some bonding d-states are unoccupied while for NbCr{sub 2}, all bonding and some anti-bonding d-states are occupied. The bonding difference may be responsible for the alloying behavior in the two Laves phase alloys. As a result, alloy design schemes are suggested for enhanced deformability in Laves phases.

  10. Irradiation-induced formation of nano-crystallites with C15 Laves phase structure in bcc iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinica, Mihai-Cosmin; Willaime, François; Crocombette, Jean-Paul

    2013-03-01

    The thermal diffusion of defects as vacancies or interstitials is the main process which drives the material towards equilibrium after or in parallel to the damage production. A three dimensional periodic structure is proposed for self-interstitial clusters in body-centered-cubic metals, as opposed to the conventional two dimensional loop morphology. The underlying crystal structure corresponds to the C15 Laves phase. The new three dimensional structures generalize previous observations. By systematic exploration of the energy landscape performed using an Eigenvector Following method and Density Functional Theory calculations, we demonstrate that in α-iron these C15 aggregates are highly stable and immobile and that they exhibit large antiferromagnetic moments. These clusters form directly in displacement cascades and they can grow by capturing self-interstitials. This new morphology of self-interstitial clusters thus constitutes an important element to account for when predicting the microstructural evolution of iron base materials under irradiation.

  11. Synthesis of hexagonal C14/C36 and cubic C15 ZrCr2 Laves phases and thermodynamic stability of their hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodega, J.; Fernández, J. F.; Leardini, F.; Ares, J. R.; Sánchez, C.

    2011-11-01

    ZrCr2 samples with well defined hexagonal (C14/C36) or cubic (C15) Laves phase structures have been synthesised by melting in an arc furnace followed by different treatments depending on the sample type. Hydrogen absorption capacity and thermodynamic stability of their respective hydrides have been investigated by solid-gas reaction. Pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) curves obtained for both structures at temperatures of 348, 373, 398 and 423 K, and H-pressures from 101 to 106 Pa, showed that the cubic phase is less stable than the hexagonal ones. This result was related to Miedema's rule of reversed stability and also correlated to the volume of the interstitial hole for hydrogen.

  12. Enhancement of a cyclic endurance of phase change memory by application of a high-density C15(Ge21Sb36Te43) film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Ko, D. H.; Wu, Z.; Ahn, D.; Ahn, D. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kang, S. B.; Choi, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    The lower cyclic endurance of Phase Change Memory (PCM) devices limits the spread of its applications for reliable memory. The findings reported here show that micro-voids and excess vacancies that are produced during the deposition process and the subsequent growth in sputtered carbon-doped GeSbTe films is one of the major causes of device failure in PCM with cycling. We found that the size of voids in C15(Ge21Sb36Te43) films increased with increasing annealing temperature and the activation energy for the growth rate of voids was determined to be 2.22 eV. The film density, which is closely related to voids, varies with the deposition temperature and sputtering power used. The lower heat of vaporization of elemental Sb and Te compared to that for elemental Ge and C is a major cause of the low density of the film. It was possible to suppress void formation to a considerable extent by optimizing the deposition conditions, which leads to a dramatic enhancement in cyclic endurance by 2 orders of magnitude in PCM devices prepared at 300oC-300W compared to one prepared at 240oC-500W without change of compositions.

  13. 42 CFR 68c.15 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional conditions. 68c.15 Section 68c.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY RESEARCH...

  14. 42 CFR 68c.15 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional conditions. 68c.15 Section 68c.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY RESEARCH...

  15. 42 CFR 68c.15 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional conditions. 68c.15 Section 68c.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CONTRACEPTION AND INFERTILITY RESEARCH...

  16. ALCHEMI of niobium dichrome/vanadium C15 Laves phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, P.G.; Chu, Fuming; Mitchell, T.E.; Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J.

    1996-05-01

    33Nb42Cr25V was prepared by arc melting and annealing at 1400 C for 120 hr. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectra were collected over a range of {l_brace}400{l_brace} excitations between symmetry and beyond {l_brace}12 0 0{l_brace}. Results show that at least qualitatively V substitutes for Cr. Therefore, electronic effects must be more important than size effects in this case.

  17. Measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy in [(13)C,(15)N] uniformly enriched proteins using CSA amplification.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Ge, Yuwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Mali; Li, Conggang; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-11-01

    Extended chemical shift anisotropy amplification (xCSA) is applied for measuring (13)C/(15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of uniformly labeled proteins under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The amplification sequence consists of a sequence of π-pulses that repetitively interrupt MAS averaging of the CSA interaction. The timing of the pulses is designed to generate amplified spinning sideband manifolds which can be fitted to extract CSA parameters. The (13)C/(13)C homonuclear dipolar interactions are not affected by the π-pulses due to the bilinear nature of the spin operators and are averaged by MAS in the xCSA experiment. These features make the constant evolution-time experiment suitable for measuring CSA of uniformly labeled samples. The incorporation of xCSA with multi-dimensional (13)C/(15)N correlation is demonstrated with a GB1 protein sample as a model system for measuring (13)C/(15)N CSA of all backbone (15)NH, (13)CA and (13)CO sites. PMID:26404770

  18. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  19. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  20. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  1. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  3. Thermal and electron microprobe analyses of an Ni-0.5C-15Cr-3.2Si-2B alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'inykh, A. S.; Zamyatin, V. M.; Barbin, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    The melting and solidification of a powder alloy Ni-0.5 wt % C-15 wt % Cr-3.2 wt % Si-2 wt % B is studied. The microstructure and chemical composition of the phases present in the compact alloy prepared by melting of the powder are investigated. The sequence of phase formation during solidification of the alloy is suggested.

  4. C15H10 and C15H12 Thermal Chemistry: Phenanthrylcarbene Isomers and Phenylindenes by Falling Solid Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Tetrazoles.

    PubMed

    Wentrup, Curt; Becker, Jürgen; Diehl, Manfred

    2015-07-17

    2-Phenyl-5-(phenylethynyl)tetrazole 44 provides a new entry to the C15H10 energy surface. Flash vacuum pyrolysis of 44 using the falling solid flash vacuum pyrolysis (FS-FVP) method afforded cyclopenta[def]phenanthrene 31 and cyclopenta[jk]fluorene 52 as the principal products. The products are explained in terms of the formation of N-phenyl-C-phenylethynylnitrile imine/(phenylazo)(phenylethynyl)carbene 45 and its cyclization to 3-(phenylethynyl)-3H-indazole 46b. Pyrolytic loss of N2 from 46b generates C15H10 intermediate 48. Cyclization of 48 to a dibenzocycloheptatetraene derivative and further rearrangements with analogies in the chemistry of phenylcarbene and the naphthylcarbenes leads to the final products. Similar pyrolysis of 2-phenyl-5-styryltetrazole 43 afforded 3-styrylindazole 58, which on further pyrolysis eliminated N2 to generate 3- and 2-phenylindenes 61 and 62 via C15H12 intermediates. PMID:26086716

  5. Improved mass analysis of oligoribonucleotides by 13C, 15N double depletion and electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ying; Schroeder, Kersten; Greenbaum, Nancy L; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G

    2004-03-15

    13C, 15N doubly depleted 32-ribonucleotide was synthesized enzymatically by in vitro transcription from nucleoside triphosphates isolated from E. coli grown in a minimal medium containing 12C, 14N-enriched glucose and ammonium sulfate. Following purification and desalting by reversed-phase HPLC, buffer exchange with Microcon YM-3, and ethanol precipitation, electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra revealed greatly enhanced abundance of monoisotopic ions (by a factor of approximately 100) and a narrower isotopic distribution with higher signal-to-noise ratio. The abrupt onset and high magnitude of the monoisotopic species promise to facilitate accurate mass measurement of RNA's. PMID:15018587

  6. Antifungal effects of synthetic human β-defensin 3-C15 peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ki-Bum; Kim, Christine; Kum, Jong-Won; Gu, Yu; Han, Seung Hyun; Shon, Won-Jun; Lee, Woocheol; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this ex vivo study was to compare the antifungal activity of a synthetic peptide consisting of 15 amino acids at the C-terminus of human β-defensin 3 (HBD3-C15) with calcium hydroxide (CH) and Nystatin (Nys) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) biofilm. Materials and Methods C. albicans were grown on cover glass bottom dishes or human dentin disks for 48 hr, and then treated with HBD3-C15 (0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 300 µg/mL), CH (100 µg/mL), and Nys (20 µg/mL) for 7 days at 37℃. On cover glass, live and dead cells in the biomass were measured by the FilmTracer Biofilm viability assay, and observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). On dentin, normal, diminished and ruptured cells were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The results were subjected to a two-tailed t-test, a one way analysis variance and a post hoc test at a significance level of p = 0.05. Results C. albicans survival on dentin was inhibited by HBD3-C15 in a dose-dependent manner. There were fewer aggregations of C. albicans in the groups of Nys and HBD3-C15 (≥ 100 µg/mL). CLSM showed C. albicans survival was reduced by HBD3-C15 in a dose dependent manner. Nys and HBD3-C15 (≥ 100 µg/mL) showed significant fungicidal activity compared to CH group (p < 0.05). Conclusions Synthetic HBD3-C15 peptide (≥ 100 µg/mL) and Nys exhibited significantly higher antifungal activity than CH against C. albicans by inhibiting cell survival and biofilm. PMID:27200276

  7. The First in Vivo Observation of 13C- 15N Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2001-12-01

    [5-13C,15N]Glutamine, with 1J(13C-15N) of 16 Hz, was observed in vivo in the brain of spontaneously breathing rats by 13C MRS at 4.7 T. The brain [5-13C]glutamine peak consisted of the doublet from [5-13C,15N]glutamine and the center [5-13C,14N]glutamine peak, resulting in an apparent triplet with a separation of 8 Hz. The time course of formation of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine was monitored in vivo with a time resolution of 20-35 min. This [5-13C,15N]glutamine was formed by glial uptake of released neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate and its reaction with 15NH3 catalyzed by the glia-specific glutamine synthetase. The neurotransmitter glutamate C5 was selectively13C-enriched by intravenous [2,5-13C]glucose infusion to 13C-label whole-brain glutamate C5, followed by [12C]glucose infusion to chase 13C from the small and rapidly turning-over glial glutamate pool, leaving 13C mainly in the neurotransmitter [5-13C]glutamate pool, which is sequestered in vesicles until release. Hence, the observed [5-13C,15N]glutamine arises from a coupling between 13C of neuronal origin and 15N of glial origin. Measurement of the rate of brain [5-13C,15N]glutamine formation provides a novel noninvasive method of studying the kinetics of neurotransmitter uptake into glia in vivo, a process that is crucial for protecting the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity.

  8. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(15)-1 - Indebtedness of certain personal holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indebtedness of certain personal holding...)-1 Indebtedness of certain personal holding companies. (a) Qualified indebtedness—(1) Carryover... indebtedness, then, under section 381(c)(15), in computing its undistributed personal holding company...

  9. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(15)-1 - Indebtedness of certain personal holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indebtedness of certain personal holding...)-1 Indebtedness of certain personal holding companies. (a) Qualified indebtedness—(1) Carryover... indebtedness, then, under section 381(c)(15), in computing its undistributed personal holding company...

  10. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(15)-1 - Mutual insurance companies or associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Mutual insurance companies or associations. 1.501... Mutual insurance companies or associations. (a) Taxable years beginning after December 31, 1962. An insurance company or association described in section 501(c)(15) is exempt under section 501(a) if it is...

  11. Two-photon excitation of chlorin-e6-C15 monomethyl ester for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Zhao, P. D.; Guo, P.; Lin, Lie; Liu, J. Wei; Yu, Q.

    2005-01-01

    Two-photon-induced fluorescence spectrum and lifetime of Chlorin-e6-C15 Monomethyl Ester in tetrahydrofura (THF) are experimentally examined with femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm from a Ti:sapphire laser. The two-photon excited fluorescence spectra of the molecule are basically similar to those obtained by one-photon excitation. The lifetimes of two-photon and one-photon excitation fluorescence of this molecule in the solution are of the order of 5.2 ns and 4.8 ns respectively. Our experimental results indicate that the two-photon-induced photodynamic processes of Chlorin-e6-C15 Monomethyl Ester are similar to one-photon-induced photodynamic processes. The two-photon absorption cross section of the molecule is measured at 800 nm as about σ2' ~ 29.1 x 10-50 cm4 " s/photon. As an example for two-photon photodynamic therapy, we also further examine the cell-damaging effects of the Ester. Our preliminary results of cell viability test indicate that Chlorin-e6-C15 Monomethyl Ester can effectively damage the liver cancer cells BEL-7402 under two-photon irradiation. Our results suggest Chlorin-e6-C15 Monomethyl Ester may become a potential two-photon phototherapeutic agent.

  12. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(15)-1 - Mutual insurance companies or associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... insurance company or association described in section 501(c)(15) is exempt under section 501(a) if it is a mutual company or association (other than life or marine) or if it is a mutual interinsurer or reciprocal... in § 1.61-7. Interest shall be adjusted for amortization of premium and accrual of discount...

  13. Synthesis of C-15 Vindoline Analogues by Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Peter D.; Sohn, Jeong-Hun

    2008-01-01

    Described are general protocols for the rapid construction of various C-15-substituted analogs of vindoline using palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. The required bromo- and iodovindolines were prepared in high yield by the reaction of vindoline with N-bromosuccinimide or N-iodosuccinimide, respectively. The study not only led to the synthesis a number of structurally novel vindoline analogues but also opens the door to new strategies for the synthesis of vinblastine, vincristine, and related anticancer agents. Also described is the conversion of ent-tabersonine to ent-vindoline. PMID:16995709

  14. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(15)-1 - Services in delivery or distribution of newspapers, shopping news, or magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... newspapers, shopping news, or magazines. 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., shopping news, or magazines. (a) Services of individuals under age 18. Services performed by an employee under the age of 18 in the delivery or distribution of newspapers or shopping news, not...

  15. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(15)-1 - Services in delivery or distribution of newspapers, shopping news, or magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... newspapers, shopping news, or magazines. 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., shopping news, or magazines. (a) Services of individuals under age 18. Services performed by an employee under the age of 18 in the delivery or distribution of newspapers or shopping news, not...

  16. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(15)-1 - Services in delivery or distribution of newspapers, shopping news, or magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... newspapers, shopping news, or magazines. 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., shopping news, or magazines. (a) Services of individuals under age 18. Services performed by an employee under the age of 18 in the delivery or distribution of newspapers or shopping news, not...

  17. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(15)-1 - Services in delivery or distribution of newspapers, shopping news, or magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... newspapers, shopping news, or magazines. 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., shopping news, or magazines. (a) Services of individuals under age 18. Services performed by an employee under the age of 18 in the delivery or distribution of newspapers or shopping news, not...

  18. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(15)-1 - Services in delivery or distribution of newspapers, shopping news, or magazines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... newspapers, shopping news, or magazines. 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Section 31.3306(c)(15)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL..., shopping news, or magazines. (a) Services of individuals under age 18. Services performed by an employee under the age of 18 in the delivery or distribution of newspapers or shopping news, not...

  19. Correlation between hereditary structures and properties of an Fe50Cr15Mo14C15B6 bulk-amorphous alloy in the solid and liquid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, K. S.

    2010-05-01

    An attempt is made to find the effect of a hereditary structure on the physicochemical and structural properties of a solid and liquid Fe50Cr15Mo14C15B6 bulk-amorphous alloy in order to evaluate the possibility of using a precursor, i.e., a solid metal that has a genetic relation to the liquid phase, as an the initial metal of a heat involved in the formation of an amorphous structure. The structural state of the melt is estimated from the temperature dependence of the structural parameters, density, and surface tension with allowance for the validation criterion of the approximation of experimental points R 2.

  20. BnC15 and BnATA20, the different putative components, control anther development in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lili; Hu, Qin; Hong, Dengfeng; Yang, Guangsheng

    2012-10-01

    In Brassica napus, male fertility depends on proper cell differentiation in the anther. However, relatively little is known about the genes regulating anther cell differentiation and function. Here, we report two floral organ specific genes, BnC15 and BnATA20, derived from a B. napus two-line Rs1046A/B floral subtractive library. Although BnC15 and BnATA20 genes have a different expression pattern in anthers demonstrated by in situ hybridization and real-time PCR analysis, silencing of both genes in B. napus by antisense suppression resulted in pollen abortion after microspore release. Light and electron microscopy observation revealed the lack of plastoglobuli, lipid bodies and sporopollenin secreted from the tapetum leading to aberrations in exine sculpturing and the formation of a pollen coat. In addition, the microspores were squeezed to the irregular shape in the locule in the end. As shown by gene expression analysis in transgenic plants and the comparison of anther development between bnc15 or bnata20 mutants and Rs1046A, BnC15 and BnATA20 were positively regulated downstream of Rf gene controlling the fertility of Rs1046B in the same pathway. The results support the hypothesis that BnC15 and BnATA20 are crucial components of a genetic network that controls tapetum development and exine sculpturing. PMID:22841791

  1. Application of unsymmetrical indirect covariance NMR methods to the computation of the (13)C <--> (15)N HSQC-IMPEACH and (13)C <--> (15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectra.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary E; Hilton, Bruce D; Irish, Patrick A; Blinov, Kirill A; Williams, Antony J

    2007-10-01

    Utilization of long-range (1)H--(15)N heteronuclear chemical shift correlation has continually grown in importance since the first applications were reported in 1995. More recently, indirect covariance NMR methods have been introduced followed by the development of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing methods. The latter technique has been shown to allow the calculation of hyphenated 2D NMR data matrices from more readily acquired nonhyphenated 2D NMR spectra. We recently reported the use of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing to combine (1)H--(13)C GHSQC and (1)H--(15)N GHMBC long-range spectra to yield a (13)C--(15)N HSQC-HMBC chemical shift correlation spectrum that could not be acquired in a reasonable period of time without resorting to (15)N-labeled molecules. We now report the unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing of (1)H--(13)C GHMBC and (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectra to afford a (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH spectrum that has the potential to span as many as six to eight bonds. Correlations for carbon resonances long-range coupled to a protonated carbon in the (1)H--(13)C HMBC spectrum are transferred via the long-range (1)H--(15)N coupling pathway in the (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectrum to afford a much broader range of correlation possibilities in the (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectrum. The indole alkaloid vincamine is used as a model compound to illustrate the application of the method. PMID:17729230

  2. Simple shearing flow of dry soap foams with TCP structure[Tetrahedrally Close-Packed

    SciTech Connect

    REINELT,DOUGLAS A.; KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.

