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Sample records for cadherin expression pattern

  1. Expression patterns of cadherin genes in Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zartman, Jeremiah J.; Kanodia, Jitendra S.; Yakoby, Nir; Schafer, Xenia; Watson, Colin; Schlichting, Karin; Dahmann, Christian; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila oogenesis, the follicular epithelium that envelops the oocyte is patterned by a small set of inductive signals and gives rise to an elaborate three-dimensional eggshell. Several eggshell structures provide sensitive readouts of the patterning signals, but the formation of these structures is still poorly understood. In other systems, epithelial morphogenesis is guided by the spatial patterning of cell adhesion and cytoskeleton genes. As a step towards developing a comprehensive description of patterning events leading to eggshell morphogenesis, we report the expression of Drosophila cadherins, calcium dependent adhesion molecules that are repeatedly used throughout development. We found that 9/17 of Drosophila cadherins are expressed in the follicular epithelium in dynamic patterns during oogenesis. In late oogenesis, the expression patterns of cadherin genes in the main body follicle cells is summarized using a compact set of simple geometric shapes, reflecting the integration of the EGFR and DPP inductive signals. The multi-layered composite patterning of the cadherins is hypothesized to play a key role in the formation of the eggshell. Of particular note is the complex patterning of the region of the follicular epithelium that gives rise to the dorsal appendages, which are tubular structures that serve as respiratory organs for the developing embryo. PMID:18817893

  2. Conserved alternative splicing and expression patterns of arthropod N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shu-Ning; Yonekura, Shinichi; Ting, Chun-Yuan; Robertson, Hugh M; Iwai, Youichi; Uemura, Tadashi; Lee, Chi-Hon; Chiba, Akira

    2009-04-01

    Metazoan development requires complex mechanisms to generate cells with diverse function. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA not only expands proteomic diversity but also provides a means to regulate tissue-specific molecular expression. The N-Cadherin gene in Drosophila contains three pairs of mutually-exclusive alternatively-spliced exons (MEs). However, no significant differences among the resulting protein isoforms have been successfully demonstrated in vivo. Furthermore, while the N-Cadherin gene products exhibit a complex spatiotemporal expression pattern within embryos, its underlying mechanisms and significance remain unknown. Here, we present results that suggest a critical role for alternative splicing in producing a crucial and reproducible complexity in the expression pattern of arthropod N-Cadherin. We demonstrate that the arthropod N-Cadherin gene has maintained the three sets of MEs for over 400 million years using in silico and in vivo approaches. Expression of isoforms derived from these MEs receives precise spatiotemporal control critical during development. Both Drosophila and Tribolium use ME-13a and ME-13b in "neural" and "mesodermal" splice variants, respectively. As proteins, either ME-13a- or ME-13b-containing isoform can cell-autonomously rescue the embryonic lethality caused by genetic loss of N-Cadherin. Ectopic muscle expression of either isoform beyond the time it normally ceases leads to paralysis and lethality. Together, our results offer an example of well-conserved alternative splicing increasing cellular diversity in metazoans. PMID:19343204

  3. Regulation of cadherin expression in nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Alicia F; Prasad, Maneeshi S; Thuringer, Amanda Henke; Manzerra, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for classical cadherin expression during development of the vertebrate nervous system. The complexity of the spatial and temporal expression patterns is linked to morphogenic and functional roles in the developing nervous system. While the regulatory networks controlling cadherin expression are not well understood, it is likely that the multiple signaling pathways active in the development of particular domains also regulate the specific cadherins expressed at that time and location. With the growing understanding of the broader roles of cadherins in cell–cell adhesion and non-adhesion processes, it is important to understand both the upstream regulation of cadherin expression and the downstream effects of specific cadherins within their cellular context. PMID:24526207

  4. Anomalous expression of P-cadherin in breast carcinoma. Correlation with E-cadherin expression and pathological features.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, J.; Benito, N.; Pizarro, A.; Suárez, A.; Espada, J.; Cano, A.; Gamallo, C.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies on the cell-cell adhesion molecules P- and E-cadherin have shown that P-cadherin is not expressed in breast cancer. In contrast, the expression of E-cadherin is a normal event in these tumors, but a reduction in the levels of this molecule in neoplastic cells is associated with the histological type, high histological grade, greater tumor size, and metastasis. The expression pattern of P- and E-cadherin were immunohistochemically studied in tissue sections from normal breast tissue, benign breast lesions, and 57 infiltrating breast carcinomas. Cadherin expression was analyzed in parallel with pathological features and the immunohistochemical expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast carcinomas. P-cadherin was detected in the myoepithelial cells and E-cadherin in luminal epithelial cells from normal breast and benign breast lesions. P-cadherin expression was detected in 9 of 45 cases (20%) of infiltrating ductal carcinomas of no special type; none of the special histological types that were analyzed (7 infiltrating lobular carcinomas, 3 colloid carcinomas, and 2 infiltrating papillary carcinomas) expressed P-cadherin. In infiltrating ductal carcinomas, P-cadherin expression correlated significantly with a reduction in E-cadherin expression, histological grade (all cases were grade III tumors), and hormone receptor content (8 of 9 cases were estrogen and progesterone receptor negative). Although E-cadherin was not found in the 7 infiltrating lobular carcinomas, it was present in the remaining histological types and was preserved in 15 infiltrating ductal and 3 colloid and 2 papillary carcinomas and was reduced in 30 infiltrating ductal carcinomas. In addition, a reduction in E-cadherin expression was significantly associated with high histological grade and a lack of steroid hormone receptors in infiltrating ductal carcinomas. No apparent relationship was found between P- and E-cadherin expression and tumor size and axillary lymph

  5. Synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates the mosaic cellular pattern of the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Sayaka; Honda, Hisao; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Miyata, Takaki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), olfactory cells (OCs) and supporting cells (SCs), which express different cadherins, are arranged in a characteristic mosaic pattern in which OCs are enclosed by SCs. However, the mechanism underlying this cellular patterning is unclear. Here, we show that the cellular pattern of the OE is established by cellular rearrangements during development. In the OE, OCs express nectin-2 and N-cadherin, and SCs express nectin-2, nectin-3, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin. Heterophilic trans-interaction between nectin-2 on OCs and nectin-3 on SCs preferentially recruits cadherin via α-catenin to heterotypic junctions, and the differential distributions of cadherins between junctions promote cellular intercalations, resulting in the formation of the mosaic pattern. These observations are confirmed by model cell systems, and various cellular patterns are generated by the combinatorial expression of nectins and cadherins. Collectively, the synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates mosaic pattern, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism. PMID:26929452

  6. Expression profile of the cadherin family in the developing Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Fung, Siaumin; Wang, Fay; Chase, Maretta; Godt, Dorothea; Hartenstein, Volker

    2008-01-20

    The Drosophila genome encodes 17 members of the cadherin family of adhesion molecules, which in vertebrates has been implicated in patterning the nervous system through cell and axon sorting. With only a few exceptions all cadherins show widespread expression in the larval brain. What expression patterns have in common is that 1) they are global, in the sense that all lineages of the central brain or optic lobe, or both, show expression; and 2) expression is stage-specific: some cadherins are expressed only in primary neurons (located closest to the neuropile), others in early secondary neurons (near the brain surface), or primaries plus late secondaries. The Fat-like cadherins, Fat and Dachsous, as well as Cad96Ca and Cad74A, are expressed in the epithelial optic lobe anlagen, which matches the widespread epithelial expression of these molecules in the embryo. DE-cadherin is restricted to immature secondary neurons and glia; by contrast, DN-cadherin, Flamingo, Cad87A, Cad99C, and Calsyntenin-1 appear in differentiating primary neurons and, at a later stage, some or all secondary neurons. Cad87A is strongly enriched apically in epithelia and in neuronal dendrites. Fat-like, Cad86C, Cad88C, Cad89D, and Dret are expressed ubiquitously in embryonic and larval brains at low or moderate levels. We conclude from this analysis that cadherins are likely to play a role in 'generic' neural functions, such as neurite fasciculation, branching, and synapse formation. PMID:18041774

  7. E-cadherin, N-cadherin Expression and Histologic Characterization of Canine Choroid Plexus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Reginato, A; Girolami, D; Menchetti, L; Foiani, G; Mandara, M T

    2016-07-01

    Choroid plexus tumors (CPTs) are reported with an increasing incidence in dogs, and they call for a reexamination of histologic features and criteria of classification corresponding to their biological behavior. In this study, the human World Health Organization classification was applied to 16 canine CPTs, and the expression of molecules involved in neoplastic cell adhesion (E-cadherin, N-cadherin), invasion (doublecortin), and proliferation (Ki-67) was investigated. Mitotic index was found to be the main criterion for grading CPTs. Cell density and multilayering of papillae were also statistically associated with histologic grade. Intraventricular spread and parenchymal invasion was observed for tumors showing histologic benign features. E-cadherin was expressed in all CPT grades, independent of tumor invasion. N-cadherin immunolabeling was more expressed in grade I than high-grade CPTs, whereas doublecortin expression was not detected in CPTs. An increasing proliferative activity was observed in relation with histologic grade. PMID:26792846

  8. Characteristics of bladder transitional cell carcinoma with E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression

    PubMed Central

    LUO, YANG; ZHU, YONG-TONG; MA, LI-LI; PANG, SHI-YU; WEI, LI-JIE; LEI, CHENG-YONG; HE, CHENG-WU; TAN, WAN-LONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the characteristics of bladder transitional cell carcinoma with E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression. An immunofluorescence assay was used to detect E-cadherin and N-cadherin expression in infiltrative bladder cancer tissues, and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis were used to detect E-cadherin and N-cadherin expression in human urinary bladder grade II carcinoma 5637, transitional cell carcinoma UMUC-3 and invasive bladder carcinoma EJ cells. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion and plate colony formation assays were used to detect the proliferative, migratory and invasive abilities and the efficiency of plate colony formation of 5637, UMUC3 and EJ cells. A tumor xenograft formation assay was used to evaluate the tumorigenic abilities of 5637, UMUC-3 and EJ cells in vivo. E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression was identified in various pathological grades of infiltrative bladder cancers. E-cadherin positive and N-cadherin negative expression was exhibited by 5637 cells. By contrast, E-cadherin negative and N-cadherin positive expression was exhibited by EJ cells, and E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression was exhibited by UMUC-3 cells. The ability of cells to proliferate, migrate, invade, and the efficiency of plate colony formation and tumorigenic abilities of the cells were significantly different among 5637, UMUC-3 and EJ cells. These cell characteristics were significantly increased in UMUC-3 cells compared with 5637 cells; however, the characteristics were significantly decreased compared with EJ cells. The biological characteristics of bladder cancer cells with E-cadherin and N-cadherin double-negative expression was between bladder cancer cells that exhibited a E-cadherin positive and N-cadherin negative expression, and bladder cancer cells that exhibited E-cadherin negative and N-cadherin positive expression. The present study deduces that the status of E-cadherin

  9. Mucinous Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Influence of EGFR and E-Cadherin Expression on Clinicopathologic Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd AlRahman M; AbdelAziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira K; Hosni, Ali; Zalata, Khalid R; Gado, Asmaa I

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin expression in colorectal carcinoma and their prognostic significance. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate EGFR and E-cadherin expression, interrelation and relation to clinicopathologic, histologic parameters, and survival in rare colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA). In this study, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal MA and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tips technique, and immunohistochemistry for EGFR and E-cadherin was performed. All relations were analyzed using established statistical methodologies. NMA expressed EGFR and E-cadherin in significantly higher rates with significant heterogenous pattern than MA. EGFR and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in both NMA and MA groups. In the NMA group, high EGFR expression was associated with old age, male sex, multiplicity of tumors, lack of mucinous component, and association with schistosomiasis. However, in the MA group, high EGFR expression was associated only with old age and MA subtype rather than signet ring carcinoma subtype. Conversely, high E-cadherin expression in MA cases was associated with old age, fungating tumor configuration, MA subtype, and negative intratumoral lymphocytic response. However, in the NMA cases, none of these factors was statistically significant. In a univariate analysis, neither EGFR nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival. Targeted therapy against EGFR and E-cadherin may not be useful in patients with MA. Neither EGFR nor E-cadherin is an independent prognostic factor in NMA or MA. PMID:26262813

  10. Detection of T-Cadherin Expression in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Rubina, K. A.; Smutova, V. A.; Semenova, M. L.; Poliakov, A. A.; Gerety, S.; Wilkinson, D.; Surkova, E. I.; Semina, E. V.; Sysoeva, V. Yu.; Tkachuk, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate T-cadherin expression at the early developmental stages of the mouse embryo. Using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining of whole embryos in combination with confocal microscopy, we found that T-cadherin expression is detected in the developing brain, starting with the E8.75 stage, and in the heart, starting with the E11.5 stage. These data suggest a possible involvement of T-cadherin in the formation of blood vessels during embryogenesis. PMID:26085949

  11. p63 and E-cadherin Expression in Canine Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, L A; Pissarra, H; Faísca, P B; Bragança, M; Peleteiro, M C; Niza, M M R E

    2015-07-01

    The expression of p63 and E-cadherin was studied in 22 oral squamous cell carcinomas in the dog according to immunohistochemical techniques. The association between these markers and clinicopathologic parameters was assessed. All tumor cells studied showed enhanced p63 expression. Regarding E-cadherin expression, 17 of 22 cases (77.3%) showed decreased immunoreactivity, and in 13 of 22 cases (59.1%), its expression was cytoplasmic. Neither p63 nor E-cadherin expression patterns were associated with tumor size, bone invasion, or lymph node metastasis. p63 score was related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen proliferative index (P = .020). A statistically significant correlation between the expression patterns of these 2 markers was noted (P = .026). Furthermore, they were related with tumor grade. An atypical p63 labeling and a cytoplasmic E-cadherin staining were statistically related with a higher tumor grade (P = .022 and P = .017, respectively). These findings suggest that changes in p63 and E-cadherin expression are frequent events in oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs. PMID:25248518

  12. N-Cadherin in Neuroblastoma Disease: Expression and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Derycke, Lara; De Craemer, Annemie; De Brouwer, Sara; De Preter, Katleen; Van Roy, Nadine; Vandesompele, Jo; Speleman, Frank; Philippé, Jan; Benoit, Yves; Beiske, Klaus; Bracke, Marc; Laureys, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    One of the first and most important steps in the metastatic cascade is the loss of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. N-cadherin, a crucial mediator of homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell interactions, might play a central role in the metastasis of neuroblastoma (NB), a solid tumor of neuroectodermal origin. Using Reverse Transcription Quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), Western blot, immunocytochemistry and Tissue MicroArrays (TMA) we demonstrate the expression of N-cadherin in neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines. All neuroblastic tumors (n = 356) and cell lines (n = 10) expressed various levels of the adhesion protein. The N-cadherin mRNA expression was significantly lower in tumor samples from patients suffering metastatic disease. Treatment of NB cell lines with the N-cadherin blocking peptide ADH-1 (Exherin, Adherex Technologies Inc.), strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro by inducing apoptosis. Our results suggest that N-cadherin signaling may play a role in neuroblastoma disease, marking involvement of metastasis and determining neuroblastoma cell viability. PMID:22355346

  13. Nitric Oxide Increases Arterial Endotheial Permeability through Mediating VE-Cadherin Expression during Arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqiong; Guan, Yinglu; Zhang, Bin; Cai, Weijun; Schaper, Jutta; Schaper, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage invasion is an important event during arteriogenesis, but the underlying mechanism is still only partially understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and VE-cadherin, two key mediators for vascular permeability, contribute to this event in a rat ischemic hindlimb model. In addition, the effect of NO on expression of VE-caherin and endothelial permeability was also studied in cultured HUVECs. We found that: 1) in normal arteriolar vessels (NAV), eNOS was moderately expressed in endothelial cells (EC) and iNOS was rarely detected. In contrast, in collateral vessels (CVs) induced by simple femoral artery ligation, both eNOS and iNOS were significantly upregulated (P<0.05). Induced iNOS was found mainly in smooth muscle cells, but also in other vascular cells and macrophages; 2) in NAV VE-cadherin was strongly expressed in EC. In CVs, VE-cadherin was significantly downregulated, with a discontinuous and punctate pattern. Administration of nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate (NONOate) further reduced the amounts of Ve-cadherin in CVs, whereas NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME inhibited downregulation of VE-cadherin in CVs; 3) in normal rats Evans blue extravasation (EBE) was low in the musculus gracilis, FITC-dextron leakage was not detected in the vascular wall and few macrophages were observed in perivascular space. In contrast, EBE was significantly increased in femoral artery ligation rats, FITC-dextron leakage and increased amounts of macrophages were detected in CVs, which were further enhanced by administration of NONOate, but inhibited by L-NAME supplement; 4) in vitro experiments confirmed that an increase in NO production reduced VE-cadherin expression, correlated with increases in the permeability of HUVECs. In conclusion, our data for the first time reveal the expression profile of VE-cadherin and alterations of vascular permeability in CVs, suggesting that NO-mediated VE-cadherin pathway may be one important mechanism

  14. IL-8 suppresses E-cadherin expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by enhancing E-cadherin promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Peng, Li-Xia; Yang, Jun-Ping; Zheng, Li-Sheng; Xie, Ping; Wang, Meng-Yao; Huang, Bi-Jun; Zhao, Hua-Rong; Bao, Yong-Xing; Qian, Chao-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has the highest metastasis potential among head and neck cancers. Distant metastasis is the major cause of treatment failure. Recent studies from our laboratory have revealed that IL-8 promotes NPC metastasis via activation of AKT signaling and induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the cells. In the present study, we found that IL-8 treatment for NPC cells resulted in an accumulation of DNMT1 protein through activating AKT1 pathway and consequent DNMT1 protein stabilization. Then DNMT1 suppressed E-cadherin expression by increasing the methylation of its promoter region. LY-294002 blocked IL-8-induced p-AKT1 activation resulting in reduction of DNMT1 and increase of E-cadherin expression, whereas forced demethylation using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored E-cadherin expression. In conclusion, our study, for the first time, shows that the IL-8/AKT1 signaling pathway stabilizes DNMT1 protein, consequently enhancing hypermethylation of E-cadherin promoter regions and downregulating E-cadherin protein level in NPC cells. Upon blockage of the IL-8/AKT pathway and inhibition of DNMT1, E-cadherin expression can be reversed. These data suggest that targeting the IL-8/AKT1 signaling pathway and DNMT1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for blocking NPC metastasis. PMID:26530812

  15. E-cadherin-negative acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: report of a case showing a solid pseudopapillary growth pattern.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Waki, Michihiko; Azuma, Masaki; Koda, Kenji; Ohata, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    E-cadherin expression patterns in acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) of the pancreas have not been well documented. Herein, we present a hitherto undescribed case of E-cadherin-negative ACC with a solid pseudopapillary growth pattern in a 65-year-old man. We used an antibody against the extracellular domain of E-cadherin. As a further unusual status in ACC, faint β-catenin expression was observed in the cytoplasm of carcinoma cells. Morphological distinction from a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas might be problematic in such a case, because of their similarities concerned with the growth pattern and E-cadherin negativity. Without nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, a diagnosis of SPN was almost excluded. Immunoreactivity for trypsin and BCL10 made an accurate diagnosis of ACC to this case. The tumor recurred 10 months post-surgery as rapidly enlarging masses in the liver, presumably indicating the aggressiveness of the E-cadherin-negative phenotype among ACCs. PMID:25600280

  16. CDH1 promoter hypermethylation and E-cadherin protein expression in infiltrating breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, José Roberto F; Prando, Érika C; Quevedo, Francisco C; Neto, Francisco A Moraes; Rainho, Cláudia A; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2006-01-01

    Background The E-cadherin gene (CDH1) maps, at chromosome 16q22.1, a region often associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human breast cancer. LOH at this site is thought to lead to loss of function of this tumor suppressor gene and was correlated with decreased disease-free survival, poor prognosis, and metastasis. Differential CpG island methylation in the promoter region of the CDH1 gene might be an alternative way for the loss of expression and function of E-cadherin, leading to loss of tissue integrity, an essential step in tumor progression. Methods The aim of our study was to assess, by Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MSP), the methylation pattern of the CDH1 gene and its possible correlation with the expression of E-cadherin and other standard immunohistochemical parameters (Her-2, ER, PgR, p53, and K-67) in a series of 79 primary breast cancers (71 infiltrating ductal, 5 infiltrating lobular, 1 metaplastic, 1 apocrine, and 1 papillary carcinoma). Results CDH1 hypermethylation was observed in 72% of the cases including 52/71 ductal, 4/5 lobular carcinomas and 1 apocrine carcinoma. Reduced levels of E-cadherin protein were observed in 85% of our samples. Although not statistically significant, the levels of E-cadherin expression tended to diminish with the CDH1 promoter region methylation. In the group of 71 ductal cancinomas, most of the cases of showing CDH1 hypermethylation also presented reduced levels of expression of ER and PgR proteins, and a possible association was observed between CDH1 methylation and ER expression (p = 0.0301, Fisher's exact test). However, this finding was not considered significant after Bonferroni correction of p-value. Conclusion Our preliminary findings suggested that abnormal CDH1 methylation occurs in high frequencies in infiltrating breast cancers associated with a decrease in E-cadherin expression in a subgroup of cases characterized by loss of expression of other important genes to the mammary

  17. Increased epithelial cadherin expression among Japanese intestinal-type gastric cancers compared with specimens from American patients of European descent.

    PubMed

    Theuer, Charles P; Al-Kuran, Rasha; Akiyama, Yoshiyuki; Okumura, Minoru; Ziogas, Al; Carpenter, Philip M

    2006-04-01

    The different patterns of gastric cancer in the Far East and West have evolved to the extent that it has been suggested that the disease in Japan is biologically less aggressive than in the West. We studied paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissue blocks from Japanese patients and American patients of European descent who had undergone gastrectomy for gastric cancer not involving the gastroesophageal junction. Specimens were staged (T stage), graded (Lauren classification), and biomarker expression (epithelial cadherin [E-cadherin], c-erbB2, Ki67, and p53) was quantified using immunohistochemistry without knowledge of the country of origin. E-cadherin was expressed in 49 per cent of malignant cells from Japanese specimens compared with 27 per cent of malignant cells from American specimens (P = 0.04). The expression of E-cadherin on diffuse cancers from the two countries was similar (34.4 in Japanese vs 41.5 in American, P = 0.92). E-cadherin expression, however, was significantly higher among intestinal cancers from the two countries: 56.3 per cent of cells from intestinal or mixed cancers from Japan (n = 32) expressed E-cadherin compared with 22.2 per cent of American specimens (n = 12; P = 0.008).-c-erbB2 was expressed on a higher proportion of malignant cells from American specimens (30% vs 22%; P = 0.20). E-cadherin expression, a favorable prognostic factor, is more common in Japanese intestinal-type gastric cancer not involving the gastroesophageal junction. If the biology of gastric cancer in the Far East is less aggressive than that in the United States, it is likely that treatments need to be individualized. PMID:16676859

  18. Immunohistochemical Analysis of E-Cadherin, p53 and Inhibin-α Expression in Hydatidiform Mole and Hydropic Abortion.

    PubMed

    Erol, Onur; Süren, Dinç; Tutuş, Birsel; Toptaş, Tayfun; Gökay, Ahmet Arda; Derbent, Aysel Uysal; Özel, Mustafa Kemal; Sezer, Cem

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of E-cadherin, p53, and inhibin-α immunostaining in the differential diagnosis of hydropic abortion (HA), partial hydatidiform mole (PHM), and complete hydatidiform mole (CHM). E-cadherin, p53, and inhibin-α protein expression patterns were investigated immunohistochemically using paraffin -embedded tissue sections from histologically diagnosed cases of HA (n = 23), PHM (n = 24), and CHM (n = 23). Expression patterns of these markers were scored semi-quantitatively according to the staining intensity, percentage of positive cells, and immunoreactivity score. Classification of cases was established on histologic criteria and supported by the molecular genotyping. Immunostaining allowed the identification of specific cell types with E-cadherin, p53, and inhibin-α expression in all cases. E-cadherin expression was detected on the cell surface of villous cytotrophoblasts. We observed a marked decline in the expression of E-cadherin from HAs to PHMs to CHMs. The p53-positive reaction was restricted to the nucleus of villous cytotrophoblasts. Significantly increased p53 expression was observed in CHMs, compared with HAs and PHMs. The expression of inhibin-α was localised in the cytoplasm of villous syncytiotrophoblasts, and the expression of this marker was significantly higher in PHMs and CHMs than HAs. In conclusion, immunohistochemical analysis of E-cadherin, p53, and inhibin-α expression could serve as a useful adjunct to conventional methods in the differential diagnosis of HA, PHM, and CHM. PMID:26683836

  19. Cadherin expression in gastrointestinal tract endometriosis: possible role in deep tissue invasion and development of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Van Patten, Katy; Parkash, Vinita; Jain, Dhanpat

    2010-01-01

    Cadherins are cell surface proteins crucial for cell adhesion and tissue integrity. The mechanism of deep tissue invasion in gastrointestinal endometriosis is unknown and may be related to the altered expression of these cell surface proteins. The goal of this study was to evaluate the expression of N-cadherin, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin in peritoneal endometriotic implants, gastrointestinal endometriosis, and carcinoma arising in gastrointestinal endometriosis. Cases of peritoneal endometriosis, gastrointestinal endometriosis, and carcinoma arising in gastrointestinal endometriosis were identified from our pathology database. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against N-cadherin, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin on representative tissue sections. Cases of normal proliferative and secretory endometrium and adenomyosis were included in the study for comparison. The intensity and extent of staining for each marker was scored semiquantitatively. Appropriate positive and negative controls were used. A total of 38 cases (peritoneal endometriosis (n=14), gastrointestinal endometriosis (n=21: 11 colon, 8 appendix, 2 small bowel), and 3 cases of endometrioid carcinoma arising in colonic endometriosis (n=3)) were included in the study. Compared with normal proliferative endometrium, N-cadherin expression was decreased in intensity and extent in secretory endometrium. Peritoneal and gastrointestinal endometriosis also showed markedly decreased expression of N-cadherin compared with proliferative endometrium. All three cases of carcinoma arising in colonic endometriosis showed a total loss of N-cadherin in the tumor, but preserved E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression. In these cases, areas of benign endometriotic glands near the tumor showed weak and focal N-cadherin expression that was gradually lost. Moderate-to-strong membranous staining for beta-catenin expression and variable intensity of E-cadherin expression was seen diffusely in normal endometrium and

  20. Expression of connexin 43 and E-cadherin in choroidal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jin-Yong; Zhao, Jie; Lin, Hong; Hu, Li-Ting; Xu, Qiang; Wang 1, Qing; Sun, Wei-Rong

    2011-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression of connexin 43 and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) in choroidal melanoma, to explore the clinical and pathological implications of expression of these proteins, and to determine their relations with malignant features. METHODS The expression of connexin 43 and E-cadherin in choroidal melanoma were detected by immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinicopathological features. RESULTS Positive rates of connexin 43 in choroidal melanomas and benign pigmented nevus tissues were 75% and 40% respectively with significant differences between the two groups (χ2=5.607, P=0.009). Positive rates of E-cadherin in choroidal melanomas and benign pigmented nevus tissues were 40% and 75% respectively with significant differences between the two groups (χ2=5.214, P=0.010). Significant overexpression of connexin 43 and reduction of E-cadherin expression was associated with the invasion to the sclera, and there were respectively significant differences between without and with scleral invasion groups (χ2=2.880, P=0.040; χ2=2.778, P=0.046). Overexpression of connexin 43 were correlated with tumor cell types and the expression of connexin 43 and E-cadherin may be correlated with each other. CONCLUSION The increased expression of connexin 43 and the decreased expression of E-cadherin may be involved in the process of invasion of choroidal melanoma. The overepression of connexin 43 and reduction of E-cadherin may contribute to the development of choroidal melanoma. PMID:22553632

  1. E-cadherin expression in colorectal cancer. An immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed Central

    Dorudi, S.; Sheffield, J. P.; Poulsom, R.; Northover, J. M.; Hart, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    Expression of the epithelial-specific adhesion molecule E-cadherin has been assessed in paraffin-embedded tissue from a series of 72 colorectal carcinomas. Using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization it was found that E-cadherin expression was related inversely to tumor differentiation. Out of 44 well- and moderately differentiated tumors, 36 expressed good positivity, whereas 24 of 28 poorly differentiated tumors were E-cadherin-negative. Classification by Dukes stage revealed a highly significant difference (P << 0.001) between A and B (32 positive, four negative) and C1 and C2 (seven positive, 29 negative) stages in terms of immunoreactivity. Of the 32 lymph node metastases studied, 20 were negative for E-cadherin expression, as were seven of eight liver metastases. These results indicate that the down-regulation of E-cadherin levels in vivo is associated with the dedifferentiation, progression, and metastasis of colorectal cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7682766

  2. Epigenetic regulation of E-cadherin expression by the histone demethylase UTX in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zha, Lin; Cao, Qiang; Cui, Xin; Li, Fenfen; Liang, Houjie; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang

    2016-03-01

    Decreased epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) gene expression, a hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is essential for triggering metastatic advantage of the colon cancer. Genetic mechanisms underlying the regulation of E-cadherin expression in EMT have been extensively investigated; however, much is unknown about the epigenetic mechanism underlying this process. Here, we identified ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on chromosome X (UTX), a histone demethylase involved in demethylating di- or tri-methylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me2/3), as a positive regulator for the expression of E-cadherin in the colon cancer cell line HCT-116. We showed that inactivation of UTX down-regulated E-cadherin gene expression, while overexpression of UTX did the opposite. Notably, overexpression of UTX inhibited migration and invasion of HCT-116 cells. Moreover, UTX demethylated H3K27me3, a histone transcriptional repressive mark, leading to decreased H3K27me3 at the E-cadherin promoter. Further, UTX interacted with the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein CBP and recruited it to the E-cadherin promoter, resulting in increased H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac), a histone transcriptional active mark. UTX positively regulates E-cadherin expression through coordinated regulation of H3K27 demethylation and acetylation, switching the transcriptional repressive state to the transcriptional active state at the E-cadherin promoter. We conclude that UTX may play a role in regulation of E-cadherin gene expression in HCT-116 cells and that UTX may serve as a therapeutic target against the metastasis in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:26819089

  3. Reduced E-cadherin expression as a cause of distinctive signet-ring cell variant in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Ho Jeong; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare type of adenocarcinoma and presents with distinctive clinicopathological features. This study was performed to assess the biological characteristics of colorectal SRCC regarding the E-cadherin expression. Seventeen patients with primary colorectal SRCC were identified and their clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. The mean age of the 17 patients was 45.3 yr (14-68). Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and beta-catenin were performed in ten colorectal SRCCs and in 30 ordinary colorectal adenocarcinomas as control. Primary colorectal SRCC occurred in 0.7% of 2,388 colorectal adenocarcinomas. Most patients had advanced stage tumor at surgery (stage III and IV, AJCC: 82%). Five-year survival rate was 16%. Peritoneal seeding was the most common recurrence pattern (41%) and liver metastasis was not identified. All SRCCs showed a markedly reduced or absent expression of E-cadherin on immunohistochemical staining, whereas seven (23.3%) of ordinary carcinomas showed reduced expression, thereby indicating a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.005). In immunohistochemical staining for beta-catenin, eight of ten SRCCs showed reduced membrane expression that did not attain statistical significance compared to ordinary adenocarcinomas. It is suggested that aberrant E-cadherin expression may explain the distinct clinicopathological features in primary colorectal SRCC. PMID:11850584

  4. E-cadherin immunohistochemical expression in mammary gland neoplasms in bitches.

    PubMed

    Rodo, A; Malicka, E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate E-cadherin expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, the differentiation grade and proliferative activity. Material for the investigation comprised mammary gland tumours, collected from dogs, the patients of veterinary clinics, during surgical procedures and archival samples. All together 21 adenomas, 32 complex carcinomas, 35 simple carcinomas and 13 solid carcinomas were qualified for further investigation. E-cadherin expression was higher in adenomas as compared with carcinomas but lower in solid carcinomas as compared with simple and complex carcinomas. More over, the expression of E-cadherin decreased with the increase in the neoplasm malignancy and proliferative activity (value of the mitotic index and number of cells showing Ki67). The study has shown that the expression of E-cadherin can be used as a prognostic factor. PMID:18540208

  5. Modulation of E-cadherin expression promotes migration ability of esophageal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujun; Qin, Xuebo; Chai, Song; Qu, Changbao; Wang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Helin

    2016-01-01

    Losing the E-cadherin plays an important role in the metastasis of cancer. The regulation of the expression of E-cadherin is unclear. Circadian rhythm alteration is associated with the pathogenesis of a number of cancers. This study aims to investigate the role of one of the circadian proteins, period-2 (Per2) in repressing the expression of E-cadherin in esophageal cancer (esophageal cancer). We observed that the levels of circadian protein Per2 were significantly increased and E-cadherin was significantly decreased in the tissue of human esophageal cancer with metastasis as compared with non-metastatic esophageal cancer. Overexpression of Per2 in the esophageal cancer cells markedly repressed the expression of E-cadherin. The pHDAC1 was detected in human esophageal cancer with metastasis, which was much less in the esophageal cancer tissue without metastasis. Overexpression of Per2 increased the levels of pHDAC1 as well as the E-cadherin repressors at the E-cadherin promoter locus. Overexpression of Per2 markedly increased the migratory capacity of esophageal cancer cells, which was abolished by the inhibition of HDAC1. We conclude that Per-2 plays an important role in the esophageal cancer cell metastasis, which may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:26898709

