Science.gov

Sample records for c26 colon carcinoma

  1. Physical Activity Counteracts Tumor Cell Growth in Colon Carcinoma C26-Injected Muscles: An Interim Report.

    PubMed

    Hiroux, Charlotte; Vandoorne, Tijs; Koppo, Katrien; De Smet, Stefan; Hespel, Peter; Berardi, Emanuele

    2016-06-13

    Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis. PMID:27478560

  2. Physical Activity Counteracts Tumor Cell Growth in Colon Carcinoma C26-Injected Muscles: An Interim Report

    PubMed Central

    Hiroux, Charlotte; Vandoorne, Tijs; Koppo, Katrien; De Smet, Stefan; Hespel, Peter; Berardi, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis. PMID:27478560

  3. Dual role of macrophages in the response of C26 colon carcinoma cells to 5-fluorouracil administration

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Laura; Sesarman, Alina; Licarete, Emilia; Luca, Lavinia; Alupei, Marius Costel; Rakosy-Tican, Elena; Banciu, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are pivotal players in tumor progression via modulation of tumor angiogenesis, inflammation, metastasis and oxidative stress, as well as of the response of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. Nevertheless, the role of TAMs in the prognosis of colorectal cancer remains controversial. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate how TAMs mediate the response of C26 colon carcinoma cells to the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), upon TAM co-cultivation with these cancer cells in vitro. In this respect, 5-FU cytotoxicity was assessed in C26 cells in standard culture and in a co-culture with peritoneal macrophages, the production of NF-κB was determined by western blot analysis, and the production of angiogenic/inflammatory proteins in each experimental model was evaluated by protein array analysis. To gain further evidence of the effect of TAMs on oxidative stress, malondialdehyde was measured through high-performance liquid chromatography, and the total nonenzymatic antioxidant levels and the production of nitrites were measured through colorimetric assays. The results demonstrated that TAMs exerted a dual role in the response of C26 cells to 5-FU administration in the co-culture model. Thus, on one side, TAMs sensitized C26 cells to 5-FU administration through inhibition of the production of inflammatory and angiogenic proteins in these cancer cells; however, they also protected cancer cells against 5-FU-induced oxidative stress. Collectively, the present findings suggest that the combined administration of 5-FU with pharmacological agents that prevent TAMs to maintain the physiological range of tumor cell oxidative stress may highly improve the therapeutic potential of this drug. PMID:27446416

  4. Biosynthesized silver nanoparticles performing as biogenic SERS-nanotags for investigation of C26 colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Potara, Monica; Bawaskar, Manisha; Simon, Timea; Gaikwad, Swapnil; Licarete, Emilia; Ingle, Avinash; Banciu, Manuela; Vulpoi, Adriana; Astilean, Simion; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-09-01

    In this work, two classes of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were biosynthesized with the goal to assess their reliability in vitro as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanotags. Mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles (MAgNPs) and phytosynthesized silver nanoparticles (PAgNPs) were produced through environmentally friendly procedures by reduction of silver nitrate with Fusarium oxysporum cell filtrate and Azadirachta indica extract, respectively. Two cell lines, namely C26 murine colon carcinoma cells as example of cancer cells and human immortalized keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) as representative of healthy cell line, were selected for in vitro investigation. The in vitro toxicity studies show that M(P)AgNPs present lower cytotoxic effect on both cell lines as compared with standard citrate coated AgNPs. The internalization of M(P)AgNPs by colon carcinoma cells and structural alterations induced in the morphology of treated cells were analyzed by dark-field (DF) and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, respectively. The most informative data about the cellular uptake and tracking potential of M(P)AgNPs were provided by scanning Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) and multivariate K-means cluster analysis of collected Raman spectra. The analysis reveals the subcellular components and the localization of AgNPs inside the cell via the intrinsic SERS signature of biogenic coating material. The use of unique biological material to perform synthesis, stability, biocompatibility and SERS tagging is relevant both from the point of view of encoding nanoparticles with Raman reporters and further applications in cell investigation via Raman/SERS imaging. PMID:26123850

  5. Pharmacokinetics, micro-SPECT/CT imaging and therapeutic efficacy of (188)Re-DXR-liposome in C26 colon carcinoma ascites mice model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Yu, Chia-Yu; Chang, Ya-Jen; Wu, Yu-Hsien; Lee, Wan-Chi; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Te-Wei; Ting, Gann

    2008-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics and internal radionuclide therapy of intraperitoneally administrated (188)Re-N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylethylenediamine (BMEDA)-labeled pegylated liposomal doxorubicin ((188)Re-DXR-liposome) were investigated in the C26 murine colon carcinoma ascites mouse model. After intraperitoneal administration of the nanotargeted bimodality (188)Re-DXR-liposome, the ascites and tumor accumulation of the radioactivity were observed, the levels of radioactivity within the ascites were maintained at relatively higher levels before 48 h and the levels of radioactivity in the tumor were maintained at steady levels after 4 h. The AUC((o-->infinity)) of (188)Re-DXR-liposome in blood, ascites and tumor was 9.3-, 4.2- and 4.7-fold larger than that of (188)Re-BMEDA, respectively. The maximum tolerated dose of intraperitoneally administrated (188)Re-DXR-liposome was determined in normal BALB/c mice. The survival, tumor and ascites inhibition of mice after (188)Re-DXR-liposome (22.2 MBq of (188)Re, 5 mg/kg of DXR) treatment were evaluated. Consequently, radiochemotherapeutics of (188)Re-DXR-liposome attained better survival time, tumor and ascites inhibition (decreased by 49% and 91% at 4 days after treatment; P<.05) in mice than radiotherapeutics of (188)Re-liposome or chemotherapeutics of Lipo-Dox did. Therefore, intraperitoneal administration of novel (188)Re-DXR-liposome could provide a benefit and promising strategy for delivery of passive nanotargeted bimodality radiochemotherapeutics in oncology applications. PMID:19026950

  6. Investigation of Hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) usage in Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin as a synergistic ingredient: In vitro and in vivo evaluation in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma and B16F0 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Teymouri, Manouchehr; Farzaneh, Hamidreza; Badiee, Ali; Golmohammadzadeh, Shiva; Sadri, Kayvan; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-12-01

    In this investigation, Hexadecylphosphocholine (HePC, miltefosine) was being used as a new ingredient in Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and different aspects of this integration such as its effect on doxorubicin (Dox) release and cell uptake, cytotoxicity of liposomes, in vivo distribution and half-life clearance time of Dox as well as median survival time were illustrated. The liposomal formulations were Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin containing 0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4% mole ratios of HePC (HePC-PLD) and their respective Dox-free liposomes (HePC-PLs). The cells used were colon carcinoma (C26), adriamycin-resistant breast cancer (MCF-7-ADR), and B16F0 melanoma cell lines, of which C26 and B16F0 cells were exploited for tumoring in BALB/c and C57Bl/6 mice, respectively. In most cases, increase in miltefosine percentage resulted in physically liposomal instability, increased Dox delivery and toxicity and reduced blood half-life of Dox. Overall, HePC 4% -PLD and PLD differed significantly in many respects and it was considered too toxic to be injected at the same dose (15mg Dox/ kg) as PLD. Although HePC 2% -PLD could extend the median survival time marginally in comparison to PLD, the concept of HePC- containing liposomes merits further investigation. PMID:26299343

  7. The influence of phospholipid on the physicochemical properties and anti-tumor efficacy of liposomes encapsulating cisplatin in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alavizadeh, Seyedeh Hoda; Badiee, Ali; Golmohammadzadeh, Shiva; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2014-10-01

    SPI-077, cisplatin stealth liposome, is the best illustration of poor cisplatin release from liposomes and the subsequent negligible therapeutic activity. For this reason, optimizing drug release kinetics is desirable. In this report, cisplatin was encapsulated in liposomes composed of different phosphatidylcholines with various phase transition temperatures (Tm) (HSPC, DPPC, DMPC, soy phosphatidylcholine (SPC)), cholesterol and mPEG2000-DSPE. In vitro cytotoxicity studies indicated that lowering Tm of lipids increases cisplatin release; the highest cytotoxicity was observed in SPCs. Cisplatin plasma concentration was also sensitive to the transition temperature. The highest platinum concentration observed after treatment with HSPC and DPPC liposomes, whilst the lowest was observed with SPC. HSPC and DPPC containing liposomes showed the highest therapeutic efficacy and survival with DPPC exhibited better efficacy in mouse model of C26. It seems that DPPC with Tm (41.5°C) nearly, or close to body temperature maintains good drug retention in blood circulation. Upon extravasation through permeable tumor microvasculature, it gradually releases its payload in the tumor area better than HSPC, with a greater Tm of 55°C. Our data suggests, the choice of Tm for lipid mixture directed to a considerable extent the rate of cisplatin elimination from plasma and therapeutic effects. PMID:25051111

  8. Diffuse lymphoid follicles of the colon associated with colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bronen, R A; Glick, S N; Teplick, S K

    1984-01-01

    In four patients aged 59-75 years, colonic carcinoma was associated with diffuse lymphoid follicles in the colon. In one case, the prominence and distribution of the lymphoid follicles corresponded to the progression and regression of the tumor bulk. It is extremely unusual to demonstrate lymphoid follicles, particularly diffuse, on barium enema in patients in this age range. The colonic carcinomas and lymphoid follicles are directly related, possibly representing an immune response. PMID:6606941

  9. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Causing Colonic Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, André Costa; Marques, Ana; Lopes, Joanne; Duarte, Alexandre; da Silva, Pedro Correia; Lopes, José Manuel; Maia, J. Costa

    2016-01-01

    Colonic intussusception is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults and is caused by a malignant lesion in about 70% of cases. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential. We present a 64-year-old male patient with right colonic intussusception caused by a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC), presenting as a giant pedunculated polyp (54 mm of largest diameter). The patient underwent right colectomy with primary anastomosis and adjuvant chemotherapy. The diagnosis of intussusception of the colon in adults is difficult because of its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation. In this case, the cause was a rare histological type malignant tumor (MANEC). PMID:27525153

  10. Colon carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, J.W. Jr.; Carter, M.P.; Berens, S.V.; Long, R.F.; Caplan, G.E.

    1986-09-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the thyroid gland rarely is encountered in clinical practice; however, autopsy series have shown that it is not a rare occurrence. A case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with metastases to the thyroid is reported. A review of the literature reveals that melanoma, breast, renal, and lung carcinomas are the most frequent tumors to metastasize to the thyroid. Metastatic disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cold nodules on radionuclide thyroid scans, particularly in patients with a known primary.

  11. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Willett, C G; Tepper, J E; Skates, S J; Wood, W C; Orlow, E C; Duttenhaver, J R

    1987-01-01

    One hundred thirty-three patients with Stage B2, B3, and C colonic carcinoma had resection for curative intent followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy to the tumor bed. The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rates for these 133 patients were 82% and 61%, respectively. Stage for stage, the development of local regional failure was reduced for patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy compared with a historic control series. Local recurrence occurred in 8%, 21%, and 31% of patients with Stage B3, C2, and C3 tumors who had radiation therapy, respectively, whereas the local failure rates were 31%, 36%, and 53% in patients treated with surgery alone. There was a 13% and 12% improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate in the patients with Stage B3 and C3 lesions who had radiotherapy compared with the historic controls. For patients with Stage C disease, local control and disease-free survival rates decreased progressively with increasing nodal involvement; however, local control and disease-free survival rates were higher in the patients who had radiotherapy than in those who had surgery alone. Failure patterns in the patients who had radiotherapy did not show any notable changes compared with those for patients who had surgery alone. Postoperative radiation therapy for Stage B3, C2, and C3 colonic carcinoma is a promising treatment approach that deserves further investigation. PMID:3689006

  12. Specific Antigen in Serum of Patients with Colon Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Herlyn, Meenhard; Steplewski, Zenon; Sears, Henry F.

    1981-04-01

    The binding of monoclonal antibody specific for colon carcinoma was inhibited by serum from patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon but not by serum from patients with other bowel diseases or from healthy volunteers. Of other malignancies studied, serum from two patients with gastric carcinoma and two patients with pancreatic carcinoma also inhibited the specific binding of monoclonal antibody. The levels of carcinoembryonic antigen in these serum samples were not correlated with their levels of binding inhibition. Such monoclonal antibodies may prove useful for the detection of colorectal carcinoma.

  13. Colonic carcinoma presenting as strangulated inguinal hernia: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Slater, R; Amatya, U; Shorthouse, A J

    2008-09-01

    Inguinal hernia and colonic carcinoma are common surgical conditions, yet carcinoma of the colon occurring within an inguinal hernia sac is rare. Of 25 reported cases, only one was a perforated sigmoid colon carcinoma in an inguinal hernia. We report two cases of sigmoid colon carcinoma, one of which had locally perforated. Each presented within a strangulated inguinal hernia. Oncologically correct surgery in these patients presents a technical challenge. PMID:18798013

  14. Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Arifi, Samia; Elmesbahi, Omar; Amarti Riffi, Afaf

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal primary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare entity accounting for nearly 1% of all colorectal carcinomas. It is an independent prognostic factor associated with less favorable outcome. This aggressiveness is mainly due to the intrinsic biology of these tumors. Here is an overview of the literature related to clinicopathological features, molecular biology, and management of SRCC of the colon and the rectum. PMID:26412710

  15. [Synchronous carcinomas of the colon and rectum].

    PubMed

    Mandarano, R; Ciccone, A

    1995-12-01

    The authors base their observations on 3 cases of synchronous carcinoma of the large intestine and 1 case of association of cancer on polyps and synchronous colorectal carcinoma. After a short review of the etiopathogenetic and diagnostic aspects, they focus attention in particular on the various types on surgical approach which synchronous carcinoma of the large intestine offer to surgeons. The authors underline that numerous forms of surgery exist which are often complex and difficult, especially if multiple neoplasia involve separate colic segments and above all if they affect the distal rectal section. In conclusion, they affirm that the association of cancer on polyps and synchronous colorectal carcinoma is not rare and should be treated using combined endoscopic and surgical therapy. To the precise colic exeresis should be followed by endoscopic resection in the case of a scissil, villous polyps with high non-differentiated neoplastic tissue laying close on the endoscopic plane of section. PMID:8725069

  16. A Key Role for Leukemia Inhibitory Factor in C26 Cancer Cachexia.

    PubMed

    Seto, Danielle N; Kandarian, Susan C; Jackman, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Cachexia is an exacerbating event in many types of cancer that is strongly associated with a poor prognosis. We have identified cytokine, signaling, and transcription factors that are required for cachexia in the mouse C26 colon carcinoma model of cancer. C2C12 myotubes treated with conditioned medium from C26 cancer cells induced atrophy and activated a STAT-dependent reporter gene but not reporter genes dependent on SMAD, FOXO, C/EBP, NF-κB, or AP-1. Of the gp130 family members IL-11, IL-6, oncostatin M (OSM), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), only OSM and LIF were sufficient to activate the STAT reporter in myotubes. LIF was elevated in C26 conditioned medium (CM), but IL-6, OSM, TNFα, and myostatin were not. A LIF-blocking antibody abolished C26 CM-induced STAT reporter activation, STAT3 phosphorylation, and myotube atrophy but blocking antibodies to IL-6 or OSM did not. JAK2 inhibitors also blocked C26 CM-induced STAT reporter activation, STAT3 phosphorylation, and atrophy in myotubes. LIF at levels found in the C26 CM was sufficient for STAT reporter activation and atrophy in myotubes. In vivo, an increase in serum LIF preceded the increase in IL-6 in mice with C26 tumors. Overexpression of a dominant negative Stat3Cβ-EGFP gene in myotubes and in mouse muscle blocked the atrophy caused by C26 CM or C26 tumors, respectively. Taken together, these data support an important role of LIF-JAK2-STAT3 in C26 cachexia and point to a therapeutic approach for at least some types of cancer cachexia. PMID:26092726

  17. [A case of mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma of the transverse colon].

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Jiro; Miki, Akira; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Uryuhara, Kenji; Hashida, Hiroki; Mizumoto, Masaki; Kaihara, Satoshi; Hosotani, Ryo; Yamashita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A 7 1-year-old man presented to our hospital with constipation and abdominal pain. Computed tomography of the abdomen and colonoscopy revealed advanced cancer of the transverse colon. The biopsy specimen indicated a highly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent extended right hemicolectomy with regional lymph node dissection. Pathological examination showed a neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) with concurrent adenocarcinoma of the transverse colon and regional lymph node metastases of the NEC and adenocarcinoma. The histopathological examination confirmed a diagnosis of mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) in accordance with the 2010 WHO Classification of Tumors of the Digestive System. Liver and lung metastases were identified 8 months after the surgery. We administered chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX) plus bevacizumab, with limited therapeutic effect, as the disease progressed despite treatment. The patient chose best supportive care 13 months after the surgery. Several studies have reported that most patients with adenoendocrine cell carcinoma, including MANEC, experience relapse within 1 year after surgery, and few patients remain disease-free for long periods after surgery. The optimal strategy for the management of MANEC is variable owing to its rarity; only 2 cases of MANEC in the colon, including the present case, have been reported in Japan. It is thus important to gather more evidence on this disease and its management. PMID:25731343

  18. Plasminogen receptors on rat colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Durliat, M.; Komano, O.; Correc, P.; Bertrand, O.; Cochet, S.; Caignard, A.; Martin, F.; Burtin, P.

    1992-01-01

    Cells from rat carcinoma cell lines PROb (giving progressive tumours) and REGb (giving regressive tumours) have cell surface receptors which bind specifically rat plasminogen and plasmin. Affinity for Pg was found to be higher in PROb (Kd = 10(-7) M) than in REGb cells (Kd = 5.10(-7) M) but with a concomitant decrease in the number of binding sites, 0.9 x 10(6)/cell (range from 0.6 to 1.2 x 10(6)) in PROb vs 3.6 x 10(6)/cell (range 1.2 to 6 x 10(6)) in REGb cells. The number and the affinity of binding sites varied in an opposite way in PROb and REGb cells. The difference in affinity parameters was unrelated to the degree of invasiveness of tumour cells in syngenetic rats. Bound plasmin retained its enzymatic activity, which indicates that its binding does not involve the catalytic active site. In cell solubilisates plasminogen receptor appeared as one major band situated in the area of 50-60 kDa. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:1322156

  19. Pleomorphic Carcinoma of the Colon: Morphological and Immunohistochemical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Giovanni; Barresi, Valeria; Ieni, Antonio; Irato, Eleonora; Caruso, Rosario Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Pleomorphic carcinoma is an aggressive neoplasm defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a poorly differentiated (squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma) or undifferentiated carcinoma in which at least 10% spindle and/or giant cells are identified, or as a carcinoma constituted purely of spindle and giant cells. Although this entity has initially been shown in the lung, it has been described also in extrapulmonary locations, with only one report for a colonic site. A 65-year-old woman developed a caecal tumour. Gross examination revealed an endophytic/ulcerative mass 7 cm in length. Microscopically, the tumour was a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with a pleomorphic component that occupied more than 10% of the specimen. The tumour shared these histopathological findings with pulmonary giant cell carcinoma but differed in other clinicopathological features such as a pushing growth pattern, stage pT3N1, and an uneventful outcome 24 months after operation. The pleomorphic component showed morphological and immunohistochemical features compatible with mitotic catastrophe, a non-apoptotic cell death occurring in cycling cells after aberrant mitosis. These features included multinucleation, micronucleation, atypical mitoses, foci of geographic necrosis, as well as immunohistochemical overexpression of p53 and Ki-67. The interpretation of the pleomorphic component as morphological expression of mitotic catastrophe may be useful in comprehending the pathogenesis of this rare neoplasm, and it may have practical implications as a potential cancer therapeutic target. PMID:27462191

  20. Sigmoid colon carcinoma with focal neuroendocrine differentiation associated with ulcerative colitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Rifu, Kazuma; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Kono, Yoshihiko; Tahara, Makiko; Sakuma, Yasunaru; Hosoya, Yoshinori; Kitayama, Joji; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Sata, Naohiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neuroendocrine tumors of the colon and rectum are relatively rare compared to sporadic colorectal carcinoma. There are few reports of neuroendocrine tumors of the colon and rectum in patients with ulcerative colitis. Presentation of case A patient with sigmoid colon carcinoma with focal neuroendocrine features is presented. A 32-year-old man, who had been followed for ulcerative colitis for 14 years, was found to have carcinoma of the sigmoid colon on routine annual colonoscopy, and he underwent laparoscopic total colectomy. Pathologic examination showed sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma with focal neuroendocrine features. Discussion Most colorectal carcinomas associated with inflammatory bowel disease are histologically similar to the sporadic type, and tumors with neuroendocrine features are very unusual. Conclusion Very rare case of sigmoid colon carcinoma with neuroendocrine features arising in a patient with UC was described. PMID:27136202

  1. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early stage colon neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Uedo, Noriya; Ishihara, Ryu; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Early stage colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma is rare. A small colon tumour was found in a 56-year-old man during diagnostic colonoscopy performed after a positive faecal occult blood test, and he was referred for treatment. A slightly reddish superficial elevated lesion with a shallow depression 10 mm in size was found in the transverse colon. Magnifying narrow-band imaging revealed disrupted irregular microvessels and the absence of a surface pattern in the depressed area. En bloc endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the tumour was undertaken. The tumour was positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin, and had a mitotic rate of >20/10 high-power fields and a Ki-67 proliferative index of >50%; it was diagnosed as a neuroendocrine carcinoma. The tumour minimally invaded the submucosa (300 μm) without lymphovascular involvement. The patient was followed up carefully, and at 1 year after EMR, no recurrence was found using colonoscopy and CT scans. PMID:25737221

  2. [Synchronous or metachronous extragastric neoplasms associated with gastric neoplasia. Common pathogenesis of gastric intestinal and colonic carcinoma?].

    PubMed

    Planells Roig, M V; García Espinosa, R; Morcillo Ródenas, R; Rodero Rodero, D

    1990-12-01

    Coexistence of syncronous or metacronous extragastric carcinomas, particularly of the colon and small bowel may favour the hypothesis of a common origin with gastric carcinoma. Three cases of colonic carcinoma coexisting with early gastric cancer, are presented. The etiopathogenesis of intestinal-type gastric cancer and colonic cancer are discussed in the light of a possible common mechanism. PMID:2091707

  3. Proteomic analysis of colon and rectal carcinoma using standard and customized databases

    PubMed Central

    Slebos, Robbert J.C.; Wang, Xia; Wang, Xaojing; Zhang, Bing; Tabb, David L.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding proteomic differences underlying the different phenotypic classes of colon and rectal carcinoma is important and may eventually lead to a better assessment of clinical behavior of these cancers. We here present a comprehensive description of the proteomic data obtained from 90 colon and rectal carcinomas previously subjected to genomic analysis by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Here, the primary instrument files and derived secondary data files are compiled and presented in forms that will allow further analyses of the biology of colon and rectal carcinoma. We also discuss new challenges in processing these large proteomic datasets for relevant proteins and protein variants. PMID:26110064

  4. Elective laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon carcinoma incarcerated within an inguinal hernia: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kanemura, Takashi; Takeno, Atsushi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Nakahira, Shin; Suzuki, Rei; Nakata, Ken; Egawa, Chiyomi; Miki, Hirohumi; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi

    2014-07-01

    Primary colon carcinoma within an inguinal hernia sac is very rare and most reported cases were found at emergency open surgery for an incarcerated hernia. We report a case of incarcerated sigmoid colon carcinoma diagnosed preoperatively and treated with elective laparoscopic surgery. A 67-year-old man with a 2-year history of swelling of the scrotum and a breast lump was referred to us for surgical treatment of an irreducible left inguinal hernia and a right breast tumor. Blood examination results showed severe anemia. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic biopsy confirmed sigmoid colon carcinoma incarcerated in the left inguinal hernia. Thus, we performed definitive laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and conventional hernia repair for preoperatively diagnosed sigmoid colon carcinoma within an inguinal hernia. PMID:23846798

  5. Mucin production by human colonic carcinoma cells correlates with their metastatic potential in animal models of colon cancer metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Bresalier, R S; Niv, Y; Byrd, J C; Duh, Q Y; Toribara, N W; Rockwell, R W; Dahiya, R; Kim, Y S

    1991-01-01

    Patients with mucinous colorectal cancers characteristically present with advanced disease, however, the relationship between mucin production by colon cancer cells and their metastatic potential remains unclear. We therefore sought to define the relationship between mucin production by human colon cancer cells and metastatic ability by employing animal models of colon cancer metastasis. LS LiM 6, a colon carcinoma cell line with high liver metastasizing ability during cecal growth in nude mice produced twofold more metabolically labeled intracellular mucin and secreted four- to fivefold more mucin into the culture medium compared to poorly metastatic parental line LS174T. This was accompanied by a similar elevation in poly(A)+ RNA detected by blot hybridization with a human intestinal mucin cDNA probe, and increases in mucin core carbohydrate antigens determined immunohistochemically. Variants of LS174T selected for high (HM 7) or low (LM 12) mucin synthesizing capacity also yielded metastases after cecal growth and colonized the liver after splenic-portal injection in proportion to their ability to produce mucin. Inhibition of mucin glycosylation by the arylglycoside benzyl-alpha-N-acetyl-galactosamine greatly reduced liver colonization after splenic-portal injection of the tumor cells. These data suggest that mucin production by human colon cancer cells correlates with their metastatic potential and affects their ability to colonize the liver in experimental model systems. Images PMID:1999484

  6. Reduced expression of β-catenin inhibitor Chibby in colon carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Schuierer, Marion M; Graf, Elisabeth; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the Chibby expression and its function in colon carcinoma cell lines and colorectal carcinoma (CRC). METHODS: Chibby expression levels were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR in a panel of seven different colon carcinoma cell lines. By sequencing, we analysed mutational status of Chibby. To test whether Chibby exhibited effects on β-catenin signalling in colon carcinoma cells, we transfected SW480 cells with Chibby expression plasmid and, subsequently, analysed activity of β-catenin and tested for alterations in cellular phenotype. In addition, we examined Chibby mRNA levels in samples of colorectal carcinomas and adjacent normal tissues by using quantitative RT-PCR and hybridised gene chips with samples from CRC and normal tissues. RESULTS: Chibby mRNA expression was strongly down-regulated in colon carcinoma cell lines in comparison to normal colon epithelial cells and no mutation in any of the examined colon carcinoma cell lines was found. Further, we could show that Chibby inhibited β-catenin activity in TOPflash assays when over-expressed in SW480 cells. Proliferation and invasion assays with Chibby transfected SW480 cells did not reveal profound differences compared to control cells. In contrast to these in vitro data, quantitative RT-PCR analyses of Chibby mRNA levels in CRC tumor samples did not show significant differences to specimens in adjacent non-cancerous tissue. Consistent with these findings, gene chips analysing tissue samples of tumors and corresponding normal tissue did not show altered Chibby expression CONCLUSION: Altered Chibby expression might be observed in vitro in different colon carcinoma cell lines. However, this finding could not be confirmed in vitro in CRC tumors, indicating that Chibby is not likely to promote CRC tumor development or progression. As Chibby is an important inhibitor of ß-catenin signalling, our data implicate that the usability of colon carcinoma cell lines for in vitro studies analysing the Wnt

  7. T cell receptor-zeta and granzyme B expression in mononuclear cell infiltrates in normal colon mucosa and colon carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, W M; Bloemena, E; Stukart, M J; Kummer, J A; Wagstaff, J; Scheper, R J

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whereas the presence of a lymphoid infiltrate has been associated with a favourable prognosis in colorectal carcinoma, the proliferative and cytotoxic responses of freshly isolated tumour infiltrating lymphocytes are frequently impaired. In mice, tumour induced immune suppression has been associated with a decreased expression of the zeta-chain of the T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex, and loss of mRNA for granzyme B. AIM: To compare the expression of TCR-zeta and granzyme B in lymphocytes infiltrating normal colonic mucosa and Duke's A and D colorectal carcinomas. SPECIMENS: Paraffin wax embedded normal (n = 10) and malignant colonic mucosa (seven Dukes's A, nine Dukes's D). METHOD: Immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The numbers of TCR-zeta + lymphocytes decreased from normal mucosa to Dukes's D carcinomas. In contrast, granzyme B+ lymphocytes were more frequent in Dukes's A carcinomas than in normal mucosa, but disappeared from advanced stage tumours. Granzyme B expressing cells were mainly CD3- (natural killer/lymphokine activated killer cells) in normal mucosa, but CD3+ in tumours, indicating the presence of activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In vitro culture of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes rapidly restored the expression of both molecules. CONCLUSION: The frequency of TCR-zeta + and granzyme B+ lymphocytes is decreased in advanced stage colorectal carcinomas. The restoration of expression during in vitro stimulation suggests the presence of tumour derived suppressive factors in situ. Images PMID:9155587

  8. Growth inhibition effects of ent-11α-hydroxy-15-oxo-kaur-16-en-19-oic-acid on colorectal carcinoma cells and colon carcinoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hua; Wu, Qiong; Guo, Meng; Wu, Kefeng; Lv, Yingnian; Yu, Fengyan; Liu, Yi; Gao, Xiaosheng; Zhu, Yuzhen; Cui, Liao; Liang, Nianci; Yun, Tu; Li, Li; Zheng, Xuebao

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the antitumor effects of ent-11α-hydroxy-15-oxo-kaur-16-en-19-oic-acid (5F) in colorectal cancer (CRC). 5F was isolated and used to treat C26 murine colon carcinoma cells, a xenograft tumor mouse model (induced by C26 cells) and a CRC mouse model [induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)]. C26 cell growth was inhibited by 5F in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. In addition, 5F induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G2 phase, increased the activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9, but did not affect the activity of cascase‑8, suggesting that 5F induced apoptosis via activation of the mitochondrial signaling pathway rather than the death‑receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, treatment of C26 cells with 5F resulted in upregulation of cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21, Cip1), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein, nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B‑cells inhibitor, α and downregulation of B‑cell lymphoma 2, nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain enhancer of activated B cells and survivin. In vivo animal models demonstrated that 5F treatment protected mice from carcinogenesis induced by DMH/DSS and markedly decreased the xenograft tumor weight with minimal side effects. Therefore, 5F may have potential as an anti-CRC therapeutic agent for use in the clinical setting. PMID:26935771

  9. Involvement of N-acetyl-lactosamine-containing sugar structures in the liver metastasis of mouse colon carcinoma (colon 26) cells.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, H; Ito, M; Miura, Y; Hirano, H

    1994-01-01

    Histochemical aspects of the process of experimentally induced metastasis were examined by light and electron microscopy with labelled lectins employed as a probe. Mouse colon carcinoma cells (colon 26) were injected into the spleen of Balb/c mice and liver metastasis was induced. Among the lectins tested, Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA) stained the metastasized colon 26 cells strongly compared with the heterogeneous and faint staining in non-metastasized tumour foci in the spleen or in the subcutaneous space. Other lectins, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E) and Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA), having specificity for branched complex type sugar chains, did not show any differences between metastasized cells and non-metastasized tumour foci. In addition, N-acetyl-lactosamine, a specific inhibitor of ECA binding, significantly inhibited the attachment of suspended colon 26 cells to sectioned unfixed normal liver tissue. These results indicate that the expression of galactose (Gal) beta 1-4 N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residues of branched complex type sugar chains having specificity for ECA are important for the interaction process of carcinoma cells with hepatic cells in the process of liver metastasis. PMID:7532448

  10. Disturbed Colonic Motility Contributes to Anorectal Symptoms and Dysfunction After Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric K.; Bartholomeusz, Dylan L.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fraser, Robert J.; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata; Moore, James W.; Schoeman, Mark N.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of colonic motility in the pathogenesis of anorectal symptoms and dysfunction after radiotherapy (RT) for carcinoma of the prostate. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients, median age 71 (range, 50-81) years with localized prostate carcinoma randomized to one of two radiation dose schedules underwent colonic transit scintigraphy and assessment of anorectal symptoms (questionnaire), anorectal function (manometry), and anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and at 1 month and 1 year after RT. Results: Whole and distal colonic transit increased 1 month after RT, with faster distal colonic transit only persisting at 1 year. Frequency and urgency of defecation, fecal incontinence, and rectal bleeding increased 1 month after RT and persisted at 1 year. Basal anal pressures remained unchanged, but progressive reductions occurred in anal squeeze pressures and responses to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Rectal compliance decreased progressively in the patients, although no changes in anorectal sensory function ensued. Radiotherapy had no effect on the morphology of the internal and external anal sphincters. Distal colonic retention was weakly related to rectal compliance at 1 month, but both faster colonic transit and reduced rectal compliance were more frequent with increased fecal urgency. At 1 year, a weak inverse relationship existed between colonic half-clearance time and frequency of defecation, although both faster whole-colonic transit and reduced rectal compliance occurred more often with increased stool frequency. Conclusion: Colonic dysmotility contributes to anorectal dysfunction after RT for carcinoma of the prostate. This has implications for improving the management of anorectal radiation sequelae.

  11. A colonization of basal cell carcinoma by malignant melanoma in situ resembling a malignant basomelanocytic tumor.

    PubMed

    Goeser, Megan; DiMaio, Dominick J

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of colonization of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) by malignant melanoma in situ (MIS) simulating a malignant basomelanocytic tumor. A biopsy of a pigmented lesion present on an 83-year-old man's scalp displayed intimate admixing of basaloid and melanocytic cells. This seemingly inseparable combination of BCC and neoplastic melanocytes has been referred to as a malignant basomelanocytic tumor. However, our case also displays an adjacent component of MIS, thus favoring colonization of BCC by MIS as the etiology. To our knowledge, this is the third case report of colonization of BCC by MIS resembling a malignant basomelanocytic tumor. PMID:24752214

  12. Creatine kinase activity and isoenzymes in lung, colon and liver carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, J.; Cardesa, A.; Carreras, J.

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the levels of creatine kinase (CK) activity and the distribution of CK isoenzymes determined by agarose gel electrophoresis in normal colon, liver and lung tissues, and in colon, liver and lung adenocarcinomas, lung squamous cell carcinomas and lung carcinoids. Colon and lung adenocarcinomas, and squamous cell carcinomas presented lower CK activity than the normal tissues and no differences were found between hepatocarcinoma and normal liver tissue. In contrast, lung carcinoids had higher CK activity than normal lung tissue. Type BB-CK was the predominant isoenzyme in normal lung, colon and liver tissues. Type MM isoenzyme was detected in normal lung and type MB-CK was found in normal colon. In most lung tumours the CK isoenzyme electrophoretic pattern did not change. However, no type BB-CK was detected in some hepatocarcinomas, type MM-CK decreased in lung carcinoids and type MB isoenzyme was not observed in colon adenocarcinomas. It is concluded that in most tumours there is a decrease in the expression of type B- and type M-CK subunits, whereas in lung carcinoid the expression of type B-CK activity increases. Thus, the increase in type BB-CK observed in the serum of patients with lung and colon adenocarcinomas is probably due mainly to enhanced enzyme release as a result of tumour cell necrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9303358

  13. Colonic metastasis in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Jeba, Jenifer; Suryawanshi, Mayur; Gaikwad, Pranay; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of intermediate-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid with late local recurrence and colonic metastasis. A 69-year-old man who had undergone right total conservative parotidectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy for intermediate-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma 10 years prior, presented with a recurrent swelling in the postoperative site and cardiac failure. On evaluation, he was found to have severe anaemia with positive stool occult blood. Colonoscopic evaluation revealed a globular submucosal bulge with erosion 40 cm from the anal verge, the biopsy of which was consistent with mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The presentation, diagnostic details and management of this rare case are discussed. PMID:26823365

  14. Visualization of metastases from colon carcinoma using an iodine 131-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Leyden, M.J.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; Andrews, J.T.; Sullivan, J.R.; Zalcberg, J.R.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1986-03-15

    A murine monoclonal antibody that reacts with human colonic cancer (250-30.6) was labeled with radioactive iodine (131I) and the antibody was injected intravenously into 15 patients with known metastases originating from carcinoma of the colon (10 cases), malignant melanoma (1), breast (1), pancreas (1), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and adenocarcinoma of unknown origin (1). Of the patients with metastatic colon carcinoma, there were 19 known deposits as judged by the techniques of clinical examination, x-rays, and scans obtained using sulpha-colloid. Of these 19 deposits, 17 (90%) were found using the 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody. In one case, the primary tumor, previously undiagnosed, was found. In only 1 of the 10 patients was tumor not found and this was due to the subsequent finding that the undifferentiated tumor did not react with antibody. Of the five patients who did not have carcinoma of the colon, three had negative scans, but two were positive. Thus, the technique of immunoscintography can readily detect both primary and metastatic tumors.