    2000-02-16

    The microrheology of dry soap foams subjected to large, quasistatic, simple shearing deformations is analyzed. Two different monodisperse foams with tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) structure are examined: Weaire-Phelan (A15) and Friauf-Laves (C15). The elastic-plastic response is evaluated by calculating foam structures that minimize total surface area at each value of strain. The minimal surfaces are computed with the Surface Evolver program developed by Brakke. The foam geometry and macroscopic stress are piecewise continuous functions of strain. The stress scales as T/V{sup 1/3} where T is surface tension and V is cell volume. Each discontinuity corresponds to large changes in foam geometry and topology that restore equilibrium to unstable configurations that violate Plateau's laws. The instabilities occur when the length of an edge on a polyhedral foam cell vanishes. The length can tend to zero smoothly or abruptly with strain. The abrupt case occurs when a small increase in strain changes the energy profile in the neighborhood of a foam structure from a local minimum to a saddle point, which can lead to symmetry-breaking bifurcations. In general, the new foam topology associated with each stable solution branch results from a cascade of local topology changes called T1 transitions. Each T1 cascade produces different cell neighbors, reduces surface energy, and provides an irreversible, film-level mechanism for plastic yield behavior. Stress-strain curves and average stresses are evaluated by examining foam orientations that admit strain-periodic behavior. For some orientations, the deformation cycle includes Kelvin cells instead of the original TCP structure; but the foam does not remain perfectly ordered. Bifurcations during subsequent T1 cascades lead to disorder and can even cause strain localization.

  3. Simple shearing flow of dry soap foams with tetrahedrally close-packed structure

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; Kraynik, Andrew M.

    2000-05-01

    The microrheology of dry soap foams subjected to quasistatic, simple shearing flow is analyzed. Two different monodisperse foams with tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) structure are examined: Weaire-Phelan (A15) and Friauf-Laves (C15). The elastic-plastic response is evaluated by using the Surface Evolver to calculate foam structures that minimize total surface area at each value of strain. The foam geometry and macroscopic stress are piecewise continuous functions of strain. The stress scales as T/V{sup 1/3}, where T is surface tension and V is cell volume. Each discontinuity corresponds to large changes in foam geometry and topology that restore equilibrium to unstable configurations that violate Plateau's laws. The instabilities occur when the length of an edge on a polyhedral foam cell vanishes. The length can tend to zero smoothly or abruptly with strain. The abrupt case occurs when a small increase in strain changes the energy profile in the neighborhood of a foam structure from a local minimum to a saddle point, which can lead to symmetry-breaking bifurcations. In general, the new structure associated with each stable solution branch results from an avalanche of local topology changes called T1 transitions. Each T1 cascade produces different cell neighbors, reduces surface energy, and provides an irreversible, film-level mechanism for plastic yield behavior. Stress-strain curves and average stresses are evaluated by examining foam orientations that admit strain-periodic behavior. For some orientations, the deformation cycle includes Kelvin cells instead of the original TCP structure; but the foam does not remain perfectly ordered. Bifurcations during subsequent T1 cascades lead to disorder and can even cause strain localization. (c) 2000 Society of Rheology.

  4. Benchmark fragment-based (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua D; Kudla, Ryan A; Day, Graeme M; Mueller, Leonard J; Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-08-21

    The performance of fragment-based ab initio(1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (17)O chemical shift predictions is assessed against experimental NMR chemical shift data in four benchmark sets of molecular crystals. Employing a variety of commonly used density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP, TPSSh, OPBE, PBE, TPSS), we explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, and combined cluster/fragment models. The hybrid density functionals (PBE0, B3LYP and TPSSh) generally out-perform their generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based counterparts. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O isotropic chemical shifts can be predicted with root-mean-square errors of 0.3, 1.5, 4.2, and 9.8 ppm, respectively, using a computationally inexpensive electrostatically embedded two-body PBE0 fragment model. Oxygen chemical shieldings prove particularly sensitive to local many-body effects, and using a combined cluster/fragment model instead of the simple two-body fragment model decreases the root-mean-square errors to 7.6 ppm. These fragment-based model errors compare favorably with GIPAW PBE ones of 0.4, 2.2, 5.4, and 7.2 ppm for the same (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (17)O test sets. Using these benchmark calculations, a set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided and their robustness assessed using statistical cross-validation. We demonstrate the utility of these approaches and the reported scaling parameters on applications to 9-tert-butyl anthracene, several histidine co-crystals, benzoic acid and the C-nitrosoarene SnCl2(CH3)2(NODMA)2. PMID:27431490

  5. Simple, efficient protocol for enzymatic synthesis of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA for heteronuclear NMR studies.

    PubMed Central

    Masse, J E; Bortmann, P; Dieckmann, T; Feigon, J

    1998-01-01

    The use of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled RNA has greatly facilitated structural studies of RNA oligonucleotides by NMR. Application of similar methodologies for the study of DNA has been limited, primarily due to the lack of adequate methods for sample preparation. Methods for both chemical and enzymatic synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides uniformly labeled with 13C and/or 15N have been published, but have not yet been widely used. We have developed a modified procedure for preparing uniformly 13C,15N-labeled DNA based on enzymatic synthesis using Taq DNA polymerase. The highly efficient protocol results in quantitative polymerization of the template and approximately 80% incorporation of the labeled dNTPs. Procedures for avoiding non-templated addition of nucleotides or for their removal are given. The method has been used to synthesize several DNA oligonucleotides, including two complementary 15 base strands, a 32 base DNA oligonucleotide that folds to form an intramolecular triplex and a 12 base oligonucleotide that dimerizes and folds to form a quadruplex. Heteronuclear NMR spectra of the samples illustrate the quality of the labeled DNA obtained by these procedures. PMID:9592146

  6. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  7. Polyamine flux analysis by determination of heavy isotope incorporation from 13C, 15N-enriched amino acids into polyamines by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Cerrada-Gimenez, Marc; Häkkinen, Merja R; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Auriola, Seppo; Alhonen, Leena; Keinänen, Tuomo A

    2012-02-01

    The study of polyamine flux, i.e. the circulating flow of polyamines through the interconnected biosynthetic and catabolic pathways, is of considerable interest because of the established links between the polyamine metabolism and many diseases, such as cancer and diabetes. To study polyamine flux in detail, a novel method based on following the label incorporation from the (13)C, (15)N-labeled polyamine precursors, arginine, methionine and ornithine, into polyamines by LC-MS/MS was implemented. This methodology was tested on three distinct cell lines with different spermidine/spermine-N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) expression levels, i.e. non-transgenic, transgenic and knockout. These trials allowed the identification of the critical conditions for the successful polyamine flux measurement, such as the functional time frame of label incorporation, until plateau phase with the selected precursor is reached. The novel LC-MS/MS-based method for polyamine flux overcame the limitations of previous existing methodologies, with baseline separation of the different polyamine species and the exact quantification of the incorporated label. Moreover, the obtained results clearly show that the increased SSAT expression is associated with accelerated polyamine flux. PMID:21818565

  8. Heterogeneous Diastereoselective Catalysis--A Powerful Strategy Toward C(15) Stereoselectivity from PGF2α Analogues Structure.

    PubMed

    Coman, Simona M; Parvulescu, Vasile I

    2015-01-01

    A major trend in fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals is the synthesis of molecules with increased complexity. This trend translates the aim of organic syntheses to conditions in which high degrees of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity can be provided. In this context, the chemoselective hydrogenation of one functional group in the presence of other reactive groups is a frequently encountered problem in fine chemicals manufacture. This study provides a critical analysis including elegant examples of reactions in which high chemo- and diastereoselectivities were achieved in the hydrogenation of a C=O group in the presence of C=C double bond. A particular emphasis is addressed to the stereoselective C(15) synthesis from Cloprostenol--a PGF2α structural analogue. PMID:26553252

  9. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22 kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600 MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i - 2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed.

  10. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i-2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed. PMID:20060344

  11. Temperature stabilized phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The construction, tests, and performance of a temperature stabilized phase detector are discussed. It has a frequency stability of 5 parts in 10 to the 16th power at 100 MHz, with a temperature step of 20 C (15 to 35 C).

  12. Rotational and rovibrational spectrum of C 15NC 15N in the region of the bending modes ν4, ν5, the combination band ν4 + ν5 and the Fermi interacting modes ν3, 2 ν4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, J. W. Günter; Winnewisser, Manfred; Winnewisser, Brenda P.; Bickelhaupt, Friedrich

    1996-02-01

    The high-resolution gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the doubly 15N-substituted isocyanogen, C 15NC 15N, has been measured in the spectral regions 160-240 cm -1 and 390-1110 cm -1 with unapodized resolutions of 0.0017 and 0.0021 cm -1 respectively. In these experiments we were able to measure the band systems due to the excitation of the bending modes ν5 and ν4 at 190.9 cm -1 and 458.1 cm -1, a combination band system of the two bending modes ν4 + ν5 at 649.7 cm -1, as well as two band systems arising from a Fermi interaction between the twofold excited bending mode 2 ν4 and the stretching mode ν3 at 869.9 cm -1 and 960.2 cm -1 respectively. Furthermore, we have measured and assigned pure rotational transitions of C 15NC 15N in the vibrational ground state and in excited vibrational bending states lying in the microwave and the millimeter wave region between 19.9 and 20.2 GHz, 29.9 and 30.4 GHz and 120 and 440 GHz. Constants of a power series in J( J + 1) for numerous rovibrational subbands, as well as accurate molecular constants using the effective hamiltonian for linear polyatomic molecules, defined by Yamada et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc., 112 (1985) 347], were determined.

  13. Quality of Life in Patients With Brain Metastases Using the EORTC QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL

    SciTech Connect

    Caissie, Amanda; Nguyen, Janet; Chen, Emily; Zhang Liying; Sahgal, Arjun; Clemons, Mark; Kerba, Marc; Arnalot, Palmira Foro; Danjoux, Cyril; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Holden, Lori; Danielson, Brita; Chow, Edward

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The 20-item European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Brain Neoplasm (QLQ-BN20) is a validated quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with primary brain tumors. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15 Palliative (QLQ-C15-PAL) core palliative questionnaire is a 15-item version of the core 30-item QLQ-C30 and was developed to decrease the burden on patients with advanced cancer. The combination of the QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30 to assess QOL may be too burdensome for patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess QOL in patients before and after treatment for brain metastases using the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL, a version of the QLQ-BN20 questionnaire with 2 additional questions assessing cognitive functioning that were not addressed in the QLQ-C15-PAL. Methods and Materials: Patients with brain metastases completed the QLQ-C15-PAL and QLQ-BN20+2 questionnaires to assess QOL before and 1 month after radiation. Linear regression analysis was used to assess changes in QOL scores over time, as well as to explore associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales, patient demographics, and clinical variables. Spearman correlation assessed associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales. Results: Among 108 patients, the majority (55%) received whole-brain radiotherapy only, with 65% of patients completing follow-up at 1 month after treatment. The most prominent symptoms at baseline were future uncertainty (QLQ-BN20+2) and fatigue (QLQ-C15-PAL). After treatment, significant improvement was seen for the QLQ-C15-PAL insomnia scale, as well as the QLQ-BN20+2 scales of future uncertainty, visual disorder, and concentration difficulty. Baseline Karnofsky Performance Status was negatively correlated to QLQ-BN20+2 motor dysfunction but positively related to QLQ-C15-PAL physical functioning and QLQ-BN20+2 cognitive functioning at

  14. Statistical model structure of A1-xZxB2 Laves phase C15 system—the superconducting alloy Ce1-xLaxRu2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robouch, B. V.; Marcelli, A.; Saini, N. L.; Kisiel, A.

    2009-01-01

    The local structure of the Ce1-xLaxRu2 system measured by EXAFS is re-examined and correlated to the statistical ad hoc model recently applied to the sphalerite, wurtzite, and other intermetallic ternary alloys. Deconvolution of the EXAFS data shows that the Ce1-xLaxRu2 ternary system is essentially a mixture of CeRu2 and LaRu2 binary alloys with a small proportion of the Ce0.5La0.5Ru2 ternary configuration, which is maximum for the intermediate concentration. Moreover, the analysis reveals that while the LaRu2 configuration exhibits a Bernoulli random distribution, the presence of a Ce atom affects both the CeRu2 and Ce0.5La0.5Ru2 distributions, strongly favoring the configuration with the CeCe pair, while keeping rare that with a single Ce ion.

  15. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive (13)C/(15)N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of (13)C/(15)N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% (13)C-glycerol and 0.5% (15)N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of (13)C/(15)N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  16. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly 13C/15N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive 13C/15N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of 13C/15N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% 13C-glycerol and 0.5% 15N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of 13C/15N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  17. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 91. Phenols with Water. Part 2. C8 to C15 Alkane Phenols with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góral, Marian; Shaw, David G.; Måczyński, Andrzej; Wiśniewska-Gocłowska, Barbara

    2011-09-01

    The mutual solubilities and related liquid-liquid equilibria of 43 binary systems of C7 to C15 phenols with water are exhaustively and critically reviewed. Reports of experimental determination of solubility that appeared in the primary literature prior to the end of 2009 are compiled. For 11 systems, sufficient data are available to allow critical evaluation. All data are expressed as mass percent and mole fraction as well as the originally reported units. The standard evaluation criteria used throughout the Solubility Data Series were applied.

  18. 13C/15N‐Enriched l‐Dopa as a Triple‐Resonance NMR Probe to Monitor Neurotransmitter Dopamine in the Brain and Liver Extracts of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Tetsuro; Kimura, Yu; Imai, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Sando, Shinsuke; Toshimitsu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In an attempt to monitor μm‐level trace constituents, we applied here 1H‐{13C‐15N} triple‐resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to 13C/15N‐enriched l‐Dopa as the inevitable precursor of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. The perfect selectivity (to render endogenous components silent) and μm‐level sensitivity (700 MHz spectrometer equipped with a cryogenic probe) of triple‐resonance allowed the unambiguous and quantitative metabolic and pharmacokinetic analyses of administered l‐Dopa/dopamine in the brain and liver of mice. The level of dopamine generated in the brain (within the range 7–76 μm, which covers the typical stimulated level of ∼30 μm) could be clearly monitored ex vivo, but was slightly short of the detection limit of a 7 T MR machine for small animals. This work suggests that μm‐level trace constituents are potential targets of ex vivo monitoring as long as they contain N atom(s) and their appropriate 13C/15N‐enrichment is synthetically accessible. PMID:27308224

  19. SIMS ion microscopy imaging of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine in human glioblastoma cells: Relevance of subcellular scale observations to BPA-mediated boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Lorey, Daniel R., II

    2007-02-01

    p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a clinically approved boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent currently being used in clinical trials of glioblastoma multiforme, melanoma and liver metastases. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) observations from the Cornell SIMS Laboratory provided support for using a 6 h infusion of BPA, instead of a 2 h infusion, for achieving higher levels of boron in brain tumor cells. These observations were clinically implemented in Phase II experimental trials of glioblastoma multiforme in Sweden. However, the mechanisms for higher BPA accumulation with longer infusions have remained unknown. In this work, by using 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine and T98G human glioblastoma cells, comparisons between the 10B-delivery of BPA and the accumulation of labeled phenylalanine after 2 and 6 h treatments were made with a Cameca IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution in fast frozen, freeze-fractured, freeze-dried cells. Due to the presence of the Na-K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells, the cells maintain an approximately 10/1 ratio of K/Na in the intracellular milieu. Therefore, the quantitative imaging of these highly diffusible species in the identical cell in which the boron or labeled amino acid was imaged provides a rule-of-thumb criterion for validation of SIMS observations and the reliability of the cryogenic sampling. The labeled phenylalanine was detected at mass 28, as the 28(13C15N)- molecular ion. Correlative analysis with optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that fractured freeze-dried glioblastoma cells contained well-preserved ultrastructural details with three discernible subcellular regions: a nucleus or multiple nuclei, a mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region and the remaining cytoplasm. SIMS analysis revealed that the overall cellular signals of both 10B from BPA and 28CN- from labeled phenylalanine increased approximately 1.6-fold between the 2 and 6 h exposures

  20. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  1. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  2. Structural, stability and electronic properties of C15-AB2 (A = Ti, Zr; B = Cr) intermetallic compounds and their hydrides: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhaddi, Reza; Arabi, Hadi; Pourarian, Faiz

    2014-05-01

    The structural, stability and electronic properties of C15-AB2 (A = Ti, Zr; B = Cr) isomeric intermetallic compounds were systematically investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) and plane-wave pseudo-potential (PW-PP) method. The macroscopic properties including the lattice constant, bulk modulus and stability for these compounds were studied before and after hydrogenation. For parent compounds, the enthalpy of formation was evaluated with regard to their bulk modules and electronic structures. After hydrogenation of compounds at different interstitial tetrahedral sites (A2B2, A1B3, B4), a volume expansion was found for hydrides. The stability properties of hydrides characterized the A2B2 sites as the site preference of hydrogen atoms for both compounds. The Miedema's "reverse stability" rule is also satisfied in these compounds as lower the enthalpy of formation for the host compound, the more stable the hydride. Analysis of microscopic properties (electronic structures) after hydrogenation at more stable interstitial site (A2B2) shows that the H atoms interact stronger with the weaker (or non) hydride forming element B (Cr) than the hydride forming element A (Ti/Zr). A correlation was also found between the stability of the hydrides and their electronic structure: the deeper the hydrogen band, the less stable the hydride.

  3. HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH experiment for (1)H(N) and (15)N sequential correlations in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Goradia, Nishit; Häfner, Sabine; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2015-10-01

    A simple triple resonance NMR experiment that leads to the correlation of the backbone amide resonances of each amino acid residue 'i' with that of residues 'i-1' and 'i+1' in ((13)C, (15)N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is presented. The experimental scheme, {HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH}, exploits the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of (1) J CαN and (2) J CαN couplings to transfer the (15)N x magnetisation from amino acid residue 'i' to adjacent residues via the application of a band-selective (15)N-(13)C(α) heteronuclear cross-polarisation sequence of ~100 ms duration. Employing non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions, the efficacy of the approach has been demonstrated by the acquisition of 3D HNN chemical shift correlation spectra of α-synuclein. The experimental performance of the RF pulse sequence has been compared with that of the conventional INEPT-based HN(CA)NH pulse scheme. As the availability of data from both the HCCNH and HNN experiments will make it possible to use the information extracted from one experiment to simplify the analysis of the data of the other and lead to a robust approach for unambiguous backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, a time-saving strategy for the simultaneous collection of HCCNH and HNN data is also described. PMID:26282620

  4. 1H, 13C, 15N and 195Pt NMR studies of Au(III) and Pt(II) chloride organometallics with 2-phenylpyridine.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2009-11-01

    (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (195)Pt NMR studies of gold(III) and platinum(II) chloride organometallics with N(1),C(2')-chelated, deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine (2ppy*) of the formulae [Au(2ppy*)Cl(2)], trans(N,N)-[Pt(2ppy*)(2ppy)Cl] and trans(S,N)-[Pt(2ppy*)(DMSO-d(6))Cl] (formed in situ upon dissolving [Pt(2ppy*)(micro-Cl)](2) in DMSO-d(6)) were performed. All signals were unambiguously assigned by HMBC/HSQC methods and the respective (1)H, (13)C and (15)N coordination shifts (i.e. differences between chemical shifts of the same atom in the complex and ligand molecules: Delta(1H)(coord) = delta(1H)(complex) - delta(1H)(ligand), Delta(13C)(coord) = delta(13C)(complex) - delta(13C)(ligand), Delta(15N)(coord) = delta(15N)(complex) - delta(15N)(ligand)), as well as (195)Pt chemical shifts and (1)H-(195)Pt coupling constants discussed in relation to the known molecular structures. Characteristic deshielding of nitrogen-adjacent H(6) protons and metallated C(2') atoms as well as significant shielding of coordinated N(1) nitrogens is discussed in respect to a large set of literature NMR data available for related cyclometallated compounds. PMID:19691018

  5. The molecular core in G34.3 + 0.2 - Millimeter interferometric observations of HCO(+), H(C-13)N, H(C-15)N, and SO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carral, Patricia; Welch, William J.