  6. Expression of E-, P- and N-Cadherin and Its Clinical Significance in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Precancerous Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baohua; Shi, Haiyan; Wang, Fenfen; Hong, Die; Lv, Weiguo; Xie, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of classical cadherins has been observed in tumor invasion and metastasis, but its involvement in cervical carcinogenesis and cancer progression is not clear. We investigated E-, P- and N-cadherin expression and its significance in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). This retrospective study enrolled 508 patients admitted to Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University with cervical lesions between January 2006 and December 2010. Immunochemical staining was performed in 98 samples of normal cervical epithelium (NC), 283 of CIN, and 127 of early-stage SCC. The association of cadherin staining with clinical characteristics and survival of the patients was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. We found gradients of decreasing E-cadherin expression and increasing P-cadherin expression from NC through CIN to SCC. Aberrant E-cadherin and P-cadherin expression were significantly associated with clinical parameters indicating poor prognosis and shorter patient survival. Interestingly, we found very low levels of positive N-cadherin expression in CIN and SCC tissues that were not related to CIN or cancer. Pearson chi-square tests showed that E-cadherin expression in SCC was inversely correlated with P-cadherin expression (E-P switch), and was not correlated with N-cadherin expression. More important, patients with tissues exhibiting an E-P switch in expression had highly aggressive phenotypes and poorer prognosis than those without E-P switch expression. Our findings suggest that E-cadherin and P-cadherin, but not N-cadherin staining, might be useful in diagnosing CIN and for predicting prognosis in patients with early-stage SCC. PMID:27223886

  7. N-cadherin expression is regulated by UTP in schwannoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martiáñez, Tania; Lamarca, Aloa; Casals, Nuria; Gella, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are peripheral myelinating glial cells that express the neuronal Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecule, neural cadherin (N-cadherin). N-cadherin is involved in glia-glia and axon-glia interactions and participates in many key events, which range from the control of axonal growth and guidance to synapse formation and plasticity. Extracellular UTP activates P2Y purinergic receptors and exerts short- and long-term effects on several tissues to promote wound healing. Nevertheless, the contribution of P2Y receptors in peripheral nervous system functions is not completely understood. The current study demonstrated that UTP induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in N-cadherin expression in SCs. Furthermore, N-cadherin expression was blocked by the P2 purinoceptor antagonist suramin. The increased N-cadherin expression induced by UTP was mediated by phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular-regulated kinase and p38 kinase. Moreover, the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 and the protein kinase C inhibitor calphostin C attenuated the UTP-induced activation of MAPKs significantly. Extracellular UTP also modulated increased in the expression of the early transcription factors c-Fos and c-Jun. We also demonstrated that the region of the N-cadherin promoter between nucleotide positions -3698 and -2620, which contained one activator protein-1-binding site, was necessary for UTP-induced gene expression. These results suggest a novel role for P2Y purinergic receptors in the regulation of N-cadherin expression in SCs. PMID:23271561

  8. Knockdown of LI-cadherin alters expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiongfang; Shen, Wei; Zhou, Huangyan; Dong, Weiguo; Gao, Dian

    2016-05-01

    Liver-intestine cadherin (LI-cadherin), a novel member of the cadherin family, has been associated with the ability of a tumor to acquire an aggressive phenotype in several types of cancer. However, the exact function of LI-cadherin in the process of tumor invasion and metastasis remains predominantly unknown. To explore the effect of LI-cadherin on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and galectin-3 in LoVo human colorectal cancer cells, a RNA interference technique was applied to suppress the expression of LI‑cadherin. Subsequently, the mRNA levels and activities of MMP-2 and -9 were analyzed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and gelatin zymography, respectively. Additionally, the protein expression level of galectin-3 was determined by western blot analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-silencing of LI-cadherin significantly increased the mRNA levels and activities of MMP‑2 and ‑9, and significantly reduced the protein levels of galectin‑3 in LoVo cells compared with control shRNA (P<0.05). These data indicate that knockdown of LI‑cadherin facilitates the invasion of cancer cells by degrading extracellular matrix components via activation of MMP‑2 and ‑9, and increases cancer cell adhesion and migration via altered expression of galectin‑3. This suggests that LI‑cadherin serves an important role in the invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer, and may be used as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27035870

  9. Cadherin-11 Promotes Invasive Behavior of Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, Hans P.; Niederreiter, Birgit; Lee, David M.; Jimenez-Boj, Esther; Smolen, Josef S.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To define the expression pattern of cadherin-11 in destructive pannus tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to determine if cadherin-11 expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes controls their invasive capacity. Methods Cadherin-11 expression in rheumatoid synovial tissue was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. To examine the role of cadherin-11 in regulating the invasive behavior of fibroblast-like synoviocytes, we generated L-cell clones expressing wild-type cadherin-11, mutant cadherin-11, and empty vector transfected controls. The invasive capacity of L-cell transfectants and cultured fibroblast-like synoviocytes treated with a blocking cadherin-11-Fc protein or control immunoglobulin was determined in Matrigel invasion assays. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed that cadherin-11 is abundantly expressed in cells at the cartilage-pannus junction in rheumatoid synovitis. Invasion assays demonstrate a twofold increased invasive capacity of cadherin-11 transfected L-cells compared to L-cells transfected with E-cadherin or control vector. The invasive behavior of the L-cells stably transfected with a cadherin-11 construct that lacked the juxta-membrane cytoplasmic domain (cadherin-11 ΔJMD) was diminished to the level of vector control L-cells. Further, treatment with the cadherin-11-Fc fusion protein diminished the invasive capacity of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Conclusion These in vitro studies implicate a role for cadherin-11 in promoting cell invasion and contribute insight into the invasive nature of fibroblast-like synoviocytes in chronic synovitis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19404963

  10. Expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric carcinoma and its correlation with the clinicopathological features and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Xu, Cai-Pu; Han, Biao; Li, Min; Qiao, Liang; Fang, Dian-Chun; Yang, Jian-Min

    2002-01-01

    AIM: The E-cadherin-catenin complex is important for cell-cell adhesion of epithelial cells. Impairment of one or more components of this complex is associated with poor differentiation and increased invasiveness of carcinomas. We evaluated the expression pattern of E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric carcinoma and dysplasia and analyzed their relationship with tumor clinicopathological features and patient survival. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and β-catenin was performed from paraffin specimens of 163 gastric carcinomas, 44 gastric mucosal dysplasia, and 25 intestinal metaplasia, 28 atrophic gastritis and 12 healthy controls. RESULTS: Normal membrane staining was observed in intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and control biopsy specimens for E-cadherin and β-catenin. 36% and 16% of gastric dysplasia were stained abnormally for E-cadherin and β-catenin respectively. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin was demonstrated in 46% and 44% of gastric carcinoma respectively. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin and β- catenin occurred more significantly in Borrmann III/IV than in Borrmann I/II type (P < 0.005, respectively). A significantly higher proportion of signet-ring, mucinous and tubular adenocarcinomas were abnormally expressed for E-cadherin and β-catenin as compared with papillary adenocarcinomas (χ2 = 8.47, P < 0.005, and χ2 = 7.05, P < 0.01, respectively). Morever, abnormal E-cadherin and β-catenin staining occurred more frequently in diffuse than in intestinal type of tumor (χ2 = 18.18 and 17.79, P < 0.005, respectively). There was a significant correlation between abnormal β-catenin expression and positive lymph node metastasis. A survival advantage was noted in tumors retaining normal membranous expression of β-catenin, independent of type, grade, or stage of the disease (P < 0.0005). CONCLUSION: Abnormal expression of the E-cadherin-catenin complex occurs frequently in gatric carcinoma, closely related to

  11. Expression of the extracellular domain of OB-cadherin as an Fc fusion protein using bicistronic retroviral expression vector

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Cristina B. B.; Chu, Khoi; Lee, Yu-Chen; Hu, Mickey C-T.; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Osteoblast cadherin (OB-cadherin, also known as cadherin-11) is a Ca2+-dependent homophilic cell adhesion molecule that is expressed mainly in osteoblasts. OB-cadherin is expressed in prostate cancer and may be involved in the homing of metastatic prostate cancer cells to bone. The extracellular domain of OB-cadherin may be used to inhibit the adhesion between prostate cancer cells and osteoblasts. In this report, we describe the expression of the extracellular domain of OB-cadherin as an Fc fusion protein (OB-CAD-Fc) in human embryonic kidney 293FT cells using a bicistronic retroviral vector. Coexpression of GFP and OB-CAD-Fc through the bicistronic vector permitted enrichment of OB-CAD-Fc–expressing cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Recombinant OB-CAD-Fc proteins were secreted into cell medium, and about 0.85 mg of purified OB-CAD-Fc protein was purified from 1 liter of the conditioned medium using immobilized protein A-affinity chromatography. The purified OB-CAD-Fc was biologically active because it supported the adhesion of PC3 cells and L cells transduced with OB-cadherin. The availability of OB-CAD-Fc offers opportunities to test whether OB-CAD-Fc can be used to inhibit OB-cadherin–mediated prostate cancer bone metastasis in vivo or to generate antibodies for inhibiting the adhesion between prostate cancer cells and osteoblasts. PMID:18620062

  12. XPC inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation and migration by enhancing E-Cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Tiantian; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Linlin; Zhao, Ran; Zou, Ning; Qu, Meihua; Duan, Wenrui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Qi-En

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) protein is an important DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair. Deletion of XPC is associated with early stages of human lung carcinogenesis, and reduced XPC mRNA levels predict poor patient outcome for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the mechanisms linking loss of XPC expression and poor prognosis in lung cancer are still unclear. Here, we report evidence that XPC silencing drives proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells by down-regulating E-Cadherin. XPC knockdown enhanced proliferation and migration while decreasing E-Cadherin expression in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype. Restoration of E-Cadherin in these cells suppressed XPC knockdown-induced cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that the loss of XPC repressed E-Cadherin expression by activating the ERK pathway and upregulating Snail expression. Our findings indicate that XPC silencing-induced reduction of E-Cadherin expression contributes, at least in part, to the poor outcome of NSCLC patients with low XPC expression. PMID:25871391

  13. Transition of Immunohistochemical Expression of E-Cadherin and Vimentin from Premalignant to Malignant Lesions of Oral Cavity and Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Kafil; Ara, Anjum; Siddiqui, Shahid A; Sherwani, Rana K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to study the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and vimentin in precancerous lesions of the oral cavity and oropharynx and to use the specific pattern of expression to predict invasiveness. Methods This cross-sectional study looked at 87 cases of oral and oropharyngeal lesions obtained between December 2012 and November 2014 in the Department of Pathology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, India. Fifty-three biopsies from the buccal mucosa, tongue, and pharynx and 34 resected oral specimens were evaluated for premalignant and malignant lesions using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical stains. Immunohistochemical expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and mesenchymal marker vimentin was evaluated wherever possible. Slides were examined for staining pattern (cytoplasmic or membrane), proportion, and intensity of staining of tumor cells. Patients follow-up and therapy related changes were also studied. Results There were 64 premalignant and 23 malignant cases in our study with 65 (74.7%) cases seen in males and 22 (25.3%) cases seen in females. The majority of malignant cases, (n = 15; 64.2%) were seen in the fifth and sixth decades of life while most of the premalignant lesions (n = 36; 56.4%) were seen in the fourth and fifth decade. Amongst the 64 premalignant oral lesions, leukoplakia comprised of 14 cases (21.9%), of which three cases had associated mild to moderate dysplasia. The majority of premalignant lesions showed strong E-cadherin expression and decreased expression of vimentin with negative and weak expression in both dysplasias and carcinoma in situ (p = 0.013). E-cadherin expression was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas compared to dysplasias and carcinoma in situ and the difference in immunoreactivity was statistically significant (p < 0.050). Vimentin expression increased as the tumor progressed from dysplasias to carcinoma in situ to invasive

  14. Decreased expression of VE-cadherin and claudin-5 and increased phosphorylation of VE-cadherin in vascular endothelium in nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Yukitatsu, Yoriko; Hata, Masaki; Yamanegi, Koji; Yamada, Naoko; Ohyama, Hideki; Nakasho, Keiji; Kojima, Yusuke; Oka, Hideki; Tsuzuki, Kenzo; Sakagami, Masafumi; Terada, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-01

    VE-cadherin and claudin-5 are major components of adherens and tight junctions of vascular endothelial cells and a decrease in their expression and an increase in the tyrosine-phosphorylation of VE-cadherin are associated with an increase in endothelial paracellular permeability. To clarify the mechanism underlying the development of edema in nasal polyps, we studied these molecules in polyp microvessels. Normal inferior turbinate mucosal tissues and nasal polyps from patients treated with or without glucocorticoid were stained for VE-cadherin or claudin-5 and CD31 by a double-immunofluorescence method and the immunofluorescence intensities were graded 1-3 with increasing intensity. To correct for differences in fluorescence intensity attributable to a different endothelial area being exposed in a section or to the thickness of a section, the relative immunofluorescence intensity was estimated by dividing the grade of VE-cadherin or claudin-5 by that of CD31 in each microvessel. Tyrosine-phosphorylation of VE-cadherin was examined by Western blot analysis. The relative intensities of VE-cadherin and claudin-5 in the CD31-positive microvessels significantly decreased in the following order; inferior turbinate mucosa, treated polyps and untreated polyps. The ratio of tyrosine-phosphorylated VE-cadherin to VE-cadherin was significantly higher in untreated polyps than in the inferior turbinate mucosa and treated polyps, between which no significant difference in the ratio was seen. Thus, in nasal polyps, the barrier function of endothelial adherens and tight junctions is weakened, although glucocorticoid treatment improves this weakened barrier function. PMID:23474739

  15. HER-2/neu and E-cadherin Expression and Microsatellite Instability in Gastric Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, L; Kamkari, S; Mokarram, P; Lankarani, K Bagheri; Tabibi, N; Ashktorab, H; Vasei, M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastric dysplasia (GD) is a precursor lesion of gastric adenocarcinoma. Intestinal type gastric carcinoma commonly shows microsatellite instability (MSI) and the diffuse type is associated with down regulation of E-cadherin. HER-2/neu is over-expressed in some cases of gastric cancer. In this study, MSI and expression rates of HER-2/neu and E-cadherin in GD were evaluated. METHODS Paraffin blocks of 21 cases of low grade dysplasia (LD), 11 cases of high grade dysplasia (HD) and 25 cases of indefinite for dysplasia (ID) were collected. After deparaffinization and antigen retrieval, the sections were incubated with antibodies against E-cadherin, hMLH1, hMSH2 and HER-2/neu. The streptavidin-biotin complex method was used followed by peroxidase enzyme development with diaminobenzidine. RESULTS HER-2/neu was positive in six cases of HD (50%), four LD (21%) and two ID (9%). E-cadherin was absent in two cases of LD and showed normal expression in all HD and ID cases. hMLH1 expression was absent or markedly decreased only in the zones of dysplasia in HD (3/11), LD (3/21) and ID (4/25). Absence or diminished expression of hMSH2 was seen in HD (3/11), LD (2/21) and ID (3/25) cases. HER-2/neu expression showed close association with diminished expression of hMLH1 or hMSH2 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Stepwise increase in the expression rate of HER-2/neu was seen in ID, LD and HD cases implying its role in cancer evolution. The absence of hMLH1 and hMSH2 in GD may predispose individuals to over-expression of other oncogenes such as HER-2/neu. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin is not a frequent finding in GD. PMID:25197528

  16. Toxoplasma gondii down modulates cadherin expression in skeletal muscle cells inhibiting myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii belongs to a large and diverse group of obligate intracellular parasitic protozoa. Primary culture of mice skeletal muscle cells (SkMC) was employed as a model for experimental toxoplasmosis studies. The myogenesis of SkMC was reproduced in vitro and the ability of T. gondii tachyzoite forms to infect myoblasts and myotubes and its influence on SkMC myogenesis were analyzed. Results In this study we show that, after 24 h of interaction, myoblasts (61%) were more infected with T. gondii than myotubes (38%) and inhibition of myogenesis was about 75%. The role of adhesion molecules such as cadherin in this event was investigated. First, we demonstrate that cadherin localization was restricted to the contact areas between myocytes/myocytes and myocytes/myotubes during the myogenesis process. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analysis of parasite-host cell interaction showed a 54% reduction in cadherin expression at 24 h of infection. Concomitantly, a reduction in M-cadherin mRNA levels was observed after 3 and 24 h of T. gondii-host cell interaction. Conclusions These data suggest that T. gondii is able to down regulate M-cadherin expression, leading to molecular modifications in the host cell surface that interfere with membrane fusion and consequently affect the myogenesis process. PMID:21592384

  17. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  18. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  19. Surface engineered magnetic nanoparticles for specific immunotargeting of cadherin expressing cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Maria; Delhaes, Flavien; Puertas, Sara; Saez, Berta; de la Fuente, Jesús M.; Grazú, Valeria; Feracci, Helene

    2016-02-01

    In spite of historic advances in cancer biology and recent development of sophisticated chemotherapeutics, the outlook for patients with advanced cancer is still grim. In this sense nanoparticles (NPs), through their unique physical properties, enable the development of new approaches for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Thus far the most used active targeting scheme involves NPs functionalization with antibodies specific to molecules overexpressed on cancer cell’s surface. Therefore, such active targeting relies on differences in NPs uptake kinetics rates between tumor and healthy cells. Many cancers of epithelial origin are associated with the inappropriate expression of non-epithelial cadherins (e.g. N-, P-, -11) with concomitant loss of E-cadherin. Such phenomenon named cadherin switching favors tumor development and metastasis via interactions of tumor cells with stromal components. That is why we optimized the oriented functionalization of fluorescently labelled magnetic NPs with a novel antibody specific for the extracellular domain of cadherin-11. The obtained Ab-NPs exhibited high specificity when incubated with two cell lines used as models of tumor and healthy cells. Thus, cadherin switching offers a great opportunity for the development of active targeting strategies aimed to improve the early detection and treatment of cancer.

  20. Expression Level of Genes Coding for Cell Adhesion Molecules of Cadherin Group in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Zbigniew; Opiłka, Mieszko Norbert; Kruszniewska-Rajs, Celina; Rajs, Antoni; Waniczek, Dariusz; Starzewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Justyna; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and also one of the main death causes. Cell adhesion molecules are taking part in specific junctions, contributing to tissue integrality. Lower expression of the cadherins may be correlated with poorer differentiation of the CRC, and its more aggressive phenotype. The aim of the study is to designate the cadherin genes potentially useful for the diagnostics, prognostics, and the treatment of CRC. Material/Method Specimens were collected from 28 persons (14 female and 14 male), who were operated for CRC. The molecular analysis was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays, mRNA used was collected from adenocarcinoma, and macroscopically healthy tissue. The results were validated using qRT-PCR technique. Results Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of normalized mRNA levels has shown 4 groups with statistically different gene expression. The control group was divided into 2 groups, the one was appropriate control (C1), the second (C2) had the genetic properties of the CRC, without pathological changes histologically and macroscopically. The other 2 groups were: LSC (Low stage cancer) and HSC (High stage cancer). Consolidated results of the fluorescency of all of the differential genes, designated two coding E-cadherin (CDH1) with the lower expression, and P-cadherin (CDH3) with higher expression in CRC tissue. Conclusions The levels of genes expression are different for several groups of cadherins, and are related with the stage of CRC, therefore could be potentially the useful marker of the stage of the disease, also applicable in treatment and diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26167814

  1. Dehydropeptidase 1 promotes metastasis through regulation of E-cadherin expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Seon-Jin; Cho, Hee Jun; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Jong-Tae; Kim, Jae Wha; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Yeom, Young Il; Lim, Jong-Seok; Lee, Younghee; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-01

    Dehydropeptidase 1 (DPEP1) is a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase that is expressed aberrantly in several cancers. The role of DPEP1 in cancer remain controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that DPEP1 functions as a positive regulator for colon cancer cell metastasis. The expression of DPEP1 mRNA and proteins were upregulated in colon cancer tissues compared to normal mucosa. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches were used to examine the malignant phenotype of DPEP1-expressing or DPEP1-depleted cells. DPEP1 expression caused a significant increase in colon cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro, and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, DPEP1 depletion induced opposite effects. Furthermore, cilastatin, a DPEP1 inhibitor, suppressed the invasion and metastasis of DPEP1-expressing cells. DPEP1 inhibited the leukotriene D4 signaling pathway and increased the expression of E-cadherin. We also show that DPEP1 mediates TGF-β-induced EMT. TGF-β transcriptionally repressed DPEP1 expression. TGF-β treatment decreased E-cadherin expression and promoted cell invasion in DPEP1-expressing colon cancer cell lines, whereas it did not affect these parameters in DPEP1-depleted cell lines. These results suggest that DPEP1 promotes cancer metastasis by regulating E-cadherin plasticity and that it might be a potential therapeutic target for preventing the progression of colon cancer. PMID:26824987

  2. Hypotonic stress induces E-cadherin expression in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Loitsch, Stefan; Guschel, Maike; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August

    2005-01-01

    Human epidermis marks the interface between internal and external environments with the major task being to maintain body hydration. Alternating exposure of skin to a dry or humid environment is likely to cause changes in the epidermal water gradient resulting in osmotic alterations of epidermal keratinocytes. The present in vitro approach studied the effect of hypotonicity on cell-cell contact. It was demonstrated that hypotonic stress applied to human epithelial cells (HaCaT, A-431) induced upregulation of E-cadherin at both, the protein and mRNA level. 5'-deletional mutants of the E-cadherin promoter identified an element ranging from -53 to +31 that conveyed strong transactivation under hypotonic stress. In order to define relevant upstream regulators members of the MAP kinase family, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt) were investigated. Hypotonic conditions led to a fast activation of ERK1/2, SAPK/JNK, p38, EGFR and PKB/Akt with distinct activation patterns. Experiments using specific inhibitors showed that p38 contributes to the E-cadherin transactivation under hypotonic conditions. Further upstream, adhesion was found to be a prerequisite for E-cadherin transactivation in this model. In summary, the present study provides evidence that E-cadherin is an osmo-sensitive gene that responds to hypotonic stress. The function of this regulation may be found in morphological changes induced by cell swelling. It is likely that induction of E-cadherin contributes to the stabilization between adjacent cells in order to withstand the physical forces induced by hypotonicity. PMID:15620715

  3. Phospholipase Cδ1 induces E-cadherin expression and suppresses malignancy in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Satow, Reiko; Hirano, Tamaki; Batori, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Tomomi; Murayama, Yumi; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations in CRC predict the ineffectiveness of EGF receptor-targeted therapy. Previous transcriptional microarray analysis suggests the association between phospholipase Cδ1 (PLCδ1) expression and KRAS mutation status in CRC. However, both the roles and the regulatory mechanisms of PLCδ1 in CRC are not known. Here, we found that the expression of PLCδ1, one of the most basal PLCs, is down-regulated in CRC specimens compared with normal colon epithelium by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we examined the roles of PLCδ1 in CRC cell lines that harbor an activating KRAS mutation. Ectopic expression of PLCδ1 in CRC cells induced the expression of E-cadherin, whereas knockdown of PLCδ1 repressed the expression of E-cadherin. Moreover, the overexpression of PLCδ1 suppressed the expression of several mesenchymal genes and reduced cell motility, invasiveness, and in vivo tumorigenicity of SW620 CRC cells. We also showed that PLCδ1 expression is repressed by the KRAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) pathway. Furthermore, PLCδ1 suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 through E-cadherin induction in CRC cells, suggesting the presence of a negative regulatory loop between KRAS/MEK/ERK signaling and PLCδ1. These data indicate that PLCδ1 has tumor-suppressive functions in CRC through E-cadherin induction and KRAS/MEK/ERK signal attenuation. PMID:25197077

  4. Salt-inducible kinase 1 regulates E-cadherin expression and intercellular junction stability.

    PubMed

    Eneling, Kristina; Brion, Laura; Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria J; Sznajder, Jacob I; Mochizuki, Naoki; Emoto, Kazuo; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Bertorello, Alejandro M

    2012-08-01

    The protein kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) regulates cell polarity and intercellular junction stability. Also, LKB1 controls the activity of salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1). The role and relevance of SIK1 and its downstream effectors in linking the LKB1 signals within these processes are partially understood. We hypothesize that SIK1 may link LKB1 signals to the maintenance of epithelial junction stability by regulating E-cadherin expression. Results from our studies using a mouse lung alveolar epithelial (MLE-12) cell line or human renal proximal tubule (HK2) cell line transiently or stably lacking the expression of SIK1 (using SIK1 siRNAs or shRNAs), or with its expression abrogated (sik1(+/+) vs. sik1(-/-) mice), indicate that suppression of SIK1 (∼40%) increases the expression of the transcriptional repressors Snail2 (∼12-fold), Zeb1 (∼100%), Zeb2 (∼50%), and TWIST (∼20-fold) by activating cAMP-response element binding protein. The lack of SIK1 and activation of transcriptional repressors decreases the availability of E-cadherin (mRNA and protein expression by ∼100 and 80%, respectively) and the stability of intercellular junctions in epithelia (decreases in transepithelial resistance). Furthermore, LKB1-mediated increases in E-cadherin expression are impaired in cells where SIK1 has been disabled. We conclude that SIK1 is a key regulator of E-cadherin expression, and thereby contributes to the stability of intercellular junctions. PMID:22522110

  5. β-elemene decreases cell invasion by upregulating E-cadherin expression in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yinghua

    2013-08-01

    Inactivation of E-cadherin results in cell migration and invasion, hence leading to cancer aggressiveness and metastasis. Downregulation of E-cadherin is closely correlated with a poor prognosis in invasive breast cancer. Thus, re-introducing E-cadherin is a novel strategy for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of the traditional Chinese medicine, β-elemene (ELE), on E-cadherin expression, cell migration and invasion in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. MCF-7 cells were treated with 50 and 100 µg/ml ELE. E-cadherin mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. E-cadherin protein levels were determined by immunofluorescence and western blot assays. Cell motility was measured by a Transwell assay. ELE increased both the protein and mRNA levels of E-cadherin, accompanied by decreased cell migration and invasion. Further analysis demonstrated that ELE upregulated estrogen receptor‑α (ERα) and metastasis-associated protein 3 (MTA3), and decreased the nuclear transcription factor Snail. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that ELE decreases cell migration and invasion by upregulating E-cadherin expression via controlling the ERα/MTA3/Snail signaling pathway. PMID:23732279

  6. Thrombomodulin reduces tumorigenic and metastatic potential of lung cancer cells by up-regulation of E-cadherin and down-regulation of N-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nana; Huo, Zihe; Zhang, Bin; Meng, Mei; Cao, Zhifei; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Quansheng

    2016-08-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an endothelial cell membrane protein and plays critical roles in anti-thrombosis, anti-inflammation, vascular endothelial protection, and is traditionally regarded as a "vascular protection god". In recent years, although TM has been reported to be down-regulated in a variety of malignant tumors including lung cancer, the role and mechanism of TM in lung cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we found that induction of TM overexpression by cholesterol-reducing drug atorvastatin significantly diminished the tumorigenic capability of the lung cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that TM overexpression caused G0/G1 phase arrest and markedly reduced the colony forming capability of the cells. Furthermore, overexpression of TM inhibited cell migration and invasion. Consistently, depletion of TM promoted cell growth, reduced the cell population at the G0/G1 phase, and enhanced cell migratory ability. Mechanistic study revealed that TM up-regulated E-cadherin but down-regulated N-cadherin expression, resulting in reversal of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the lung cancer cells. Moreover, silencing TM expression led to decreased E-cadherin and increased N-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that TM functions as a tumor suppressive protein, providing a conceptual framework for inducing TM overexpression as a sensible strategy and approach for novel anti-lung cancer drug discovery. PMID:27223053

  7. Hybrid GPCR/cadherin (Celsr) proteins in rat testis are expressed with cell type specificity and exhibit differential Sertoli cell-germ cell adhesion activity.

    PubMed

    Beall, Stephanie A; Boekelheide, Kim; Johnson, Kamin J

    2005-01-01

    Spermatogenesis requires Sertoli cell-germ cell adhesion for germ cell survival and maturation. Cadherins are a diverse superfamily of adhesion proteins; structurally unique members of this superfamily (celsr cadherins) are hybrid molecules containing extracellular cadherin repeats connected to a G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane motif. Here we demonstrate postnatal testicular mRNA expression of the 3 celsr paralogs (celsr1, celsr2, and celsr3), protein localization of celsr2 and celsr3, and functional analysis of celsr2 adhesion activity in primary Sertoli cell-germ cell co-cultures. Evaluation of celsr mRNA levels during a postnatal time course indicated that celsr1 and celsr2 were Sertoli cell and/or early-stage germ cell products, whereas celsr3 was expressed in later-stage germ cells. Cell type-specific expression was verified using the Sertoli cell line 93RS2, where celsr1 and celsr2 mRNA, but not celsr3, were detected. Immunostaining of testicular cryosections resulted in celsr2 protein localization to a spokelike pattern in the basal seminiferous epithelium and punctate figures in the apical epithelium, consistent with both Sertoli cell and germ cell expression. Celsr3 localized to punctate structures in the adluminal epithelium from postnatal day 40, consistent with elongate spermatid expression. The subcellular localization of celsr2 was examined further to define its localization in Sertoli cells and germ cells. Celsr2 localized to the Golgi complex in Sertoli cells and germ cells. In addition, germ cell celsr2 localized to a rab7-positive structure, which may be an endocytic compartment. Neither celsr2 nor celsr3 immunostaining was present at classic cadherin-based adhesion junctions. Nonetheless, the addition of a recombinant celsr2 protein fragment consisting of extracellular cadherin domains 4 through 8 to Sertoli cell-germ cell co-cultures resulted in germ cell detachment from Sertoli cells. Collectively, these data indicate that celsr

  8. The Characteristics and Prognostic Effect of E-Cadherin Expression in Colorectal Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renjie; Ma, Xiaoji; Li, Yaqi; He, Yiping; Huang, Dan; Cai, Sanjun; Peng, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is rare. The aim of this study is to understand the clinicopathological features and identify the possible prognostic factors in colorectal SRCC. Methods Patients with SRCC who underwent primary lesion resection at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from September 2008 to July 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient’s gender, age, tumor location, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, synchronous distant metastasis, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and E-cadherin expression were studied with prognosis, and the correlation between E-cadherin expression and clinicopathological features were analyzed. All clinicopathological and molecular factors were put into multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model for detecting independent prognostic factors. Results 59 patients accounting for 0.89% of total colorectal cancer patients met the criteria and were enrolled in the study. The median survival time is 28.9 months, and the 3-year survival rate is 62.7%. SRCC were seen more common in young male patients. Advanced stage was more common in SRCC, 58 (98.3%) patients had T3/T4 lesions, 52 (88.1%) patients had lymph node metastasis, and 14 (23.7%) patients had distant metastasis. Distant metastases were seen more common in peritoneal cavity. Distant metastasis (HR = 4.194, 95% CI: 1.297–13.567), lymphovascular invasion (HR = 2.888, 95% CI: 1.115–7.483), and E-cadherin expression (HR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.096–0.768) were independent predictors for survival. Conclusions SRCC is a rare subtype of colorectal cancer with poor prognosis. Distant metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, and E-cadherin expression can predict prognosis of colorectal SRCCs independently. More precise therapy and more close surveillance are needed for these patients. PMID:27509205

  9. Cutaneous histiocytic sarcoma with E-cadherin expression in a Pembroke Welsh Corgi dog.

    PubMed

    Hirako, Ayano; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Sakurai, Masashi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Sakai, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Takashi; Morita, Takehito; Moore, Peter F

    2015-09-01

    An 11-year-old male neutered Pembroke Welsh Corgi dog displayed a mass measuring 7.5 cm × 6.6 cm × 1.6 cm in the skin. Neoplastic tissue was nonencapsulated, and the neoplastic cells showed infiltrative growth into the surrounding tissue on microscopic examination. The neoplastic tissue was mainly located from the dermis to the subcutis. Epidermotropism of neoplastic cells was not observed. The tissue was composed of irregular, solid nests of round to polygonal cells. Nests were separated by fine fibrovascular stroma. Mitotic index was high (7.90 ± 0.38 per high power field) and extensive necrosis was observed in the neoplastic tissue. Vascular invasion was often observed in the neoplastic tissue. Neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, HLA-DR antigen, Iba1, CD18, and E-cadherin, but cells did not express cytokeratin, S100, CD20, CD79α, CD3, MUM-1, lambda light chain, kappa light chain, lysozyme, CD204, or CD11d by immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dendrites on these cells. From the above-mentioned findings, the tumor was diagnosed as a cutaneous histiocytic sarcoma with E-cadherin expression. It is possible that neoplastic cells in the present case were derived from cutaneous Langerhans cell. To our knowledge, cutaneous histiocytic sarcoma with E-cadherin expression in domestic animals has not been previously diagnosed in domestic animals. PMID:26330395

  10. Prognostic significance of reduced immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin in endometrial cancer-results of a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xing; Du, Xue-Lian; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies which investigated the relationship between reduced E-cadherin and prognosis of endometrial cancer were ambiguous and conflicting. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between reduced expression of E-cadherin and endometrial cancer by meta-analysis approach. Method: AfterPubmed and Embasewere deliberately searched via the internet, 8 pieces of literaturewere totally included in final meta-analysis. After the data had been abstracted, the pulled odds ratio (OR) and hazard ratio (HR) were calculated by STATA with random or fixed effect model depending on their heterogeneity. The publication bias of included literature were tested by Begg’s funnel plot and Egger’s test. Results: The pulled data showed that the reduced expression of E-cadherin was significantly associated with overall survival (OS), HR=2.42, 95% CI: 1.50-3.89. The clinical parameters such as lymph node metastasis (LNM), myometrial invasion (MI), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, histological type and pathological type were also significantly associated with reduced expression of E-cadherin. The results of publication biasshowed there were no significant publication bias. Conclusion: Endometrial cancer patients with reduced expression of E-cadherin may have a poorer prognosis than those with normal or higher expression of E-cadherin. PMID:26770483

  11. Activated macrophages down-regulate expression of E-cadherin in hepatocellular carcinoma cells via NF-κB/Slug pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianteng; Wang, Hao; Li, Guosheng; Song, Yonghong; Wang, Shurong; Zhu, Faliang; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Shi, Yongyu