  15. Medullary carcinoma of the colon: a distinct morphology reveals a distinctive immunoregulatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Kenneth; Brodsky, Alexander S; Lu, Shaolei; Wood, Stephanie; Gill, Anthony J; Lombardo, Kara; Yang, Dongfang; Resnick, Murray B

    2016-05-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the colon is a unique histologic subtype of microsatellite unstable colorectal carcinoma but little is known regarding its tumor-immunoregulatory microenvironment. The aims of this study were to characterize the immune environment of medullary carcinoma and compare it with other microsatellite unstable and microsatellite stable colorectal carcinomas. An initial gene expression microarray analysis of six cases of medullary carcinoma was used to detect potentially differentially expressed genes. We extended this analysis utilizing genomic data from the Cancer Genome Atlas to compare eight cases of medullary carcinoma with other microsatellite unstable and stable carcinomas. Finally, we evaluated expression of key immune pathway proteins and lymphocyte subsets via immunohistochemistry of a large group of medullary carcinomas (n=105) and compared these findings with three other groups: poorly differentiated, microsatellite unstable well-differentiated and microsatellite stable well-differentiated carcinomas. Microarray and the Cancer Genome Atlas data analysis identified significant upregulation of several immunoregulatory genes induced by IFNγ including IDO-1, WARS (tRNA(trp)), GBP1, GBP4, GBP5, PDCD1 (PD-1), and CD274 (PD-L1) in medullary carcinoma compared with other microsatellite unstable and microsatellite stable tumors. By immunohistochemistry, IDO-1 was expressed in 64% of medullary carcinomas compared with 19% (9/47) of poorly differentiated carcinomas, 14% (3/22) of microsatellite unstable, and 7% (2/30) of the microsatellite stable well-differentiated carcinomas (P<0.0001). tRNA(trp) was overexpressed in 81% (84/104) of medullary carcinomas, 19% (9/47) of poorly differentiated, 32% (7/22) of microsatellite unstable, and 3% (1/30) of microsatellite stable well-differentiated carcinomas (P<0.0001). Medullary carcinoma had higher mean CD8+ and PD-L1+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with all other groups (P<0.0001). This study

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma of the colon with an elevated serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen responding to combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Copur, S; Ledakis, P; Novinski, D; Mleczko, K L; Frankforter, S; Bolton, M; Fruehling, R M; VanWie, E; Norvell, M; Muhvic, J

    2001-05-01

    Primary squamous cell colorectal carcinomas are uncommon, and their characteristics are not well known. They seem to occur most commonly in the fifth decade of life with a slight predominance for men. The most commonly reported anatomic locations are the rectum and the proximal colon. Clinical features and common diagnostic methods do not easily differentiate squamous cell colorectal carcinomas from adenocarcinomas. Because of their extremely rare occurrence, it is difficult to study their natural course, clinical behavior, and response to therapy. This report presents the case of a pure squamous cell colorectal cancer and provides a brief review of the literature, which includes 60 previously published cases. The case of a patient with T3N2M0 primary squamous cell carcinoma of the rectosigmoid colon, which was initially treated with abdominoperineal resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation, is presented. During the follow-up, an elevated squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC Ag) level led to restaging computed tomography scans, which confirmed recurrent metastatic disease in the liver. Response to chemotherapy with a decrease in tumor size correlated with a decrease in the serum SCC Ag level. Although SCC Ag has been used as a tumor marker for squamous cell cancers of the lung, head and neck, uterine cervix, and esophagus, this is the first reported case of a squamous cell colon carcinoma presenting with an elevated SCC Ag at the time of recurrence. In addition, this patient showed an objective partial response to combination chemotherapy, with a decrease in the serum level of this tumor marker. PMID:12445380

  17. Squamous esophageal carcinoma and mucinous adenocarcinoma of the colon - an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Mirea, Cecil Sorin; Vasile, Manuela Ioana; Vîlcea, Ionică Daniel; Vasile, Ion; Moraru, Emil; Ciorbagiu, Mihai Călin; Sfeclan, Maria Cristina; Marin, Cătălina; Obleagă, Vasile Cosmin; Gheonea, Ioana Andreea; Vîlcea, Alina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a simultaneous cancer of the esophagus and colon is a rare situation that recognizes an increased incidence in recent years in the world, probably as a result of the improved measures of diagnosis and treatment, as well as the development of screening programs. The aim of this work is to present a case of synchronous esophageal squamous carcinoma with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the hepatic angle of the colon. The patient was hospitalized to our Surgical Clinic with the thoracic squamous esophageal carcinoma diagnosis. On admission, symptoms were dominated by overall dysphagia, patient showing a weight loss of 10 kg for the last 30 days. Preoperative imaging tests did not revealed regional or distant metastatic disease. Preoperative colonoscopy was incomplete (only until the splenic angle of the left colon) due to the insufficient mechanical preparation. On laparotomy, a carcinoma of the hepatic angle of the colon, partially stenosing was discovered. An upper pole esogastrectomy with intrathoracic esogastrostomy and a right colectomy with ileotransversostomy were practiced, at the same operative session. Postoperative evolution was poor and the patient died on the ninth day from the surgery during an alcohol withdrawal crisis. PMID:27151719

  18. Disparities of conjugating protective enzyme activities in the colon of patients with adenomas and carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hoensch, Harald P; Roelofs, Hennie MJ; Edler, Lutz; Kirch, Wilhelm; Peters, Wilbert HM

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the metabolic enzymatic capacity of the colon mucosa to detoxify noxious carcinogenic compounds. METHODS: We investigated the activity of 2 conjugating enzymes-the microsomal uridine glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and the cytosomal glutathione S-transferase (GST) in the uninvolved mucosa of the colon transversum and sigmoideum in patients with adenomatous polyps and colorectal cancer. Biopsies were taken from the mucosa during colonoscopies which were done for clinical (diagnostic) reasons. After storage, the biopsy material was homogenized and after differential centrifugation the enzyme assays were performed with 4-nitrophenol (UGT) and 1-chloro 2,4-dinitrobenzene (GST) as substrates. RESULTS: About 48 patients were included of which 28 had adenomas and 20 had colorectal carcinomas confirmed by histopathology. Enzyme activities were expressed as nmol/mg per minute protein for the GST and as pmol/mg per minute protein for the UGT. Analysis of variance (F-test) indicated that both enzymes were more widely distributed in adenoma than in cancer patients. The means ± SD were smaller for cancer patients: GST for adenomas 268 ± 152 vs 241 ± 69 for carcinomas and UGT for adenomas 197 ± 200 vs 150 ± 86 for carcinomas. CONCLUSION: Compared to patients with adenomatous colon polyps those with colorectal carcinoma exhibited a lower capacity of detoxifying enzyme metabolism and their activities clustered over a smaller range. PMID:24106402

  19. A case of Krukenberg carcinoma metastasized from colon cancer resembling mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Saori; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Hiroaki; Arakawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takanori; Yao, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 44-year-old woman with bilateral ovarian carcinoma that had metastasized from the colon and mimicked primary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Macroscopically, both ovarian tumors were large, multiloculated cystic masses with abundant mucinous content. Histologically, they were lined with mucinous epithelium with mild to moderate nuclear atypia and showed stromal invasion and surface involvement. At first, the tumors were diagnosed as bilateral primary ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinomas. However, three months after surgery, a large villous tumor was discovered in the ascending colon by colonoscopic examination and was surgically resected. Histologically, the colonic tumor was a villous adenomatous tumor with invasive components of mucinous adenocarcinoma composed of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and exhibited abundant extracellular mucin production. As a villous adenomatous component was present in the mucosal area, the colonic tumor was considered a primary tumor. Therefore, the original diagnosis of bilateral ovarian tumors was revised for consistent with metastasis from the colon carcinoma, in line with the findings of immunohistochemistry and loss of heterozygosity analysis. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of metastatic tumors from the gastrointestinal tract in the diagnosis of mucinous ovarian tumors. PMID:24427362

  20. Different expression of calgizzarin (S100A11) in normal colonic epithelium, adenoma and colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Mothes, Henning; Kaufmann, Roland; Settmacher, Utz; Von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect proteomic markers usable to distinguish colorectal carcinoma from colon adenoma for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms in the process of tumourigenesis. Therefore, we microdissected colon carcinoma tissue, epithelial colon adenoma tissue as well as normal adjacent colon epithelium and determined protein profiles by SELDI-TOF MS. A multitude of significantly different signals was detected. For their identification colon biopsis were lysed and subjected to a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for separation. Subsequently, we identified nearly 100 proteins by tryptic digestion, peptide fingerprint mapping and database search. Calgizzarin (S100A11; S100C) identified by peptide fingerprint mapping correlated very well with a significantly differentially expressed signal found in prior protein profiling. Using an immunodepletion assay we confirmed the identity of this signal as calgizzarin. To localise calgizzarin in tissues we performed immunohistochemistry. For further confirmation of the identity of calgizzarin we re-analysed IHC-positive as well as IHC-negative tissue sections on ProteinChip arrays. This work demonstrates that biomarkers in colorectal cancer can be detected, identified and assessed by a proteomic approach comprising tissue-microdissection, protein profiling and immunological techniques. PMID:16327996

  1. Genomic profiling of high-grade large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, William A.; Crozier, Jennifer A.; Nakhleh, Raouf E.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (HGNEC) of the colon is a rare and aggressive cancer that has a poor prognosis. Currently no standard treatment exists, and published case series report an overall survival of approximately one year with treatment. Typically patients receive treatment similar to that recommended for small-cell lung cancer, extrapolating from the similarity in cancer biology. Here we report a case of HGNEC of the colon with genomic profiling that identified a KRAS G12D mutation and a PI3K mutation that has not yet been reported in the literature for this tumor type. PMID:27034803

  2. Effect of dehydrodidemnin B on human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lobo, C; García-Pozo, S G; Núñez de Castro, I; Alonso, F J

    1997-01-01

    Didemnins are cytotoxic agents belonging to a depsipeptide family isolated from marine tunicates. In the present study, a new member, dehydrodidemnin B (DDB), isolated from the mediterranean tunicate Aplidium albicans, was used. The effect of the drug on human colon cultured cell lines was tested using multiple approaches: proliferation studies, long term survival after three hours of exposure to DDB by means of a clonogenic assay and the decrease of the protooncogen, ornithine decarboxylase, activity. A dehydrodidemnin B concentration of 10(-8) M completely inhibited cell growth. The IC50 obtained using the MTT proliferation test, indicated that the most proliferative cell line (CT-2) was the most sensitive to the drug. Using a clonogenic assay a clear dose-response was obtained for the three cell lines used; HT-29 cell line showed the minimum survival after 3 hours of dehydrodidemnin B treatment. A dose-dependent decrease in ornithine decarboxylase activity was also observed in three cell lines assayed. The data presented indicate that the dehydrodidemnin B is a potent cytotoxic agent on rapidly dividing human colon cancer cells. PMID:9066673

  3. Combination Gene Therapy for Liver Metastasis of Colon Carcinoma in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hsai; Chen, X. H. Li; Wang, Yibin; Kosai, Ken-Ichiro; Finegold, Milton J.; Rich, Susan S.

    1995-03-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8^+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver.

  4. Combination gene therapy for liver metastasis of colon carcinoma in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S H; Chen, X H; Wang, Y; Kosai, K; Finegold, M J; Rich, S S; Woo, S L

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy with a "suicide gene" and a cytokine gene to treat metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver was investigated. Tumor in the liver was generated by intrahepatic injection of a colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26) in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Recombinant adenoviral vectors containing various control and therapeutic genes were injected directly into the solid tumors, followed by treatment with ganciclovir. While the tumors continued to grow in all animals treated with a control vector or a mouse interleukin 2 vector, those treated with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase vector, with or without the coadministration of the mouse interleukin 2 vector, exhibited dramatic necrosis and regression. However, only animals treated with both vectors developed an effective systemic antitumoral immunity against challenges of tumorigenic doses of parental tumor cells inoculated at distant sites. The antitumoral immunity was associated with the presence of MCA-26 tumor-specific cytolytic CD8+ T lymphocytes. The results suggest that combination suicide and cytokine gene therapy in vivo can be a powerful approach for treatment of metastatic colon carcinoma in the liver. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7708688

  5. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin-12 gene therapy for metastatic colon carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, M; Pham-Nguyen, K; Kwong, Y L; Xu, B; Kosai, K I; Finegold, M; Woo, S L; Chen, S H

    1996-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral mediated delivery of suicide and cytokine genes has been investigated as a treatment for hepatic metastases of colon carcinoma in mice. Liver tumors were established by intrahepatic implantation of a poorly immunogenic colon carcinoma cell line (MCA-26), which is syngeneic in BALB/c mice. Intratumoral transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and the murine interleukin (mIL)-2 genes resulted in substantial hepatic tumor regression, induced an effective systemic antitumoral immunity in the host and prolonged the median survival time of the treated animals from 22 to 35 days. The antitumoral immunity declined gradually, which led to tumor recurrence over time. A recombinant adenovirus expressing the mIL-12 gene was constructed and tested in the MCA-26 tumor model. Intratumoral administration of this cytokine vector alone increased significantly survival time of the animals with 25% of the treated animals still living over 70 days. These data indicate that local expression of IL-12 may also be an attractive treatment strategy for metastatic colon carcinoma. Images Fig. 5 PMID:8876130

  6. Submucosal Invasive Micropapillary Carcinoma of the Colon with Massive Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Shoichiro; Takakura, Yuji; Egi, Hiroyuki; Hinoi, Takao; Saito, Yasufumi; Tanimine, Naoki; Miguchi, Masashi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Shimomura, Manabu; Ohdan, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Micropapillary carcinoma was originally reported to be an aggressive variant of breast carcinoma, and it is associated with frequent lymphovascular invasion and a dismal clinical outcome. It has subsequently been found in other organs; however, at present, only a limited number of cases of colorectal micropapillary carcinoma have been reported. We present a case of early colon cancer with extensive nodal metastases in a Japanese patient. An 82-year-old man was found by colonoscopy to have a 20-mm pedunculated polyp in his sigmoid colon. Endoscopic resection of the sigmoid colon tumor was performed, and pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma component and a micropapillary component. Despite the tumor being confined within the submucosa, massive lymphatic invasion was noted. Thereafter, the patient underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with lymph node dissection, and multiple lymph node metastases were observed. Our case suggests that when a micropapillary component is identified in a pre-operative biopsy specimen, even for early colorectal cancer, surgical resection with adequate lymph node dissection would be required because of the high potential for nodal metastases. PMID:23275774

  7. Submucosal invasive micropapillary carcinoma of the colon with massive lymph node metastases: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Shoichiro; Takakura, Yuji; Egi, Hiroyuki; Hinoi, Takao; Saito, Yasufumi; Tanimine, Naoki; Miguchi, Masashi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Shimomura, Manabu; Ohdan, Hideki

    2012-09-01

    Micropapillary carcinoma was originally reported to be an aggressive variant of breast carcinoma, and it is associated with frequent lymphovascular invasion and a dismal clinical outcome. It has subsequently been found in other organs; however, at present, only a limited number of cases of colorectal micropapillary carcinoma have been reported. We present a case of early colon cancer with extensive nodal metastases in a Japanese patient. An 82-year-old man was found by colonoscopy to have a 20-mm pedunculated polyp in his sigmoid colon. Endoscopic resection of the sigmoid colon tumor was performed, and pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma component and a micropapillary component. Despite the tumor being confined within the submucosa, massive lymphatic invasion was noted. Thereafter, the patient underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with lymph node dissection, and multiple lymph node metastases were observed. Our case suggests that when a micropapillary component is identified in a pre-operative biopsy specimen, even for early colorectal cancer, surgical resection with adequate lymph node dissection would be required because of the high potential for nodal metastases. PMID:23275774

  8. Successful radioimmunotherapy of established syngeneic rat colon carcinoma with 211At-mAb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most carcinomas are prone to metastasize despite successful treatment of the primary tumor. One way to address this clinical challenge may be targeted therapy with α-emitting radionuclides such as astatine-211 (211At). Radioimmunotherapy utilizing α-particle emitting radionuclides is considered especially suitable for the treatment of small cell clusters and single cells, although lesions of different sizes may also be present in the patient. The aim of this study was primarily to evaluate the toxicity and secondarily in vivo efficacy of a 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against colon carcinoma with tumor diameters of approximately 10 mm. Methods Eighteen rats with subperitoneal syngeneic colon carcinoma were allocated to three groups of six animals together with three healthy rats in each group. The groups were injected intravenously with either 150 μg of unlabeled mAbs (controls) or 2.5 or 5 MBq 211At-mAbs directed towards the Lewis Y antigen expressed on the cell membrane of several carcinomas. Tumor volume, body weight, and blood cell counts were monitored for 100 days after treatment. Results Local tumors were non-palpable in five out of six rats after treatment with both activities of 211At-mAbs, compared to one out of six in the control group. At the study end, half of the animals in each group given 211At-BR96 and one animal in the control group were free from disease. Radioimmunotherapy resulted in dose-dependent, transient weight loss and myelotoxicity. Survival was significantly better in the groups receiving targeted alpha therapy than in those receiving unlabeled mAbs. Conclusions This study demonstrates the possibility of treating small, solid colon carcinoma tumors with α-emitting radionuclides such as 211At bound to mAbs, with tolerable toxicity. PMID:23557183

  9. Tumor-Associated Macrophage (TAM) and Angiogenesis in Human Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badawi, Manal A.; Abouelfadl, Dalia M.; El-Sharkawy, Sonia L.; El-Aal, Wafaa E. Abd; Abbas, Naglaa F.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to clarify how macrophages affect prognosis in cancer colon and their association with tumor angiogenesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty four biopsies of colon carcinoma and 15 of benign adenomatous polyps were investigated for macrophages infiltration and microvessels density using immunohistochemistry and image morphometric analysis. Macrophages and blood vessels were stained immunohistochemically by CD68 and F-VIII markers respectively. The morphometric analysis was carried out on the immunohistochemically stained slides using the Leica Qwin 500 Image Analyzer. Both of macrophages infiltration and microvessels density were correlated with histological tumor grade, stage and lymph node metastases and were correlated with each others. RESULTS: Macrophage infiltration was significantly higher in malignant cases than in benign polyps. High macrophage infiltration and hypervascularity were significantly correlated with T-staging and lymph nodes metastasis. A significant correlation was found between macrophage infiltration and microvessels densitie in malignant tumors where hypervascularity was significantly correlated with high macrophages infiltration. CONCLUSION: The significant correlation between macrophage infiltration and tumor angiogenesis suggests an interaction between macrophages and cancer cells stimulating microvessels formation, tumor invasion and metastasis in colon cancer. We recommend that macrophages infiltration should be evaluated to investigate their clinical value in development of individualized therapeutic regimens for management of colon carcinoma.

  10. HDAC inhibitors induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Meiying; Lee, Eun Jeoung; Kim, Ki Bae; Kim, Yangmi; Sung, Rohyun; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Kim, Don Soo; Park, Seon Mee

    2015-05-01

    The effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) differ in various types of cancers. We investigated the EMT phenotype in four colon cancer cell lines when challenged with HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA) and valproic acid (VPA) with or without transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) treatment. Four colon cancer cell lines with different phenotypes in regards to tumorigenicity, microsatellite stability and DNA mutation were used. EMT phenotypes were assessed by the expression of E-cadherin and vimentin using western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, quantitative real-time RT-PCR following treatment with TSA (100 or 200 nM) or VPA (0.5 mM) with or without TGF-β1 (5 ng/ml) for 24 h. Biological EMT phenotypes were also evaluated by cell morphology, migration and invasion assays. TSA or VPA induced mesenchymal features in the colon carcinoma cells by a decrease in E-cadherin and an increase in vimentin expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Confocal microscopy revealed membranous attenuation or nuclear translocation of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of vimentin. These responses occurred after 6 h and increased until 24 h. Colon cancer cells changed from a round or rectangular shape to a spindle shape with increased migration and invasion ability following TSA or VPA treatment. The susceptibility to EMT changes induced by TSA or VPA was comparable in microsatellite stable (SW480 and HT29) and microsatellite unstable cells (DLD1 and HCT116). TSA or VPA induced a mesenchymal phenotype in the colon carcinoma cells and these effects were augmented in the presence of TGF-β1. HDAC inhibitors require careful caution before their application as new anticancer drugs for colon cancers. PMID:25813246

  11. New chemotherapeutic drug sensitivity assay for colon carcinomas in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Schroy, P C; Cohen, A; Winawer, S J; Friedman, E A

    1988-06-01

    Ten previously untreated colon carcinomas were tested for chemotherapeutic drug sensitivity in primary monolayer culture. Colon carcinomas were partly digested to groups of epithelial cells which plated with a mean efficiency of 42 +/- 9% (SE) on a collagen I-bovine serum albumin substrate in serum-free medium, producing patches of tightly adherent epithelial cells. The cultured cells were judged epithelial by the presence of cytokeratins, an epithelial cell surface epitope, junctional complexes, and brush borders. Each carcinoma was plated in 40 to 60 Petri dishes (35 mm), yielding a mean of 28 +/- 8 (SE) colonies per dish (6832 +/- 1952 cells). Drugs tested in duplicate plates were mitomycin C, cisplatin, streptozotocin, and 5-fluorouracil at 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 micrograms/ml, and at 0.1, 1, and 2x the peak tolerated drug concentration in serum. Twenty-four h after plating, any nonadherent cells were removed, and the adherent tumor cells were continuously exposed to the drugs for 3 days. Each drug induced colony lysis in a dose-dependent manner in responsive tumors. Drug-resistant, cycling cells were identified by [3H]thymidine incorporation in colonies which were not lysed by drug treatment. Each of the ten carcinomas exhibited inherent resistance to one or more chemotherapy drugs within the concentration ranges clinically achievable. PMID:2966672

  12. Major Protein of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Gene Family - CD66c, A Novel Marker in Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Suma M; Prema, Chaitra Linganna; Vimalambike, Manjunath Gubbanna; Shivalingaiah, Sheeladevi Chandakavadi; Sundaram, Shivakumar; Kumar, Anjali Pradeep; Math, Ananda Kuruvatti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In view of rising trend of the incidence of colorectal carcinoma in the Indian population due to adoption of western lifestyles and behaviours, we investigated the expression of the new emerging stem cell biomarker, CD66c in colorectal carcinoma of Indian origin. Aim To study the expression of CD66c in human colorectal carcinoma and to correlate level of marker expression with tumour staging. Materials and Methods This hospital based prospective study was conducted on 26 colorectal carcinoma patients in the age group of 20 years to 70 years. Surgically resected tumour specimens along with adjacent normal tissue were collected taking necessary precautions, paraffin embedded sections were prepared and used for histological and immunohistochemical analysis of CD66c. Statistical analysis Descriptive statistical measures like mean, standard deviation, percentage was applied. Other inferential statistical tests like Chi-square, Fisher’s-exact test and one-way ANOVA was applied to find out the association of CD66c with different stages. The difference were interpreted as statistically significant when p <0.05. Results CD66c showed differential expression with membrane positivity in normal colorectal epithelial cells and cytoplasmic expression in tumour cells. There was significant correlation between CD66c expression and tumour site (p=0.02) with colon carcinoma showing positive expression compared to the rectal carcinoma. There was no significant correlation between CD66c staining and tumour stage (p=0.947). No significant relationship was observed between CD66c expression and other clinicopathologic variables studied such as sex (p=0.552), age (p=0.713) and tumour grade (p=0.263). Conclusion CD66c can be specifically used for colon carcinoma and may be a novel marker in colon carcinoma stem cell isolation. The quantification of CD66c can be further verified by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Further studies can be carried out using CD66c alone or in

  13. The balance between two isoforms of LEF-1 regulates colon carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colon cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with a very poor prognosis. Although it has been suggested that different isoforms of the lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF-1) have opposing biological activities, the biological outcome of aberrant LEF-1 activation in colon cancer is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the different LEF-1 phenotypes on the growth of colon carcinoma cell lines. A deeper understanding of these processes might improve the targeted therapies for colon cancer by regulating the expression of LEF-1. Methods The role of different isoforms of LEF-1 on the growth of human colon carcinoma cell lines (SW480 and HT-29) was studied using various in vitro and in vivo assays. In vitro proliferation, migration, adhesion and apoptosis of the cells stably transfected of different isoforms of LEF-1 were monitored by MTT assay, carboxyfluorescein diacetate–succinimidyl ester staining, annexin V staining, ECM adhesion assay and transwell assay, respectively. In nude mice, the formation of neovasculature in the tumors formed by our constructed cells was measured by immunohistochemistry. All the data were analyzed using a t test, and data were treated as significant when p < 0.05. Results Overexpression of truncated LEF-1 (LEF-1-ΔL) in the colon cell lines, SW480 and HT29, inhibited their growth significantly in vitro and in vivo, but the full-length LEF-1 (LEF-1-FL) promoted the proliferation of HT29. Inactivation of Wnt signaling by LEF-1-ΔL reduced the expression of CXCR4 in colon cell lines, which may lead to a decrease in activities such as migration, adhesion and survival. In nude mice, the formation of neovasculature as well as an increase in tumor volume were inhibited by the short isoform of LEF-1. LEF-1-FL, however, caused an increase in all these parameters compared with controls. Conclusions These findings suggest that LEF-1 might play an important role in colon carcinogenesis by

  14. P21 and CEA expression and AgNOR counts in dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinoma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Wu, Jing-Ying; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Gu, Da-Kun; Fang, Fang

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study P21 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression and to measure argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) counts in various lesions of colonic mucosa and the mechanism of carcinogenesis. METHODS: Thirty-eight male Wistar rats were injected with dimethylhydrazine (DMH) once a week for 25 wk. P21 and CEA expression was detected by immunohistochemical methods, and AgNOR was counted by silver staining paraffin sections from various colonic lesions. RESULTS: The incidence of colonic carcinoma in DMH-treated rats was 71.05% (27/38), and lymph node metastasis occurred in six rats. Immunohistochemical studies showed that P21 was primarily expressed in dysplasia and carcinomas, while CEA was expressed in carcinomas and metastatic tumors. AgNOR counts were higher in dysplasia and carcinomas. There were significant differences in P21 and CEA expression between benign and malignant lesions (P < 0.05). The difference in AgNOR counts was also significant between normal and dysplastic tissues, and between dysplasia and malignant lesions (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Dysplasia is a premalignant change of colonic carcinoma. The detection of P21 via immunohistochemistry and AgNOR counting may be an important clinical screening technique for colon carcinoma and premalignant lesions.

  15. Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon progressed rapidly after hepatic rupture: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiromitsu; Kudo, Atsushi; Matsumura, Satoshi; Ban, Daisuke; Irie, Takumi; Ochiai, Takanori; Nakamura, Noriaki; Tanaka, Shinji; Tanabe, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of a metastatic mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) has not been previously reported, although the neuroendocrine cell carcinoma is often associated with a high incidence of hepatic metastases. The patient was a 39-year-old male who presented with upper abdominal pain over 3 months. Computed tomography showed multiple tumors in both hepatic lobes, while lower gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a tumor in the transverse colon. Histopathologic examination of the tumor revealed it to be a neuroendocrine cell carcinoma. After the resection of the primary tumor, hepatic metastases rapidly increased, and one of them in the left lateral segment was ruptured with significant hemorrhage. The rupture led us to undertake the emergency operation to stop the bleeding. Histology showed a high-grade large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma associated with moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. The Ki-67 labeling index was 80% (G3). The diagnosis was mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma according to the 2010 World Health Organization guidelines. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization did not decrease the tumor progress, and the patient died on postoperative day 110. Reporting this highly malignant case, I hope all doctors can be interested in MANEC. PMID:24444267

  16. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Colon Progressed Rapidly After Hepatic Rupture: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromitsu; Kudo, Atsushi; Matsumura, Satoshi; Ban, Daisuke; Irie, Takumi; Ochiai, Takanori; Nakamura, Noriaki; Tanaka, Shinji; Tanabe, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of a metastatic mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) has not been previously reported, although the neuroendocrine cell carcinoma is often associated with a high incidence of hepatic metastases. The patient was a 39-year-old male who presented with upper abdominal pain over 3 months. Computed tomography showed multiple tumors in both hepatic lobes, while lower gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a tumor in the transverse colon. Histopathologic examination of the tumor revealed it to be a neuroendocrine cell carcinoma. After the resection of the primary tumor, hepatic metastases rapidly increased, and one of them in the left lateral segment was ruptured with significant hemorrhage. The rupture led us to undertake the emergency operation to stop the bleeding. Histology showed a high-grade large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma associated with moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. The Ki-67 labeling index was 80% (G3). The diagnosis was mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma according to the 2010 World Health Organization guidelines. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization did not decrease the tumor progress, and the patient died on postoperative day 110. Reporting this highly malignant case, I hope all doctors can be interested in MANEC. PMID:24444267

  17. Morphological Differentiation of Colon Carcinoma Cell Lines in Rotating Wall Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine whether (1) microgravity permits unique, three-dimensional cultures of neoplastic human colon tissues and (2) this culture interaction produces novel intestinal growth and differentiation factors. The initial phase of this project tested the efficacy of simulated microgravity for the cultivation and differentiation of human colon carcinoma in rotating wall vessels (RWV's) on microcarrier beads. The RWV's simulate microgravity by randomizing the gravity vector in an aqueous medium under a low shear stress environment in unit gravity. This simulation achieves approximately a one-fifth g environment that allows cells to 'float' and form three-dimensional relationships with less shear stress than in other stirred aqueous medium bioreactors. In the second phase of this project we assessed the ability of human colon carcinoma lines to adhere to various substrates because adhesion is the first event that must occur to create three-dimensional masses. Finally, we tested growth factor production in the last phase of this project.

  18. Early signet ring cell carcinoma arising from colonic adenoma: the molecular profiling supports the adenoma-carcinoma sequence.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Alberto; Cappellesso, Rocco; Lo Mele, Marcello; Peraro, Laura; Balsamo, Laura; Lanza, Cristiano; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Among colorectal cancers, the prevalence of signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is lower than 1%; to date, only 6 cases of early SRCCs arising in colonic adenoma have been reported. In spite of the well-established understanding of the phenotypic and genetic changes occurring in conventional colonic carcinogenesis, the molecular landscape of colon SRCC is still far to be elucidated. We describe the histologic and immunohistochemical phenotype and the molecular profile of a case of intramucosal SRCC developed within a 4.5-cm large sigmoid adenoma. The DNA sequencing of the 2 microdissected neoplastic components (adenomatous and SRCC) showed the same G12V KRAS mutation. Interestingly, although the adenomatous epithelium showed unequivocal p53 overexpression, no signet ring cancer cells featured p53 nuclear immunostain. This molecular pattern supports the unique histogenesis of the 2 coexisting neoplastic oncotypes, also suggesting that the signet ring cell component is derived from the molecular de-differentiation (p53 loss) of the preexisting adenomatous lesion. PMID:26997454

  19. Impact of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor on the adenoma–carcinoma sequence of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, K; Vieth, M; Koschel, A; Wiedenmann, B; Röcken, C; Anders, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has been suggested to function as a tumour suppressor. Its impact on the adenoma–carcinoma sequence of the colon, however, is unclear. Methods: Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor was analysed in non-cancerous and neoplastic colon samples using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT–PCR. The function of CAR in colon cancer cell lines was determined following application of CAR siRNA or ectopic expression of a human full-length CAR cDNA. Results: Compared with healthy mucosa, increased CAR-mRNA expression was found in adenomas, whereas primary cancers and metastases displayed a marked decline. At the plasma membrane, CAR was present in normal mucosa samples (93%), adenomas, and metastases (100% ea.), whereas in colon cancers, it was found less frequently (49%, P<0.0001). Cytoplasmic CAR immunopositivity increased from normal mucosa (22%), to adenomas (73%, P=0.0006), primary cancers (83%, P<0.0001), and metastases (67%, P=0.0019). In cancer cell lines, CAR inhibition resulted in increased proliferation, whereas enforced ectopic CAR expression led to opposite results. Blocking the extracellular portion of CAR increased cell invasion in vitro. In mice, xenotransplants of colon cancer cells with enforced CAR expression formed significantly smaller tumours, whereas CAR inhibition increased the formation of liver metastases. Conclusion: We conclude that CAR facilitates complex effects during colon carcinogenesis, potentially mediated by its stage-dependent subcellular distribution; high CAR expression potentially prevents apoptosis in adenomas, loss of CAR at the plasma membrane promotes growth, and dissemination of primary cancers, and high membranous CAR presence may support the establishment of distant metastases. PMID:21468049

  20. Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential of the Pim-1 Kinase in Colon Carcinoma12

    PubMed Central

    Weirauch, Ulrike; Beckmann, Nadine; Thomas, Maren; Grünweller, Arnold; Huber, Kilian; Bracher, Franz; Hartmann, Roland K; Aigner, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus 1 (Pim-1) kinase is overexpressed in various tumors and has been linked to poor prognosis. Its role as proto-oncogene is based on several Pim-1 target proteins involved in pivotal cellular processes. Here, we explore the functional relevance of Pim-1 in colon carcinoma. Experimental Design RNAi-based knockdown approaches, as well as a specific small molecule inhibitor, were used to inhibit Pim-1 in colon carcinoma cells. The effects were analyzed regarding proliferation, apoptosis, sensitization toward cytostatic treatment, and overall antitumor effect in vitro and in mouse tumor models in vivo. Results We demonstrate antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and overall antitumor effects of Pim-1 inhibition. The sensitization to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment upon Pim-1 knockdown offers new possibilities for combinatorial treatment approaches. Importantly, this also antagonizes a 5-FU-triggered Pim-1 up-regulation, which is mediated by decreased levels of miR-15b, a microRNA we newly identify to regulate Pim-1. The analysis of the molecular effects of Pim-1 inhibition reveals a complex regulatory network, with therapeutic Pim-1 repression leading to major changes in oncogenic signal transduction with regard to p21Cip1/WAF1, STAT3, c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), c-Myc, and survivin and in the levels of apoptosis-related proteins Puma, Bax, and Bcl-xL. Conclusions We demonstrate that Pim-1 plays a pivotal role in several tumor-relevant signaling pathways and establish the functional relevance of Pim-1 in colon carcinoma. Our results also substantiate the RNAi-mediated Pim-1 knockdown based on polymeric polyethylenimine/small interfering RNA nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:23814490

  1. Primary micropapillary carcinoma of the colon with submucosal invasion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Miyaoka, Youichi; Fujiwara, Aya; Kotani, Satoshi; Tsukano, Kosuke; Ogawa, Sayaka; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Fujishiro, Hirofumi; Kohge, Naruaki; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Amano, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: We present a case of invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) of the colon treated by endoscopic resection following magnifying endoscopy. A 47-year-old woman visited our hospital for follow-up of a positive fecal occult blood test. Colonoscopy revealed a semi-pedunculated reddish polyp, the surface of which showed gentle irregularity, and mild tension in the sigmoid colon. Magnifying colonoscopy with narrow band imaging revealed an irregular surface pattern with heterogeneity in vascular diameter and distribution. Magnifying endoscopic findings using crystal violet staining showed an irregular pit pattern with an expansion of stromal areas. Endoscopic resection of the sigmoid colon tumor was performed, and the histology of the resected specimen primarily revealed a micropapillary component with a small moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma component that massively invaded into the submucosal layer, accompanied by lymphatic invasion, although the tumor was very small (7 mm in diameter, smaller than any in previous reports). Laparoscopy-assisted sigmoidectomy and regional lymph node resection were performed; neither cancer nor lymph node metastases were present. This is the first report of a case with early-stage colonic IMPC observed with magnifying colonoscopy.

  2. Thyroid, Renal, and Breast Carcinomas, Chondrosarcoma, Colon Adenomas, and Ganglioneuroma: A New Cancer Syndrome, FAP, or Just Coincidence.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ihab Shafek; AlQahtani, Fahd Nasser

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a case associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, invasive mammary carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, benign ganglioneuroma, and numerous colon adenomas. The patient had a family history of colon cancer, kidney and bladder cancers, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia, and throat and mouth cancers. She was diagnosed with colonic villous adenoma at the age of 41 followed by thyroid, renal, and breast cancers and chondrosarcoma at the ages of 48, 64, 71, and 74, respectively. Additionally, we included a table with the most common familial cancer syndromes with one or more benign or malignant tumors diagnosed in our case, namely, FAP, HNPCC, Cowden, Peutz-Jeghers, renal cancer, tuberous sclerosis, VHL, breast/other, breast/ovarian, Carney, Werner's, Bloom, Li-Fraumeni, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia-telangiectasia, osteochondromatosis, retinoblastoma, and MEN2A. PMID:27087812

  3. Thyroid, Renal, and Breast Carcinomas, Chondrosarcoma, Colon Adenomas, and Ganglioneuroma: A New Cancer Syndrome, FAP, or Just Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Ihab Shafek; AlQahtani, Fahd Nasser

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a case associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, invasive mammary carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, benign ganglioneuroma, and numerous colon adenomas. The patient had a family history of colon cancer, kidney and bladder cancers, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia, and throat and mouth cancers. She was diagnosed with colonic villous adenoma at the age of 41 followed by thyroid, renal, and breast cancers and chondrosarcoma at the ages of 48, 64, 71, and 74, respectively. Additionally, we included a table with the most common familial cancer syndromes with one or more benign or malignant tumors diagnosed in our case, namely, FAP, HNPCC, Cowden, Peutz-Jeghers, renal cancer, tuberous sclerosis, VHL, breast/other, breast/ovarian, Carney, Werner's, Bloom, Li-Fraumeni, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia-telangiectasia, osteochondromatosis, retinoblastoma, and MEN2A. PMID:27087812

  4. Soluble OX40L favors tumor rejection in CT26 colon carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O; Yuzhakova, Diana V; Ryumina, Alina P; Druzhkova, Irina N; Sharonov, George V; Kotlobay, Alexey A; Zagaynova, Elena V; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Shirmanova, Marina V

    2016-08-01

    OX40 receptor-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) populate tumors and suppress a variety of immune cells, posing a major obstacle for cancer immunotherapy. Different ways to functionally inactivate Tregs by triggering OX40 receptor have been suggested, including anti-OX40 antibodies and Fc:OX40L fusion proteins. To investigate whether the soluble extracellular domain of OX40L (OX40Lexo) is sufficient to enhance antitumor immune response, we generated an OX40Lexo-expressing CT26 colon carcinoma cell line and studied its tumorigenicity in immunocompetent BALB/c and T cell deficient nu/nu mice. We found that soluble OX40L expressed in CT26 colon carcinoma favors the induction of an antitumor response which is not limited just to cells co-expressing EGFP as an antigenic determinant, but also eliminates CT26 cells expressing another fluorescent protein, KillerRed. Tumor rejection required the presence of T lymphocytes, as indicated by the unhampered tumor growth in nu/nu mice. Subsequent re-challenge of tumor-free BALB/c mice with CT26 EGFP cells resulted in no tumor growth, which is indicative of the formation of immunological memory. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from mice that successfully rejected CT26 OX40Lexo EGFP tumors to naïve mice conferred 100% resistance to subsequent challenge with the CT26 EGFP tumor. PMID:27203665

  5. Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induces oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in human colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    De Berardis, Barbara; Civitelli, Gabriele; Condello, Maria; Lista, Pasquale; Pozzi, Roberta; Arancia, Giuseppe; Meschini, Stefania

    2010-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles offer great promise in many industrial and biomedical applications, however little information is available about gastrointestinal toxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis and proinflammatory mediator release induced by ZnO nanoparticles on human colon carcinoma LoVo cells. The biological activity of these particles was related to their physico-chemical characteristics. The physico-chemical characteristics were evaluated by analytical electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity was determined by growth curves and water-soluble tetrazolium assay. The reactive oxygen species production, cellular glutathione content, changes of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis cell death were quantified by flow cytometry. The inflammatory cytokines were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay. Treatment with ZnO (5 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} corresponding to 11.5 {mu}g/ml) for 24 h induced on LoVo cells a significant decrease of cell viability, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/OH{center_dot} increase, O2{sup -{center_dot}} and GSH decrease, depolarization of inner mitochondrial membranes, apoptosis and IL-8 release. Higher doses induced about 98% of cytotoxicity already after 24 h of treatment. The experimental data show that oxidative stress may be a key route in inducing the cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in colon carcinoma cells. Moreover, the study of the relationship between toxicological effects and physico-chemical characteristics of particles suggests that surface area does not play a primary role in the cytotoxicity.