    1992-01-01

    This study presents high-resolution observations of the molecular core in the star-forming region G34.3 + 0.2. Maps at 6-arcsec resolution of emission and absorption of the J = 1 - 0 transitions of HCO(+), H (C-13)N, H(C-15)N, and of the 2(2) - 1(1) transition of SO were obtained in addition to a map of the 3.4-mm continuum emission from the compact H II component. The HCL(+) emission toward G34.3 + 0.2 traces a warm molecular core about 0.9 pc in size. Emission from H (C-13)N is detected over about 0.3 pc. The cometary H II region lies near the edge of the molecular core. The blueshift of the radio recombination lines with respect to the molecular emission suggests that gas from the H II region is accelerated in a champagne flow caused by a steep gradient in the ambient gas density.

  6. Balancing the (carbon) budget: Using linear inverse models to estimate carbon flows and mass-balance 13C:15N labelling experiments in low oxygen sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Van Oevelen, Dick; Witte, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Over 1 million km2 of seafloor experience permanent low-oxygen conditions within oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). OMZs are predicted to grow as a consequence of climate change, potentially affecting oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The Arabian Sea OMZ impinges upon the western Indian continental margin at bathyal depths (150 - 1500m) producing a strong depth dependent oxygen gradient at the sea floor. The influence of the OMZ upon the short term processing of organic matter by sediment ecosystems was investigated using in situ stable isotope pulse chase experiments. These deployed doses of 13C:15N labeled organic matter onto the sediment surface at four stations from across the OMZ (water depth 540 - 1100 m; [O2] = 0.35 - 15 μM). In order to prevent experimentally anoxia, the mesocosms were not sealed. 13C and 15N labels were traced into sediment, bacteria, fauna and 13C into sediment porewater DIC and DOC. However, the DIC and DOC flux to the water column could not be measured, limiting our capacity to obtain mass-balance for C in each experimental mesocosm. Linear Inverse Modeling (LIM) provides a method to obtain a mass-balanced model of carbon flow that integrates stable-isotope tracer data with community biomass and biogeochemical flux data from a range of sources. Here we present an adaptation of the LIM methodology used to investigate how ecosystem structure influenced carbon flow across the Indian margin OMZ. We demonstrate how oxygen conditions affect food-web complexity, affecting the linkages between the bacteria, foraminifera and metazoan fauna, and their contributions to benthic respiration. The food-web models demonstrate how changes in ecosystem complexity are associated with oxygen availability across the OMZ and allow us to obtain a complete carbon budget for the stationa where stable-isotope labelling experiments were conducted.

  7. Color Tuning in Red/Green Cyanobacteriochrome AnPixJ: Photoisomerization at C15 Causes an Excited-State Destabilization.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-07-30

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial phytochrome-like photoreceptors that carry a single or several GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA) domains in a repetitive manner. Unlike phytochromes that photoswitch between red-absorbing 15Z Pr and far-red-absorbing 15E Pfr states, CBCRs exhibit a much wider spectral activity. One of the best-characterized CBCRs, the phototaxis regulator PixJ of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, AnPixJ can adopt two thermally stable photoreversible states, a red-absorbing dark state (Pr) and a green-absorbing photoproduct (Pg). Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR spectroscopy on AnPixJ assembled in vitro with uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore identifies changes of the electronic structure of the chromophore between the two states. Results are compared with the data from red- and far-red-absorbing forms of the complete sensory module of cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 aiming at a conceptual understanding of the distinct photoproduct (Pg vs Pfr) absorbances upon Pr photoconversion. The PCB chromophore in the Pr state of both photosensors exhibits very similar spectral features. The photoconversion of Cph1 and the red/green switching AnPixJ C15-Z/E photoisomerization result in a very similar chemical-shift difference (Δδ) pattern having, however, opposite sign. The persistence of this pattern confirms the identity of the photochemical isomerization process, while the difference in its sign demonstrates that the same electronic factors drive into opposite direction. It is proposed that the LUMO energy of the 15E photoproduct is stabilized in Cph1 but destabilized in AnPixJ leading to opposite color shifts upon phototransformation. PMID:26115331

  8. Quantitation of metabolic compartmentation in hyperammonemic brain by natural abundance 13C-NMR detection of 13C-15N coupling patterns and isotopic shifts.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, A; Gopher, A

    1997-02-01

    In the present study, the removal of cerebral ammonia by glutamine synthetase (GS) and by reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of an amino donor group, was determined in hyperammonemic rabbit brains. The 15N enrichments of brain metabolite alpha-amino and amide positions of glutamine, glutamate, and alanine were determined by the indirect detection of 15N-labeled compounds of the 13C-15N spin coupling patterns of natural abundance 13C-NMR spectra. The 13C-NMR spectra of brain extracts were obtained from rabbits infused with 15NH4Cl with or without intraperitoneal infusion of the GS inhibitor, L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, in a reasonable acquisition time period. When 15NH4Cl was infused, [5-15N]glutamine and [2-15N]glutamine concentrations reached 5.2 mumol/100 mg protein and 3.6 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively, which indicates the relatively high activity of reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate in the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. The low concentration of [2-15N]glutamate, which is about 30% of that of [2-15N]glutamine obtained in this study, suggests that very little glutamine serves as a precursor of neuronal glutamate. When GS was inhibited by L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, a flux of 15NH4+ via the residual activity of GS was accompanied by an apparent increase of [2-15N]glutamate and [15N]alanine concentrations (2.9 mumol/100 mg protein and 1.8 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively). These findings and those obtained from 13C-13C isotopomer analysis (Lapidot and Gopher, 1994b) suggest that astrocytic 2-oxoglutarate is partially utilized (together with an amino group donor) as a precursor for neuronal glutamate in the hyperammonemic brain when GS is inhibited. This process can partly replace GS activity in metabolizing ammonia in the hyperammonemic rabbit brain. PMID:9057821

  9. Rethinking Sensitized Luminescence in Lanthanide Coordination Polymers and MOFs: Band Sensitization and Water Enhanced Eu Luminescence in [Ln(C15H9O5)3(H2O)3]n (Ln = Eu, Tb).

    PubMed

    Einkauf, Jeffrey D; Kelley, Tanya T; Chan, Benny C; de Lill, Daniel T

    2016-08-15

    A coordination polymer [Ln(C15H9O9)3(H2O)3]n (1-Ln = Eu(III), Tb(III)) assembled from benzophenonedicarboxylate was synthesized and characterized. The organic component is shown to sensitize lanthanide-based emission in both compounds, with quantum yields of 36% (Eu) and 6% (Tb). Luminescence of lanthanide coordination polymers is currently described from a molecular approach. This methodology fails to explain the luminescence of this system. It was found that the band structure of the organic component rather than the molecular triplet state was able to explain the observed luminescence. Deuterated (Ln(C15H9O9)3(D2O)3) and dehydrated (Ln(C15H9O9)3) analogues were also studied. When bound H2O was replaced by D2O, lifetime and emission increased as expected. Upon dehydration, lifetimes increased again, but emission of 1-Eu unexpectedly decreased. This reduction is reasoned through an unprecedented enhancement effect of the compound's luminescence by the OH/OD oscillators in the organic-to-Eu(III) energy transfer process. PMID:27472192

  10. Twinning in Laves Phases by Synchroshear: Atomic Mechanisms and Compositional Control. Final report, May 15, 1997 to August 31, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Luzzi, David E.; Pope, David P.

    2003-04-07

    Compression tests between 4.2 and 1273 K, compositional variation and conventional transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the deformation and twinning behavior of C15 HfV2+Nb - based Laves phase alloys. We chose two phase C15/bcc alloys to improve the ambient temperature ductility which has not been found in the single phase Laves intermetallic compound. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that substantial mechanical twinning takes place in the CI5 Laves phase matrix at room temperature and 77 K. A deep minimum in the flow stress, with a drop of nearly 500 MPa, appears at around 77 K in the C15/bcc two-phase alloy with C15 matrix. Since no such anomaly is seen in the bcc phase, we believe that the cause of this can be attributed to mechanical twinning in the CI5 Laves phase. Twin bands observed in the CI5 matrix of deformed samples at both 298 K and 77 K can be classified into three categories by their thicknesses; coarse twin bands about 10nm to several hundreds nm thick, fine twin bands around 3 to 10 nm thick, and ultra fine twin bands with average thickness of 1.5 nm. A high density of ultra-fine twin bands is the characteristic feature of twinning in the C15 matrix. They belong to the <112>(111) twinning system and commonly intersect with each other.

  11. Slip, twinning and transformation in Laves phases. Technical progress report, August 1, 1990--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1993-01-26

    Research was concentrated on two-phase Ti-TiCr{sub 2} alloys, two- phase Fe-ZrFe{sub 2} alloys, and two-phase ternary Ni-Cu-Mg alloys containing MgNi{sub 2} and MgCu{sub 2} phases. Work demonstrated that a variety of room-temperature deformation processes are possible in Laves phases. A strain-induced phase transformation from C36{r_arrow}C15 structures is one mechanism for plastic deformation in ZrFe{sub 2}. The C15 structure in TiCr{sub 2} deforms by slip and twinning. The microstructure after indentation of specimens containing C36 phases ZrFe{sub 2} and MgNi{sub 2} indicates that a variety of slip systems operate in this form. 8 figs.

  12. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  13. Electron concentration and phase stability in NbCr2-based Laves phase alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.H.; Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.

    1997-05-12

    Phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases was studied, based on the data reported for binary X-Cr, Nb-X, and ternary Nb-Cr-X phase diagrams. It was shown that when the atomic size ratios are kept identical, the average electron concentration factor, e/a, is the dominating factor in controlling the phase stability of NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases. The e/a ratios for different Laves polytypes were determined as followed: with e/a < 5.76, the C15 structure is stabilized; at an e/a range of 5.88--7.53, the C14 structure is stabilized; with e/a > 7.65, the C15 structure is stabilized again. A further increase in the electron concentration factor (e/a > 8) leads to the disordering of the alloy. The electron concentration effect on the phase stability of Mg-based Laves phases and transition-metal A{sub 3}B intermetallic compounds is also reviewed and compared with the present observations in transition-metal Laves phases. In order to verify the e/a/phase stability relationship experimentally, additions of Cu (with e/a = 11) were selected to replace Cr in the NbCr{sub 2} Laves phase. Experimental results for the ternary Nb-Cr-Cu system are reported and discussed in terms of the correlation between the e/a ratio and phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based Laves phases. A new phase was found, which has an average composition of Nb-47Cr-3Cu. Within the solubility limit, the electron concentration and phase stability relationship is obeyed in the Nb-Cr-Cu system.

  14. Characterization of Red/Green Cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 by Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Hydrophobic Pocket for the C15-E,anti Chromophore in the Photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Lim, Sunghyuk; Lagarias, J Clark; Ames, James B

    2015-06-23

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photosensory proteins distantly related to phytochromes. Like phytochromes, CBCRs reversibly photoconvert between a dark-stable state and a photoproduct via photoisomerization of the 15,16-double bond of their linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophores. CBCRs provide cyanobacteria with complete coverage of the visible spectrum and near-ultraviolet region. One CBCR subfamily, the canonical red/green CBCRs typified by AnPixJg2 and NpR6012g4, can function as sensors of light color or intensity because of their great variation in photoproduct stability. The mechanistic basis for detection of green light by the photoproduct state in this subfamily has proven to be a challenging research topic, with competing hydration and trapped-twist models proposed. Here, we use ¹³C-edited and ¹⁵N-edited ¹H-¹H NOESY solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to probe changes in chromophore configuration and protein-chromophore interactions in the NpR6012g4 photocycle. Our results confirm a C15-Z,anti configuration for the red-absorbing dark state and reveal a C15-E,anti configuration for the green-absorbing photoproduct. The photoactive chromophore D-ring is located in a hydrophobic environment in the photoproduct, surrounded by both aliphatic and aromatic residues. Characterization of variant proteins demonstrates that no aliphatic residue is essential for photoproduct tuning. Taken together, our results support the trapped-twist model over the hydration model for the red/green photocycle of NpR6012g4. PMID:25989712

  15. Phase relation and microstructure of NbCr{sub 2} Laves intermetallics in ternary Nb-Cr-X alloy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, M.; Takasugi, T.

    1997-12-31

    The isothermal phase diagrams of ternary alloy systems Nb-Cr-V and Nb-Cr-Mo are determined by metallography, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). In two alloy systems, the C15 NbCr{sub 2} Laves phases are equilibrated directly with bcc solid solution without forming any intermediate phases. Relatively large amount of ternary elements V and Mo are soluble in the C15 NbCr{sub 2} Laves phases. It is shown that the C15 Laves phases extend along directions so that V occupies Cr site while Mo occupies Nb site. Also, characteristic structure containing micro twins and stacking faults is observed in the C15 Laves phase alloyed with Mo. Bcc phase has a wider solid solution range in the X(=V and Mo)-rich side than the Nb-rich and Cr-rich sides. A variety of duplex microstructures are observed depending on alloy system and alloy composition.

  16. Study of stereospecificity of 1H, 13C, 15N and 77Se shielding constants in the configurational isomers of the selenophene-2-carbaldehyde azine by NMR spectroscopy and MP2-GIAO calculations.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Albanov, Alexander I; Levanova, Ekaterina P; Levkovskaya, Galina G

    2011-11-01

    In the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of selenophene-2-carbaldehyde azine, the (1)H-5, (13)C-3 and (13)C-5 signals of the selenophene ring are shifted to higher frequencies, whereas those of the (1)H-1, (13)C-1, (13)C-2 and (13)C-4 are shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZZ isomer or from the E moiety to the Z moiety of EZ isomer. The (15)N chemical shift is significantly larger in the EE isomer relative to the ZZ isomer and in the E moiety relative to the Z moiety of EZ isomer. A very pronounced difference (60-65 mg/g) between the (77)Se resonance positions is revealed in the studied azine isomers, the (77)Se peak being shifted to higher frequencies in the ZZ isomer and in the Z moiety of EZ isomer. The trends in the changes of the measured chemical shifts are reasonably reproduced by the GIAO calculations at the MP2 level of the (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (77)Se shielding constants in the energy-favorable conformation with the syn orientation of both selenophene rings relative to the C = N groups. The NBO analysis suggests that such an arrangement of the selenophene rings may take place because of a higher energy of some intramolecular interactions. PMID:22002712

  17. Moon Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    When teaching Moon phases, the focus seems to be on the sequence of Moon phases and, in some grade levels, how Moon phases occur. Either focus can sometimes be a challenge, especially without the use of models and observations of the Moon. In this month's column, the author describes some of the lessons that he uses to teach the phases of the Moon…

  18. Hyperfine spectroscopic study of Laves phase HfFe 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belošević-Čavor, J.; Novaković, N.; Cekić, B.; Ivanović, N.; Manasijević, M.

    2004-05-01

    Hyperfine fields in HfFe 2 were measured at 181Ta probe using the time-differential perturbed angular correlation method (TDPAC) in the temperature range 78-1200 K. Analysis of the spectra revealed two interactions with hyperfine fields of 13.82(7) T and 8.0(2) T, at 293 K. First is ascribed to the interaction at the 8a position in the cubic C15 structure. The second can be assigned to a minor amount of hexagonal C14 phase, or to an irregular position of the probe in the C15 lattice. Results of calculations using LAPW-WIEN97 are in a good agreement with experiment.

  19. Phase stability of laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.

    1999-04-08

    Phase transformations occurring in a stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy were studied by in situ neutron diffraction. Neutron diffraction patterns as a function of time were obtained on alloys that were held at various elevated temperatures (1084-1275 C). As-cast SS-15Zr alloys contain ferrite, austenite, ZrFe{sub 2}-type Laves polytypes C36 and C15, and small amounts of a Fe{sub 23}Zr{sub 6}-type intermetallic. Annealing at high temperatures resulted in an increase of the Fe{sub 23}Zr{sub 6}, intermetallic content. The C15 Laves polytype is the equilibrium phase for T {le} 1230 C; C36 is the stable polytype at higher temperatures ({approximately}1275 C). Phase changes were slow for temperatures <1100 C.These findings have important implications for use of the SS-15Zr alloy as a nuclear waste form.

  20. Study of fatigue and fracture behavior of NbCr{sub 2}-based alloys and intermetallic materials: Phase stability in NbCr{sub 2} Laves phase alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.H.; Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.

    1996-08-01

    Phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases is studied in this paper, using data from binary X-Cr, Nb-X, and ternary Nb-Cr-X phase diagrams. It was shown that when the atomic size ratios are kept identical, the average electron concentration factor (e/a = the average number of electrons per atom outside the closed shells of the component atoms) is the determinate factor in controlling the phase stability of NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases. The e/a ratios for different Laves phase structures were determined as follows: with e/a < 5.76, the C15 structure is stabilized; at an e/a range of 5.88-7.53, the C14 structure is stabilized; with e/a > 7.65, the C15 structure was stabilized again. A further increase in the electron concentration factor (e/a > 8) leads to the disordering of the alloy. The electron concentration effect on the phase stability of transition-metal A{sub 3}B intermetallic compounds and Mg-based Laves phases is also reviewed and compared with the present observations in transition-metal Laves phases.

  1. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  2. Slip, twinning and transformation in Laves phases. [Ti-TiCr[sub 2]; Fe-ZrFe[sub 2]; Ni-Cu-Mg containing MgNi[sub 2] and MgCu[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1993-01-26

    Research was concentrated on two-phase Ti-TiCr[sub 2] alloys, two- phase Fe-ZrFe[sub 2] alloys, and two-phase ternary Ni-Cu-Mg alloys containing MgNi[sub 2] and MgCu[sub 2] phases. Work demonstrated that a variety of room-temperature deformation processes are possible in Laves phases. A strain-induced phase transformation from C36[r arrow]C15 structures is one mechanism for plastic deformation in ZrFe[sub 2]. The C15 structure in TiCr[sub 2] deforms by slip and twinning. The microstructure after indentation of specimens containing C36 phases ZrFe[sub 2] and MgNi[sub 2] indicates that a variety of slip systems operate in this form. 8 figs.