    2014-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas are an aggressive malignancy mainly due to metastasis or postsurgical recurrence. Expression of E-cadherin is strongly reduced in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and its downregulation is connected to invasiveness and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinomas. The previous study showed that the supernatant from activated macrophages can downregulate the expression of E-cadherin in HCC cells. The partial known molecular mechanism is that tyrosine kinases c-Src- and EGFR phosphorylate β-catenin and E-cadherin leading to destabilization of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex. The aim of this study is to clarify other mechanism by which activated macrophages downregulate the expression of E-cadherin. We detect the expression of E-cadherin and macrophage infiltration in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues by double-staining immunohistochemistry and evaluate the relationship between macrophages and E-cadherin expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro experiments. We found that reduced expression of E-cadherin was associated with macrophage infiltration along the border between the tumor nest and stroma in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Besides, protein expression of E-cadherin was significantly decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma cells co-cultured with macrophages derived from THP-1 cells. Consistently, mRNA expression of E-cadherin was also decreased in cancer cells co-cultured with THP-1-differentiated macrophages. Moreover, the downregulation of E-cadherin expression was companied by upregulation of Slug expression in cancer cells with conditional medium from THP-1-differentiated macrophage culture. The change in expression of E-cadherin and Slug was abrogated when NF-κB signaling pathway was blocked. All the findings suggested that macrophages contributed to the decreased expression of E-cadherin by NF-κB/Slug pathway in hepatocellular carcinomas. PMID:24894673

  12. Surface Expression of Precursor N-cadherin Promotes Tumor Cell Invasion12

    PubMed Central

    Maret, Deborah; Gruzglin, Eugenia; Sadr, Mohamad Seyed; Siu, Vincent; Shan, Weisong; Koch, Alexander W; Seidah, Nabil G; Del Maestro, Rolando F; Colman, David R

    2010-01-01

    The expression of N-cadherin (NCAD) has been shown to correlate with increased tumor cell motility and metastasis. However, NCAD-mediated adhesion is a robust phenomenon and therefore seems to be inconsistent with the “release” from intercellular adhesion required for invasion. We show that in the most invasive melanoma and brain tumor cells, altered posttranslational processing results in abundant nonadhesive precursor N-cadherin (proNCAD) at the cell surface, although total NCAD levels remain constant. We demonstrate that aberrantly processed proNCAD promotes cell migration and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, in human tumor specimens, we find high levels of proNCAD as well, supporting an overall conclusion that proNCAD and mature NCAD coexist on these tumor cell surfaces and that it is the ratio between these functionally antagonistic moieties that directly correlates with invasion potential. Our work provides insight into what may be a widespread mechanism for invasion and metastasis and challenges the current dogma of the functional roles played by classic cadherins in tumor progression. PMID:21170270

  13. Plakoglobin Reduces the in vitro Growth, Migration and Invasion of Ovarian Cancer Cells Expressing N-Cadherin and Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Alaee, Mahsa; Danesh, Ghazal; Pasdar, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of cadherins and catenins plays pivotal roles in ovarian cancer development and progression. Plakoglobin (PG, γ-catenin) is a paralog of β-catenin with dual adhesive and signaling functions. While β-catenin has known oncogenic function, PG generally acts as a tumor/metastasis suppressor. We recently showed that PG interacted with p53 and that its growth/metastasis inhibitory function may be mediated by this interaction. Very little is known about the role of PG in ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the in vitro tumor/metastasis suppressor effects of PG in ovarian cancer cell lines with mutant p53 expression and different cadherin profiles. We showed that the N-cadherin expressing and E-cadherin and PG deficient ES-2 cells were highly migratory and invasive, whereas OV-90 cells that express E-cadherin, PG and very little/no N-cadherin were not. Exogenous expression of PG or E-cadherin or N-cadherin knockdown in ES-2 cells (ES-2-E-cad, ES-2-PG and ES-2-shN-cad) significantly reduced their migration and invasion. Also, PG expression or N-cadherin knockdown significantly decreased ES-2 cells growth. Furthermore, PG interacted with both cadherins and with wild type and mutant p53 in normal ovarian and ES-2-PG cell lines, respectively. PMID:27144941

  14. An ileal endometrioma: of carcinoids and cadherin.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Rahul; Gafni-Kane, Adam; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2007-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with history of prior adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome presented with intermittent right lower quadrant (RLQ) abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, and non-bloody diarrhea for 2 months. Symptoms were not related to her menstrual periods. Examination revealed only an ill-defined mass in the RLQ. Investigations for infectious causes, inflammatory bowel disease, and carcinoid tumor were negative. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a terminal ileal mass with mesenteric stranding and dilatation of the proximal bowel. At laparotomy, a fibrotic, terminal ileal mass with matted adhesions involving the mesentery and retroperitoneum was resected. Histopathological examination identified multiple foci of endometriosis extending from the serosal surface into the mucosa of the terminal ileum. Immunostaining revealed E- and P-cadherin, but not N-cadherin immuno-positivity. Mucosal involvement without cyclical menstrual symptoms and intestinal obstruction is an unusual presentation of intestinal endometriosis. Although the mechanism of endometriosis is not clear, the role of cell adhesion molecules such as cadherins has received attention. Increased expression of E- and P-cadherin and decreased N-cadherin expression in our patient demonstrates differential expression of these cadherins in endometriotic tissue. Future studies may investigate patterns of differential expression of these cadherins in a series of cases to elucidate the mechanisms of migration of endometriotic tissue. PMID:17390177

  15. N-cadherin mediated distribution of beta-catenin alters MAP kinase and BMP-2 signaling on chondrogenesis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Modarresi, Rozbeh; Lafond, Toulouse; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Danielson, Keith G; Tuan, Rocky S; Seghatoleslami, M Reza

    2005-05-01

    We have examined the effect of calcium-dependent adhesion, mediated by N-cadherin, on cell signaling during chondrogenesis of multipotential embryonic mouse C3H10T1/2 cells. The activity of chondrogenic genes, type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 were examined in monolayer (non-chondrogenic), and micromass (chondrogenic) cultures of parental C3H10T1/2 cells and altered C3H10T1/2 cell lines that express a dominant negative form of N-cadherin (delta390-T1/2) or overexpress normal N-cadherin (MNCD2-T1/2). Our findings show that missexpression or inhibition of N-cadherin in C3H10T1/2 cells results in temporal and spatial changes in expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II. We have also analyzed activity of the serum response factor (SRF), a nuclear target of MAP kinase signaling implicated in chondrogenesis. In semi-confluent monolayer cultures (minimum cell-cell contact) of C3H10T1/2, MNCD2-T1/2, or delta390-T1/2 cells, there was no significant change in the pattern of MAP kinase or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) regulation of SRF. However, in micromass cultures, the effect of MAP kinase and BMP-2 on SRF activity was proportional to the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a Wnt stabilized cytoplasmic factor that can associate with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF) to serve as a transcription factor. Our findings suggest that the extent of adherens junction formation mediated by N-cadherin can modulate the potential Wnt-induced nuclear activity of beta-catenin. PMID:15723280

  16. Syndecan-2 enhances E-cadherin shedding and fibroblast-like morphological changes by inducing MMP-7 expression in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bohee; Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Moon, Byung-In; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-08-12

    E-cadherin plays a mechanical role in mediating cell-cell interactions and maintaining epithelial tissue integrity, and the loss of E-cadherin function has been implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. Syndecan-2, a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is upregulated during the development of colon cancer. Here, we assessed the functional relationship between E-cadherin and syndecan-2. We found that stable overexpression of syndecan-2 in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) enhanced the proteolytic shedding of E-cadherin to conditioned-media. Either knockdown of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) or inhibition of MMP-7 activity using GM6001 significantly reduced the extracellular shedding of E-cadherin, suggesting that syndecan-2 mediates E-cadherin shedding via MMP-7. Consistent with this notion, enhancement of MMP-7 expression by interleukin-1α treatment increased the shedding of E-cadherin. Conversely, the specific reduction of either syndecan-2 or MMP-7 reduced the shedding of E-cadherin. HT29 cells overexpressing syndecan-2 showed significantly lower cell-surface expression of E-cadherin, decreased cell-cell contact, a more fibroblastic cell morphology, and increased expression levels of ZEB-1. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 induces extracellular shedding of E-cadherin and supports the acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology by regulating MMP-7 expression in a colon cancer cell line. PMID:27270030

  17. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component: relation of MMP-13, EGFR, and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal; Aziz, Azza Abdel

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, ordinary adenocarcinoma (OA) and mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA) regarding clinicopathological parameters, survival, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin. We studied tumor tissue specimens from 28 patients with adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, 47 with OA, and 56 with MA, who underwent radical surgery from January 2007 to January 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. High density manual tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry for EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin was done. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component (AWMC) was significantly associated with more perineural invasion, lower EGFR, and MMP-13 expressions than OA, with no difference in E-cadherin expression. Conversely, only microscopic abscess formation was significantly more with colorectal AWMC than MC with no difference in EGFR, MMP-13 and E-cadherin expression between both groups. Colorectal AWMC showed a better survival than MA with no difference with OA. In a univariate analysis, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin expressions did not show a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival in patients with colorectal AWMC. Colorectal AWMC remains a vague entity that resembles OA in some clinicopathological and molecular respects as well as MA. PMID:25907382

  18. Cadherin Expression, Vectorial Active Transport, and Metallothionein Isoform 3 Mediated EMT/MET Responses in Cultured Primary and Immortalized Human Proximal Tubule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Slusser, Andrea; Bathula, Chandra S.; Sens, Donald A.; Somji, Seema; Sens, Mary Ann; Zhou, Xu Dong; Garrett, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cultures of human proximal tubule cells have been widely utilized to study the role of EMT in renal disease. The goal of this study was to define the role of growth media composition on classic EMT responses, define the expression of E- and N-cadherin, and define the functional epitope of MT-3 that mediates MET in HK-2 cells. Methods Immunohistochemistry, microdissection, real-time PCR, western blotting, and ELISA were used to define the expression of E- and N-cadherin mRNA and protein in HK-2 and HPT cell cultures. Site-directed mutagenesis, stable transfection, measurement of transepithelial resistance and dome formation were used to define the unique amino acid sequence of MT-3 associated with MET in HK-2 cells. Results It was shown that both E- and N-cadherin mRNA and protein are expressed in the human renal proximal tubule. It was shown, based on the pattern of cadherin expression, connexin expression, vectorial active transport, and transepithelial resistance, that the HK-2 cell line has already undergone many of the early features associated with EMT. It was shown that the unique, six amino acid, C-terminal sequence of MT-3 is required for MT-3 to induce MET in HK-2 cells. Conclusions The results show that the HK-2 cell line can be an effective model to study later stages in the conversion of the renal epithelial cell to a mesenchymal cell. The HK-2 cell line, transfected with MT-3, may be an effective model to study the process of MET. The study implicates the unique C-terminal sequence of MT-3 in the conversion of HK-2 cells to display an enhanced epithelial phenotype. PMID:25803827

  19. N-cadherin is Key to Expression of the Nucleus Pulposus Cell Phenotype under Selective Substrate Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Priscilla Y; Jing, Liufang; Chen, Jun; Lim, Foon-Lian; Tang, Ruhang; Choi, Hyowon; Cheung, Kenneth M; Risbud, Makarand V; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid; Leung, Victor Y; Setton, Lori A

    2016-01-01

    Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells of the intervertebral disc are essential for synthesizing extracellular matrix that contributes to disc health and mechanical function. NP cells have a unique morphology and molecular expression pattern derived from their notochordal origin, and reside in N-cadherin (CDH2) positive cell clusters in vivo. With disc degeneration, NP cells undergo morphologic and phenotypic changes including loss of CDH2 expression and ability to form cell clusters. Here, we investigate the role of CDH2 positive cell clusters in preserving healthy, biosynthetically active NP cells. Using a laminin-functionalized hydrogel system designed to mimic features of the native NP microenvironment, we demonstrate NP cell phenotype and morphology is preserved only when NP cells form CDH2 positive cell clusters. Knockdown (CRISPRi) or blocking CDH2 expression in vitro and in vivo results in loss of a healthy NP cell. Findings also reveal that degenerate human NP cells that are CDH2 negative can be promoted to re-express CDH2 and healthy, juvenile NP matrix synthesis patterns by promoting cell clustering for controlled microenvironment conditions. This work also identifies CDH2 interactions with β-catenin-regulated signaling as one mechanism by which CDH2-mediated cell interactions can control NP cell phenotype and biosynthesis towards maintenance of healthy intervertebral disc tissues. PMID:27292569

  20. N-cadherin is Key to Expression of the Nucleus Pulposus Cell Phenotype under Selective Substrate Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Priscilla Y; Jing, Liufang; Chen, Jun; Lim, Foon-Lian; Tang, Ruhang; Choi, Hyowon; Cheung, Kenneth M; Risbud, Makarand V; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid; Leung, Victor Y; Setton, Lori A

    2016-01-01

    Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells of the intervertebral disc are essential for synthesizing extracellular matrix that contributes to disc health and mechanical function. NP cells have a unique morphology and molecular expression pattern derived from their notochordal origin, and reside in N-cadherin (CDH2) positive cell clusters in vivo. With disc degeneration, NP cells undergo morphologic and phenotypic changes including loss of CDH2 expression and ability to form cell clusters. Here, we investigate the role of CDH2 positive cell clusters in preserving healthy, biosynthetically active NP cells. Using a laminin-functionalized hydrogel system designed to mimic features of the native NP microenvironment, we demonstrate NP cell phenotype and morphology is preserved only when NP cells form CDH2 positive cell clusters. Knockdown (CRISPRi) or blocking CDH2 expression in vitro and in vivo results in loss of a healthy NP cell. Findings also reveal that degenerate human NP cells that are CDH2 negative can be promoted to re-express CDH2 and healthy, juvenile NP matrix synthesis patterns by promoting cell clustering for controlled microenvironment conditions. This work also identifies CDH2 interactions with β-catenin-regulated signaling as one mechanism by which CDH2-mediated cell interactions can control NP cell phenotype and biosynthesis towards maintenance of healthy intervertebral disc tissues. PMID:27292569

  1. Homeoprotein Six2 promotes breast cancer metastasis via transcriptional and epigenetic control of E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chu-An; Drasin, David; Pham, Catherine; Jedlicka, Paul; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Guney, Michelle; Li, Howard; Nemenoff, Raphael; Costello, James C.; Tan, Aik-Choon; Ford, Heide L.

    2014-01-01

    Misexpression of developmental transcription factors occurs often in human cancers, where embryonic programs may be reinstated in a context that promotes or sustains malignant development. In this study, we report the involvement of the kidney development transcription factor Six2 in the metastatic progression of human breast cancer. We found that Six2 promoted breast cancer metastasis by a novel mechanism involving both transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of E-cadherin. Downregulation of E-cadherin by Six2 was necessary for its ability to increase soft agar growth and in vivo metastasis in an immune competent mouse model of breast cancer. Mechanistic investigations showed that Six2 represses E-cadherin expression by upregulating Zeb2, in part through a microRNA-mediated mechanism, and by stimulating promoter methylation of the E-cadherin gene (Cdh1). Clinically, SIX2 expression correlated inversely with CDH1 expression in human breast cancer specimens, corroborating the disease relevance of their interaction. Our findings establish Six2 as a regulator of metastasis in human breast cancers and demonstrate an epigenetic function for SIX family transcription factors in metastatic progression through the regulation of E-cadherin. PMID:25348955

  2. Expression of E-Cadherin and N-Cadherin in Perinatal Hamster Ovary: Possible Involvement in Primordial Follicle Formation and Regulation by Follicle-Stimulating Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Roy, Shyamal K.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the expression and hormonal regulation of E-cadherin (CDH1) and N-cadherin (CDH2) with respect to primordial follicle formation. Hamster Cdh1 and Cdh2 cDNA and amino acid sequences were more than 90% similar to those of the mouse, rat, and human. Although CDH1 expression remained exclusively in the oocytes during neonatal ovary development, CDH2 expression shifted from the oocytes to granulosa cells of primordial follicles on postnatal day (P)8. Subsequently, strong CDH2 expression was restricted to granulosa cells of growing follicles. Cdh2 mRNA levels in the ovary decreased from embryonic d 13 through P10 with a transient increase on P7, which was the day before the appearance of primordial follicles. Cdh1 mRNA levels decreased from embryonic d 13 through P3 and then showed a transient increase on P8, coinciding with the formation of primordial follicles. CDH1 and CDH2 expression were consistent with that of mRNA. Neutralization of FSH in utero impaired primordial follicle formation with an associated decrease in Cdh2 mRNA and CDH2, but an increase in Cdh1 mRNA and CDH1 expression. The altered expression was reversed by equine chorionic gonadotropin treatment on P1. Whereas a CDH2 antibody significantly reduced the formation of primordial and primary follicles in vitro, a CDH1 antibody had the opposite effect. This is the first evidence to suggest that primordial follicle formation requires a differential spatiotemporal expression and action of CDH1 and CDH2. Further, FSH regulation of primordial follicle formation may involve the action of CDH1 and CDH2. PMID:20219978

  3. Cadherins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Strumane, K; Berx, G; Van Roy, F

    2004-01-01

    The presence of a functional E-cadherin/catenin cell-cell adhesion complex is a prerequisite for normal development and maintenance of epithelial structures in the mammalian body. This implies that the acquisition of molecular abnormalities that disturb the expression or function of this complex is related to the development and progression of most, if not all, epithelial cell-derived tumors, i.e. carcinomas. E-cadherin downregulation is indeed correlated with malignancy parameters such as tumor progression, loss of differentiation, invasion and metastasis, and hence poor prognosis. Moreover, E-cadherin has been shown to be a potent invasion suppressor as well as a tumor suppressor. Disturbed expression profiles of the E-cadherin/catenin complex have been demonstrated in histological sections of many human tumor types. In different kinds of carcinomas, biallelic downregulation of the E-cadherin gene, resulting in tumor-restricted decrease or even complete loss of E-cadherin expression, appears to be caused by a variety of inactivation mechanisms. Gene deletion due to loss of heterozygosity of the CDH1 locus on 16q22.1 frequently occurs in many carcinoma types. However, somatic inactivating mutations resulting in aberrant E-cadherin expression by loss of both wild-type alleles is rare and restricted to only a few cancer types. A majority of carcinomas thus seems to show deregulated E-cadherin expression by other mechanisms. The present evidence proposes transcriptional repression as a powerful and recurrent molecular mechanism for silencing E-cadherin expression. The predominant mechanisms emerging in most carcinomas are hypermethylation of the E-cadherin promoter and expression of transrepressor molecules such as SIP1, Snail, and Slug that bind sequence elements in the proximal E-cadherin promoter. Interestingly, complex differential expression of other cadherins seems to be associated with loss of E-cadherin and to reinforce effects of this loss on tumor

  4. A novel o-naphtoquinone inhibits N-cadherin expression and blocks melanoma cell invasion via AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; de Vasconcellos, Marne Carvalho; Barbosa, Gleyce Dos Santos; Burbano, Rommel M R; Souza, Luciana G S; Lemos, Telma L G; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico

    2013-10-01

    The down-regulation or loss of epithelial markers is often accompanied by the up-regulation of mesenchymal markers. E-cadherin generally suppresses invasiveness, whereas N-cadherin promotes invasion and metastasis in vitro. The aim of this work is to investigate the role of biflorin, a naphthoquinone with proven anticancer properties, on the expression of N-cadherin and AKT proteins in MDA-MB-435 invasive melanoma cancer cells after 12h of exposure to 1, 2.5 and 5 μM biflorin. Biflorin inhibited MDA-MB-435 invasion in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.01). Likewise, biflorin down-regulated N-cadherin and AKT-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Biflorin did not inhibit the adhesion of MDA-MB-435 cells to any tested substrates. Additionally, biflorin blocked the invasiveness of cells by down-regulating N-cadherin, most likely via AKT-1 signaling. As such, biflorin may be a novel anticancer agent and a new prototype for drug design. PMID:23912027

  5. N-Cadherin, ADAM-10 and Aquaporin 1 expression in lung tissue exposed to fluoro-edenite fibers: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Imbesi, Rosa; Rapisarda, Venerando; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Castorina, Sergio; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Fluoro-edenite (FE) fibers are similar to other amphibole asbestos fibers. The scientific relevance of FE is due to its ability to lead to chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis in lung tissue shown after its inhalation. These fibers stimulate aberrant host cell proliferation and induce the release of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen and nitrite species, which results in DNA damage. In previous studies, we showed that FE induces functional modifications in sheep and human lung fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells, where the overexpression of several molecules probably involved in pathological cellular mechanisms induced by FE exposition have been detected. However, the mechanisms of cellular and molecular toxicity and the cellular response to FE fibers are still not well known. N-cadherin, ADAM-10 and AQP1 are molecules involved in carcinogenesis and in inflammatory process. In this study we analyzed, through immunohistochemistry, their expression in the lung tissue of sheep exposed to FE. Our results showed different patterns of immunolabeling for N-cadherin, ADAM-10 and AQP1. N-cadherin and ADAM-10 were more expressed in FE exposed lung tissue, when compared with the control. On the contrary, AQP1 was more expressed in non exposed lung tissue. These results suggest that N-Cadherin, ADAM-10 and AQP1 are probably involved in different pathological processes induced by FE fiber exposition. The aim of the study was to better understand the mechanisms of cellular and molecular toxicity and of cellular response to FE fibers in order to identify, in the future, a possible therapeutic intervention in cases of FE-associated pathogenesis. PMID:25757887

  6. Gene cloning and expression of cadherin in midgut of Helicoverpa armigera and its Cry1A binding region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guirong; Wu, Kongming; Liang, Gemei; Guo, Yuyuan

    2005-08-01

    Cadherins belong to one of the families of animal glycoproteins responsible for calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion. Recent literatures showed that the cadherin-like in midgut of several insects served as the receptor of Bt toxin Cry1A and the variation of cadherin-like is related to insect's resistance to Cry1A. The full-length cDNA encoding cadherin-like of Helicoverpa armigera is cloned by degenerate PCR and RACE techniques and the gene was designated as BtR-harm, which is 5581 bp in full-length, encoding 1730 amino acid residues (BtR-harm was deposited in GenBank and the accession number is AF519180). Its predicted molecular weight and isoelectric point were 195.39 kDa and 4.23, respectively. The inferred amino acid sequence includes a signal sequence, 11 cadherin repeats, a membrane-proximal region, a transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic region. Sequence analysis indicated that the deduced protein sequence was most similar to the cadherin-like from Heliothis virescens with 84.2% identity and highly similar to three other lepidopteran cadherin from Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Pectinophora gossypiella, with the sequence identities of 60.3.6%, 57.5% and 51.0%, respectively. The cDNA encoding cadherin gene was expressed successfully in E. coli and the recombinant proteins can bind with Cry1Ac. Truncation analysis and binding experiment of BtR-harm revealed that the Cry1A binding region was a contiguous 244-amino acid sequence, which located between amino acid 1217 and 1461. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that BtR-harm was highly expressed in midgut of H. armigera, very low expressed in foregut and hindgut and was not expressed in other tissues. After H. armigera producing resistance to Cry1Ac, the expression quantity of BtR-harm significantly decreased in midgut of H. armigera. It is the first confirmation that BtR-harm can function as receptor of Cry1Ac in H. armigera and the binding region was located on a contiguous 244 amino acid sequence

  7. Differential expression of the seven-pass transmembrane cadherin genes Celsr1-3 and distribution of the Celsr2 protein during mouse development.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yasuyuki; Copeland, Neal G; Gilbert, Debra J; Jenkins, Nancy A; Chisaka, Osamu; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Uemura, Tadashi

    2002-03-01

    Drosophila Flamingo (Fmi) is an evolutionally conserved seven-pass transmembrane receptor of the cadherin superfamily. Fmi plays multiple roles in patterning neuronal processes and epithelial planar cell polarity. To explore the in vivo roles of Fmi homologs in mammals, we previously cloned one of the mouse homologs, mouse flamingo1/Celsr2. Here, we report the results of our study of its embryonic and postnatal expression patterns together with those of two other paralogs, Celsr1 and Celsr3. Celsr1-3 expression was initiated broadly in the nervous system at early developmental stages, and each paralog showed characteristic expression patterns in the developing CNS. These genes were also expressed in several other organs, including the cochlea, where hair cells develop planar polarity, the kidney, and the whisker. The Celsr2 protein was distributed at intercellular boundaries in the whisker and on processes of neuronal cells such as hippocampal pyramidal cells, Purkinje cells, and olfactory neurons. Celsr2 is mapped to a distal region of the mouse chromosome 3. We discussed possible functions of seven-pass transmembrane cadherins in mouse development. PMID:11891983

  8. Loss of N-Cadherin Expression in Tumor Transplants Produced From As+3- and Cd+2-Transformed Human Urothelial (UROtsa) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Elizabeth J.; Somji, Seema; Dunlevy, Jane R.; Garrett, Scott H.; Zhou, Xu Dong; Slusser-Nore, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial to mesenchymal transition is a process in which a cell experiences a loss of epithelial cell characteristics and acquires a more mesenchymal cell phenotype. In cancer, epithelial to mesenchymal transition has been proposed to play an important role during specific stages of tumor progression. The role epithelial to mesenchymal transition and mesenchymal to epithelial transition might play in toxicant-induced urothelial cancer is unknown. Methods Real-time PCR, Western blotting, immuno-histochemistry and immuno-fluorescence were used to determine the expression of E- and N-cadherin in the UROtsa parent, the As+3- and Cd+2-transformed cell lines, the spheroids isolated from these cell lines as well as the tumor heterotransplants that were produced by the injection of the transformed cells into immune compromised mice. Results This study showed that N-cadherin expression was increased in 6 As+3- and 7 Cd+2- transformed cell lines generated from human urothelial cells (UROtsa). The expression varied within each cell line, with 10% to 95% of the cells expressing N-cadherin. Tumors produced from these cell lines showed no expression of the N-cadherin protein. Spheroids which are made up of putative cancer initiating cells produced from these cell lines showed only background expression of N-cadherin mRNA, increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 mRNA and produced tumors which did not express N-cadherin. There was no change in the expression of E-cadherin in the tumors, and the tumors formed by all the As+3 and Cd+2-transformed cell lines and cancer initiating cells stained intensely and uniformly for E-cadherin. Conclusions The finding that the cells expressing N-cadherin gave rise to tumors with no expression of N-cadherin is in agreement with the classical view of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition and N-cadherin are associated with dissemination and not with the ability to establish new tumor growth

  9. HOXC8 promotes breast tumorigenesis by transcriptionally facilitating cadherin-11 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Chao, Fengmei; Huang, Bei; Liu, Dahai; Kim, Jaejik; Huang, Shuang

    2014-05-15

    Cell-cell adhesion molecule cadherin-11(CDH11) is preferentially expressed in basal-like breast cancer cells and facilitates breast cancer cell migration by promoting small GTPase Rac activity. However, how the expression of CDH11 is regulated in breast cancer cells is not understood. Here, we show that CDH11 is transcriptionally controlled by homeobox C8 (HOXC8) in human breast cancer cells. HOXC8 serves as a CDH11-specific transcription factor and binds to the site of nucleotides -196 to -191 in the CDH11 promoter. Depletion of HOXC8 leads to the decrease in anchorage-independent cell growth, cell migration/invasion and spontaneous metastasis of breast cancer cells; however, suppressed tumorigenic events were fully rescued by ectopic CDH11 expression in HOXC8-knockdown cells. These results indicate that HOXC8 impacts breast tumorigenesis through CDH11. The analysis of publically available human breast tumor microarray gene expression database demonstrates a strong positive linear association between HOXC8 and CDH11 expression ( = 0.801, p < 0.001). Survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test) show that both high HOXC8 and CDH11 expression correlate with poor recurrence-free survival rate of patients. Together, our study suggests that HOXC8 promotes breast tumorigenesis by maintaining high level of CDH11 expression in breast cancer cells. PMID:24810778

  10. Relation of glypican-3 and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis of mucinous and non-mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohammad, Mie Ali; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal

    2015-06-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a member of the membrane-bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans. E-cadherin is an adhesive receptor that is believed to act as a tumor suppressor gene. Many studies had investigated E-cadherin expressions in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) while only one study had investigated GPC3 expression in CRC. This study aims to investigate expression of GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal mucinous carcinoma (MA) and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA) using manual tissue microarray technique. Tumor tissue specimens are collected from 75 cases of MC and 75 cases of NMA who underwent radical surgery from Jan 2007 to Jan 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. Their clinicopathological parameters and survival data were revised and analyzed using established statistical methodologies. High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique and immunohistochemistry for GPC3 and E-cadherin was done. NMA showed higher expression of GPC3 than MA with no statistically significant relation. NMA showed a significantly higher E-cadherin expression than MA. GPC3 and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in NMA, but not in MA, group. In NMA group, there was no significant relation between either GPC3 or E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features. In a univariate analysis, neither GPC3 nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS). GPC3 and E-cadherin expressions are not independent prognostic factors in CRC. However, expressions of both are significantly interrelated in NMA patients, suggesting an excellent interplay between both, in contrast to MA. Further molecular studies are needed to further explore the relationship between GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25619476

  11. Expression and function of the atypical cadherin FAT1 in chronic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Valletta, Daniela; Czech, Barbara; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Mueller, Martina; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of the atypical cadherin FAT1 is increased in chronic liver disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 expression goes up during the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated HSCs are the cellular source of enhanced FAT1 expression in diseased livers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 enhanced NFkB activity and resistance to apoptosis in activated HSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 is a new therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of hepatic fibrosis. -- Abstract: Hepatic fibrosis can be considered as wound healing process in response to hepatocellular injury. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a key event of hepatic fibrosis since activated HSCs are the cellular source of enhanced extracellular matrix deposition, and reversion of liver fibrosis is accompanied by clearance of activated HSCs by apoptosis. The atypical cadherin FAT1 has been shown to regulate diverse biological functions as cell proliferation and planar cell polarity, and also to affect wound healing. Here, we found increased FAT1 expression in different murine models of chronic liver injury and in cirrhotic livers of patients with different liver disease. Also in hepatic tissue of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis FAT1 expression was significantly enhanced and correlated with collagen alpha I(1) expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed no significant differences in staining intensity between hepatocytes in normal and cirrhotic liver tissue but myofibroblast like cells in fibrotic septa of cirrhotic livers showed a prominent immunosignal. Furthermore, FAT1 mRNA and protein expression markedly increased during in vitro activation of primary human and murine HSCs. Together, these data indicated activated HSCs as cellular source of enhanced FAT1 expression in diseased livers. To gain insight into the functional role of FAT1 in activated HSCs we suppressed FAT1 in these

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  13. Impact of p120-catenin isoforms 1A and 3A on epithelial mesenchymal transition of lung cancer cells expressing E-cadherin in different subcellular locations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Zhao, Huanyu; Wu, Junhua; Xu, Ke; Wang, Enhua

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process in tumor development. Despite previous investigations, it remains unclear how p120-catenin (p120ctn) isoforms 1A and 3A affect the EMT of tumor cells. Here we investigated expression of p120ctn, E-cadherin and vimentin in 78 human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples by immunohistochemistry and found that p120ctn membrane expression positively correlated with E-cadherin expression (P<0.001) and negatively correlated with vimentin expression and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Meanwhile, p120ctn cytoplasmic expression negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression (P<0.001) and positively correlated with vimentin expression and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Cells expressing high (H460 and SPC) and low (H1299 and LK2) levels of p120ctn were screen to investigate its impact on EMT. E-cadherin was restricted to the cell membrane in H460 and H1299 cells, whereas it was expressed in the cytoplasm of SPC and LK2 cells. Ablation of endogenous p120ctn isoform 1A in cells expressing high levels of the protein resulted in decreased E-cadherin expression, increased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and enhanced invasiveness in H460 cells. Meanwhile, completely opposite results were observed in SPC cells. Furthermore, transfection of in H1299 cells expressing low p120ctn levels with the p120ctn isoform 1A plasmid resulted in increased E-cadherin expression, decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and weakened invasiveness, while LK2 cells showed completely opposite results. Both cell lines expressing low p120ctn levels and transfected with the p120ctn isoform 3A plasmid appeared to have increased E-cadherin expression, decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and weakened invasiveness. In conclusion, in cells with membrane E-cadherin, both p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A inhibited EMT and decreased cell invasiveness. In cells with cytoplasmic E-cadherin, p120ctn isoform 1A

  14. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie; Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2011-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  15. Hematopoietic stem cells develop in the absence of endothelial cadherin 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Heidi; Patch, Taylor C; Reddy, Pavankumar N G; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Kim, Peter G; Soltis, Kathleen A; Chen, Michael J; Tamplin, Owen J; Frye, Maike; MacLean, Glenn A; Hübner, Kathleen; Bauer, Daniel E; Kanki, John P; Vogin, Guillaume; Huston, Nicholas C; Nguyen, Minh; Fujiwara, Yuko; Paw, Barry H; Vestweber, Dietmar; Zon, Leonard I; Orkin, Stuart H; Daley, George Q; Shah, Dhvanit I

    2015-12-24

    Rare endothelial cells in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) transition into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during embryonic development. Lineage tracing experiments indicate that HSCs emerge from cadherin 5 (Cdh5; vascular endothelial-cadherin)(+) endothelial precursors, and isolated populations of Cdh5(+) cells from mouse embryos and embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into hematopoietic cells. Cdh5 has also been widely implicated as a marker of AGM-derived hemogenic endothelial cells. Because Cdh5(-/-) mice embryos die before the first HSCs emerge, it is unknown whether Cdh5 has a direct role in HSC emergence. Our previous genetic screen yielded malbec (mlb(bw306)), a zebrafish mutant for cdh5, with normal embryonic and definitive blood. Using time-lapse confocal imaging, parabiotic surgical pairing of zebrafish embryos, and blastula transplantation assays, we show that HSCs emerge, migrate, engraft, and differentiate in the absence of cdh5 expression. By tracing Cdh5(-/-)green fluorescent protein (GFP)(+/+) cells in chimeric mice, we demonstrated that Cdh5(-/-)GFP(+/+) HSCs emerging from embryonic day 10.5 and 11.5 (E10.5 and E11.5) AGM or derived from E13.5 fetal liver not only differentiate into hematopoietic colonies but also engraft and reconstitute multilineage adult blood. We also developed a conditional mouse Cdh5 knockout (Cdh5(flox/flox):Scl-Cre-ER(T)) and demonstrated that multipotent hematopoietic colonies form despite the absence of Cdh5. These data establish that Cdh5, a marker of hemogenic endothelium in the AGM, is dispensable for the transition of hemogenic endothelium to HSCs. PMID:26385351

  16. E-cadherin expression and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: evidence from 19 published investigations

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xusheng; Wang, Jianning; Lin, Xuefen; Wang, Xuxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to review the published literature and investigate whether E-cadherin gene is a prognostic factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by conducting a meta-analysis. Methods Studies were identified from the databases Embase, Medline, and Cochrane Library by using the keywords “E-cadherin gene” and “head and neck cancer”. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were the primary outcome measurements. Results Our literature review identified 1,458 articles; 19 studies with a total number of 2,012 cases were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The hazard ratio (HR) for OS of patients with decreased expression of E-cadherin gene was 0.57 (95% CI =0.37, 0.89; P=0.000). However, statistical heterogeneity was unacceptably high (I2=74.5%, P=0.000). After sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity became acceptable, and the effect measure was still significant (I2=7.0%; HR =0.52; 95% CI =0.40, 0.66; P=0.000). The HR for DFS was 0.53 (95% CI =0.42, 0.67; P=0.000). Conclusion This meta-analysis showed clear evidence that high E-cadherin gene expression is a positive prognostic factor of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, resulting in better OS and DFS. However, this conclusion must be interpreted with caution due to a few limitations. PMID:27217768

  17. Force via integrins but not E-cadherin decreases Oct3/4 expression in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, Yuhei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Chowdhury, Farhan; Wu, Douglas C.; Tanaka, Tetsuya S.; Sato, Masaaki; Wang, Ning

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins or cadherins induces similar cell stiffening responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces cell spreading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces differentiation of embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Increasing evidence suggests that mechanical factors play a critical role in fate decisions of stem cells. Recently we have demonstrated that a local force applied via Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides coated magnetic beads to mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells increases cell spreading and cell stiffness and decreases Oct3/4 (Pou5f1) gene expression. However, it is not clear whether the effects of the applied stress on these functions of ES cells can be extended to natural extracellular matrix proteins or cell-cell adhesion molecules. Here we show that a local cyclic shear force applied via fibronectin or laminin to integrin receptors increased cell spreading and stiffness, downregulated Oct3/4 gene expression, and decreased cell proliferation rate. In contrast, the same cyclic force applied via cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (Cdh1) had no effects on cell spreading, Oct3/4 gene expression, and the self-renewal of mouse ES cells, but induced significant cell stiffening. Our findings demonstrate that biological responses of ES cells to force applied via integrins are different from those to force via E-cadherin, suggesting that mechanical forces might play different roles in different force transduction pathways to shape early embryogenesis.