  6. Cytotoxicity of fucosterol containing fraction of marine algae against breast and colon carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Khanavi, Mahnaz; Gheidarloo, Razieh; Sadati, Nargess; Ardekani, Mohammad Reza Shams; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Tavajohi, Shohreh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Context: Marine algae produce different secondary metabolites with a wide range of biological activities. Many studies have been achieved on the screening of biological effects of marine organisms and a lot of active compounds were isolated and characterized. Aims: In an attempt to find cytotoxic compound of hexane fraction, isolation, identification, and cytotoxicity of active compound of this fraction were performed. Materials and Methods: In this study, total methanolic (70%) extract and partition fractions of hexane, chloroform (CHCl3), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), and MeOH–H2O of Sargassum angustifolium, Chondria dasyphylla, and Ulva flexuosa, collected from coastlines of the Persian Gulf in south of Iran, were studied against colon carcinoma (HT-29), colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2), breast ductal carcinoma (T47D), and Swiss mouse embryo fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines by MTT assay. Statistical Analysis Used: IC50 (median growth inhibitory concentration) values were calculated by Sigmaplot (10) software. Results: Hexane fraction of Chondria dasyphylla (IC50 82.26 ± 4.09 μg/ml) and MeOH-H2O fraction of Ulva flexuosa (IC50 116.92 ± 8.58 μg/ml) showed cytotoxic activity against proliferation of T47D cells. Hexane fraction of Sargassum angustifolium was also observed for cytotoxicity against T47D and HT-29 cell lines (IC50 166.42 ± 26.7 and 190.24 ± 52.8 μg/ml), respectively. An investigation of a component from the hexane fraction of Sargassum angustifolium yielded a steroidal metabolite, fucosterol, with cytotoxicity in T47D and HT29 (IC50 27.94 ± 9.3 and 70.41 ± 7.5 μg/ml). Conclusions: These results indicated that fucosterol, the most abundant phytosterol in brown algae, is responsible for cytotoxic effect of this extract against breast and colon carcinoma cell lines. PMID:22438665

  7. Orthotopic xenografts of human melanoma and colonic and ovarian carcinoma in sheep to evaluate radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. H.; Rose, A. H.; Glancy, R. J.; Penhale, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Extrapolation to humans from experimental radioimmunotherapy in nude mouse xenograft models is confounded by large relative tumour size and small volume of distribution in mice allowing tumour uptake of radiolabelled antibodies unattainable in patients. Our large animal model of human tumours in cyclosporin-immunosuppressed sheep demonstrated tumour uptake of targeted radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies comparable with uptakes reported in clinical trials. Sheep immunosuppression with daily intravenous cyclosporin augmented by oral ketoconazole maintained trough blood levels of cyclosporin within the range 1000-1500 ng ml(-1). Human tumour cells were transplanted orthotopically by inoculation of 10(7) cells: SKMEL melanoma subcutaneously; LS174T and HT29 colon carcinoma into bowel, peritoneum and liver; and JAM ovarian carcinoma into ovary and peritoneum. Tumour xenografts grew at all sites within 3 weeks of inoculation, preserving characteristic morphology without evidence of necrosis or host rejection. Lymphatic metastasis was demonstrated in regional nodes draining xenografts of melanoma and ovarian carcinoma. Colonic LS1 74T xenografts produced mucin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The anti-CEA IgG1 monoclonal antibody A5B7 was radiolabelled with iodine-131 and administered intravenously to sheep. Peak uptake at 5 days in orthotopic human tumour transplants in gut was 0.027% DI g(-1) (percentage of injected dose per gram) and 0.034% DI g(-1) in hepatic metastases with tumour to blood ratios of 2-2.5. Non-specific tumour uptake in melanoma was 0.003% DI g(-1). Uptake of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in human tumours in our large animal model is comparable with that observed in patients and may be more realistic than nude mice xenografts for prediction of clinical efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9716032

  8. Synchronous metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to the colon and cervical lymph nodes from a carcinoma of unknown primary site: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Homare; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Tsukui, Hidenori; Naoi, Daishi; Tahara, Makiko; Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Sata, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from an unknown primary site to the colon has not been reported previously. A 75-year-old woman presented with a mass in the left submandibular region. Biopsy revealed a Class V lesion, but the histologic type was undetermined. Surgical resection of the left submandibular gland with cervical lymph node dissection was performed. However, SCC was seen in the lymph nodes only, with no tumor in the submandibular gland. Three months after surgery, computed tomography revealed that the preoperatively diagnosed lesion in the transverse colon had grown considerably. A laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was performed. Histological examination showed features of SCC, similar to the findings in the cervical lymph nodes. We report a rare case of synchronous metastatic SCC to the colon and cervical lymph nodes from a carcinoma of unknown primary site. PMID:27173884

  9. Clinicopathological features of an ascending colon mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with clinical serosal invasion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xi-Jun; Feng, Jin-Shan; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Wang, Ling-Mei; Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Liang, Yan-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is exceedingly rare with a poor outcome. In this article, we reported a MANEC in a 68-year-old woman with a symptom of abdominal pain and distension. MANEC derived from the ascending colon with highly aggressive behavior. The diagnosis and distinguish of MANEC must base on histological findings and immunohistochemical findings. In this case, microscopic observation showed tumor cells were arranged in conglobate and nested by fibrous tissue with a visible cell atypia and mitotic. NEC-like and exocrine glandular cells were also been seen in a single neoplasm. MANEC tissues were immunopositive for CK, CK20, P53, CK7, CDX-2, Ki-67 (70%+), E-cad, CD56, CEA, Syn, villin and CgA, and immunonegative for CA125, NSE, ER and PR. Here, the patient was treated by surgical operation and was followed-up near 3 months, no local recurrence and distant metastasis. PMID:25337298

  10. Clinicopathological features of an ascending colon mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with clinical serosal invasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Jun; Feng, Jin-Shan; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Wang, Ling-Mei; Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Liang, Yan-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is exceedingly rare with a poor outcome. In this article, we reported a MANEC in a 68-year-old woman with a symptom of abdominal pain and distension. MANEC derived from the ascending colon with highly aggressive behavior. The diagnosis and distinguish of MANEC must base on histological findings and immunohistochemical findings. In this case, microscopic observation showed tumor cells were arranged in conglobate and nested by fibrous tissue with a visible cell atypia and mitotic. NEC-like and exocrine glandular cells were also been seen in a single neoplasm. MANEC tissues were immunopositive for CK, CK20, P53, CK7, CDX-2, Ki-67 (70%+), E-cad, CD56, CEA, Syn, villin and CgA, and immunonegative for CA125, NSE, ER and PR. Here, the patient was treated by surgical operation and was followed-up near 3 months, no local recurrence and distant metastasis. PMID:25337298

  11. Multiple Skeletal Muscle Metastases from Colon Carcinoma Preceded by Paraneoplastic Dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Gerardi, Assunta Maria Teresa; Fersini, Alberto; Modoni, Sergio; Stoppino, Luca Pio; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Neri, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle metastases are very rare events in colorectal carcinoma. By contrast, dermatomyositis is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with characteristic cutaneous manifestations and a well-recognized association with several human malignancies and, among others, colorectal cancer. Here, we report the case of a 71-year-old woman with paraneoplastic dermatomyositis followed by the development of a metastatic colon cancer. Interestingly, this patient developed multiple skeletal metastases which were preceded by the worsening of systemic symptoms of dermatomyositis. This observation suggests that, while muscle tissue is usually resistant to the development of tumor metastases, the inflammatory and immune response which characterizes and boosts paraneoplastic myopathy may represent a favorable soil for tumor cell invasion and metastasization to skeletal muscles. PMID:23983709

  12. Multiple skeletal muscle metastases from colon carcinoma preceded by paraneoplastic dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Landriscina, Matteo; Gerardi, Assunta Maria Teresa; Fersini, Alberto; Modoni, Sergio; Stoppino, Luca Pio; Macarini, Luca; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Neri, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle metastases are very rare events in colorectal carcinoma. By contrast, dermatomyositis is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with characteristic cutaneous manifestations and a well-recognized association with several human malignancies and, among others, colorectal cancer. Here, we report the case of a 71-year-old woman with paraneoplastic dermatomyositis followed by the development of a metastatic colon cancer. Interestingly, this patient developed multiple skeletal metastases which were preceded by the worsening of systemic symptoms of dermatomyositis. This observation suggests that, while muscle tissue is usually resistant to the development of tumor metastases, the inflammatory and immune response which characterizes and boosts paraneoplastic myopathy may represent a favorable soil for tumor cell invasion and metastasization to skeletal muscles. PMID:23983709

  13. Teng-Long-Bu-Zhong-Tang, a Chinese herbal formula, enhances anticancer effects of 5 - Fluorouracil in CT26 colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has played a positive role in colorectal cancer treatment. There is a great need to establish effective herbal formula for colorectal cancer treatment. Based on TCM principles and clinical practices, we have established an eight herbs composed formula for colorectal cancer treatment, which is Teng-Long-Bu-Zhong-Tang (TLBZT). We have demonstrated the anticancer effects of TLBZT against colorectal carcinoma in vitro. In present study, we evaluated the anticancer potential of TLBZT, used alone or in combination with low dose of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu), in CT26 colon carcinoma in vivo. Methods CT26 colon carcinoma was established in BALB/c mice and treated with TLBZT, 5-Fu, or TLBZT plus 5-Fu. The tumor volumes were observed. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay. Caspases activities were detected by colorimetric assay. Cell senescence was indentified by senescence β-galactosidase staining. Gene expression and angiogenesis was observed by immunohistochemistry or western blot. Results TLBZT significantly inhibited CT26 colon carcinoma growth. TLBZT elicited apoptosis in CT26 colon carcinoma, accompanied by Caspase-3, 8, and 9 activation and PARP cleavage, and downregulation of XIAP and Survivin. TLBZT also induced cell senescence in CT26 colon carcinoma, with concomitant upregulation of p16 and p21 and downregulation of RB phosphorylation. In addition, angiogenesis and VEGF expression in CT26 colon carcinoma was significantly inhibited by TLBZT treatment. Furthermore, TLBZT significantly enhanced anticancer effects of 5-Fu in CT26 colon carcinoma. Conclusions TLBZT exhibited significantly anticancer effect, and enhanced the effects of 5-Fu in CT26 colon carcinoma, which may correlate with induction of apoptosis and cell senescence, and angiogenesis inhibition. The present study provides new insight into TCM approaches for colon cancer treatment

  14. [Hansenula anomala fungemia in a patient undergoing IVH-treatment with ascending colon carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, M; Kawata, K; Kaminaga, Y; Ito, A; Makimura, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1996-02-01

    A case of catheter-related fungemia due to Hansenula anomala is reported. A 61-year-old male was diagnosed as having stage 3 ascending colon carcinoma stenosing the colon severely and was admitted to our hospital to receive an operation of the carcinoma. Just after admission, an intravenous hyperalimentation (IVH) catheter was inserted and IVH was started to prevent development of ileus and to prepare for laparotomy. Nine days later, he developed a fever. On the next day, the IVH catheter was removed and cultures of blood and the catheter revealed the presence of yeast-like organisms that were identified as H. anomala. Laboratory data showed hypogranulocytemia, slight disturbances of liver and kidney, a prolongation of PT, an increase of FDP and positive reaction of candida antigen by CAND-TEC. He improved after the removal of the catheter, and treatment with intravenous infusion of fluconazole 2 days after the removal was thought to be useful for recovery and to prevent the reappearance of infection though susceptibility to fluconazole was not good. Human infections due to H. anomala are rare and this is the 8th case of H. anomala fungemia in Japan. From this report and a review of the literature, risk factors for developing this fungemia include the use and abuse of central venous catheters such as IVH-catheter. It appears that H. anomala has recently emerged as a potential pathogen in the immunocompromised hosts and patients after insertion of central venous catheters and that these organisms should be added to the growing list of unusual fungal pathogens in these patients. PMID:8851393

  15. Requirement of p53 targets in chemosensitization of colonic carcinoma to death ligand therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shulin; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2003-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) exhibits specific tumoricidal activity and is under development for cancer therapy. Mismatch-repair-deficient colonic tumors evade TRAIL-induced apoptosis through mutational inactivation of Bax, but chemotherapeutics including Camptosar (CPT-11) restore TRAIL sensitivity. However, the signaling pathways in restoring TRAIL sensitivity remain to be elucidated. Here, we imaged p53 transcriptional activity in Bax-/- carcinomas by using bioluminescence, in vivo, and find that p53 is required for sensitization to TRAIL by CPT-11. Small interfering RNAs directed at proapoptotic p53 targets reveal TRAIL receptor KILLER/DR5 contributes significantly to TRAIL sensitization, whereas Bak plays a minor role. Caspase 8 inhibition protects both CPT-11 pretreated wild-type and Bax-/- HCT116 cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis, whereas caspase 9 inhibition only rescued the wild-type HCT116 cells from death induced by TRAIL. The results suggest a conversion in the apoptotic mechanism in HCT116 colon carcinoma from a type II pathway involving Bax and the mitochondria to a type I pathway involving efficient extrinsic pathway caspase activation. In contrast to Bax-/- cells, Bak-deficient human cancers undergo apoptosis in response to TRAIL or CPT-11, implying that these proteins have nonoverlapping functions. Our studies elucidate a mechanism for restoration of TRAIL sensitivity in MMR-deficient Bax-/- human cancers through p53-dependent activation of KILLER/DR5 and reconstitution of a type I death pathway. Efforts to identify agents that up-regulate DR5 may be useful in cancer therapies restoring TRAIL sensitivity. PMID:14645705

  16. p53 is important for the anti-proliferative effect of ibuprofen in colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Astrid; Schiffmann, Susanne; Birod, Kerstin; Maier, Thorsten J.; Wobst, Ivonne; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2008-01-25

    S-ibuprofen which inhibits the cyclooxygenase-1/-2 and R-ibuprofen which shows no COX-inhibition at therapeutic concentrations have anti-carcinogenic effects in human colon cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanisms for these effects are still unknown. Using HCT-116 colon carcinoma cell lines, expressing either the wild-type form of p53 (HCT-116 p53{sup wt}) or being p(HCT-116 p53{sup -/-}), we demonstrated that both induction of a cell cycle block and apoptosis after S- and R-ibuprofen treatment is in part dependent on p53. Also in the in vivo nude mice model HCT-116 p53{sup -/-} xenografts were less sensitive for S- and R-ibuprofen treatment than HCT-116 p53{sup wt} cells. Furthermore, results indicate that induction of apoptosis in HCT-116 p53{sup wt} cells after ibuprofen treatment is in part dependent on a signalling pathway including the neutrophin receptor p75{sup NTR}, p53 and Bax.

  17. 5-Fluorouracil causes leukocytes attraction in the peritoneal cavity by activating autophagy and HMGB1 release in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cottone, Lucia; Capobianco, Annalisa; Gualteroni, Chiara; Perrotta, Cristiana; Bianchi, Marco E; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Manfredi, Angelo A

    2015-03-15

    Signals released by leukocytes contribute to tumor growth and influence the efficacy of antineoplastic treatments. The outcome of peritoneal carcinomatosis treatments is unsatisfactory, possibly because chemotherapy activates events that have in the long-term deleterious effects. In this study we offer evidence that 5-fluorouracile (5-FU), besides provoking apoptosis of MC38 colon carcinoma cells, induces a striking attraction of leukocytes both in an orthotopic model of colon carcinomatosis in vivo and in monocyte-migration assays in vitro. Leukocyte attraction depends on the presence of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), an endogenous immune adjuvant and chemoattractant released by dying cells. Leukocyte recruitment is prevented in vivo and in vitro using blocking antibodies against HMGB1 and its competitive antagonist BoxA or by interfering with HMGB1 expression. Autophagy is required for leukocyte chemoattraction, since the latter abates upon pharmacological blockade of the autophagic flux while activation of autophagy per se, in the absence of death of colon carcinoma cells, is not sufficient to attract leukocytes. Our results identify autophagy induction and HMGB1 release in colon carcinoma cells as key events responsible for 5-FU elicited leukocyte attraction and define a novel rate-limiting target for combinatorial therapies. PMID:25098891

  18. [Tubular rectum and colon resection. A new operative method for the removal of large adenomas and low-risk carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Gall, F P

    1982-08-01

    A new operative method for the removal of large sessile tubular or villous adenomas and small early carcinomas of the low risk type by a "tubular" colonic or rectal resection is described. The term "tubular" applies to a short segmental resection of the colon or rectum with complete preservation of the mesocolon or mesorectum and the marginal or superior hemorrhoidal artery. This tubular resection has been used by us since 1981 in 11 patients (7 adenomas, 3 adenocarcinomas and one carcinoid). There was no suture line leakage. No lethality and so far no recurrence. The advantages of this new operative technique over conventional methods are discussed in detail. PMID:7128268

  19. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Treatments Counteract Cachexia by Modulating Autophagy in Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pigna, Eva; Berardi, Emanuele; Aulino, Paola; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Zampieri, Sandra; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Merigliano, Stefano; Gruppo, Mario; Mericskay, Mathias; Li, Zhenlin; Rocchi, Marco; Barone, Rosario; Macaluso, Filippo; Di Felice, Valentina; Adamo, Sergio; Coletti, Dario; Moresi, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have correlated physical activity with a better prognosis in cachectic patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. In order to identify the pathways involved in the physical activity-mediated rescue of skeletal muscle mass and function, we investigated the effects of voluntary exercise on cachexia in colon carcinoma (C26)-bearing mice. Voluntary exercise prevented loss of muscle mass and function, ultimately increasing survival of C26-bearing mice. We found that the autophagic flux is overloaded in skeletal muscle of both colon carcinoma murine models and patients, but not in running C26-bearing mice, thus suggesting that exercise may release the autophagic flux and ultimately rescue muscle homeostasis. Treatment of C26-bearing mice with either AICAR or rapamycin, two drugs that trigger the autophagic flux, also rescued muscle mass and prevented atrogene induction. Similar effects were reproduced on myotubes in vitro, which displayed atrophy following exposure to C26-conditioned medium, a phenomenon that was rescued by AICAR or rapamycin treatment and relies on autophagosome-lysosome fusion (inhibited by chloroquine). Since AICAR, rapamycin and exercise equally affect the autophagic system and counteract cachexia, we believe autophagy-triggering drugs may be exploited to treat cachexia in conditions in which exercise cannot be prescribed. PMID:27244599

  20. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Treatments Counteract Cachexia by Modulating Autophagy in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pigna, Eva; Berardi, Emanuele; Aulino, Paola; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Zampieri, Sandra; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Merigliano, Stefano; Gruppo, Mario; Mericskay, Mathias; Li, Zhenlin; Rocchi, Marco; Barone, Rosario; Macaluso, Filippo; Di Felice, Valentina; Adamo, Sergio; Coletti, Dario; Moresi, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have correlated physical activity with a better prognosis in cachectic patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. In order to identify the pathways involved in the physical activity-mediated rescue of skeletal muscle mass and function, we investigated the effects of voluntary exercise on cachexia in colon carcinoma (C26)-bearing mice. Voluntary exercise prevented loss of muscle mass and function, ultimately increasing survival of C26-bearing mice. We found that the autophagic flux is overloaded in skeletal muscle of both colon carcinoma murine models and patients, but not in running C26-bearing mice, thus suggesting that exercise may release the autophagic flux and ultimately rescue muscle homeostasis. Treatment of C26-bearing mice with either AICAR or rapamycin, two drugs that trigger the autophagic flux, also rescued muscle mass and prevented atrogene induction. Similar effects were reproduced on myotubes in vitro, which displayed atrophy following exposure to C26-conditioned medium, a phenomenon that was rescued by AICAR or rapamycin treatment and relies on autophagosome-lysosome fusion (inhibited by chloroquine). Since AICAR, rapamycin and exercise equally affect the autophagic system and counteract cachexia, we believe autophagy-triggering drugs may be exploited to treat cachexia in conditions in which exercise cannot be prescribed. PMID:27244599

  1. Inflammatory regulatory T cells in the microenvironments of ulcerative colitis and colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kryczek, Ilona; Wang, Lin; Wu, Ke; Li, Wei; Zhao, Ende; Cui, Tracy; Wei, Shuang; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yin; Vatan, Linda; Szeliga, Wojciech; Greenson, Joel K; Roliński, Jacek; Zgodzinski, Witold; Huang, Emina; Tao, Kaixiong; Wang, Guobin; Zou, Weiping

    2016-08-01

    Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are thought to express negligible levels of effector cytokines, and inhibit immune responses and inflammation. Here, we have identified a population of IL-8(+)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells in human peripheral blood, which is selectively increased in the microenvironments of ulcerative colitis and colon carcinoma. Phenotypically, this population is minimally overlapping with IL-17(+)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells, and is different from IL-8(-)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells in the same microenvironment. 40-60% of IL-8(+)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells exhibit naive phenotype and express CD127, whereas IL-8(-)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) cells are basically memory T cells and express minimal CD127. The levels of CXCR5 expression are higher in IL-8(+)Foxp3(+) cells than in IL-8(-)Foxp3(+) cells. IL-2 and TGFβ induce IL-8(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. Exogenous Foxp3 expression promotes IL-8(+)Foxp3(+) T cells and inhibits effector cytokine IFNγ and IL-2 expression. Furthermore, Foxp3 binds to IL-8 proximal promoter and increases its activity. Functionally, IL-8(+)Foxp3(+) T cells inhibit T cell proliferation and effector cytokine production, but stimulate inflammatory cytokine production in the colon tissues, and promote neutrophil trafficking through IL-8. Thus, IL-8(+)Foxp3(+) cells may be an "inflammatory" Treg subset, and possess inflammatory and immunosuppressive dual biological activities. Given their dual roles and localization, these cells may be in a unique position to support tumor initiation and development in human chronic inflammatory environment. PMID:27622054

  2. Effects of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid on human colon carcinoma cell line HCT15

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Guo, Wei-Jian; Yang, Qing-Yao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) are triperpene acids having a similar chemical structure and are distributed wildly in plants all over the world. In recent years, it was found that they had marked anti-tumor effects. There is little literature currently available regarding their effects on colon carcinoma cells. The present study was designed to investigate their inhibitory effects on human colon carcinoma cell line HCT15. METHODS: HCT15 cells were cultured with different drugs. The treated cells were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and their morphologic changes observed under a light microscope. The cytotoxicity of these drugs was evaluated by tetrazolium dye assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry (FCM). Data were expressed as means ± SEM and Analysis of variance and Student’ t-test for individual comparisons. RESULTS: Twenty-four to 72 h after UA or OA 60 μmol/L treatment, the numbers of dead cells and cell fragments were increased and most cells were dead at the 72nd hour. The cytotoxicity of UA was stronger than that of OA. Seventy-eight hours after 30 μmol/L of UA or OA treatment, a number of cells were degenerated, but cell fragments were rarely seen. The IC50 values for UA and OA were 30 and 60 μmol/L, respectively. Proliferation assay showed that proliferation of UA and OA-treated cells was slightly increased at 24 h and significantly decreased at 48 h and 60 h, whereas untreated control cells maintained an exponential growth curve. Cell cycle analysis by FCM showed HCT15 cells treated with UA 30 and OA 60 for 36 h and 72 h gradually accumulated in G0/G1 phase (both drugs P < 0.05 for 72 h), with a concomitant decrease of cell populations in S phase (both drugs P < 0.01 for 72 h) and no detectable apoptotic fraction. CONCLUSION: UA and OA have significant anti-tumor activity. The effect of UA is stronger than that of OA. The possible mechanism of action is that both drugs have an inhibitory effect on tumor cell

  3. Detection of gastrin mRNA in fresh human colonic carcinomas by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Monges, G; Biagini, P; Cantaloube, J F; Chicheportiche, C; Frances, V; Brandini, D; Parc, P; Seitz, J F; Giovannini, M; Sauvan, R

    1993-10-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that gastrin might be synthesized by tumour tissues in cancer of the colon, samples from six human colon tumours, one hepatic metastasis, four normal colonic mucosal samples and two antral and one fundic gastric mucosal samples from nine patients were analysed to determine whether gastrin mRNA was present. RNA was extracted from surgical specimens by ultracentrifugation on a CsCl cushion, purified using the guanidinium thiocyanate method, reverse-transcribed and amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Gastrin mRNA was detected in each colonic carcinoma sample (including the hepatic metastasis), while no such signal was observed in normal colon biopsies. Positive and negative controls (gastric antrum and fundus respectively) gave the expected results. In each of the positive samples, the chemiluminescent revelation of amplified products after Southern blotting corresponded to gastrin mRNA without the intron. These findings demonstrate the ability of primary and metastatic human colonic tumours to produce gastrin mRNA. Since malignant cell lines have been reported to produce gastrin peptide, and since gastrin receptors were present in some cases, our results support the idea that gastrin may be involved in an autocrine mechanism. PMID:7507679

  4. Pathological complete response following neoadjuvant radiotherapy and intraperitoneal perfusion chemotherapy for recurrent colon carcinoma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    BIAN, XINYU; LIU, BAORUI; YANG, YANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a 28-year-old male who was diagnosed with sigmoid colon carcinoma and exhibited local recurrence following radical surgery and 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary surgery consisted of a partial sigmoidectomy and bladder repair. At 8 months post-chemotherapy, the patient was referred to Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital (Nanjing, China) due to local recurrence at the anastomotic site, which was confirmed by colonoscopy and total abdominal computed tomography. Synchronous intensity modulation radiation therapy and intraperitoneal (IP) perfusion chemotherapy with irinotecan (100 mg/m2) was administered. Following treatment, the object efficacy evaluation revealed a complete response and a second resection of the remaining sigmoid colon was performed. The post-operative results showed a pathological complete response. This case indicated that a combination of therapies, including radiotherapy, IP perfusion chemotherapy and surgery, may be beneficial and effective in patients with recurrent colon cancer. PMID:27073546

  5. Urethral metastasis from a sigmoid colon carcinoma: a quite rare case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Urethral metastatic adenocarcinoma is extremely rare. Moreover, only 9 previous cases with metastases from colorectal cancer have been reported to date, and not much information on urethral metastases from colorectum is available so far. Case presentation We report our experience in the diagnosis and the management of the case with urethral metastasis from a sigmoid colon cancer. A 68-year-old man, who underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon carcinoma four years ago, presented gross hematuria with pain. Urethroscopy identified a papillo-nodular tumor 7 mm in diameter in the bulbar urethra. CT-scan imaging revealed the small mass of bulbous portion of urethra and solitary lung metastasis. Histological examination of the tumor obtained by transurethral resection showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was diagnosed as a metastasis of a sigmoid colon carcinoma pathologically by morphological examination. Immunohistochemical analysis of the urethral tumor revealed the positive for cytokertin 20 and CDX2, whereas negative for cytokertin 7. These features were consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon cancer. As the management of this case with urethral and lung metastasis, 6-cycle of chemotherapy with fluorouracil with leucovorin plus oxaliplatin was administered to the patient, and these metastases were disappeared with no recurrence of disease for 34 months. Conclusion Urethral metastasis from colorectal cancer is a very rare occurrence. However, in the presence of urinary symptoms, the possibility of the urethral metastasis should be considered. PMID:24884559

  6. [Experience of the Pharmacotherapy against Appendix and Sigmoid Colon Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma with the Peritoneal Dissemination].

    PubMed

    Harada, Shingo; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Shibuya, Taisuke; Doi, Yuki; Kikuchi, Akitomo; Mori, Koichi; Yabushita, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takuo; Murakami, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Seiji; Fukushima, Tadao; Ike, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    We report 2 cases of signet ring cell carcinoma of the appendix and colon. Case 1: A 61-year-old man was admitted for lower abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed an elevated lesion in the orifice of the appendix. Signet ring cell carcinoma was diagnosed on biopsy. The surgical findings showed multiple peritoneal dissemination nodules, while the primary tumor was unresectable owing to extensive invasion into the retroperitoneum. The histopathological findings were signet ring cell carcinoma, T4b (retroperitoneum), NX, P3, Stage Ⅳ. Although the patient received 14 courses of treatment with S-1 as postoperative chemotherapy, he died of his illness at 32 postoperative months. Case 2: A 76-year-old man was admitted for abdominal pain. Perforation of the lower gastrointestinal tract was diagnosed on abdominal CT, and an emergency operation was performed. The surgical findings demonstrated a large number of peritoneal dissemination nodules, cecal invasion of a sigmoid tumor, and perforation of the ascending colon. The primary tumor was thought to be unresectable, and the perforated segment was resected. The histopathological findings were signet ring cell carcinoma, T4b (cecum), NX, P3, Stage Ⅳ. Although 11 courses of treatment using FOLFIRI+Bev were administered as postoperative chemotherapy, the patient died of his illness at 26 postoperative months. PMID:26489568

  7. Sensitizing human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells to cisplatin by cyclopentenylcytosine, in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, K; Szekeres, T; Yalowitz, J A; Fritzer-Szekeres, M; Pommier, Y G; Jayaram, H N

    2000-11-24

    Cyclopentenylcytosine (CPEC) is cytotoxic to HT-29 cells in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with CPEC resulted in sensitizing HT-29 cells to cisplatin (CDDP), as evidenced by synergistic cytotoxicity. CPEC exhibits potent cytotoxicity to HT-29 cells in vitro, 2 and 24 h exposure providing an LC50 of 2.4 and 0.46 microM, respectively. Exposure of HT-29 cells to CDDP for 2 h resulted in an LC50 of 26 microM. Treatment of HT-29 cells with 1.0 or 1.25 microM CPEC and then incubating with CDDP showed synergistic cytotoxicity. Lesser synergy at very high concentrations of CPEC was demonstrated when HT-29 cells were first exposed to CDDP and then incubated with CPEC. Combination index calculations showed synergistic cytotoxicity in HT-29 cells when CPEC was combined with CDDP. Synergistic antitumor activity was demonstrable in vivo in mice transplanted with HT-29 tumor when treated with a combination of CPEC and CDDP without undue toxicity, since no excessive loss in mouse body weight or overt pathology was observed. CPEC had no influence on the total DNA adduct formation and CDDP did not affect the intracellular levels of CPEC or its metabolites, suggesting that enhanced CDDP cytotoxicity resulted from a step subsequent to excision of platinum-cross-linked DNA. These studies support a new approach for augmenting cytotoxic effect of CPEC with CDDP in treating human colon carcinoma. PMID:11132239

  8. Relationship of apical lymph node involvement to survival in resected colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Malassagne, B; Valleur, P; Serra, J; Sarnacki, S; Galian, A; Hoang, C; Hautefeuille, P

    1993-07-01

    In a prospective study of 197 patients with resected colon carcinoma treated between 1974 and 1985, we explored the relationships between pathologic parameters, and the effect of the latter on survival, to identify the parameter whose systematic measurement would improve the predictive capacity of pathologic staging. Prognostic characteristics were studied by univariate analysis. The results showed significant relationships between the location and number of lymph nodes involved, blood vessel invasion, depth of tumor penetration, and metastases. The five-year survival rates were 45 percent and 17 percent (P < 0.001) for patients without and with apical lymph node involvement, respectively, and 44 percent and 6 percent (P < 0.05) for those with four or less nodes involved and more than four involved, respectively. Among the patients treated by incomplete resection, the respective survival rates of those resected for metastases and of those resected for apical lymph node involvement did not differ significantly. We conclude that the involvement of apical lymph nodes has a significant effect on prognosis and suggest systematic pathologic examination of these nodes to allow simpler and more reproducible selection of patients for treatment by incomplete resection who are at high risk of disease-related death. PMID:8394236

  9. IR spectral imaging for histopathological characterization of xenografted human colon carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, Rolf; Travo, Adrian; Nicolet, Céline; Neuville, Agnès; Gaub, Marie-Pierre; Guenot, Dominique; Ly, Elodie; Manfait, Michel; Jeannesson, Pierre; Piot, Olivier

    2008-11-15

    This study aims to develop IR imaging of tumor tissues for generating an automated IR-based histology. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded xenografts of human colon carcinomas were analyzed. Chemometric and statistical multivariate treatments of spectral data permitted to probe the intrinsic chemical composition of tissues, directly from paraffinized sections without previous dewaxing. Reconstructed color-coded spectral images revealed a marked tumor heterogeneity. We identified three spectral clusters associated to tumoral tissues, whereas HE staining revealed only a single structure. Nine other clusters were assigned to either necrotic or host tissues. This spectral histology proved to be consistent over multiple passages of the same xenografted tumor confirming that intratumoral heterogeneity was maintained over time. In addition, developing an innovative image analysis, based on the quantification of neighboring pixels, permitted the identification of two main sequences of spectral clusters related to the tissue spatial organization. Molecular attribution of the spectral differences between the tumor clusters revealed differences of transcriptional activity within these tumor tissue subtypes. In conclusion, IR spectral imaging proves to be highly effective both for reproducible tissue subtype recognition and for tumor heterogeneity characterization. This may represent an attractive tool for routine high throughput diagnostic challenges, independent from visual morphology. PMID:18847281

  10. Mechanism of transport and intracellular binding of porfiromycin in HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, S S; Johnson, R; Gonzalez, H; Thohan, V

    1989-09-15

    The mechanism of uptake and efflux of porfiromycin (PFM) by HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells or freshly obtained human RBC was investigated. The time course of uptake of radioactivity upon exposure of HCT 116 cells to [14C]PFM showed one fast and one slow phase of linear increase. The initial phase of PFM uptake was not saturable with external drug concentrations from 2 to 100 microM. PFM accumulation was temperature dependent with a temperature coefficient (Q10 24-37 degrees C) of 2.3 +/- 0.3. PFM uptake was not affected either by individual inhibitors such as 1 mM 2,4-dinitrophenol, sodium azide, iodoacetic acid, ouabain, 0.02 mM oligomycin, p-hydroxylmercuribenzoate, 0.2 mM N-ethylmaleimide, or by combinations of inhibitors. PFM uptake did not demonstrate competitive inhibition by unlabeled PFM and mitomycin C. Efflux of cellular radioactivity was not affected by the above mentioned inhibitors or by verapamil, diltiazem, or trifluoperazine. Only aliphatic alcohols accelerated the initial influx rate. The RBC, however, only exhibited the initial fast accumulation of [14C]PFM, and all the 14C accumulated by RBC was exchangeable. These data demonstrate that the uptake and the efflux of PFM in HCT 116 cells and RBC comprise a passive diffusion process. PMID:2766276

  11. Oak ellagitannins suppress the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, Diana; Glabasnia, Arne; Fritz, Jessica; Esselen, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Hofmann, Thomas; Marko, Doris

    2008-05-14

    The ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, and the C-glycosides grandinin and roburin E as well as ellagic acid were found to potently inhibit the growth of human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) in vitro. In a cell-free system these compounds were identified as potent inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with IC 50 values in the low nanomolar range. To address the question of whether the interference with the activity of the isolated EGFR also plays a role within intact cells, effects on the phosphorylation status of the EGFR, as a measure for its activity, were determined in HT29 cells. As exemplified for castalagin and grandinin, both the nonglycosylated and the glycosylated ellagitannins effectively suppressed EGFR phosphorylation, but only at concentrations > or =10 microM, thus, in a concentration range where growth inhibition was observed. These results indicate that the suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling might contribute to the growth inhibitory effects of these compounds present in oak-matured wines and spirits such as whiskey. In contrast, despite substantial growth inhibitory properties, ellagic acid did not significantly affect EGFR phosphorylation in HT29 cells up to 100 microM. PMID:18419129

  12. ZnO nanoparticle tracking from uptake to genotoxic damage in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Condello, Maria; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Barone, Flavia; Condello, Giancarlo; Degan, Paolo; Meschini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used both in the industry and in biomedical applications for their chemical and physical nanomaterial properties. It is therefore essential to go in depth into the cytotoxicity mechanisms and interactions between nanomaterials and cells. The aim of this work was to evaluate the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and their uptake, from a few minutes after treatments up to 24h. ZnO nanoparticles routes of entry into the human colon carcinoma cells (LoVo) were followed at different times by a thorough ultrastructural investigation and semiquantitative analysis. The intracellular release of Zn(2+) ions by Zinquin fluorescent dye, and phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) expression were evaluated. The genotoxic potential of ZnO nanoparticles was also investigated by determining the levels of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). The experimental data show that ZnO nanoparticles entered LoVo cells by either passive diffusion or endocytosis or both, depending on the agglomeration state of the nanomaterial. ZnO nanoparticles coming into contact with acid pH of lysosomes altered organelles structure, resulting in the release of Zn(2+) ions. The simultaneous presence of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn(2+) ions in the LoVo cells determined the formation of reactive oxygen species at the mitochondrial and nuclear level, inducing severe DNA damage. PMID:27317967

  13. Imaging of human colon carcinoma thin sections by FT-IR microspectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasch, Peter; Waesche, Wolfgang; McCarthy, W. J.; Mueller, Gerhard J.; Naumann, Dieter

    1998-04-01

    FTIR microspectroscopic maps of unstained colon carcinoma thin sections were obtained on a conventional IR microscope equipped with an automatic x, y stage, or alternatively by using a MCT focal plane array detector system. IR data were analyzed by different image re-assembling techniques. One main goal of the present study was to test the influence of different spectra data compression approaches on the quality of the FTIR images. The images, re-assembled by Principal component analysis (PCA) on the basis of spectral information available from the fingerprint region exhibited an excellent image contrast confirming standard histo- pathological examinations. The second approach included a systematic search for spectral windows which were supposed to contain the relevant information, necessary for spectra classification and identification. Data from these spectral windows were analyzed by an ANN and output data were utilized for image construction. In contrast to the PCA approach, the image contrast was lower although the main morphological structures were exactly classified. From the spectroscopic point of view, the spectral feature selection method delivered useful information which could be discussed in terms of structural alternations upon carcinogenesis.