  3. Venus Phasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Presents a science activity designed to introduce students to the geocentric and heliocentric models of the universe. Helps students discover why phase changes on Venus knocked Earth out of the center of the universe. (DKM)

  4. Effect of lattice anharmonicity in the structural phase transformation of Laves phase HfV2 alloy: A first-principles investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Krcmar, Maja; Fu, Chong Long

    2013-01-01

    First-principles theory was developed to study the structural phase transformations in the Laves phase HfV2 alloy. We explored the energy landscape and established the role of lattice anharmonicity underlying the structural phase transitions. Our approach is based on a phenomenological Landau theory for the structural phase transition and a mean-field approximation for the free energy. First-principles calculations were utilized to obtain the distortion energy as a function of relevant deformations, and to deduce parameters for constructing the free energy. Our result for the phase transition temperature of HfV2 is in good agreement with experiment. We find that the high-temperature cubic C15 phase is stabilized by the effect of lattice anharmonicity. The theory also predicts an anomalous increase in shear modulus with increasing temperature for systems where the anharmonicity is pronounced.

  5. Corrosion Resistances of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals with Yttrium and Tungsten Additions in Hot Calcium Chloride Brine & Natural Seawater: Fe48Mo14CR15Y2C15B6 and Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Lian, T; Saw, C; Hailey, P; Choi, J; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peter, W; Payer, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, M B; Aprigliano, L

    2006-10-12

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of stainless steels and Ni-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022), based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Electrochemical studies of the passive film stability of SAM1651 are reported here. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). Yttrium-containing SAM1651, also known as SAM7 (Fe{sub 48.0}Cr{sub 15.0}Mo{sub 14.0}B{sub 6.0}C{sub 15.0}Y{sub 2.0}), has a critical cooling rate (CCR) of approximately 80 Kelvin per second, while yttrium-free SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) has a higher critical cooling rate of approximately 600 Kelvin per second. SAM1651's low CCR enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous material in practical materials processes. While the yttrium enables a low CCR to be achieved, it makes the material relatively difficult to atomize, due to increases in melt viscosity. Consequently, the powders have irregular shape, which makes pneumatic conveyance during thermal spray deposition difficult. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion under sufficiently harsh conditions. Both Alloy C-22 and Type 316L stainless lose their resistance to corrosion during thermal spraying, due to the formation of deleterious intermetallic phases which depletes the matrix of key alloy elements, whereas SAM1651 can be applied as coatings with the same corrosion resistance as a fully-dense completely amorphous melt-spun ribbon, provided that its amorphous

  6. Phase Won.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocher, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Describes ten steps involved in successful renovation of a college recreation center. They are as follows: hire the right architect, be realistic about costs, devise a plan, do a mental walk through, approach the renovation in phases, communicate to users, expect lost revenue and displacement issues, continue to communicate with architects and…

  7. Transition of Bery Phase and Pancharatnam Phase and Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guolan; Pan, Hui; Wang, Zisheng

    2016-07-01

    Berry Phase and time-dependent Pancharatnam phase are investigated for nuclear spin polarization in a liquid by a rotation magnetic field, where two-state mixture effect is exactly included in the geometric phases. We find that when the system of nuclear spin polarization is in the unpolarized state, the transitive phenomena of both Berry phase and Pancharatnam phase are taken place. For the polarized system, in contrast, such a transition is not taken place. It is obvious that the transitions of geometric phase correspond to the phase change of physical system.

  8. Point Defects in Binary Laves-Phase Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.; Pike, L.M.; Zhu, J.H.

    1998-11-30

    Point defect mechanisms in the binary C15 NbCr{sub 2} and NbCo{sub 2}, and C14 NbFe{sub 2} systems on both sides of stoichiometry was studied and clarified by both bulk density and X-ray lattice parameter measurements. It was found that the vacancy concentrations in these systems after quenching from 1000 C are essentially zero. The constitutional defects on both sides of stoichiometry for these systems were found to be of the anti-site type in comparison with the model predictions. However, thermal vacancies exhibiting a maximum at the stoichiometric composition were obtained in NbCr{sub 2} laves phase alloys after quenching from 1400 C. These could be completely eliminated by annealing at 1000 C. Anti-site hardening was found on both sides of stoichiometry for all three Laves phase systems studied. Furthermore, the thermal vacancies in NbCr{sub 2} alloys after quenching from 1400 C were found to soften the Laves phase. The anti-site hardening of the Laves phases is similar to that of the B2 compounds, while the thermal vacancy softening is unique to the Laves phase. Both the anti-site defects and thermal vacancies do not significantly affect the fracture toughness of the Laves phases.

  9. Point Defects in Binary Laves-Phase Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.; Pike, L.M.; Zhu, J.H.

    1999-01-11

    Point defects in the binary C15 NbCrQ and NbCoz, and C 14 NbFe2 systems on both sides of stoichiometry were studied by both bulk density and X-ray Iattiee parameter measurements. It was found that the vacancy concentrations in these systems after quenching from 1000"C are essentially zero. The constitutional defects on both sides of stoichiometry for these systems were found to be of the anti-site type in comparison with the model predictions. Thermal vacancies exhibiting a maximum at the stoichiometric composition were obtained in NbCr2 Laves phase alloys after quenching from 1400"C. However, there are essentially no thermal vacancies in NbFe2 alloys after quenching from 1300oC. Anti-site hardening was found on both sides of stoichiometry for all the tie Laves phase systems studied, while the thermal vacancies in NbCr2 alloys quenched from 1400'C were found to soften the Laves phase. The anti-site hardening of the Laves phases is similar to that of the B2 compounds and the thermal vacancy softening is unique to the Laves phase. Neither the anti-site defects nor the thermal vacancies affect the fracture toughness of the Laves phases significantly.

  10. GC-MS determination of ratios of stable-isotope labelled to natural urea using [13C15N2]urea for studying urea kinetics in serum and as a means to validate routine methods for the quantitative assay of urea in dialysate.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, B G; Tepper, T; Withag, A; Nagel, G T; de Haan, T H; van Leeuwen, J J; Stegeman, C A; Huisman, R M

    1994-02-01

    A GC-MS determination of urea in serum or spent dialysate is described, using 13C15N2-labelled urea and assaying the area ratio of labelled to natural urea by mass fragmentographic monitoring of fragments m/e 153 and 156, after its eventual conversion into the trimethylsilylether-derivative of 2-hydroxypyrimidine. The procedure can be successfully applied in the follow-up of the disappearance of labelled urea in serum after intravenous injection in man, enabling kinetic parameters of urea to be established, e.g. for purposes of studying the effectiveness of dialysis procedures. Furthermore the method can be used for validation of routine methods for measuring urea in other fluids, in particular dialysate. Examples are given of both applications of the GC-MS method described. PMID:8033352

  11. Unfolding wrapped phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2015-11-01

    Phase unwrapping is the final step in phase extraction methods, which consists of recovering the correct phase from the wrapped phase by removing 2π discontinuities. The difference between the correct phase and the wrapped phase is the phase wrapping map. A new method for phase unwrapping is presented by identifying the phase wrapping map as a sequence of binary valued intermediate wrapping maps and iteratively removing them producing the correct phase by phase-wrapped unfolding. A path-following algorithm is presented to exemplify the phase wrapped unfolding method.

  12. Four-phase differential phase shift resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to resolve phase uncertainty without transmitting reference signals. In both methods signal is impressed on carrier as differential, rather than absolute, phase shift. At the receiver four-phase demodulation and logic process unambiguously resolves differential phase shift of input carrier.

  13. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Two-Phase Alloys Based on NbCr(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, C.M.; Chen, K.C.; Kotula, P.G.; Mauro, M.E.; Thoma, D.J.

    1998-12-07

    A two-phase, Nb-Cr-Ti alloy (bee+ C15 Laves phase) has been developed using several alloy design methodologies. In effort to understand processing-microstructure-property relationships, diffment processing routes were employed. The resulting microstructure and mechanical properties are discussed and compared. Plasma arc-melted samples served to establish baseline, . . . as-cast properties. In addition, a novel processing technique, involving decomposition of a supersaturated and metastable precursor phase during hot isostatic pressing (HIP), was used to produce a refined, equilibrium two-phase microstructure. Quasi-static compression tests as a ~ function of temperature were performed on both alloy types. Different deformation mechanisms were encountered based upon temperature and microstructure.

  14. Laves phase-based materials: Microstructure, deformation modes and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, K.S.

    1997-12-31

    Intermetallic compounds with the AB{sub 2} stoichiometry can exist with the C14, C15 or C36 structures, otherwise called Laves phases. In the past, single-phase Laves compounds, particularly Mg-containing binary compounds, have been examined to obtain an understanding of the dislocation structures as well as their mobility; alternately, effort has also been expended in examining the polytypic transformations that occur in such Laves phases. More recently however, Laves phases and polyphase alloys containing the Laves phase have been examined with the intent of developing structural alloys for elevated temperature applications. Specifically, alloys based on the Cr-Group IV (Ti, Zr, Hf) and Group V (Nb, Ta) elements as well as the ternary V-Hf-Nb system have been the focus of several investigations. Physical and mechanical properties have been measured, and microstructure has been characterized as a function of heat treatment. Deformation modes have been re-examined in detail. New ideas based on synchroshear have been put forth to explain the polytypic transformations that occur in these systems, and have been extended to also explain twinning and slip. Earlier observations are first summarized and then these recent advances are reviewed and the potential for these materials is assessed. 57 refs., 8 figs.

  15. TEM investigation on the low temperature phase of HfV{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Fuming; Mitchell, T.E.

    1995-04-01

    HfV2, a particularly attractive C15 Laves phase structural material, undergoes a structural transformation at 115K. A tentative reciprocal lattice for low-temperature HfV2 based on a combination of selected area diffraction patterns is illustrated. The results reveal structural characteristics inconsistent with earlier claims by other investigators. Further and detailed studies are under way, using a combination of CBED and synchrotron diffraction to determine the low-temperature structure`s crystal symmetry, lattice parameters, and atomic positions.

  16. Study of fatigue and fracture behavior of NbCr{sub 2}-based alloys: Phase stability in Nb-Cr-Ni ternary system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.H.; Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.

    1997-12-01

    Phase stability in a ternary Nb-Cr-Ni Laves phase system was studied in this paper. Their previous study in NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases has shown that the average electron concentration factor, e/a, is the dominating factor in controlling the phase stability of NbCr{sub 2}-based Laves phases when the atomic size ratios are kept identical. Since Ni has ten out-shell electrons, the substitution of Ni for Cr in NbCr{sub 2} will increase the average electron concentration of the alloy, thus leading to the change of the crystal structures from C15 to C14. In this paper, a number of pseudo-binary Nb(Cr,Ni){sub 2} alloys were prepared, and the crystal structures of the alloys after a long heat-treatment at 1000 C as a function of the Ni content were determined by the X-ray diffraction technique. The boundaries of the C15/C14 transition were determined and compared to their previous predictions. It was found that the electron concentration and phase stability correlation is obeyed in the Nb-Cr-Ni system. However, the e/a ratio corresponding to the C15/C14 phase transition was found to move to a higher value than the predicted one. The changes in the lattice constant, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were also determined as a function of the Ni content, which were discussed in light of the phase stability difference of the alloys.

  17. An Exhaustive Symmetry Approach to Structure Determination: Phase Transitions in Bi2Sn2O7.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James W; Payne, Julia L; Evans, Ivana Radosavljevic; Stokes, Harold T; Campbell, Branton J; Evans, John S O

    2016-06-29

    The exploitable properties of many materials are intimately linked to symmetry-lowering structural phase transitions. We present an automated and exhaustive symmetry-mode method for systematically exploring and solving such structures which will be widely applicable to a range of functional materials. We exemplify the method with an investigation of the Bi2Sn2O7 pyrochlore, which has been shown to undergo transitions from a parent γ cubic phase to β and α structures on cooling. The results include the first reliable structural model for β-Bi2Sn2O7 (orthorhombic Aba2, a = 7.571833(8), b = 21.41262(2), and c = 15.132459(14) Å) and a much simpler description of α-Bi2Sn2O7 (monoclinic Cc, a = 13.15493(6), b = 7.54118(4), and c = 15.07672(7) Å, β = 125.0120(3)°) than has been presented previously. We use the symmetry-mode basis to describe the phase transition in terms of coupled rotations of the Bi2O' anti-cristobalite framework, which allow Bi atoms to adopt low-symmetry coordination environments favored by lone-pair cations. PMID:27248317

  18. Assessment of the compositional influences on the toughness of TiCr{sub 2}-base Laves phase alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.C.; Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1997-12-31

    Systematic studies of alloys based on TiCr{sub 2} have been performed in order to improve the toughness of Laves phase intermetallics. The extent to which alloy compositions and annealing treatments influence the toughness was quantified by Vickers indentation. The single-phase Laves behavior was first established by studying stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric TiCr{sub 2}. Next, alloying effects were investigated with ternary Laves phases based on TiCr{sub 2}. Different microstructures of two-phase alloys consisting of (Ti,Cr)-bcc + TiCr{sub 2} were also examined. Various toughening theories based on vacancies, site-substitutions, crystal structure (C14, C36, or C15) stabilization, and the presence of a second phase were evaluated. The most effective factors improving the toughness of TiCr{sub 2} were determined, and toughening mechanisms are suggested.

  19. Phase Coexistence in a Dynamic Phase Diagram.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Coppola, Luigi; Balog, Sandor; Mortensen, Kell; Ranieri, Giuseppe A; Olsson, Ulf

    2015-08-01

    Metastability and phase coexistence are important concepts in colloidal science. Typically, the phase diagram of colloidal systems is considered at the equilibrium without the presence of an external field. However, several studies have reported phase transition under mechanical deformation. The reason behind phase coexistence under shear flow is not fully understood. Here, multilamellar vesicle (MLV)-to-sponge (L3 ) and MLV-to-Lα transitions upon increasing temperature are detected using flow small-angle neutron scattering techniques. Coexistence of Lα and MLV phases at 40 °C under shear flow is detected by using flow NMR spectroscopy. The unusual rheological behavior observed by studying the lamellar phase of a non-ionic surfactant is explained using (2) H NMR and diffusion flow NMR spectroscopy with the coexistence of planar lamellar-multilamellar vesicles. Moreover, a dynamic phase diagram over a wide range of temperatures is proposed. PMID:26083451

  20. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-06-01

    The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems. The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it

  1. Topologically close-packed phases in binary transition-metal compounds: matching high-throughput ab initio calculations to an empirical structure map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschmidt, T.; Bialon, A. F.; Pettifor, D. G.; Drautz, R.

    2013-11-01

    In steels and single-crystal superalloys the control of the formation of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases is critical for the performance of the material. The structural stability of TCP phases in multi-component transition-metal alloys may be rationalized in terms of the average valence-electron count \\bar {N} and the composition-dependent relative volume-difference \\overline {\\Delta V/V} . We elucidate the interplay of these factors by comparing density-functional theory calculations to an empirical structure map based on experimental data. In particular, we calculate the heat of formation for the TCP phases A15, C14, C15, C36, χ, μ and σ for all possible binary occupations of the Wyckoff positions. We discuss the isovalent systems V/Nb-Ta to highlight the role of atomic-size difference and observe the expected stabilization of C14/C15/C36/μ by \\overline {\\Delta V/V} at ΔN = 0 in V-Ta. In the systems V/Nb-Re, we focus on the well-known trend of A15 → σ → χ stability with increasing \\bar {N} and show that the influence of \\overline {\\Delta V/V} is too weak to stabilize C14/C15/C36/μ in Nb-Re. As an example for a significant influence of both \\bar {N} and \\overline {\\Delta V/V} , we also consider the systems Cr/Mo-Co. Here the sequence A15 → σ → χ is observed in both systems but in Mo-Co the large size-mismatch stabilizes C14/C15/C36/μ. We also include V/Nb-Co that cover the entire valence range of TCP stability and also show the stabilization of C14/C15/C36/μ. Moreover, the combination of a large volume-difference with a large mismatch in valence-electron count reduces the stability of the A15/σ/χ phases in Nb-Co as compared to V-Co. By comparison to non-magnetic calculations we also find that magnetism is of minor importance for the structural stability of TCP phases in Cr/Mo-Co and in V/Nb-Co.

  2. Non-equilibrium phases and phase diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Massalski, T.B.; Rizzo, H.F.

    1988-03-01

    In this paper we consider the degree of usefulness of the phase diagram and the related thermodynamics in predicting and understanding the formation of metastable phases during quenching, or during low-temperature solid-state interdiffusion, or during co-deposition. Recent research has demonstrated that many of such metastable phases are formed because the more stable intermediate phases that are favored thermodynamically are nevertheless bypassed kinetically. The kinetic elimination of intermediate phases provides conditions where a metastable equilibrium can be established at low temperatures between the supercooled liquid and the terminal solid solutions, leading to metastable partitioned two-phase regions. Alternatively, the range of the metastable phases may be governed by the T/sub 0/ principle related to the crossover of the respective free energy curves, or may be controlled mainly by kinetic considerations. Which particular thermodynamic conditions apply appears to depend on the initial form of the phase diagram and the specific technique used. The occurrence of massive transformations also is discussed. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Map-likelihood phasing

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ▶), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2Fo − Fc or σA-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density. PMID:11717488

  4. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-06-01

    The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as `crowdsourcing'. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of `individuals', each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing. PMID:24914965

  5. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    PubMed Central

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing. PMID:24914965

  6. Propagating phase interface with intermediate interfacial phase: Phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-05-01

    An advanced three-phase phase field approach (PFA) is suggested for a nonequilibrium phase interface that contains an intermediate phase, in particular, a solid-solid interface with a nanometer-sized intermediate melt (IM). A thermodynamic potential in the polar order parameters is developed that satisfies all thermodynamic equilibrium and stability conditions. The special form of the gradient energy allowed us to include the interaction of two solid-melt interfaces via an intermediate melt and obtain a well-posed problem and mesh-independent solutions. It is proved that for stationary 1D solutions to two Ginzburg-Landau equations for three phases, the local energy at each point is equal to the gradient energy. Simulations are performed for β ↔δ phase transformations (PTs) via IM in an HMX energetic material. The obtained energy IM width dependence is described by generalized force-balance models for short- and long-range interaction forces between interfaces but not far from the melting temperature. A force-balance model is developed that describes phase field results even 100 K below the melting temperature. The effects of the ratios of width and energies of solid-solid and solid-melt interfaces, temperature, and the parameter characterizing interaction of two solid-melt interfaces, on the structure, width, energy of the IM and interface velocity are determined by finite element method. Depending on parameters, the IM may appear by continuous or discontinuous barrierless disordering or via critical nucleus due to thermal fluctuations. The IM may appear during heating and persist during cooling at temperatures well below than it follows from sharp-interface approach. On the other hand, for some parameters when IM is expected, it does not form, producing an IM-free gap. The developed PFA represents a quite general three-phase model and can be extended to other physical phenomena, such as martensitic PTs, surface-induced premelting and PTs, premelting

  7. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James A.; Johnson, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  8. Simplified phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershey, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Tanlick sine-wave phase detector gives dc output voltage nearly proportional to phase difference between oscillator signal and reference signal. Device may be used for systems in which signal-to-noise ratio is high.