  18. Correlation of E-cadherin expression with differentiation grade and histological type in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gamallo, C.; Palacios, J.; Suarez, A.; Pizarro, A.; Navarro, P.; Quintanilla, M.; Cano, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a correlation has been suggested between a loss of E-cadherin (E-CD) and increased invasiveness of neoplastic cells. In this study, E-CD expression in breast cancer was investigated using an affinity-purified antibody (ECCD-2) in an immunoenzymatic (avidin-biotin-alkaline phosphatase) test. Intensity and extension of E-CD immunoreactivity were evaluated in 61 breast carcinomas and correlated with their histological type and grade, nodal involvement, and hormonal receptor status. Histological types were infiltrating ductal carcinoma of no special type (n = 54) and infiltrating lobular carcinoma (n = 7). All infiltrating ductal carcinomas of no special type except two grade 3 carcinomas showed positive immunoreactivity that was variable among different cases. Grade 1 breast carcinomas (n = 10) showed greater immunoreactivity than grade 2 (n = 25) and grade 3 (n = 19) carcinomas. E-CD immunoreactivity correlated positively with the degree of tubular formation and inversely with the mitoses number. None of the infiltrating lobular carcinomas expressed E-CD in their infiltrating cells, whereas they showed only weak immunostains in areas of atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ. These results indicate that E-CD expression correlates with histological type and grade in breast carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7682767

  19. Comparative analysis of the expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and β1 integrin in congenital and acquired cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Chung, Jae Ho; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Chul Won; Kang, Sung-Ho; Oh, Young Ha; Pyo, Ju Yeon

    2016-04-01

    E-cadherin, β-catenin, and β1 integrin are important cell adhesion molecules to maintain epithelial structure and function. We investigated the expression of these cell adhesion molecules in cholesteatomas to understand the role of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interaction in cholesteatomas. An immunohistochemical investigation was carried out on 35 cholesteatoma tissue samples (14 congenital, 21 acquired cholesteatomas) and 10 normal retroauricular skin (RAS) tissues which are obtained during middle ear surgery. The expression rate was measured to find out differences between retroauricular skin and cholesteatoma, as well as between congenital and acquired cholesteatoma. E-cadherin expression rate was significantly lower in the cholesteatoma (spinous layer 88.7 ± 17.9 %, granular layer 54.6 ± 22.6 %) than in the RAS (100 %, 74.4 ± 7.4 %) and in the acquired (83.3 ± 19.4 %, 48.1 ± 22.9 %) than in the congenital (96.7 ± 12.0 %, 64.4 ± 18.8 %). β-catenin expression rate was significantly lower in the cholesteatoma (spinous layer 84.1 ± 17.2 %, granular layer 28.7 ± 30.8 %) than in the RAS (100 %, 75.9 ± 6.1 %) and in the acquired (78.1 ± 17.0 %, 17.1 ± 22.3 %) than in the congenital (93.2 ± 13.5 %, 46.1 ± 34.2 %). The expression pattern of β-catenin is similar to that of E-cadherin. In β1 integrin, there was no significant difference of the expression rate between RAS and cholesteatoma, as well as between congenital and acquired cholesteatoma. In conclusion, the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin is reduced in cholesteatoma, and the reduction is more pronounced in acquired cholesteatoma than in congenital cholesteatoma. Acquired cholesteatomas showed more aggressive characteristics than congenital cholesteatomas in terms of cell-cell adhesion. PMID:25864182

  20. E-cadherin expression in macrophages dampens their inflammatory responsiveness in vitro, but does not modulate M2-regulated pathologies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bossche, Jan; Laoui, Damya; Naessens, Thomas; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Stijlemans, Benoît; Grooten, Johan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2015-01-01

    IL-4/IL-13-induced alternatively activated macrophages (M(IL-4/IL-13), AAMs or M2) are known to express E-cadherin, enabling them to engage in heterotypic cellular interactions and IL-4-driven macrophage fusion in vitro. Here we show that E-cadherin overexpression in Raw 264.7 macrophages inhibits their inflammatory response to LPS stimulation, as demonstrated by a reduced secretion of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO). To study the function of E-cadherin in M(IL-4/IL-13) macrophages in vivo, we generated macrophage-specific E-cadherin-deficient C57BL/6 mice. Using this new tool, we analyzed immunological parameters during two typical AAM-associated Th2-driven diseases and assessed Th2-associated granuloma formation. Although E-cadherin is strongly induced in AAMs during Taenia crassiceps helminth infections and allergic airway inflammation, its deletion in macrophages does not affect the course of both Th2 cytokine-driven diseases. Moreover, macrophage E-cadherin expression is largely redundant for granuloma formation around Schistosoma mansoni ova. Overall, we conclude that E-cadherin is a valuable AAM marker which suppresses the inflammatory response when overexpressed. Yet E-cadherin deletion in macrophages does not affect M(LPS+IFNγ) and M(IL-4) polarization in vitro, nor in vivo macrophage function, at least in the conditions tested. PMID:26226941

  1. AP-1 Transcription Factors c-FOS and c-JUN Mediate GnRH-Induced Cadherin-11 Expression and Trophoblast Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhu, Hua; Ma, Liyang; Wang, Yan-Ling; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-06-01

    GnRH is expressed in first-trimester human placenta and increases cell invasion in extravillous cytotrophoblasts (EVTs). Invasive phenotypes have been reported to be regulated by transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) and mesenchymal cadherin-11. The aim of our study was to investigate the roles of AP-1 components (c-FOS/c-JUN) and cadherin-11 in GnRH-induced cell invasion in human EVT cells. Phosphorylated c-FOS and phosphorylated c-JUN were detected in the cell column regions of human first-trimester placental villi by immunohistochemistry. GnRH treatment increased c-FOS, c-JUN, and cadherin-11 mRNA and protein levels in immortalized EVT (HTR-8/SVneo) cells. Moreover, GnRH treatment induced c-FOS and c-JUN protein phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation. Pretreatment with antide, a GnRH antagonist, attenuated GnRH-induced cadherin-11 expression. Importantly, basal and GnRH-induced cadherin-11 expression and cell invasion were reduced by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of c-FOS, c-JUN, and cadherin-11 in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Our results suggest that GnRH induces the expression and phosphorylation of the AP-1 transcription factors c-FOS and c-JUN in trophoblast cells, which contributes to GnRH-induced elevation of cadherin-11 expression and cell invasion. PMID:25794160

  2. Loss of E-cadherin expression is not a prerequisite for c-erbB2-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    NILSSON, GISELA M.A.; AKHTAR, NOREEN; KANNIUS-JANSON, MARIE; BAECKSTRÖM, DAN

    2014-01-01

    Recent research into the mechanisms of tumour cell invasiveness has highlighted the parallels between carcinogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), originally described as a developmental transdifferentiation program but also implicated in fibrosis and cancer. In a model system for mammary carcinogenesis, we previously observed that induced signalling from a homodimer of the c-erbB2 (HER2) receptor tyrosine kinase in an initially non-malignant mammary cell line caused EMT where i) cell scattering occurred before downregulation of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin and ii) the progress of EMT was dramatically delayed when cells were grown at high density. Here, we have further analysed these phenomena. Ectopic expression of E-cadherin concomitant with c-erbB2 signalling was unable to impede the progression of EMT, suggesting that E-cadherin downregulation is not required for EMT. Furthermore, fibroblast-like cells isolated after EMT induced in the presence or absence of ectopic E-cadherin expression showed highly similar morphology and vimentin expression. E-cadherin expressed in these fibroblastic cells had a subcellular localisation similar to that found in epithelial cells, but it exhibited a much weaker attachment to the cytoskeleton, suggesting cytoskeletal rearrangements as an important mechanism in EMT-associated cell scattering. We also investigated whether density-dependent inhibition of EMT is mediated by E-cadherin as a sensor for cell-cell contact, by expressing dominant-negative E-cadherin. While expression of this mutant weakened cell-cell adhesion, it failed to facilitate EMT at high cell densities. These results indicate that loss of E-cadherin expression is a consequence rather than a cause of c-erbB2-induced EMT and that density-dependent inhibition of EMT is not mediated by E-cadherin signalling. PMID:24807161

  3. Prognostic and Clinicopathological Significance of Downregulated E-Cadherin Expression in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have investigated the prognostic role of E-cadherin in patients with NSCLC; however, the result still remains inconclusive. An up-to data system review and meta-analysis was necessary to give a comprehensive evaluation of prognostic role of E-cadherin in NSCLC. Methods Eligible studies were searched in Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science databases. The inclusion criteria were studies that assessed the relationship between E-cadherin expression detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the prognosis or clinicopathological features in patients with NSCLC. Subgroup analysis according to race, percentage of reduced/negative E-cadherin expression, histological type, and sample size were also conducted. Odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to examine the risk or hazard association. Results A total of 29 studies including 4010 patients were qualified for analysis. The analysis suggested that downregulated E-cadherin expression was significant associated with unfavorable overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival/progression-free survival (DFS/PFS) in patients with NSCLC. Subgroup analysis by race, percentage of reduced/negative E-cadherin expression, sample size also found the significant association in OS. When only the stage I NSCLC were considered, downregulated E-cadherin expression still had an unfavorable impact on OS. Additionally, downregulated E-cadherin expression was significantly associated with differentiation grade, lymphnode metastasis, vascular invasion, and TNM stage. Conclusion Downregulated E-cadherin expression detected by IHC seems to correlate with tumour progression and could serve as an important prognostic factor in patients with NSCLC. PMID:24978478

  4. Expression of E-cadherin, beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen and their reciprocal relationships in mammary adenocarcinomas in bitches.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Marcin; Madej, Janusz A; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    In progression of tumours, resulting from, i.e., release of cells from the parental tumour and development of metastases, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) plays a significant role. CAM, including E-cadherin and the linked to it beta-catenin, determine the extent of adhesion between normal and neoplastically altered cells. Moreover, the unbound form of beta-catenin in a cell nucleus may affect the rate of cell proliferation This study aimed at demonstrating intensity and localisation of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression as related to expression of the proliferation-associated antigen, Ki-67 in mammary adenocarcinomas of bitches. The study was performed on 35 cases of the above mentioned tumours. On paraffin sections immunohistochemical reactions were performed using monoclonal antibodies directed against E-cadherin, beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen. In the studies a membranous expression of E-cadherin, a cytoplasmic-nuclear expression of beta-catenin and nuclear expression of Ki-67 antigen were demonstrated. Statistical calculations using Spearman's test demonstrated a pronounced positive correlation between expression of beta-catenin and Ki-67 antigen and absence of correlation between expression of E-cadherin and Ki-67 antigen. No correlation could be detected between expression intensities of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. PMID:17951173

  5. Osteopontin, E-cadherin, and β-catenin expression as prognostic biomarkers in patients with radically resected gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Pellegrinelli, Alessandro; Martinetti, Antonia; Mariani, Luigi; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Bajetta, Emilio; Pelosi, Giuseppe; de Braud, Filippo; Floriani, Irene; Miceli, Rosalba

    2016-04-01

    A correlation between osteopontin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and cyclooxygenase 2 overexpression and poor clinicopathological features and prognosis has been previously suggested in gastric cancer. This translational study was aimed at assessing the correlation of these immunohistochemical biomarkers with outcome in patients with radically resected gastric cancer. We analyzed osteopontin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and cyclooxygenase 2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 346 primary gastric tumor tissue samples from patients enrolled in the ITACA-S trial. This phase III study randomized patients with radically resected gastric cancer to receive adjuvant chemotherapy with either 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin or a sequential regimen of infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin plus irinotecan followed by cisplatin and docetaxel. High expression of osteopontin was correlated with high histological grade, diffuse histotype, and peritoneal relapse, but not with TNM stage. Moreover, osteopontin overexpression was associated with higher risk of tumor recurrence and metastases, and was an independent prognostic factor for both relapse-free and overall survival of gastric cancer patients following adjuvant chemotherapy. Abnormal E-cadherin expression and abnormal β-catenin expression were correlated with more advanced disease stage, and as a consequence, with poor outcome. Our results suggest that osteopontin overexpression is a valuable independent predictor of tumor recurrence and survival in patients with radically resected gastric cancer. PMID:25862567

  6. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-07-02

    The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin.

  7. Expression of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlations.

    PubMed

    Ping, Fu-Min; Liu, Gui-Jing; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Hai-Bin; Zhai, Jian-Wen; Li, Shu-Xia; Liu, Yue-Mei; Li, Bao-Wei; Wei, Hong

    2015-01-01

    To detect the expression of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and study their correlations. Steptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) method was employed to detect the expressions of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues from 77 cases and paracancerous tissues from 77 cases. The correlations between their expressions and clinicopathological indices and between the expressions of these proteins themselves were analyzed. The expressions of RKIP and E-cadherin in ESCC tissues were obviously lower than those in the paracancerous tissues (P<0.01); the expressions in ESCC tissues from cases with lymph node metastasis were lower than those from cases without lymph node metastasis (P<0.01); the expression of RKIP was positively correlated with the expression of E-cadherin in ESCC tissues (P<0.01). The expression of NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues was correlated with clinical staging, lymph node metastasis and tumor differentiation (P<0.01); the expression of RKIP was negatively correlated with the expression of NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues (P<0.05). Downregulation or depletion of RKIP was related to the onset and progression of ESCC, and facilitated the invasion and metastasis of ESCC by downregulating E-cadherin and upregulating NF-kB p65. PMID:26617724

  8. Expression of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlations

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Fu-Min; Liu, Gui-Jing; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Hai-Bin; Zhai, Jian-Wen; Li, Shu-Xia; Liu, Yue-Mei; Li, Bao-Wei; Wei, Hong

    2015-01-01

    To detect the expression of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and study their correlations. Steptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) method was employed to detect the expressions of RKIP, E-cadherin and NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues from 77 cases and paracancerous tissues from 77 cases. The correlations between their expressions and clinicopathological indices and between the expressions of these proteins themselves were analyzed. The expressions of RKIP and E-cadherin in ESCC tissues were obviously lower than those in the paracancerous tissues (P<0.01); the expressions in ESCC tissues from cases with lymph node metastasis were lower than those from cases without lymph node metastasis (P<0.01); the expression of RKIP was positively correlated with the expression of E-cadherin in ESCC tissues (P<0.01). The expression of NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues was correlated with clinical staging, lymph node metastasis and tumor differentiation (P<0.01); the expression of RKIP was negatively correlated with the expression of NF-kB p65 in ESCC tissues (P<0.05). Downregulation or depletion of RKIP was related to the onset and progression of ESCC, and facilitated the invasion and metastasis of ESCC by downregulating E-cadherin and upregulating NF-kB p65. PMID:26617724

  9. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-11-15

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions.

  10. N-Cadherin Expression Is Associated with Acquisition of EMT Phenotype and with Enhanced Invasion in Erlotinib-Resistant Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoju; Liu, Guangzhi; Kang, Yi; Dong, Zhaogang; Qian, Qiyu; Ma, Xitao

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth-factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been effective in non-small cell lung cancer patients. However, acquired resistance eventually develops in most patients despite an initial positive response. Emerging evidence suggests that there is a molecular connection between acquired resistance and the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). N-cadherin is involved in the EMT and in the metastasis of cancer cells. Here, we analyzed N-cadherin expression and function in erlotinib-resistant lung cancer cell lines. Methods H1650 cell lines were used to establish the subline resistant to erlotinib(H1650ER). Then, induction of the EMT was analyzed using immunostaining and western blots in H1650ER cells. N-cadherin expression in the resistant cells was examined using FACS and western blot. In addition, an invasion assay was performed to characterize the resistant cells. The effects of N-cadherin on cell proliferation and invasion were analyzed. The association of N-cadherin expression with the EMT phenotype was investigated using immunohistochemical analysis of 13 archived, lung adenocarcinoma tissues, before and after treatment with erlotinib. Results In H1650ER cells, N-cadherin expression was upregulated, paralleled by the reduced expression of E-cadherin. The marked histological change and the development of a spindle-like morphology suggest that H1650ER cells underwent an EMT, accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin and an increase in vimentin. A change in the EMT status between pre-and post-treatment was observed in 11 out of 13 cases (79%). In biopsies of resistant cancers, N-cadherin expression was increased in 10 out of 13 cases. Induction of the EMT was consistent with aggressive characteristics. Inhibition of N-cadherin expression by siRNA was tested to reduce proliferation and invasion of H1650ER cells in vitro. Conclusions Our data provide evidence that induction of the EMT contributes to the acquired resistance to EGFR

  11. Epidermal growth factor down-regulates the expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) through E-cadherin in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhimin; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sung, Bokyung; Koolwal, Pooja; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Mani, Sendurai A.; Bresalier, Robert S.; Batra, Surinder K.; Guha, Sushovan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our group previously reported that neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) overexpression significantly blocked invasion and angiogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and also demonstrated a loss of NGAL expression in the advanced stages of PDAC. However, little is known regarding mechanisms of NGAL regulation in PDAC. As EGF-EGFR axis is significantly upregulated in PDAC, we examined EGF-mediated NGAL regulation in these cells. METHODS NGAL-positive AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells were used as model system. Quantitative RT-PCR, western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence studies were used to investigate EGF-mediated effects on NGAL expression. E-cadherin expression was manipulated using lentiviral overexpression or shRNA constructs. NGAL promoter activity was assessed by luciferase-reporter assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). RESULTS NGAL expression was positively associated with tumor differentiation and was significantly downregulated after EGF treatment along with a concomitant reduction of E-cadherin expression in PDAC cells. E-cadherin downregulation was partly through the EGF receptor (EGFR)-dependent MEK-ERK signaling pathway. In addition, E-cadherin downregulation reduced NGAL expression in PDAC cells, whereas overexpression of E-cadherin led to increased NGAL expression and partly rescued inhibition of NGAL expression by EGF. Furthermore, EGF in part through E-cadherin reduced NGAL promoter activity by blocking NF-κB activation. CONCLUSIONS We demonstrated for the first time that EGF potently blocked NGAL expression in PDAC cells. This effect is partly mediated through activation of the EGFR-MEK-ERK signaling pathway, which in turn downregulated E-cadherin with a subsequent reduction in NF-κB activation. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism by which EGF regulates NGAL expression in PDAC. PMID:24048788

  12. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung’s disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = −0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  13. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  14. Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition by inhibiting Snail and regulating E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyereen; Lee, Minjae; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •We investigated the effects of celastrol on TGF-β1-induced EMT in epithelial cells. •Celastrol regulates TGF-β1-induced morphological changes and E-cadherin expression. •Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced Snail expression. •Celastrol strongly suppresses TGF-β1-induced invasion in MDCK and A549 cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in the invasive and metastatic potentials of cancer progression. Celastrol inhibits the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells including leukemia, glioma, prostate, and breast cancer; however, the possible role of celastrol in the EMT is unclear. We investigated the effect of celastrol on the EMT. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) induced EMT-like morphologic changes and upregulation of Snail expression. The downregulation of E-cadherin expression and upregulation of Snail in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and A549 cell lines show that TGF-β1-mediated the EMT in epithelial cells; however, celastrol markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced morphologic changes, Snail upregulation, and E-cadherin expression. Migration and invasion assays revealed that celastrol completely inhibited TGF-β1-mediated cellular migration in both cell lines. These findings indicate that celastrol downregulates Snail expression, thereby inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT in MDCK and A549 cells. Thus, our findings provide new evidence that celastrol suppresses lung cancer invasion and migration by inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT.

  15. E-cadherin and β-catenin expression in well-differentiated and moderately-differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma: relations with clinical variables.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo; Lequerica-Fernández, Paloma; Fernández, Soledad; Allonca, Eva; Villallaín, Lucas; de Vicente, Juan C

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the expression and localisation of E-cadherin and β-catenin in oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) so that we could correlate the findings with prognostically-relevant clinicopathological variables. E-cadherin and β-catenin expression in normal oral mucosa and in oral squamous cell carcinomas were examined immunohistochemically, and their association with clinicopathological factors and prognosis were then analysed in 69 patients who had been operated on for oral SCC. E-cadherin expression was found in all 69 cases: in 11 cases (16%) it was weak; in 21 (30%) moderate, and in 37 (54%) high. β-Catenin expression was found in 64 cases (93%): in 18 cases (26%) cell-membrane expression was weak; in 26 (38%) it was moderate; in 19 (28%) it was high, and in one case (1%) there was cytoplasmic staining. No nuclear staining was detected. E-cadherin was significantly associated with histological grade (p=0.002) and alcohol consumption (p=0.05), and β-catenin was significantly associated with nodal stage (p=0.02), TNM stage (p=0.009), and E-cadherin expression (p=0.01). However, none of them were independent prognostic factors in the disease-specific survival analysis. E-cadherin is closely linked to β-catenin expression in oral SCC and to tumour differentiation. Alcohol consumption could increase the aggressiveness of SCC, leading to reduced expression of E-cadherin. β-catenin could be an early marker for the identification of occult metastases in patients with oral SCC. PMID:22525043

  16. Hepatitis C virus depends on E-cadherin as an entry factor and regulates its expression in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Lowey, Brianna; Schweitzer, Cameron J; Cha, Helen; Zhang, Fang; Liang, T Jake

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters the host cell through interactions with a cascade of cellular factors. Although significant progress has been made in understanding HCV entry, the precise mechanisms by which HCV exploits the receptor complex and host machinery to enter the cell remain unclear. This intricate process of viral entry likely depends on additional yet-to-be-defined cellular molecules. Recently, by applying integrative functional genomics approaches, we identified and interrogated distinct sets of host dependencies in the complete HCV life cycle. Viral entry assays using HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps) of various genotypes uncovered multiple previously unappreciated host factors, including E-cadherin, that mediate HCV entry. E-cadherin silencing significantly inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells, HepG2/miR122/CD81 cells, and primary human hepatocytes at a postbinding entry step. Knockdown of E-cadherin, however, had no effect on HCV RNA replication or internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. In addition, an E-cadherin monoclonal antibody effectively blocked HCV entry and infection in hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that E-cadherin is closely associated with claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN) on the cell membrane. Depletion of E-cadherin drastically diminished the cell-surface distribution of these two tight junction proteins in various hepatic cell lines, indicating that E-cadherin plays an important regulatory role in CLDN1/OCLN localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes is associated with HCV-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing an important link between HCV infection and liver cancer. Our data indicate that a dynamic interplay among E-cadherin, tight junctions, and EMT exists and mediates an important function in HCV entry. PMID:27298373

  17. The Epstein-Barr virus oncogene product, latent membrane protein 1, induces the downregulation of E-cadherin gene expression via activation of DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Neu; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Tse, Ka-Po; Chang, Hwan-You; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2002-07-23

    The latent membrane protein (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is expressed in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which is notoriously metastatic. Although it is established that LMP1 represses E-cadherin expression and enhances the invasive ability of carcinoma cells, the mechanism underlying this repression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that LMP1 induces the expression and activity of the DNA methyltransferases 1, 3a, and 3b, using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme activity assay. This results in hypermethylation of the E-cadherin promoter and down-regulation of E-cadherin gene expression, as revealed by methylation-specific PCR, real-time reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting data. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5'-Aza-2'dC, restores E-cadherin promoter activity and protein expression in LMP1-expressing cells, which in turn blocks cell migration ability, as demonstrated by the Transwell cell migration assay. Our findings suggest that LMP1 down-regulates E-cadherin gene expression and induces cell migration activity by using cellular DNA methylation machinery. PMID:12110730

  18. AHNAK is downregulated in melanoma, predicts poor outcome, and may be required for the expression of functional cadherin-1

    PubMed Central

    Feisst, Vaughan; Chen, Jennifer; Print, Cris; Dunbar, P. Rod

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to further our understanding of the transformation process by identifying differentially expressed proteins in melanocytes compared with melanoma cell lines. Tandem mass spectrometry incorporating iTRAQ reagents was used as a screen to identify and comparatively quantify the expression of proteins in membrane-enriched samples isolated from primary human melanocytes or three melanoma cells lines. Real-time PCR was used to validate significant hits. Immunohistochemistry was used to validate the expression of proteins of interest in melanocytes in human skin and in melanoma-infiltrated lymph nodes. Publically available databases were examined to assess mRNA expression and correlation to patient outcome in a larger cohort of samples. Finally, preliminary functional studies were carried out using siRNAs to reduce the expression of a protein of interest in primary melanocytes and in a keratinocyte cell line. Two proteins, AHNAK and ANXA2, were significantly downregulated in the melanoma cell lines compared with melanocytes. Downregulation was confirmed in tumor cells in a subset of human melanoma-infiltrated human lymph nodes compared with melanocytes in human skin. Examination of Gene Expression Omnibus database data sets suggests that downregulation of AHNAK mRNA and mutation of the AHNAK gene are common in metastatic melanoma and correlates to a poor outcome. Knockdown of AHNAK in primary melanocytes and in a keratinocyte cell line led to a reduction in detectable cadherin-1. This is the first report that we are aware of which correlates a loss of AHNAK with melanoma and poor patient outcome. We hypothesize that AHNAK is required for the expression of functional cadherin-1. PMID:26672724

  19. T-cadherin structures reveal a novel adhesive binding mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ciatto, Carlo; Bahna, Fabiana; Zampieri, Niccolò; VanSteenhouse, Harper C.; Katsamba, Phini S; Ahlsen, Goran; Harrison, Oliver J.; Brasch, Julia; Jin, Xiangshu; Posy, Shoshana; Vendome, Jeremie; Ranscht, Barbara; Jessell, Thomas M.; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2010-03-30

    Vertebrate genomes encode 19 classical cadherins and about 100 nonclassical cadherins. Adhesion by classical cadherins depends on binding interactions in their N-terminal EC1 domains, which swap N-terminal {beta}-strands between partner molecules from apposing cells. However, strand-swapping sequence signatures are absent from nonclassical cadherins, raising the question of how these proteins function in adhesion. Here, we show that T-cadherin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cadherin, forms dimers through an alternative nonswapped interface near the EC1-EC2 calcium-binding sites. Mutations within this interface ablate the adhesive capacity of T-cadherin. These nonadhesive T-cadherin mutants also lose the ability to regulate neurite outgrowth from T-cadherin-expressing neurons. Our findings reveal the likely molecular architecture of the T-cadherin homophilic interface and its requirement for axon outgrowth regulation. The adhesive binding mode used by T-cadherin may also be used by other nonclassical cadherins

  20. Tobacco plants expressing the Cry1AbMod toxin suppress tolerance to Cry1Ab toxin of Manduca sexta cadherin-silenced larvae.

    PubMed

    Porta, Helena; Jiménez, Gladys; Cordoba, Elizabeth; León, Patricia; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2011-07-01

    Cry toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria are insecticidal proteins used worldwide in the control of different insect pests. Alterations in toxin-receptor interaction represent the most common mechanism to induce resistance to Cry toxins in lepidopteran insects. Cry toxins bind with high affinity to the cadherin protein present in the midgut cells and this interaction facilitates the proteolytic removal of helix α-1 and pre-pore oligomer formation. Resistance to Cry toxins has been linked with mutations in the cadherin gene. One strategy effective to overcome larval resistance to Cry1A toxins is the production of Cry1AMod toxins that lack helix α-1. Cry1AMod are able to form oligomeric structures without binding to cadherin receptor and were shown to be toxic to cadherin-silenced Manduca sexta larvae and Pectinophora gossypiella strain with resistance linked to mutations in a cadherin gene. We developed Cry1AbMod tobacco transgenic plants to analyze if Cry1AMod toxins can be expressed in transgenic crops, do not affect plant development and are able to control insect pests. Our results show that production of the Cry1AbMod toxin in transgenic plants does not affect plant development, since these plants exhibited healthy growth, produced abundant seeds, and were virtually undistinguishable from control plants. Most importantly, Cry1AbMod protein produced in tobacco plants retains its functional toxic activity against susceptible and tolerant M. sexta larvae due to the silencing of cadherin receptor by RNAi. These results suggest that CryMod toxins could potentially be expressed in other transgenic crops to protect them against both toxin-susceptible and resistant lepidopteran larvae affected in cadherin gene. PMID:21621616

  1. Developmental changes in expression, subcellular distribution, and function of Drosophila N-cadherin, guided by a cell-intrinsic program during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kurusu, Mitsuhiko; Katsuki, Takeo; Zinn, Kai; Suzuki, Emiko

    2012-06-15

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) perform numerous functions during neural development. An individual CAM can play different roles during each stage of neuronal differentiation; however, little is known about how such functional switching is accomplished. Here we show that Drosophila N-cadherin (CadN) is required at multiple developmental stages within the same neuronal population and that its sub-cellular expression pattern changes between the different stages. During development of mushroom body neurons and motoneurons, CadN is expressed at high levels on growing axons, whereas expression becomes downregulated and restricted to synaptic sites in mature neurons. Phenotypic analysis of CadN mutants reveals that developing axons require CadN for axon guidance and fasciculation, whereas mature neurons for terminal growth and receptor clustering. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CadN downregulation can be achieved in cultured neurons without synaptic contact with other cells. Neuronal silencing experiments using Kir(2.1) indicate that neuronal excitability is also dispensable for CadN downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, downregulation of CadN can be prematurely induced by ectopic expression of a nonselective cation channel, dTRPA1, in developing neurons. Together, we suggest that switching of CadN expression during neuronal differentiation involves regulated cation influx within neurons. PMID:22542600

  2. ID2 predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer, especially in triple-negative breast cancer, and inhibits E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Yao, Ling; Chen, Li; Cao, Zhi-Gang; Yu, San-Jian; Kuang, Xia-Ying; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibitors of DNA-binding (ID) proteins are known as important modulators in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. This study sought to investigate the prognostic value of ID proteins in breast cancer. Methods The prognostic role of ID proteins in human breast cancer was investigated in 250 breast cancers, via tissue microarrays. The messenger (m)RNA and protein levels of E-cadherin were examined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting, in cells overexpressing IDs. Dual-luciferase report assay was used to investigate the potential mechanism, and a migration assay was performed to investigate the influence of IDs on cell migratory activity. Results The survival analysis with Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression showed that ID2 expression level, which correlated with estrogen receptor status and E-cadherin abundance, served as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.013). The prognostic value of ID2 for DFS was most significant in triple-negative breast cancer patients (P=0.009). We also found that ID2 was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression by correlation analysis (P=0.020, Pearson’s R=−0.155). Subsequently, we explored the biological rationale and uncovered that the enforced expression of ID proteins could suppress E-cadherin expression significantly, thus increasing the migration ability of mammary epithelial cells. Then using a combination of ID2 and E-cadherin expression, the patients were classified into four subgroups with different DFS (P=0.023). Conclusion The overexpression of ID2 can be used as a prognostic marker in breast cancer patients, especially in triple-negative breast cancer patients. ID proteins were still, unexpectedly, revealed to inhibit E-cadherin abundance. PMID:24971018

  3. Functional loss of E-cadherin and cadherin-11 alleles on chromosome 16q22 in colonic cancer.

    PubMed

    Braungart, E; Schumacher, C; Hartmann, E; Nekarda, H; Becker, K F; Höfler, H; Atkinson, M J

    1999-04-01

    Proteins of the cadherin family regulate cellular adhesion and motility and are believed to act as tumour suppressors. Previous studies have identified frequent mutation and allelic inactivation of the E-cadherin (cadherin-1) locus in diffuse gastric cancer. At least two other cadherin genes, P-cadherin (cadherin-3) and OB-cadherin (cadherin-11), have been mapped close to the E-cadherin gene on chromosome 16q22. As this region of the genome is frequently deleted in malignancy, multiple cadherin loci may be affected by losses of chromosome 16q22. The expression of mRNA transcripts from polymorphic alleles of the E-cadherin and cadherin-11 genes was examined in 30 cases of colonic, gastric, and renal carcinoma. In gastric cancer, loss of expression of one allele was restricted to the E-cadherin locus, whilst in renal carcinoma neither locus was affected. In colonic cancers, loss of expression of one E-cadherin allele was detected in 5 of 22 cases, whilst loss of a cadherin-11 allele was seen in 5 of 23 cases. This functional loss of cadherin gene expression may be due to gene deletion, inactivation or recombination. As no evidence of cadherin gene mutation was observed in the remaining transcripts, we can conclude that these two genes are only indirectly involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:10398117

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta is required for vitamin D receptor-dependent E-cadherin expression in SW480 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouchi, Zen; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} We analyzed Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate kinase II{beta} (PIPKII{beta}) function in cancer. {yields} PIPKII{beta} is required for vitamin D receptor-mediated E-cadherin upregulation in SW480. {yields} PIPKII{beta} suppresses cellular motility through E-cadherin induction in SW480 cells. {yields} Nuclear PIP{sub 2} but not plasma membrane-localized PIP{sub 2} mediates E-cadherin upregulation. -- Abstract: Numerous epidemiological data indicate that vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling induced by its ligand or active metabolite 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) has anti-cancer activity in several colon cancers. 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces the epithelial differentiation of SW480 colon cancer cells expressing VDR (SW480-ADH) by upregulating E-cadherin expression; however, its precise mechanism remains unknown. We found that phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta (PIPKII{beta}) but not PIPKII{alpha} is required for VDR-mediated E-cadherin induction in SW480-ADH cells. The syntenin-2 postsynaptic density protein/disc large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain and pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC{delta}1 PHD) possess high affinity for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}) mainly localized to the nucleus and plasma membrane, respectively. The expression of syntenin-2 PDZ but not PLC{delta}1 PHD inhibited 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-induced E-cadherin upregulation, suggesting that nuclear PI(4,5)P{sub 2} production mediates E-cadherin expression through PIPKII{beta} in a VDR-dependent manner. PIPKII{beta} is also involved in the suppression of the cell motility induced by 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. These results indicate that PIPKII{beta}-mediated PI(4,5)P{sub 2} signaling is important for E-cadherin upregulation and inhibition of cellular motility induced by VDR activation.