  14. Obesity: is there an increase in perioperative complications in those undergoing elective colon and rectal resection for carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Blee, Thomas H; Belzer, G Eric; Lambert, Pamela J

    2002-02-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that obese and overweight patients undergoing elective resection for colon and rectal cancer have longer operative times, increased intraoperative blood loss, and more postoperative complications compared with normal-weight individuals. Our study cohorts included all patients undergoing elective first-time colon resection for proven colorectal carcinoma. Patients undergoing resection for recurrent disease or for emergent indications such as obstruction, perforation, or hemorrhage and those who underwent an additional surgical procedure at the time of colon resection were excluded from analysis. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing resection for colorectal carcinoma during a 30-month period. One hundred fifty-three consecutive patients were identified. Body Mass Index was calculated for each patient. Each patient was labeled as normal, overweight, or obese on the basis of World Health Organization criteria. Estimated intraoperative blood loss, duration of surgery, and postoperative complications were recorded for each patient. Comparisons of continuous variables were made using one- or two-way analysis of variance testing. Comparisons of discrete variables were made with chi-square testing. Level of confidence was defined as P < 0.05. Forty-eight normal, 54 overweight, and 51 obese patients were identified. The type of colon resection, age range, and premorbid conditions were well matched between groups. There was no statistical difference in intraoperative blood loss between groups. The operative times were statistically longer in obese and overweight groups compared with the normal group. No statistical differences existed in postoperative complications between groups. We conclude that obese and overweight patients undergoing resection for colorectal carcinoma when compared with normal-weight patients have similar intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications but longer operative times

  15. Salicylic acid induces apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells grown in-vitro: Influence of oxygen and salicylic acid concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Zitta, Karina; Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Huang, Ying; Heinrich, Christin; Scholz, Jens; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-15

    In solid tumors the hypoxic environment can promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Recently, acetylsalicylic acid a major component of analgesic drugs and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) have been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, but the mechanisms of action remain still unclear. Here we elucidate the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of SA on colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2) grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Western blotting, caspase-3/7 apoptosis assays, MTS cell-proliferation assays, LDH cytotoxicity assays and hydrogen peroxide measurements were performed to investigate the effects of 1 and 10 {mu}M SA on CaCo-2 cells grown under normoxic conditions and cells exposed to hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, SA did not influence cell proliferation or LDH release of CaCo-2 cells. However, caspase-3/7 activity was significantly increased. Under hypoxia, cell proliferation was reduced and LDH release and caspase-3/7 activities were increased. None of these parameters was altered by the addition of SA under hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations 300-fold and SA significantly augmented the release of hydrogen peroxide under normoxic, but not under hypoxic conditions. Phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinases akt and erk1/2 was not changed by SA under hypoxic conditions, whereas under normoxia SA reduced phosphorylation of erk1/2 after 2 hours. We conclude that in colon carcinoma cells effects of SA on apoptosis and cellular signaling are dependent on the availability of oxygen. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of salicylic acid on colon carcinoma cells grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid increases caspase-3/7 activity and hydrogen peroxide release under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid decreases pro-survival erk-1/2 phosphorylation under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid does

  16. Antioxidant supplementation accelerates cachexia development by promoting tumor growth in C26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Assi, Mohamad; Derbré, Frédéric; Lefeuvre-Orfila, Luz; Rébillard, Amélie

    2016-02-01

    More than 50% of patients with advanced stages of colon cancer suffer from progressive loss of skeletal muscle, called cachexia, resulting in reduced quality of life and shortened survival. It is becoming evident that reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate pathways controlling skeletal muscle atrophy. Herein we tested the hypothesis that antioxidant supplementation could prevent skeletal muscle atrophy in a model of cachectic Colon 26 (C26) tumor-bearing mice. Seven-week-old BALB/c mice were subcutaneously inoculated with colon 26 (C26) cancer cells or PBS. Then C26-mice were daily gavaged during 22 days either with PBS (vehicle) or an antioxidant cocktail whose composition is close to that of commercial dietary antioxidant supplements (rich in catechins, quercetin and vitamin C). We found that antioxidants enhanced weight loss and caused premature death of mice. Antioxidants supplementation failed to prevent (i) the increase in plasma TNF-α levels and systemic oxidative damage, (ii) skeletal muscle atrophy and (iii) activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (MuRF-1, MAFbx and polyubiquitinated proteins). Accordingly, immunohistological staining for Ki-67 and the expression of cell cycle inhibitors demonstrated that tumor of supplemented mice developed faster with a concomitant decrease in oxidative damage. Previous studies have shown that the use of catechins and quercetin separately can improve the musculoskeletal function in cachectic animals. However, our results indicate that the combination of these antioxidants reduced survival and enhanced cachexia in C26-mice. PMID:26708754

  17. Preclinical evaluation of azathioprine plus buthionine sulfoximine in the treatment of human hepatocarcinoma and colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Breijo, Borja; Monserrat, Jorge; Ramírez-Rubio, Sara; Cuevas, Eva P; Vara, Diana; Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Fernández-Moreno, M Dolores; Román, Irene D; Gisbert, Javier P; Guijarro, Luis G

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and the safety of azathioprine (AZA) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) by localized application into HepG2 tumor in vivo. METHODS: Different hepatoma and colon carcinoma cell lines (HepG2, HuH7, Chang liver, LoVo, RKO, SW-48, SW-480) were grown in minimal essencial medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotic/antimycotic solution and maintained in a humidified 37 °C incubator with 5% CO2. These cells were pretreated with BSO for 24 h and then with AZA for different times. We examined the effects of this combination on some proteins and on cellular death. We also studied the efficacy and the safety of AZA (6 mg/kg per day) and BSO (90 mg/kg per day) in HepG2 tumor growth in vivo using athymic mice. We measured safety by serological markers such as aminotransferases and creatine kinase. RESULTS: The in vitro studies revealed a new mechanism of action for the AZA plus BSO combination in the cancer cells compared with other thiopurines (6-mercaptopurine, 6-methylmercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine and 6-methylthioguanine) in combination with BSO. The cytotoxic effect of AZA plus BSO in HepG2 cells resulted from necroptosis induction in a mitochondrial-dependent manner. From kinetic studies we suggest that glutathione (GSH) depletion stimulates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and Bax translocation in HepG2 cells with subsequent deregulation of mitochondria (cytochrome c release, loss of membrane potential), and proteolysis activation leading to loss of membrane integrity, release of lactate dehydrogenase and DNA degradation. Some of this biochemical and cellular changes could be reversed by N-acetylcysteine (a GSH replenisher). In vivo studies showed that HepG2 tumor growth was inhibited when AZA was combined with BSO. CONCLUSION: Our studies suggest that a combination of AZA plus BSO could be useful for localized treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma as in the currently used transarterial chemoembolization method. PMID

  18. Specific Oncogenic Activity of the Src-Family Tyrosine Kinase c-Yes in Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paquay de Plater, Ludmilla; Edmonds, Thomas; David, Géraldine; Jan, Michel; de Montrion, Catherine; Cogé, Francis; Léonce, Stéphane; Burbridge, Michael; Bruno, Alain; Boutin, Jean A.; Lockhart, Brian; Roche, Serge; Cruzalegui, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    c-Yes, a member of the Src tyrosine kinase family, is found highly activated in colon carcinoma but its importance relative to c-Src has remained unclear. Here we show that, in HT29 colon carcinoma cells, silencing of c-Yes, but not of c-Src, selectively leads to an increase of cell clustering associated with a localisation of β-catenin at cell membranes and a reduction of expression of β-catenin target genes. c-Yes silencing induced an increase in apoptosis, inhibition of growth in soft-agar and in mouse xenografts, inhibition of cell migration and loss of the capacity to generate liver metastases in mice. Re-introduction of c-Yes, but not c -Src, restores transforming properties of c-Yes depleted cells. Moreover, we found that c-Yes kinase activity is required for its role in β-catenin localisation and growth in soft agar, whereas kinase activity is dispensable for its role in cell migration. We conclude that c-Yes regulates specific oncogenic signalling pathways important for colon cancer progression that is not shared with c-Src. PMID:21390316

  19. Modulation of the plasminogen activation system by inflammatory cytokines in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Trân-Thang, C.; Kruithof, E.; Lahm, H.; Schuster, W. A.; Tada, M.; Sordat, B.

    1996-01-01

    Inflammation may promote malignant invasion by enhancing cancer cell-associated proteolysis. Here we present the effect of inflammatory cytokines on the plasminogen activation system of eight human colon carcinoma cell lines. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) increased in several, but not all, cell lines the production of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue-type PA (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) as analysed by zymography, enzyme immunoassays and Northern analysis. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) had no effect. uPA receptor (uPAR) mRNA levels were also upregulated. However, each individual cell line responded differently following exposure to TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta. For example, there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of uPA and PAI-1 in SW 620 cells, whereas increased uPA production in SW 1116 cells was not accompanied by an increase in PAI-1. The TNF-alpha stimulatory effect was blocked by anti-TNF-alpha Fab fragments. All cell lines expressed both types of TNF receptor mRNAs, whereas no transcript for TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-6 receptor or the IL-1 receptors was found. Our results demonstrate that TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta stimulate the plasminogen activation system in tumour cell but the responses differed even in cells derived from the same tissue origin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8826848

  20. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colorectal carcinoma above the peritoneal reflection. II. Antimesenteric wall ascending and descending colon and cecum

    SciTech Connect

    Kopelson, G.

    1983-08-15

    From 1970 to 1981, 50 patients had curative surgery for carcinoma of the cecum, ascending, or descending colon and were Stage greater than or equal to B2. In 15 cases, the lesion originated on the antimesenteric (posterolateral) bowel wall. Of seven cases (with minimum three-year follow-up) not receiving adjuvant postoperative regional irradiation, four recurred in the tumor bed/abdominal wall versus 0/3 irradiated patients. Similarly, the five-year survival was improved in the irradiated group (2/3) versus only 2/9 in the unirradiated group. Patients with transmural extension of right or left colon cancers originating on the anti mesenteric (posterolateral) bowel wall may have a high incidence of postoperative regional failure which may be decreased by adjuvant postoperative regional irradiation.

  1. [I costi farmacologici della terapia di conversione con farmaci biologici nel carcinoma del colon-retto con metastasi epatiche].

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Riassunto. Lo scopo di questo studio è quello di valutare i costi dei farmaci (con particolare riferimento alle terapie con farmaci biologici) utilizzati nella terapia di conversione in una popolazione non selezionata di pazienti affetti da carcinoma del colon-retto in stadio avanzato, al fine di ottenere una resezione epatica R0. In questa rassegna sono stati selezionati i report completi e gli aggiornamenti di tutti gli studi clinici randomizzati (di fase II e fase III) che confrontassero almeno 2 regimi di terapia con farmaci biologici in prima linea in pazienti affetti da carcinoma del colon-retto in stadio avanzato di malattia. I costi dei farmaci sono stati ricavati dalla nostra Farmacia Ospedaliera e sono espressi in euro (€). Il nostro studio inizia con la valutazione di 683 abstract. 48 tria sono stati considerati adeguati per una successiva analisi. Una valutazione più approfondita ha portato all'esclusione di 37 trial, lasciando alla valutazione finale 11 studi clinici randomizzati (3 trial di fase II, per un totale di 522 pazienti, e 8 studi di fase III, per un totale di 7191 pazienti). I costi dei farmaci utilizzati nella terapia di conversione aumentano con la sostituzione del 5-fluorouracile con la capecitabina e, in misura maggiore, con l'introduzione degli agenti biologici. In questo lavoro sono presentati due punti chiave. Primo, i costi degli agenti farmacologici utilizzati nei regimi di prima linea a base di agenti biologici più comunemente utilizzati nel trattamento del carcinoma del colon-retto in stadio avanzato sono molto variabili. Secondo, i dati di efficacia dei regimi pubblicati, in termini di tassi di resezione, dipendono dalla selezione dei pazienti, dalle caratteristiche del tumore e dal tipo di schema di terapia. PMID:27571559

  2. Cooperative effect of BI-69A11 and celecoxib enhances radiosensitization by modulating DNA damage repair in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pal, Ipsita; Dey, Kaushik Kumar; Chaurasia, Madhuri; Parida, Sheetal; Das, Subhayan; Rajesh, Y; Sharma, Kulbhushan; Chowdhury, Tamohan; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2016-05-01

    Amplification of PI3K-Akt pathway promotes radioresistance in various cancers including colorectal carcinoma. Local recurrence in colon cancer causes poor prognosis affecting overall survival of cancer-affected patient population. To avoid local recurrence, pre-operative or post-operative additional radiotherapy is given. However, main concern regarding radiotherapy is to increase the radiosensitivity of malignant cell without hampering the activities of normal cells. In this context, addition of two or more than two chemotherapeutic drugs as a radiosensitizer is a common practice in radiation biology. BI-69A11 earlier showed potential apoptosis-inducing effect in melanoma and colon carcinoma. Celecoxib showed anti-cancer effects in both COX-2 dependent and independent pathways and used to act as a radiosensitizing enhancer. Here, we suggest that the combination of BI-69A11 and celecoxib inhibits the phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and DNA-PK responsible for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced double-strand break (DSB) repair. Moreover, the combinatorial effect of BI-69A11 and celecoxib attenuates the IR-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, this combination also impairs IR-induced activation of Akt and downstream targets of ATM. This might lead to induced activation of apoptotic pathway after triple therapy treatment modulating pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins. This activation of apoptotic pathway also showed the interdependence of PUMA and BAD in triple combination-treated colon cancer cells in a p53 independent manner. This study reveals the therapeutic potential of the triple combination therapy in prevention of radioresistance. Besides, it also demonstrates the cytotoxic effects of triple combination therapy in colon cancer. This study shows utility and potential implication on safety of the patients undergoing radiation therapy. PMID:26631035

  3. Stress responses to DNA damaging agents in the human colon carcinoma cell line, RKO.

    PubMed

    Beard, S E; Capaldi, S R; Gee, P

    1996-11-01

    DNA damage results from a wide variety of external agents such as chemicals and radiation. The consequences of exposure to agents that damage DNA have been traditionally studied from the perspective of cell survival and mutagenesis. Mutations are late endpoints of DNA damage. Cells respond to the earlier stages of DNA damage by inducing the expression of several genes, including those specific of the nature of the lesion. These early transcriptional responses are likely to predetermine the later fate of the damaged cell. Genes activated during this early response include those involved in DNA repair, replication, and growth control. We are interested in the transcriptional mechanisms by which cells respond to DNA damaging agents. To facilitate the measurement of gene induction, we used seven different reporter constructs integrated stably into the RKO cell line derived from a human colon carcinoma. These constructs were derived from promoters and/or response elements isolated from genes associated with DNA damage responses in human cells, and were fused to the bacterial reporter gene, choramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). The cell lines generated in this manner contain the promoters and/or response elements representing DNA polymerase beta, p53, gadd (growth arrest and DNA damage) 45 and 153, c-fos, TPA response element, and tissue-type plasminogen activator. These recombinant cell lines were assembled in a 96-well microtiter plate permitting their simultaneous exposure to compounds and subsequent CAT protein measurement. This assembly has been designated the CAT-Tox (D) assay. These cell lines were exposed to different classes of DNA damaging agents including those which covalently join bases to form dimers (e.g., UVC irradiation), generate DNA adducts by alkylation (e.g., methylmethane sulfonate [MMS], ethylmethane sulfonate [EMS], N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanine [MNNG], dimethylnitrosamine [DMN]), cross-link DNA (e.g., mitomycin C), and inhibit DNA

  4. Ceramide mediates FasL-induced caspase 8 activation in colon carcinoma cells to enhance FasL-induced cytotoxicity by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Genevieve L.; Redd, Priscilla S.; Paschall, Amy V.; Lu, Chunwan; Gu, Lilly; Cai, Houjian; Albers, Thomas; Lebedyeva, Iryna O.; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    FasL-mediated cytotoxicity is one of the mechanisms that CTLs use to kill tumor cells. However, human colon carcinoma often deregulates the Fas signaling pathway to evade host cancer immune surveillance. We aimed at testing the hypothesis that novel ceramide analogs effectively modulate Fas function to sensitize colon carcinoma cells to FasL-induced apoptosis. We used rational design and synthesized twenty ceramide analogs as Fas function modulators. Five ceramide analogs, IG4, IG7, IG14, IG17, and IG19, exhibit low toxicity and potent activity in sensitization of human colon carcinoma cells to FasL-induced apoptosis. Functional deficiency of Fas limits both FasL and ceramide analogs in the induction of apoptosis. Ceramide enhances FasL-induced activation of the MAPK, NF-κB, and caspase 8 despite induction of potent tumor cell death. Finally, a sublethal dose of several ceramide analogs significantly increased CTL-mediated and FasL-induced apoptosis of colon carcinoma cells. We have therefore developed five novel ceramide analogs that act at a sublethal dose to enhance the efficacy of tumor-specific CTLs, and these ceramide analogs hold great promise for further development as adjunct agents in CTL-based colon cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27487939

  5. Ceramide mediates FasL-induced caspase 8 activation in colon carcinoma cells to enhance FasL-induced cytotoxicity by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Coe, Genevieve L; Redd, Priscilla S; Paschall, Amy V; Lu, Chunwan; Gu, Lilly; Cai, Houjian; Albers, Thomas; Lebedyeva, Iryna O; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    FasL-mediated cytotoxicity is one of the mechanisms that CTLs use to kill tumor cells. However, human colon carcinoma often deregulates the Fas signaling pathway to evade host cancer immune surveillance. We aimed at testing the hypothesis that novel ceramide analogs effectively modulate Fas function to sensitize colon carcinoma cells to FasL-induced apoptosis. We used rational design and synthesized twenty ceramide analogs as Fas function modulators. Five ceramide analogs, IG4, IG7, IG14, IG17, and IG19, exhibit low toxicity and potent activity in sensitization of human colon carcinoma cells to FasL-induced apoptosis. Functional deficiency of Fas limits both FasL and ceramide analogs in the induction of apoptosis. Ceramide enhances FasL-induced activation of the MAPK, NF-κB, and caspase 8 despite induction of potent tumor cell death. Finally, a sublethal dose of several ceramide analogs significantly increased CTL-mediated and FasL-induced apoptosis of colon carcinoma cells. We have therefore developed five novel ceramide analogs that act at a sublethal dose to enhance the efficacy of tumor-specific CTLs, and these ceramide analogs hold great promise for further development as adjunct agents in CTL-based colon cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27487939

  6. Growth-inhibitory effects of a mineralized extract from the red marine algae, Lithothamnion calcareum, on Ca2+-sensitive and Ca2+-resistant human colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem Aslam, Muhammad; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Paruchuri, Tejaswi; Hu, Xin; Chakrabarty, Subhas; Varani, James

    2009-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation were assessed in a series of human colon carcinoma cell lines in response to a mineral-rich extract derived from the red marine algae, Lithothamnion calcareum. The extract contains 12% Ca2+, 1% Mg2+, and detectable amounts of 72 trace elements, but essentially no organic material. The red algae extract was as effective as inorganic Ca2+ alone in suppressing growth and inducing differentiation of colon carcinoma cells that are responsive to a physiological level of extracellular Ca2+ (1.4 mM). However, with cells that are resistant to Ca2+ alone, the extract was still able to reduce proliferation and stimulate differentiation. PMID:19394137

  7. Curcumin conjugated with PLGA potentiates sustainability, anti-proliferative activity and apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Waghela, Bhargav N; Sharma, Anupama; Dhumale, Suhashini; Pandey, Shashibahl M; Pathak, Chandramani

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, an ingredient of turmeric, exhibits a variety of biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-proliferative, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-metastatic. It is a highly pleiotropic molecule that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Despite its imperative biological activities, chemical instability, photo-instability and poor bioavailability limits its utilization as an effective therapeutic agent. Therefore, enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin may improve its therapeutic index for clinical setting. In the present study, we have conjugated curcumin with a biodegradable polymer Poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) and evaluated its apoptotic potential in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT 116). The results show that curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently inhibits cell proliferation and cell survival in human colon carcinoma cells as compared to native curcumin. Additionally, curcumin conjugated with PLGA shows improved cellular uptake and exhibits controlled release at physiological pH as compared to native curcumin. The curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently activates the cascade of caspases and promotes intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus, the results suggest that conjugation potentiates the sustainability, anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of curcumin. This approach could be a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic index of cancer therapy. PMID:25692854

  8. Synergistic therapeutic effects of Schiff's base cross-linked injectable hydrogels for local co-delivery of metformin and 5-fluorouracil in a mouse colon carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xilong; He, Chaoliang; Wu, Yundi; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    In situ formed hydrogels based on Schiff base reaction were formulated for the co-delivery of metformin (ME) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU). The reactive aldehyde-functionalized four-arm polyethylene glycol (PFA) was synthesized by end-capping of 4-arm PEG with 4-formylbenzoic acid (FA) and used as a cross-linking agent. The injectable hydrogels are designed through the quick gelation induced by the formation of covalent bonds via Schiff-base reaction of PFA with 4-arm poly (ethylene glycol)-b-poly (L-lysine) (PPLL). This formulation eliminated the need for metal catalysts and complicated processes in the preparation of in situ-forming hydrogels. In vitro degradation and drug release studies demonstrated that both ME and 5FU were released through PFA/PPLL hydrogels in a controlled and pH-dependent manner. When incubated with mouse colon adenocarcinoma cells (C26), the ME/5FU-incorporated PFA/PPLL hydrogels had synergistic inhibitory effects on the cell cycle progression and cell proliferation in colon cancer cells. After a single subcutaneous injection of the hydrogel containing ME/5FU beside the tumors of BALB/c mice inoculated with C26 cells, the dual-drug-loaded hydrogels displayed superior therapeutic activity resulted from a combination of p53-mediated G1 arrest and apoptosis in C26 cells. Hence, the Schiff's base cross-linked hydrogels containing ME and 5FU may have potential therapeutic applications in the treatments of colon cancer. PMID:26497429

  9. MicroRNA profiles in colorectal carcinomas, adenomas and normal colonic mucosa: variations in miRNA expression and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Mullany, Lila E; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D; Samowitz, Wade S; Wolff, Roger K

    2016-03-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression either by post-transcriptionally suppressing mRNA translation or by mRNA degradation. We examine differentially expressed miRNAs in colorectal carcinomas, adenomas and normal colonic mucosa. Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma/normal-paired samples and 290 adenoma tissue samples were run on the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0 which contained 2006 miRNAs. We tested for significant differences in miRNA expression between paired carcinoma/adenoma/normal colonic tissue samples. Fewer than 600 miRNAs were expressed in >80% of people for colonic tissue; of these 86.5% were statistically differentially expressed between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa using a false discovery rate of 0.05. Roughly half of these differentially expressed miRNAs showed a progression in levels of expression from normal to adenoma to carcinoma tissue. Other miRNAs appeared to be altered at the normal to adenoma stage, while others were only altered at the adenoma to carcinoma stage or only at the normal to carcinoma stage. Evaluation of the Agilent platform showed a high degree of repeatability (r = 0.98) and reasonable agreement with the NanoString platform. Our data suggest that miRNAs are highly dysregulated in colorectal tissue among individuals with colorectal cancer; the pattern of disruption varies by miRNA as tissue progresses from normal to adenoma to carcinoma. PMID:26740022

  10. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma of the colon: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Sonmoon; Ibrarullah, Mohammad; Mohapatra, Ashutosh; Baisakh, Manas Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) originating from the gastrointestinal tract are considered to be relatively rare tumors with a poor prognosis. We describe a case of an 83-year-old male who presented with complains of bleeding per rectum. Colonoscopy revealed two ulceroproliferative tumors, one in the sigmoid colon and another in the descending colon. The patient underwent left hemicolectomy. Based on the immunohistochemistry, the sigmoid colon tumor was diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas the descending colon tumor was diagnosed as NET. NET coexisted with adenocarcinoma occurring separately in the same segment of colon, as in the present case, is distinctly rare and has not been reported earlier. The coexistence of the NETs with other primary malignancies has been increasingly recognized. Therefore, we recommend that the patients with the diagnosis of NETs should undergo further screening for the associated primary malignancies to prevent late-stage diagnosis of synchronous malignancies. PMID:27009325

  11. Right colon carcinoma infiltrating the alimentary limb in a patient with biliopancreatic diversion.

    PubMed

    López-Tomassetti Fernández, Eudaldo M; Hernández Hernández, Juan Ramón; Jorge, Valentine Nuñez

    2014-01-01

    Biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) has excellent results, with the average patient losing 60% to 80% of the excess weight in the first 2 years. However, the BPD works by malabsorption and malabsorptive problems may be experienced with the operation. Therefore, monitoring is necessary for life. In the recent literature there is some debate over the possibility that this technique can increase the risk of colon cancer secondary to the action of the unabsorbed food and bile acid on colonic mucosa. We report the case of a 42-year-old patient with a previous bariatric surgery (BPD with 50 cm common channel; 300 cm alimentary limb) who developed a very aggressive right colon cancer 6 years after the operation. We also review our series of 330 patients operated on during a 14-year period to try to answer if there is any relationship between BPD and colon cancer. PMID:25058764

  12. Effects of high-fat mixed-lipid diet and exercise on the antioxidant system in skeletal and cardiac muscles of rats with colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Perse, Martina; Injac, Rade; Strukelj, Borut; Cerar, Anton

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle play a critical role in the incidence of colon carcinoma. In order to investigate the effects of high-fat mixed-lipid (HFML) diet in conjunction with long-term swimming, the antioxidant capacity of skeletal and cardiac muscles were observed in rats with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinoma. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into one control group and four cancer groups: sedentary and swimming groups fed low fat corn oil diet and sedentary and swimming groups, fed a HFML diet. After 6 months of swimming, rats were sacrificed and the blood, cardiac and soleus muscle were taken for analysis. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose concentrations were measured and the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase as well as levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione were determined. The results showed that endurance swimming prevented lipid peroxidation in the soleus muscle of HFML diet rats due to elevated activities of antioxidant enzymes. On the other hand, increased lipid peroxidation in the hearts of all cancer groups indicated that DMH-induced colon carcinoma impaired the antioxidant status of the heart. This failure in heart tissue indicated that enhanced antioxidant capacity after regular physical activity is not sufficient to offset oxidative stress caused by DMH-induced colon carcinoma. PMID:19904015

  13. First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Crivello, Martin; Perona, Marina; Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto; Pozzi, Emiliano; Casal, Mariana; Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a

  14. Regorafenib Effects on Human Colon Carcinoma Xenografts Monitored by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography with Immunohistochemical Validation

    PubMed Central

    Cyran, Clemens C.; Kazmierczak, Philipp M.; Hirner, Heidrun; Moser, Matthias; Ingrisch, Michael; Havla, Lukas; Michels, Alexandra; Eschbach, Ralf; Schwarz, Bettina; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Bruns, Christiane J.; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography for monitoring the effects of regorafenib on experimental colon carcinomas in rats by quantitative assessments of tumor microcirculation parameters with immunohistochemical validation. Materials and Methods Colon carcinoma xenografts (HT-29) implanted subcutaneously in female athymic rats (n = 15) were imaged at baseline and after a one-week treatment with regorafenib by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (128-slice dual-source computed tomography). The therapy group (n = 7) received regorafenib daily (10 mg/kg bodyweight). Quantitative parameters of tumor microcirculation (plasma flow, mL/100 mL/min), endothelial permeability (PS, mL/100 mL/min), and tumor vascularity (plasma volume, %) were calculated using a 2-compartment uptake model. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography parameters were validated with immunohistochemical assessments of tumor microvascular density (CD-31), tumor cell apoptosis (TUNEL), and proliferation (Ki-67). Results Regorafenib suppressed tumor vascularity (15.7±5.3 to 5.5±3.5%; p<0.05) and tumor perfusion (12.8±2.3 to 8.8±2.9 mL/100 mL/min; p = 0.063). Significantly lower microvascular density was observed in the therapy group (CD-31; 48±10 vs. 113±25, p<0.05). In regorafenib-treated tumors, significantly more apoptotic cells (TUNEL; 11844±2927 vs. 5097±3463, p<0.05) were observed. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography tumor perfusion and tumor vascularity correlated significantly (p<0.05) with microvascular density (CD-31; r = 0.84 and 0.66) and inversely with apoptosis (TUNEL; r = −0.66 and −0.71). Conclusions Regorafenib significantly suppressed tumor vascularity (plasma volume) quantified by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography in experimental colon carcinomas in rats with good-to-moderate correlations to an immunohistochemical gold standard. Tumor response biomarkers assessed by dynamic contrast

  15. Curcumin-Loading-Dependent Stability of PEGMEMA-Based Micelles Affects Endocytosis and Exocytosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teddy; Trench, David; Putnam, Joshua; Stenzel, Martina H; Lord, Megan S

    2016-03-01

    Polymeric micelles were formed from poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)-block-poly(styrene) (P(PEGMEMA)-b-PS) block copolymer of two different chain lengths. The micelles formed were approximately 16 and 46 nm in diameter and used to encapsulate curcumin. Upon loading of the curcumin into the micelles, their size increased to approximately 34 and 80 nm in diameter, respectively, with a loading efficiency of 58%. The unloaded micelles were not cytotoxic to human colon carcinoma cells, whereas only the smaller loaded micelles were cytotoxic after 72 h of exposure. The micelles were rapidly internalized by the cells within minutes of exposure, with the loaded micelles internalized to a greater extent owing to their enhanced stability compared to that of the unloaded micelles. The larger micelles were more rapidly internalized and exocytosed than the smaller micelles, demonstrating the effect of micelle size and drug loading on drug delivery and cytotoxicity. PMID:26755445

  16. Apoptosis inducing capacity of Holothuria arenicola in CT26 colon carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Afzali, Mahbubeh; Nikdel, Najme; Mostafapour, Asma; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Sea cucumber is one of the classes of echinoderms, which is considered as a health marine product and possess various biological characteristics with therapeutic application. The present investigation attempted to evaluate the potential of anti-cancer Persian Gulf sea cucumber species Holothuria arenicola (H. arenicola) aqueous extract on mice colon carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods: The CT26 carcinoma cells were treated with various concentrations of extract in 24 and 48 hr, and then its anti-proliferative effect was measured by MTT assay and morphological observations. The apoptotic effect was examined by fluorescence microscopy (DNA fragmentation assay), Flow cytometry, caspase-3 and -9 colorimetric assays. The in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of sea cucumber extract on CT26 tumor cells transplanted in BALB/c mice was also investigated. Results: The results showed that the water extract of sea cucumber revealed remarkable anti-proliferative effect on CT26 tumor cells with IC50= 31 µg/ml with recruitment of intrinsic apoptotic pathway in vitro. In addition, the colon tumor volume in treated groups remarkably reduced in homozygous mice. Histopathological examination elucidated that sea cucumber extract attenuated tumor size and volume along with apoptosis characteristics. Moreover, RT-PCR analysis revealed that sea cucumber extract induced intrinsic apoptosis in vivo through suppression of Bcl-2 expression. Conclusion: Our data confirmed this notion that sea cucumber administrates anti-cancer effect that can be used as complementary in preclinical experiments, so further characterization are recommended for detection sea cucumber metabolites and clinical application. PMID:27279978

  17. Flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy and double-contrast barium-enema examination in the identification of adenomas and carcinoma of the colon.

    PubMed

    Farrands, P A; Vellacott, K D; Amar, S S; Balfour, T W; Hardcastle, J D

    1983-11-01

    To assess the accuracy of the flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscope, 227 consecutive patients (mean age 61.8 +/- 13 years) requiring investigation of colonic symptoms were evaluated using rigid and flexible sigmoidoscopy (PAF and KDV) and double-contrast barium enema (SSA). Patients with equivocal findings or adenomatous polyps underwent colonoscopy (TWB). Thirty-four patients had carcinoma and 50 patients had one or more adenomatous polyps (greater than 5mm). The neoplastic yield from rigid sigmoidoscopy was 12 per cent, flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy 90 per cent, and double-contrast barium enema only 76 per cent. Barium enema failed to identify eight carcinomas and 13 adenomatous polyps; seven of the eight carcinomas were polypoid Dukes' Stage A lesions, and associated diverticular disease was present in 62.5 per cent of cases. Flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy failed to identify seven carcinomas and one adenomatous polyp. Five of the carcinomas were beyond range of the instrument; in one patient, a stricture was seen that was caused by the carcinoma; and in the seventh patient, the examination was terminated because of angulation spasm. Double-contrast barium enema is inaccurate in detecting lesions in the sigmoid colon, with flexible sigmoidoscopy being superior. PMID:6628146

  18. Carcinoma of the small intestine and colon as a complication of Crohn disease: radiologic manifestation

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, G.W.; Frank, P.H.

    1984-03-01

    Barium examinations of the large and small bowel were analyzed in six of seven patients who had adenocarcinoma in areas of the intestine affected with Crohn disease; radiographic changes were correlated with clinical, surgical, and pathologic findings. Radiographic examinations were available in five of these patients at the time of diagnosis of tumor. Two of the five patients demonstrated classic radiographic changes associated with carcinoma. In the other three cases, the radiographic changes were atypical for carcinoma and demonstrated progression of disease over time to include more portions of the bowel and presence of fistulas, strictures, and obstruction. The most frequent clinical presentation of adenocarcinoma in these patients was a recrudescence of symptoms after a long quiescent period. In patients with long-standing Crohn disease plus these clinical features and the above radiographic findings, the diagnosis of a coexisting carcinoma should be considered.

  19. Efficacy of treatment of colon, lung and breast human carcinoma xenografts with: doxorubicin, cisplatin, irinotecan or topotecan.

    PubMed

    Hardman, W E; Moyer, M P; Cameron, I L

    1999-01-01

    Given that human cancer xenografts tend to retain chemosensitivities similar to the cancerous tissue of origin, human carcinoma xenografts grown in nude mice were tested for sensitivity to four drug protocols: doxorubicin at 5 mg/kg, i.v., q5d; irinotecan at 60 mg/kg, i.v., q4d; cisplatin 5 mg/kg, i.p., q7d; and topotecan 1.5 mg/kg, p.o., qd (5 of 7 days). Irinotecan and doxorubicin protocols either halted or caused significant regression of the breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, MDA-MB 231 and T47D). None of the protocols tested resulted in significant regression in the lung cancer xenografts (H460, A549 and H226) although both irinotecan and doxorubicin did halt growth of the H226 xenograft. The ability of the irinotecan treatment to cause regression of xenograft size in all three colon cancer cell lines (SW620, COLO205 and HT29) justifies further clinical trials of irinotecan as an especially promising drug for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:10472342

  20. Plant Polyphenols and Oxidative Metabolites of the Herbal Alkenylbenzene Methyleugenol Suppress Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes. PMID:23476753

  1. Plant polyphenols and oxidative metabolites of the herbal alkenylbenzene methyleugenol suppress histone deacetylase activity in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes. PMID:23476753

  2. Selected case from the Arkadi M. Rywlin International Pathology Slide Club: carcinoma of the transverse colon in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Galliani, Carlos A; Sanchez, Irene C; D'Errico, Maria M; Bisceglia, Michele

    2015-05-01

    We report a case of a 14-year-old female with primary adenocarcinoma of the transverse colon. She was hospitalized after presenting with abdominal pain and signs of intestinal obstruction. There was no health antecedent or family history of neoplasia. Physical examination revealed a distended abdomen. Tenderness was elicited to palpation of the right lower quadrant. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen revealed obstructive signs, with a constricting lesion in the mid-transverse colon of probable neoplastic nature. Laparoscopic segmental resection of the colon was followed by standard right hemicolectomy. A circumferential mid-transverse tumor was diagnosed as primary colorectal carcinoma (CRC) of signet-ring cell type, AJCC stage IIIC, Dukes' C stage. On the basis of immunohistochemistry and clinical data, hereditary nonpolyposis and hamartomatous colorectal cancer syndromes were excluded. Involvement of either the p53, BRAF, or K-RAS genes was ruled out by immunohistochemistry profiling and genetic testing. The neoplasm was categorized as sporadic. The possibility of activation of the Wnt signaling pathway was suspected, because of a defective turnover of the β-catenin protein. Postoperatively, the patient was treated with both systemic and intra-abdominal adjuvant chemotherapy, including oxaliplatin. Between 18 and 24 months after diagnosis, intra-abdominal tumor recurrences were detected. The patient underwent bilateral oophorectomies for Krukenberg tumors and received salvage chemotherapy. Recently, additional recurrent metastatic retroperitoneal disease caused hydronephrosis. The retroperitoneal mass was debulked and a ureteric stent was placed. At the time of this writing, 43 months after diagnosis, the patient is receiving FOLFOX chemotherapy combined with panitumumab. CRC of childhood is exceedingly rare, generally develops in the setting of unrecognized genetic predisposing factors to cancer, presents with advanced disease, is high grade, and tends

  3. BVES regulates EMT in human corneal and colon cancer cells and is silenced via promoter methylation in human colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher S.; Zhang, Baolin; Smith, J. Joshua; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Barrett, Caitlyn W.; Pino, Christopher; Russ, Patricia; Presley, Sai H.; Peng, DunFa; Rosenblatt, Daniel O.; Haselton, Frederick R.; Yang, Jin-Long; Washington, M. Kay; Chen, Xi; Eschrich, Steven; Yeatman, Timothy J.; El-Rifai, Wael; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Chang, Min S.

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype is a critical step in the metastatic progression of epithelial carcinomas. Adherens junctions (AJs) are required for suppressing this epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) but less is known about the role of tight junctions (TJs) in this process. Here, we investigated the functions of blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES, also known as POPDC1 and POP1), an integral membrane protein that regulates TJ formation. BVES was found to be underexpressed in all stages of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and in adenomatous polyps, indicating its suppression occurs early in transformation. Similarly, the majority of CRC cell lines tested exhibited decreased BVES expression and promoter DNA hypermethylation, a modification associated with transcriptional silencing. Treatment with a DNA-demethylating agent restored BVES expression in CRC cell lines, indicating that methylation represses BVES expression. Reexpression of BVES in CRC cell lines promoted an epithelial phenotype, featuring decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth; impaired growth of an orthotopic xenograft; and blocked metastasis. Conversely, interfering with BVES function by expressing a dominant-negative mutant in human corneal epithelial cells induced mesenchymal features. These biological outcomes were associated with changes in AJ and TJ composition and related signaling. Therefore, BVES prevents EMT, and its epigenetic silencing may be an important step in promoting EMT programs during colon carcinogenesis. PMID:21911938

  4. Delineating the effect of demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine on human Caco-2 colonic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIUMEI; QIN, BINGZHAO; LIU, BO

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant epigenetic changes are known to contribute to various phases of tumor development. The gene function loss caused by aberrant methylation is analogous to genetic mutations. Unlike genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations can be reversed. 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of certain types of cancer, such as MDS and leukemia. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 5-aza-CdR has the potential to be used in the treatment of colon cancer using a human Caco-2 colonic carcinoma cell line. The effect of 5-aza-CdR on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and reversal of aberrant methylation of the Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A) gene was also examined. The 5-aza-CdR was prepared at different concentrations in sterile tri-distilled water at 0.4, 1.6, 6.4, 25.6 and 102.4 µmol/l and employed to treat the human Caco-2 colonic carcinoma cells. An MTT assay was used to detect the effect of 5-aza-CdR on cell proliferation. Flow cytometry was used to examine the cell cycle and apoptosis. The RASSF1A mRNA transcript level was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that 5-aza-CdR inhibited the proliferation of Caco-2 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (p<0.01). The 5-aza-CdR treatment affected the cell cycle and caused accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase and this effect was concentration-dependent (p<0.05). 5-aza-CdR treatment caused an increase in the number of cells undergoing apoptosis and reactivated the RASSF1A tumor suppressor gene that was silenced by hypermethylation in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, 5-aza-CdR inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in Caco-2 cells by upregulating the epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor RASSF1A gene. PMID:27347114

  5. Terahertz absorption and reflection imaging of carcinoma-affected colon tissues embedded in paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Venckevicius, Rimvydas; Seliuta, Dalius; Valusis, Gintaras; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Molis, Gediminas; Carneiro, Fatima; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Granja, Pedro L.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, dehydrated human colon tissues embedded in paraffin were studied at THz frequency. A compact THz imaging system with high numerical aperture optics was developed for the analysis of adenocarcinoma-affected colon sections, in transmission and reflection geometry. A comprehensive analysis of the THz images revealed a contrast up to 23% between the neoplastic and control tissues. Absorption and reflection THz images demonstrated the possibility to distinguish adenocarcinoma-affected areas even without water in the tissue, as the main contrast mechanism in THz measurements has been observed to be water absorption in in vivo or freshly excised tissues. The present results corroborate with previous histologic findings in the same tissues, and confirm that the contrast prevails even in dehydrated tissues.