  9. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  10. Phase jitter in a differential phase experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanenbaum, B. S.; Connolly, D. J.; Austin, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Austin (1971) had concluded that, because of the 'phase jitter,' the differential phase experiment is useful over a more limited height range than the differential absorption experiment. Several observations are presented to show that this conclusion is premature. It is pointed out that the logical basis of the differential absorption experiment also requires that the O- and X-mode echoes, at a given time, come from the same irregularities. Austin's calculations are believed to contain a systematic error above 80 km.

  11. Perceptions about Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Presents research on different techniques to determine the level of understanding among middle school students regarding the phases of the moon. Quotes student responses to provide some insight into students' level of understanding of general knowledge about the moon, moon phases, and modeling the phases. Presents implications for teachers. (KHR)

  12. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  13. Phase microscope imaging in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Mehta, Shalin B.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging in a bright field or phase contrast microscope is partially coherent. We have found that the image can be conveniently considered and modeled in terms of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) of the object transmission. The WDF of the object has a simple physical interpretation for the case of a slowly varying object. Basically, the image intensity is the spatial marginal of the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the phase space imager kernel (PSIkernel), a rotated version of the transmission cross-coefficient. The PSI-kernel can be regarded as a partially-coherent generalization of the point spread function. This approach can be extended to consider the partial coherence of the image itself. In particular, we can consider the mutual intensity, WDF or ambiguity function of the image. It is important to note that the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the PSI-kernel is not a WDF, and not the WDF of the image. The phase space representations of the image have relevance to phase reconstruction methods such as phase space tomography, or the transport of intensity equation approach, and to the three-dimensional image properties.

  14. Gymnastics in Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    As accelerator technology advances, the requirements on accelerator beam quality become increasingly demanding. Facing these new demands, the topic of phase space gymnastics is becoming a new focus of accelerator physics R&D. In a phase space gymnastics, the beam's phase space distribution is manipulated and precision tailored to meet the required beam qualities. On the other hand, all realization of such gymnastics will have to obey accelerator physics principles as well as technological limitations. Recent examples of phase space gymnastics include Emittance exchanges, Phase space exchanges, Emittance partitioning, Seeded FELs and Microbunched beams. The emittance related topics of this list are reviewed in this report. The accelerator physics basis, the optics design principles that provide these phase space manipulations, and the possible applications of these gymnastics, are discussed. This fascinating new field promises to be a powerful tool of the future.

  15. Noncommutative Anandan quantum phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, E.; Ribeiro, L. R.; Furtado, C.; Nascimento, J. R.

    2007-07-01

    In this work, we study the noncommutative nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle, which possesses permanent magnetic and electric dipole moments, in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields. We use the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac spinor with a nonminimal coupling to obtain the nonrelativistic limit. In this limit, we study the noncommutative quantum dynamics and obtain the noncommutative Anandan geometric phase. We analyze the situation where the magnetic dipole moment of the particle is zero, and we obtain the noncommutative version of the He-McKellar-Wilkens effect. We demonstrate that this phase in the noncommutative case is a geometric dispersive phase. We also investigate this geometric phase by considering the noncommutativity in the phase space, and the Anandan phase is obtained.

  16. PHASE DIFFERENTIAL INDICATING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Kirsten, F.A.

    1962-01-01

    An electronic circuit for totalizing the net phase difference between two alternating current signals is designed which responds to both increasing and decreasing phase changes. A phase comparator provldes an output pulse for each 360 deg of phase difference occurring, there being a negative pulse for phase shtft in one direction and a positive pulse for a phase shift in the opposite direction. A counting circuit utilizing glow discharge tubes receives the negative and positive pulses at a single input terminal and provides a running net total, pulses of one polarity dded and pulses of the opposite polarity being subtracted. The glow discharge tubes may be decaded to increase the total count capacity. (AEC)

  17. Crystal phase identification

    DOEpatents

    Michael, Joseph R.; Goehner, Raymond P.; Schlienger, Max E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample. This invention provides a method and apparatus for unambiguously identifying and determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample by using an electron beam generator, such as a scanning electron microscope, to obtain a backscattered electron Kikuchi pattern of a sample, and extracting crystallographic and composition data that is matched to database information to provide a quick and automatic method to identify crystalline phases.

  18. Phase Holograms In PMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D.; Muller, Richard E.

    1994-01-01

    Complex, computer-generated phase holograms written in thin films of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by process of electron-beam exposure followed by chemical development. Spatial variations of phase delay in holograms quasi-continuous, as distinquished from stepwise as in binary phase holograms made by integrated-circuit fabrication. Holograms more precise than binary holograms. Greater continuity and precision results in decreased scattering loss and increased imaging efficiency.

  19. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  20. Phase detection of chaos.

    PubMed

    Follmann, Rosangela; Macau, Elbert E N; Rosa, Epaminondas

    2011-01-01

    A technique, first introduced in the context of pseudoperiodic sound waves, is here applied to the problem of detecting the phase of phase coherent and also phase noncoherent chaotic oscillators. The approach is based on finding sinusoidal fits to segments of the signal, therefore obtaining, for each segment, an appropriate frequency from which a phase can be derived. Central to the method is a judicious choice for the size of a sliding window and for the frequency range, as well as for the window advancing step. The approach is robust against moderate noise levels and three cases are presented for demonstrating the applicability of the method. PMID:21405762

  1. Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 31 NIST/ACerS Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database (PC database for purchase)   The Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database contains commentaries and more than 21,000 diagrams for non-organic systems, including those published in all 21 hard-copy volumes produced as part of the ACerS-NIST Phase Equilibria Diagrams Program (formerly titled Phase Diagrams for Ceramists): Volumes I through XIV (blue books); Annuals 91, 92, 93; High Tc Superconductors I & II; Zirconium & Zirconia Systems; and Electronic Ceramics I. Materials covered include oxides as well as non-oxide systems such as chalcogenides and pnictides, phosphates, salt systems, and mixed systems of these classes.

  2. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  3. Lunar Phases Planisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawl, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a lunar phases planisphere with which a user can answer questions about the rising and setting times of the Moon as well as questions about where the Moon will be at a given phase and time. The article contains figures that can be photocopied to make the planisphere. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  5. UPVG phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

  6. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  7. Simulation of phase structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.

    1995-04-20

    This memo outlines a procedure developed by the author to extract information from phase measurements and produce a simulated phase structure for use in modeling optical systems, including characteristic optics for the Beamlet and NIF laser systems. The report includes an IDL program listing.

  8. Templated blue phases.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Miha; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-21

    Cholesteric blue phases of a chiral liquid crystal are interesting examples of self-organised three-dimensional nanostructures formed by soft matter. Recently it was demonstrated that a polymer matrix introduced by photopolymerization inside a bulk blue phase not only stabilises the host blue phase significantly, but also serves as a template for blue phase ordering. We show with numerical modelling that the transfer of the orientational order of the blue phase to the surfaces of the polymer matrix, together with the resulting surface anchoring, can account for the templating behaviour of the polymer matrix inducing the blue phase ordering of an achiral nematic liquid crystal. Furthermore, tailoring the anchoring conditions of the polymer matrix surfaces can bring about orientational ordering different from those of bulk blue phases, including an intertwined complex of the polymer matrix and topological line defects of orientational order. Optical Kerr response of templated blue phases is explored, finding large Kerr constants in the range of K = 2-10 × 10(-9) m V(-2) and notable dependence on the surface anchoring strength. More generally, the presented numerical approach is aimed to clarify the role and actions of templating polymer matrices in complex chiral nematic fluids, and further to help design novel template-based materials from chiral liquid crystals. PMID:26412643

  9. Low distortion automatic phase control circuit. [voltage controlled phase shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauge, G.; Pederson, C. W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A voltage controlled phase shifter is rendered substantially harmonic distortion free over a large dynamic input range by employing two oppositely poled, equally biased varactor diodes as the voltage controlled elements which adjust the phase shift. Control voltages which affect the bias of both diodes equally are used to adjust the phase shift without increasing distortion. A feedback stabilized phase shifter is rendered substantially frequency independent by employing a phase detector to control the phase shift of the voltage controlled phase shifter.

  10. Source Wavelet Phase Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghadeh, Diako Hariri; Morley, Christopher Keith

    2016-06-01

    Extraction of propagation wavelet phase from seismic data can be conducted using first, second, third and fourth-order statistics. Three new methods are introduced, which are: (1) Combination of different moments, (2) Windowed continuous wavelet transform and (3) Maximum correlation with cosine function. To compare different methods synthetic data with and without noise were chosen. Results show that first, second and third order statistics are not able to preserve wavelet phase. Kurtosis can preserve propagation wavelet phase but signal-to-noise ratio can affect the extracted phase using this method. So for data set with low signal-to-noise ratio, it will be unstable. Using a combination of different moments to extract the phase is more robust than applying kurtosis. The improvement occurs because zero phase wavelets with reverse polarities have equal maximum kurtosis values hence the correct wavelet polarity cannot be identified. Zero-phase wavelets with reverse polarities have minimum and maximum values for a combination of different-moments method. These properties enable the technique to handle a finite data segment and to choose the correct wavelet polarity. Also, the existence of different moments can decrease sensitivity to outliers. A windowed continuous wavelet transform is more sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio than the combination of different-moments method, also if the scale for the wavelet is incorrect it will encounter with more problems to extract phase. When the effects of frequency bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio and analyzing window length are considered, the results of extracting phase information from data without and with noise demonstrate that combination of different-moments is superior to the other methods introduced here.

  11. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  12. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  13. FEL phased array configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellan, Jeffrey B.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various phased array and shared aperture concepts for FEL configurations are discussed. Consideration is given to the characteristics of intra- and inter-micropulse phasing; intra-macropulse phasing; an internal coupled resonator configuration; and an injection locked oscillator array. The use of a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration with multiple or single master oscillators for FELs is examined. The venetian blind, rotating plate, single grating, and grating rhomb shared aperture concepts are analyzed. It is noted that the shared aperture approach using a grating rhomb and the MOPA concept with a single master oscillator and a coupled resonator are useful for FEL phased array configurations; and the MOPA concept is most applicable.

  14. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  15. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  16. ELECTRONIC PHASE CONTROL CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, J.D.; Klein, W.W.; Hansen, C.F.

    1959-04-21

    An electronic circuit is described for controlling the phase of radio frequency energy applied to a multicavity linear accelerator. In one application of the circuit two cavities are excited from a single radio frequency source, with one cavity directly coupled to the source and the other cavity coupled through a delay line of special construction. A phase detector provides a bipolar d-c output signal proportional to the difference in phase between the voltage in the two cavities. This d-c signal controls a bias supply which provides a d-c output for varying the capacitnce of voltage sensitive capacitors in the delay line. The over-all operation of the circuit is completely electronic, overcoming the time response limitations of the electromechanical control systems, and the relative phase relationship of the radio frequency voltages in the two caviiies is continuously controlled to effect particle acceleration.

  17. Geometry and Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kenneth W.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity, designed to comply with the National Science Education Standards, that integrates science and mathematics concepts. Mathematical modeling of the moon's phases is employed to show students the role of mathematics in describing scientific phenomena. (DKM)

  18. Digital Receiver Phase Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcin, Martin; Abramovici, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The software of a commercially available digital radio receiver has been modified to make the receiver function as a two-channel low-noise phase meter. This phase meter is a prototype in the continuing development of a phase meter for a system in which radiofrequency (RF) signals in the two channels would be outputs of a spaceborne heterodyne laser interferometer for detecting gravitational waves. The frequencies of the signals could include a common Doppler-shift component of as much as 15 MHz. The phase meter is required to measure the relative phases of the signals in the two channels at a sampling rate of 10 Hz at a root power spectral density <5 microcycle/(Hz)1/2 and to be capable of determining the power spectral density of the phase difference over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz. Such a phase meter could also be used on Earth to perform similar measurements in laser metrology of moving bodies. To illustrate part of the principle of operation of the phase meter, the figure includes a simplified block diagram of a basic singlechannel digital receiver. The input RF signal is first fed to the input terminal of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). To prevent aliasing errors in the ADC, the sampling rate must be at least twice the input signal frequency. The sampling rate of the ADC is governed by a sampling clock, which also drives a digital local oscillator (DLO), which is a direct digital frequency synthesizer. The DLO produces samples of sine and cosine signals at a programmed tuning frequency. The sine and cosine samples are mixed with (that is, multiplied by) the samples from the ADC, then low-pass filtered to obtain in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signal components. A digital signal processor (DSP) computes the ratio between the Q and I components, computes the phase of the RF signal (relative to that of the DLO signal) as the arctangent of this ratio, and then averages successive such phase values over a time interval specified by the user.

  19. Efficient Bayesian Phase Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Nathan; Granade, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new method called rejection filtering that we use to perform adaptive Bayesian phase estimation. Our approach has several advantages: it is classically efficient, easy to implement, achieves Heisenberg limited scaling, resists depolarizing noise, tracks time-dependent eigenstates, recovers from failures, and can be run on a field programmable gate array. It also outperforms existing iterative phase estimation algorithms such as Kitaev's method.

  20. Phased array antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  1. Efficient Bayesian Phase Estimation.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Nathan; Granade, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new method called rejection filtering that we use to perform adaptive Bayesian phase estimation. Our approach has several advantages: it is classically efficient, easy to implement, achieves Heisenberg limited scaling, resists depolarizing noise, tracks time-dependent eigenstates, recovers from failures, and can be run on a field programmable gate array. It also outperforms existing iterative phase estimation algorithms such as Kitaev's method. PMID:27419551

  2. Production of Liquid Alkanes by Aqueous-Phase Processing of Biomass-Derived Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, George W.; Chheda, Juben N.; Barrett, Christopher J.; Dumesic, James A.

    2005-06-01

    Liquid alkanes with the number of carbon atoms ranging from C7 to C15 were selectively produced from biomass-derived carbohydrates by acid-catalyzed dehydration, which was followed by aldol condensation over solid base catalysts to form large organic compounds. These molecules were then converted into alkanes by dehydration/hydrogenation over bifunctional catalysts that contained acid and metal sites in a four-phase reactor, in which the aqueous organic reactant becomes more hydrophobic and a hexadecane alkane stream removes hydrophobic species from the catalyst before they go on further to form coke. These liquid alkanes are of the appropriate molecular weight to be used as transportation fuel components, and they contain 90% of the energy of the carbohydrate and H2 feeds.

  3. Quantum phase of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berera, Arjun; Rangarajan, Raghavan

    2013-02-01

    Inflation models can have an early phase of inflation where the evolution of the inflaton is driven by quantum fluctuations before entering the phase driven by the slope of the scalar field potential. For a Coleman-Weinberg potential this quantum phase lasts 107-8 e-foldings. A long period of fluctuation driven growth of the inflation field can possibly take the inflaton past ϕ*, the value of the field where our current horizon scale crosses the horizon; alternatively, even if the field does not cross ϕ*, the inflaton could have high kinetic energy at the end of this phase. Therefore, we study these issues in the context of different models of inflation. In scenarios where cosmological relevant scales leave during the quantum phase, we obtain large curvature perturbations of O(10). We also apply our results to quadratic curvaton models and to quintessence models. In curvaton models we find that inflation must last longer than required to solve the horizon problem, that the curvaton models are incompatible with small field inflation models, and that there may be too large non-Gaussianity. A new phase of thermal fluctuation driven inflation is proposed, in which during inflation the inflaton evolution is governed by fluctuations from a sustained thermal radiation bath rather than by a scalar field potential.

  4. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  5. Electron Holography: phases matter.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Hannes

    2013-06-01

    Essentially, all optics is wave optics, be it with light, X-rays, neutrons or electrons. The information transfer from the object to the image can only be understood in terms of waves given by amplitude and phase. However, phases are difficult to measure: for slowly oscillating waves such as sound or low-frequency electromagnetic waves, phases can be measured directly; for high frequencies this has to be done by heterodyne detection, i.e. superposition with a reference and averaging over time. In optics, this is called interferometry. Because interference is mostly very difficult to achieve, phases have often been considered 'hidden variables' seemingly pulling the strings from backstage, only visible by their action on the image intensity. This was almost the case in conventional Electron Microscopy with the phase differences introduced by an object. However, in the face of the urgent questions from solid state physics and materials science, these phases have to be determined precisely, because they encode the most dominant object properties, such as charge distributions and electromagnetic fields. After more than six decades of very patient advancement, electron interferometry and holography offer unprecedented analytical facilities down to an atomic scale. Akira Tonomura has prominently contributed to the present state. PMID:23620338

  6. Compressed sensing phase retrieval with phase diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shun; Hu, Xinqi; Qin, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    The compressed sensing (CS) theory shows that sparse signal can be reconstructed accurately with some randomly observed measurements that are much fewer than what traditional method requires. Since it takes structure of signals into consideration, it has many advantages in the structured signals process. With CS, measuring can be speeded up and the cost of hardware can be decreased significantly. However, it faces great challenge in the amplitude-only measurement. In this article, we study the magnitude-only compressed sensing phase retrieval (CSPR) problem, and propose a practical recovery algorithm. In our algorithm, we introduce the powerful Hybrid-Input-Output algorithm with phase diversity to make our algorithm robust and efficient. A relaxed ℓ0 norm constrain is also introduced to help PR find a sparse solution with fewer measurements, which is demonstrated to be essential and effective to CSPR. We finally successfully apply it into complex-valued object recovery in THz imaging. The numerical results show that the proposed algorithm can recover the object pretty well with fewer measurements than what PR traditionally requires.