  5. Soy isoflavone genistein upregulates epithelial adhesion molecule e-cadherin expression and attenuates beta-catenin signaling in mammary epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced Wnt/beta -catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor protection by dietary intake of soy-rich foods and the soy isoflavone genistein (Gen) is widely regarded based on numerous epidemiological and animal studies; howev...

  6. A sharp cadherin-6 gene expression boundary in the developing mouse cortical plate demarcates the future functional areal border.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Youhei W; Inoue, Yukiko U; Asami, Junko; Hoshino, Mikio; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2013-10-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex can be tangentially subdivided into tens of functional areas with distinct cyto-architectures and neural circuitries; however, it remains elusive how these areal borders are genetically elaborated during development. Here we establish original bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse lines that specifically recapitulate cadherin-6 (Cdh6) mRNA expression profiles in the layer IV of the somatosensory cortex and by detailing their cortical development, we show that a sharp Cdh6 gene expression boundary is formed at a mediolateral coordinate along the cortical layer IV as early as the postnatal day 5 (P5). By further applying mouse genetics that allows rigid cell fate tracing with CreERT2 expression, it is demonstrated that the Cdh6 gene expression boundary set at around P4 eventually demarcates the areal border between the somatosensory barrel and limb field at P20. In the P6 cortical cell pellet culture system, neurons with Cdh6 expression preferentially form aggregates in a manner dependent on Ca(2+) and electroporation-based Cdh6 overexpression limited to the postnatal stages perturbs area-specific cell organization in the barrel field. These results suggest that Cdh6 expression in the nascent cortical plate may serve solidification of the protomap for cortical functional areas. PMID:22875867

  7. Ginkgolide B Inhibits JAM-A, Cx43, and VE-Cadherin Expression and Reduces Monocyte Transmigration in Oxidized LDL-Stimulated Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueqing; Sun, Wenjia; Zhao, Yanyang; Chen, Beidong; Wu, Wei; Bao, Li; Qi, Ruomei

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of ginkgolide B on junction proteins and the reduction of monocyte migration in oxidized low-density lipoprotein- (ox-LDL-) treated endothelial cells. Methods. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used in the present study. Immunofluorescence and Western blot were performed to determine the expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A), connexin 43 (Cx43), and vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). Monocyte migration was detected by the Transwell assay. Results. ox-LDL stimulation increased JAM-A expression by 35%, Cx43 expression by 24%, and VE-cadherin expression by 37% in HUVECs. Ginkgolide B (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mg/mL) dose-dependently abolished the expression of these junction proteins. The monocyte transmigration experiments showed that the level of monocyte migration was sixfold higher in the ox-LDL-treated group than in the control group. Ginkgolide B (0.6 mg/mL) nearly completely abolished monocyte migration. Both ginkgolide B and LY294002 suppressed Akt phosphorylation and the expression of these junction proteins in ox-LDL-treated endothelial cells. These results suggest that the ginkgolide B-induced inhibition of junction protein expression is associated with blockade of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Conclusion. Ginkgolide B suppressed junction protein expression and reduced monocyte transmigration that was induced by ox-LDL. Ginkgolide B may improve vascular permeability in atherosclerosis. PMID:26246869

  8. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and e-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Denise; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E.; Cotsarelis, George

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode ‘budding’ is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of adherens junction component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another adherens junction component, has been more difficult to study due to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent adherens junction dissolution. PMID:25010141

  9. Correlation of cadherin-17 protein expression with clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with sporadic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, W.; Gu, T.; Gao, L. M.; Zong, Z. G.; Meng, L.; Fu, Z. Z.; Guo, L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the correlations between cadherin-17 (CDH17) protein expression and the clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with sporadic gastric cancer (GC). Nine relevant studies of 1,960 patients were identified using electronic database searches supplemented with a manual search in strict accordance with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Statistical analyses were conducted using STATA 12.0 statistical software. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were determined, and Z test was used to measure the significance of the overall effect size. A total of nine eligible cohort studies were included in this meta-analysis. The expression of CDH17 in patients with diffuse GC was significantly higher than in those with intestinal-type GC. Moreover, the tumor depth of invasion differed significantly between patients with positive CDH17 (CDH17+) and negative CDH17 (CDH17-) GC. However, there were no significant differences between CDH17+ and CDH17- GC patients with respect to tumor node metastasis clinical stages, histological grades, or lymph node metastasis. Despite the differences in invasive depth, there was no significant difference in 5-year survival rates between CDH17+ and CDH17- GC patients. Our meta-analysis provides evidence that CDH17 protein expression may be associated with the development of GC, suggesting that CDH17 is an important biomarker that could be useful for the early diagnosis of GC. However, CDH17 levels do not appear to impact overall survival. PMID:26421870

  10. Nuclear Signaling from Cadherin Adhesion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Pierre D.; Maher, Meghan T.; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell–cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of “outside-in” or “inside-out” signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure–function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell–cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell–cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  11. Nuclear signaling from cadherin adhesion complexes.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Pierre D; Maher, Meghan T; Gottardi, Cara J

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell-cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of "outside-in" or "inside-out" signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure-function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell-cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell-cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  12. Comparative Evaluation of β-Catenin and E-Cadherin Expression in Liquid Aspiration Biopsy Specimens of Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Isaeva, A V; Zima, A P; Saprina, T V; Kasoyan, K T; Popov, O S; Brynova, O V; Berezkina, I S; Vasil'eva, O A; Ryazantseva, N V; Shabalova, I P; Litvinova, L S; Pak, Yu D; Novitskii, V V

    2016-06-01

    We compared the results of gene molecular and immunocytochemical studies of β-catenin and E-cadherin in different variants of nodular thyroid disease (nodular colloid goiter, follicular thyroid adenocarcinoma, papillary thyroid cancer) and revealed changes of the function of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex leading to switching from adhesion function of β-catenin in nodular colloid goiter to predominantly transcriptional activity in papillary carcinoma. The results confirm the important role of disturbances in E-cadherin-β-catenin interactions in the mechanisms of malignant transformation of follicular epithelium. PMID:27383156

  13. Deoxynivanelol and Fumonisin, Alone or in Combination, Induce Changes on Intestinal Junction Complexes and in E-Cadherin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Karina; Gomes, Fernando; Loureiro Bracarense, Ana Paula

    2013-01-01

    Fusariotoxins such as fumonisin B1 (FB1) and deoxynivalenol (DON) cause deleterious effects on the intestine of pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these mycotoxins, alone and in combination, on jejunal explants from piglets, using histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural assays. Five 24-day old pigs were used for sampling the explants. Forty-eight explants were sampled from each animal. Explants were incubated for 4 hours in culture medium and medium containing FB1 (100 µM), DON (10 µM) and both mycotoxins (100 µM FB1 plus 10 µM DON). Exposure to all treatments induced a significant decrease in the normal intestinal morphology and in the number of goblet cells, which were more severe in explants exposed to DON and both mycotoxins. A significant reduction in villus height occurred in groups treated with DON and with co-contamination. Expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in explants exposed to FB1 (40%), DON (93%) and FB1 plus DON (100%). The ultrastructural assay showed increased intercellular spaces and no junction complexes on enterocytes exposed to mycotoxins. The present data indicate that FB1 and DON induce changes in cell junction complexes that could contribute to increase paracellular permeability. The ex vivo model was adequate for assessing intestinal toxicity induced by exposure of isolated or associated concentrations of 100 µM of FB1 and 10 µM of DON. PMID:24287571

  14. Paranuaclear E-cadherin in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Philip M; Al-Kuran, Rasha A; Theuer, Charles P

    2002-12-01

    Decreased E-cadherin expression permits dissociation and widespread dissemination of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. We studied the relationship between paranuclear E-cadherin distribution and the histopathologic characteristics of gastric adenocarcinomas. E-cadherin immunostains of 173 gastric adenocarcinoma sections revealed paranuclear; punctate to vesicular staining in 18% (16/87) of the intestinal-type adenocarcinomas, 30% (17/56) of the diffuse-type adenocarcinomas, and 30% (9/30) of the mired adenocarcinomas. These data suggest that in some gastric adenocarcinomas, there is a defect in transport of E-cadherin to the cell surface, which may prevent intercellular adhesion and encourage dissemination. Of 34 cancers with paranuclear E-cadherin staining, 20 (59%) had paranuclear staining within the nonneoplastic epithelium, but only 22.0% of 100 carcinomas with absent or membranous E-cadherin staining were accompanied by morphologically benign epithelium with paranuclear E-cadherin. In surface epithelium, paranuclear E-cadherin staining colocalized with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II in the Golgi apparatus. The presence of paranuclear E-cadherin in cancer-associated benign epithelium suggests that the alteration in the E-cadherin molecule responsible for the paranuclear distribution may be an early change in gastric adenocarcinoma progression. PMID:12472282

  15. Aberrant expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in association with transforming growth factor-beta1 in urinary bladder lesions in humans after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Alina; Morimura, Keiichirou; Kinoshita, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Vozianov, Alexander; Fukushima, Shoji

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the molecular pathways of cell-cell communication in chronic inflammatory processes associated with long-term low-dose urinary bladder exposure to ionizing radiation in people without major disease living more than 19 years in radio-contaminated areas of Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident. Patterns of components of the E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex, and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were immunohistochemically evaluated in urinary bladder biopsies from 52 males with benign prostate hyperplasia and 8 females with chronic cystitis (group 1). For comparison, 25 males and 6 females living in non-contaminated areas of Ukraine were also investigated (group 2). Fourteen patients with primary urothelial carcinomas, which were operated on before the Chernobyl accident, were included as a carcinoma group. Chronic proliferative atypical cystitis ('Chernobyl cystitis') was observed in group 1 patients. Foci of dysplasia and carcinoma in situ were found in 51 (85%) and 34 (57%) of the 60 cases, respectively. Chronic cystitis with areas of dysplasia was detected in only 4 (13%) cases of 31 group 2 patients. Statistically significant differences in immunohistochemical scores for TGF-beta1 in the urothelium and lamina propria, iNOS in the urothelium and both beta-catenin and E-cadherin in the cytoplasm were observed between groups 1 and 2 with marked expression in group 1. Furthermore, TGF-beta1 overexpression and alteration in E-cadherin/beta-catenin complexes in bladder urothelium might play a crucial role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis in humans exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation. PMID:16367920

  16. Suppression of SIPA-1 expression may reduce bladder cancer invasion and metastasis via the downregulation of E-cadherin and ZO-1

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, PING; WANG, XINGHUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the capacity of signal-induced proliferation-associated protein 1 (SIPA-1) to regulate bladder cancer cell invasion and metastasis. BIU-87 and T24 cells were transfected with the SIPA gene and SIPA short hairpin (sh)RNA, respectively. Western blot analysis was conducted to analyze the expression levels of SIPA-1, Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1), Rap1 guanosine triphosphate (Rap1GTP), E-cadherin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1). Cell motility and invasion were evaluated in vitro using wound and Transwell assays. Transfected cells were inoculated into the pelvic region of BALB/c nude mice, and the number of resulting tumors was recorded after 6 weeks. Western blot analysis revealed that expression levels of E-cadherin and ZO-1 were reduced in the cells with enhanced levels of SIPA-1. By contrast, the levels of E-cadherin and ZO-1 were elevated in the cells in which SIPA-1 was knocked down. In comparison with untransfected cells, the cells with reduced levels of SIPA-1 exhibited reduced wound closure and fewer cells crossed the chamber in the Transwell experiment, whereas the cells with enhanced levels of SIPA-1 exhibited increased migration and invasion In vivo, an increased tumor count was obtained in the mice with elevated levels of SIPA-1. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that SIPA-1 is able to regulate bladder cancer cell metastasis and invasion by reducing the expression of E-cadherin and ZO-1. PMID:26889242

  17. Cadherins mediate sequential roles through a hierarchy of mechanisms in the developing mammillary body

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Nora-Emöke; Haddad-Tóvolli, Roberta; Zhou, Xunlei; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Expression of intricate combinations of cadherins (a family of adhesive membrane proteins) is common in the developing central nervous system. On this basis, a combinatorial cadherin code has long been proposed to underlie neuronal sorting and to be ultimately responsible for the layers, columns and nuclei of the brain. However, experimental proof of this particular function of cadherins has proven difficult to obtain and the question is still not clear. Alternatively, non-specific, non-combinatorial, purely quantitative adhesive differentials have been proposed to explain neuronal sorting in the brain. Do cadherin combinations underlie brain cytoarchitecture? We approached this question using as model a well-defined forebrain nucleus, the mammillary body (MBO), which shows strong, homogeneous expression of one single cadherin (Cdh11) and patterned, combinatorial expression of Cdh6, −8 and −10. We found that, besides the known combinatorial Cdh pattern, MBO cells are organized into a second, non-overlapping pattern grouping neurons with the same date of neurogenesis. We report that, in the Foxb1 mouse mutant, Cdh11 expression fails to be maintained during MBO development. This disrupted the combination-based as well as the birthdate-based sorting in the mutant MBO. In utero RNA interference (RNAi) experiments knocking down Cdh11 in MBO-fated migrating neurons at one specific age showed that Cdh11 expression is required for chronological entrance in the MBO. Our results suggest that neuronal sorting in the developing MBO is caused by adhesion-based, non-combinatorial mechanisms that keep neurons sorted according to birthdate information (possibly matching them to target neurons chronologically sorted in the same manner). Non-specific adhesion mechanisms would also prevent cadherin combinations from altering the birthdate-based sorting. Cadherin combinations would presumably act later to support specific synaptogenesis through specific axonal fasciculation and

  18. Crystal Structure of Human E-Cadherin-EC1EC2 in Complex with a Peptidomimetic Competitive Inhibitor of Cadherin Homophilic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Valentina; Lucarelli, Anna Paola; Dalle Vedove, Andrea; Fanelli, Roberto; Tomassetti, Antonella; Belvisi, Laura; Civera, Monica; Parisini, Emilio

    2016-05-26

    Cadherins are transmembrane cell adhesion proteins whose aberrant expression often correlates with cancer development and proliferation. We report the crystal structure of an E-cadherin extracellular fragment in complex with a peptidomimetic compound that was previously shown to partially inhibit cadherin homophilic adhesion. The structure reveals an unexpected binding mode and allows the identification of a druggable cadherin interface, thus paving the way to a future structure-guided design of cell adhesion inhibitors against cadherin-expressing solid tumors. PMID:27120112

  19. miR-199a-5p induces cell invasion by suppressing E-cadherin expression in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHAOHUA; CAO, KE; HE, QUANYONG; YIN, ZHAOQI; ZHOU, JIANDA

    2016-01-01

    A growing quantity of evidence exists to suggest that microRNAs are significant regulators of multiple cellular processes. When expressed aberrantly in different types of cancer, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), they play key roles in tumorigenesis and progression. The aberrant expression of miR-199a-5p has been observed to contribute to carcinogenesis in various types of cancer. However, the role of miR-199a-5p in the progression of cSCC metastasis remains largely unknown. In this study, we determined that miR-199a-5p was the upstream regulator of CDH1 (E-cadherin) and that it could suppress the expression of E-cadherin in cSCC cells. In addition, miR-199a-5p mimics significantly induced cell invasion and the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 in cSCC cells. In conclusion, these results are likely to aid in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cSCC progression. In addition, the findings provide a new theoretical basis to further investigate miR-199a-5p as a potential biomarker and a promising approach in cSCC treatment. PMID:27347107

  20. Deciphering Seed Sequence Based Off-Target Effects in a Large-Scale RNAi Reporter Screen for E-Cadherin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert; Nicke, Barbara; Pohlenz, Hans-Dieter; Sohler, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Functional RNAi based screening is affected by large numbers of false positive and negative hits due to prevalent sequence based off-target effects. We performed a druggable genome targeting siRNA screen intended to identify novel regulators of E-cadherin (CDH1) expression, a known key player in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Analysis of primary screening results indicated a large number of false-positive hits. To address these crucial difficulties we developed an analysis method, SENSORS, which, similar to published methods, is a seed enrichment strategy for analyzing siRNA off-targets in RNAi screens. Using our approach, we were able to demonstrate that accounting for seed based off-target effects stratifies primary screening results and enables the discovery of additional screening hits. While traditional hit detection methods are prone to false positive results which are undetected, we were able to identify false positive hits robustly. Transcription factor MYBL1 was identified as a putative novel target required for CDH1 expression and verified experimentally. No siRNA pool targeting MYBL1 was present in the used siRNA library. Instead, MYBL1 was identified as a putative CDH1 regulating target solely based on the SENSORS off-target score, i.e. as a gene that is a cause for off-target effects down regulating E-cadherin expression. PMID:26361354

  1. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Ruben G.; van der Veer, Eric P.; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K.; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C.; Rabelink, Ton J.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3′UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  2. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Ruben G; van der Veer, Eric P; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J C; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C; Rabelink, Ton J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3'UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  3. Inappropriate cadherin switching in the mouse epiblast compromises proper signaling between the epiblast and the extraembryonic ectoderm during gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Basilicata, M. Felicia; Frank, Marcus; Solter, Davor; Brabletz, Thomas; Stemmler, Marc P.

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin switching from E-cadherin (E-cad) to N-cadherin (N-cad) is a key step of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes that occurs during gastrulation and cancer progression. We investigate whether cadherins actively participate in progression of EMT by crosstalk to signaling pathways. We apply ectopic cadherin switching before the onset of mouse gastrulation. Mutants with an induced E-cad to N-cad switch (Ncadki) die around E8.5. Severe morphological changes including a small epiblast, a rounded shape, an enlarged extra-embryonic compartment and lack of the amnion, combined with a massive cell detachment from the ectodermal layer are detected. In contrast to epiblast-specific E-cad depletion, gastrulation is initiated in Ncadki embryos, but patterning of the germ-layers is abnormal. An overall reduction in BMP signaling, expansion of Nodal and Eomes domains, combined with reduced Wnt3a expression at the primitive streak is observed. Our results show that in addition to cadherin-dependent adhesion, proper embryonic development requires E-cad mediated signaling function to facilitate a feedback loop that stabilizes Bmp4 and Bmp2 expression in the extraembryonic ectoderm and sustained downstream activity in the epiblast. Moreover, for proper morphogenesis a fine-tuned spatio-temporal control of cadherin switching is required during EMT at gastrulation to avoid premature cell detachment and migration. PMID:27217206

  4. Ankyrin-G Inhibits Endocytosis of Cadherin Dimers.

    PubMed

    Cadwell, Chantel M; Jenkins, Paul M; Bennett, Vann; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of endothelial cell adhesion is central to vascular development and maintenance. Furthermore, altered endothelial adhesion is implicated in numerous diseases. Therefore, normal vascular patterning and maintenance require tight regulation of endothelial cell adhesion dynamics. However, the mechanisms that control junctional plasticity are not fully understood. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) is an adhesive protein found in adherens junctions of endothelial cells. VE-cadherin mediates adhesion through trans interactions formed by its extracellular domain. Trans binding is followed by cis interactions that laterally cluster the cadherin in junctions. VE-cadherin is linked to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic interactions with β- and α-catenin, which serve to increase adhesive strength. Furthermore, p120-catenin binds to the cytoplasmic tail of cadherin and stabilizes it at the plasma membrane. Here we report that induced cis dimerization of VE-cadherin inhibits endocytosis independent of both p120 binding and trans interactions. However, we find that ankyrin-G, a protein that links membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton, associates with VE-cadherin and inhibits its endocytosis. Ankyrin-G inhibits VE-cadherin endocytosis independent of p120 binding. We propose a model in which ankyrin-G associates with and inhibits the endocytosis of VE-cadherin cis dimers. Our findings support a novel mechanism for regulation of VE-cadherin endocytosis through ankyrin association with cadherin engaged in lateral interactions. PMID:26574545

  5. Cadherin Cell Adhesion System in Canine Mammary Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Adelina; Schmitt, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes play important roles by providing cell-cell adhesion and communication in different organ systems. Abnormal expression of cadherin adhesion molecules constitutes a common phenomenon in canine mammary cancer and has been frequently implicated in tumour progression. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on cadherin/catenin adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, β-catenin, and P-cadherin) in canine mammary cancer, focusing on the putative biological functions and clinical significance of these molecules in this disease. This paper highlights the need for further research studies in this setting in order to elucidate the role of these adhesion molecules during tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:22973534

  6. Application of APTES-Anti-E-cadherin film for early cancer monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ben Ismail, Manel; Carreiras, Franck; Agniel, Rémy; Mili, Donia; Sboui, Dejla; Zanina, Nahla; Othmane, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Cancer staging is a way to classify cancer according to the extent of the disease in the body. The stage is usually determined by several factors such as the location of the primary tumor, the tumor size, the degree of spread in the surrounding tissues, etc. The study of E-cadherin (EC) expression on cancerous cells of patients has revealed variations in the molecular expression patterns of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. The detection of these cells requires a long procedure involving conventional techniques, thus, the requirement for development of new rapid devices that permit direct and highly sensitive detection stimulates the sensing field progress. Here, we explore if E-cadherin could be used as a biomarker to bind and detect epithelial cancer cells. Hence, the sensitive and specific detection of E-cadherin expressed on epithelial cells is approached by immobilizing anti-E-cadherin antibody (AEC) onto aminosilanized indium-tin oxide (ITO) surface. The immunosensing surfaces have been characterized by electrochemical measurements, wettability and confocal microscopy and their performance has been assessed in the presence of cancer cell lines. Under optimal conditions, the resulting immunosensor displayed a selective detection of E-cadherin expressing cells, which could be detected either by fluorescence or electrochemical techniques. The developed immunosensing surface could provide a simple tool that can be applied to cancer staging. PMID:27423102

  7. Cadherin2 (N-cadherin) plays an essential role in zebrafish cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Bagatto, Brian; Francl, Jessie; Liu, Bei; Liu, Qin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cadherins are cell surface adhesion molecules that play important roles in development of vertebrate tissues and organs. We studied cadherin2 expression in developing zebrafish heart using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical methods, and we found that cadherin2 was strongly expressed by the myocardium of the embryonic zebrafish. To gain insight into cadherin2 role in the formation and function of the heart, we analyzed cardiac differentiation and performance in a cadherin2 mutant, glass onion (glo). Results We found that the cadherin2 mutant had enlarged pericardial cavity, disorganized atrium and ventricle, and reduced expression of a ventricular specific marker vmhc. Individual myocardiocytes in the glo mutant embryos became round shaped and loosely aggregated. In vivo measurements of cardiac performance revealed that the mutant heart had significantly reduced heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output compared to control embryos. Formation of the embryonic vascular system in the glo mutants was also affected. Conclusion Our results suggest that cadherin2 plays an essential role in zebrafish cardiovascular development. Although the exact mechanisms remain unknown as to the formation of the enlarged pericardium and reduced peripheral blood flow, it is clear that myocardiocyte differentiation and physiological cardiovascular performance is impaired when cadherin2 function is disrupted. PMID:16719917

  8. Gastrulation EMT Is Independent of P-Cadherin Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Moly, Pricila K.; Cooley, James R.; Zeltzer, Sebastian L.; Yatskievych, Tatiana A.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an evolutionarily conserved process during which cells lose epithelial characteristics and gain a migratory phenotype. Although downregulation of epithelial cadherins by Snail and other transcriptional repressors is generally considered a prerequisite for EMT, recent studies have challenged this view. Here we investigate the relationship between E-cadherin and P-cadherin expression and localization, Snail function and EMT during gastrulation in chicken embryos. Expression analyses show that while E-cadherin transcripts are detected in the epiblast but not in the primitive streak or mesoderm, P-cadherin mRNA and protein are present in the epiblast, primitive and mesoderm. Antibodies that specifically recognize E-cadherin are not presently available. During EMT, P-cadherin relocalizes from the lateral surfaces of epithelial epiblast cells to a circumferential distribution in emerging mesodermal cells. Cells electroporated with an E-cadherin expression construct undergo EMT and migrate into the mesoderm. An examination of Snail function showed that reduction of Slug (SNAI2) protein levels using a morpholino fails to inhibit EMT, and expression of human or chicken Snail in epiblast cells fails to induce EMT. In contrast, cells expressing the Rho inhibitor peptide C3 rapidly exit the epiblast without activating Slug or the mesoderm marker N-cadherin. Together, these experiments show that epiblast cells undergo EMT while retaining P-cadherin, and raise questions about the mechanisms of EMT regulation during avian gastrulation. PMID:27097030

  9. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  10. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, TA; Dias, AM; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, JM; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, CA; Pinho, SS

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell–cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  11. E-cadherin is required for cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaolie; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-03-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile and multipotent embryonic cell population, which migrates directionally on defined routes throughout the embryo, contributing to facial structures including cartilage, bone and ganglia. Cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is known to play a crucial role in the directional migration of CNC cells. However, migrating CNC co-express different cadherin subtypes, and their individual roles have yet to be fully explored. In previous studies, the expression of individual cadherin subtypes has been analysed using different methods with varying sensitivities, preventing the direct comparison of expression levels. Here, we provide the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of the expression of six cadherin superfamily members during different phases of CNC cell migration in Xenopus. By applying a quantitative RT-qPCR approach, we can determine the copy number and abundance of each expressed cadherin through different phases of CNC migration. Using this approach, we show for the first time expression of E-cadherin and XB/C-cadherin in CNC cells, adding them as two new members of cadherins co-expressed during CNC migration. Cadherin co-expression during CNC migration in Xenopus, in particular the constant expression of E-cadherin, contradicts the classical epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) model postulating a switch in cadherin expression. Loss-of-function experiments further show that E-cadherin is required for proper CNC cell migration in vivo and also for cell protrusion formation in vitro. Knockdown of E-cadherin is not rescued by co-injection of other classical cadherins, pointing to a specific function of E-cadherin in mediating CNC cell migration. Finally, through reconstitution experiments with different E-cadherin deletion mutants in E-cadherin morphant embryos, we demonstrate that the extracellular domain, but not the cytoplasmic domain, of E-cadherin is sufficient to rescue CNC cell migration in vivo

  12. Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns Using Biclustering.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swarup; Bhattacharyya, Dhruba K; Kalita, Jugal K

    2016-01-01

    Mining microarray data to unearth interesting expression profile patterns for discovery of in silico biological knowledge is an emerging area of research in computational biology. A group of functionally related genes may have similar expression patterns under a set of conditions or at some time points. Biclustering is an important data mining tool that has been successfully used to analyze gene expression data for biologically significant cluster discovery. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce interesting patterns that may be observed in expression data and discuss the role of biclustering techniques in detecting interesting functional gene groups with similar expression patterns. PMID:26350227

  13. RNAi-mediated knock-down of arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 expression induces E-cadherin up-regulation and cell-cell contact growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tiang, Jacky M; Butcher, Neville J; Cullinane, Carleen; Humbert, Patrick O; Minchin, Rodney F

    2011-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the biotransformation of arylamine and hydrazine substrates. It also has a role in the catabolism of the folate metabolite p-aminobenzoyl glutamate. Recent bioinformatics studies have correlated NAT1 expression with various cancer subtypes. However, a direct role for NAT1 in cell biology has not been established. In this study, we have knocked down NAT1 in the colon adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29 and found a marked change in cell morphology that was accompanied by an increase in cell-cell contact growth inhibition and a loss of cell viability at confluence. NAT1 knock-down also led to attenuation in anchorage independent growth in soft agar. Loss of NAT1 led to the up-regulation of E-cadherin mRNA and protein levels. This change in E-cadherin was not attributed to RNAi off-target effects and was also observed in the prostate cancer cell-line 22Rv1. In vivo, NAT1 knock-down cells grew with a longer doubling time compared to cells stably transfected with a scrambled RNAi or to parental HT-29 cells. This study has shown that NAT1 affects cell growth and morphology. In addition, it suggests that NAT1 may be a novel drug target for cancer therapeutics. PMID:21347396

  14. E-cadherin expression on human carcinoma cell affects trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity through killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 on natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Chisako; Fujii, Satoshi; Kimura, Taichi; Kuwata, Takeshi; Wada, Noriaki; Mukai, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Fukayama, Masashi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2011-05-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant antibody drug that is widely used for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma. Despite encouraging clinical results, many HER2-overexpressing carcinomas are primarily resistant to trastuzumab. We attempted to explain trastuzumab resistance and search for solutions. Since the killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1), an inhibitory receptor expressed on subsets of natural killer (NK) cells recognizes E-cadherin as ligands and may inhibit immune responses by regulating the effector function of NK cells, we used HER2-overexpressing carcinoma cells which were expressing E-cadherin to investigate the role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) through KLRG1 on NK cells in vitro and vivo. The results indicated that HER2-overexpressing carcinoma cells were killed by trastuzumab-mediated ADCC and the ADCC activity was reflected the degree of E-cadherin expression on carcinoma cells. We found that expression of E-cadherin was shown to be a predictor of response to trastuzumab-based treatment for HER2-overexpressing carcinomas, furthermore, trastuzumab-mediated ADCC was markedly enhanced by KLRG1-negative peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs(KLRG1(-))). PMID:21387286

  15. Differential Function of N-Cadherin and Cadherin-7 in the Control of Embryonic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Sylvie; Beauvais-Jouneau, Alice; Delouvée, Annie; Thiery, Jean Paul

    1999-01-01

    Similar amounts of N-cadherin and cadherin-7, the prototypes of type I and type II cadherin, induced cell-cell adhesion in murine sarcoma 180 transfectants, Ncad-1 and cad7-29, respectively. However, in the initial phase of aggregation, Ncad-1 cells aggregated more rapidly than cad7-29 cells. Isolated Ncad-1 and cad7-29 cells adhered and spread in a similar manner on fibronectin (FN), whereas aggregated cad7-29 cells were more motile and dispersed than aggregated Ncad-1 cells. cad7-29 cells established transient contacts with their neighbors which were stabilized if FN-cell interactions were perturbed. In contrast, Ncad-1 cells remained in close contact when they migrated on FN. Both β-catenin and cadherin were more rapidly downregulated in cad7-29 than in Ncad-1 cells treated with cycloheximide, suggesting a higher turnover rate for cadherin-7–mediated cell-cell contacts than for those mediated by N-cadherin. The extent of FN-dependent focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation was much lower if the cells had initiated N-cadherin–mediated rather than cadherin-7–mediated cell adhesion before plating. On grafting into the embryo, Ncad-1 cells did not migrate and remained at or close to the graft site, even after 48 h, whereas grafted cad7-29 cells dispersed efficiently into embryonic structures. Thus, the adhesive phenotype of cadherin-7–expressing cells is regulated by the nature of the extracellular matrix environment which also controls the migratory behavior of the cells. In addition, adhesions mediated by different cadherins differentially regulate FN-dependent signaling. The transient contacts specifically observed in cadherin- 7–expressing cells may also be important in the control of cell motility. PMID:10427101

  16. Cadherins and catenins in dendrite and synapse morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Eunju; Yuan, Li; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized specialized cells. Neuronal integrity and functional roles are critically dependent on dendritic architecture and synaptic structure, function and plasticity. The cadherins are glycosylated transmembrane proteins that form cell adhesion complexes in various tissues. They are associated with a group of cytosolic proteins, the catenins. While the functional roles of the complex have been extensively investigates in non-neuronal cells, it is becoming increasingly clear that components of the complex have critical roles in regulating dendritic and synaptic architecture, function and plasticity in neurons. Consistent with these functional roles, aberrations in components of the complex have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we discuss the roles of the classical cadherins and catenins in various aspects of dendrite and synapse architecture and function and their relevance to human neurological disorders. Cadherins are glycosylated transmembrane proteins that were initially identified as Ca2+-dependent cell adhesion molecules. They are present on plasma membrane of a variety of cell types from primitive metazoans to humans. In the past several years, it has become clear that in addition to providing mechanical adhesion between cells, cadherins play integral roles in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. The cadherin family is composed of more than 100 members and classified into several subfamilies, including classical cadherins and protocadherins. Several of these cadherin family members have been implicated in various aspects of neuronal development and function.1-3 The classical cadherins are associated with a group of cytosolic proteins, collectively called the catenins. While the functional roles of the cadherin-catenin cell adhesion complex have been extensively investigated in epithelial cells, it is now clear that components of the complex are well expressed in central neurons at different

  17. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Marr, Isabell; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability. PMID:27120348

  18. Expression of Tight Junction Proteins and Cadherin 17 in the Small Intestine of Young Goats Offered a Reduced N and/or Ca Diet

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Mirja R.; Breves, Gerhard; Langeheine, Marion; Brehm, Ralph; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Diets fed to ruminants should contain nitrogen (N) as low as possible to reduce feed costs and environmental pollution. Though possessing effective N-recycling mechanisms to maintain the N supply for rumen microbial protein synthesis and hence protein supply for the host, an N reduction caused substantial changes in calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis in young goats including decreased intestinal transepithelial Ca absorption as reported for monogastric species. In contrast to the transcellular component of transepithelial Ca transport, the paracellular route has not been investigated in young goats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N and/or Ca reduction on paracellular transport mechanisms in young goats. Electrophysiological properties of intestinal epithelia were investigated by Ussing chamber experiments. The expression of tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) proteins in intestinal epithelia were examined on mRNA level by qPCR and on protein level by western blot analysis. Dietary N reduction led to a segment specific increase in tissue conductances in the proximal jejunum which might be linked to concomitantly decreased expression of cadherin 17 mRNA. Expression of occludin (OCLN) and zonula occludens protein 1 was increased in mid jejunal epithelia of N reduced fed goats on mRNA and partly on protein level. Reduced dietary Ca supply resulted in a segment specific increase in claudin 2 and claudin 12 expression and decreased the expression of OCLN which might have been mediated at least in part by calcitriol. These data show that dietary N as well as Ca reduction affected expression of TJ and AJ proteins in a segment specific manner in young goats and may thus be involved in modulation of paracellular Ca permeability. PMID:27120348

  19. E-Cadherin and Gastric Cancer: Cause, Consequence, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin (epithelial-cadherin), encoded by the CDH1 gene, is a transmembrane glycoprotein playing a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin has been reported to be a tumor suppressor and to be down regulated in gastric cancer. Besides genetic mutations in CDH1 gene to induce hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), epigenetic factors such as DNA hypermethylation also contribute to the reduction of E-cadherin in gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, expression of E-cadherin could be mediated by infectious agents such as H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori). As E-cadherin is vitally involved in signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and migration, dysregulation of E-cadherin leads to dysfunction of gastric epithelial cells and contributes to gastric cancer development. Moreover, changes in its expression could reflect pathological conditions of gastric mucosa, making its role in gastric cancer complicated. In this review, we summarize the functions of E-cadherin and the signaling pathways it regulates. We aim to provide comprehensive perspectives in the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin and its involvement in gastric cancer initiation and progression. We also focus on its applications for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy in gastric cancer in order to open new avenues in this field. PMID:25184143

  20. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Qualtrough, David; Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C; Paraskeva, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, Cancers 2015, 7 1886 these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26393651

  1. Zeb1 Regulates E-cadherin and Epcam (Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule) Expression to Control Cell Behavior in Early Zebrafish Development*

    PubMed Central

    Vannier, Corinne; Mock, Kerstin; Brabletz, Thomas; Driever, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The ZEB1 transcription factor is best known as an inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) in cancer metastasis, acting through transcriptional repression of CDH1 (encoding E-cadherin) and the EMT-suppressing microRNA-200s (miR-200s). Here we analyze roles of the ZEB1 zebrafish orthologs, Zeb1a and Zeb1b, and of miR-200s in control of cell adhesion and morphogenesis during gastrulation and segmentation stages. Loss and gain of function analyses revealed that Zeb1 represses cdh1 expression to fine-tune adhesiveness of migrating deep blastodermal cells. Furthermore, Zeb1 acts as a repressor of epcam in the deep cells of the blastoderm and may contribute to control of epithelial integrity of enveloping layer cells, the outermost cells of the blastoderm. We found a similar ZEB1-dependent repression of EPCAM expression in human pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines, mediated through direct binding of ZEB1 to the EPCAM promoter. Thus, Zeb1 proteins employ several evolutionary conserved mechanisms to regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and cancer. PMID:23667256

  2. The Heliothis virescens cadherin protein expressed in Drosophila S2 cells functions as a receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A but not Cry1Fa toxins.