  6. Activated systemic inflammatory response at diagnosis reduces lymph node count in colonic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, Rory P; Murphy, Brenda; Larkin, John O; Mehigan, Brian J; McCormick, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate a link between lymph node yield and systemic inflammatory response in colon cancer. METHODS A prospectively maintained database was interrogated. All patients undergoing curative colonic resection were included. Neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and albumin were used as markers of SIR. In keeping with previously studies, NLR ≥ 4, albumin < 35 was used as cut off points for SIR. Statistical analysis was performed using 2 sample t-test and χ2 tests where appropriate. RESULTS Three hundred and two patients were included for analysis. One hundred and ninety-five patients had NLR < 4 and 107 had NLR ≥ 4. There was no difference in age or sex between groups. Patients with NLR of ≥ 4 had lower mean lymph node yields than patients with NLR < 4 [17.6 ± 7.1 vs 19.2 ± 7.9 (P = 0.036)]. More patients with an elevated NLR had node positive disease and an increased lymph node ratio (≥ 0.25, P = 0.044). CONCLUSION Prognosis in colon cancer is intimately linked to the patient’s immune response. Assuming standardised surgical technique and sub specialty pathology, lymph node count is reduced when systemic inflammatory response is activated. PMID:27574555

  7. Curcumin and docosahexaenoic acid block insulin-induced colon carcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Jenifer I; McCaskey, Sarah J

    2013-03-01

    Diets high in fish and curcumin are associated with a decreased risk of CRC. Insulin resistance and obesity are associated with increased CRC risk and higher reoccurrence rates. We utilized cell culture to determine if dietary compounds could reduce insulin-induced cell proliferation comparing the response in normal and metastatic colon epithelial cells. We treated model normal murine colon epithelial cells (YAMC) and adenocarcinoma cells (MC38) with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or curcumin alone and then co-treatments of the diet-derived compound and insulin were combined. Cell proliferation was stimulated with insulin (1 ug/mL) to model insulin resistance in obesity. Despite the presence of insulin, proliferation was reduced in the MC38 cells treated with 10 μM curcumin (p<0.001) and 50 μM DHA (p<0.001). Insulin stimulated MAPK and MEK phosphorylation was inhibited by DHA and curcumin in MC38 cancer cells. Here we show that curcumin and DHA can block insulin-induced colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro via a MEK mediated mechanism. PMID:23266210

  8. Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Effects of Polyphenols from Sugar Beet Molasses on Colon Carcinoma Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingshun; Zhao, Zhengang; Yu, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Three polyphenols were isolated and purified from sugar beet molasses by ultrasonic-aid extraction and various chromatographic techniques, and their structures were elucidated by spectral analysis. Cytotoxicity and the molecular mechanism were measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, flow cytometry, caspase-3 activity assay and Western blot assay. The results showed that gallic acid, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride and epicatechin have cytotoxicity to the human colon, hepatocellular and breast cancer cells. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride showed its cytotoxicity against various tumor cell lines, particularly against colon cancer Caco-2 cells with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 23.21 ± 0.14 μg/mL in vitro. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride may be a potential candidate for the treatment of colon cancer. In the mechanism study, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride increased the ratio of cell cycle at G₀/G₁ phase and reduced cyclin D1 expression on Caco-2 cells. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride decreased mutant p21 expression, and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the activation of caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. PMID:27347927

  9. Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Effects of Polyphenols from Sugar Beet Molasses on Colon Carcinoma Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingshun; Zhao, Zhengang; Yu, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Three polyphenols were isolated and purified from sugar beet molasses by ultrasonic-aid extraction and various chromatographic techniques, and their structures were elucidated by spectral analysis. Cytotoxicity and the molecular mechanism were measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, flow cytometry, caspase-3 activity assay and Western blot assay. The results showed that gallic acid, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride and epicatechin have cytotoxicity to the human colon, hepatocellular and breast cancer cells. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride showed its cytotoxicity against various tumor cell lines, particularly against colon cancer Caco-2 cells with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 23.21 ± 0.14 μg/mL in vitro. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride may be a potential candidate for the treatment of colon cancer. In the mechanism study, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride increased the ratio of cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and reduced cyclin D1 expression on Caco-2 cells. Cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride decreased mutant p21 expression, and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the activation of caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. PMID:27347927

  10. Native Valve Streptococcus bovis Endocarditis and Refractory Transfusion Dependent Iron Deficiency Anaemia Associated with Concomitant Carcinoma of the Colon: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ahamed Riyaaz, Abdul Azeez; Samarasinghe, Randula; Sellahewa, Kolitha; Sivakumaran, Sabaratnam; Tampoe, Manjula Sri

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis is found as a commensal organism in human gut and may become opportunistically pathogenic. Infective endocarditis is one of the commonest modes of presentation of this infection. The association between Streptococcus bovis endocarditis and colorectal cancer is well recognized. We report a case of Streptococcus bovis endocarditis along with a refractory iron deficiency anaemia associated with concomitant carcinoma of ascending colon in a 63-year-old male. Cooccurrence of these two conditions may cause a challenge in the management. Considering the strong association of colon cancer with Streptococcus bovis endocarditis, a detailed screening colonoscopy is mandatory following the diagnosis of the latter. PMID:26881154

  11. A new in vitro model of Entamoeba histolytica adhesion, using the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2: scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Rigothier, M C; Coconnier, M H; Servin, A L; Gayral, P

    1991-01-01

    The human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, which is widely used to study the adhesion and cytotoxicity of enterobacteria, was used to investigate the adhesion of the trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. We observed a high percentage of adhesion of amoebae to Caco-2 cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that amoebial membrane structures were involved in adhesion and the cytolytic action. These differentiated cells should prove to be a useful model system for investigation of the pathogenic action of amoebae. Images PMID:1937772

  12. [A Case of Signet-Ring Cell Carcinoma of the Sigmoid Colon with Disseminated Carcinomatosis Successfully Treated with CPT-11/Panitumumab].

    PubMed

    Nagahisa, Yoshio; Kai, Chen; Hattori, Kuniaki; Sakurai, Reo; Matsuba, Yuri; Hashida, Kazuki; Kawamoto, Kazuyuki; Itou, Tadashi

    2015-12-01

    A 70-year-old man, who had undergone S-1/oxaliplatin/bevacizumab combination chemotherapy for LNs metastasis of signet-ring cell carcinoma of the sigmoid colon, complained of back pain and lumbago.He was diagnosed with disseminated carcinomatosis of the bone marrow and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). He was treated with systemic chemotherapy consisting of CPT-11/panitumumab. After 2 courses of the treatment, the DIC resolved and the back pain and lumbago improved. PMID:26809308

  13. γ-Tocotrienol induces paraptosis-like cell death in human colon carcinoma SW620 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Shu; Li, Da-Ming; Ma, Yue; He, Ning; Gu, Qing; Wang, Feng-Shan; Jiang, Shu-Qing; Chen, Bing-Qing; Liu, Jia-Ren

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most serious illnesses among diagnosed cancer. As a new type of anti-cancer composition from tocotrienol-rich fraction of palm oil, γ-tocotrienol is widely used in anti-cancer research. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of γ-tocotrienol on human colon cancer SW620 and HCT-8 cells. We showed that treatment with different concentrations of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a dose dependent inhibition of cell growth. Cell death induced by γ-tocotrienol was mediated by a paraptosis-like cell death in SW620 and HCT-8 cells. Real-time RT-PCR and western blot analyses showed that γ-tocotrienol inhibited the expression level of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-jun. These data suggest that a paraptosis-like cell death induced by γ-tocotrienol in SW620 cells is associated with the suppression of the Wnt signaling pathway, which offers a novel tool for treating apoptosis-resistance colon cancer. PMID:23469066

  14. Natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF) augments natural killer cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal response against colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M D; Sigal, R K; Williams, N N; Daly, J M

    1991-04-01

    The therapy of colorectal cancer may be improved by biologic response modifiers that enhance natural killer (NK) cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal mechanisms. This study examined the effect of a recently discovered cytokine purified from the supernatant of an Ebstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line (RPMI-8866), natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF), on NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 24 hr in the presence or absence of NKSF (3.6 pM) or interleukin-2 (1 nM). The cultured lymphocytes were analyzed for lytic potential toward chromium-51-labeled colon carcinoma targets SW 1116, 498 LI, and WC 1. ADCC was measured by incubating chromium-51-labeled SW 1116 or WC 1 targets with the monoclonal antibody CO17-1A, an IgG2a antibody reactive with gastrointestinal cancer-associated cell antigen, or control mouse IgG prior to testing NKSF-treated or control PBL effectors in a 6-hr cytotoxicity assay. NKSF significantly enhanced NK cytolysis of colon carcinoma and NK-resistant lymphoma cell lines, and on a molar basis was approximately 300 times more potent than interleukin-2 in generating NK cytotoxicity. Furthermore, NKSF significantly augmented lymphocyte-mediated ADCC against colon carcinoma targets, and the combination of NKSF with the antibody CO17-1A had an additive effect on lymphocyte tumoricidial capacity. Thus, NKSF may have a potential role in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:1673486

  15. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  16. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2–ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  17. Immunophotodiagnosis of colon carcinomas in patients injected with fluoresceinated chimeric antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Folli, S; Wagnières, G; Pèlegrin, A; Calmes, J M; Braichotte, D; Buchegger, F; Chalandon, Y; Hardman, N; Heusser, C; Givel, J C

    1992-01-01

    Based on previous experiments in nude mice, showing that fluoresceinated monoclonal antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen localized specifically in human carcinoma xenografts and could be detected by laser-induced fluorescence, we performed a feasibility study to determine whether this immunophotodiagnosis method could be applied in the clinic. Six patients, with known primary colorectal carcinoma, received an i.v. injection of 4.5 or 9 mg of mouse-human chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody coupled with 0.10-0.28 mg of fluorescein (molar ratio 1/10 to 1/14). The monoclonal antibody was also labeled with 0.2-0.4 mCi of 125I (1 Ci = 37 GBq). Photodetection of the tumor was done ex vivo on surgically resected tissues for the six patients and in vivo by fluorescence rectosigmoidoscopy for the sixth patient. Upon laser irradiation, clearly detectable heterogeneous green fluorescence from the dye-antibody conjugate was visually observed on all six tumors; almost no such fluorescence was detectable on normal mucosa. The yellowish tissue autofluorescence, which was emitted from both tumor and normal mucosa, could be subtracted by real-time image processing. Radioactivity measurements confirmed the specificity of tumor localization by the conjugate; tissue concentrations of up to 0.059% injected dose per g of tumor and 10 times less (0.006%) per g of normal mucosa were found. The overall results demonstrate the feasibility of tumor immunophotodiagnosis at the clinical level. Images PMID:1518823

  18. Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix associated with adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and hepatocellular carcinoma of the liver: Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Djuranovic, Srdjan P; Spuran, Milan M; Kovacevic, Nada V; Ugljesic, Milenko B; Kecmanovic, Dragutin M; Micev, Marjan T

    2006-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix is a rare condition and represents one of the three entities with the common name mucocele of the appendix. It is characterized by a cystic dilatation of the lumen with stasis of mucus inside it. Histopathologically mucocele is divided into three groups: focal or diffuse mucosal hyperplasia, mucinous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. This condition is often associated with other neoplasia, especially adenocarcinoma of the colon and ovaries. We here describe a 57 year old male patient who presented with abdominal discomfort, constipation, fresh blood in stool and frequent urination. He had a big cystadenoma of the appendix associated with adenocarcinoma of the colon and hepatocellular carcinoma of the liver. The patient underwent right haemicolectomy, sigmoid colon resection and segmental resection of the liver. Now 3 years later he has no evidence of disease relapse. According to this, we stress the need of accurate preoperative diagnosis and intraoperative exploration of the whole abdomen in these patients. PMID:16610012

  19. Pathophysiological study of diarrhoea in a patient with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Evidence against a secretory mechanism and for the role of shortened colonic transit time.

    PubMed Central

    Rambaud, J C; Jian, R; Flourié, B; Hautefeuille, M; Salmeron, M; Thuillier, F; Ruskoné, A; Florent, C; Chaoui, F; Bernier, J J

    1988-01-01

    Intubation techniques and scintigraphic studies were used to determine the origin and mechanism of diarrhoea in a patient with medullary thyroid carcinoma, high plasma immunoreactive calcitonin and normal circulating serotonin, substance P and prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha. Normal function of the small intestine was found for the following: (a) absorption tests; (b) water and electrolyte absorption in the proximal jejunum; (c) 24 hour flow rate and composition of fluid entering the colon and (d) gastric emptying rate and small intestinal progression of a normal meal. By contrast, colonic function was markedly impaired in three ways: (a) water absorption was decreased by half; (b) as the main excreted solutes were organic acids, a large electrolyte gap was recorded in faecal water, and (c) colonic transit time of the meal marker was very short, and was in agreement with the rapid transit of ingested radioopaque markers. These data strongly suggest that decreased absorption in the colon secondary to a motor disturbance is the main mechanism of diarrhoea in this case of medullary thyroid carcinoma, while calcitonin induced small intestinal fluid secretion suggested earlier is either non-existent, or only of minor importance. PMID:3371722

  20. Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs As Gatekeepers Of Colon Carcinoma Highlight New Scenarios Beyond Cyclooxygenases Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) inhibitors (COXibs) can exert chemopreventive and antitumour effects in many human neoplasia. This is particularly true in colon cancer (CC), where the regular assumption of these molecules has been shown to exert chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects. Since the late '90s, there has been a progressive increase in experimental evidence, indicating that in CC the antiproliferative effects of NSAIDs and COXibs could be both dependent on and independent of COXs inhibition, and that these effects do not necessarily exclude each other. This review will examine some of these COX-independent cellular pathways, with a focus on those involved in the inhibition of CC cells proliferation through transcription factors crosstalk. PMID:26310524

  1. Metastasis-associated in colon cancer 1 is a novel survival-related biomarker for human patients with renal pelvis carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Tian, Dawei; Chen, Tao; Han, Ruifa; Sun, Yan; Wu, Changli

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis-associated in colon cancer 1 (MACC1) has recently been identified as a novel independent prognostic indicator for metastasis occurrence, overall survival and cancer-free survival for patients with colon cancer and other solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the role of MACC1 in the development and progression of renal pelvis carcinoma, a form of upper tract urothelial carcinomas. MACC1 protein has been found in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus of the transitional epithelial cells of the normal renal pelvis in immunohistochemical (IHC) assays. Quantitative IHC examinations revealed that MACC1 abnormal abundance in cancerous tissues might represent a biological indicator clinically suggestive of tumor malignancy in the renal pelvis. Furthermore, investigation of the association of MACC1 protein levels with clinicopathological parameters in this study has suggested a correlation of MACC1 expression with tumor-node-metastasis stage and histopathological grade of patients with renal pelvis carcinoma, with elevated MACC1 protein levels frequently associated with higher aggressiveness of the disease. Moreover, both disease-free survival and overall survival for the patients in the high MACC1 expression group were significantly lower than those in the low expression group. Multivariate analysis with a Cox proportional-hazards model suggested that MACC1 is indeed an independent prognostic indicator of overall survival and cancer-free survival for patients with renal pelvis carcinoma. Thus, MACC1 may represent a promising prognostic biomarker candidate, as well as a potential therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:24949951

  2. Metastasis-Associated in Colon Cancer 1 Is a Novel Survival-Related Biomarker for Human Patients with Renal Pelvis Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Han, Ruifa; Sun, Yan; Wu, Changli

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis-associated in colon cancer 1 (MACC1) has recently been identified as a novel independent prognostic indicator for metastasis occurrence, overall survival and cancer-free survival for patients with colon cancer and other solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the role of MACC1 in the development and progression of renal pelvis carcinoma, a form of upper tract urothelial carcinomas. MACC1 protein has been found in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus of the transitional epithelial cells of the normal renal pelvis in immunohistochemical (IHC) assays. Quantitative IHC examinations revealed that MACC1 abnormal abundance in cancerous tissues might represent a biological indicator clinically suggestive of tumor malignancy in the renal pelvis. Furthermore, investigation of the association of MACC1 protein levels with clinicopathological parameters in this study has suggested a correlation of MACC1 expression with tumor-node-metastasis stage and histopathological grade of patients with renal pelvis carcinoma, with elevated MACC1 protein levels frequently associated with higher aggressiveness of the disease. Moreover, both disease-free survival and overall survival for the patients in the high MACC1 expression group were significantly lower than those in the low expression group. Multivariate analysis with a Cox proportional-hazards model suggested that MACC1 is indeed an independent prognostic indicator of overall survival and cancer-free survival for patients with renal pelvis carcinoma. Thus, MACC1 may represent a promising prognostic biomarker candidate, as well as a potential therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:24949951

  3. Targeted gene therapy of LS174 T human colon carcinoma by anti-TAG-72 immunoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Lee, Y K; Kim, J S; Koo, K H; Hong, H J; Park, Y S

    2008-05-01

    Anti-tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 PEG-immunoliposomes (PILs) were prepared by conjugation of Fab' fragments of recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody, HuCC49, to sterically stabilize unilamellar liposomes (90-110 nm in diameter) to target TAG-72-overexpressing cancer cells. The liposomes consisted of 1-palmitonyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 92 mol percent, O,O'-dymyrisyl-N-lysyl aspartate (DMKD cationic lipid), 4 mol percent, distearoyl-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine-polyethylene glycol 2000 (DSPE-PEG(2000)), 3 mol percent and DSPE-maleimide (DSPE-PEG(2000)-Mal), 1 mol percent. These anti-TAG-72 PILs were able to adhere to the surface of TAG-72-overexpressing LS174 T human colon cancer cells more effectively than conventional liposomes. Also, in vitro gene transfection of the LS174 T cells by the anti-TAG-72 PILs in the presence of a high concentration of fetal bovine serum (up to 60%) was greater than that by conventional cationic lipoplexes. Intravenously administered anti-TAG-72 PILs efficiently localized in the LS174 T tumor tissues, while the non-targeted conventional liposomes did not. Intravenous administration of the anti-TAG-72 PILs containing plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins, such as angiostatin K1/3, endostatin and saxatilin, significantly inhibited in vivo growth of LS174 T tumors and angiogenesis in the tumor tissues. These results demonstrated the potential of TAG-72-mediated targeting of immunoliposomes as a modality for systemic gene delivery to human colon cancer cells. PMID:18309354

  4. Genetics and biochemistry of collagen binding-triggered glandular differentiation in a human colon carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, M.; Bodmer, W.F. )

    1988-08-01

    The authors have examined the interaction between collagen binding and epithelial differentiation by using a human colon carcinoma cell line (SW1222) that can differentiate structurally when grown in a three-dimensional collagen gel to form glandular structures. As much as 66% inhibition of glandular differentiation can be achieved by addition to the culture of a synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr (RGDT) sequence, which is a cell recognition site found in collagen. Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr also inhibited the cell attachment to collagen-coated plates. Chromosome 15 was found in all human-mouse hybrid clones that could differentiate in the collagen gel and bind collagen. Both binding to collagen and glandular differentiation of the hybrid cells were also inhibited by Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr as for the parent cell line SW1222. The ability of SW1222 cells to express the differentiated phenotype appears, therefore, to be determined by an Arg-Gly-Asp-directed collagen receptor on the cell surface that is controlled by a gene on chromosome 15.

  5. Hedyotis Diffusa Willd extract induces apoptosis via activation of the mitochondrion-dependent pathway in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiumao; Chen, Youqin; Wei, Lihui; Chen, Xuzhen; Xu, Wei; Hong, Zhenfeng; Sferra, Thomas J; Peng, Jun

    2010-11-01

    Hedyotis Diffusa Willd has been used as a major component in several Chinese medicine formulations for the clinical treatment of colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of the anti-cancer activity of Hedyotis Diffusa Willd remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the cellular effects of the ethanol extract of Hedyotis Diffusa Willd (EEHDW) in the HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line. We found that EEHDW inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells demonstrating EEHDW-induced cell morphological changes and reduced cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we observed that EEHDW treatment resulted in DNA fragmentation, loss of plasma membrane asymmetry, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and increase of the ratio of pro-apoptotic Bax to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, suggesting that the HT-29 cell growth inhibitory activity of EEHDW was due to mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis, which may partly explain the anti-cancer activity of Hedyotis Diffusa Willd. PMID:20878081

  6. Apoptotic-like death occurs through a caspase-independent route in colon carcinoma cells undergoing mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Llovera, Laia; Mansilla, Sylvia; Portugal, José

    2012-12-29

    We have examined the relationship between chemotherapy-induced mitotic catastrophe and cell death by apoptosis in both wild-type and p53(-/-) HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells treated with nanomolar concentrations of paclitaxel (PTX), a drug that acts on tubulin altering the normal development of mitosis. After treatment, HCT116 cells entered mitosis regardless of the presence of functional p53, which resulted in changes in the distribution of cells in the different phases of the cell cycle, and in cell death. In the presence of PTX, the percentage of polyploid cells observed was higher in p53-deficient cells, indicating that mitotic slippage was favored compared to wild-type cells, with the presence of large multinucleate cells. PTX caused mitotic catastrophe and about 50-60% cells that were entering an aberrant mitosis died through an apoptotic-like pathway characterized by the presence of phosphatidylserine in the outer cell membrane, which occurred in the absence of significant activation of caspases. Lack of p53 facilitated endoreduplication and polyploidy in PTX-treated cells, but cells were still killed with similar efficacy through the same apoptotic-like mechanism in the absence of caspase activity. PMID:22885806

  7. Cardiotrophin-1 determines liver engraftment of syngenic colon carcinoma cells through an immune system-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Matilde; Dubrot, Juan; Martinez-Anso, Eduardo; Larequi, Eduardo; Castaño, David; Palazon, Asis; Belza, Idoia; Sanmamed, Miguel F; Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Alfaro, Carlos; Melero, Ignacio

    2012-12-01

    Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1/CTF1) is a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines that stimulates STAT-3 phosphorylation in cells bearing the cognate receptor. We report that Ctf1(-/-) mice (hereby referred to as CT-1(-/-) mice) are resistant to the hepatic engraftment of MC38 colon carcinoma cells, while these cells engraft normally in the mouse subcutaneous tissue. Tumor intake in the liver could be enhanced by the systemic delivery of a recombinant adenovirus encoding CT-1, which also partly rescued the resistance of CT-1(-/-) mice to the hepatic engraftment of MC38 cells. Moreover, systemic treatment of wild-type (WT) mice with a novel antibody-neutralizing mouse CT-1 also reduced engraftment of this model. Conversely, experiments with Panc02 pancreatic cancer and B16-OVA melanoma cells in CT-1(-/-) mice revealed rates of hepatic engraftment similar to those observed in WT mice. The mechanism whereby CT-1 renders the liver permissive for MC38 metastasis involves T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, as shown by selective depletion experiments and in genetically deficient mice. However, no obvious changes in the number or cell killing capacity of liver lymphocytes in CT-1(-/-) animals could be substantiated. These findings demonstrate that the seed and soil concept to understand metastasis can be locally influenced by cytokines as well as by the cellular immune system. PMID:23264899

  8. Cell-Surface Nucleolin is a Signal Transducing P-Selectin Binding Protein for Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Reyes, E. Merit; Akiyama, Steven K.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that P-selectin binding to Colo-320 human colon carcinoma cells induces specific activation of the α5β1 integrin with a concomitant increase of cell adhesion and spreading on fibronectin substrates in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K) and p38 MAPK-dependent manner. Here, we identified by affinity chromatography and characterized nucleolin as a P-selectin receptor on Colo-320 cells. Nucleolin mAb D3 significantly decreases the Colo-320 cell adhesion to immobilized P-selectin-IgG-Fc. Moreover, nucleolin becomes clustered at the external side of the plasma membrane of living, intact cells when bound to cross-linked P-selectin-IgG-Fc chimeric protein. We have also found P-selectin binding to Colo-320 cells induces tyrosine phosphorylation specifically of cell-surface nucleolin and formation of a signaling complex containing cell surface nucleolin, PI 3-K, and p38 MAPK. Using siRNA approaches, we have found that both P-selectin binding to Colo-320 cells and formation of the P-selectin-mediated p38 MAPK/ PI 3-K signaling complex require nucleolin expression. These results show that nucleolin (or a nucleolin-like protein) is a signaling receptor for P-selectin on Colo-320 cells and suggest a mechanism for linkage of nucleolin to P-selectin-induced signal transduction pathways that regulate the adhesion and the spreading of Colo-320 on fibronectin substrates. PMID:18504038

  9. Lack of evidence for low-LET radiation induced bystander response in normal human fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marianne B. Sowa; Wilfried Goetz; Janet E. Baulch; Dinah N. Pyles; Jaroslaw Dziegielewski; Susannah Yovino; Andrew R. Snyder; Sonia M. de Toledo; Edouard I. Azzam; William F. Morgan

    2008-06-30

    Purpose: To investigate radiation induced bystander responses and to determine the role of gap junction intercellular communication and the radiation environment in propagating this response. Materials and Methods: We use medium transfer and targeted irradiation to examine radiation induced bystander effects in primary human fibroblast (AG1522) and human colon carcinoma (RKO36) cells. We examined the effect of variables such as gap junction intercellular communication, linear energy transfer (LET), and the role of the radiation environment in non-targeted responses. Endpoints included clonogenic survival, micronucleus formation and foci formation at histone 2AX over doses ranging from 10 to 100 cGy. Results: The results show no evidence of a low-LET radiation induced bystander response for the endpoints of clonogenic survival and induction of DNA damage. Nor do we see evidence of a high-LET, Fe ion radiation (1 GeV/n) induced bystander effect. However, direct comparison for 3.2 MeV α-particle exposures showed a statistically significant medium transfer bystander effect for this high-LET radiation. Conclusions: From our results, it is evident that there are many confounding factors influencing bystander responses as reported in the literature. Our observations reflect the inherent variability in biological systems and the difficulties in extrapolating from in vitro models to radiation risks in humans.

  10. Effects of meloxicam on vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietin-2 expression in colon carcinoma cell line HT-29.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Tao, Kaixiong; Huang, Tao

    2007-08-01

    To investigate the effect of meloxicam, a selected NSAIDs, on cell growth, expression of VEGF and angiopointin-2 (Ang-2) protein in HT-29 cell line, cultured HT-29 cells were treated with meloxicam of various concentrations for various lengths of time. The proliferation of HT-29 was detected by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), the cell cycle was determined by flow cytometer and the levels of VEGF and Ang-2 protein in supernatants were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mRNA expressions of VEGF and Ang-2 in cultured HT-29 were determined by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that treatment of meloxicam of different concentrations and for various lengths of time had a cytotoxicic effect on the cell proliferation of HT-29 cells in a concentration-dependant and time-dependant manner. Cell cycle analysis showed that the cells were mainly blocked in G0/G1 phase. The VEGF and Ang-2 protein levels in supernatants of the culture medium were decreased gradually in a concentration-dependent or time-dependent fashion. The mRNA expression of cox-2, VEGF and Ang-2 showed a gradual and concentration-dependent reduction. It is concluded that meloxicam can reduce the expression of VEGF and Ang-2 at the protein and mRNA level in colon carcinoma cell line. PMID:17828495

  11. Induction of Apoptosis of 2,4′,6-Trihydroxybenzophenone in HT-29 Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Ma Ma; Karsani, Saiful Anuar

    2014-01-01

    2,4′,6-Trihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl. fruits. It was found to inhibit cell proliferation in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line but caused little damage to WRL-68 normal human liver and MRC-5 normal human fibroblast lung cell lines. The compound was found to sharply affect the viability of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. HT-29 cells treated with the compound showed morphological changes under microscopic examination such as cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, DNA fragmentation, and the occurrence of apoptotic nuclei. The percentage of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, and dead or necrotic cells was determined by flow cytometry using annexin V-FTIC/PI staining. In addition, flow cytometry showed that, when the HT-29 cells were treated with 115 µM of the compound, it resulted in G0/G1 phase arrest in a time-dependent manner. Western blot revealed an upregulation of PUMA, Bak, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 proteins suggesting that the compound induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells by regulating these proteins. PMID:24579081

  12. Sulindac modulates secreted protein expression from LIM1215 colon carcinoma cells prior to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Ji, Hong; Kapp, Eugene A; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality in Western populations. Growing evidence from human and rodent studies indicate that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause regression of existing colon tumors and act as effective chemopreventive agents in sporadic colon tumor formation. Although much is known about the action of the NSAID sulindac, especially its role in inducing apoptosis, mechanisms underlying these effects is poorly understood. In previous secretome-based proteomic studies using 2D-DIGE/MS and cytokine arrays we identified over 150 proteins released from the CRC cell line LIM1215 whose expression levels were dysregulated by treatment with 1mM sulindac over 16h; many of these proteins are implicated in molecular and cellular functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, angiogenesis and apoptosis (Ji et al., Proteomics Clin. Appl. 2009, 3, 433-451). We have extended these studies and describe here an improved protein/peptide separation strategy that facilitated the identification of 987 proteins and peptides released from LIM1215 cells following 1mM sulindac treatment for 8h preceding the onset of apoptosis. This peptidome separation strategy involved fractional centrifugal ultrafiltration of concentrated cell culture media (CM) using nominal molecular weight membrane filters (NMWL 30K, 3K and 1K). Proteins isolated in the >30K and 3-30K fractions were electrophoretically separated by SDS-PAGE and endogenous peptides in the 1-3K membrane filter were fractioned by RP-HPLC; isolated proteins and peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS-MS. Collectively, our data show that LIM1215 cells treated with 1mM sulindac for 8h secrete decreased levels of proteins associated with extracellular matrix remodeling (e.g., collagens, perlecan, syndecans, filamins, dyneins, metalloproteinases and endopeptidases), cell adhesion (e.g., cadherins, integrins, laminins) and mucosal maintenance (e.g., glycoprotein 340 and mucins 5AC, 6

  13. Anti-metastatic potential of human Vδ1(+) γδ T cells in an orthotopic mouse xenograft model of colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Christel; Rousseau, Benoît; Netzer, Sonia; Pitard, Vincent; Paroissin, Christian; Khairallah, Camille; Costet, Pierre; Moreau, Jean-François; Couillaud, Franck; Dechanet-Merville, Julie; Capone, Myriam

    2013-07-01

    The role of human intraepithelial Vδ1(+) γδ T cell cytotoxic effectors in the immune surveillance against metastatic colon cancer has never been addressed, despite their reported capacity to infiltrate colon carcinomas and to kill colonic cancer cells in vitro. We previously showed that Vδ1(+) γδ T cells are enriched in blood in response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, and that such increase may be protective against epithelial cancers. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether CMV-induced Vδ1(+) γδ T lymphocytes could inhibit the propagation of human colon tumors in vivo, in order to evaluate their immunotherapeutic potential in this context. Even though metastases are an important cause of death in various cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC), the anti-metastatic effect of immune effectors has been poorly analyzed. To this purpose, we set up a reliable model of metastatic colon cancer through orthotopic implantation of luciferase-expressing human HT29 cells in immunodeficient mice. Using bioluminescence imaging to follow the outcome of colonic cancer cells, we showed that a systemic treatment with CMV-induced Vδ1(+) γδ T cells could not only inhibit primary colon tumor growth but also the emergence of secondary tumor foci in the lungs and liver. Finally, our data lead to propose that Vδ1(+) γδ T lymphocytes may directly influence the appearance of metastases independently from their control of primary tumor size. These findings, which extend our previous work, pave the road for the potential manipulation of Vδ1(+) γδ T lymphocytes in novel anti-CRC immunotherapeutic protocols. PMID:23619975

  14. Evaluating the effect of four extracts of avocado fruit on esophageal squamous carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines in comparison with peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Vahedi Larijani, Laleh; Ghasemi, Maryam; AbedianKenari, Saeid; Naghshvar, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with gastrointestinal cancers refer to the health centers at advanced stages of the disease and conventional treatments are not significantly effective for these patients. Therefore, using modern therapeutic approaches with lower toxicity bring higher chance for successful treatment and reduced adverse effects in such patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of avocado fruit extracts on inhibition of the growth of cancer cells in comparison with normal cells. In an experimental study, ethanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and petroleum extracts of avocado (Persea americana) fruit were prepared. Then, the effects if the extracts on the growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines were evaluated in comparison with the control group using the MTT test in the cell culture medium. Effects of the four extracts of avocado fruit on three cells lines of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and colon adenocarcinoma were tested. The results showed that avocado fruit extract is effective in inhibition of cancer cell growth in comparison with normal cells (P<0.05). Avocado fruit is rich in phytochemicals, which play an important role in inhibition of growth of cancer cells. The current study for the first time demonstrates the anti-cancer effect of avocado fruit extracts on two cancers common in Iran. Therefore, it is suggested that the fruit extracts can be considered as appropriate complementary treatments in treatment of esophageal and colon cancers. PMID:24901722

  15. Cytochemical staining for beta 1,6 branching of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides in variants of metastatic human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, W P; Zuber, C; Heitz, P U; Roth, J

    1994-08-01

    A positive correlation between tumor progression in human colon and increased beta 1,6 branching in oligosaccharides has recently been demonstrated. The present study was undertaken to elucidate whether such a correlation can be extended to variants of metastasizing human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. The Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating lectin, which binds to beta 1,6 branched oligosaccharides, was employed. In blots, a band of approximately 140 kd was detectable in both the HCT116a and HCT116b sublines. However, in the more aggressive subline HCT116a, the intensity of this band was increased by 100%, and additional reactive bands of approximately 100 kd and approximately 170 kd were observed. Analysis by electron microscopy revealed lectin labeling in the Golgi apparatus, lysosomal elements, mucus droplets, cytoplasmic vesicles, and at the plasma membrane. Quantification of the lectin plasma membrane labeling revealed a significantly higher labeling intensity in HCT116a cells than in HCT116b cells. The difference in lectin plasma membrane labeling intensity could also be observed in paraffin sections. Thus, variants of metastatic HCT116 colon carcinoma cells differ quantitatively and qualitatively in glycoproteins carrying beta 1,6 branches. PMID:7519829

  16. In vivo migration of labeled autologous natural killer cells to liver metastases in patients with colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Lina; Galetto, Alessandra; Bello, Marilena; Baiocco, Cinzia; Chiappino, Isabella; Castellano, Giancarlo; Stacchini, Alessandra; Satolli, Maria A; Mele, Michele; Sandrucci, Sergio; Mussa, Antonio; Bisi, Gianni; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2006-01-01

    Background Besides being the effectors of native anti-tumor cytotoxicity, NK cells participate in T-lymphocyte responses by promoting the maturation of dendritic cells (DC). Adherent NK (A-NK) cells constitute a subset of IL-2-stimulated NK cells which show increased expression of integrins and the ability to adhere to solid surface and to migrate, infiltrate, and destroy cancer. A critical issue in therapy of metastatic disease is the optimization of NK cell migration to tumor tissues and their persistence therein. This study compares localization to liver metastases of autologous A-NK cells administered via the systemic (intravenous, i.v.) versus locoregional (intraarterial, i.a.) routes. Patients and methods A-NK cells expanded ex-vivo with IL-2 and labeled with 111In-oxine were injected i.a. in the liver of three colon carcinoma patients. After 30 days, each patient had a new preparation of 111In-A-NK cells injected i.v. Migration of these cells to various organs was evaluated by SPET and their differential localization to normal and neoplastic liver was demonstrated after i.v. injection of 99mTc-phytate. Results A-NK cells expressed a donor-dependent CD56+CD16+CD3- (NK) or CD56+CD16+CD3+ (NKT) phenotype. When injected i.v., these cells localized to the lung before being visible in the spleen and liver. By contrast, localization of i.a. injected A-NK cells was virtually confined to the spleen and liver. Binding of A-NK cells to liver neoplastic tissues was observed only after i.a. injections. Conclusion This unique study design demonstrates that A-NK cells adoptively transferred to the liver via the intraarterial route have preferential access and substantial accumulation to the tumor site. PMID:17105663

  17. Inhibition of polyamine oxidase prevented cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor-induced apoptosis in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gürkan, Ajda Coker; Arisan, Elif Damla; Obakan, Pinar; Palavan-Ünsal, Narçin

    2013-12-01

    Roscovitine and purvalanol are novel cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors that prevent cell proliferation and induce apoptotic cell death in various cancer cell lines. Although a number of studies have demonstrated the potential apoptotic role of roscovitine, there is limited data about the therapeutic efficiency of purvalanol on cancer cells. The natural polyamines (PAs) putrescine, spermidine, and spermine have essential roles in the regulation of cell differentiation, growth, and proliferation, and increased levels of these compounds have been associated with cancer progression. Recently, depletion of intracellular PA levels because of modulation of PA catabolic enzymes was shown to be an indicator of the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, our aim was to investigate the potential role of PA catabolic enzymes in CDK inhibitor-induced apoptosis in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells. Exposure of cells to roscovitine or purvalanol decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The selected concentrations of roscovitine and purvalanol inhibited cell viability by 50 % compared with control cells and induced apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-mediated pathway in a caspase-dependent manner. However, the apoptotic effect of purvalanol was stronger than that of roscovitine in HCT 116 cells. In addition, we found that CDK inhibitors decreased PA levels and significantly upregulated expression of key PA catabolic enzymes such as polyamine oxidase (PAO) and spermine oxidase (SMO). MDL-72,527, a specific inhibitor of PAO and SMO, decreased apoptotic potential of CDK inhibitors on HCT 116 cells. Moreover, transient silencing of PAO was also reduced prevented CDK inhibitor-induced apoptosis in HCT 116 cells. We conclude that the PA catabolic pathway, especially PAO, is a critical target for understanding the molecular mechanism of CDK inhibitor-induced apoptosis. PMID:23892915

  18. Monitoring Cell Death in Regorafenib-Treated Experimental Colon Carcinomas Using Annexin-Based Optical Fluorescence Imaging Validated by Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Philipp M.; Burian, Egon; Eschbach, Ralf; Hirner-Eppeneder, Heidrun; Moser, Matthias; Havla, Lukas; Eisenblätter, Michel; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Cyran, Clemens C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate annexin-based optical fluorescence imaging (OI) for monitoring regorafenib-induced early cell death in experimental colon carcinomas in rats, validated by perfusion MRI and multiparametric immunohistochemistry. Materials and Methods Subcutaneous human colon carcinomas (HT-29) in athymic rats (n = 16) were imaged before and after a one-week therapy with regorafenib (n = 8) or placebo (n = 8) using annexin-based OI and perfusion MRI at 3 Tesla. Optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and MRI tumor perfusion parameters (plasma flow PF, mL/100mL/min; plasma volume PV, %) were assessed. On day 7, tumors underwent immunohistochemical analysis for tumor cell apoptosis (TUNEL), proliferation (Ki-67), and microvascular density (CD31). Results Apoptosis-targeted OI demonstrated a tumor-specific probe accumulation with a significant increase of tumor SNR under therapy (mean Δ +7.78±2.95, control: -0.80±2.48, p = 0.021). MRI detected a significant reduction of tumor perfusion in the therapy group (mean ΔPF -8.17±2.32 mL/100 mL/min, control -0.11±3.36 mL/100 mL/min, p = 0.036). Immunohistochemistry showed significantly more apoptosis (TUNEL; 11392±1486 vs. 2921±334, p = 0.001), significantly less proliferation (Ki-67; 1754±184 vs. 2883±323, p = 0.012), and significantly lower microvascular density (CD31; 107±10 vs. 182±22, p = 0.006) in the therapy group. Conclusions Annexin-based OI allowed for the non-invasive monitoring of regorafenib-induced early cell death in experimental colon carcinomas, validated by perfusion MRI and multiparametric immunohistochemistry. PMID:26393949

  19. Lactobacillus casei Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects Accompanied by Apoptotic Cell Death and Up-Regulation of TRAIL in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Tiptiri-Kourpeti, Angeliki; Spyridopoulou, Katerina; Santarmaki, Valentina; Aindelis, Georgios; Tompoulidou, Evgenia; Lamprianidou, Eleftheria E; Saxami, Georgia; Ypsilantis, Petros; Lampri, Evangeli S; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Chlichlia, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) exert a number of strain-specific health-promoting activities attributed to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Despite recent attention, our understanding of the biological processes involved in the beneficial effects of LAB strains is still limited. To this end, the present study investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 against experimental colon cancer. Administration of live Lactobacillus casei (as well as bacterial components thereof) on murine (CT26) and human (HT29) colon carcinoma cell lines raised a significant concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect, determined by cell viability assays. Specifically, a dramatic decrease in viability of colon cancer cells co-incubated with 10(9) CFU/mL L. casei for 24 hours was detected (78% for HT29 and 52% for CT26 cells). In addition, live L. casei induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines as revealed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The significance of the in vitro anti-proliferative effects was further confirmed in an experimental tumor model. Oral daily administration of 10(9) CFU live L. casei for 13 days significantly inhibited in vivo growth of colon carcinoma cells, resulting in approximately 80% reduction in tumor volume of treated mice. Tumor growth inhibition was accompanied by L. casei-driven up-regulation of the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and down-regulation of Survivin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for beneficial tumor-inhibitory, anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects driven by this probiotic LAB strain. PMID:26849051

  20. Lactobacillus casei Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects Accompanied by Apoptotic Cell Death and Up-Regulation of TRAIL in Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santarmaki, Valentina; Aindelis, Georgios; Tompoulidou, Evgenia; Lamprianidou, Eleftheria E.; Saxami, Georgia; Ypsilantis, Petros; Lampri, Evangeli S.; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Galanis, Alex; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Chlichlia, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) exert a number of strain-specific health-promoting activities attributed to their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Despite recent attention, our understanding of the biological processes involved in the beneficial effects of LAB strains is still limited. To this end, the present study investigated the growth-inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 against experimental colon cancer. Administration of live Lactobacillus casei (as well as bacterial components thereof) on murine (CT26) and human (HT29) colon carcinoma cell lines raised a significant concentration- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect, determined by cell viability assays. Specifically, a dramatic decrease in viability of colon cancer cells co-incubated with 109 CFU/mL L. casei for 24 hours was detected (78% for HT29 and 52% for CT26 cells). In addition, live L. casei induced apoptotic cell death in both cell lines as revealed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The significance of the in vitro anti-proliferative effects was further confirmed in an experimental tumor model. Oral daily administration of 109 CFU live L. casei for 13 days significantly inhibited in vivo growth of colon carcinoma cells, resulting in approximately 80% reduction in tumor volume of treated mice. Tumor growth inhibition was accompanied by L. casei-driven up-regulation of the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL and down-regulation of Survivin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for beneficial tumor-inhibitory, anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects driven by this probiotic LAB strain. PMID:26849051

  1. Mechanisms of resistance to etoposide and teniposide in acquired resistant human colon and lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Long, B H; Wang, L; Lorico, A; Wang, R C; Brattain, M G; Casazza, A M

    1991-10-01

    Stable acquired resistance to etoposide (VP-16) or teniposide (VM-26) in HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, was previously obtained by weekly 1-h exposures to either drug (B. H. Long, Natl. Cancer Inst. Monogr., 4: 123-127, 1987). The purpose of this study was to identify possible mechanisms of resistance present in these cells by using human mdr1 and topoisomerase II DNA probes, antibodies to these gene products, and P4 phage unknotting assay for topoisomerase II activities. HCT116(VP)35 cells were 9-, 7-, and 6-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and Adriamycin, respectively, and showed no cross-resistance to colchicine and actinomycin D. These cells had no differences in mdr1 gene, mdr1 mRNA, or P-glycoprotein levels but displayed decreased levels of topoisomerase II mRNA and enzyme activity without any alteration of drug sensitivity displayed by the enzyme. HCT116(VM)34 cells were 5-, 7-, and 21-fold resistant to VP-16, VM-26, and Adriamycin; were cross-resistant to colchicine (7-fold) and actinomycin D (18-fold); and possessed a 9-fold increase in mdr1 mRNA and increased P-glycoprotein without evidence of mdr1 gene amplification. No alterations in topoisomerase II gene or mRNA levels, enzyme activity, or drug sensitivity were observed. A549(VP)28 and A549(VM)28 cells were 8-fold resistant to VP-16 and VM-26 and 3-fold resistant to Adriamycin. Both lines were not cross-resistant to colchicine or actinomycin D but were hypersensitive to cis-platinum. No alterations in mdr1 gene, mdr1 mRNA, or P-glycoprotein levels, but lower topoisomerase II mRNA levels and decreased enzyme activities, were observed. Of the four acquired resistant cell lines, resistance is likely related to elevated mdr1 expression in one line and to decreased topoisomerase II expression in the other three lines. PMID:1717144

  2. SPROUTY-2 represses the epithelial phenotype of colon carcinoma cells via upregulation of ZEB1 mediated by ETS1 and miR-200/miR-150.