  7. Phased array ghost elimination.

    PubMed

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2006-05-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  8. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  9. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  10. On phase reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Min

    This thesis focuses on the mathematical analysis of the optical phase reconstruction problem. Phase information of light waves has played an important role in many optical applications. However, the phase function of a light wave cannot be measured directly. In 1983, Teague proposed the idea of an intensity senor for measuring phase functions of light waves. It uses an elliptic partial differential equation called the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE), which relates intensity to the phase function of a light wave. Teague's study was followed by Roddier and others. When intensity decreases to zero at the boundary, the equation has singularity since the diffusion coefficient vanishes. In 1996, Gureyev and Nugent claimed that no boundary conditions are needed for getting a unique solution of the TIE in this singular case. We present in this thesis the theoretical analysis of the necessity of boundary conditions for solving the TIE. A hybrid theoretical-numerical boundary condition is also derived for solving the TIE numerically in the case of vanishing intensity at the boundary. Numerical tests and optical simulations over discs verified the potency of this theoretical-numerical hybrid boundary condition and the algorithm. Another approach studied is the Weighted Least Action Principle (WLAP), which is proposed by Rubinstein and Wolansky in the year 2004. The WLAP states a variational principle for finding the light rays mapping between two planes using the intensity profiles on the planes, and it writes the problem of phase reconstruction in the functional form. Minimizing the associated functional, we obtain the ray mapping of the light wave in question. The phase function can be derived from the optimized ray mapping. A numerical algorithm was designed to carry out the process. Simulations and tests are reported to show the feasibility of the methods proposed.

  11. Separation of dialkyl sulfides by metallo-mesogenic stationary phases for complexation gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Lian; Liu, Chuen-Ying

    2007-08-17

    A copper mesogenic side-chain polymer (P-C(15)CuC(18)) was cross-linked onto the capillary wall as a stationary film for gas chromatography (GC) separation of alkyl sulfides. These organic sulfides are of interest for their large health impact because of their wide range of volatiles and high reactivities toward metals. Different GC parameters for optimal separation efficiency are discussed for use with a mesogenic polymer column along with flame photometric detection (FPD). Both the carrier gas flow-rate and column temperature were studied to determine the relationship of plate height to the chemical structure of the solutes, as well as to determine the morphology of the mesogenic polymer. Van 't Hoff plots show phase transitions of the stationary mesophase as the column temperature was varied. The results reveal that the separation mechanism might be based on ligand exchange and polarity interaction between the analytes and the stationary phase, with the vapor pressure of the analytes also being important. The former interaction dominates in the lamellar crystalline phase and the latter interaction dominates in the hexagonal columnar-discotic phase. With high reproducibility for retention time (RSD< or =0.37%) and for peak area (RSD< or =5.16%), the GC-FPD system produced linear calibration graphs (r> or =0.9918) for the determination of 13 sulfides with a detection limit below 2.5 ng. PMID:17568598

  12. Digital phase-lock loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved digital phase lock loop incorporates several distinctive features that attain better performance at high loop gain and better phase accuracy. These features include: phase feedback to a number-controlled oscillator in addition to phase rate; analytical tracking of phase (both integer and fractional cycles); an amplitude-insensitive phase extractor; a more accurate method for extracting measured phase; a method for changing loop gain during a track without loss of lock; and a method for avoiding loss of sampled data during computation delay, while maintaining excellent tracking performance. The advantages of using phase and phase-rate feedback are demonstrated by comparing performance with that of rate-only feedback. Extraction of phase by the method of modeling provides accurate phase measurements even when the number-controlled oscillator phase is discontinuously updated.

  13. EUCLIDES: first phase completed!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benschop, Jos P.; Dinger, Udo; Ockwell, David C.

    2000-07-01

    The Extreme UV Concept Lithography Development System (EUCLIDES) program headed by ASM Lithography (ASML), partnered with Carl Zeiss and Oxford Instruments is evaluating EUV lithography for its viability at resolutions of 70 nm and below. From August 1998 through February 2000 the first phase was done. In this phase, the core technologies necessary to demonstrate the technical solutions for the list of possible EUV lithography 'showstoppers' have been developed. This includes: (1) Mirror substrates, (2) High reflectivity multi- layer coatings, (3) Resist outgassing reduction schemes, (4) Vacuum stages. A synchrotron source design was developed to compare synchrotron sources with plasma sources. The consortium also investigated the total system architecture to make sure the system concept meets the requirements of the semiconductor industry at an acceptable cost of ownership. In this paper, an overview of the program objectives is given, followed by an overview of highlights obtained by the various program partners and subcontractors throughout the first phase. Finally, the European partner's plan for the next phase is shown (working in close collaboration with other international consortia). This next phase will eventually lead to EUVL production tools.

  14. Two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program to characterize the spray from candidate nozzles for icing-cloud simulation is discussed. One canidate nozzle, which is currently used for icing research, has been characterized for flow and drop size. The median-volume diameter (MVD) from this air-assist nozzle is compared with correlations in the literature. The new experimental spray facility is discussed, and the drop-size instruments are discussed in detail. Since there is no absolute standard for drop-size measurements and there are other limitations, such as drop -size range and velocity range, several instruments are used and results are compared. A two-phase model was developed at Pennsylvania State University. The model uses the k-epsilon model of turbulence in the continous phase. Three methods for treating the discrete phase are used: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model. In the LHF model both phases have the same velocity and temperature at each point. The DSF model provides interphase transport but ignores the effects of turbulent fluctuations. In the SSF model the drops interact with turbulent eddies whose properties are determined by the k-epsilon turbulence model. The two-phase flow model has been extended to include the effects of evaporation and combustion.

  15. Phasing rectangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utterback, E; Jones, S M

    2009-10-26

    Several techniques have been developed to phase apertures in the context of astronomical telescopes with segmented mirrors. Phasing multiple apertures, however, is important in a wide range of optical applications. The application of primary interest in this paper is the phasing of multiple short pulse laser beams for fast ignition fusion experiments. In this paper analytic expressions are derived for parameters such as the far-field distribution, a line-integrated form of the far-field distribution that could be fit to measured data, enclosed energy or energy-in-a-bucket and center-of-mass that can then be used to phase two rectangular apertures. Experimental data is taken with a MEMS device to simulate the two apertures and comparisons are made between the analytic parameters and those derived from the measurements. Two methods, fitting the measured far-field distribution to the theoretical distribution and measuring the ensquared energy in the far-field, produced overall phase variance between the 100 measurements of less than 0.005 rad(2) or an RMS displacement of less than 12 nm. PMID:19997175

  16. Single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinn-Chang; Wang, Yung-Shan; Jou, Hurng-Liahng; Lu, Wei-Tso

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface which converts the power from a single-phase utility to three-phase power for a three-phase load. The proposed single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface comprises a bridge-type switch set, a set of three-phase inductors, a transformer set and a set of three-phase capacitors. A current-mode control controls the switching of bridge-type switch set, to generate a set of nonzero-sequence (NZS) currents and a set of zero-sequence (ZS) currents. The transformer set is used to decouple the NZS currents and the ZS currents. The NZS currents are used to generate a high-quality three-phase voltage that supplies power to a three-phase load. The ZS currents flow to the single-phase utility so that the utility current is sinusoidal and in phase with the utility voltage. Accordingly, only a bridge-type switch set is used in the single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface to simply the power circuit. A prototype is developed and tested to verify the performance of the proposed single-phase to three-phase power conversion interface.

  17. Short-Range Order of Mesomorphic Phase of a Semi-crystalline Polymer by Solid-State NMR: Isotactic Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shichen; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Mesophase is intermediate phase between crystalline and melt state. Characterization of short-range structures of disordered mesomorphic phase without long-range order is challenging issue in polymer characterization. The short range order was considered same as α or β i PP, or neither. In this work, a new strategy using 13C-13C through space interactions as well as molecular dynamics based on chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) re-orientation is proposed for evaluating short-range order of mesophase of isotactic-polypropylene (iPP). 13C-13C double quantum (DQ) build up curves of 13C 15 percent CH3 selectively labeled iPP and spin dynamics simulations elucidate that local packing structures in mesophase is very close to that in β phase. Moreover, exchange NMR proves that the crystalline chains perform large amplitude motions in all α, β, and mesophase. The correlation time of overall dynamics of stems in mesophase follows the same Arrhenius line with that of β phase but is largely deviated from the Arrhenius line of the α phase. Through the obtained results, it is concluded that short-range order in mesophase is exceedingly close or same to those in β phase. This work was financially supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-1105829) and by UA startup funds.

  18. Phase trombones with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    The phase shifting trombones considered up to now for SSC application consisted of sets of evenly spaced quadrupoles separated by drift spaces. One such trombone was placed between a dispersion suppressor and a crossing insertion, so that the trombone had zero dispersion. With such trombones, it is possible to change {beta}{sup *} at constant tune, or to change the tunes by several units without altering the cell phase advances in the arcs. An objection to the above type of phase trombone is that it adds to the circumference, since no bending is included. This objection may or may not be valid depending on the potential usefulness of the drift spaces in them. In this note the authors show an alternative trombone design in which dipoles are included between the quadrupoles as in the normal arc cells. Since these trombones have dispersion, they are placed at the ends of the arcs, to be followed in turn by the dispersion suppressors and crossing insertions.

  19. Controllable tomography phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Tomography phase microscopy (TPM) is a new microscopic method that can quantitatively yield the volumetric 3D distribution of a sample's refractive index (RI), which is significant for cell biology research. In this paper, a controllable TPM system is introduced. In this system a circulatory phase-shifting method and piezoelectric ceramic are used which enable the TPM system to record the 3D RI distribution at a more controllable speed, from 1 to 40 fps, than in the other TPM systems reported. The resolution of the RI distribution obtained by this controllable TPM is much better than that in images recorded by phase contrast microscopy and interference tomography microscopy. The realization of controllable TPM not only allows for the application of TPM to the measurement of kinds of RI sample, but also contributes to academic and technological support for the practical use of TPM.

  20. Phase insensitive acoustoelectric transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic transducers transform acoustic waves into electrical signals preserving phase and amplitude information. When the acoustic wavelength is significantly smaller than the transducer diameter, severe phase modulation of the electrical signal can occur. This results in anomalous attenuation measurements, background noise in nondestructive evaluation, and in general complicates data interpretation. This article describes and evaluates a phase-insensitive transducer based on the acoustoelectric effect. Theory of operation of the acoustoelectric transducer (AET) is discussed, and some optimization procedures outlined for its use. Directivity data for the AET are contrasted with a conventional piezoelectric transducer. In addition, transmission scanning data of phantom flaws in metal plates are presented for both transducers and demonstrate a significant improvement in resolution with the AET.

  1. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  2. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  3. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  4. Hydrogeologic investigation and establishment of a permanent multi-observational well network in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Phase VIII

    SciTech Connect

    Gellici, J.A.; Gawne, C.E.

    1996-02-01

    The Lower Savannah River Project was established in 1986 to improve our understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions in west-central South Carolina. Six progress reports have been written since 1987. This report covers the period from July 1, 1994, to June 30, 1995. During the current phase, work focused on locating and procuring suitable sites for future well clusters; drafting well-construction specifications and bid packages; drilling monitoring wells at site C-7; and completing two comprehensive reports. Land was acquired for three future well-cluster sites: C-11, C-13, and C-15. Site C-11 will be located at the Oakwood Fire Tower in Aiken County. This land was made available through the South Carolina Forestry Commission. Land for site C-13 was donated by the Wildlife Division of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and will be located at Little Hell Landing on the Savannah River flood plain southwest of Millet in Allendale County. Site C-15 will be located at Gillisonville in northern Jasper County. A 0.9-acre parcel of land was purchased from Westvaco, Inc., for this site. Well specifications and bid packages were drawn up for the construction of seven monitoring wells at site C-10, three at C-13, and two at C-15. Specific-capacity values of nine wells at site C-7 range from 0.3 to 20.6 gpm/ft (gallons per minute per foot of drawdown). Two deep Cretaceous wells were drilled at site C-7, one each in the Midville and Dublin aquifer systems. An upward hydraulic gradient exists between the aquifers. Two comprehensive reports were completed during this phase of the project: (1) a compilation and interpretation of data collected from the project since its inception in 1986, and (2) a detailed description of the hydrogeologic framework of west-central South Carolina and the hydrologic characteristics of the aquifers and confining units.

  5. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Xingyu; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-09-01

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear 1H-X (X = 13C, 15N, 31P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the 1H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the 1H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from 1H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the 1H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [15N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-13C,15N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate 1H-15N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-13C,15N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  6. Compressive phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, F.; MacDowell, A.; Marchesini, S.; Padmore, H. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; Pien, J.; Schirotzek, A.; Yang, C.

    2010-08-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  7. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  8. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  9. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-06-06

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line. 2 figs.

  10. Linear phase compressive filter

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

  11. GAS PHASE EXPOSURE HISTORY DERIVED FROM MATERIAL PHASE CONCENTRATION PROFILES USING SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P31059
    Title: Gas Phase Exposure History Derived from Material Phase Concentration Profiles Using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Jonathan Lewis McKinney
    Institution: University of Missouri - ...

  12. Phase interpolation circuits using frequency multiplication for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, P. R.; Mailloux, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Antenna phasing circuit is described with the following advantages - 1/ increased number of phased elements, 2/ current repetition for each array element, 3/ circuit simplicity, and 4/ accurate phase interpolation. This circuit functions with Huggins Scan or with nearly any other phasing system.

  13. Suppressing phase errors from vibration in phase-shifting interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Leslie L.

    2009-07-10

    A general method for reducing the influence of vibrations in phase-shifting interferometry corrects the surface phase map through a spectral analysis of a ''phase-error pattern,'' a plot of the interference intensity versus the measured phase, for each phase-shifted image. The method is computationally fast, applicable to any phase-shifting algorithm and interferometer geometry, has few restrictions on surface shape, and unlike spatial Fourier methods, high density spatial carrier fringes are not required, although at least a fringe of phase departure is recommended. Over a 100x reduction in vibrationally induced surface distortion is achieved for small amplitude vibrations on real data.

  14. Fun with Phase Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, David

    2006-01-01

    A lot of good elementary science involves studying solids, liquids, and gases, and some inquiry-based activities that are easy to set up and do. In this article, the author presents activities pertaining to simple phase change. Using water as the example, these activities introduce upper-grade students to the idea of the arrangement of molecules…

  15. Apodized Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Among the optical instruments proposed to detect and characterize exoplanets, phase masks coronagraphs offer very small inner working angles. Designed for off-axis telescopes, their performance is greatly reduced when used with centrally obstructed apertures such as those of the Palomar telescope, the very large telescope, or the James Webb space telescope. However, a clear circular aperture is not the only pupil shape for which a phase mask coronagraph can work properly. In fact, for a given centrally obstructed aperture, we show that it is possible to compute optimal apodizers that help achieve stellar extinction levels similar to those obtained in the ideal case of an off-axis telescope. Trade-offs exist between these levels, the transmission of the apodizer, and the area covered by the Lyot stop. We detail the Fourier optics formalism that makes these optimizations possible, as well as a few examples of shaped pupils. Some are designed for a four-quadrants phase mask, and some others for a vortex phase mask. We also offer a comparison with a coronagraph solely composed of a shaped pupil.

  16. SSIP Phase I Roadmap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinh, Megan; Lucas, Anne; Taylor, Cornelia; Kelley, Grace; Kasprzak, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This roadmap provides a description of the activities involved in the development of the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) (SPP/APR Indicators C11 and B17) due to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) on April 1, 2015. The roadmap is intended to support states with completing Phase I of the SSIP process. This document provides…

  17. Soviet phase conjugation research

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.A.; Boyd, R.W.; Klein, M.B.; Kurnit, N.A.; Milonni, P.W.; Rockwell, D.A.; Yeh, P.

    1990-09-01

    Optical phase conjugation is a Soviet-discovered technique that applies nonlinear optical effects to automatically manipulate laser beams while automatically correcting for arbitrary distortions. Optical phase conjugation can aid in providing improved configurations for average-power and high-peak-power laser systems; it can provide nearly automatic pointing and tracking laser systems; and it can provide many other practical applications (both military and nonmilitary). Here it is important to note that 100- to 1000-watt systems are also of significant importance, not just ultra-high-energy or high-power lasers designed to do significant structural damage at significant distances. One class of phase conjugation techniques, namely, stimulated Brillouin scattering, along with its four-wave mixing counterpart, Brillioun-enhanced four-wave mixing, has been the hallmark of the Soviet effort -- with nearly all contributions (both theoretical and experimental) arising from the Soviet Union. Both stimulated Brillouin scattering and Brillouin-enhanced four-wave mixing arise from the same electrostrictive nonlinearity, where the presence of a gradient in the optical intensity produces a force on the fluid. Scientists in the United States started studying optical phase conjugation approximately five years after Soviet scientists, and initially concentrated on areas quite different from those of Soviet emphasis.

  18. Phase change compositions

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  19. Phase change compositions

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  20. Low gravity phase separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Pope, W. L.; Smith, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for phase separating a gas-liquid mixture as might exist in a subcritical cryogenic helium vessel for cooling a superconducting magnet at low gravity such as in planetary orbit, permitting conservation of the liquid and extended service life of the superconducting magnet.

  1. Semiconductor Laser Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Oscillations synchronized and modulated individually for beam steering. Phased array of GaAs infrared lasers put out powerful electronically-steerable coherent beam. Fabricated as integrated circuit on GaAs chip, new device particularly suited to optical communications, optical data processing and optical detection and ranging systems.

  2. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  3. Advanced Virgo phase cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaaf, L.; Agatsuma, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gebyehu, M.; van den Brand, J.

    2016-05-01

    A century after the prediction of gravitational waves, detectors have reached the sensitivity needed to proof their existence. One of them, the Virgo interferometer in Pisa, is presently being upgraded to Advanced Virgo (AdV) and will come into operation in 2016. The power stored in the interferometer arms raises from 20 to 700 kW. This increase is expected to introduce higher order modes in the beam, which could reduce the circulating power in the interferometer, limiting the sensitivity of the instrument. To suppress these higher-order modes, the core optics of Advanced Virgo is equipped with a thermal compensation system. Phase cameras, monitoring the real-time status of the beam constitute a critical component of this compensation system. These cameras measure the phases and amplitudes of the laser-light fields at the frequencies selected to control the interferometer. The measurement combines heterodyne detection with a scan of the wave front over a photodetector with pin-hole aperture. Three cameras observe the phase front of these laser sidebands. Two of them monitor the in-and output of the interferometer arms and the third one is used in the control of the aberrations introduced by the power recycling cavity. In this paper the working principle of the phase cameras is explained and some characteristic parameters are described.

  4. Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinger, Scott A.; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa; Cohen, David; Green, Joseph J.; Lou, John; Ohara, Catherine; Redding, David; Shi, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval software uses the Modified Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm, an image-based sensing method that can turn any focal plane science instrument into a wavefront sensor, avoiding the need to use external metrology equipment. Knowledge of the wavefront enables intelligent control of active optical systems.

  5. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  6. Mentoring Phases and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Georgia T.