    PubMed

    Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Adang, Michael J

    2006-08-15

    Genetic knockout of the BtR4 gene encoding the Heliothis virescens cadherin-like protein (HevCaLP) is linked to resistance against Cry1Ac toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis. However, the functional Cry1Ac receptor role of this protein has not been established. We previously proposed HevCaLP as a shared binding site for B. thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A and Cry1Fa toxins in the midgut epithelium of H. virescens larvae. Considering that Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa are coexpressed in second-generation transgenic cotton for enhanced control of Heliothine and Spodoptera species, our model suggests the possibility of evolution of cross resistance via alteration of HevCaLP. To test whether HevCaLP is a Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa receptor, HevCaLP was transiently expressed on the surface of Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells. Expressed HevCaLP bound [(125)I]Cry1A toxins under native (dot blot) and denaturing (ligand blot) conditions. Affinity pull-down assays demonstrated that Cry1Fa does not bind to HevCaLP expressed in S2 cells or in solubilized brush border membrane proteins. Using a fluorescence-based approach, we tested the ability of expressed HevCaLP to mediate toxicity of Cry1A and Cry1Fa toxins. Cry1A toxins killed S2 cells expressing HevCaLP, whereas Cry1Fa toxin did not. Our results demonstrate that HevCaLP is a functional Cry1A but not Cry1Fa receptor. PMID:16893170

  3. In vivo biomarker expression patterns are preserved in 3D cultures of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Windus, Louisa C.E.; Kiss, Debra L.; Glover, Tristan; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-11-15

    Here we report that Prostate Cancer (PCa) cell-lines DU145, PC3, LNCaP and RWPE-1 grown in 3D matrices in contrast to conventional 2D monolayers, display distinct differences in cell morphology, proliferation and expression of important biomarker proteins associated with cancer progression. Consistent with in vivo growth rates, in 3D cultures, all PCa cell-lines were found to proliferate at significantly lower rates in comparison to their 2D counterparts. Moreover, when grown in a 3D matrix, metastatic PC3 cell-lines were found to mimic more precisely protein expression patterns of metastatic tumour formation as found in vivo. In comparison to the prostate epithelial cell-line RWPE-1, metastatic PC3 cell-lines exhibited a down-regulation of E-cadherin and {alpha}6 integrin expression and an up-regulation of N-cadherin, Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin expression and re-expressed non-transcriptionally active AR. In comparison to the non-invasive LNCaP cell-lines, PC3 cells were found to have an up-regulation of chemokine receptor CXCR4, consistent with a metastatic phenotype. In 2D cultures, there was little distinction in protein expression between metastatic, non-invasive and epithelial cells. These results suggest that 3D cultures are more representative of in vivo morphology and may serve as a more biologically relevant model in the drug discovery pipeline. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed and optimised 3D culturing techniques for Prostate Cancer cell-lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated biomarker expression in 2D versus 3D culture techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PC3 cells re-expressed non-transcriptionally active androgen receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PCa cell lines retain in vivo-like antigenic profiles in 3D cultures.

  4. Quantitative immunohistochemical analyses of the expression of E-cadherin, thrombomodulin, CD44H and CD44v6 in primary tumours of pharynx/larynx squamous cell carcinoma and their lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Hernández Gaspar, R; de los Toyos, J R; Alvarez Marcos, C; Riera, J R; Sampedro, A

    1999-01-01

    The quantitative expression of E-cadherin, thrombomodulin, CD44H and CD44v6 in 32 specimens of primary tumours of pharynx/larynx squamous cell carcinoma and their lymph node metastases was studied by immunohistochemistry. With the aim of obtaining comparative and objective data, image acquisition conditions were kept unaltered for all the measurements and the immunostaining intensity was quantified by applying an image processing system. On the one hand, correlations were only observed between CD44H and CD44v6, both in primary tumours and metastases, and between E-cadherin and TM in metastases. On the other hand, statistical analyses of paired data did not show significant differences in the expression of these markers between the two tumour sites. In agreement with previous reports, E-cadherin expression was rather low or negative in primary tumours and metastases of the three poorly differentiated specimens we studied, as well as that of TM, but otherwise some of these samples showed intermediate immunostaining levels of CD44H/CD44v6. It may be concluded from the present study that the quantitative expression of these adhesion molecules in well established lymph node metastases of pharynx/larynx squamous cell carcinoma is essentially unaltered in relation to their primary sites. PMID:10609562

  5. Cadherin selectivity filter regulates endothelial sieving properties

    PubMed Central

    Quadri, Sadiqa K.; Sun, Li; Islam, Mohammad Naimul; Shapiro, Lawrence; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of endothelial protein sieving, the critical vascular barrier function that restricts flow of large plasma proteins into tissues while allowing small molecules and water to pass, is not understood. Here, we address this issue using a novel assay to detect macromolecular penetrance at microdomains of endothelial adherens junctions. Adherens junctions, as detected by cadherin-GFP expression, were distributed in the cell perimeter as high- or low-density segments. Low but not high-density segments permitted penetrance of a 70-kDa fluorescent dextran, a molecule of equivalent size to albumin. Expression of a cadherin mutant that abrogates strand–swap adhesive binding in the cadherin EC1 ectodomain, or alternatively of an α-actinin-1 mutant that inhibits F-actin bundling, increased both cadherin mobility and 70 kDa dextran penetrance at high-density segments. These findings suggest that adhesive interactions in the cadherin EC1 domain, which underlie adherens junction structure, are critical determinants of endothelial macromolecular sieving. PMID:23033075

  6. [Genetic control of intercellular adhesion or how cadherins shape the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Bécam, Isabelle; Huynh, Jean-René

    2007-03-01

    The beauty and diversity of cell shapes have always fascinated both biologists and physicists. In the early 1950, J. Holtfreter coined the term "tissue affinities" to describe the forces behind the spontaneous shaping of groups of cells. These tissue affinites were later on related to adhesive properties of cell membranes. In the 1960, Malcom Steinberg proposed the differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH) as a physical explanation of the liquid-like behaviour of tissues and cells during morphogenesis. However, the link between the cellular properties of adhesion molecules, such as the cadherins, and the physical rules that shape the body, has remained unclear. Recent in vitro studies have now shown that surface tensions, which drive the spontaneous liquid-like behaviour of cell rearrangements, are a direct and linear function of cadherin expression levels. Tissue surface tensions thus arise from differences in intercellular adhesiveness, which validates the DAH in vitro. The DAH was also vindicated in vivo by stunning experiments in Drosophila. The powerful genetic tools available in Drosophila allow to manipulate the levels and patterns of expression of several cadherins and to create artificially differences in intercellular adhesiveness. The results showed that simple laws of thermodynamics, as well as quantitative and qualitative differences in cadherins expression were sufficient to explain processes as complex as the establishment of the anterior-posterior axis and the formation of the compound eye in Drosophila. PMID:17349290

  7. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  8. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  9. Expression of the E-cadherin repressors Snail, Slug and Zeb1 in urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: relation to stromal fibroblast activation and invasive behaviour of carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Julia; Weidig, Michaela; Balzer, Philipp; Richter, Petra; Franz, Marcus; Junker, Kerstin; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Wunderlich, Heiko; Östman, Arne; Petersen, Iver; Berndt, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is regulated by interaction of carcinoma and stromal cells and crucial for progression of urinary bladder carcinoma (UBC). Therefore, the influence of activated fibroblasts on the expression of E-cadherin repressors as well as EMT and invasion in UBC was investigated. A correlative analysis of the immunohistochemical expression of fibroblast (ASMA, S100A4, FAP, SDF1, PDGFRβ) and EMT (Snail, Slug, Zeb1, E-cadherin) markers was performed on 49 UBC cases of different stages. The impact of distinguishable growth factor stimulated fibroblasts on invasion, EMT, and E-cadherin repressor expression was investigated in an invasion model. In situ, invasiveness was significantly correlated to the loss of membranous E-cadherin (E-cad_m) and increased Snail, Slug, Zeb1 in tumour cells, as well as to increased ASMA, S100A4, and PDGFRβ in stromal cells. A significant correlation to nodal metastasis could be evidenced for the loss of E-Cad_m, and for an increase in S100A4 and PDGFRβ. Comparison of stromal and EMT markers revealed significant correlations of ASMA to Snail and Slug; of S100A4 to the loss of E-cad_m and Zeb1; and of PDGFRβ to the loss of E-Cad_m, Slug and Zeb1. In vitro, TGFβ1 induced myofibroblasts were the strongest attractants, while aFGF or TGFβ1/aFGF stimulated fibroblasts were the most potent EMT inductors. As shown here for the first time, distinct sub-populations of fibroblasts are to various extents associated with EMT and tumour progression in UBC. These relevant findings might be the basis for the identification of new diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets selectively affecting tumour supporting CAF effects. PMID:22820858

  10. Characterization of the role of cadherin in regulating cell adhesion during sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Miller, J R; McClay, D R

    1997-12-15

    During development, the modulation of cadherin adhesive function is proposed to control various morphogenetic events including epithelial-mesenchymal conversions and tubulogenesis, although the mechanisms responsible for regulating cadherin activity during these events remain unclear. In order to gain insights into the regulation of cadherin function during morphogenesis, we utilized the sea urchin embryo as a model system to study the regulation of cadherin localization during epithelial-mesenchymal conversion and convergent-extension movements. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the cytoplasmic domain of a cloned sea urchin cadherin recognize three major polypeptides of M(r) 320, 140, and 125 kDa and specifically stain adherens junctions, and to a lesser extent, lateral membrane domains in all epithelial tissues of the embryo. Analysis of embryos during gastrulation demonstrates that changes in cadherin localization are observed in cells undergoing an epithelial-mesenchymal conversion. Ingression of primary mesenchyme cells is accompanied by the rapid loss of junctional cadherin staining and the coincident accumulation of cadherin in intracellular organelles. These data are consistent with the idea that the deadhesion of mesenchymal cells from neighboring epithelial cells involves the regulated endocytosis of cell surface cadherin molecules. Conversely, neither cadherin abundance nor localization is altered in cells of the gut which undergo convergent-extension movements during the formation of the archenteron. This observation indicates that these movements do not require the loss of junctional cadherin molecules. Instead, the necessary balance between adhesion and motility may be achieved by regulating the expression of different subtypes of cadherin molecules or modifying interactions between cadherins and catenins, proteins that bind the cytoplasmic domain of cadherin and are necessary for cadherin adhesive function. To address cadherin function at the

  11. Expression of E-cadherin in normal oral mucosa, in oral precancerous lesions and in oral carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, Ugrappa; Jain, Ajay; Nagalaxmi, Velpula; Kumar, Ugrappa Vijay; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of E-cad in oral precancerous lesions and conditions and oral carcinomas in comparison with normal mucosa. Materials and Methods: Total of 50 samples were selected for the study and were categorized into five groups and 10 samples in each group as Group I-oral leukoplakia (OL), Group II-oral lichen planus (OLP), Group III-oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), Group IV-oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Group V-normal oral mucosa (NOM) as control group. All the samples were assessed for the expression of E-cad by immunohistochemical study. Results: Upon assessing the expression of E-cad in OL, OSMF, OLP and OSCC, as majority of the samples with OSCC (90%), OL (80%), OLP (70%) and OSMF (60%) showed mild to moderate expression of E-cad staining, which was suggestive of reduction in dysplastic cells on comparison to NOM cells. This difference in expression and variation of E-cad upon comparison with normal mucosa was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There is significant (P < 0.001) variation of expression of E-cad with the histopathological dysplasia of the oral precancerous lesions and conditions, and the tumor differentiation of the oral cancers. However, there was no correlation of the degree of loss of expression of E-cad with the degree of dysplasia or the tumor differentiation of oral cancers. We conclude with our study that, there is a variation in the expression of E-cad but its value as a prognostic marker is questionable. PMID:26430364

  12. A novel role for p120 catenin in E-cadherin function

    PubMed Central

    Ireton, Reneé C.; Davis, Michael A.; van Hengel, Jolanda; Mariner, Deborah J.; Barnes, Kirk; Thoreson, Molly A.; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Matrisian, Linsey; Bundy, Linda M.; Sealy, Linda; Gilbert, Barbara; van Roy, Frans; Reynolds, Albert B.

    2002-01-01

    Îndirect evidence suggests that p120-catenin (p120) can both positively and negatively affect cadherin adhesiveness. Here we show that the p120 gene is mutated in SW48 cells, and that the cadherin adhesion system is impaired as a direct consequence of p120 insufficiency. Restoring normal levels of p120 caused a striking reversion from poorly differentiated to cobblestone-like epithelial morphology, indicating a crucial role for p120 in reactivation of E-cadherin function. The rescue efficiency was enhanced by increased levels of p120, and reduced by the presence of the phosphorylation domain, a region previously postulated to confer negative regulation. Surprisingly, the rescue was associated with substantially increased levels of E-cadherin. E-cadherin mRNA levels were unaffected by p120 expression, but E-cadherin half-life was more than doubled. Direct p120–E-cadherin interaction was crucial, as p120 deletion analysis revealed a perfect correlation between E-cadherin binding and rescue of epithelial morphology. Interestingly, the epithelial morphology could also be rescued by forced expression of either WT E-cadherin or a p120-uncoupled mutant. Thus, the effects of uncoupling p120 from E-cadherin can be at least partially overcome by artificially maintaining high levels of cadherin expression. These data reveal a cooperative interaction between p120 and E-cadherin and a novel role for p120 that is likely indispensable in normal cells. PMID:12427869

  13. N-cadherin prodomain cleavage regulates synapse formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Latefi, Nazlie S; Pedraza, Liliana; Schohl, Anne; Li, Ziwei; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2009-07-01

    Cadherins are initially synthesized bearing a prodomain that is thought to limit adhesion during early stages of biosynthesis. Functional cadherins lack this prodomain, raising the intriguing possibility that cells may utilize prodomain cleavage as a means to temporally or spatially regulate adhesion after delivery of cadherin to the cell surface. In support of this idea, immunostaining for the prodomain of zebrafish N-cadherin revealed enriched labeling at neuronal surfaces at the soma and along axonal processes. To determine whether post-translational cleavage of the prodomain affects synapse formation, we imaged Rohon-Beard cells in zebrafish embryos expressing GFP-tagged wild-type N-cadherin (NCAD-GFP) or a GFP-tagged N-cadherin mutant expressing an uncleavable prodomain (PRON-GFP) rendering it nonadhesive. NCAD-GFP accumulated at synaptic microdomains in a developmentally regulated manner, and its overexpression transiently accelerated synapse formation. PRON-GFP was much more diffusely distributed along the axon and its overexpression delayed synapse formation. Our results support the notion that N-cadherin serves to stabilize pre- to postsynaptic contacts early in synapse development and suggests that regulated cleavage of the N-cadherin prodomain may be a mechanism by which the kinetics of synaptogenesis are regulated. PMID:19365814

  14. Prelinguistic Pitch Patterns Expressing "Communication" and "Apprehension"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papaeliou, Christina F.; Trevarthen, Colwyn

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether pitch patterns of prelinguistic vocalizations could discriminate between social vocalizations, uttered apparently with the intention to communicate, and "private" speech, related to solitary activities as an expression of "thinking". Four healthy ten month old English-speaking infants (2 boys and 2 girls) were…

  15. Alterations of MEN1 and E-cadherin/β-catenin complex in sporadic pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    VESCHI, SERENA; LATTANZIO, ROSSANO; ACETO, GITANA MARIA; CURIA, MARIA CRISTINA; MAGNASCO, SALVATORE; ANGELUCCI, DOMENICO; CAMA, ALESSANDRO; PIANTELLI, MAURO; BATTISTA, PASQUALE

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids, distinct in typical and atypical, represent 2–5% of all primary lung tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular alterations correlated with the development of this form of neoplasms. A collection of 38 paraffin-embedded apparently sporadic carcinoids was investigated, through a combined study, for protein expression/localization of menin, p53, β-catenin and E-cadherin and for mutational analysis of the MEN1, TP53 and CTNNB1 genes. Menin was expressed in 71% of cases, with a prevalent cytoplasmic (c) localization, β-catenin was expressed in 68.4% of cases, of which 36.8% with a membranous (m) and 31.6% with a cytoplasmic localization. Membranous E-cadherin immunoreactivity was detected in 84.2% cases, nuclear p53 expression in 5.3% of cases. Positive correlation was found between c-menin and c-β-catenin expression (rho=0.439, P=0.008). In addition, m-β-catenin showed a positive correlation with both c-β-catenin and E-cadherin expression (rho=0.380, P=0.022 and rho=0.360, P=0.040, respectively). With regard to the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex, we found also a significant positive correlation between c-menin and ‘disarrayed’ β-catenin expression (rho=0.481, P= 0.007). MEN1 gene variants were characterized in 34% of cases. c-menin was more highly expressed in tumors with MEN1 variants, compared to tumors without MEN1 variants (P=0.023). Three nucleotide variants of TP53 were also detected. This study confirms the involvement of the MEN1 gene in the development of sporadic pulmonary carcinoids, demonstrates the accumulation of menin in the cytoplasm, and indicates that the disarrayed pattern of the complex significantly correlates with c-menin accumulation. PMID:22825745

  16. Cadherins: The Superfamily Critically Involved in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ashaie, Maeirah Afzal; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among females, is regulated in part by diverse classes of adhesion molecules one of which is known as cadherins. Located at adherens junctions, the members of this superfamily are responsible for upholding proper cell-cell adhesion. Cadherins possess diverse structures and functions and any alteration in their structures or functions causes impeding of normal mammary cells development and maintenance, thus leading to breast malignancy. E-, N-, P-, VE-, Proto-, desmosomal and FAT cadherins have been found to regulate breast cancer in positive as well as negative fashion, whereby both Ecadherin (CDH1) and N-cadherin (CDH2) contribute significantly towards transitioning from epithelial state to mesenchymal state (EMT) and enacting the abnormal cells to invade and metastasize nearby and distant tissues. Aberration in gene expression of cadherins can be either due to somatic or epigenetic silencing or via transcriptional factors. Besides other cadherins, E-cadherin which serves as hallmark of EMT is associated with several regulatory factors such as Snail, Slug, Twist, Zeb, KLF4, NFI, TBX2, SIX, b-Myb, COX-2, Arf6, FOXA2, GATA3 and SMAR1, which modulate E-cadherin gene transcription to promote or represses tumor invasion and colonization. Signaling molecules such as Notch, TGF-β, estrogen receptors, EGF and Wnt initiate numerous signaling cascades via these vital factors of cell programming, controlling expression of E-cadherin at transcriptional (mRNA) and protein level. Thus, interactions of cadherins with their roles in tumor suppression and oncogenic transformation can be beneficial in providing valuable insights for breast cancer diagnosis and therapeutics development. PMID:26825466

  17. N-Cadherin Aided in Maintaining the Characteristics of Leukemic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Lei; Gao, Ying; Yu, Chunyan; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Jie; Yao, Zhi

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, it has been revealed that N-cadherin(+) and leukemic stem cells (LSCs, CD34(+) /CD38(-) /CD123(+) ) could be enriched by chemotherapy because of their resistance to chemotherapy. In this study, we found that N-cadherin mRNA was highly expressed in the bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) of patients with t(8;21) translocation. To determine the role of N-cadherin in maintaining LSCs self-renewal and stationary properties, colony-forming assay, cell cycle analysis, and engraftment in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice were used to compare N-cadherin(+) and N-cadherin(-) cells. Both leukemic cell lines KG1a and CD34(+) /CD38(-) BMMNCs derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients were used, and cells were divided into N-cadherin(+) and N-cadherin(-) fraction after sorting by FACS. The results showed that N-cadherin(+) cells had remarkable increased numbers of colonies with cytokines stimulation when compared with the negative control, suggesting a higher proliferative capacity of N-cadherin(+) cells with cytokines stimulation. The results also showed that most cells in N-cadherin(+) fraction stayed in the G0 -G1 stage, indicating the involvement of N-cadherin in maintaining the quiescent state of LSCs in niche. The results of engraftment showed that there was a higher proportion of hCD45(+) cells in mice transplanted with N-cadherin(+) cells than N-cadherin(-) cells. In addition, it was obvious that NOD/SCID mice transplanted with N-cadherin(+) cells had a shorter lifetime than the negative control, suggesting that LSCs self-renewal capacity resides predominantly in N-cadherin(+) fraction. In summary, N-cadherin might play an important role in maintaining the self-renewal and stationary properties of LSCs. Anat Rec, 299:990-998, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27064800

  18. Fus Expression Patterns in Developing Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the RNA/DNA-binding protein FUS, Fused in sarcoma, was shown to play a role in growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis in vertebrates. Because little is known about Fus, we investigated its expression pattern in murine tooth development. In situ hybridization of mouse mandibles at specific developmental stages was performed with a DIG-labeled RNA probe. During early tooth development, Fus was detected in the dental epithelium and dental mesenchyme at 11 days postcoitum (dpc) and 12 dpc. From 14 dpc, Fus was strongly expressed in the dental papilla and the cervical loop of the dental epithelium. At postnatal day 4 (PN4), Fus expression was observed in the odontoblasts, ameloblasts, the proliferation zone of the pulp, and the cervical loop. At PN14, the expression pattern of Fus was found to be maintained in the odontoblasts and the proliferation zone of the pulp. Furthermore, Fus expression was especially strong in the Hertwig’s epithelial root sheath (HERS). Therefore, this study suggests that Fus may play a role in the HERS during root development. PMID:25949136

  19. Connections between cadherin-catenin proteins, spindle misorientation, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin-catenin mediated adhesion is an important determinant of tissue architecture in multicellular organisms. Cancer progression and maintenance is frequently associated with loss of their expression or functional activity, which not only leads to decreased cell-cell adhesion, but also to enhanced tumor cell proliferation and loss of differentiated characteristics. This review is focused on the emerging implications of cadherin-catenin proteins in the regulation of polarized divisions through their connections with the centrosomes, cytoskeleton, tissue tension and signaling pathways; and illustrates how alterations in cadherin-catenin levels or functional activity may render cells susceptible to transformation through the loss of their proliferation-differentiation balance. PMID:26451345

  20. The classic cadherins in synaptic specificity

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Raunak; Taylor, Matthew R; Williams, Megan E

    2015-01-01

    During brain development, billions of neurons organize into highly specific circuits. To form specific circuits, neurons must build the appropriate types of synapses with appropriate types of synaptic partners while avoiding incorrect partners in a dense cellular environment. Defining the cellular and molecular rules that govern specific circuit formation has significant scientific and clinical relevance because fine scale connectivity defects are thought to underlie many cognitive and psychiatric disorders. Organizing specific neural circuits is an enormously complicated developmental process that requires the concerted action of many molecules, neural activity, and temporal events. This review focuses on one class of molecules postulated to play an important role in target selection and specific synapse formation: the classic cadherins. Cadherins have a well-established role in epithelial cell adhesion, and although it has long been appreciated that most cadherins are expressed in the brain, their role in synaptic specificity is just beginning to be unraveled. Here, we review past and present studies implicating cadherins as active participants in the formation, function, and dysfunction of specific neural circuits and pose some of the major remaining questions. PMID:25837840

  1. E-cadherin is important for cell differentiation during osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Cara; Harrison, Rene E

    2016-05-01

    E-cadherin, a protein responsible for intercellular adhesion between epithelial cells, is also expressed in the monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this study we have explored the involvement of E-cadherin during receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated osteoclast differentiation. Osteoclastogenesis involves a period of precursor expansion followed by multiple fusion events to generate a multinuclear osteoclast that is capable of bone resorption. We asked whether E-cadherin participated in early precursor interactions and recognition or was a component of the osteoclast fusion machinery. Here, we show that endogenous E-cadherin expression is the highest during early stages of osteoclast differentiation, with surface expression visible on small precursor cells (fewer than four nuclei per cell) in both RAW 264.7 cells and primary macrophages. Blocking E-cadherin function with neutralizing antibodies prior to the onset of fusion delayed the expression of TRAP, Cathepsin K, DC-STAMP and NFATc1 and significantly diminished multinucleated osteoclast formation. Conversely, E-cadherin-GFP overexpressing macrophages displayed earlier NFATc1 nuclear translocation along with faster formation of multinucleated osteoclasts compared to control macrophages. Through live imaging we identified that disrupting E-cadherin function prolonged the proliferative phase of the precursor population while concomitantly decreasing the proportion of migrating precursors. The lamellipodium and polarized membrane extensions appeared to be the principal sites of fusion, indicating precursor migration was a critical factor contributing to osteoclast fusion. These findings demonstrate that E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts can modulate osteoclast-specific gene expression and prompt differentiating osteoclast precursors toward migratory and fusion activities. PMID:26959175

  2. Sequence variation and differential splicing of the midgut cadherin gene in Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Kain, Wendy; Wang, Ping

    2013-08-01

    The insect midgut cadherin serves as an important receptor for the Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Variation of the cadherin in insect populations provides a genetic potential for development of cadherin-based Bt resistance in insect populations. Sequence analysis of the cadherin from the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, together with cadherins from 18 other lepidopterans showed a similar phylogenetic relationship of the cadherins to the phylogeny of Lepidoptera. The midgut cadherin in three laboratory populations of T. ni exhibited high variability, although the resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in the T. ni strain is not genetically associated with cadherin gene mutations. A total of 142 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the cadherin cDNAs from the T. ni strains, including 20 missense mutations. In addition, insertion and deletion polymorphisms (indels) were also identified in the cadherin alleles in T. ni. More interestingly, the results from this study reveal that differential splicing of mRNA also occurs in the cadherin gene expression. Therefore, variation of the midgut cadherin in insects may not only be caused by cadherin gene mutations, but could also result from alternative splicing of its mRNA regulated by factors acting in trans. Analysis of cadherin gene alleles in F2, F3 and F4 progenies from the cross between the Cry1Ac resistant and the susceptible strain after consecutive selections with Cry1Ac for three generations showed that selection with Cry1Ac did not result in an increase of frequencies of the cadherin alleles originated from the resistant strain. PMID:23743444

  3. Therapeutic intervention of silymarin on the migration of non-small cell lung cancer cells is associated with the axis of multiple molecular targets including class 1 HDACs, ZEB1 expression, and restoration of miR-203 and E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and its metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality world-wide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for about 90% of total lung cancer cases. Despite advancements in therapeutic approaches, only limited improvement has been achieved. Therefore, alternative strategies are required for the management of lung cancer. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effect of silymarin, a phytochemical from milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn.), on NSCLC cell migration using metastatic human NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1299 and H460) together with the molecular targets underlying these effects. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we found that treatment of human NSCLC cells (A549, H1299 and H460) with silymarin (0, 5, 10 and 20 µg/mL) for 24 h resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, which was associated with the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and reduced levels of class 1 HDAC proteins (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3 and HDAC8) and concomitant increases in the levels of histone acetyltransferase activity (HAT). Known HDAC inhibitors (sodium butyrate and trichostatin A) exhibited similar patterns of therapeutic effects on the lung cancer cells. Treatment of A549 and H460 cells with silymarin reduced the expression of the transcription factor ZEB1 and restored expression of E-cadherin. The siRNA knockdown of ZEB1 also reduced the expression of HDAC proteins and enhanced re-expression of the levels of E-cadherin in NSCLC cells. MicroRNA-203 (miR-203) acts as a tumor suppressor, regulates tumor cell invasion and is repressed by ZEB1 in cancer cells. Silymarin treatment restored the levels of miR-203 in NSCLC cells. These findings indicate that silymarin can effectively inhibit lung cancer cell migration and provide a coherent model of its mechanism of action suggesting that silymarin may be an important therapeutic option for the prevention or treatment of lung cancer metastasis when administered either

  4. Prelinguistic pitch patterns expressing 'communication' and 'apprehension'.

    PubMed

    Papaeliou, Christina F; Trevarthen, Colwyn

    2006-02-01

    This study examined whether pitch patterns of prelinguistic vocalizations could discriminate between social vocalizations, uttered apparently with the intention to communicate, and 'private' speech, related to solitary activities as an expression of 'thinking'. Four healthy ten month old English-speaking infants (2 boys and 2 girls) were simultaneously video- and audiorecorded in their homes under two conditions: (A) when the infant was playing with mother, and (B) when the infant was alone. One hundred and fifty-six vocalizations were classified as 'communicative', if accompanied by non-vocal communicative behaviour, or as 'investigative', if accompanied by explorative activities. For the acoustic analysis, an automatic PITCH PATTERN RECOGNITION (PPR) software system was developed. The PPR-system could distinguish 'communicative' from 'investigative' vocalizations with an overall accuracy of 91.67%. These findings confirm that prelinguistic vocalizations might serve both as means of purposeful communication and as a tool of thought. These are the functions later assumed by language. PMID:16566325

  5. N-cadherin relocalization during cardiac trabeculation.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Anoop V; Fukuda, Ryuichi; Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2016-07-01

    During cardiac trabeculation, cardiomyocytes delaminate from the outermost (compact) layer to form complex muscular structures known as trabeculae. As these cardiomyocytes delaminate, the remodeling of adhesion junctions must be tightly coordinated so cells can extrude from the compact layer while remaining in tight contact with their neighbors. In this study, we examined the distribution of N-cadherin (Cdh2) during cardiac trabeculation in zebrafish. By analyzing the localization of a Cdh2-EGFP fusion protein expressed under the control of the zebrafish cdh2 promoter, we initially observed Cdh2-EGFP expression along the lateral sides of embryonic cardiomyocytes, in an evenly distributed pattern, and with the occasional appearance of punctae. Within a few hours, Cdh2-EGFP distribution on the lateral sides of cardiomyocytes evolves into a clear punctate pattern as Cdh2-EGFP molecules outside the punctae cluster to increase the size of these aggregates. In addition, Cdh2-EGFP molecules also appear on the basal side of cardiomyocytes that remain in the compact layer. Delaminating cardiomyocytes accumulate Cdh2-EGFP on the surface facing the basal side of compact layer cardiomyocytes, thereby allowing tight adhesion between these layers. Importantly, we find that blood flow/cardiac contractility is required for the transition from an even distribution of Cdh2-EGFP to the formation of punctae. Furthermore, using time-lapse imaging of beating hearts in conjunction with a Cdh2 tandem fluorescent protein timer transgenic line, we observed that Cdh2-EGFP molecules appear to move from the lateral to the basal side of cardiomyocytes along the cell membrane, and that Erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Erbb2) function is required for this relocalization. PMID:27339140

  6. Role of N-cadherin in proliferation, migration, and invasion of germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Hubertus; Küffer, Stefan; Kaulfuss, Silke; Burfeind, Peter; Strauβ, Arne; Thelen, Paul; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Honecker, Friedemann; Behnes, Carl Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most common malignancies in young men. Most patients with GCT can be cured with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy, even in metastatic disease. In case of therapy resistance, prognosis is usually poor. We investigated the potential of N-cadherin inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. We analyzed the GCT cell lines NCCIT, NTERA-2, TCam-2, and the cisplatin-resistant sublines NCCIT-R and NTERA-2R. Effects of a blocking antibody or siRNA against N-cadherin on proliferation, migration, and invasion were investigated. Mouse xenografts of GCT cell lines were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for N-cadherin expression. All investigated GCT cell lines were found to express N-cadherin protein in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of N-cadherin in vitro leads to a significant inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion. N-cadherin-downregulation leads to a significantly higher level of pERK. N-cadherin-inhibition resulted in significantly higher rates of apoptotic cells in caspase-3 staining. Expression of N-cadherin is preserved in cisplatin-resistant GCT cells, pointing to an important physiological role in cell survival. N-cadherin-downregulation results in a significant decrease of proliferation, migration, and invasion and stimulates apoptosis in cisplatin-naive and resistant GCT cell lines. Therefore, targeting N-cadherin may be a promising therapeutic approach, particularly in cisplatin-resistant, therapy refractory and metastatic GCT. PMID:26451610

  7. Cadherin controls nectin recruitment into adherens junctions by remodeling the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Troyanovsky, Regina B.; Indra, Indrajyoti; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Hong, Soonjin; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism that coordinates activities of different adhesion receptors is poorly understood. We investigated this mechanism by focusing on the nectin-2 and E-cadherin adherens junction receptors. We found that, cadherin was not required for the basic process of nectin junction formation because nectin-2 formed junctions in cadherin-deficient A431D cells. Formation of nectin-2 junctions in these cells, however, became regulated by cadherin as soon as E-cadherin was re-expressed. E-cadherin recruited nectin-2 into adherens junctions, where both proteins formed distinct but tightly associated clusters. Live-cell imaging showed that the appearance of E-cadherin clusters often preceded that of nectin-2 clusters at sites of junction assembly. Inactivation of E-cadherin clustering by different strategies concomitantly suppressed the formation of nectin clusters. Furthermore, cadherin significantly increased the stability of nectin clusters, thereby making them resistant to the BC-12 antibody, which targets the nectin-2 adhesion interface. By testing different E-cadherin–α-catenin chimeras, we showed that the recruitment of nectin into chimera junctions is mediated by the actin-binding domain of α-catenin. Our data suggests that E-cadherin regulates assembly of nectin junctions through α-catenin-induced remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton around the cadherin clusters. PMID:25395582

  8. Quantification of mutant E-cadherin using bioimaging analysis of in situ fluorescence microscopy. A new approach to CDH1 missense variants

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, João Miguel; Figueiredo, Joana; Fonseca, Martina; Durães, Cecília; Melo, Soraia; Esménio, Sofia; Seruca, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations result in full-length proteins containing an amino acid substitution that can be neutral or deleterious, interfering with the normal conformation, localization, and function of a protein. A striking example is the presence of CDH1 (E-cadherin gene) germline missense variants in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), which represent a clinical burden for genetic counseling and surveillance of mutation carriers and their families. CDH1 missense variants can compromise not only the function of E-cadherin but also its expression pattern. Here, we propose a novel method to characterize E-cadherin signature in order to identify cases with E-cadherin deregulation and functional impairment. The strategy includes a bioimaging pipeline to quantify the expression level and characterize the distribution of the protein from in situ immunofluorescence images. The algorithm computes 1D (dimension intensity) radial and internuclear fluorescence profiles to generate expression outlines and 2D virtual cells representing a typical cell within the populations analyzed. Using this new approach, we verify that cells expressing mutant forms of E-cadherin display fluorescence profiles distinct from those of the wild-type cells. Mutant proteins showed a significantly decrease of fluorescence intensity at the membrane and often abnormal expression peaks in the cytoplasm, reflecting the underlying molecular mechanism of trafficking deregulation. Our results suggest employing this methodology as a complementary approach to evaluate the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense variants. Moreover, it can be applied to a wide range of proteins and, more importantly, to diseases characterized by aberrant protein expression or trafficking deregulation. PMID:25388006

  9. Quantification of mutant E-cadherin using bioimaging analysis of in situ fluorescence microscopy. A new approach to CDH1 missense variants.