    PubMed

    Barbáchano, A; Fernández-Barral, A; Pereira, F; Segura, M F; Ordóñez-Morán, P; Carrillo-de Santa Pau, E; González-Sancho, J M; Hanniford, D; Martínez, N; Costales-Carrera, A; Real, F X; Pálmer, H G; Rojas, J M; Hernando, E; Muñoz, A

    2016-06-01

    SPROUTY-2 (SPRY2) is a modulator of tyrosine kinase receptor signaling with receptor- and cell type-dependent inhibitory or enhancing effects. Studies on the action of SPRY2 in major cancers are conflicting and its role remains unclear. Here we have dissected SPRY2 action in human colon cancer. Global transcriptomic analyses show that SPRY2 downregulates genes encoding tight junction proteins such as claudin-7 and occludin and other cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix adhesion molecules in human SW480-ADH colon carcinoma cells. Moreover, SPRY2 represses LLGL2/HUGL2, PATJ1/INADL and ST14, main regulators of the polarized epithelial phenotype, and ESRP1, an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inhibitor. A key action of SPRY2 is the upregulation of the major EMT inducer ZEB1, as these effects are reversed by ZEB1 knock-down by means of RNA interference. Consistently, we found an inverse correlation between the expression level of claudin-7 and those of SPRY2 and ZEB1 in human colon tumors. Mechanistically, ZEB1 upregulation by SPRY2 results from the combined induction of ETS1 transcription factor and the repression of microRNAs (miR-200 family, miR-150) that target ZEB1 RNA. Moreover, SPRY2 increased AKT activation by epidermal growth factor, whereas AKT and also Src inhibition reduced the induction of ZEB1. Altogether, these data suggest that AKT and Src are implicated in SPRY2 action. Collectively, these results show a tumorigenic role of SPRY2 in colon cancer that is based on the dysregulation of tight junction and epithelial polarity master genes via upregulation of ZEB1. The dissection of the mechanism of action of SPRY2 in colon cancer cells is important to understand the upregulation of this gene in a subset of patients with this neoplasia that have poor prognosis. PMID:26455323

  3. Novel irreversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor 324674 sensitizes human colon carcinoma HT29 and SW480 cells to apoptosis by blocking the EGFR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhiwei; Cui, Binbin; Jin, Yinghu; Chen, Haipeng; Wang, Xishan

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} This article described the effects of the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor on the cell proliferation and the apoptosis induction of the colon carcinoma cell lines. {yields} Demonstrated that 326474 is a more potent EGFR inhibitor on colon cancer cells than other three TKIs. {yields} It can be important when considering chemotherapy for colonic cancer patients. -- Abstract: Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is widely expressed in multiple solid tumors including colorectal cancer by promoting cancer cell growth and proliferation. Therefore, the inhibition of EGFR activity may establish a clinical strategy of cancer therapy. Methods: In this study, using human colon adenocarcinoma HT29 and SW480 cells as research models, we compared the efficacy of four EGFR inhibitors in of EGFR-mediated pathways, including the novel irreversible inhibitor 324674, conventional reversible inhibitor AG1478, dual EGFR/HER2 inhibitor GW583340 and the pan-EGFR/ErbB2/ErbB4 inhibitor. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT analysis, and apoptosis was evaluated by the Annexin-V binding assay. EGFR and its downstream signaling effectors were examined by western blotting analysis. Results: Among the four inhibitors, the irreversible EGFR inhibitor 324674 was more potent at inhibiting HT29 and SW480 cell proliferation and was able to efficiently induce apoptosis at lower concentrations. Western blotting analysis revealed that AG1478, GW583340 and pan-EGFR/ErbB2/ErbB4 inhibitors failed to suppress EGFR activation as well as the downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K/AKT/mTOR (AKT) pathways. In contrast, 324674 inhibited EGFR activation and the downstream AKT signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: Our studies indicated that the novel irreversible EGFR inhibitor 324674 may have a therapeutic application in colon cancer therapy.

  4. Metformin blocks the stimulative effect of a high-energy diet on colon carcinoma growth in vivo and is associated with reduced expression of fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Algire, Carolyn; Amrein, Lilian; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Panasci, Lawrence; Pollak, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the association of obesity with adverse colon cancer outcomes are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of a high-energy diet on growth of an in vivo colon cancer model. Seventeen days following the injection of 5x10(5) MC38 colon carcinoma cells, tumors from mice on the high-energy diet were approximately twice the volume of those of mice on the control diet. These findings were correlated with the observation that the high-energy diet led to elevated insulin levels, phosphorylated AKT, and increased expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) by the tumor cells. Metformin, an antidiabetic drug, leads to the activation of AMPK and is currently under investigation for its antineoplastic activity. We observed that metformin blocked the effect of the high-energy diet on tumor growth, reduced insulin levels, and attenuated the effect of diet on phosphorylation of AKT and expression of FASN. Furthermore, the administration of metformin led to the activation of AMPK, the inhibitory phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the upregulation of BNIP3 and increased apoptosis as estimated by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Prior work showed that activating mutations of PI3K are associated with increased AKT activation and adverse outcome in colon cancer; our results demonstrate that the aggressive tumor behavior associated with a high-energy diet has similar effects on this signaling pathway. Furthermore, metformin is demonstrated to reverse the effects of the high-energy diet, thus suggesting a potential role for this agent in the management of a metabolically defined subset of colon cancers. PMID:20228137

  5. Comparison of intracellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of free mTHPC and mTHPC-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in human colon carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löw, Karin; Knobloch, Thomas; Wagner, Sylvia; Wiehe, Arno; Engel, Andrea; Langer, Klaus; von Briesen, Hagen

    2011-06-01

    The second generation photosensitizer mTHPC was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the palliative treatment of advanced head and neck cancer in October 2001. It is known that mTHPC possesses a significant phototoxicity against a variety of human cancer cells in vitro but also exhibits dark toxicity and can cause adverse effects (especially skin photosensitization). Due to its poor water solubility, the administration of hydrophobic photosensitizer still presents several difficulties. To overcome the administration problems, the use of nanoparticles as drug carrier systems is much investigated. Nanoparticles based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) have been extensively studied as delivery systems into tumours due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. The goal of this study was the comparison of free mTHPC and mTHPC-loaded PLGA nanoparticles concerning cytotoxicity and intracellular accumulation in human colon carcinoma cells (HT29). The nanoparticles delivered the photosensitizer to the colon carcinoma cells and enabled drug release without losing its activity. The cytotoxicity assays showed a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and viability after illumination. However, first and foremost mTHPC lost its dark toxic effects using the PLGA nanoparticles as a drug carrier system. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticles are a promising drug carrier system for the hydrophobic photosensitizer mTHPC.

  6. The bispecific immunoligand ULBP2-aCEA redirects natural killer cells to tumor cells and reveals potent anti-tumor activity against colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Achim; Jachimowicz, Ron D; Borchmann, Sven; Madlener, Marie; Keßler, Jörg; Reiners, Katrin S; Sauer, Maike; Hansen, Hinrich P; Ullrich, Roland T; Chatterjee, Sampurna; Borchmann, Peter; Yazaki, Paul; Koslowsky, Thomas C; Engert, Andreas; Heukamp, Lukas C; Hallek, Michael; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge

    2014-06-15

    NKG2D, an activating receptor expressed on NK cells and T cells, is critically involved in tumor immunosurveillance. In this study, we explored the potential therapeutic utility of the NKG2D ligand ULBP2 for the treatment of colon carcinoma. To this end we designed a fusion protein consisting of human ULBP2 and an antibody-derived single chain targeting the tumor carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The bispecific recombinant fusion protein re-directed NK cells towards malignant cells by binding to both, tumor cells and NK cells, and triggered NK cell-mediated target cell killing in vitro. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly delayed in a syngeneic colon carcinoma mouse model in response to immunoligand treatment. The anti-tumor activity could be attributed to the stimulation of immune cells with an elevated expression of the activation marker CD69 on NK, T and NKT cells and the infiltration of CD45+ immune cells into the solid tumor. In summary, it was demonstrated that immunoligands provide specific tumor targeting by NK cells and exert anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. This technology represents a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for solid tumors with the potential to be further developed for clinical applications. PMID:24242212

  7. Acquired resistance to HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG and increased metastatic potential are associated with MUC1 expression in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Ban, Li-Li; Luo, Gang; Li, Zhi-Yao; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Wang, Xi-Cai; Jin, Cong-Guo; Ye, Jia-Gui; Ma, Ding-Ding; Xie, Qing; Huang, You-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of many proteins. The chaperoning of oncoproteins by HSP90 enhances the survival, growth, and invasive potential of cancer cells. HSP90 inhibitors are promising new anticancer agents, in which the benzoquinone ansamycin 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is currently in clinical evaluation. However, the implications of acquired resistance to this class of drug remain largely unexplored. In the present study, we have generated isogenic human colon cancer cell lines that are resistant to 17-AAG by continued culturing in the compound. Cross-resistance was found with another HSP90 inhibitor 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. The resistant cells showed obvious morphology changes with a metastatic phenotype and significant increases in migration and adhesion to collagens. Western blotting analysis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition molecular markers found that expression of E-cadherin downregulated, whereas expression of N-cadherin and β-catenin upregulated in the resistant cells. Mucin 1 (MUC1) has been reported to mediate metastasis as well as chemical resistance in many cancers. Here, we found that MUC1 expression was significantly elevated in the acquired drug resistance cells. 17-AAG treatment could decrease MUC1 more in parental cells than in acquired 17-AAG-resistant cells. Further study found that knockdown of MUC1 expression by small interfering RNA could obviously re-sensitize the resistant cells to 17-AAG treatment, and decrease the cell migration and adhesion. These were coupled with a downregulation in N-cadherin and β-catenin. The results indicate that HSP90 inhibitor therapies in colon carcinomas could generate resistance and increase metastatic potential that might mediated by upregulation of MUC1 expression. Findings from this study further our understanding of the potential clinical effects of HSP90-directed therapies in

  8. Differential induction of apoptosis in human colonic carcinoma cells (Caco-2) by Atopobium, and commensal, probiotic and enteropathogenic bacteria: mediation by the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Altonsy, Mohammed O; Andrews, Simon C; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2010-02-28

    The induction of apoptosis in mammalian cells by bacteria is well reported. This process may assist infection by pathogens whereas for non-pathogens apoptosis induction within carcinoma cells protects against colon cancer. Here, apoptosis induction by a major new gut bacterium, Atopobium minutum, was compared with induction by commensal (Escherichia coli K-12 strains), probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium latis) and pathogenic (E. coli: EPEC and VTEC) gut bacteria within the colon cancer cell line, Caco-2. The results show a major apoptotic effect for the pathogens, mild effects for the probiotic strains and A. minutum, but no effect for commensal E. coli. The mild apoptotic effects observed are consistent with the beneficial roles of probotics in protection against colon cancer and suggest, for the first time, that A. minutum possesses similar advantageous, anti-cancerous activity. Although bacterial infection increased Caco-2 membrane FAS levels, caspase-8 was not activated indicating that apoptosis is FAS independent. Instead, in all cases, apoptosis was induced through the mitochondrial pathway as indicated by BAX translocation, cytochrome c release, and caspase-9 and -3 cleavage. This suggests that an intracellular stimulus initiates the observed apoptosis responses. PMID:20036023

  9. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Curcumin-loaded biodegradable polymeric micelles for colon cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Maling; Men, Ke; Shi, Huashan; Xiang, Mingli; Zhang, Juan; Song, Jia; Long, Jianlin; Wan, Yang; Luo, Feng; Zhao, Xia; Qian, Zhiyong

    2011-04-01

    Curcumin is an effective and safe anticancer agent, but its hydrophobicity inhibits its clinical application. Nanotechnology provides an effective method to improve the water solubility of hydrophobic drug. In this work, curcumin was encapsulated into monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) micelles through a single-step nano-precipitation method, creating curcumin-loaded MPEG-PCL (Cur/MPEG-PCL) micelles. These Cur/MPEG-PCL micelles were monodisperse (PDI = 0.097 +/- 0.011) with a mean particle size of 27.3 +/- 1.3 nm, good re-solubility after freeze-drying, an encapsulation efficiency of 99.16 +/- 1.02%, and drug loading of 12.95 +/- 0.15%. Moreover, these micelles were prepared by a simple and reproducible procedure, making them potentially suitable for scale-up. Curcumin was molecularly dispersed in the PCL core of MPEG-PCL micelles, and could be slow-released in vitro. Encapsulation of curcumin in MPEG-PCL micelles improved the t1/2 and AUC of curcuminin vivo. As well as free curcumin, Cur/MPEG-PCL micelles efficiently inhibited the angiogenesis on transgenic zebrafish model. In an alginate-encapsulated cancer cell assay, intravenous application of Cur/MPEG-PCL micelles more efficiently inhibited the tumor cell-induced angiogenesisin vivo than that of free curcumin. MPEG-PCL micelle-encapsulated curcumin maintained the cytotoxicity of curcumin on C-26 colon carcinoma cellsin vitro. Intravenous application of Cur/MPEG-PCL micelle (25 mg kg-1curcumin) inhibited the growth of subcutaneous C-26 colon carcinoma in vivo (p < 0.01), and induced a stronger anticancer effect than that of free curcumin (p < 0.05). In conclusion, Cur/MPEG-PCL micelles are an excellent intravenously injectable aqueous formulation of curcumin; this formulation can inhibit the growth of colon carcinoma through inhibiting angiogenesis and directly killing cancer cells.

  11. Major contribution of MEK1 to the activation of ERK1/ERK2 and to the growth of LS174T colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shama, Jessica; Garcia-Medina, Raquel; Pouyssegur, Jacques Vial, Emmanuel

    2008-08-08

    Mammalian cells express two closely related MEK isoforms, MEK1 and MEK2, upstream of the ERK1/ERK2 MAPK module. Although genetic studies have suggested that MEK1 and MEK2 do not have overlapping functions in vivo, little is known about their specific contribution to the activation of ERKs and to tumor cell proliferation. We used Tet-inducible shRNA to investigate the independent role of MEK1 and MEK2 for the oncogenic and the serum-induced activation of ERK1 and ERK2 in LS174T colon carcinoma cells. We show that MEK1 is the main activator of both ERK1 and ERK2. MEK2 removal has no impact by itself but it can cooperate with MEK1 ablation for the inhibition of ERK1/2 activity. In addition, we show that MEK1 is the critical isoform regulating tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Ochratoxin A and T-2 Toxin Induce Clonogenicity and Cell Migration in Human Colon Carcinoma and Fetal Lung Fibroblast Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Abassi, Haila; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Shirley, Sarah; Abid, Salwa; Bacha, Hassen

    2016-03-01

    T-2 toxin and Ochratoxin A (OTA) are toxic secondary metabolites produced by various fungi, and together they contaminate feedstuffs worldwide. T-2 toxin and OTA may exert carcinogenic action in rodent. Despite the various in vivo experiments, carcinogenicity of these two mycotoxins has not yet been proven for human. In this current study, we proposed to investigate, in Human colon carcinoma cells and fetal lung fibroblast-like cells transfected with MYC, the effect of T-2 toxin and OTA on cell clonogenicity and cell migration. Results of the present investigation showed that T2-toxin as well as OTA has an important clonogenic effect in all cell lines, suggesting that these mycotoxins could promote the transcription of c-myc gene. Furthermore, T-2 toxin and OTA enhanced the migration effect of HCT116 cells at very low concentrations, proposing that these mycotoxins may exhibit carcinogenesis-like properties in the studied cells. PMID:26849850

  13. The mycotoxin zearalenone enhances cell proliferation, colony formation and promotes cell migration in the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116.

    PubMed

    Abassi, Haila; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Shirley, Sarah; Abid, Salwa; Bacha, Hassen; Micheau, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) and Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) are fungal secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium and Aspergillus genera, respectively. These mycotoxins are found world-wide as corn and wheat contaminants. AFB1 is probably the most toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin. It has been demonstrated to be mutagenic, genotoxic, and hepatocarcinogenic. ZEN is a non-steroidal estrogenic mycotoxin that displays hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic properties have so far remained controversial and questionable. Using the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, we will show here that ZEN, at low concentrations, enhances cell proliferation, increases colony formation and fastens cell migration after wound healing. The highest effect of ZEN was observed at a concentration 10 times lower as compared to AFB1. Our findings suggest thus that this mycotoxin exhibits carcinogenesis-like properties in HCT116 cells. PMID:27084041

  14. Studies on the antitumor activity and biochemical actions of cyclopentenyl cytosine against human colon carcinoma HT-29 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, K; Zhen, W; Fritzer-Szekeres, M; Szekeres, T; Jayaram, H N

    1999-01-01

    Cyclopentenyl cytosine (CPEC) is cytotoxic to several tumor cell lines. CPEC inhibits CTP synthesis resulting in depletion of cytidylate pools. The aim of this study was to examine CPEC's cytotoxic and antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo against human colon carcinoma HT-29, and to relate its action on CTP synthesis. CPEC exhibits potent cytotoxicity in vitro to HT-29 cells with an LC50 (concentration that is lethal to the survival of 50% cell colonies) of 2.4 microM and 0.46 microM following 2 h and 24 h exposure, respectively. Incubation of cells with CPEC for 2 h resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cytidylate pools. The in vivo antitumor activity of CPEC in athymic mice transplanted subcutaneously (s.c.) with 3 million HT-29 cells was examined. Antitumor activity of CPEC was elucidated in early-staged tumor, wherein CPEC (1.5 mg/kg, QD x 9 or 3 mg/kg, QOD x 9) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) 24 h after tumor implantation and it resulted in a significant reduction in tumor weight to 48% of control. The effect of CPEC on established solid tumors in vivo was examined in athymic mice transplanted s.c. 14 days earlier with HT-29 cells and treated i.p. with 1.5 mg/kg CPEC, QD x 5 for 4 courses, with a 10 day-interval between courses. This treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumor weight (72%) in the treated group. HPLC analysis of HT-29 tumor obtained from mice after treatment with CPEC showed a depletion of the CTP concentration reaching a nadir at 8 h. In conclusion, the present studies demonstrate potent antitumor activity of CPEC against freshly transplanted and established human colon carcinoma which can be corroborated with the drug's biochemical actions. PMID:10069488

  15. Heterogeneity in gamma-glutamyltransferase mRNA expression and glycan structures. Search for tumor-specific variants in human liver metastases and colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Ingvild; Andersen, Jeanette Hammer; Bjornland, Kristin; Mathisen, Øystein; Bremnes, Roy; Wellman, Maria; Visvikis, Athanase; Huseby, Nils-Erik

    2003-05-30

    The enzyme gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells and tissues and has significant utility as a cancer marker. Significant heterogeneity of the enzyme has been described due to both transcriptional and post-translational variations. For possible use in diagnosis and follow-up of patients with colorectal cancer, a search was performed for specific mRNA subtypes and glycan structures of the enzyme in liver metastases. We found no differences in the distribution of three GGT mRNA subtypes (fetal liver, HepG2, placenta) in metastatic tissue and normal liver tissue. Furthermore, the three subtypes were present in leukocytes isolated from both normal individuals and cancer patients. Two colon carcinoma cell lines (Colo 205 and HCC 2998) also displayed the three forms and no consistent changes in mRNA composition were noted after butyrate-induced differentiation of the cells. Thus, neither of the GGT mRNA subforms appear to be tumor-specific, although some qualitative and quantitative variations were noted. Two distinct glycosylation features were detected for GGT in metastatic tissue in contrast to normal liver GGT; an extreme sialic acid heterogeneity and a significant increase in beta1,6GlcNAc branching. The GGT glycans from the two colon carcinoma cell lines also possessed these features. As butyrate treatment of the cells resulted in an increased sialic acid content and a reduced beta1,6GlcNAc branching, the described carbohydrate structures appear to be part of a tumor-related pattern. We were, however, unable to identify such GGT isoforms in serum from patients with advanced colorectal cancer. This indicates that their usefulness in diagnostic use is doubtful. PMID:12758164

  16. Detachment of glycolytic enzymes from cytoskeleton of Lewis lung carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma cells induced by clotrimazole and its correlation to cell viability and morphology.

    PubMed

    Penso, Julia; Beitner, Rivka

    2002-07-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by a high rate of glycolysis, which is their primary energy source. Glycolysis is known to be controlled by allosteric regulators, as well as by reversible binding of glycolytic enzymes to cytoskeleton. We report here that clotrimazole (l-(alpha-2-chlorotrityl)imidazole), the antifungal azole derivative, which was recently recognized as calmodulin antagonist, induced a dose-dependent detachment of the glycolytic enzymes, phosphofructokinase (ATP: D-fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.11) and aldolase (D-fructose-l,6-bisphosphate D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-lyase, EC 4.1.2.13), from cytoskeleton of LL/2 Lewis lung carcinoma cells and CT-26 colon adenocarcinoma cells. The detachment of glycolytic enzymes from cytoskeleton would reduce the provision of local ATP, in the vicinity of the cytoskeleton membrane, and would also affect cytoskeleton structure and cell shape. We show here that clotrimazole decreased the viability of LL/2 Lewis lung carcinoma cells and CT-26 colon adenocarcinoma cells. After 3h of incubation with clotrimazole, complete cell destruction was detected. Ultrastructural cell damage was manifested by disintegration of the outer membrane by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The detachment of glycolytic enzymes from cytoskeleton, induced by clotrimazole, preceded the decrease in cell viability, which indicates that this is an early effect and not a result of cell death. Since the cytoskeleton is being recognized as an important modulator of cell function, proliferation, differentiation, and neoplasia, detachment of the glycolytic enzymes from cytoskeleton induced by clotrimazole, as well as its reported inhibitory action on cell proliferation, makes this drug the most promising agent in the treatment of cancer. PMID:12126931

  17. Lidamycin induces marked G2 cell cycle arrest in human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells through activation of p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Bian, Chunjing; Ren, Kaihuan; Jin, Haixia; Li, Baowei; Shao, Rong-Guang

    2007-03-01

    Lidamycin (LDM), a member of the enediyne antibiotic family, is presently undergoing phase I clinical trials in P.R. China. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of LDM-induced cell cycle arrest in order to support its use in clinical cancer therapy. Using human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells, we observed that LDM induced G2 cell cycle arrest in a time- and dose-dependent manner. LDM-induced G2 arrest was associated with increasing phosphorylation of Chk1, Chk2, Cdc25C, Cdc2 and expression of Cdc2 and cyclin B1. In addition, cytoplasmic localization of cyclin B1 was also involved in LDM-induced G2 arrest. Moreover, we found that p38 MAPK pathway contributed to LDM-induced G2 arrest. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by its inhibitor SB203580 not only attenuated LDM-induced G2 arrest but also potentiated LDM-induced apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreasing phosphorylation of Cdc2 and increasing expression of FasL and phosphorylation of JNK. Finally, we demonstrated that cells at G1 phase were more sensitive to LDM. Together, our findings suggest that p38 MAPK signaling pathway is involved in LDM-induced G2 arrest, at least partly, and a combination of LDM with p38 MAPK inhibitor may represent a new strategy for human colon cancer therapy. PMID:17273739

  18. Antioxidant effectiveness of phenolic apple juice extracts and their gut fermentation products in the human colon carcinoma cell line caco-2.

    PubMed

    Bellion, Phillip; Hofmann, Thomas; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L; Will, Frank; Dietrich, Helmut; Knaup, Bastian; Richling, Elke; Baum, Matthias; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine

    2008-08-13

    Apples represent a major dietary source of antioxidative polyphenols. Their metabolic conversion by the gut microflora might generate products that protect the intestine against oxidative damage. We studied the antioxidant effectiveness of supernatants of fermented apple juice extracts (F-AEs, 6 and 24 h fermentation) and of selected phenolic degradation products, identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS. Cell free antioxidant capacity of unfermented apple juice extracts (AEs) was decreased after fermentation by 30-50%. In the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, F-AEs (containing <0.5% of original AE-phenolics) decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level more efficiently than the F-blank (fermented without AE) but were less effective than the respective AEs. Similarly, antioxidant effectiveness of individual degradation products was lower compared to respective AE constituents. Glutathione level was slightly increased and oxidative DNA damage slightly decreased by fermented AE03, rich in quercetin glycosides. In conclusion, F-AEs/degradation products exhibit antioxidant activity in colon cells but to a lesser extent than the respective unfermented AEs/constituents. PMID:18624411

  19. A paraptosis-like cell death induced by δ-tocotrienol in human colon carcinoma SW620 cells is associated with the suppression of the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Shu; Li, Da-Ming; He, Ning; Liu, Ying-Hua; Wang, Chun-Hua; Jiang, Shu-Qing; Chen, Bing-Qing; Liu, Jia-Ren

    2011-07-11

    Tocotrienol is considered a beneficial effect agent on inhibition of tumor development. In this study, we focused on the effects of δ-tocotrienol and its possible mechanism on induction of death in human colon cancer SW620 cells. δ-Tocotrienol inhibited proliferation of SW620 cell in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings showed that δ-tocotrienol effectively induced paraptosis-like death in SW620 cells, correlated with the vacuolation that may be from welling and fusion of mitochondria and/or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as caspase-3 nonactivated. However, there were no changes in apoptosis based on flow cytometry analysis. Of being noted, δ-tocotrienol reduced the expression of β-catenin and wnt-1 proteins by about 50% at the highest dose (20μmol/L). δ-Tocotrienol also decreased cyclin D1, c-jun and MMP-7 protein levels in SW620 cells. Altogether, these data indicate that δ-tocotrienol induces paraptosis-like cell death, which is associated with the suppression of the Wnt signaling pathway. Thus, our findings may provide a novel application in treatment of human colon carcinoma. PMID:21453743

  20. STUDIES OF DBP-INDUCED COLON CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of colon carcinomas by trihalomethanes in rats may be relevant to epidemiological findings of increased incidences of colon-rectal cancer associated with exposure to chlorination byproducts. These studies have demonstrated that the brominated THMs in drinking water ind...

  1. Berberine Reduces cAMP-Induced Chloride Secretion in T84 Human Colonic Carcinoma Cells through Inhibition of Basolateral KCNQ1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Alzamora, Rodrigo; O'Mahony, Fiona; Ko, Wing-Hung; Yip, Tiffany Wai-Nga; Carter, Derek; Irnaten, Mustapha; Harvey, Brian Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with multiple pharmacological actions, including antidiarrhoeal activity and has been shown to inhibit Cl(-) secretion in distal colon. The aims of this study were to determine the molecular signaling mechanisms of action of berberine on Cl(-) secretion and the ion transporter targets. Monolayers of T84 human colonic carcinoma cells grown in permeable supports were placed in Ussing chambers and short-circuit current measured in response to secretagogues and berberine. Whole-cell current recordings were performed in T84 cells using the patch-clamp technique. Berberine decreased forskolin-induced short-circuit current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) 80 ± 8 μM). In apically permeabilized monolayers and whole-cell current recordings, berberine inhibited a cAMP-dependent and chromanol 293B-sensitive basolateral membrane K(+) current by 88%, suggesting inhibition of KCNQ1 K(+) channels. Berberine did not affect either apical Cl(-) conductance or basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity. Berberine stimulated p38 MAPK, PKCα and PKA, but had no effect on p42/p44 MAPK and PKCδ. However, berberine pre-treatment prevented stimulation of p42/p44 MAPK by epidermal growth factor. The inhibitory effect of berberine on Cl(-) secretion was partially blocked by HBDDE (∼65%), an inhibitor of PKCα and to a smaller extent by inhibition of p38 MAPK with SB202190 (∼15%). Berberine treatment induced an increase in association between PKCα and PKA with KCNQ1 and produced phosphorylation of the channel. We conclude that berberine exerts its inhibitory effect on colonic Cl(-) secretion through inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels responsible for K(+) recycling via a PKCα-dependent pathway. PMID:21747769

  2. Morphologic differentiation of colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and HT-29KM in rotating-wall vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Jessup, J. M.; Wolf, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A new low shear stress microcarrier culture system has been developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center that permits three-dimensional tissue culture. Two established human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines, HT-29, an undifferentiated, and HT-29KM, a stable, moderately differentiated subline of HT-29, were grown in new tissue culture bioreactors called Rotating-Wall Vessels (RWVs). RWVs are used in conjunction with multicellular cocultivation to develop a unique in vitro tissue modeling system. Cells were cultivated on Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads, with and without mixed normal human colonic fibroblasts, which served as the mesenchymal layer. Culture of the tumor lines in the absence of fibroblasts produced spheroidlike growth and minimal differentiation. In contrast, when tumor lines were co-cultivated with normal colonic fibroblasts, initial growth was confined to the fibroblast population until the microcarriers were covered. The tumor cells then commenced proliferation at an accelerated rate, organizing themselves into three-dimensional tissue masses that achieved 1.0- to 1.5-cm diameters. The masses displayed glandular structures, apical and internal glandular microvilli, tight intercellular junctions, desmosomes, cellular polarity, sinusoid development, internalized mucin, and structural organization akin to normal colon crypt development. Differentiated samples were subjected to transmission and scanning electron microscopy and histologic analysis, revealing embryoniclike mesenchymal cells lining the areas around the growth matrices. Necrosis was minimal throughout the tissue masses. These data suggest that the RWV affords a new model for investigation and isolation of growth, regulatory, and structural processes within neoplastic and normal tissue.

  3. Drug-loading of poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PEGMEMA)-based micelles and mechanisms of uptake in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teddy; Gosain, Pallavi; Stenzel, Martina H; Lord, Megan S

    2016-08-01

    In this study polymeric micelles formed from poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (P(PEGMEMA75)-b-PMMA80) block copolymer of approximately 25nm in diameter were used to encapsulate the model drug, Nile Red, with a loading efficiency of 0.08wt% and a chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin (DOX), with an efficiency of 2.75wt%. The release of DOX from the micelles was sufficient to be cytotoxic to human colon carcinoma cells, WiDr, while Nile Red and the unloaded micelles were found not to be cytotoxic when exposed to the cells at polymer concentrations up to 200μg/mL. Nile Red loaded micelles were used to analyze uptake of the micelles into the cells which were rapidly internalized within minutes of exposure. The three major endocytotic pathways were involved in the internalization of micelles; however other passive mechanisms were also at play as the addition of inhibitors to all three pathways did not completely inhibit the uptake of these nanoparticles. These data demonstrate the potential of the P(PEGMEMA)75-b-PMMA80 block copolymer micelles to be rapidly internalized by carcinoma cells and deliver low doses of drugs intracellularly for controlled drug release. PMID:27100852

  4. ERAS protocol in laparoscopic surgery for colonic versus rectal carcinoma: are there differences in short-term outcomes?