    1997-01-01

    Data from 178 proteges supported Kram's model of mentoring phases: initiation, cultivation, separation, and redefinition. Data from 82 current and 69 former proteges were compared to those from 93 who were never mentored. Mentees had better career outcomes, organizational socialization, and job satisfaction; those not mentored had slightly higher…

  7. Introduction to phasing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Garry L.

    2010-01-01

    When collecting X-ray diffraction data from a crystal, we measure the intensities of the diffracted waves scattered from a series of planes that we can imagine slicing through the crystal in all directions. From these intensities we derive the amplitudes of the scattered waves, but in the experiment we lose the phase information; that is, how we offset these waves when we add them together to reconstruct an image of our molecule. This is generally known as the ‘phase problem’. We can only derive the phases from some knowledge of the molecular structure. In small-molecule crystallography, some basic assumptions about atomicity give rise to relationships between the amplitudes from which phase information can be extracted. In protein crystallography, these ab initio methods can only be used in the rare cases in which there are data to at least 1.2 Å resolution. For the majority of cases in protein crystallography phases are derived either by using the atomic coordinates of a structurally similar protein (molecular replacement) or by finding the positions of heavy atoms that are intrinsic to the protein or that have been added (methods such as MIR, MIRAS, SIR, SIRAS, MAD, SAD or com­binations of these). The pioneering work of Perutz, Kendrew, Blow, Crick and others developed the methods of isomorphous replacement: adding electron-dense atoms to the protein without disturbing the protein structure. Nowadays, methods from small-molecule crystallography can be used to find the heavy-atom substructure and the phases for the whole protein can be bootstrapped from this prior knowledge. More recently, improved X-ray sources, detectors and software have led to the routine use of anomalous scattering to obtain phase information from either incorporated selenium or intrinsic sulfurs. In the best cases, only a single set of X-ray data (SAD) is required to provide the positions of the anomalous scatters, which together with density-modification procedures can reveal

  8. Phase Operator and Phase State in Thermo Field Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong-Yi; Jiang, Nian-Quan

    We extend the Susskind-Glogower phase operator and phase state in quantum optics to thermo field dynamics (TFD). Based on the thermo entangled state representation, we introduce thermo excitation and de-excitation operators with which the phase operator and phase state in TFD can be constructed. The phase state treated as a limiting case of a new SU(1, 1) coherent states is also exhibited.

  9. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  10. Multicomponent three-phase equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents the relations that describe thermodynamic equilibrium in a three-phase system. Multiple components, including air, water, and oil components, are considered in three phases: (1) aqueous, (2) oil, and (3) gas. Primary variables are specified for each of seven possible phase combinations. These primary variables are then used to determine the necessary secondary variables to completely describe the system. Criteria are also developed to check the stability of each phase configuration and determine possible transitions from one phase configuration to another phase configuration via phase appearances and disappearances.

  11. Noisy quantum phase communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Berihu; Trapani, Jacopo; Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2015-06-01

    We address quantum phase channels, i.e communication schemes where information is encoded in the phase-shift imposed to a given signal, and analyze their performances in the presence of phase diffusion. We evaluate mutual information for coherent and phase-coherent signals, and for both ideal and realistic phase receivers. We show that coherent signals offer better performances than phase-coherent ones, and that realistic phase channels are effective ones in the relevant regime of low energy and large alphabets.

  12. Phase-field modeling of multi-phase solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Britta; Wheeler, Adam A.

    2002-08-01

    A phase-field model for a general class of multi-phase metallic alloys is now proposed which describes both multi-phase solidification phenomena as well as polycrystalline grain structures. The model serves as a computational method to simulate the motion and kinetics of multiple phase boundaries and enables the visualization of the diffusion processes and of the phase transitions in multi-phase systems. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate the capability of the phase-field model to recover a variety of complex experimental growth structures. In particular, the phase-field model can be used to simulate microstructure evolutions in eutectic, peritectic and monotectic alloys. In addition, polycrystalline grain structures with effects such as wetting, grain growth, symmetry properties of adjacent triple junctions in thin film samples and stability criteria at multiple junctions are described by phase-field simulations.

  13. Gas-phase and X-ray studies of branched ligands: Cu(II) coordination polymer formed by Nα, Nɛ, Nɛ-tris(cyanoethyl)- L-lysine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiszewska, Jolanta; Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia

    2006-05-01

    A small dendrimeric compound, Nα, Nɛ, Nɛ-tris(dicyanoethyl)- L-lysine—C 15H 23N 5O 2 ( 1) was synthesized and used for the construction of Cu(II) complex—[Cu(C 15H 23N 5O 2) 2(ClO 4) 2·H 2O] ( 3). In the gas-phase, the dimeric and trimeric clusters of 1, surrounding Na + core were observed. The aggregates with a complex structure were found for the mixtures of 1 and Cu(ClO 4) 2 at various ratios in ESI-MS experiments. The X-ray studies showed that a new 1D coordination polymer ( 3), connected by the Cu…N tbnd6 C coordination with the α- N-cyanoethyl group of ligand is formed in a solid-state. The structure contains penta-coordinated Cu(II) with the Cu-Cu separation 7.820(1)-7.927(1) Å. The Cu(II)-coordinated branched ligands form cavities where three perchlorate anions are encapsulated into the void space by the electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. The remaining three perchlorate anions are hydrogen-bonded to the ɛ-NH + groups. Thus, the polymeric structure shows properties postulated for dendrimers, where charged groups can be isolated by the non-polar branches from the outside environment. Both gas-phase and X-ray studies show predominance of the 2:1 aggregation pattern between ligand 1 and Cu 2+ atoms.

  14. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  15. Spatial Phase Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Frequently, scientists grow crystals by dissolving a protein in a specific liquid solution, and then allowing that solution to evaporate. The methods used next have been, variously, invasive (adding a dye that is absorbed by the protein), destructive (crushing protein/salt-crystal mixtures and observing differences between the crushing of salt and protein), or costly and time-consuming (X-ray crystallography). In contrast to these methods, a new technology for monitoring protein growth, developed in part through NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Marshall Space Flight Center, is noninvasive, nondestructive, rapid, and more cost effective than X-ray analysis. The partner for this SBIR, Photon-X, Inc., of Huntsville, Alabama, developed spatial phase imaging technology that can monitor crystal growth in real time and in an automated mode. Spatial phase imaging scans for flaws quickly and produces a 3-D structured image of a crystal, showing volumetric growth analysis for future automated growth.

  16. High power phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Makarov, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    One of the approaches to power distribution system of a superconducting proton linac under discussion at FNAL requires development of a fast-action, megawatt-range phase shifter. Using a couple of this kind of devices with a waveguide hybrid junction can allow independent control of phase and amplitude of RF power at the input of each superconducting cavity, which will result in significant saving in number of klystrons and modulators required for the accelerator. A prototype of a waveguide version of the shifter that uses Yttrium-Iron Garnet (YIG) blocks was developed and tested. This report presents design concept of the device, and main results of simulation and proof-of-principle tests.

  17. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  18. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  19. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  20. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  1. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  2. Phase calibration generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A phase calibration system was developed for the Deep Space Stations to generate reference microwave comb tones which are mixed in with signals received by the antenna. These reference tones are used to remove drifts of the station's receiving system from the detected data. This phase calibration system includes a cable stabilizer which transfers a 20 MHz reference signal from the control room to the antenna cone. The cable stabilizer compensates for delay changes in the long cable which connects its control room subassembly to its antenna cone subassembly in such a way that the 20 MHz is transferred to the cone with no significant degradation of the hydrogen maser atomic clock stability. The 20 MHz reference is used by the comb generator and is also available for use as a reference for receiver LO's in the cone.

  3. Phase-Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    System developed and used at Langley Research Center measures phase between two signals of same frequency or between two signals, one of which is harmonic multiple of other. Simple and inexpensive device combines digital and analog components to give accurate phase measurements. One signal at frequency f fed to pulse shaper, produces negative pulse at time t4. Pulse applied to control input of sample-and-hold module 1. Second signal, at frequency nf, fed to zero-crossover amplifier, producing square wave at time t. Signal drives first one-shot producing narrow negative pulse at t1. Signal then drives second one-shot producing narrow positive pulse at time t2. This pulse used to turn on solid-state switch and reset integrator circuit to zero.

  4. Measurement by phase severance

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1987-03-01

    It is claimed that the measurement process is more accurately described by ''quasi-local phase severance'' than by ''wave function collapse''. The approach starts from the observation that the usual route to quantum mechanics starting from the Hamilton-Jacobi equations throws away half the degrees of freedom, namely, the classical initial state parameters. To overcome this difficulty, the full set of Hamilton-Jacobi equations is interpreted as operator equations acting on a state vector. The measurement theory presented is based on the conventional S-matrix boundary condition of N/sub A/ free particles in the distant past and N/sub B/ free particles in the distant future and taking the usual free particle wave functions, multiplied by phase factors.

  5. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  6. Phase space quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszak, Maciej; Domański, Ziemowit

    2012-02-01

    This paper develops an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics known as the phase space quantum mechanics or deformation quantization. It is shown that the quantization naturally arises as an appropriate deformation of the classical Hamiltonian mechanics. More precisely, the deformation of the point-wise product of observables to an appropriate noncommutative ⋆-product and the deformation of the Poisson bracket to an appropriate Lie bracket are the key elements in introducing the quantization of classical Hamiltonian systems. The formalism of the phase space quantum mechanics is presented in a very systematic way for the case of any smooth Hamiltonian function and for a very wide class of deformations. The considered class of deformations and the corresponding ⋆-products contains as a special case all deformations which can be found in the literature devoted to the subject of the phase space quantum mechanics. Fundamental properties of ⋆-products of observables, associated with the considered deformations are presented as well. Moreover, a space of states containing all admissible states is introduced, where the admissible states are appropriate pseudo-probability distributions defined on the phase space. It is proved that the space of states is endowed with a structure of a Hilbert algebra with respect to the ⋆-multiplication. The most important result of the paper shows that developed formalism is more fundamental than the axiomatic ordinary quantum mechanics which appears in the presented approach as the intrinsic element of the general formalism. The equivalence of two formulations of quantum mechanics is proved by observing that the Wigner-Moyal transform has all properties of the tensor product. This observation allows writing many previous results found in the literature in a transparent way, from which the equivalence of the two formulations of quantum mechanics follows naturally. In addition, examples of a free particle and a simple harmonic

  7. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  8. Solid phase extraction membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Kurt C; Langer, Roger L

    2002-11-05

    A wet-laid, porous solid phase extraction sheet material that contains both active particles and binder and that possesses excellent wet strength is described. The binder is present in a relatively small amount while the particles are present in a relatively large amount. The sheet material is sufficiently strong and flexible so as to be pleatable so that, for example, it can be used in a cartridge device.

  9. Photoinduced phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K H

    2011-02-23

    Optically induced ultrafast electronic excitations with sufficiently long lifetimes may cause strong effects on phase transitions like structural and nonmetal→metal ones and on supercooling, supersaturation, etc. Examples are the transitions diamond→graphite, graphite→graphene, non-metal→metal, solid→liquid and vapor→liquid, solid. Photoinduced formation of graphene and water condensation of saturated or supersaturated vapor due to increased bonding amongst water molecules are of particular interest. These nonequilibrium transitions are an ultrafast response, on a few hundred fs time scale, to the fast low to large energy electronic excitations. The energy of the photons is converted into electronic energy via electronic excitations changing the cohesive energy. This changes the chemical potential controlling the phase transition. In view of the advances in laser optics photon induced transitions are expected to become an active area in nonequilibrium physics and phase transition dynamics. Conservation laws like energy or angular momentum conservation control the time during which the transitions occur. Since the photon induced effects result from weakening or strengthening of the bonding between the atoms or molecules transitions like solid/liquid, etc can be shifted in both directions. Photoinduced transitions will be discussed from a unified point of view. PMID:21411879

  10. Compactification on phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelady, Benjamin; Wheeler, James

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge for string theory is to understand the dimensional reduction required for comparison with the standard model. We propose reducing the dimension of the compactification by interpreting some of the extra dimensions as the energy-momentum portion of a phase-space. Such models naturally arise as generalized quotients of the conformal group called biconformal spaces. By combining the standard Kaluza-Klein approach with such a conformal gauge theory, we may start from the conformal group of an n-dimensional Euclidean space to form a 2n-dimensional quotient manifold with symplectic structure. A pair of involutions leads naturally to two n-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds. For n = 5, this leaves only two extra dimensions, with a countable family of possible compactifications and an SO(5) Yang-Mills field on the fibers. Starting with n=6 leads to 4-dimensional compactification of the phase space. In the latter case, if the two dimensions each from spacetime and momentum space are compactified onto spheres, then there is an SU(2)xSU(2) (left-right symmetric electroweak) field between phase and configuration space and an SO(6) field on the fibers. Such a theory, with minor additional symmetry breaking, could contain all parts of the standard model.

  11. Phases, phase equilibria, and phase rules in low-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, T.; Mishin, Y.

    2015-07-28

    We present a unified approach to thermodynamic description of one, two, and three dimensional phases and phase transformations among them. The approach is based on a rigorous definition of a phase applicable to thermodynamic systems of any dimensionality. Within this approach, the same thermodynamic formalism can be applied for the description of phase transformations in bulk systems, interfaces, and line defects separating interface phases. For both lines and interfaces, we rigorously derive an adsorption equation, the phase coexistence equations, and other thermodynamic relations expressed in terms of generalized line and interface excess quantities. As a generalization of the Gibbs phase rule for bulk phases, we derive phase rules for lines and interfaces and predict the maximum number of phases than may coexist in systems of the respective dimensionality.

  12. Phases, phase equilibria, and phase rules in low-dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Frolov, T; Mishin, Y

    2015-07-28

    We present a unified approach to thermodynamic description of one, two, and three dimensional phases and phase transformations among them. The approach is based on a rigorous definition of a phase applicable to thermodynamic systems of any dimensionality. Within this approach, the same thermodynamic formalism can be applied for the description of phase transformations in bulk systems, interfaces, and line defects separating interface phases. For both lines and interfaces, we rigorously derive an adsorption equation, the phase coexistence equations, and other thermodynamic relations expressed in terms of generalized line and interface excess quantities. As a generalization of the Gibbs phase rule for bulk phases, we derive phase rules for lines and interfaces and predict the maximum number of phases than may coexist in systems of the respective dimensionality. PMID:26233156

  13. Digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An digital phase-locked loop is provided for deriving a loop output signal from an accumulator output terminal. A phase detecting exclusive OR gate is fed by the loop digital input and output signals. The output of the phase detector is a bi-level digital signal having a duty cycle indicative of the relative phase of the input and output signals. The accumulator is incremented at a first rate in response to a first output level of the phase detector and at a second rate in response to a second output level of the phase detector.

  14. Monoclinic phases arising across thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yijia; Xue, Fei; Lei, Shiming; Lummen, Tom T. A.; Wang, Jianjun; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Chen, Long-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Thermotropic phase boundaries (TPBs), as thermal analogs of morphotropic phase boundaries (MPBs), are associated with the thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions. Similar to an MPB, a TPB exhibits a characteristically flattened energy profile which favors polarization rotation, thus giving rise to a structurally bridging low-symmetry phase. We report on the kinetic process of thermal inter-ferroelectric phase transitions in BaTiO3 and KNbO3 using the phase-field method. The domain structures are found to play key roles in stabilizing the monoclinic phase. In simple domain structures, the monoclinic phase is a transient phase and cannot be stabilized into its neighboring phase regimes. However, by introducing structural inhomogeneity (orthogonal in-plane domain twins), we found that the monoclinic phase can be stabilized over a range of over 100 K across the transition. As a result, the piezoelectric properties are enhanced due to the stabilized monoclinic phase. In addition to the emergence of new piezoelectric components with monoclinic symmetry, most of the original components present in the tetragonal symmetry also show substantial enhancement with the rotation of polarization.

  15. VRA Modeling, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindt, Louis M.; Mullins, Michael E.; Hand, David W.; Kline, Andrew A.

    1995-01-01

    The destruction of organic contaminants in waste water for closed systems, such as that of Space Station, is crucial due to the need for recycling the waste water. A co-current upflow bubble column using oxygen as the gas phase oxidant and packed with catalyst particles consisting of a noble metal on an alumina substrate is being developed for this process. The objective of this study is to develop a plug-flow model that will predict the performance of this three phase reactor system in destroying a multicomponent mixture of organic contaminants in water. Mass balances on a series of contaminants and oxygen in both the liquid and gas phases are used to develop this model. These mass balances incorporate the gas-to-liquid and liquid-to-particle mass transfer coefficients, the catalyst effectiveness factor, and intrinsic reaction rate. To validate this model, a bench scale reactor has been tested at Michigan Technological University at elevated pressures (50-83 psig,) and a temperature range of 200 to 290 F. Feeds consisting of five dilute solutions of ethanol (approx. 10 ppm), chlorobenzene (approx. 20 ppb), formaldehyde (approx. 100 ppb), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO approx. 300 ppb), and urea (approx. 20 ppm) in water were tested individually with an oxygen mass flow rate of 0.009 lb/h. The results from these individual tests were used to develop the kinetic parameter inputs necessary for the computer model. The computer simulated results are compared to the experimental data obtained for all 5 components run in a mixture on the differential test column for a range of reactor contact times.

  16. Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara A.; Chien, Steve A.; Castano, Rebecca; Gaines, Daniel M.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Schoolcraft, Josua B.; Oyake, Amalaye; Vaughs, Ashton G.; Torgerson, Jordan L.

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Adaptive Optics System actively corrects for changing aberrations in light due to atmospheric turbulence. However, the underlying internal static error is unknown and uncorrected by this process. The dedicated wavefront sensor device necessarily lies along a different path than the science camera, and, therefore, doesn't measure the true errors along the path leading to the final detected imagery. This is a standard problem in adaptive optics (AO) called "non-common path error." The Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration (APRC) software suite performs automated sensing and correction iterations to calibrate the Palomar AO system to levels that were previously unreachable.

  17. Quantum phase magnification.

    PubMed

    Hosten, O; Krishnakumar, R; Engelsen, N J; Kasevich, M A

    2016-06-24

    Quantum metrology exploits entangled states of particles to improve sensing precision beyond the limit achievable with uncorrelated particles. All previous methods required detection noise levels below this standard quantum limit to realize the benefits of the intrinsic sensitivity provided by these states. We experimentally demonstrate a widely applicable method for entanglement-enhanced measurements without low-noise detection. The method involves an intermediate quantum phase magnification step that eases implementation complexity. We used it to perform squeezed-state metrology 8 decibels below the standard quantum limit with a detection system that has a noise floor 10 decibels above the standard quantum limit. PMID:27339982

  18. Quantum phase magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, O.; Krishnakumar, R.; Engelsen, N. J.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum metrology exploits entangled states of particles to improve sensing precision beyond the limit achievable with uncorrelated particles. All previous methods required detection noise levels below this standard quantum limit to realize the benefits of the intrinsic sensitivity provided by these states. We experimentally demonstrate a widely applicable method for entanglement-enhanced measurements without low-noise detection. The method involves an intermediate quantum phase magnification step that eases implementation complexity. We used it to perform squeezed-state metrology 8 decibels below the standard quantum limit with a detection system that has a noise floor 10 decibels above the standard quantum limit.