    PubMed

    Sanches, João Miguel; Figueiredo, Joana; Fonseca, Martina; Durães, Cecília; Melo, Soraia; Esménio, Sofia; Seruca, Raquel

    2015-08-01

    Missense mutations result in full-length proteins containing an amino acid substitution that can be neutral or deleterious, interfering with the normal conformation, localization, and function of a protein. A striking example is the presence of CDH1 (E-cadherin gene) germline missense variants in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), which represent a clinical burden for genetic counseling and surveillance of mutation carriers and their families. CDH1 missense variants can compromise not only the function of E-cadherin but also its expression pattern. Here, we propose a novel method to characterize E-cadherin signature in order to identify cases with E-cadherin deregulation and functional impairment. The strategy includes a bioimaging pipeline to quantify the expression level and characterize the distribution of the protein from in situ immunofluorescence images. The algorithm computes 1D (dimension intensity) radial and internuclear fluorescence profiles to generate expression outlines and 2D virtual cells representing a typical cell within the populations analyzed. Using this new approach, we verify that cells expressing mutant forms of E-cadherin display fluorescence profiles distinct from those of the wild-type cells. Mutant proteins showed a significantly decrease of fluorescence intensity at the membrane and often abnormal expression peaks in the cytoplasm, reflecting the underlying molecular mechanism of trafficking deregulation. Our results suggest employing this methodology as a complementary approach to evaluate the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense variants. Moreover, it can be applied to a wide range of proteins and, more importantly, to diseases characterized by aberrant protein expression or trafficking deregulation. PMID:25388006

  10. N- and E-cadherins in Xenopus are specifically required in the neural and non-neural ectoderm, respectively, for F-actin assembly and morphogenetic movements

    PubMed Central

    Nandadasa, Sumeda; Tao, Qinghua; Menon, Nikhil R.; Heasman, Janet; Wylie, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Summary Transmembrane cadherins are calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion molecules. Recently, they have also been shown to be sites of actin assembly during adhesive contact formation. However, the roles of actin assembly on transmembrane cadherins during development are not fully understood. We show here, using the developing ectoderm of the Xenopus embryo as a model, that F-actin assembly is a primary function of both N-cadherin in the neural ectoderm and E-cadherin in the non-neural (epidermal) ectoderm, and that each cadherin is essential for the characteristic morphogenetic movements of these two tissues. However, depletion of N-cadherin and E-cadherin did not cause dissociation in these tissues at the neurula stage, probably owing to the expression of C-cadherin in each tissue. Depletion of each of these cadherins is not rescued by the other, nor by the expression of C-cadherin, which is expressed in both tissues. One possible reason for this is that each cadherin is expressed in a different domain of the cell membrane. These data indicate the combinatorial nature of cadherin function, the fact that N- and E-cadherin play primary roles in F-actin assembly in addition to roles in cell adhesion, and that this function is specific to individual cadherins. They also show how cell adhesion and motility can be combined in morphogenetic tissue movements that generate the form and shape of the embryonic organs. PMID:19279134

  11. A novel amphioxus cadherin that localizes to epithelial adherens junctions has an unusual domain organization with implications for chordate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hiroki; Wada, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Kunifumi; Akiyama-Oda, Yasuko; Satoh, Nori; Humphreys, Tom; Zhang, Shicui; Tsukita, Shoichiro

    2002-01-01

    Although data are available from only vertebrates, urochordates, and three nonchordate animals, there are definite differences in the structures of classic cadherins between vertebrates plus urochordates and nonchordates. In this study we examined structural diversity of classic cadherins among bilaterian animals by obtaining new data from an amphioxus (Cephalochordata, Chordata), an acorn worm (Hemichordata), a sea star (Echinodermata), and an oyster (Mollusca). The structures of newly identified nonchordate cadherins are grouped together with those of the known sea urchin and Drosophila cadherins, whereas the structure of an amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) cadherin, designated BbC, is differently categorized from those of other known chordate cadherins. BbC is identified as a cadherin by its cytoplasmic domain whose sequence is highly related to the cytoplasmic sequences of all known classic cadherins, but it lacks all of the five repeats constituting the extracellular homophilic-binding domain of other chordate cadherins. The ectodomains of BbC match the ectodomains found in nonchordate cadherins but not present in other chordate cadherins. We show that the BbC functions as a cell-cell adhesion molecule when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells and localizes to adherens junctions in the ectodermal epithelia in amphioxus embryos. We argue that BbC is the amphioxus homologue of the classic cadherins involved in the formation of epithelial adherens junctions. The structural relationships of the cadherin molecules allow us to propose a possibility that cephalochordates might be basal to the sister-groups vertebrates and urochordates. PMID:12492143

  12. N-cadherin-catenin complexes form prior to cleavage of the proregion and transport to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Wahl, James K; Kim, Young J; Cullen, Janet M; Johnson, Keith R; Wheelock, Margaret J

    2003-05-01

    Cadherins are calcium-dependent glycoproteins that function as cell-cell adhesion molecules and are linked to the actin cytoskeleton via catenins. Newly synthesized cadherins contain a prosequence that must be proteolytically removed to generate a functional adhesion molecule. The goal of this study was to examine the proteolytic processing of N-cadherin and the assembly of the cadherin-catenin complex in cells that express endogenous N-cadherin. A monoclonal antibody specific for the proregion of human N-cadherin was generated and used to examine N-cadherin processing. Our data show that newly synthesized proN-cadherin is phosphorylated and proteolytically processed prior to transport to the plasma membrane. In addition, we show that beta-catenin and plakoglobin associate only with phosphorylated proN-cadherin, whereas p120(ctn) can associate with both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated proN-cadherin. Immunoprecipitations using anti-proN-cadherin showed that cadherin-catenin complexes are assembled prior to localization at the plasma membrane. These data suggest that a core N-cadherin-catenin complex assembles in the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi compartment and is transported to the plasma membrane where linkage to the actin cytoskeleton can be established. PMID:12604612

  13. Altered cadherin and catenin complexes in the Barrett's esophagus-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence: correlation with disease progression and dedifferentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, T.; Biddlestone, L.; Shepherd, N.; Barr, H.; Warner, P.; Jankowski, J.

    1998-01-01

    The maintenance of adult tissue architecture is largely dependent on the function of cadherins. E-cadherin is expressed in most epithelia, although it may be co-expressed with P-cadherin in basal layers of stratified epithelia. Adhesive function of cadherins relies on interactions with catenins. Many reports have characterized reduced expression of cadherins and catenins in tumors, including those of the gastrointestinal tract. This study aimed to characterize expression of E- and P-cadherins, and the catenins, in the progression of Barrett's esophagus to adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting were performed on paraffin-embedded and fresh-frozen tissue using antisera to the selected cadherins and catenins. The results of this study have shown inappropriate expression of cadherins and catenins in neoplastic Barrett's mucosa. There was a significant reduction of E-cadherin expression as the Barrett's metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence progressed (P < 0.01). In contrast, P-cadherin, expressed in basal layers of squamous esophagus, was usually absent from Barrett's and dysplasia but was expressed in 17 of 24 carcinomas, especially at the advancing tumor edge. Reduced expression of catenins was also seen, but in some specimens, immunoreactivity was observed in neoplastic nuclei, suggesting mediation of a nuclear function such as transcriptional regulation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9422531

  14. miR-27a-3p suppresses tumor metastasis and VM by down-regulating VE-cadherin expression and inhibiting EMT: an essential role for Twist-1 in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Sun, Huizhi; Sun, Baocun; Zhu, Dongwang; Zhao, Xiulan; Wang, Yong; Gu, Qiang; Dong, Xueyi; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yanhui; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Twist-1 and miRNAs have been reported to be associated with tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. However, the relationship between Twist-1 and miRNAs and the function of miRNAs remain largely undefined. We aimed to reveal the Twist-1-related miRNA expression profile and to determine whether Twist-1 functions in tumor metastasis and vasculogenic mimicry (VM) by regulating miRNA expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Results showed that the expression of miR-27a-3p was consistently down-regulated in HCC cell lines and tissue samples displaying high expression of Twist-1. Both loss- and gain-of-function assays revealed suppressive effects of miR-27a-3p. Low miR-27a-3p expression was significantly associated with early metastasis in HCC. Subsequent investigations revealed that miR-27a-3p mediated the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additional experiments showed that VE-cadherin is a direct target of miR-27a-3p and further demonstrated the critical role of miR-27a-3p in suppressing tumor metastasis and VM. Conclusions: Twist-1 up-regulation in HepG2 cells resulted in the differential expression of 18 miRNAs. Among them, miR-27a-3p deregulation contributed to VM and metastasis. The miR-27a-3p-mediated down-regulation of VE-cadherin and inhibition of EMT may be essential for Twist-1 to induce tumor metastasis and VM. Our findings highlight the importance of miR-27a-3p and suggest a promising new strategy for anti-HCC therapy. PMID:26980408

  15. Quantification of topological features in cell meshes to explore E-cadherin dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Tânia; Figueiredo, Joana; Ribeiro, Ana Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Seruca, Raquel; Sanches, João Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In cancer, defective E-cadherin leads to cell detachment, migration and metastization. Further, alterations mediated by E-cadherin dysfunction affect cell topology and tissue organization. Herein, we propose a novel quantitative approach, based on microscopy images, to analyse abnormal cellular distribution patterns. We generated undirected graphs composed by sets of triangles which accurately reproduce cell positioning and structural organization within each image. Network analysis was developed by exploring triangle geometric features, namely area, edges length and formed angles, as well as their variance, when compared with the respective equilateral triangles. We generated synthetic networks, mimicking the diversity of cell-cell interaction patterns, and evaluated the applicability of the selected metrics to study topological features. Cells expressing wild-type E-cadherin and cancer-related mutants were used to validate our strategy. Specifically, A634V, R749W and P799R cancer-causing mutants present more disorganized spatial distribution when compared with wild-type cells. Moreover, P799R exhibited higher length and angle distortions and abnormal cytoskeletal organization, suggesting the formation of very dynamic and plastic cellular interactions. Hence, topological analysis of cell network diagrams is an effective tool to quantify changes in cell-cell interactions and, importantly, it can be applied to a myriad of processes, namely tissue morphogenesis and cancer. PMID:27151223

  16. Quantification of topological features in cell meshes to explore E-cadherin dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mestre, Tânia; Figueiredo, Joana; Ribeiro, Ana Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Seruca, Raquel; Sanches, João Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In cancer, defective E-cadherin leads to cell detachment, migration and metastization. Further, alterations mediated by E-cadherin dysfunction affect cell topology and tissue organization. Herein, we propose a novel quantitative approach, based on microscopy images, to analyse abnormal cellular distribution patterns. We generated undirected graphs composed by sets of triangles which accurately reproduce cell positioning and structural organization within each image. Network analysis was developed by exploring triangle geometric features, namely area, edges length and formed angles, as well as their variance, when compared with the respective equilateral triangles. We generated synthetic networks, mimicking the diversity of cell-cell interaction patterns, and evaluated the applicability of the selected metrics to study topological features. Cells expressing wild-type E-cadherin and cancer-related mutants were used to validate our strategy. Specifically, A634V, R749W and P799R cancer-causing mutants present more disorganized spatial distribution when compared with wild-type cells. Moreover, P799R exhibited higher length and angle distortions and abnormal cytoskeletal organization, suggesting the formation of very dynamic and plastic cellular interactions. Hence, topological analysis of cell network diagrams is an effective tool to quantify changes in cell-cell interactions and, importantly, it can be applied to a myriad of processes, namely tissue morphogenesis and cancer. PMID:27151223

  17. N-cadherin deficiency impairs pericyte recruitment, and not endothelial differentiation or sprouting, in embryonic stem cell-derived angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tillet, Emmanuelle . E-mail: emmanuelle.tillet@cea.fr; Vittet, Daniel; Feraud, Olivier; Moore, Robert; Kemler, Rolf; Huber, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    Endothelial cells express two classical cadherins, VE-cadherin and N-cadherin. VE-cadherin is absolutely required for vascular morphogenesis, but N-cadherin is thought to participate in vessel stabilization by interacting with periendothelial cells during vessel formation. However, recent data suggest a more critical role for N-cadherin in endothelium that would regulate angiogenesis, in part by controlling VE-cadherin expression. In this study, we have assessed N-cadherin function in vascular development using an in vitro model derived from embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. We show that pluripotent ES cells genetically null for N-cadherin can differentiate normally into endothelial cells. In addition, sprouting angiogenesis was unaltered, suggesting that N-cadherin is not essential for the early events of angiogenesis. However, the lack of N-cadherin led to an impairment in pericyte covering of endothelial outgrowths. We conclude that N-cadherin is necessary neither for vasculogenesis nor proliferation and migration of endothelial cells but is required for the subsequent maturation of endothelial sprouts by interacting with pericytes.

  18. The flamingo-related mouse Celsr family (Celsr1-3) genes exhibit distinct patterns of expression during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Formstone, C J; Little, P F

    2001-11-01

    We have isolated cDNAs for three members of a family of seven-pass transmembrane cadherins in mouse (Celsr1, 2 and 3). These three genes represent vertebrate homologues of flamingo/starry night, recently identified as an essential component of the Drosophila planar cell polarity pathway and for the correct formation of dendritic fields within the Drosophila peripheral nervous system. In this study, we show that each member of the mouse Celsr family exhibit distinct patterns of expression within a range of different tissues within the developing embryo. Celsr1 and Celsr2 expression is observed during gastrulation and within the developing nervous system. Celsr3 transcripts, however, are found only at sites of active neurogenesis. PMID:11677057

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of p53, Bcl-2, COX-2, C-erb-B2, EPO-R, beta-catenin, and E-cadherin in non tumoral gastric mucous membrane.

    PubMed

    Sereno, M; García-Cabezas, M A; De Castro, J; Cejas, P; Saenz, E Casado; Belda-Iniesta, C; Feijoo, J Barriuso; Larrauri, J; Nistal, M; Baron, M Gonzalez

    2006-01-01

    Different authors have investigated the immunohistochemical expression of some proteins in the adenocarcinoma of the stomach, including cell cycle regulators proteins like p53 and Bcl-2; growth factors (c-erb-B2 and EPO-R); angiogenesis-related markers such as COX-2 and cellular adhesion molecules (beta-catenin and E-cadherin). While these proteins have been studied in gastric adenocarcinoma, their immunophenotyping in non tumoral gastric mucous membrane remains unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the expression, function and behavior of these proteins in normal gastric mucous membrane to contribute to gain further knowledge on the significance of their loss or overexpression in malignant gastric tumors. PMID:17213037

  20. Transcriptional Repression of E-Cadherin by Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, Zarina J.; Jolly, Carol; Androphy, Elliot J.; Mercer, Andrew; Matthews, Charles M.; Hibma, Merilyn H.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence supporting DNA virus regulation of the cell adhesion and tumour suppressor protein, E-cadherin. We previously reported that loss of E-cadherin in human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16-infected epidermis is contributed to by the major viral proto-oncogene E6 and is associated with reduced Langerhans cells density, potentially regulating the immune response. The focus of this study is determining how the HPV16 E6 protein mediates E-cadherin repression. We found that the E-cadherin promoter is repressed in cells expressing E6, resulting in fewer E-cadherin transcripts. On exploring the mechanism for this, repression by increased histone deacetylase activity or by increased binding of trans-repressors to the E-cadherin promoter Epal element was discounted. In contrast, DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity was increased in E6 expressing cells. Upon inhibiting DNMT activity using 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine, E-cadherin transcription was restored in the presence of HPV16 E6. The E-cadherin promoter was not directly methylated, however a mutational analysis showed general promoter repression and reduced binding of the transactivators Sp1 and AML1 and the repressor Slug. Expression of E7 with E6 resulted in a further reduction in surface E-cadherin levels. This is the first report of HPV16 E6-mediated transcriptional repression of this adhesion molecule and tumour suppressor protein. PMID:23189137

  1. Inhibition of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition by E-cadherin Up-regulation via Repression of Slug Transcription and Inhibition of E-cadherin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Arghya; Chakraborty, Samik; Mazumdar, Minakshi; Ghosh, Swatilekha; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Manna, Argha; Mohanty, Suchismita; Nakka, Kiran Kumar; Joshi, Shruti; De, Abhijit; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Sa, Gaurisankar; Das, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the cancer cell into a metastatic entity is the major cause of death in patients with cancer. It has been acknowledged that aberrant activation of a latent embryonic program, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), can endow cancer cells with the migratory and invasive capabilities associated with metastatic competence for which E-cadherin switch is a well-established hallmark. Discerning the molecular mechanisms that regulate E-cadherin expression is therefore critical for understanding tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Here we report that SMAR1 overexpression inhibits EMT and decelerates the migratory potential of breast cancer cells by up-regulating E-cadherin in a bidirectional manner. While SMAR1-dependent transcriptional repression of Slug by direct recruitment of SMAR1/HDAC1 complex to the matrix attachment region site present in the Slug promoter restores E-cadherin expression, SMAR1 also hinders E-cadherin-MDM2 interaction thereby reducing ubiquitination and degradation of E-cadherin protein. Consistently, siRNA knockdown of SMAR1 expression in these breast cancer cells results in a coordinative action of Slug-mediated repression of E-cadherin transcription, as well as degradation of E-cadherin protein through MDM2, up-regulating breast cancer cell migration. These results indicate a crucial role for SMAR1 in restraining breast cancer cell migration and suggest the candidature of this scaffold matrix-associated region-binding protein as a tumor suppressor. PMID:25086032

  2. LI-cadherin: a marker of gastric metaplasia and neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Grotzinger, C; Kneifel, J; Patschan, D; Schnoy, N; Anagnostopoulos, I; Faiss, S; Tauber, R; Wiedenmann, B; Gessner, R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Intestinal metaplasia is considered a risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type and is found in approximately 20% of gastric biopsies. Conventional histology only detects advanced stages of intestinal metaplasia.
AIMS—To study expression of the enterocyte specific adhesion molecule liver-intestinal (LI)-cadherin in intestinal metaplasia as well as in gastric cancer, and to evaluate its use as a diagnostic marker molecule.
PATIENTS—Gastric biopsies (n=77) from 30 consecutive patients (n=30; aged 28-90 years) as well as surgically resected tissue samples (n=24) of all types of gastric carcinomas were analysed.
METHODS—Single and double label immunofluorescence detection on cryosections of gastric biopsies; alkaline phosphatase antialkaline phosphatase method on paraffin embedded carcinoma tissue sections.
RESULTS—Of 77 biopsies (from 30 patients), 12 (from 10 patients) stained positive for LI-cadherin. LI-cadherin staining correlated with the presence of intestinal metaplasia. Conventional histological diagnosis however failed to detect subtle gastric intestinal metaplasia (three of 10 patients). In contrast, only LI-cadherin and villin were positive in these cases whereas sucrase-isomaltase also failed to detect intestinal metaplasia in four of 10 patients. Well differentiated gastric carcinomas showed intense staining for LI-cadherin while undifferentiated carcinomas showed only weak diffuse cytoplasmic staining.
CONCLUSIONS—To detect early metaplastic changes in the gastric mucosa, LI-cadherin has a sensitivity superior to sucrase-isomaltase and conventional histology and comparable with that of villin. Its specificity exceeds that of villin. Thus LI-cadherin represents a new, reliable, and powerful marker molecule for early detection of gastric intestinal metaplasia and well differentiated adenocarcinomas.


Keywords: stomach; intestinal metaplasia; cadherins; carcinogenesis

  3. Beta-catenin expression in human cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, T.; Shiozaki, H.; Shibamoto, S.; Oka, H.; Kimura, Y.; Tamura, S.; Inoue, M.; Monden, T.; Ito, F.; Monden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion in tissue is mainly regulated by homotypic interaction of cadherin molecules, which are anchored to the cytoskeleton via cytoplasmic proteins, including alpha- and beta-catenin. Although we previously demonstrated that alpha-catenin is crucial for cadherin function in vivo, little is known about the role of beta-catenin. We examined the expression of beta-catenin in human carcinoma samples along with normal tissue (esophagus, stomach, and colon) by immunostaining using our antibody for beta-catenin. Normal epithelium strongly expressed beta-catenin. However, beta-catenin expression was frequently reduced in primary tumors of the esophagus (10 of 15, 67%), stomach (9 of 19, 47%), and colon (11 of 22, 50%). From an immunoprecipitation study, we found that beta-catenin forms a complex with E-cadherin not only in the normal epithelium but also in cancerous tissues. In coexpression patterns of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, 43 (77%) of the 56 tumors showed a similar expression of both molecules, whereas the other 13 tumors (23%) showed positive staining for E-cadherin and reduced expression of beta-catenin. These findings suggest that beta-catenin forms a complex with E-cadherin in vivo and down-regulation of beta-catenin expression is associated with malignant transformation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8546224

  4. N-cadherin prodomain processing regulates synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reinés, Analía; Bernier, Louis-Philippe; McAdam, Robyn; Belkaid, Wiam; Shan, Weisong; Koch, Alexander W; Séguéla, Philippe; Colman, David R; Dhaunchak, Ajit S

    2012-05-01

    Classical cadherins, which are adhesion molecules functioning at the CNS synapse, are synthesized as adhesively inactive precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Signal sequence and prodomain cleavage in the ER and Golgi apparatus, respectively, activates their adhesive properties. Here, we provide the first evidence for sorting of nonadhesive precursor N-cadherin (ProN) to the neuronal surface, where it coexists with adhesively competent mature N-cadherin (N-cad), generating a spectrum of adhesive strengths. In cultured hippocampal neurons, a high ProN/N-cad ratio downregulates synapse formation. Neurons expressing genetically engineered uncleavable ProN make markedly fewer synapses. The synapse number can be rescued to normality by depleting surface ProN levels through prodomain cleavage by an exogenous protease. Finally, prodomain processing is developmentally regulated in the rat hippocampus. We conclude that it is the ProN/N-cad ratio and not mature N-cad alone that is critical for regulation of adhesion during synaptogenesis. PMID:22553038

  5. Relating movement recurrence and expressive timing patterns in music performances.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Euler C F; Yehia, Hani C; Loureiro, Mauricio A

    2015-09-01

    In this study the movement patterns of ten expert musicians are quantitatively related to expressive timing patterns and the music structure during performances. The hypothesis is that ancillary gestures recurrently employed are closely related to expressive intentions, and that the expressive content imposed in key musical passages is thus reflected in the patterns of gestural recurrence. A movement and an audio analysis of 30 clarinet performances of a Brahms' excerpt are compared. Results show direct correlations between the recurrence pattern of clarinetists' ancillary movements and expressive bar duration manipulations employed by them, associated with melodic phrasing and harmonic transitions. PMID:26428815

  6. A new rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin antibody [EP700Y] shows higher sensitivity than mouse monoclonal E-cadherin [HECD-1] antibody in breast ductal carcinomas and does not stain breast lobular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Laura L; Tang, Ping; Hicks, David G; Chen, Huijiao; Yang, Qi; Haas, Thomas S; Bremer, Ryan E; Tacha, David

    2014-09-01

    Immunohistochemical studies have shown E-cadherin to be expressed in breast carcinomas showing a ductal histology, with a corresponding loss of expression in tumors with a lobular histology. As a result, mouse monoclonal anti-E-cadherin [HECD-1] has been used by pathologists to differentiate between ductal and lobular carcinomas, with currently published sensitivity and specificity rates of approximately 90%. Rabbit monoclonal antibodies may combine the best properties of both mouse monoclonal antibodies and rabbit antisera. Therefore, this study compares the staining sensitivity and specificity of a new rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin and the standard mouse monoclonal E-cadherin [HECD-1] in breast ductal carcinomas, and evaluates a cocktail of rabbit monoclonal E-cadherin and p120 catenin in the discrimination of ductal from lobular carcinomas. The rabbit E-cadherin showed sharper staining and increased sensitivity (80/81, 99%) than the mouse E-cadherin (75/81, 93%). The rabbit E-cadherin achieved a score of 3+ in 85.2% (69/81) of cases as compared with a 3+ in only 21.0% (17/81) of cases stained with mouse E-cadherin. All lobular carcinomas (n=37) were confirmed by the absence of E-cadherin and the diffuse cytoplasmic expression of p120 catenin. Although both the single mouse E-cadherin and dual stain can differentiate ductal from lobular lesions, the dual stain is helpful in challenging cases because of its bright pink p120 catenin and dark brown rabbit E-cadherin staining. The highly sensitive rabbit E-cadherin antibody is the preferred antibody for evaluating ductal carcinomas and for distinguishing ductal versus lobular lesions, and the dual stain was superior to the single E-cadherin stain. PMID:24569788

  7. A Novel Role of E-Cadherin-Based Adherens Junctions in Neoplastic Cell Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Gloushankova, Natalya A.

    2015-01-01

    Using confocal microscopy, we analyzed the behavior of IAR-6-1, IAR1170, and IAR1162 transformed epithelial cells seeded onto the confluent monolayer of normal IAR-2 epithelial cells. Live-cell imaging of neoplastic cells stably expressing EGFP and of normal epithelial cells stably expressing mKate2 showed that transformed cells retaining expression of E-cadherin were able to migrate over the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer and invade the monolayer. Transformed IAR cells invaded the IAR-2 monolayer at the boundaries between normal cells. Studying interactions of IAR-6-1 transformed cells stably expressing GFP-E-cadherin with the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer, we found that IAR-6-1 cells established E-cadherin-based adhesions with normal epithelial cells: dot-like dynamic E-cadherin-based adhesions in protrusions and large adherens junctions at the cell sides and rear. A comparative study of a panel of transformed IAR cells that differ by their ability to form E-cadherin-based AJs, either through loss of E-cadherin expression or through expression of a dominant negative E-cadherin mutant, demonstrated that E-cadherin-based AJs are key mediators of the interactions between neoplastic and normal epithelial cells. IAR-6-1DNE cells expressing a dominant-negative mutant form of E-cadherin with the mutation in the first extracellular domain practically lost the ability to adhere to IAR-2 cells and invade the IAR-2 epithelial monolayer. The ability of cancer cells to form E-cadherin-based AJs with the surrounding normal epithelial cells may play an important role in driving cancer cell dissemination in the body. PMID:26207916

  8. Global analysis of patterns of gene expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomancak, Pavel; Berman, Benjamin P; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Kwan, Elaine; Hartenstein, Volker; Celniker, Susan E; Rubin, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    Background Cell and tissue specific gene expression is a defining feature of embryonic development in multi-cellular organisms. However, the range of gene expression patterns, the extent of the correlation of expression with function, and the classes of genes whose spatial expression are tightly regulated have been unclear due to the lack of an unbiased, genome-wide survey of gene expression patterns. Results We determined and documented embryonic expression patterns for 6,003 (44%) of the 13,659 protein-coding genes identified in the Drosophila melanogaster genome with over 70,000 images and controlled vocabulary annotations. Individual expression patterns are extraordinarily diverse, but by supplementing qualitative in situ hybridization data with quantitative microarray time-course data using a hybrid clustering strategy, we identify groups of genes with similar expression. Of 4,496 genes with detectable expression in the embryo, 2,549 (57%) fall into 10 clusters representing broad expression patterns. The remaining 1,947 (43%) genes fall into 29 clusters representing restricted expression, 20% patterned as early as blastoderm, with the majority restricted to differentiated cell types, such as epithelia, nervous system, or muscle. We investigate the relationship between expression clusters and known molecular and cellular-physiological functions. Conclusion Nearly 60% of the genes with detectable expression exhibit broad patterns reflecting quantitative rather than qualitative differences between tissues. The other 40% show tissue-restricted expression; the expression patterns of over 1,500 of these genes are documented here for the first time. Within each of these categories, we identified clusters of genes associated with particular cellular and developmental functions. PMID:17645804

  9. E-cadherin Surface Levels in Epithelial Growth Factor-stimulated Cells Depend on Adherens Junction Protein Shrew-1

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Julia Christina; Schreiner, Alexander; Engels, Knut

    2009-01-01

    Gain- and loss-of-function studies indicate that the adherens junction protein shrew-1 acts as a novel modulator of E-cadherin internalization induced by epithelial growth factor (EGF) or E-cadherin function-blocking antibody during epithelial cell dynamics. Knocking down shrew-1 in MCF-7 carcinoma cells preserves E-cadherin surface levels upon EGF stimulation. Overexpression of shrew-1 leads to preformation of an E-cadherin/EGF receptor (EGFR) HER2/src-kinase/shrew-1 signaling complex and accelerated E-cadherin internalization. Shrew-1 is not sufficient to stimulate E-cadherin internalization, but facilitates the actions of EGFR and thus may promote malignant progression in breast cancer cells with constitutive EGFR stimulation by reducing surface E-cadherin expression. PMID:19515834

  10. Significance of P-cadherin overexpression and possible mechanism of its regulation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Keita; Imai, Katsunori; Higashi, Takaaki; Taki, Katunobu; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Okabe, Hirohisa; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Chikamoto, Akira; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Beppu, Toru; Baba, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    It has become evident that P-cadherin, one of the classical cadherins, contributes to the malignant behavior of several types of cancer. In this study, we analyzed the expression of P-cadherin and its clinicopathological and prognostic values in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, we investigated the functional role of P-cadherin in these cancer cells by knockdown and overexpression in vitro and by analyzing the correlation between the P-cadherin expression and its promoter methylation status. Thirty of 59 ICC cases (51%) and 36 of 73 pancreatic cancer cases (49%) stained positive for P-cadherin with mainly membranous distribution in tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. P-cadherin expression was significantly correlated with several clinicopathological factors, which reflect tumor behavior, and was identified as an independent adverse prognostic factor for disease-free survival in patients with ICC (relative risk [RR] 2.93, P = 0.04) and pancreatic cancer (RR 2.68, P = 0.005) via multivariate analyses. P-cadherin downregulation by siRNA suppressed migration and invasion, and P-cadherin overexpression induced the opposite effects in both ICC and pancreatic cancer cells, without any effects on cell proliferation. P-cadherin expression was related to its promoter methylation status in both cell lines and cancer tissues. In summary, P-cadherin overexpression may serve as a useful biomarker of invasive phenotype and poor prognosis; P-cadherin expression was found to be regulated by its promoter methylation. These results suggest that P-cadherin represents a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ICC and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26132727