    PubMed

    Pędziwiatr, Michał; Pisarska, Magdalena; Kisielewski, Michał; Major, Piotr; Mydlowska, Anna; Rubinkiewicz, Mateusz; Winiarski, Marek; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Most of the studies concerning enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols in colorectal surgery include heterogeneous groups of patients undergoing open or laparoscopic surgery, both due to colonic and rectal cancer, thus creating a potential bias. The data investigating the differences between patients operated for either colonic or rectal cancer are sparse. The aim of the study was to compare short-term outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for colonic and rectal cancer with ERAS protocol. The analysis included consecutive prospectively registered patients operated for a colorectal cancer between January 2012 and September 2015. Patients were divided into two groups (colon vs. rectum). The measured outcomes were: length of stay (LOS), complication rate, readmission rate, compliance with ERAS protocol elements and recovery parameters (tolerance of early oral diet, mobilization and time to first flatus). Group 1 (colon) consisted of 150 patients and Group 2 (rectum) of 82 patients. Patients in Group 1 (150 patients) were discharged home earlier than in Group 2 (82 patients)-median LOS 4 versus 5 days, respectively. There was no statistical difference in complication rate (27.3 vs. 36.6 %) and readmissions (7.3 vs. 6.1 %). Compliance with the protocol was 86.9 and 82.6 %, respectively. However, in Group 1, the following procedures were used less frequently: bowel preparation (24 vs. 78.3 %) and postoperative drainage (23.3 vs. 71.0 %). There were no differences in recovery parameters between the groups. Univariate logistic regression showed that the type of surgery, drainage and stoma creation significantly prolonged LOS. In a multivariate logistic regression model, only a bowel preparation and drainage were shown to be significant. Although functional recovery and high compliance with ERAS protocol are possible irrespective of the type of surgery, laparoscopic rectal resections are associated with a longer LOS. PMID:27154634

  5. Inhibitory effect of vitamin K1 on growth and polyamine biosynthesis of human gastric and colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Linsalata, Michele; Orlando, Antonella; Tutino, Valeria; Notarnicola, Maria; D'Attoma, Benedetta; Russo, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Gastric and colon cancers remain the leading cause of cancer mortality throughout the world. Since the gastrointestinal tract works in a constant link with the external environment, chemoprevention by dietary constituents could represent a possible approach to reduce cancer risk. Dietary vitamin K1 (VK1) has been shown to prevent the growth of many types of cancer cells. However, no data are available on possible different susceptibility to VK1 by gastric or colon neoplastic cell lines. Moreover, the exact mechanism of action of VK1 is still object of investigation, even if it has been reported that VK1 may induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Therefore, molecules affecting cell growth such as the natural polyamines could be of interest in VK1 action. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of increasing concentrations of VK1 (from 10 to 200 µM) administered up to 72 h, on the cell proliferation and apoptosis of a gastric (HGC-27) and a colon (SW480) cancer cell line. Additionally, the polyamine biosynthesis and the MAPK pathway were also examined. VK1 treatments caused an inhibition of cell proliferation and an induction of apoptosis in both cell lines, with a concomitant significant decrease of the polyamine biosynthesis, increased phospho-ERK 1/2 expression was also observed. A different proliferative behavior and a different response to VK1 by gastric and colon cancer cells was evident, with colon cells showing a more pronounced susceptibility to VK1 action. VK1 is safe and without known toxicities in adult humans, consequently it could be effective in prevention and treatment of selected gastrointestinal neoplasms. Protocols based on the use of VK1, along with polyamine inhibitors and/or analogues, could represent a suitable alternative option for improving the efficacy of chemoprevention and treatment in future strategies for gastrointestinal cancer management. PMID:26043965

  6. Does self-regulation and autonomic regulation have an influence on survival in breast and colon carcinoma patients? results of a prospective outcome study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer Related Fatigue (CRF) and circadian rhythm have a great impact on the quality of life (HRQL) of patients with breast (BC) and colon cancer (CRC). Other patient related outcomes in oncology are measured by new instruments focusing on adaptive characteristics such as sense of coherence or self-regulation, which could be more appropriate as a prognostic tool than classical HRQL. The aim of this study was to assess the association of autonomic regulation (aR) and self-regulation (SR) with survival. Methods 146 cancer patients and 120 healthy controls took part in an initial evaluation in 2000/2001. At a median follow up of 5.9 years later, 62 of 95 BC, 17 of 51 CRC patients, and 85 of 117 healthy controls took part in the follow-up study. 41 participants had died. For the follow-up evaluation, participants were requested to complete the standardized aR and SR questionnaires. Results On average, cancer patients had survived for 10.1 years with the disease. Using a Cox proportional hazard regression with stepwise variables such as age, diagnosis group, Charlson co-morbidity index, body mass index (BMI)) aR and SR. SR were identified as independent parameters with potential prognostic relevance on survival While aR did not significantly influence survival, SR showed a positive and independent impact on survival (OR = 0.589; 95%-CI: 0.354 - 0.979). This positive effect persisted significantly in the sensitivity analysis of the subgroup of tumour patients and in the subscale 'Achieve satisfaction and well-being' and by tendency in the UICC stages nested for the different diagnoses groups. Conclusions Self-regulation might be an independent prognostic factor for the survival of breast and colon carcinoma patients and merits further prospective studies. PMID:21961625

  7. The utility of microCT and MRI in the assessment of longitudinal growth of liver metastases in a preclinical model of colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Prachi; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Story, Jennifer; Nelson, Rendon; Johnson, G. Allan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Liver is a common site for distal metastases in colon and rectal cancer. Numerous clinical studies have analyzed the relative merits of different imaging modalities for detection of liver metastases. A number of exciting new therapies are being investigated in preclinical models. But, technical challenges in preclinical imaging make it difficult to translate conclusions from clinical studies to the preclinical environment. This study addresses the technical challenges of preclinical MR and micro-CT to enable comparison of state-of-the-art methods for following metastatic liver disease. Materials and Methods We optimized two promising preclinical protocols to enable a parallel longitudinal study tracking metastatic human colon carcinoma growth in a mouse model: T2-weighted MRI using 2-shot PROPELLER (Periodically Rotated Overlapping ParallEL Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction), and contrast-enhanced micro-CT using a liposomal contrast agent. Both methods were tailored for high throughput with attention to animal support and anesthesia to limit biological stress. Results and Conclusions Each modality has its strengths. Micro-CT permitted more rapid acquisition (<10 minutes) with the highest spatial resolution (88-micron isotropic resolution). But detection of metastatic lesions requires the use of a blood pool contrast agent, which could introduce a confound in the evaluation of new therapies. MR imaging was slower (30 minutes) and had lower anisotropic spatial resolution. But MR eliminates the need for a contrast agent and the contrast-to-noise between tumor and normal parenchyma was higher, making earlier detection of small lesions possible. Both methods supported a relatively high-throughput, longitudinal study of the development of metastatic lesions. PMID:23498983

  8. Tubb3 regulation by the Erk and Akt signaling pathways: a mechanism involved in the effect of arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase 1 (Art1) on apoptosis of colon carcinoma CT26 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Tang, Yi; Chen, Wen-Wen; Wang, Ya-Lan; Yang, Lian; Li, Xian; Song, Guang-Lin; Kuang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The influence of the most important classical mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase, arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase 1 (Art1), on survival and apoptosis of colon carcinoma cells and the potential mechanisms have been partly discussed in our previous study but still need to be further studied. In this present study, Art1 of colon carcinoma CT26 cells was silenced with lentiviral vector-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or overexpressed with lentiviral vector-mediated complementary DNA (cDNA) and allograft transplant tumors are established in Balb/c mice. We verified Art1 knockdown increases apoptosis of CT26 cells transplant tumor; Art1 overexpression acts oppositely. Accordingly, growth of transplant tumors is inhibited in Art1 knockdown transplant tumors and increases in Art1 overexpression transplant tumors. Furthermore, activity of Akt and Erk cell signal pathways and expression of an apoptosis biomarker, βIII-tubulin (Tubb3), decrease when Art1 was silenced and increase when Art1 was overexpressed. Inhibiting Akt pathway or Erk pathway both downregulates expression of Tubb3 on protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) level, indicating that Tubb3 could be regulated by both Akt and Erk pathways, and plays a role in the influence of Art1 on apoptosis of Balb/c mice allograft transplant tumor. We also demonstrated that Bcl-2 family is not the responsible downstream factor of the Erk pathway in colon carcinoma cells which is undergoing apoptosis. These findings enrich the molecular mechanism for the function of Art1 in colon carcinoma and provide a complementary support for Art1 to be a potential therapeutic target of the treatment of this kind of malignant tumor. PMID:26373733

  9. Polyamine depletion enhances the roscovitine-induced apoptosis through the activation of mitochondria in HCT116 colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arısan, Elif Damla; Coker, Ajda; Palavan-Ünsal, Narçin

    2012-02-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) show high therapeutic potential in various cancer types which are characterized by the accumulation of transformed cells due to impaired apoptotic machinery. Roscovitine, a CDK inhibitor showed to be a potent apoptotic inducer in several cancer cells. Polyamines, putrescine, spermidine and spermine, are biogenic amines involved in many cellular processes, including apoptosis. In this study, we explored the potential role of polyamines in roscovitine-induced apoptosis in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Roscovitine induced apoptosis by activating mitochondrial pathway caspases and modulating the expression of Bcl-2 family members. Depletion of polyamines by treatment with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) increased roscovitine-induced apoptosis. Transient silencing of ornithine decarboxylase, polyamine biosynthesis enzyme and special target of DFMO also increased roscovitine-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. Interestingly, additional putrescine treatment was found pro-apoptotic due to the presence of non-functional ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). Finally, roscovitine altered polyamine catabolic pathway and led to decrease in putrescine and spermidine levels. Therefore, the metabolic regulation of polyamines may dictate the power of roscovitine induced apoptotic responses in HCT116 colon cancer cells. PMID:21809075

  10. Regulation of the RhoA/ROCK/AKT/β-catenin pathway by arginine-specific ADP-ribosytransferases 1 promotes migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Guang-Lin; Jin, Cong-Cong; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Yi; Wang, Ya-Lan; Li, Ming; Xiao, Ming; Li, Xian; Li, Qing-Shu; Lin, Xiao; Chen, Wen-Wen; Kuang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Arginine-specific ADP-ribosytransferases 1 (ART1) is able to modify the arginine of specific proteins by mono-ADP-ribosylation. We previously reported that the expression of ART1 in human colon adenocarcinoma tissues was higher than in adjacent tissues. Herein, we primarily revealed that ART1 could regulate the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and, therefore, the development of colon carcinoma. In CT26 cells, which overexpressed ART1 by lentiviral transfection, the following were promoted: alterations of spindle-like non-polarization, expression of EMT inducers and mesenchymal markers, migration, invasion and adhesion. However, epithelial marker expression was decreased. Correspondingly, knockdown of ART1 in CT26 cells had the opposite effects. The effect of ART1 on EMT and carcinoma metastasis was also verified in a liver metastasis model of BALB/c mice. To further explore the molecular mechanism of ART1 in EMT, CT26 cells were treated with several specific inhibitors and gene silencing. Our data suggest that ART1 could regulate EMT by regulating the RhoA/ROCK1/AKT/β-catenin pathway and its downstream factors (snail1, vimentin, N-cadherin and E-cadherin) and that it therefore plays an important role in the progression of colon carcinoma. PMID:27277835

  11. Blockade of autophagy enhances proapoptotic potential of BI-69A11, a novel Akt inhibitor, in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pal, Ipsita; Parida, Sheetal; Prashanth Kumar, B N; Banik, Payel; Kumar Dey, Kaushik; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Bhutia, Sujit K; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2015-10-15

    BI-69A11, novel Akt inhibitor, is currently drawing much attention due to its intriguing effect in inducing apoptosis in melanoma, breast, prostate and colon cancer. However, earlier reports reveal that PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors promote autophagy at the early stage as a survival mechanism that might affect its apoptotic potential. It is necessary to investigate whether BI-69A11 mediated apoptosis is associated with autophagy for enhancing its therapeutic efficacy. Here, we found that BI-69A11 induced autophagy at earlier time point through the inhibition of Akt/mTOR/p70S6kinase pathway. Dose-dependent and time-dependent conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, increased accumulation of LC3-GFP dots in cytoplasm and increase in other autophagic markers such as Beclin-1, firmly supported the fact that BI-69A11 induces autophagy. Atg5, Atg7 and Beclin-1 siRNA mediated genetic attenuation and pre-treatment with pharmacological inhibitor 3-MA and CQ diminished the autophagy and increased the propensity of cell death towards apoptosis. It was also suggested that BI-69A11 mediated interaction between Akt, HSP-90 and Beclin-1 maintained the fine balance between autophagy and apoptosis. Interaction between Beclin-1 and HSP90 is one of the prime causes of induction of autophagy. Here, we also generated a novel combination therapy by pretreatment with CQ that inhibited the autophagy and accelerated the apoptotic potential of BI-69A11. In summary; our findings suggest that induction of autophagy lead to the resistance of colon cancer towards BI-69A11 mediated apoptosis. PMID:26306675

  12. Cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) Bl. tuber extracts against human colon carcinoma cell line HCT-15.

    PubMed

    Ansil, P N; Wills, P J; Varun, R; Latha, M S

    2014-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide and is the third most common form of malignancy in both men and women. Several possible colon cancer chemopreventive agents are found in edible plants. Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) Blume (family: Araceae) is a tuber crop, largely cultivated throughout the plains of India for using its corm as food. This tuber has also been traditionally used for the treatment of abdominal tumors, liver diseases, piles etc. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose-dependent cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing effects of the sub fractions of A. campanulatus tuber methanolic extract (ACME) viz. petroleum ether fraction (PEF), chloroform fraction (CHF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and methanolic fraction (MEF) on the colon cancer cell line, HCT-15. Antiproliferative effects of the sub fractions of ACME were studied by MTT assay. Apoptotic activity was assessed by DAPI, Annexin V-FITC and JC-1 fluorescent staining. The chemotherapeutic drug, 5-flurouracil (5-FU) was used as positive drug control. The sub fractions of ACME significantly inhibited the proliferation of HCT-15 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the extracts were found to induce apoptosis and were confirmed by DAPI, Annexin V-FITC and JC-1 fluorescent staining. A pronounced results of cytotoxic and apoptotic activities were observed in the cells treated with 5-FU and CHF, whereas, EAF and MEF treated cells exhibited a moderate result and the least effect was observed in PEF treated cells. Our results suggested that, among the sub fractions of ACME, CHF had potent cytotoxic and apoptotic activity and thus it could be explored as a novel target for anticancer drug development. Furthermore, these findings confirm that the sub fractions of ACME dose-dependently suppress the proliferation of HCT-15 cells by inducing apoptosis. PMID:25473360

  13. Cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) Bl. tuber extracts against human colon carcinoma cell line HCT-15

    PubMed Central

    Ansil, P.N.; Wills, P.J.; Varun, R.; Latha, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide and is the third most common form of malignancy in both men and women. Several possible colon cancer chemopreventive agents are found in edible plants. Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) Blume (family: Araceae) is a tuber crop, largely cultivated throughout the plains of India for using its corm as food. This tuber has also been traditionally used for the treatment of abdominal tumors, liver diseases, piles etc. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose-dependent cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing effects of the sub fractions of A. campanulatus tuber methanolic extract (ACME) viz. petroleum ether fraction (PEF), chloroform fraction (CHF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and methanolic fraction (MEF) on the colon cancer cell line, HCT-15. Antiproliferative effects of the sub fractions of ACME were studied by MTT assay. Apoptotic activity was assessed by DAPI, Annexin V-FITC and JC-1 fluorescent staining. The chemotherapeutic drug, 5-flurouracil (5-FU) was used as positive drug control. The sub fractions of ACME significantly inhibited the proliferation of HCT-15 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the extracts were found to induce apoptosis and were confirmed by DAPI, Annexin V-FITC and JC-1 fluorescent staining. A pronounced results of cytotoxic and apoptotic activities were observed in the cells treated with 5-FU and CHF, whereas, EAF and MEF treated cells exhibited a moderate result and the least effect was observed in PEF treated cells. Our results suggested that, among the sub fractions of ACME, CHF had potent cytotoxic and apoptotic activity and thus it could be explored as a novel target for anticancer drug development. Furthermore, these findings confirm that the sub fractions of ACME dose-dependently suppress the proliferation of HCT-15 cells by inducing apoptosis. PMID:25473360

  14. Colonic Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colonic polyps grow in the large intestine, or colon. Most polyps are not dangerous. However, some polyps ... member with polyps Have a family history of colon cancer Most colon polyps do not cause symptoms. ...

  15. A novel tankyrase inhibitor decreases canonical Wnt signaling in colon carcinoma cells and reduces tumor growth in conditional APC mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Waaler, Jo; Machon, Ondrej; Tumova, Lucie; Dinh, Huyen; Korinek, Vladimir; Wilson, Steven Ray; Paulsen, Jan Erik; Pedersen, Nina Marie; Eide, Tor J; Machonova, Olga; Gradl, Dietmar; Voronkov, Andrey; von Kries, Jens Peter; Krauss, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Increased nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, a mediator of canonical Wnt signaling, is found in numerous tumors and is frequently associated with tumor progression and metastasis. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling therefore is an attractive strategy for anticancer drugs. In this study, we have identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of the β-catenin signaling pathway, JW55, that functions via inhibition of the PARP domain of tankyrase 1 and tankyrase 2 (TNKS1/2), regulators of the β-catenin destruction complex. Inhibition of TNKS1/2 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity by JW55 led to stabilization of AXIN2, a member of the β-catenin destruction complex, followed by increased degradation of β-catenin. In a dose-dependent manner, JW55 inhibited canonical Wnt signaling in colon carcinoma cells that contained mutations in either the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) locus or in an allele of β-catenin. In addition, JW55 reduced XWnt8-induced axis duplication in Xenopus embryos and tamoxifen-induced polyposis formation in conditional APC mutant mice. Together, our findings provide a novel chemotype for targeting canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling through inhibiting the PARP domain of TNKS1/2. PMID:22440753

  16. SOD2-Mediated Effects Induced by WR1065 and Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Micronucleus Formation in RKO Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Miller, Richard C.; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J.

    2010-01-01

    RKO36 cells exposed to either WR1065 or 10 cGy X rays show elevated SOD2 gene expression and SOD2 enzymatic activity. Cells challenged at this time with 2 Gy exhibit enhanced radiation resistance. This phenomenon has been identified as a delayed radioprotective effect or an adaptive response when induced by thiols or low-dose radiation, respectively. In this study we investigated the relative effectiveness of both WR1065 and low-dose radiation in reducing the incidence of radiation-induced micronucleus formation in binucleated RKO36 human colon carcinoma cells. The role of SOD2 in this process was assessed by measuring changes in enzymatic activity as a function of the inducing agent used, the level of protection afforded, and the inhibitory effects of short interfering RNA (SOD2 siRNA). Both WR1065 and 10 cGy X rays effectively induced a greater than threefold elevation in SOD2 activity 24 h after exposure. Cells irradiated at this time with 2 Gy exhibited a significant resistance to micronucleus formation (P < 0.05; Student’s two-tailed t test). This protective effect was significantly inhibited in cells transfected with SOD2 siRNA. SOD2 played an important role in the adaptive/delayed radioprotective response by inhibiting the initiation of a superoxide anion-induced ROS cascade leading to enhanced mitochondrial and nuclear damages. PMID:21175348

  17. The bioactive potential of red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) leaves in exhibiting cytotoxic and cytoprotective activity on human laryngeal carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Durgo, Ksenija; Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Stančić, Angela; Franekić, Jasna; Komes, Draženka

    2012-03-01

    In this article, the bioactive potential of red raspberry leaves, a by-product of this widely spread plant, mostly valued for its antioxidant-rich fruits, was determined. The polyphenolic profile and antioxidative properties of red raspberry leaf extract were determined and examined for potential biological activity. Cytotoxic effect, antioxidative/prooxidative effect, and effect on total glutathione concentration were determined in human laryngeal carcinoma (HEp2) and colon adenocarcinoma (SW 480) cell lines. SW 480 cells are more susceptible to raspberry leaf extract in comparison with HEp2 cells. The antioxidative nature of raspberry leaf extract was detected in HEp2 cells treated with hydrogen peroxide, as opposed to SW 480 cells, where raspberry leaf extract induced reactive oxygen species formation. Raspberry leaf extract increased total glutathione level in HEp2 cells. This effect was reinforced after 24 hours of recovery, indicating that induction was caused by products formed during cellular metabolism of compounds present in the extract. Comparison of the results obtained on these two cell lines indicates that cellular response to raspberry extract will depend on the type of the cells that are exposed to it. The results obtained confirmed the biological activity of red raspberry leaf polyphenols and showed that this traditional plant can supplement the daily intake of valuable natural antioxidants, which exhibit beneficial health effects. PMID:22082102

  18. Anthocyanin-rich blackberry extract suppresses the DNA-damaging properties of topoisomerase I and II poisons in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Esselen, Melanie; Boettler, Ute; Teller, Nicole; Bachler, Simone; Hutter, Melanie; Rufer, Corinna E; Skrbek, Susanne; Marko, Doris

    2011-07-13

    In the present study, we addressed the question whether cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G) or complex C3G-rich blackberry extracts affect human topoisomerases with special emphasis on the contribution of the potential degradation products phloroglucinol aldehyde (PGA) and protocatechuic acid (PCA). In HT29 colon carcinoma cells a C3G-rich blackberry extract suppressed camptothecin- (CPT-) or doxorubicin- (DOX-) induced stabilization of the covalent DNA-topoisomerase intermediate, thus antagonizing the effects of these classical topoisomerase poisons on DNA integrity. As a single compound, C3G (100 μM) decreased the DNA-damaging effects of CPT as well, but did not significantly affect those induced by DOX. At the highest applied concentration (100 μM), cyanidin protected DNA from CPT- and DOX-induced damage. Earlier reports on DNA-damaging properties of cyanidin were found to result most likely from the formation of hydrogen peroxide as an artifact in the cell culture medium when the incubation was performed in the absence of catalase. The suppression of hydrogen peroxide accumulation, achieved by the addition of catalase, demonstrated that cyanidin does not exhibit DNA-damaging properties in HT29 cells (up to 100 μM). The observed effects on topoisomerase interference and DNA protection against CPT or DOX were clearly limited to the parent compound and were not observed for the potential cyanidin degradation products PGA and PCA. PMID:21599019

  19. Prune extract (Prunus domestica L.) suppresses the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of human colon carcinoma Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takashi; Ikami, Takao; Xu, Jin-Wen; Ikeda, Katsumi

    2006-10-01

    Prunes are the dried fruits of certain cultivars of Prunus domestica L., and are recognized as a health food. The separated ethanol fraction from concentrated prune juice by DIAION HP-20 (PE) was investigated for cytotoxic effects on two different cancer cell lines in vitro. PE dose-dependently reduced the viable cell number of Caco-2, KATO III, but does not reduce the viable cell number of human normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) used as a normal cell model. PE treatment for 24 h led to apoptotic changes in Caco-2 such as cell shrinkage and blebbed surfaces due to the convolutions of nuclear and plasma membranes and chromatin condensation, but this was not observed in CCD-18Co. PE induced nucleosomal DNA fragmentation typical of apoptosis in Caco-2 after 24 h of treatment. These results show that PE induced apoptosis in Caco-2. Furthermore, by Caco-2 treatment with H2O2 chelator catalase and Ca2+-chelator BAPTA/AM, the PE-induced cytotoxic pathway was completely blocked, and the viable cell number of Caco-2 was not affected. PMID:17190111

  20. Distinct nuclear arrangement of active and inactive c-myc genes in control and differentiated colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harnicarova, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav . E-mail: kozubek@ibp.cz; Pachernik, Jiri; Krejci, Jana; Bartova, Eva

    2006-12-10

    Using sequential RNA-DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization, the nuclear arrangement of both the active and inactive c-myc gene as well as its transcription was investigated in colon cancer HT-29 cells induced to differentiate into enterocytes. Cytogenetic studies revealed the presence of two chromosomes 8 in HT-29 cells, of which the one containing c-myc gene amplicons was substantially larger and easily distinguished from the normal chromosome. This observation enabled detection of both activity and nuclear localization of c-myc genes in single cells and in individual chromosome territories. Similar transcriptional activity of the c-myc gene was observed in both the normal and derivative chromosome 8 territories showing no influence of the amplification on the c-myc gene expression. Our experiments demonstrate strikingly specific nuclear and territorial arrangements of active genes as compared with inactive ones: on the periphery of their territories facing to the very central region of the cell nucleus. Nuclear arrangement of c-myc genes and transcripts was conserved during cell differentiation and, therefore, independent of the level of differentiation-specific c-myc gene expression. However, after the induction of differentiation, a more internal territorial location was found for the single copy c-myc gene of normal chromosome 8, while amplicons conserved their territorial topography.

  1. Polyploidisation of metastatic colon carcinoma cells by microtubule and tubulin interacting drugs: effect on proteolytic activity and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Nikolaus; Schneider, Yann; Gossé, Francine; Schleiffer, René; Raul, Francis

    2004-10-01

    When SW620 colon cancer-derived metastatic cells were exposed to nanomolar concentrations of Taxol, colchicine or (Z)-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene (R3), huge aneuploid, polynuclear cells survived the treatment. These cells released considerable amounts of the matrix metalloproteinase matrilysin (MMP-7), and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) into the surrounding culture medium. MMP-7, and other proteolytic enzymes were highly expressed by these cells. In spite of their enormous size, the polyploid cells exhibited a considerable migratory capacity, as was demonstrated by their migration through an artificial basement membrane. While colchicine and R3-treated cells showed an inverse relationship between drug concentration and invasiveness, treatment with Taxol increased the capacity of the SW620 cells to penetrate through the membrane. The invasive capacity was not correlated with the induction and release of proteolytic enzymes. The idea that expression and release of proteolytic enzymes is a fundamental prerequisite of tumour cell invasiveness is generally accepted. The ability of the cells to respond to chemotactic signalling, and the filamentous structures of the cells, together with several cell adhesion factors, which are the basis of cell migration, are prerequisites of invasiveness. These factors are presumably different in the aneuploid cells produced by Taxol, colchicine and R3, and await scrutiny. PMID:15375554

  2. Synergistic Activity of the Src Family Kinase Inhibitor Dasatinib and Oxaliplatin in Colon Carcinoma Cells is Mediated by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kopetz, Scott; Lesslie, Donald P.; Dallas, Nikolas A.; Park, Serk I.; Johnson, Marjorie; Parikh, Nila U.; Kim, Michael P.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Ellis, Lee M.; Chandra, Joya; Gallick, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of colorectal cancer generally include oxaliplatin, although inherent and acquired resistance is common. One potential mediator of oxaliplatin sensitivity is the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, Src, the activity of which correlates with disease stage and patient survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of Src inhibition using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib on oxaliplatin sensitivity. We demonstrate that oxaliplatin acutely activates Src and that combination treatment with dasatinib is synergistic in a cell-line dependent manner, with the level of Src activation correlating with extent of synergy in a panel of six cell lines. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated after oxaliplatin treatment, and ROS potently activates Src. Pretreatment with antioxidants inhibits oxaliplatin-induced Src activation. In oxaliplatin resistant cell lines, Src activity is constitutively increased. In a mouse model of colorectal liver metastases, treatment with oxaliplatin also results in chronic Src activation. The combination of dasatinib and oxaliplatin results in significantly smaller tumors compared to single agent treatment, corresponding with reduced proliferation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we conclude that oxaliplatin activates Src through a ROS-dependent mechanism. Src inhibition increases oxaliplatin activity both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Src inhibitors combined with oxaliplatin may have efficacy in metastatic colon cancer, and may provide the first indication of a molecular phenotype that might be susceptible to such combinations. PMID:19383922

  3. 5-Hydroxy-7-Methoxyflavone Triggers Mitochondrial-Associated Cell Death via Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Souren; Jakhar, Rekha; Han, Jaehong; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plant-derived compounds are an important source of clinically useful anti-cancer agents. Chrysin, a biologically active flavone found in many plants, has limited usage for cancer chemotherapeutics due to its poor oral bioavailability. 5-Hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone (HMF), an active natural chrysin derivative found in various plant sources, is known to modulate several biological activities. However, the mechanism underlying HMF-induced apoptotic cell death in human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro is still unknown. Herein, HMF was shown to be capable of inducing cytotoxicity in HCT-116 cells and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of HCT-116 cells with HMF caused DNA damage and triggered mitochondrial membrane perturbation accompanied by Cyt c release, down-regulation of Bcl-2, activation of BID and Bax, and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. These results show that ROS generation by HMF was the crucial mediator behind ER stress induction, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ release, JNK phosphorylation, and activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, time course study also reveals that HMF treatment leads to increase in mitochondrial and cytosolic ROS generation and decrease in antioxidant enzymes expression. Temporal upregulation of IRE1-α expression and JNK phosphorylation was noticed after HMF treatment. These results were further confirmed by pre-treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), which completely reversed the effects of HMF treatment by preventing lipid peroxidation, followed by abolishment of JNK phosphorylation and attenuation of apoptogenic marker proteins. These results emphasize that ROS generation by HMF treatment regulates the mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway in HCT-116 cells, demonstrating HMF as a promising pro-oxidant therapeutic candidate for targeting colorectal cancer. PMID:27116119

  4. 5-Hydroxy-7-Methoxyflavone Triggers Mitochondrial-Associated Cell Death via Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Monika; Kim, Na-Hyung; Paul, Souren; Jakhar, Rekha; Han, Jaehong; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plant-derived compounds are an important source of clinically useful anti-cancer agents. Chrysin, a biologically active flavone found in many plants, has limited usage for cancer chemotherapeutics due to its poor oral bioavailability. 5-Hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone (HMF), an active natural chrysin derivative found in various plant sources, is known to modulate several biological activities. However, the mechanism underlying HMF-induced apoptotic cell death in human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro is still unknown. Herein, HMF was shown to be capable of inducing cytotoxicity in HCT-116 cells and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of HCT-116 cells with HMF caused DNA damage and triggered mitochondrial membrane perturbation accompanied by Cyt c release, down-regulation of Bcl-2, activation of BID and Bax, and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. These results show that ROS generation by HMF was the crucial mediator behind ER stress induction, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ release, JNK phosphorylation, and activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, time course study also reveals that HMF treatment leads to increase in mitochondrial and cytosolic ROS generation and decrease in antioxidant enzymes expression. Temporal upregulation of IRE1-α expression and JNK phosphorylation was noticed after HMF treatment. These results were further confirmed by pre-treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), which completely reversed the effects of HMF treatment by preventing lipid peroxidation, followed by abolishment of JNK phosphorylation and attenuation of apoptogenic marker proteins. These results emphasize that ROS generation by HMF treatment regulates the mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway in HCT-116 cells, demonstrating HMF as a promising pro-oxidant therapeutic candidate for targeting colorectal cancer. PMID:27116119

  5. Evaluation of antigen specific recognition and cell mediated cytotoxicity by a modified lysispot assay in a rat colon carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes represent potent effector cells of the adaptive immune response against viruses as well as tumours. Therefore assays capable at exploring the generation and function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes represent an important objective for both clinical and experimental settings. Methods Here we show a simple and reproducible assay for the evaluation of antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes based on a LysiSpot technique for the simultaneous determination of antigen-specific IFN-γ production and assessment of tumor cytolysis. The assay was developed within an experimental model of colorectal carcinoma, induced by the colorectal tumor cell line DHD-K12 that induces tumors in BDIX rats and, in turn, elicits a tumor- specific immune response. Results Using DHD-K12 cells transfected to express Escherichia coli β-galactosidase as target cells, and by the fine setting of spot colours detection, we have developed an in vitro assay that allows the recognition of cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced in BDIX rats as well as the assessment of anti-tumour cytotoxicity. The method highlighted that in the present experimental model the tumour antigen-specific immune response was bound to killing target cells in the proportion of 55%, while 45% of activated cells were not cytotoxic but released IFN-γ. Moreover in this model by an ELISPOT assay we demonstrated the specific recognition of a nonapeptide epitope called CSH-275 constitutionally express in DHD-K12 cells. Conclusions The assay proved to be highly sensitive and specific, detecting even low frequencies of cytotoxic/activated cells and providing the evaluation of cytokine-expressing T cells as well as the extent of cytotoxicity against the target cells as independent functions. This assay may represent an important tool to be adopted in experimental settings including the development of vaccines or immune therapeutic strategies PMID:22296726

  6. Upregulation of colonic and hepatic tumor overexpressed gene is significantly associated with the unfavorable prognosis marker of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun-Xiong; Chen, Qian; Yu, Ya-Qun; Li, Shu-Qun; Song, Jian-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Colonic hepatic tumor overexpressed gene (ch-TOG), a member of the highly conserved XMAP215 family of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), plays a crucial role in bipolar mitotic spindle assembly. Here, we performed proof-of-principle studies targeting ch-TOG for the development of HCC and further compared its prognostic significance with the clinicopathologic features of HCC. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the expression level of ch-TOG mRNA in 207 cases of paired HCC and adjacent noncancerous liver tissues (ANLT). Additionally, immunohistochemistry was employed to identify ch-TOG protein in 71 HCC tissues. All HCC patients were divided into two groups according to the expression level of ch-TOG. Cumulative progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic value of ch-TOG was further evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Our studies suggested that ch-TOG is overexpressed in HCC tissues compared with ANLT. The ch-TOG level was correlated with other prognostic factors, including the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (p = 0.030), median size (p = 0.008), clinical tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (p = 0.002), and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level (p = 0.030). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that increased ch-TOG was associated with reduced PFS (p = 0.002) and OS (p = 0.004). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified ch-TOG as an independent prognostic factor for the PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.479, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.028-2.127, p = 0.035) and OS (HR = 1.609, 95% CI = 1.114-2.325, p = 0.011) of the HCC patients. Increased ch-TOG represents a powerful marker for predicting poorer prognosis in the clinical management of HCC, and may serve as a potential molecular target for HCC therapies in the future. PMID:27152245

  7. Upregulation of colonic and hepatic tumor overexpressed gene is significantly associated with the unfavorable prognosis marker of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun-Xiong; Chen, Qian; Yu, Ya-Qun; Li, Shu-Qun; Song, Jian-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Colonic hepatic tumor overexpressed gene (ch-TOG), a member of the highly conserved XMAP215 family of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), plays a crucial role in bipolar mitotic spindle assembly. Here, we performed proof-of-principle studies targeting ch-TOG for the development of HCC and further compared its prognostic significance with the clinicopathologic features of HCC. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the expression level of ch-TOG mRNA in 207 cases of paired HCC and adjacent noncancerous liver tissues (ANLT). Additionally, immunohistochemistry was employed to identify ch-TOG protein in 71 HCC tissues. All HCC patients were divided into two groups according to the expression level of ch-TOG. Cumulative progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic value of ch-TOG was further evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Our studies suggested that ch-TOG is overexpressed in HCC tissues compared with ANLT. The ch-TOG level was correlated with other prognostic factors, including the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (p = 0.030), median size (p = 0.008), clinical tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (p = 0.002), and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level (p = 0.030). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that increased ch-TOG was associated with reduced PFS (p = 0.002) and OS (p = 0.004). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified ch-TOG as an independent prognostic factor for the PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.479, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.028-2.127, p = 0.035) and OS (HR = 1.609, 95% CI = 1.114-2.325, p = 0.011) of the HCC patients. Increased ch-TOG represents a powerful marker for predicting poorer prognosis in the clinical management of HCC, and may serve as a potential molecular target for HCC therapies in the future. PMID:27152245

  8. Treatment with cyclophosphamide supported by various dendritic cell-based vaccines induces diversification in CD4⁺ T cell response against MC38 colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wojas-Turek, Justyna; Szczygieł, Agnieszka; Kicielińska, Jagoda; Rossowska, Joanna; Piasecki, Egbert; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elżbieta

    2016-02-01

    The present study shows that an application of cyclophosphamide (CY) supported by dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines affected differentiation of the activity of CD4+ T cell subpopulations accompanied by an alteration in CD8+ cell number. Vaccines were composed of bone marrow-derived DCs activated with tumor cell lysate (BM-DC/TAgTNF-α) and/or genetically modified DCs of JAWS II line (JAWS II/Neo or JAWS II/IL-2 cells). Compared to untreated or CY-treated mice, the combined treatment of MC38 colon carcinoma-bearing mice resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition associated with an increase in influx of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into tumor tissue. Whereas, the division of these cell population in spleen was not observed. Depending on the nature of DC-based vaccines and number of their applications, both tumor infiltrating cells and spleen cells were able to produce various amount of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 after mitogenic ex vivo stimulation. The administration of CY followed by BM-DC/TAgTNF-α and genetically modified JAWS II cells, increased the percentage of CD4+T-bet+ and CD4+GATA3+ cells and decreased the percentage of CD4+RORγt+ and CD4+FoxP3+ lymphocytes. However, the most intensive response against tumor was noted after the ternary treatment with CY + BM-DC/TAgTNF-α + JAWS II/IL-2 cells. Thus, the administration of various DC-based vaccines was responsible for generation of the diversified antitumor response. These findings demonstrate that the determination of the size of particular CD4+ T cell subpopulations may become a prognostic factor and be the basis for future development of anticancer therapy. PMID:26648160

  9. Treatment with cyclophosphamide supported by various dendritic cell-based vaccines induces diversification in CD4+ T cell response against MC38 colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WOJAS-TUREK, JUSTYNA; SZCZYGIEŁ, AGNIESZKA; KICIELIŃSKA, JAGODA; ROSSOWSKA, JOANNA; PIASECKI, EGBERT; PAJTASZ-PIASECKA, ELŻBIETA

    2016-01-01

    The present study shows that an application of cyclophosphamide (CY) supported by dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines affected differentiation of the activity of CD4+ T cell subpopulations accompanied by an alteration in CD8+ cell number. Vaccines were composed of bone marrow-derived DCs activated with tumor cell lysate (BM-DC/TAgTNF-α) and/or genetically modified DCs of JAWS II line (JAWS II/ Neo or JAWS II/IL-2 cells). Compared to untreated or CY-treated mice, the combined treatment of MC38 colon carcinoma-bearing mice resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition associated with an increase in influx of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into tumor tissue. Whereas, the division of these cell population in spleen was not observed. Depending on the nature of DC-based vaccines and number of their applications, both tumor infiltrating cells and spleen cells were able to produce various amount of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 after mitogenic ex vivo stimulation. The administration of CY followed by BM-DC/TAgTNF-α and genetically modified JAWS II cells, increased the percentage of CD4+T-bet+ and CD4+GATA3+ cells and decreased the percentage of CD4+RORγt+ and CD4+FoxP3+ lymphocytes. However, the most intensive response against tumor was noted after the ternary treatment with CY + BM-DC/TAgTNF-α + JAWS II/IL-2 cells. Thus, the administration of various DC-based vaccines was responsible for generation of the diversified antitumor response. These findings demonstrate that the determination of the size of particular CD4+ T cell subpopulations may become a prognostic factor and be the basis for future development of anticancer therapy. PMID:26648160

  10. Cytotoxicity of PEGylated liposomes co-loaded with novel pro-apoptotic drug NCL-240 and the MEK inhibitor cobimetinib against colon carcinoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sriraman, Shravan Kumar; Geraldo, Vananelia; Luther, Ed; Degterev, Alexei; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2015-12-28

    The overactivation of signaling pathways, such as the PI3K and MAPK, which are crucial to cell growth and survival, is a common feature in many cancer types. Though a number of advances have been made in the development of molecular agents targeting these pathways, their application as monotherapies has not significantly improved clinical outcome. A novel liposomal preparation was developed, co-loaded with NCL-240, a small-molecule inhibitor of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, along with cobimetinib, a MEK/ERK pathway inhibitor. This combination drug-loaded nanocarrier, (N+C)-LP, was able to significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of these drugs against colon carcinoma cells in vitro demonstrating a clear synergistic effect (combination index of 0.79). The (N+C)-LP was also able to induce cell cycle arrest of the cells, specifically in the G1 phase thereby preventing their progression to the S-phase, typical of the action of MEK inhibitors. Analyzing the apoptotic events, it was found that this effect on cell cycle regulation is followed by the induction of apoptosis. The quantified distribution of apoptotic events showed that the (N+C)-LP induced apoptosis significantly by over 3-4 fold (P<0.001) compared to other treatment groups. The co-loaded liposomal preparation was also targeted to the transferrin receptor of cancer cells by modifying the surface of the liposome with transferrin. FACS analysis showed that transferrin-mediated targeting enhanced the association of liposomes to HCT 116 cells by almost 5-fold. This could potentially allow for cancer cell-specific effects in vivo thereby minimizing any non-specific interactions of the liposomes with non-cancerous cells. Taken together, this study clearly shows that the combined inhibition of the PI3K and MEK pathways correlates with a significant anti-proliferative effect, due to cell-cycle regulation leading to the induction of apoptosis. PMID:26497930

  11. Transforming growth factor beta 1 increases the stability of p21/WAF1/CIP1 protein and inhibits CDK2 kinase activity in human colon carcinoma FET cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, JianGen; Ammanamanchi, Sudhakar; Ko, Tien C; Brattain, Michael G

    2003-06-15

    We examined transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) effects on cell cycle progression of human colon carcinoma FET cells. TGF-beta 1 inhibited DNA synthesis and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity after release from growth arrest in association with induction of the p21 CDK inhibitor, whereas cyclins, CDKs, and p27 protein levels remained relatively unchanged. The decrease in CDK2 kinase activity was the result of increased p21 association with cyclin A-CDK2 and cyclin E-CDK2. TGF-beta 1 treatment in late G(1) showed reduced induction of p21 protein levels in association with increased DNA synthesis. Consequently, p21 induction in early G(1) is critical for TGF-beta 1 inhibition of CDK2 kinase activity. Although TGF-beta 1 treatments in late G(1) failed to induce p21 protein, p21 mRNA induction was observed in late G(1) and in S phase. Further analysis showed that TGF-beta 1 treatment in early G(1) increases p21 protein stability throughout the G(1) and S phases of the cell cycle. Our results demonstrate that TGF-beta 1 stimulation of p21 is regulated at the posttranscriptional and transcriptional levels. This is a novel mechanism of TGF-beta 1 inhibition requiring early G(1) induction and stabilization of p21 protein, which binds to and inhibits cyclin E-CDK2 and cyclin A-CDK2 kinase activity rather than direct modulation of cyclin or CDK protein levels as seen in other systems. PMID:12810668

  12. Evaluation of antioxidant activity and antiproliferative effect of fruit juices enriched with Pycnogenol® in colon carcinoma cells. The effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Frontela-Saseta, Carmen; López-Nicolás, Rubén; González-Bermúdez, Carlos A; Peso-Echarri, Patricia; Ros-Berruezo, Gaspar; Martínez-Graciá, Carmen; Canali, Raffaella; Virgili, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion on the antioxidant and antiproliferative effect of fruit juices enriched with Pycnogenol® (0.5 g/L) on a colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2). The total phenolic concentration (TPC), antioxidant activity and inhibition cell growth were studied in fresh and digested pineapple juice and red fruits juice (both enriched with pine bark extract and not). After in vitro digestion the level of detectable phenolic compounds (expressed as gallic acid equivalent) was higher in both pineapple and red fruits juices enriched with Pycnogenol® than in non-enriched commercial juices (155.6 mg/100 mL vs 94.6 mg/100 mL and 478.5 mg/100 mL vs 406.9 mg/100 mL, respectively). Increased antioxidant activity (measured by 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC) methods) was observed in digested enriched juices with respect to the same samples before digestion. Pycnogenol® enrichment led to a high antiproliferative effect between 24 and 72 h of incubation with undigested pineapple juice compared with the non-enriched juice. It can be concluded that enrichment of fruit juices with Pycnogenol® provides a source of phenolic compounds with high stability to in vitro gastrointestinal conditions; however, the antioxidant properties of fruit juices were affected to a different extent. PMID:21887808

  13. Germline mutations in PMS2 and MLH1 in individuals with solitary loss of PMS2 expression in colorectal carcinomas from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rosty, Christophe; Clendenning, Mark; Walsh, Michael D; Eriksen, Stine V; Southey, Melissa C; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Boussioutas, Alex; Parry, Susan; Arnold, Julie; Young, Joanne P; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; DeRycke, Melissa; Lindor, Noralane M; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair proteins is used to screen for Lynch syndrome in individuals with colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although solitary loss of PMS2 expression is indicative of carrying a germline mutation in PMS2, previous studies reported MLH1 mutation in some cases. We determined the prevalence of MLH1 germline mutations in a large cohort of individuals with a CRC demonstrating solitary loss of PMS2 expression. Design This cohort study included 88 individuals affected with a PMS2-deficient CRC from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort. Germline PMS2 mutation analysis (long-range PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) was followed by MLH1 mutation testing (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification). Results Of the 66 individuals with complete mutation screening, we identified a pathogenic PMS2 mutation in 49 (74%), a pathogenic MLH1 mutation in 8 (12%) and a MLH1 variant of uncertain clinical significance predicted to be damaging by in silico analysis in 3 (4%); 6 (9%) carried variants likely to have no clinical significance. Missense point mutations accounted for most alterations (83%; 9/11) in MLH1. The MLH1 c.113A> G p.Asn38Ser mutation was found in 2 related individuals. One individual who carried the MLH1 intronic mutation c.677+3A>G p.Gln197Argfs*8 leading to the skipping of exon 8, developed 2 tumours, both of which retained MLH1 expression. Conclusions A substantial proportion of CRCs with solitary loss of PMS2 expression are associated with a deleterious MLH1 germline mutation supporting the screening for MLH1 in individuals with tumours of this immunophenotype, when no PMS2 mutation has been identified. PMID:26895986

  14. Death receptor-3, a new E-Selectin counter-receptor that confers migration and survival advantages to colon carcinoma cells by triggering p38 and ERK MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Gout, Stéphanie; Morin, Chantale; Houle, François; Huot, Jacques

    2006-09-15

    E-selectin-mediated adhesion of colon cancer cells to endothelial cells is a key event in metastasis. However, the signaling mechanisms that confer metastatic advantages to cancer cells adhering to E-selectin are ill defined. By using affinity column chromatography and pull-down assays on purified membrane extracts of HT29 and LoVo cells coupled to mass spectrometry analysis, we obtained the first evidence indicating that E-selectin binds to death receptor-3 (DR3) expressed by the cancer cells. Thereafter, we accumulated several results, suggesting that DR3 is an E-selectin receptor on colon cancer cells and that its activation by E-selectin triggers the activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and confers migration and survival advantages. First, by Western blotting, we found that the E-selectin-binding protein, identified as DR3, is recognized by two anti-DR3 antibodies. Second, the neutralization of DR3 with an antibody and its knockdown by small interfering RNA decrease the adhesion of colon cancer cells to E-selectin and E-selectin-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Third, inhibiting DR3 and knocking down its expression impair transendothelial migration of HT29 cells and block the activation of p38 and ERK by E-selectin. Fourth, high molecular weight isoforms of DR3 are expressed in samples of primary human colon carcinoma but not in samples from normal colon tissue. Intriguingly, DR3 is a death receptor but its activation by E-selectin does not induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells, except when ERK is inhibited. Our findings identify novel signaling and functional roles of DR3 activated in response to E-selectin and highlight the potential link between DR3 and metastasis. PMID:16982754

  15. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  16. A global search for the lowest energy isomer of C26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Jie; Gan, Li-Hua; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Li, Rui

    2010-04-01

    The complete set of 2333 isomers of C26 fullerene composed of square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and heptagonal faces together with some noncage structures is investigated at the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) levels. For the singlet states, a nonclassical isomer C26-10-01 with a square embedded is predicted by the DFT method as the lowest energy isomer, followed by the sole classical isomer C26-00-01. Further explorations reveal that the electronic ground state of C26-10-01 is triplet state in Cs symmetry, while that of C26-00-01 corresponds to its quintet in D3h symmetry. Both the total energies and nucleus independent chemical shift values at DFT level favor the classical isomer. It is found that both C26-00-01 and C26-10-01 possess high vertical electron affinity. The addition of electron(s) to C26-10-01 increases its aromatic character and encapsulation of Li atom into this cage is highly exothermic, indicating that it may be captured in the form of derivatives. To clarify the relative stabilities at elevated temperatures, the entropy contributions are taken into account based on the Gibbs free energy at the B3LYP/6-311+G∗ level. C26-10-01 behaves thermodynamically more stable than the classical isomer over a wide range of temperatures related to fullerene formation. The IR spectra of these two lowest energy isomers are simulated to facilitate their experimental identification.