  19. FNAS phase partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Project NAS8-36955 D.O. #100 initially involved the following tasks: (1) evaluation of various coatings' ability to control wall wetting and surface zeta potential expression; (2) testing various methods to mix and control the demixing of phase systems; and (3) videomicroscopic investigation of cell partition. Three complementary areas were identified for modification and extension of the original contract. They were: (1) identification of new supports for column cell partition; (2) electrokinetic detection of protein adsorption; and (3) emulsion studies related to bioseparations.

  20. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  1. Ion Phase Space Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Daniel Peter

    1987-09-01

    Experimental measurements are presented of ion phase space evolution in a collisionless magnetoplasma utilizing nonperturbing laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics. Ion configuration space and velocity space transport, and ion thermodynamic information were derived from the phase space diagrams for the following beam-plasma and obstacle-plasma systems:(UNFORMATTED TABLE OR EQUATION FOLLOWS) OBSTACLE & PLASMA SPECIES qquad disc & quad Ba ^+/e^ qquad disc & quad Ba^+/SF _6^-/e^ BEAM SPECIES & PLASMA SPECIES} qquad Ba^+ & quad Cs^+/e^ qquad Cs^+ & quad Ba^+/e^ qquad Ba^+ & quad Cs^+/SF_6 ^-/e^ qquad e^- & quad Ba^+ /e^ TABLE/EQUATION ENDS The ions were roughly mass symmetric. Plasma systems were reconstructed from multiple discrete Ba(II) ion velocity distributions with spatial, temporal, and velocity resolution of 1 mm^3, 2 musec, and 3 times 1010 cm ^3/sec^3 respectively. Phase space reconstructions indicated resonant ion response to the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (EICW) in the case of an electron beam and to the ion cyclotron-cyclotron wave in the case of ion beams. Ion energization was observed in both systems. Local particle kinetic energy densities increase far above thermal levels in the presence of the EICW and ICCW. Time-resolved measurements of the EICW identified phase space particle bunching. The nonlinear evolution of f_{rm i}(x,v,t) was investigated for both beam systems. The near wake of conducting electrically floating disc obstacle was studied. Anomalous cross field diffusion (D_bot > 10 ^4 cm^2/sec) and ion energization were correlated with strong, low-frequency turbulence generated by the obstacle. Ion perpendicular kinetic energy densities doubled over thermal levels in the near wake. Upstream of the obstacle, l ~ 50 lambda_ {rm D}, a collisionless shock was indicated; far downstream, an ion flux peak was observed. Three negative ion plasma (NIP) sources were developed and characterized in the course of research: two

  2. Vapor phase pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    The vapor phase pyrolysis process is designed exclusively for the lunar production of oxygen. In this concept, granulated raw material (soil) that consists almost entirely of metal oxides is vaporized and the vapor is raised to a temperature where it dissociates into suboxides and free oxygen. Rapid cooling of the dissociated vapor to a discrete temperature causes condensation of the suboxides, while the oxygen remains essentially intact and can be collected downstream. The gas flow path and flow rate are maintained at an optimum level by control of the pressure differential between the vaporization region and the oxygen collection system with the aid of the environmental vacuum.

  3. Frequency discriminator/phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Circuit provides dual function of frequency discriminator/phase detector which reduces frequency acquisition time without adding to circuit complexity. Both frequency discriminators, in evaluated frequency discriminator/phase detector circuits, are effective two decades above and below center frequency.

  4. Microcellular foams via phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    A study of wide variety of processes for making plastic foams shows that phase separation processes for polymers from solutions offers the most viable methods for obtaining rigid plastic foams which met the physical requirements for fusion target designs. Four general phase separation methods have been shown to give polymer foams with densities less than 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ and cell sizes of 30..mu..m or less. These methods involve the utilization of non-solvent, chemical or thermal cooling processes to achieve a controlled phase separation wherein either two distinct phases are obtained where the polymer phase is a continuous phase or two bicontinuous phases are obtained where both the polymer and solvent are interpenetrating, continuous, labyrinthine phases. Subsequent removal of the solvent gives the final foam structure.

  5. Structural, electronic and elastic properties of RERu2 (RE=Pr and Nd) Laves phase intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Deepika; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2016-05-01

    We have performed the first-principles calculations to study the structural, electronic and elastic properties of RERu2 (RE = Pr and Nd) Laves phase intermetallic compounds using full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation potential. The optimized lattices constant are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The electronic properties are analyzed in terms of band structures, total and partial density of states, which confirm their metallic character. The calculated elastic constants infer that these compounds are mechanically stable in C15 (MgCu2 type) structure and found to be ductile in nature.

  6. Stationary phase analysis of generalized cubic phase mask wavefront coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Hui, Mei; Jia, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The modified generalized cubic phase mask (GCPM) has recently been applied in wavefront coding systems including infrared imaging and microscopy. In this paper, the stationary phase method is employed to analyze the GCPM characteristics. The SPA of the modulation transfer function (MTF) under misfocus aberration is derived for a wavefront coding system with a GCPM. The approximation corresponds with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach. On the basis of this approximation, we compare the characteristics of GCPM and cubic phase masks (CPM). A GCPM design approach based on stationary phase approximation is presented which helps to determine the initial parameter of phase mask, significantly decreasing the computational time required for numerical simulation.

  7. N-Consecutive-Phase Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Lee, Ho-Kyoung; Weber, Charles

    1995-01-01

    N-consecutive-phase encoder (NCPE) is conceptual encoder for generating alphabet of N consecutive full-response continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) signals. Enables use of binary preencoder of higher rate than used with simple continuous-phase encoder (CPE). NCPE makes possible to achieve power efficiencies and bandwidth efficiencies greater than conventional trellis coders with continuous-phase frequency-shift keying (CPFSK).

  8. A cosmic superfluid phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1991-01-01

    The universe may have undergone a superfluid-like phase during its evolution, resulting from the injection of nontopological charge into the spontaneously broken vacuum. In the presence of vortices this charge is identified with angular momentum. This leads to turbulent domains on the scale of the correlation length. By restoring the symmetry at low temperatures, the vortices dissociate and push the charges to the boundaries of these domains. The model can be scaled (phenomenologically) to very low energies, it can be incorporated in a late time phase transition and form large scale structure in the boundary layers of the correlation volumes. The novel feature of the model lies in the fact that the dark matter is endowed with coherent motion. The possibilities of identifying this flow around superfluid vortices with the observed large scale bulk motion is discussed. If this identification is possible, then the definite prediction can be made that a more extended map of peculiar velocities would have to reveal large scale circulations in the flow pattern.

  9. Process for phase separation

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a continuous process for separating a gaseous phase from a hydrocarbon liquid containing carbonaceous particulates and gases. The liquid is fed to a cylindrical separator, with the gaseous phase being removed therefrom as an overhead product, whereas the hydrocarbon liquid and the particulates are withdrawn as a bottoms product. By feeding the liquid tangentially to the separator and maintaining a particulate-liquid slurry downward velocity of from about 0.01 to about 0.25 fps in the separator, a total solids weight percent in the slurry of from about 0.1 to about 30%, a slurry temperature of from about 550.degree. to about 900.degree. F., a slurry residence time in the separator of from about 30 to about 360 seconds, and a length/diameter ratio for the separator of from about 20/1 to about 50/1, so that the characterization factor, .alpha., defined as ##STR1## DOES NOT EXCEED ABOUT 48 (.degree.R sec.sup.2)/ft, the deposit of carbonaceous materials on the interior surface of the separator may be substantially eliminated.

  10. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  11. Phase calibration target for quantitative phase imaging with ptychography.

    PubMed

    Godden, T M; Muñiz-Piniella, A; Claverley, J D; Yacoot, A; Humphry, M J

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) utilizes refractive index and thickness variations that lead to optical phase shifts. This gives contrast to images of transparent objects. In quantitative biology, phase images are used to accurately segment cells and calculate properties such as dry mass, volume and proliferation rate. The fidelity of the measured phase shifts is of critical importance in this field. However to date, there has been no standardized method for characterizing the performance of phase imaging systems. Consequently, there is an increasing need for protocols to test the performance of phase imaging systems using well-defined phase calibration and resolution targets. In this work, we present a candidate for a standardized phase resolution target, and measurement protocol for the determination of the transfer of spatial frequencies, and sensitivity of a phase imaging system. The target has been carefully designed to contain well-defined depth variations over a broadband range of spatial frequencies. In order to demonstrate the utility of the target, we measure quantitative phase images on a ptychographic microscope, and compare the measured optical phase shifts with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) topography maps and surface profile measurements from coherence scanning interferometry. The results show that ptychography has fully quantitative nanometer sensitivity in optical path differences over a broadband range of spatial frequencies for feature sizes ranging from micrometers to hundreds of micrometers. PMID:27137054

  12. Phase Detector For Rectangular Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dischert, Robert A.; Walter, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Phase detector for use with phase-locked-loops, servocontrol, and other electronic circuits designed to avoid disadvantages of other phase detectors. Used with both intermittent and continuous input signals. Circuit offers several advantages; reference signals continuous, burst of few pulses, or single pulse. Circuit "coasts" in absence of reference signal. Generates no steady-state output waveform at lock which makes filtering easier.

  13. Phase-change materials handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Handbook describes relationship between phase-change materials and more conventional thermal control techniques and discusses materials' space and terrestrial applications. Material properties of most promising phase-change materials and purposes and uses of metallic filler materials in phase-change material composites are provided.

  14. Phase detector for three-phase power factor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A phase detector for the three phase power factor controller (PFC) is described. The phase detector for each phase includes an operational amplifier which senses the current phase angle for that phase by sensing the voltage across the phase thyristor. Common mode rejection is achieved by providing positive feedback between the input and output of the voltage sensing operational amplifier. this feedback preferably comprises a resistor connected between the output and input of the operational amplifier. The novelty of the invention resides in providing positive feedback such that switching of the operational amplifier is synchronized with switching of the voltage across the thyristor. The invention provides a solution to problems associated with high common mode voltage and enables use of lower cost components than would be required by other approaches.

  15. Phase chaos in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Popovych, Oleksandr V; Maistrenko, Yuri L; Tass, Peter A

    2005-06-01

    A complex high-dimensional chaotic behavior, phase chaos, is found in the finite-dimensional Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators. This type of chaos is characterized by half of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents being positive and the Lyapunov dimension equaling almost the total system dimension. Intriguingly, the strongest phase chaos occurs for intermediate-size ensembles. Phase chaos is a common property of networks of oscillators of very different natures, such as phase oscillators, limit-cycle oscillators, and chaotic oscillators, e.g., Rössler systems. PMID:16089804

  16. Phase chaos in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Maistrenko, Yuri L.; Tass, Peter A.

    2005-06-01

    A complex high-dimensional chaotic behavior, phase chaos, is found in the finite-dimensional Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators. This type of chaos is characterized by half of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents being positive and the Lyapunov dimension equaling almost the total system dimension. Intriguingly, the strongest phase chaos occurs for intermediate-size ensembles. Phase chaos is a common property of networks of oscillators of very different natures, such as phase oscillators, limit-cycle oscillators, and chaotic oscillators, e.g., Rössler systems.

  17. Geometric phase shifting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Narayanamurthy, C S; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2016-06-01

    A new phase shifting digital holographic technique using a purely geometric phase in Michelson interferometric geometry is proposed. The geometric phase in the system does not depend upon either optical path length or wavelength, unlike dynamic phase. The amount of geometric phase generated is controllable through a rotating wave plate. The new approach has unique features and major advantages in holographic measurement of transparent and reflecting three-dimensional (3D) objects. Experimental results on surface shape measurement and imaging of 3D objects are presented using the proposed method. PMID:27244436

  18. Phase coexistence far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of simple far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting phase separation leads to the conclusion that phase coexistence is not well defined in this context. This is because the properties of the coexisting nonequilibrium systems depend on how they are placed in contact, as verified in the driven lattice gas with attractive interactions, and in the two-temperature lattice gas, under (a) weak global exchange between uniform systems, and (b) phase-separated (nonuniform) systems. Thus, far from equilibrium, the notions of universality of phase coexistence (i.e., independence of how systems exchange particles and/or energy), and of phases with intrinsic properties (independent of their environment) are lost.

  19. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  20. Phasing a segmented telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykin, Irina; Yacobi, Lee; Adler, Joan; Ribak, Erez N.

    2015-02-01

    A crucial part of segmented or multiple-aperture systems is control of the optical path difference between the segments or subapertures. In order to achieve optimal performance we have to phase subapertures to within a fraction of the wavelength, and this requires high accuracy of positioning for each subaperture. We present simulations and hardware realization of a simulated annealing algorithm in an active optical system with sparse segments. In order to align the optical system we applied the optimization algorithm to the image itself. The main advantage of this method over traditional correction methods is that wave-front-sensing hardware and software are no longer required, making the optical and mechanical system much simpler. The results of simulations and laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of this optimization algorithm to correct both piston and tip-tilt errors.

  1. Infrared metamaterial phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larouche, Stéphane; Tsai, Yu-Ju; Tyler, Talmage; Jokerst, Nan M.; Smith, David R.

    2012-05-01

    As a result of advances in nanotechnology and the burgeoning capabilities for fabricating materials with controlled nanoscale geometries, the traditional notion of what constitutes an optical device continues to evolve. The fusion of maturing low-cost lithographic techniques with newer optical design strategies has enabled the introduction of artificially structured metamaterials in place of conventional materials for improving optical components as well as realizing new optical functionality. Here we demonstrate multilayer, lithographically patterned, subwavelength, metal elements, whose distribution forms a computer-generated phase hologram in the infrared region (10.6 μm). Metal inclusions exhibit extremely large scattering and can be implemented in metamaterials that exhibit a wide range of effective medium response, including anomalously large or negative refractive index; optical magnetism; and controlled anisotropy. This large palette of metamaterial responses can be leveraged to achieve greater control over the propagation of light, leading to more compact, efficient and versatile optical components.

  2. Phasing a segmented telescope.

    PubMed

    Paykin, Irina; Yacobi, Lee; Adler, Joan; Ribak, Erez N

    2015-02-01

    A crucial part of segmented or multiple-aperture systems is control of the optical path difference between the segments or subapertures. In order to achieve optimal performance we have to phase subapertures to within a fraction of the wavelength, and this requires high accuracy of positioning for each subaperture. We present simulations and hardware realization of a simulated annealing algorithm in an active optical system with sparse segments. In order to align the optical system we applied the optimization algorithm to the image itself. The main advantage of this method over traditional correction methods is that wave-front-sensing hardware and software are no longer required, making the optical and mechanical system much simpler. The results of simulations and laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of this optimization algorithm to correct both piston and tip-tilt errors. PMID:25768631

  3. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  4. Time domain phase measuring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The phase and/or period stability of a device is determined by connecting the device in one orthogonal arm of a phase detector having a mixer. In the other arm is an adjustable, variable phase shift device. The output of the mixer is fed through an active low pass filter to derive a DC voltage indicative of the phase shift. The variable phase device is adjusted so that the DC voltage will nullify the phase shift of the tested device under normal conditions. The DC voltage level is converted into a time interval indicative of the phase change of the tested device by determining when the level equals the amplitude of a low frequency ramp voltage. The interval between adjacent equality points can be measured or the period between a reference point on the ramp voltage and the quality be measured.

  5. Phase Coarsening in Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. G.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2015-08-01

    Phase coarsening (Ostwald ripening) phenomena are ubiquitous in materials growth processes such as thin film formation. The classical theory explaining late-stage phase coarsening phenomena was developed by Lifshitz and Slyozov, and by Wagner in the 1960s. Their theory is valid only for a vanishing volume fraction of the second phase in three dimensions. However, phase coarsening in two-dimensional systems is qualitatively different from that in three dimensions. In this paper, the many-body concept of screening length is reviewed, from which we derive the growth law for a `screened' phase island, and develop diffusion screening theory for phase coarsening in thin films. The coarsening rate constant, maximum size of phase islands in films, and their size distribution function will be derived from diffusion screening theory. A critical comparison will be provided of prior coarsening concepts and improvements derived from screening approaches.

  6. Simulation of Mission Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlstrom, Nicholas Mercury

    2016-01-01

    This position with the Simulation and Graphics Branch (ER7) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) provided an introduction to vehicle hardware, mission planning, and simulation design. ER7 supports engineering analysis and flight crew training by providing high-fidelity, real-time graphical simulations in the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) lab. The primary project assigned by NASA mentor and SES lab manager, Meghan Daley, was to develop a graphical simulation of the rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) phases of flight. The simulation is to include a generic crew/cargo transportation vehicle and a target object in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Various capsule, winged, and lifting body vehicles as well as historical RPOD methods were evaluated during the project analysis phase. JSC core mission to support the International Space Station (ISS), Commercial Crew Program (CCP), and Human Space Flight (HSF) influenced the project specifications. The simulation is characterized as a 30 meter +V Bar and/or -R Bar approach to the target object's docking station. The ISS was selected as the target object and the international Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) was selected as the docking mechanism. The location of the target object's docking station corresponds with the RPOD methods identified. The simulation design focuses on Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) system architecture models with station keeping and telemetry data processing capabilities. The optical and inertial sensors, reaction control system thrusters, and the docking mechanism selected were based on CCP vehicle manufacturer's current and proposed technologies. A significant amount of independent study and tutorial completion was required for this project. Multiple primary source materials were accessed using the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS) and reference textbooks were borrowed from the JSC Main Library and International Space Station Library. The Trick Simulation Environment and User

  7. Materials Data on C15S4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Degradation of C2-C15 volatile organic compounds in a landfill cover soil.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Liccioli, Caterina; Moretti, Sandro; Nisi, Barbara

    2009-07-15

    The composition of non-methane volatile organic compounds (hereafter VOCs) in i) the cover soil, at depths of 30, 50 and 70 cm, and ii) gas recovery wells from Case Passerini landfill site, (Florence, Italy) was determined by GC-MS. The study, based on the analysis of interstitial gases sampled along vertical profiles within the cover soil, was aimed to investigate the VOC behaviour as biogas transits from a reducing to a relatively more oxidizing environment. A total of 48 and 63 different VOCs were identified in the soil and well gases, respectively. Aromatics represent the dominant group (71.5% of total VOC) in soil gases, followed by alkanes (6.8%), ketones (5.7%), organic acids (5.2%), aldehydes (3.0%), esters (2.6%), halogenated compounds (2.1%) and terpenes (1.3%). Cyclics, heterocyclics, S-bearing compounds and phenols are

  9. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C15H23AsS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.