  17. [Etiopathogenesis of colorectal carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Reichlin, B

    1980-09-20

    There are a small group of colonic carcinomas of known etiology and large group of unknown etiology. In the latter group epidemiology, metabolic epidemiology, and animal experiments suggest a correlation between the fat content of the diet and the incidence of colonic carcinoma. Burkitt's postulate of a protective value of high fibre intake receives backing from 3 epidemiological studies from Israel, Scandinavia, and San Francisco. PMID:6252605

  18. Cell cycle modulation by a multitargeted antifolate, LY231514, increases the cytotoxicity and antitumor activity of gemcitabine in HT29 colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tonkinson, J L; Worzalla, J F; Teng, C H; Mendelsohn, L G

    1999-08-01

    The proliferation rate of HT29 colon carcinoma cells was decreased by the multitargeted antifolate (MTA), LY231514. This effect correlated with a buildup of cells near the G1-S interface after 24 h of incubation, and a synchronized progression of the population through S phase during the next 24 h. MTA treatment (0.03-3 microM) was minimally cytotoxic (20-30%) to HT29 cells after a 24-h exposure, and no dose response was observed. In contrast, the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine (GEM) was cytotoxic (IC50, 0.071 +/- 0.011 microM; IC90, 0.648 +/- 0.229 microM) after a 24-h exposure. We hypothesized that pretreatment of these cells with MTA would increase the potency of GEM by synchronizing the population for DNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of GEM increased 2-7-fold when MTA was administered 24 h before GEM (IC50, 0.032 +/- 0.009 microM; IC90, 0.094 +/- 0.019 microM). In addition, an increase in cell kill for the combination compared with GEM alone (IC99, 12 microM for GEM alone; IC99, 0.331 microM for combination) was observed. No increase in potency or cell kill was observed when the two compounds were added simultaneously. MTA pretreatment also potentiated the cytotoxicity of a 1-h exposure to GEM. These cell-based observations were extended to evaluate the schedule-dependent interaction of these two agents in vivo using a nude mouse HT29 xenograft tumor model. At the doses tested, MTA alone (100 mg/kg) had a marginal effect on tumor growth delay, whereas GEM (80 mg/kg) produced a statistically significant tumor growth delay. In combination, the increase in tumor growth delay was greatest when MTA was administered before GEM, compared with simultaneous drug administration or the reverse sequence, e.g., GEM followed by MTA. The effect of sequential administration of MTA followed by GEM was greater than additive, indicating synergistic interaction of these agents. Thus, in vitro, MTA induced cell cycle effects on HT29 cells that resulted in potentiation of the

  19. Calcium and calcium sensing receptor modulates the expression of thymidylate synthase, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and survivin in human colon carcinoma cells: promotion of cytotoxic response to mitomycin C and fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangming; Hu, Xin; Varani, James; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ and the cell-surface calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) constitute a novel and robust ligand/receptor system in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of colonic epithelial cells. Here we show that activation of CaSR by extracellular Ca2+ (or CaSR agonists) enhanced the sensitivity of human colon carcinoma cells to mitomycin C (MMC) and fluorouracil (5-FU). Activation of CaSR up-regulated the expression of MMC activating enzyme, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and down-regulated the expression of 5-FU target, thymidylate synthase (TS) and the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. Cells that were resistant to drugs expressed little or no CaSR but abundant amount of survivin. Disruption of CaSR expression by shRNA targeting the CaSR abrogated these modulating effects of CaSR activation on the expression of NQO1, TS, survivin and cytotoxic response to drugs. It is concluded that activation of CaSR can enhance colon cancer cell sensitivity to MMC and 5-FU and can modulate the expression of molecules involved in the cellular responses to these cytotoxic drugs. PMID:18618519

  20. Monitoring Early Response to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy: Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Volume Measurements in Colon Carcinoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Moritz Jörg; Cyran, Clemens Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Hirner, Heidrun; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Dietrich, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the use of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) and volume measurements for early monitoring of antiangiogenic therapy in an experimental tumor model. Materials and Methods 23 athymic nude rats, bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts (HT-29) were examined before and after 6 days of treatment with regorafenib (n = 12) or placebo (n = 11) in a clinical 3-Tesla MRI. For DW-MRI, a single-shot EPI sequence with 9 b-values (10–800 s/mm2) was used. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated voxelwise and its median value over a region of interest, covering the entire tumor, was defined as the tumor ADC. Tumor volume was determined using T2-weighted images. ADC and volume changes between first and second measurement were evaluated as classifiers by a receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) analysis individually and combined using Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA). Results All ADCs and volumes are stated as median±standard deviation. Tumor ADC increased significantly in the therapy group (0.76±0.09×10−3 mm2/s to 0.90±0.12×10−3 mm2/s; p<0.001), with significantly higher changes of tumor ADC than in the control group (0.10±0.11×10−3 mm2/s vs. 0.03±0.09×10−3 mm2/s; p = 0.027). Tumor volume increased significantly in both groups (therapy: 347.8±449.1 to 405.3±823.6 mm3; p = 0.034; control: 219.7±79.5 to 443.7±141.5 mm3; p<0.001), however, the therapy group showed significantly reduced tumor growth (33.30±47.30% vs. 96.43±31.66%; p<0.001). Area under the curve and accuracy of the ADC-based ROC analysis were 0.773 and 78.3%; and for the volume change 0.886 and 82.6%. The FLDA approach yielded an AUC of 0.985 and an accuracy of 95.7%. Conclusions Regorafenib therapy significantly increased tumor ADC after 6 days of treatment and also significantly reduced tumor growth. However, ROC analyses using each parameter individually revealed a lack of accuracy in discriminating between therapy and control

  1. Synergy of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase inhibitor AG1478 and ErbB2 kinase inhibitor AG879 in human colon carcinoma cells is associated with induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunfei; Brattain, Michael G

    2005-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that constitutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB2 by elevated autocrine transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) expression plays an important role in colon cancer progression. Coexpression of EGFR and ErbB2 is found in a subset of colon cancers and may cooperatively promote cancer cell growth and survival, as heterodimerization is known to provide for diversification of signal transduction. In this study, the EGFR-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AG1478 inhibited cell growth of an aggressive human colon carcinoma cell line, FET6alphaS26X, which harbors constitutively activated EGFR after stable transfection with TGF-alpha cDNA. However, AG1478 failed to induce apoptosis in FET6alphaS26X cells at concentrations sufficient for cell growth inhibition and complete suppression of EGFR phosphorylation. Similarly, AG879, a selective ErbB2 TKI, was incapable of inducing apoptosis in FET6alphaS26X cells at concentrations sufficient to inhibit cell growth and ErbB2 phosphorylation. To test the hypothesis that targeting both ErbB family members would show better efficacy than targeting the single receptors, combinations of inhibitors at fixed ratios of 1:1, 5:1, and 10:1 of AG1478 and AG879, respectively, were compared with single drugs for inhibition of cell growth. All combinations resulted in synergistic effects as indicated by combination index analysis. Synergistic inhibition was associated with induction of apoptosis as reflected by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, caspase-3 activation, and Annexin V staining. Finally, Western blot analysis showed significant inhibition of phosphorylation of both EGFR and ErbB2 by the combination treatment. These data suggest that the strategy to target both EGFR and ErbB2 simultaneously might result in more efficient inhibition of tumor growth than to target single receptor alone. PMID:15994962

  2. Monoterpene indole alkaloid hydrazone derivatives with apoptosis inducing activity in human HCT116 colon and HepG2 liver carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Paterna, Angela; Borralho, Pedro M; Gomes, Sofia E; Mulhovo, Silva; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2015-09-01

    The derivatization of dregamine (1) and tabernaemontanine (2), two epimeric monoterpene indole alkaloids isolated from the methanol extract of the roots of Tabernaemontana elegans, with several hydrazines and hydroxylamine gave rise to ten new derivatives (3-12). Their structures were assigned by spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR experiments. The compounds were tested for their ability to induce apoptosis in HCT116 colon and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Firstly, the cytotoxicity of all compounds (1-12) was evaluated in both cell lines by the MTS assay. The most active compounds (6, 9, 10) along with 1 and 2 were further investigated for their apoptosis induction capability by Guava ViaCount flow cytometry assays, nuclear morphology evaluation by Hoechst staining, and caspase-3/7 activity assays. Compounds 9 and 10 showed promising apoptosis induction profile, displaying higher activities than 5-fluorouracil, the mainstay in colon cancer treatment. PMID:26169128

  3. Establishment and characterization of HROC69 – a Crohn´s related colonic carcinoma cell line and its matched patient-derived xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Florian; Mullins, Christina S.; Krohn, Mathias; Harnack, Christine; Ramer, Robert; Krämer, Oliver H.; Klar, Ernst; Huehns, Maja; Linnebacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) seems to be a rather unique entity and differs in its genetic alterations, tumour formation capacities, and clinical features from sporadic colorectal carcinoma. Most descriptions about tumour biology of CAC refer to ulcerative colitis; data about Crohn´s colitis related carcinomas are scarce. The majority of patients with Crohn´s disease are under immunosuppression which generates a different environment for tumour growth. We first describe the clinical case of a fast growing CAC in a long-term immunosuppressed patient with Crohn´s disease and successful establishment and characterization of carcinoma cell lines along with their corresponding patient-derived xenograft. Subsequently, these tumor models were molecularly and functionally analysed. Beside numerous chromosomal alterations, mutations in TP53, APC, PTEN and SMAD3 were identified. The cell lines express numerous cancer testis antigens, surface molecules involved in immune evasion but low levels of HLA class I molecules. They show strong invasive but in comparison weak migratory activity. The present work is the first description of patient-derived in vitro and in vivo models for CAC from a Crohn´s disease patient. They might be valuable tools for analysis of genetic and epigenetic alterations, biomarker identification, functional testing, including response prediction, and the development of specific therapeutical strategies. PMID:27087592

  4. Nqrs Data for C26H35Br2CuP2 (Subst. No. 1603)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C26H35Br2CuP2 (Subst. No. 1603)

  5. Nqrs Data for C26H38N2O3 (Subst. No. 1607)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C26H38N2O3 (Subst. No. 1607)

  6. Isolation and structural proof of the large diamond molecule, cyclohexamantane (C26H30)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahl, J.E.P.; Moldowan, J.M.; Peakman, T.M.; Clardy, J.C.; Lobkovsky, E.; Olmstead, M.M.; May, P.W.; Davis, T.J.; Steeds, J.W.; Peters, K.E.; Pepper, A.; Ekuan, A.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    2003-01-01

    Ace of diamonds: Cyclohexamantane (C26H30), a large diamond-like molecule containing six peri-fused adamantane cages was identified in petroleum and its structure proven by X-ray crystallography (see picture), Never synthesized because of severe mechanistic difficulties, the structure of cyclohexamantane has appeared in theoretical molecular-simulation studies related to diamond; its experimentally determined properties are now discussed.

  7. Nqrs Data for C26H35Cl2CuNP (Subst. No. 1604)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C26H35Cl2CuNP (Subst. No. 1604)

  8. C-26A well sets new standard for ER horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, S.; Hovda, S.; Olsen, T.L.

    1995-11-01

    Well 30/6-C-26A in the Norwegian North Sea has a horizontal reach of 25,758 ft, which was briefly a new world record in extended reach drilling. The last 6,888 ft was drilled horizontally in the reservoir 20--26 ft vertically above the oil-water contact. The Oseberg field was discovered in 1979. To develop this giant (16.8 x 3.1 mile, 27 x 5 km) field, two platforms were placed 9.3 miles apart. To drain the oil between the platforms, two subsea wells were drilled and completed. The first horizontal well in the Oseberg field was drilled in 1992. Since then 17 horizontal wells have been successfully drilled and completed. The general trend during this period is that both the length of the horizontal reservoir section and the total depth for the wells have increased. New equipment and technology, as well as general field experience, played an important role when deciding to drill well C-26A. The paper describes well C-26A objectives, well bore stability, well path considerations, the casing program, hydraulics and hole cleaning and well completion.

  9. Genes with Relevance for Early to Late Progression of Colon Carcinoma Based on Combined Genomic and Transcriptomic Information from the Same Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lagerstedt, Kristina K.; Kristiansson, Erik; Lönnroth, Christina; Andersson, Marianne; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Gustafsson, Annika; Hansson, Elisabeth; Kressner, Ulf; Nordgren, Svante; Enlund, Fredrik; Lundholm, Kent

    2010-01-01

    Background: Genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer are numerous. However, it is difficult to judge whether such changes are primary or secondary to the appearance and progression of tumors. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to identify altered DNA regions with significant covariation to transcription alterations along colon cancer progression. Methods: Tumor and normal colon tissue were obtained at primary operations from 24 patients selected by chance. DNA, RNA and microRNAs were extracted from the same biopsy material in all individuals and analyzed by oligo-nucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), mRNA- and microRNA oligo-arrays. Statistical analyses were performed to assess statistical interactions (correlations, co-variations) between DNA copy number changes and significant alterations in gene and microRNA expression using appropriate parametric and non-parametric statistics. Results: Main DNA alterations were located on chromosome 7, 8, 13 and 20. Tumor DNA copy number gain increased with tumor progression, significantly related to increased gene expression. Copy number loss was not observed in Dukes A tumors. There was no significant relationship between expressed genes and tumor progression across Dukes A–D tumors; and no relationship between tumor stage and the number of microRNAs with significantly altered expression. Interaction analyses identified overall 41 genes, which discriminated early Dukes A plus B tumors from late Dukes C plus D tumor; 28 of these genes remained with correlations between genomic and transcriptomic alterations in Dukes C plus D tumors and 17 in Dukes D. One microRNA (microR-663) showed interactions with DNA alterations in all Dukes A-D tumors. Conclusions: Our modeling confirms that colon cancer progression is related to genomic instability and altered gene expression. However, early invasive tumor growth seemed rather related to transcriptomic alterations, where changes in

  10. Intratumoral administration of anti-KITENIN shRNA-loaded PEI-alt-PEG nanoparticles suppressed colon carcinoma established subcutaneously in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Kyu; Kim, Kyung Keun; Cho, Sang-Hee; Bae, Woo-Kyun; Jere, Dhananjay; Cho, Chong-Su; Chung, Ik-Joo

    2010-05-01

    Biodegradable gene carrier, termed as PEI-alt-PEG, has been synthesized based on Michael addition reaction between lower Mw PEI and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diacrylate and tested its potential of anti-metastatic cancer gene therapy by using anti-KITENIN short hairpin RNA. KITENIN is known to promote invasion of mouse colon adenocarcinoma in vivo. Intratumoral administration of anti-KITENIN shRNA-loaded PEI-alt-PEG nanoparticles has shown suppressed proliferlation and enhanced apoptosis signal in tumor compared to commercial available liposome, leading to delayed tumor growth. PMID:20358939

  11. Palmitoylethanolamide Exerts Antiproliferative Effect and Downregulates VEGF Signaling in Caco-2 Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line Through a Selective PPAR-α-Dependent Inhibition of Akt/mTOR Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sarnelli, Giovanni; Gigli, Stefano; Capoccia, Elena; Iuvone, Teresa; Cirillo, Carla; Seguella, Luisa; Nobile, Nicola; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Pesce, Marcella; Steardo, Luca; Cuomo, Rosario; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a nutraceutical compound that has been demonstrated to improve intestinal inflammation. We aimed at evaluating its antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cell line. Caco-2 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of PEA (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 μM) in the presence of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-a (PPAR-α) or PPAR-γ antagonists. Cell proliferation was evaluated by performing a MTT assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release was estimated by ELISA, while the expression of VEGF receptor and the activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were evaluated by western blot analysis. PEA caused a significant and concentration-dependent decrease of Caco-2 cell proliferation at 48 h. PEA administration significantly reduced in a concentration-dependent manner VEGF secretion and VEGF receptor expression. Inhibition of Akt phosphorylation and a downstream decrease of phospho-mTOR and of p-p70S6K were observed as compared with untreated cells. PPAR-α, but not PPAR-γ antagonist, reverted all effects of PEA. PEA is able to decrease cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The antiangiogenic effect of PEA depends on the specific inhibition of the AkT/mTOR axis, through the activation of PPAR-α pathway. If supported by in vivo models, our data pave the way to PEA co-administration to the current chemotherapeutic regimens for colon carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26929026

  12. Molecular staging of lymph node-negative colon carcinomas by one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) results in upstaging of a quarter of patients in a prospective, European, multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Croner, R S; Geppert, C-I; Bader, F G; Nitsche, U; Späth, C; Rosenberg, R; Zettl, A; Matias-Guiu, X; Tarragona, J; Güller, U; Stürzl, M; Zuber, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current histopathological staging procedures in colon carcinomas depend on midline division of the lymph nodes with one section of haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) staining only. By this method, tumour deposits outside this transection line may be missed and could lead to understaging of a high-risk group of stage UICC II cases, which recurs in ∼20% of cases. A new diagnostic semiautomated system, one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA), detects cytokeratin (CK) 19 mRNA in lymph node metastases and enables the investigation of the whole lymph node. The objective of this study was to assess whether histopathological pN0 patients can be upstaged to stage UICC III by OSNA. Methods: Lymph nodes from patients who were classified as lymph node negative after standard histopathology (single (H&E) slice) were subjected to OSNA. A result revealing a CK19 mRNA copy number >250, which makes sure to detect mainly macrometastases and not isolated tumour cells (ITC) or micrometastases only, was regarded as positive for lymph node metastases based on previous threshold investigations. Results: In total, 1594 pN0 lymph nodes from 103 colon carcinomas (median number of lymph nodes per patient: 14, range: 1–46) were analysed with OSNA. Out of 103 pN0 patients, 26 had OSNA-positive lymph nodes, resulting in an upstaging rate of 25.2%. Among these were 6/37 (16.2%) stage UICC I and 20/66 (30.3%) stage UICC II patients. Overall, 38 lymph nodes were OSNA positive: 19 patients had one, 3 had two, 3 had three, and 1 patient had four OSNA-positive lymph nodes. Conclusions: OSNA resulted in an upstaging of over 25% of initially histopathologically lymph node-negative patients. OSNA is a standardised, observer-independent technique, allowing the analysis of the whole lymph node. Therefore, sampling bias due to missing investigation of certain lymph node tissue can be avoided, which may lead to a more accurate staging. PMID:24722182

  13. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... red or processed meats Have colorectal polyps Have inflammatory bowel disease ( Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis ) Have a family history of colon cancer Have a personal history of breast cancer Some inherited diseases also increase the risk ...

  14. Inhibition of p70S6K1 Activation by Pdcd4 Overcomes the Resistance to an IGF-1R/IR Inhibitor in Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qing; Chen, Li; Yang, Hsin-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Agents targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) are being actively examined in clinical trials. Although there has been some initial success of single-agent targeting IGF-1R, attempts in later studies failed because of resistance. This study aimed to understand the effects of programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) on the chemosensitivity of the IGF-1R inhibitor OSI-906 in colorectal cancer cells and the mechanism underlying this impact. Using OSI-906-resistant and -sensitive colorectal cancer cells, we found that the Pdcd4 level directly correlates with cell chemosensitivity to OSI-906. In addition, tumors derived from Pdcd4 knockdown cells resist the growth inhibitory effect of OSI-906 in a colorectal cancer xenograft mouse model. Moreover, Pdcd4 enhances the antiproliferative effect of OSI-906 in resistant cells through suppression of p70S6K1 activation. Knockdown of p70S6K1, but not p70S6K2, significantly increases the chemosensitivity of OSI-906 in cultured colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination of OSI-906 and PF-4708671, a p70S6K1 inhibitor, efficiently suppresses the growth of OSI-906-resistant colon tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, activation of p70S6K1 that is inhibited by Pdcd4 is essential for resistance to the IGF-1R inhibitor in colon tumor cells, and the combinational treatment of OSI-906 and PF-4708671 results in enhanced antiproliferation effects in colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, providing a novel venue to overcome the resistance to the IGF-1R inhibitor in treating colorectal cancer. PMID:25573956

  15. Pharmacokinetic studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies to a rat colon carcinoma: I. Comparison of biodistribution in normal rats, syngeneic tumor-bearing rats, or tumor-bearing nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, J.; Douillard, J.Y.; Burg, C.; Lizzio, E.F.; Ridge, J.; Levenbook, I.; Hoffman, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of two iodine-131-({sup 131}I) labeled murine anti-rat colon carcinoma monoclonal antibodies (D3 and E4) were compared in normal Sprague Dawley rats, syngeneic BDIX rats, or nude mice bearing that tumor. Results of antibody uptake after i.v. administration were analyzed in terms of accumulation and localization indices for normal tissues and tumor. Statistically significant differences between rat and mouse tissue biodistribution were found. D3, which reacts in vitro with the tumor and several normal rat tissues, cleared quickly from the blood of rats and was specifically targeted to several normal tissues, notably the lung. Virtually no targeting to the tumor was observed. Nude mice, however, showed a slower blood clearance and specific antibody targeting only in the tumor. Similar results were seen after injection of another antibody, E4, which is tumor-specific in vitro. Data suggest that studies on the xenogeneic nude mouse model may not necessarily be relevant to the choice of monoclonal antibodies for clinical diagnostic imaging or therapy.

  16. Theoretical confirmation of the experimental Raman spectra of the lower-order diamondoid molecule: cyclohexamantane (C 26H 30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Steven L.; Baruah, Tunna; Mehl, Michael J.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2005-02-01

    The lower-order diamondoid hydrocarbon molecule, cyclohexamantane (C 26H 30), has been recently isolated from distilled Gulf Coast petroleum. While the structure of C 26H 30 has been confirmed through X-ray diffraction, mass spectroscopy, and 1H/ 13C NMR spectroscopy, its vibrational Raman spectra has only been identified through an indirect comparison with the experimental Raman spectra for adamantane and diamond. We used density-functional theory (DFT) to calculate a Raman spectra whose frequencies and relative intensities are in excellent agreement with the experimental Raman spectra for C 26H 30, thus providing direct vibrational proof of its existence.

  17. Theoretical Confirmation of the Experimental Raman Spectra of the Diamondoid Molecule: Cyclohexamantane (C26H30)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Steven L.; Baruah, Tunna

    2005-03-01

    Diamondoids (C4n+6H4n+12) are rigid, cage-like hydrocarbon molecules which are superimposable upon the diamond crystal structure. For n=1, we have the simplest diamondoid, adamantane C10H16. While most of the diamondoids for n<=3 have been synthesized in the lab, routes for preparing larger diamondoids for n>4 have not yet been realized. The diamondoid, cyclohexamantane (C26H30), has recently been isolated from distilled Gulf Coast petroleum.[1] While its structure has been confirmed through x-ray diffraction, mass spectroscopy, and ^1H/^13C NMR spectroscopy, its vibrational Raman spectra has only been identified through an indirect comparison with the experimental Raman spectra for adamantane and diamond. We have used density-functional theory (DFT) to calculate a Raman spectra which is in excellent agreement with the experimental Raman spectra for C26H30, thus providing direct vibrational proof of its existence.[2] ^1J. E. P. Dahl et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 42, 2040 (2003). ^2S. L. Richardson, T. Baruah, M. J. Mehl, and M. R. Pederson, accepted for publication in Chem. Phys. Lett.

  18. Large-field, external beam irradiation as a surgical adjuvant for node-positive colon carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Pilot Study (PA285).

    PubMed

    Merrick, H W; Turner, S S; Dobelbower, R R; Bennett, J M; Haller, D

    2000-08-01

    The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PA-285 study was designed as a pilot study to evaluate the effect of large-field, external beam abdominal irradiation as an adjuvant treatment for resectable stage C1 to C2 colon cancer. Eligible patients received 45 Gy directed to the tumor bed and periaortic lymph nodes, as well as 30 Gy to the liver. Patients were followed up for time to recurrence and for survival. Fourteen patients were enrolled. One elected not to have radiation after surgery; one died of acute hepatic radiation toxicity after a major deviation from protocol. Of the 12 remaining patients, seven survived longer than 10 years for a survival rate of 58%. Other than the fatal hepatic toxicity, side effects from radiation were moderate and of short duration. One patient failed to complete therapy because of ascites, had two episodes of partial bowel obstruction (successfully treated conservatively), and subsequently survived more than 10 years. Two of three patients with stage C1 tumors, four of eight with C2 tumors, and one with a C3 tumor were long-term survivors. This study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptable toxicity of this adjuvant regimen. The numbers are too limited to evaluate survival, but all seven survivors have lived more than 10 years. PMID:10955858

  19. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables. PMID:12506926

  20. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sethi, Gautam; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2016-01-01

    Flavokawain C (FKC) is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki), with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak) and death receptors (DR5), while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin), resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM) over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4), consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), and hypophosphorylation of Rb. PMID:26859847

  1. The Effects of miR-20a on p21: Two Mechanisms Blocking Growth Arrest in TGF-β-Responsive Colon Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Viktorija; Fiorino, Antonio; Zoni, Eugenio; Crippa, Elisabetta; Reid, James F; Gariboldi, Manuela; Pierotti, Marco A

    2015-12-01

    Loss of response to TGF-β is a central event in the genesis of colorectal cancer (CRC), a disease that, in the majority cases, is refractory to growth inhibition induced by this cytokine. However, inactivating mutations at receptors and transducers from the TGF-β cascade occur only in approximately half of CRCs, suggesting the involvement of additional mechanisms altering the response to the cytokine. We have recently described the amplification of the 13q31 locus, where the miR-17-92 cluster maps, associated with overexpression of its members. In this study, we address the potential role of miR-20a, from the miR-17-92 cluster, in the suppression of TGF-β cytostatic response in CRC. Using the poorly tumorigenic and TGF-β-sensitive FET cell line that expresses low miR-20a levels, we first confirmed that miR-20a downmodulated CDKN1A expression, both at mRNA and protein level, through direct binding to its 3'-UTR. We demonstrated that miR-20a significantly diminished cell response to TGF-β by preventing its delay of G1/S transition and promoting progression into cell cycle. Moreover, besides modulating CDKN1A, miR-20a blocked TGF-β-induced transactivation of its promoter without affecting the post-receptor activation of Smad3/4 effectors directly. Finally, miR-20a abrogated the TGF-β-mediated c-Myc repression, a direct inhibitor of the CDKN1A promoter activation, most likely by reducing the expression of specific MYC-regulating genes from the Smad/E2F-based core repressor complex. Our experiments indicate that miR-20a interferes with the colonic epithelium homeostasis by disrupting the regulation of Myc/p21 by TGF-β, which is essential for its malignant transformation. PMID:26012475

  2. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sethi, Gautam; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2016-01-01

    Flavokawain C (FKC) is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki), with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak) and death receptors (DR5), while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin), resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM) over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4), consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), and hypophosphorylation of Rb. PMID:26859847

  3. Molecular mode of action of NKP-1339 - a clinically investigated ruthenium-based drug - involves ER- and ROS-related effects in colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Flocke, Lea S; Trondl, Robert; Jakupec, Michael A; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-06-01

    Sodium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339) is a clinically investigated ruthenium-based metal complex, which shows promising results in solid tumors, such as non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal carcinoma, and most distinctively in gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors. In previous studies, fast binding to albumin as well as transferrin could be shown. The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, which is diversely being exploited for tumor targeting, could therefore be applicable for NKP-1339. Here we studied the serum dependence of its biological activity in various methods, influencing its cellular accumulation, cytotoxicity as well as the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS lead to Nrf2 activation, which is known to activate antioxidant response gene transcription. GRP78 down-regulation on the protein level suggests ER associated protein degradation (ERAD) as a mode of action, as RNA levels are only mildly affected. Another important part for the mode of action is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as different factors are highly upregulated on the protein level. For example PERK, a transmembrane receptor which is released by GRP78 when the ER is disturbed, is upregulated and phosphorylated. EIF2α is phosphorylated, which leads to an inhibition of CAP-dependent translation and other stress responses. The transcription factor CHOP (DDIT3), which promotes ER stress dependent apoptosis, is time and concentration dependently upregulated. Finally cytotoxicity tests could prove that inhibition of ER stress and ER stress-mediated apoptosis leads to decreased cytotoxic effects of NKP-1339, which highlights the involvement of this mechanism in the mode of action. PMID:26988975

  4. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli colonization of human colonic epithelium in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Steven B; Cook, Vivienne; Tighe, Richard; Schüller, Stephanie

    2015-03-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis and more severe complications, such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathology is most pronounced in the colon, but to date there is no direct clinical evidence showing EHEC binding to the colonic epithelium in patients. In this study, we investigated EHEC adherence to the human colon by using in vitro organ culture (IVOC) of colonic biopsy samples and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells. We show for the first time that EHEC colonizes human colonic biopsy samples by forming typical attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions which are dependent on EHEC type III secretion (T3S) and binding of the outer membrane protein intimin to the translocated intimin receptor (Tir). A/E lesion formation was dependent on oxygen levels and suppressed under oxygen-rich culture conditions routinely used for IVOC. In contrast, EHEC adherence to polarized T84 cells occurred independently of T3S and intimin and did not involve Tir translocation into the host cell membrane. Colonization of neither biopsy samples nor T84 cells was significantly affected by expression of Shiga toxins. Our study suggests that EHEC colonizes and forms stable A/E lesions on the human colon, which are likely to contribute to intestinal pathology during infection. Furthermore, care needs to be taken when using cell culture models, as they might not reflect the in vivo situation. PMID:25534942

  5. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Colonization of Human Colonic Epithelium In Vitro and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Steven B.; Cook, Vivienne; Tighe, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis and more severe complications, such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Pathology is most pronounced in the colon, but to date there is no direct clinical evidence showing EHEC binding to the colonic epithelium in patients. In this study, we investigated EHEC adherence to the human colon by using in vitro organ culture (IVOC) of colonic biopsy samples and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells. We show for the first time that EHEC colonizes human colonic biopsy samples by forming typical attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions which are dependent on EHEC type III secretion (T3S) and binding of the outer membrane protein intimin to the translocated intimin receptor (Tir). A/E lesion formation was dependent on oxygen levels and suppressed under oxygen-rich culture conditions routinely used for IVOC. In contrast, EHEC adherence to polarized T84 cells occurred independently of T3S and intimin and did not involve Tir translocation into the host cell membrane. Colonization of neither biopsy samples nor T84 cells was significantly affected by expression of Shiga toxins. Our study suggests that EHEC colonizes and forms stable A/E lesions on the human colon, which are likely to contribute to intestinal pathology during infection. Furthermore, care needs to be taken when using cell culture models, as they might not reflect the in vivo situation. PMID:25534942

  6. Long-term radioimmunotherapy studies of Cu-64 anti-colon carcinoma monoclonal antibody (MAb)-1A3, intact and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} singly and in combination, in the GW39-hamster model

    SciTech Connect

    Connett, J.M.; Anderson, C.J.; Guo, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    In previous studies we have shown that Cu-64 has potential for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). The present study was undertaken to examine the therapeutic potential of Cu-64-benzyl-TETA-MAb 1A3, intact and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments, injected single or in combination. Using the model of hamsters carrying the GW39 human colon carcinoma in their thighs, we were interested in whether injecting Cu-64-MAb 1A3 intact and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments together would give improved RIT results compared to either agent alone due to the better tumor penetrating properties of F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments and the higher uptake and long tumor residence time of intact MAbs. Hamsters were injected with either 1.5 mCi Cu-64-1A3, 1.5 mCi Cu-64-1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2} or a combination of 0.75 mCi Cu-64-1A3 intact and 0.75 mCi Cu-64-1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2}. These suboptimal doses of Cu-64 were administered in order to detect any enhanced RIT effects with the combination of Cu-64-labeled MAb and fragments. Control groups received saline along. Hamsters were sacrificed when tumors were > 10 g or after surviving for 6 months. Mean lifespans for hamsters treated with Cu-64-1A3 intact, F(ab{prime}){sub 2}, and the combination were 92 {plus_minus} 44 days, 104 {plus_minus} 54 days and 129 {plus_minus} 48 days respectively, compared to 32 {plus_minus} 5 days for the saline controls (p,0.001). 6 months following treatment 43% of the hamsters (3/7) treated with 1.5 mCi Cu-64 1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2}, and 50% of hamsters (5/10) treated with 0.75 mCi Cu-64-1A3 and 0.75 mCi Cu-64-1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2} in combination were alive and tumor free. Although tumor grown inhibition was also seen in the group receiving 1.5 mCi Cu-64 1A3 intact, only one hamster (1/7) survived tumor free to 6 months. Results show that Cu-64-1A3 F(ab{prime}){sub 2} as well as intact Cu-64-1A3 can increase survival and effect long term tumor inhibition.

  7. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  8. C26:0-Carnitine Is a New Biomarker for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy in Mice and Man

    PubMed Central

    van de Beek, Malu-Clair; Dijkstra, Inge M. E.; van Lenthe, Henk; Ofman, Rob; Goldhaber-Pasillas, Dalia; Schauer, Nicolas; Schackmann, Martin; Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Kulik, Wim; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by mutations in ABCD1 and characterized by very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) accumulation. Virtually all males develop progressive myelopathy (AMN). A subset of patients, however, develops a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease (cerebral ALD). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative for cerebral ALD provided the procedure is performed in an early stage of the disease. Unfortunately, this narrow therapeutic window is often missed. Therefore, an increasing number of newborn screening programs are including ALD. To identify new biomarkers for ALD, we developed an Abcd1 knockout mouse with enhanced VLCFA synthesis either ubiquitous or restricted to oligodendrocytes. Biochemical analysis revealed VLCFA accumulation in different lipid classes and acylcarnitines. Both C26:0-lysoPC and C26:0-carnitine were highly elevated in brain, spinal cord, but also in bloodspots. We extended the analysis to patients and confirmed that C26:0-carnitine is also elevated in bloodspots from ALD patients. We anticipate that validation of C26:0-carnitine for the diagnosis of ALD in newborn bloodspots may lead to a faster inclusion of ALD in newborn screening programs in countries that already screen for other inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:27124591

  9. Metabolism of C26 bile alcohols in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

    SciTech Connect

    Noma, Y.; Kihira, K.; Kuramoto, T.; Hoshita, T.

    1988-03-01

    Metabolism of C26 bile alcohols in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, was studied. (24-14C)-24-Dehydro-26-deoxy-5 beta-ranol (3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-27-nor-5 beta-cholestan-24-one) was chemically synthesized from (24-14C)cholic acid and incubated with bullfrog liver homogenate fortified with NADPH. 24-Dehydro-26-deoxy-5 beta-ranol was shown to be converted into both 26-deoxy-5 beta-ranol and 24-epi-26-deoxy-5 beta-ranol ((24S)- and (24R)-27-nor-5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha,24-tetrols) in addition to 5 beta-ranol ((24R)-27-nor-5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha,24,26-pentol), which is the major bile alcohol of the bullfrog. (24-3H)-26-Deoxy-5 beta-ranol and (24-3H)-24-epi-26-deoxy-5 beta-ranol were prepared from 24-dehydro-26-deoxy-5 beta-ranol by reduction with sodium (3H) borohydride and administered respectively to two each of four bullfrogs by intraperitoneal injection. After 24 h, labeled 5 beta-ranol was isolated from the bile of the bullfrogs that received (24-3H)-26-deoxy-5 beta-ranol. In contrast little if any radioactivity could be detected in 5 beta-ranol or its 24-epimer after administration of (24-3H)-24-epi-26-deoxy-5 beta-ranol.

  10. How to improve colon cancer screening rates

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Coelho, Debora Lucciola; De Lima, David Correa Alves; Petroianu, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates. PMID:26688708