  11. P120-Catenin Regulates Early Trafficking Stages of the N-Cadherin Precursor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wehrendt, Diana P.; Carmona, Fernando; González Wusener, Ana E.; González, Ángela; Martínez, Juan M. Lázaro; Arregui, Carlos O.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that binding of p120 catenin to the cytoplasmic domain of surface cadherin prevents cadherin endocytosis and degradation, contributing to cell-cell adhesion. In the present work we show that p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor, contributes to its anterograde movement from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex. In HeLa cells, depletion of p120 expression, or blocking its binding to N-cadherin, increased the accumulation of the precursor in the ER, while it decreased the localization of mature N-cadherin at intercellular junctions. Reconstitution experiments in p120-deficient SW48 cells with all three major isoforms of p120 (1, 3 and 4) had similar capacity to promote the processing of the N-cadherin precursor to the mature form, and its localization at cell-cell junctions. P120 catenin and protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B facilitated the recruitment of the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF), an ATPase involved in vesicular trafficking, to the N-cadherin precursor complex. Dominant negative NSF E329Q impaired N-cadherin trafficking, maturation and localization at cell-cell junctions. Our results uncover a new role for p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor ensuring its trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway towards the cell surface. PMID:27254316

  12. Secreted Heat Shock Protein 90α (HSP90α) Induces Nuclear Factor-κB-mediated TCF12 Protein Expression to Down-regulate E-cadherin and to Enhance Colorectal Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Shone; Chen, Chia-Chi; Chen, Li-Li; Lee, Chun-Chung; Huang, Tze-Sing

    2013-01-01

    Secreted levels of HSP90α and overexpression of TCF12 have been associated with the enhancement of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell migration and invasion. In this study, we observed that CRC patients with tumor TCF12 overexpression exhibited both a higher rate of metastatic occurrence and a higher average serum HSP90α level compared with patients without TCF12 overexpression. Therefore, we studied the relationship between the actions of secreted HSP90α and TCF12. Like overexpressed TCF12, secreted HSP90α or recombinant HSP90α (rHSP90α) induced fibronectin expression and repressed E-cadherin, connexin-26, connexin-43, and gap junction levels in CRC cells. Consistently, rHSP90α stimulated invasive outgrowths of CRC cells from spherical structures during three-dimensional culture. rHSP90α also induced TCF12 expression in CRC cells. Its effects on CRC cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion were drastically prevented when TCF12 was knocked down. This suggests that TCF12 expression is required for secreted HSP90α to enhance CRC cell spreading. Through the cellular receptor CD91, rHSP90α facilitated the complex formation of CD91 with IκB kinases (IKKs) α and β and increased the levels of phosphorylated (active) IKKα/β and NF-κB. Use of an IKKα/β inhibitor or ectopic overexpression of dominant-negative IκBα efficiently repressed rHSP90α-induced TCF12 expression. Moreover, κB motifs were recognized in the gene sequence of the TCF12 promoter, and a physical association between NF-κB and the TCF12 promoter was detected in rHSP90α-treated CRC cells. Together, these results suggest that the CD91/IKK/NF-κB signaling cascade is involved in secreted HSP90α-induced TCF12 expression, leading to E-cadherin down-regulation and enhanced CRC cell migration/invasion. PMID:23386606

  13. Secreted heat shock protein 90α (HSP90α) induces nuclear factor-κB-mediated TCF12 protein expression to down-regulate E-cadherin and to enhance colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Shone; Chen, Chia-Chi; Chen, Li-Li; Lee, Chun-Chung; Huang, Tze-Sing

    2013-03-29

    Secreted levels of HSP90α and overexpression of TCF12 have been associated with the enhancement of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell migration and invasion. In this study, we observed that CRC patients with tumor TCF12 overexpression exhibited both a higher rate of metastatic occurrence and a higher average serum HSP90α level compared with patients without TCF12 overexpression. Therefore, we studied the relationship between the actions of secreted HSP90α and TCF12. Like overexpressed TCF12, secreted HSP90α or recombinant HSP90α (rHSP90α) induced fibronectin expression and repressed E-cadherin, connexin-26, connexin-43, and gap junction levels in CRC cells. Consistently, rHSP90α stimulated invasive outgrowths of CRC cells from spherical structures during three-dimensional culture. rHSP90α also induced TCF12 expression in CRC cells. Its effects on CRC cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and invasion were drastically prevented when TCF12 was knocked down. This suggests that TCF12 expression is required for secreted HSP90α to enhance CRC cell spreading. Through the cellular receptor CD91, rHSP90α facilitated the complex formation of CD91 with IκB kinases (IKKs) α and β and increased the levels of phosphorylated (active) IKKα/β and NF-κB. Use of an IKKα/β inhibitor or ectopic overexpression of dominant-negative IκBα efficiently repressed rHSP90α-induced TCF12 expression. Moreover, κB motifs were recognized in the gene sequence of the TCF12 promoter, and a physical association between NF-κB and the TCF12 promoter was detected in rHSP90α-treated CRC cells. Together, these results suggest that the CD91/IKK/NF-κB signaling cascade is involved in secreted HSP90α-induced TCF12 expression, leading to E-cadherin down-regulation and enhanced CRC cell migration/invasion. PMID:23386606

  14. Fundamental patterns underlying gene expression profiles: Simplicity from complexity

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Neal S.; Mitra, Madhusmita; Maritan, Amos; Cieplak, Marek; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of previously published sets of DNA microarray gene expression data by singular value decomposition has uncovered underlying patterns or “characteristic modes” in their temporal profiles. These patterns contribute unequally to the structure of the expression profiles. Moreover, the essential features of a given set of expression profiles are captured using just a small number of characteristic modes. This leads to the striking conclusion that the transcriptional response of a genome is orchestrated in a few fundamental patterns of gene expression change. These patterns are both simple and robust, dominating the alterations in expression of genes throughout the genome. Moreover, the characteristic modes of gene expression change in response to environmental perturbations are similar in such distant organisms as yeast and human cells. This analysis reveals simple regularities in the seemingly complex transcriptional transitions of diverse cells to new states, and these provide insights into the operation of the underlying genetic networks. PMID:10890920

  15. Tension Monitoring during Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Links the Switch of Phenotype to Expression of Moesin and Cadherins in NMuMG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David; Baronsky, Thilo; Pietuch, Anna; Rother, Jan; Oelkers, Marieelen; Fichtner, Dagmar; Wedlich, Doris; Janshoff, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Structural alterations during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pose a substantial challenge to the mechanical response of cells and are supposed to be key parameters for an increased malignancy during metastasis. Herein, we report that during EMT, apical tension of the epithelial cell line NMuMG is controlled by cell-cell contacts and the architecture of the underlying actin structures reflecting the mechanistic interplay between cellular structure and mechanics. Using force spectroscopy we find that tension in NMuMG cells slightly increases 24 h after EMT induction, whereas upon reaching the final mesenchymal-like state characterized by a complete loss of intercellular junctions and a concerted down-regulation of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin, the overall tension becomes similar to that of solitary adherent cells and fibroblasts. Interestingly, the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton on apical tension increases significantly upon EMT induction, most likely due to the formation of stable and highly contractile stress fibers which dominate the elastic properties of the cells after the transition. The structural alterations lead to the formation of single, highly motile cells rendering apical tension a good indicator for the cellular state during phenotype switching. In summary, our study paves the way towards a more profound understanding of cellular mechanics governing fundamental morphological programs such as the EMT. PMID:24339870

  16. Systematic determination of patterns of gene expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomancak, Pavel; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Kwan, Elaine; Shu, ShengQiang; Lewis, Suzanna E; Richards, Stephen; Ashburner, Michael; Hartenstein, Volker; Celniker, Susan E; Rubin, Gerald M

    2002-01-01

    Background Cell-fate specification and tissue differentiation during development are largely achieved by the regulation of gene transcription. Results As a first step to creating a comprehensive atlas of gene-expression patterns during Drosophila embryogenesis, we examined 2,179 genes by in situ hybridization to fixed Drosophila embryos. Of the genes assayed, 63.7% displayed dynamic expression patterns that were documented with 25,690 digital photomicrographs of individual embryos. The photomicrographs were annotated using controlled vocabularies for anatomical structures that are organized into a developmental hierarchy. We also generated a detailed time course of gene expression during embryogenesis using microarrays to provide an independent corroboration of the in situ hybridization results. All image, annotation and microarray data are stored in publicly available database. We found that the RNA transcripts of about 1% of genes show clear subcellular localization. Nearly all the annotated expression patterns are distinct. We present an approach for organizing the data by hierarchical clustering of annotation terms that allows us to group tissues that express similar sets of genes as well as genes displaying similar expression patterns. Conclusions Analyzing gene-expression patterns by in situ hybridization to whole-mount embryos provides an extremely rich dataset that can be used to identify genes involved in developmental processes that have been missed by traditional genetic analysis. Systematic analysis of rigorously annotated patterns of gene expression will complement and extend the types of analyses carried out using expression microarrays. PMID:12537577

  17. Antioxidants Maintain E-Cadherin Levels to Limit Drosophila Prohemocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongjuan; Wu, Xiaorong; Simon, LaTonya; Fossett, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate a variety of biological processes by networking with signal transduction pathways to maintain homeostasis and support adaptation to stress. In this capacity, ROS have been shown to promote the differentiation of progenitor cells, including mammalian embryonic and hematopoietic stem cells and Drosophila hematopoietic progenitors (prohemocytes). However, many questions remain about how ROS alter the regulatory machinery to promote progenitor differentiation. Here, we provide evidence for the hypothesis that ROS reduce E-cadherin levels to promote Drosophila prohemocyte differentiation. Specifically, we show that knockdown of the antioxidants, Superoxide dismutatase 2 and Catalase reduce E-cadherin protein levels prior to the loss of Odd-skipped-expressing prohemocytes. Additionally, over-expression of E-cadherin limits prohemocyte differentiation resulting from paraquat-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, two established targets of ROS, Enhancer of Polycomb and FOS, control the level of E-cadherin protein expression. Finally, we show that knockdown of either Superoxide dismutatase 2 or Catalase leads to an increase in the E-cadherin repressor, Serpent. As a result, antioxidants and targets of ROS can control E-cadherin protein levels, and over-expression of E-cadherin can ameliorate the prohemocyte response to oxidative stress. Collectively, these data strongly suggest that ROS promote differentiation by reducing E-cadherin levels. In mammalian systems, ROS promote embryonic stem cell differentiation, whereas E-cadherin blocks differentiation. However, it is not known if elevated ROS reduce E-cadherin to promote embryonic stem cell differentiation. Thus, our findings may have identified an important mechanism by which ROS promote stem/progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:25226030

  18. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces.

    PubMed

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-01-18

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell-cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell-cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX-mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  19. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell–cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell–cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX–mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  20. Expression Pattern of Id Proteins in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Andrew D.; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Houston, Ronald H.; Durban, Ashley N.; Brisbin, Bethany J.; Oostra, Tyler D.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Kahwash, Basil M.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding or inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins are up regulated in a variety of neoplasms, particularly in association with high-grade, poorly differentiated tumors, while differentiated tissues show little or no Id expression. The four Id genes are members of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors and act as negative regulators of transcription by binding to and sequestering HLH complexes. We tested the hypothesis that Id proteins are overexpressed in medulloblastoma by performing immunohistochemistry using a medulloblastoma tissue microarray with 45 unique medulloblastoma and 11 normal control cerebella, and antibodies specific for Id1, Id2, Id3, and Id4. A semi-quantitative staining score that took staining intensity and the proportion of immunoreactive cells into account was used. Id1 was not detected in normal cerebella or in medulloblastoma cells, but 78 % of tumors showed strong Id1 expression in endothelial nuclei of tumor vessels. Id2 expression was scant in normal cerebella and increased in medulloblastoma (median staining score: 4). Id3 expression was noted in some neurons of the developing cerebellar cortex, but it was markedly up regulated in medulloblastoma (median staining score: 12) and in tumor endothelial cells. Id4 was not expressed in normal cerebella or in tumor cells. Id2 or Id3 overexpression drove proliferation in medulloblastoma cell lines by altering the expression of critical cell cycle regulatory proteins in favor of cell proliferation. This study shows that Id1 expression in endothelial cells may contribute to angiogenic processes and that increased expression of Id2 and Id3 in medulloblastoma is potentially involved in tumor cell proliferation and survival. PMID:23397264

  1. Patterns of gene expression in microarrays and expressed sequence tags from normal and cataractous lenses.

    PubMed

    Sousounis, Konstantinos; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution, we have examined the patterns of gene expression in normal and cataractous lenses as presented in five different papers using microarrays and expressed sequence tags. The purpose was to evaluate unique and common patterns of gene expression during development, aging and cataracts. PMID:23244575

  2. Down-regulation of MUC1 in cancer cells inhibits cell migration by promoting E-cadherin/catenin complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhenglong; Wong, Sandy; Borrelli, Alexander; Chung, Maureen A.

    2007-10-26

    MUC1, a tumor associated glycoprotein, is over-expressed in most cancers and can promote proliferation and metastasis. The objective of this research was to study the role of MUC1 in cancer metastasis and its potential mechanism. Pancreatic (PANC1) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells with stable 'knockdown' of MUC1 expression were created using RNA interference. {beta}-Catenin and E-cadherin protein expression were upregulated in PANC1 and MCF-7 cells with decreased MUC1 expression. Downregulation of MUC1 expression also induced {beta}-catenin relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, increased E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and E-cadherin membrane localization in PANC1 cells. PANC1 cells with 'knockdown' MUC1 expression had decreased in vitro cell invasion. This study suggested that MUC1 may affect cancer cell migration by increasing E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex formation and restoring E-cadherin membrane localization.

  3. Patterns of activity expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Dubofsky, E A; Simpson, S D; Chabot, Christopher C; Watson, Winsor H

    2013-09-01

    Adult American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, possess endogenous circadian and circatidal clocks controlling visual sensitivity and locomotion, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine the types of activity rhythms expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs (n = 24) when exposed to a 14:10 light/dark cycle (LD) for 10 days, followed by 10 days of constant darkness (DD). Horseshoe crab activity was recorded with a digital time-lapse video system that used an infrared-sensitive camera so animals could be monitored at night. In LD, 15 animals expressed daily patterns of activity, 6 displayed a circatidal pattern, and the remaining 3 were arrhythmic. Of the 15 animals with daily patterns of locomotion, 7 had a significant preference (P < 0.05) for diurnal activity and 3 for nocturnal activity; the remainder did not express a significant preference for day or night activity. In DD, 13 horseshoe crabs expressed circatidal rhythms and 8 maintained a pattern of about 24 h. Although these results suggest the presence of a circadian clock influencing circatidal patterns of locomotion, these apparent circadian rhythms may actually represent the expression of just one of the two bouts of activity driven by the putative circalunidian clocks that control their tidal rhythms. Overall, these results indicate that, like adults, juvenile horseshoe crabs express both daily and tidal patterns of activity and that at least one, and maybe both, of these patterns is driven by endogenous clocks. PMID:24088795

  4. Fate of E-cadherin in Early RPE Cultures: Transient Accumulation of Truncated Peptides at Nonjunctional Sites

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Janice M.; Hong, Jeehee

    2006-01-01

    Purpose E-cadherin is known to accumulate variably and slowly at junctions of cultured human RPE cells. The intent of this investigation was to determine what limits E-cadherin protein accumulation in RPE cells by analyzing cultures at early postplating intervals when junctions of the dominant cadherin (N-cadherin) are first forming. Methods RPE cell lines hTERT-RPE1 and ARPE-19 and RPE cultures established from human donors were analyzed within 48 hours after plating for E-cadherin gene and protein expression (by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively) and for protein distribution (by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy), including codistribution with markers for organelles. Cell surface localization was analyzed by biotinylation and trypsin cleavage of extracellular cadherin domains. Results The E-cadherin gene was constitutively expressed by RPE cultures, but the protein did not accumulate substantially in early RPE cultures. Instead small amounts of newly synthesized E-cadherin were detectable only transiently, peaking within a few hours after plating, at which time the protein was in the form of peptides of variable size rather the predicted 120-kDa molecular mass. Immunoreactive E-cadherin peptides did not traffic to the cell surface and localize to junctions. Rather they codistributed with several organelles including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER; but not the Golgi), sites of protein degradation (proteasomes, lysosomes, and autophagosomes) and unusual compartments (centrosomes and apposed to subdomains of the mitochondrial network). Conclusions The results suggest that in RPE cells posttranscriptional mechanisms involving altered protein processing and rapid turnover exist to limit E-cadherin accumulation. The consequence may be to limit E-cadherin-specific inductive properties in the RPE, a cell type in which N-cadherin is the normal dominant cadherin. PMID:16877438

  5. Atypical cadherin negotiates a turn.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongbo; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Uemura, Tadashi

    2013-07-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling is involved in many polarized cell behaviors. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Tatin et al. (2013) show that the atypical cadherin Celsr1 is transiently localized to cellular protrusions in lymphatic endothelial cells and acts to orient valve-forming cells perpendicular to the vessel axis. PMID:23867224

  6. Rab35 regulates cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation and myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; De Rossi, Sylvain; Echard, Arnaud; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecules implicated in many fundamental processes, such as morphogenesis, cell growth, and differentiation. They accumulate at cell–cell contact sites and assemble into large macromolecular complexes named adherens junctions (AJs). Cadherin targeting and function are regulated by various cellular processes, many players of which remain to be uncovered. Here we identify the small GTPase Rab35 as a new regulator of cadherin trafficking and stabilization at cell–cell contacts in C2C12 myoblasts and HeLa cells. We find that Rab35 accumulates at cell–cell contacts in a cadherin-dependent manner. Knockdown of Rab35 or expression of a dominant-negative form of Rab35 impaired N- and M-cadherin recruitment to cell–cell contacts, their stabilization at the plasma membrane, and association with p120 catenin and led to their accumulation in transferrin-, clathrin-, and AP-2–positive intracellular vesicles. We also find that Rab35 function is required for PIP5KIγ accumulation at cell–cell contacts and phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate production, which is involved in cadherin stabilization at contact sites. Finally, we show that Rab35 regulates myoblast fusion, a major cellular process under the control of cadherin-dependent signaling. Taken together, these results reveal that Rab35 regulates cadherin-dependent AJ formation and myoblast fusion. PMID:23197472

  7. TGF-β signaling links E-cadherin loss to suppression of nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Qiang, L; Shah, P; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; He, Y Y

    2016-06-23

    E-cadherin is a cell adhesion molecule best known for its function in suppressing tumor progression and metastasis. Here we show that E-cadherin promotes nucleotide excision repair through positively regulating the expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and DNA damage-binding protein 1 (DDB1). Loss of E-cadherin activates the E2F4 and p130/107 transcription repressor complexes to suppress the transcription of both XPC and DDB1 through activating the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway. Adding XPC or DDB1, or inhibiting the TGF-β pathway, increases the repair of ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage in E-cadherin-inhibited cells. In the mouse skin and skin tumors, UVB radiation downregulates E-cadherin. In sun-associated premalignant and malignant skin neoplasia, E-cadherin is downregulated in association with reduced XPC and DDB1 levels. These findings demonstrate a crucial role of E-cadherin in efficient DNA repair of UV-induced DNA damage, identify a new link between epithelial adhesion and DNA repair and suggest a mechanistic link of early E-cadherin loss in tumor initiation. PMID:26477308

  8. Individuality and variation in gene expression patterns in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Adeline R.; Diehn, Maximilian; Popper, Stephen J.; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Boldrick, Jennifer C.; Relman, David A.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2003-01-01

    The nature and extent of interindividual and temporal variation in gene expression patterns in specific cells and tissues is an important and relatively unexplored issue in human biology. We surveyed variation in gene expression patterns in peripheral blood from 75 healthy volunteers by using cDNA microarrays. Characterization of the variation in gene expression in healthy tissue is an essential foundation for the recognition and interpretation of the changes in these patterns associated with infections and other diseases, and peripheral blood was selected because it is a uniquely accessible tissue in which to examine this variation in patients or healthy volunteers in a clinical setting. Specific features of interindividual variation in gene expression patterns in peripheral blood could be traced to variation in the relative proportions of specific blood cell subsets; other features were correlated with gender, age, and the time of day at which the sample was taken. An analysis of multiple sequential samples from the same individuals allowed us to discern donor-specific patterns of gene expression. These data help to define human individuality and provide a database with which disease-associated gene expression patterns can be compared. PMID:12578971

  9. N-cadherin haploinsufficiency affects cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen; Levin, Mark D; Xiong, Yanming; Petrenko, Nataliya; Patel, Vickas V.; Radice, Glenn L.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac-specific deletion of the murine gene (Cdh2) encoding the cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, results in disassembly of the intercalated disc (ICD) structure and sudden arrhythmic death. Connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junctions are significantly reduced in the heart after depleting N-cadherin, therefore we hypothesized that animals expressing half the normal levels of N-cadherin would exhibit an intermediate phenotype. We examined the effect of N-cadherin haploinsufficiency on Cx43 expression and susceptibility to induced arrhythmias in mice either wild-type or heterozygous for the Cx43 (Gja1)-null allele. An increase in hypophosphorylated Cx43 accompanied by a modest decrease in total Cx43 protein levels was observed in the N-cadherin heterozygous mice. Consistent with these findings N-cadherin heterozygotes exhibited increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias compared to wild-type mice. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a reduction in size of large Cx43-containing plaques in the N-cadherin heterozygous animals compared to wild-type. Gap junctions were further decreased in number and size in the N-cad/Cx43 compound heterozygous mice with increased arrhythmic susceptibility compared to the single mutants. The scaffold protein, ZO-1, was reduced at the ICD in N-cadherin heterozygous cardiomyocytes providing a possible explanation for the reduction in Cx43 plaque size. These data provide further support for the intimate relationship between N-cadherin and Cx43 in the heart, and suggest that germline mutations in the human N-cadherin (Cdh2) gene may predispose patients to increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:18201716

  10. Structure and Binding Mechanism of Vascular Endothelial Cadherin: A Divergent Classical Cadherin

    SciTech Connect

    J Brasch; O Harrison; G Ahlsen; S Carnally; R Henderson; B Honig; L Shapiro

    2011-12-31

    Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), a divergent member of the type II classical cadherin family of cell adhesion proteins, mediates homophilic adhesion in the vascular endothelium. Previous investigations with a bacterially produced protein suggested that VE-cadherin forms cell surface trimers that bind between apposed cells to form hexamers. Here we report studies of mammalian-produced VE-cadherin ectodomains suggesting that, like other classical cadherins, VE-cadherin forms adhesive trans dimers between monomers located on opposing cell surfaces. Trimerization of the bacterially produced protein appears to be an artifact that arises from a lack of glycosylation. We also present the 2.1-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the VE-cadherin EC1-2 adhesive region, which reveals homodimerization via the strand-swap mechanism common to classical cadherins. In common with type II cadherins, strand-swap binding involves two tryptophan anchor residues, but the adhesive interface resembles type I cadherins in that VE-cadherin does not form a large nonswapped hydrophobic surface. Thus, VE-cadherin is an outlier among classical cadherins, with characteristics of both type I and type II subfamilies.

  11. Gene Expression patterns in cryogenically stored Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genes expressed in response to cryostress in plant shoot tips are not known. In this project we compared the gene expression patterns in untreated, cryoprotectant-treated, and recovering shoot tips using differential display methods. This project identified two genes that appeared to be differ...

  12. Cloning and expression pattern of akirin2 gene in broiler.

    PubMed

    Man, Chaolai; Chang, Yang; Mu, Weitao; Zhao, Dongxue

    2014-12-01

    Akirin2 is an important nuclear factor which plays functions in innate immune response, myogenesis, muscle development, and carcinogenesis. In this study, akirin2 genes were cloned from 4-day-old Sanhuang and AA(+) broiler, and its expression patterns were analyzed by RT-PCR. The results showed that there were four SNPs in the 5'-terminal region of akirin2 coding sequences. Expression profile analysis showed that the akirin2 transcripts were constitutively expressed in 15 tissues tested, and similar expression patterns were found between the two breeds of broilers. In addition, one of the interesting findings was that the akirin2 gene is highly expressed in blood and lowly expressed in heart, respectively. These data can serve as a foundation for further studying functions of akirin2 gene. PMID:25098451

  13. E-Cadherin repression increases amount of cancer stem cells in human A549 lung adenocarcinoma and stimulates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Farmakovskaya, M; Khromova, N; Rybko, V; Dugina, V; Kopnin, B; Kopnin, P

    2016-04-17

    Here we show that cancer stem cells amount in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 depends on E-cadherin expression. In fact, downregulation of E-cadherin expression enhanced expression of pluripotent genes (c-MYC, NESTIN, OCT3/4 and SOX2) and enriched cell population with the cells possessing the properties of so-called 'cancer stem cells' via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Repression of E-cadherin also stimulated cell proliferation and migration in vitro, decreased cell amount essential for xenografts formation in nude mice, increased tumors vascularization and growth. On the other hand, E-cadherin upregulation caused opposite effects i.e. diminished the number of cancer stem cells, decreased xenograft vascularization and decelerated tumor growth. Therefore, agents restoring E-cadherin expression may be useful in anticancer therapy. PMID:26940223

  14. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint

    PubMed Central

    Zapala, Matthew A.; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A.; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S.; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S.; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J.; Reilly, John F.; Young, Warren G.; Bloom, Floyd E.; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-01-01

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional “imprint” consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior–posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org). PMID:16002470

  15. Interactions between E-Cadherin and MicroRNA Deregulation in Head and Neck Cancers: The Potential Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Thian-Sze; Gao, Wei; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin expression in the head and neck epithelium is essential for the morphogenesis and homeostasis of epithelial tissues. The cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts are required for the anchorage-dependent growth of epithelial cells. Further, survival and proliferation require physical tethering created by proper cell-cell adhesion. Otherwise, the squamous epithelial cells will undergo programmed cell death. Head and neck cancers can escape from anoikis and enter into the epithelial-mesenchymal transition stages via the modulation of E-cadherin expression with epigenetic mechanisms. At epigenetic level, gene expression control is not dependent on the DNA sequence. In the context of E-cadherin regulation in head and neck cancers, 2 major mechanisms including de novo promoter hypermethylation and microRNA dysregulation are most extensively studied. Both of them control E-cadherin expression at transcription level and subsequently hinder the overall E-cadherin protein level in the head and neck cancer cells. Increasing evidence suggested that microRNA mediated E-cadherin expression in the head and neck cancers by directly/indirectly targeting the transcription suppressors of E-cadherin, ZEB1 and ZEB2. PMID:25161999

  16. Design of a Photoswitchable Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing interest in engineering proteins whose function can be controlled with the spatial and temporal precision of light. Here, we present a novel example of a functional light-triggered switch in the Ca-dependent cell–cell adhesion protein E-cadherin, created using a mechanism-based design strategy. We report an 18-fold change in apparent Ca2+ binding affinity upon illumination. Our results include a detailed examination of functional switching via linked changes in Ca2+ binding and cadherin dimerization. This design opens avenues toward controllable tools that could be applied to many long-standing questions about cadherin’s biological function in cell–cell adhesion and downstream signaling. PMID:23923816

  17. E-cadherin gene mutations are rare in adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Wijnhoven, B P; de Both, N J; van Dekken, H; Tilanus, H W; Dinjens, W N

    1999-07-01

    Reduced expression of E-cadherin, a cell-cell adhesion molecule, is observed in oesophageal adenocarcinomas and correlates with less favourable pathological parameters and survival. To determine if genetic events lead to reduced E-cadherin expression in these patients, we screened all 16 exons of the E-cadherin gene for mutations with the polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (PCR-SSCP) technique in 49 resection specimens, including four loco-regional lymph node metastases, four established cell lines and four xenografts. Fifteen exon-spanning primer pairs were used, and in nine amplicons aberrant bands were detected. Sequencing of the amplicons revealed a one base-pair deletion (codon 120; exon 3) in cell lines JROECL 47 and JROECL 50 leading to a premature downstream stop codon. Polymorphisms were identified for amplicons 1, 4/5, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16 corresponding with data from the literature. Three new polymorphisms were detected for amplicons 2, 3 and 4/5. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the E-cadherin locus on 16q22.1 was examined with four polymorphic markers. LOH was found in 31 of the 48 informative cases (65%). These results show that, despite the frequent LOH of the E-cadherin locus, mutations in the E-cadherin gene are rare events and can not be held responsible for down-regulation of E-cadherin observed in the majority of adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. PMID:10408414

  18. Recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin is necessary for smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ruping; Cleary, Rachel A; Gannon, Olivia J; Tang, Dale D

    2015-04-01

    β-Catenin is a key component that connects transmembrane cadherin with the actin cytoskeleton at the cell-cell interface. However, the role of the β-catenin/cadherin interaction in smooth muscle has not been well characterized. Here stimulation with acetylcholine promoted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Knockdown of β-catenin by lentivirus-mediated shRNA attenuated smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, myosin light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 and actin polymerization in response to contractile activation were not reduced by β-catenin knockdown. In addition, the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain disrupted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin. Force development, but not myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin polymerization, was reduced by the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain. Furthermore, actin polymerization and microtubules have been implicated in intracellular trafficking. In this study, the treatment with the inhibitor latrunculin A diminished the interaction of β-catenin with N-cadherin in smooth muscle. In contrast, the exposure of smooth muscle to the microtubule depolymerizer nocodazole did not affect the protein-protein interaction. Together, these findings suggest that smooth muscle contraction is mediated by the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin, which may facilitate intercellular mechanotransduction. The association of β-catenin with N-cadherin is regulated by actin polymerization during contractile activation. PMID:25713069

  19. MT5-MMP, ADAM-10, and N-Cadherin Act in Concert To Facilitate Synapse Reorganization after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kelly M.; Reeves, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) influence synaptic recovery following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Membrane type 5-matrix metalloproteinase (MT5-MMP) and a distintegrin and metalloproteinase-10 (ADAM-10) are membrane-bound MMPs that cleave N-cadherin, a protein critical to synapse stabilization. This study examined protein and mRNA expression of MT5-MMP, ADAM-10, and N-cadherin after TBI, contrasting adaptive and maladaptive synaptogenesis. The effect of MMP inhibition on MT5-MMP, ADAM-10, and N-cadherin was assessed during maladaptive plasticity and correlated with synaptic function. Rats were subjected to adaptive unilateral entorhinal cortical lesion (UEC) or maladaptive fluid percussion TBI+bilateral entorhinal cortical lesion (TBI+BEC). Hippocampal MT5-MMP and ADAM-10 protein was significantly elevated 2 and 7 days post-injury. At 15 days after UEC, each MMP returned to control level, while TBI+BEC ADAM-10 remained elevated. At 2 and 7 days, N-cadherin protein was below control. By the 15-day synapse stabilization phase, UEC N-cadherin rose above control, a shift not seen for TBI+BEC. At 7 days, increased TBI+BEC ADAM-10 transcript correlated with protein elevation. UEC ADAM-10 mRNA did not change, and no differences in MT5-MMP or N-cadherin mRNA were detected. Confocal imaging showed MT5-MMP, ADAM-10, and N-cadherin localization within reactive astrocytes. MMP inhibition attenuated ADAM-10 protein 15 days after TBI+BEC and increased N-cadherin. This inhibition partially restored long-term potentiation induction, but did not affect paired-pulse facilitation. Our results confirm time- and injury-dependent expression of MT5-MMP, ADAM-10, and N-cadherin during reactive synaptogenesis. Persistent ADAM-10 expression was correlated with attenuated N-cadherin level and reduced functional recovery. MMP inhibition shifted ADAM-10 and N-cadherin toward adaptive expression and improved synaptic function. PMID:22489706

  20. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  1. Mosaic cellular patterning in the nose: Adhesion molecules give their two scents.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Gerard M J

    2016-02-29

    The sense of smell is mediated by the olfactory epithelium, which is composed of a mosaic pattern of olfactory sensory cells surrounded by supporting cells. In this issue, Katsunuma et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509020) show that the differential expression of nectins and cadherins establishes this pattern. PMID:26929448

  2. Differential expression pattern of UBX family genes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Seiji; Sasagawa, Yohei; Ogura, Teru . E-mail: ogura@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi . E-mail: yamanaka@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    UBX (ubiquitin regulatory X)-containing proteins belong to an evolutionary conserved protein family and determine the specificity of p97/VCP/Cdc48p function by binding as its adaptors. Caenorhabditis elegans was found to possess six UBX-containing proteins, named UBXN-1 to -6. However, no general or specific function of them has been revealed. During the course of understanding not only their function but also specified function of p97, we investigated spatial and temporal expression patterns of six ubxn genes in this study. Transcript analyses showed that the expression pattern of each ubxn gene was different throughout worm's development and may show potential developmental dynamics in their function, especially ubxn-5 was expressed specifically in the spermatogenic germline, suggesting a crucial role in spermatogenesis. In addition, as ubxn-4 expression was induced by ER stress, it would function as an ERAD factor in C. elegans. In vivo expression analysis by using GFP translational fusion constructs revealed that six ubxn genes show distinct expression patterns. These results altogether demonstrate that the expression of all six ubxn genes of C. elegans is differently regulated.

  3. Analysis of HOX gene expression patterns in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Yun, Hyo Jung; Park, Byeong Woo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2014-01-01

    HOX genes are highly conserved transcription factors that determine the identity of cells and tissues along the anterior-posterior body axis in developing embryos. Aberrations in HOX gene expression have been shown in various tumors. However, the correlation of HOX gene expression patterns with tumorigenesis and cancer progression has not been fully characterized. Here, to analyze putative candidate HOX genes involved in breast cancer tumorigenesis and progression, the expression patterns of 39 HOX genes were analyzed using breast cancer cell lines and patient-derived breast tissues. In vitro analysis revealed that HOXA and HOXB gene expression occurred in a subtype-specific manner in breast cancer cell lines, whereas most HOXC genes were strongly expressed in most cell lines. Among the 39 HOX genes analyzed, 25 were chosen for further analysis in malignant and non-malignant tissues. Fourteen genes, encoding HOXA6, A13, B2, B4, B5, B6, B7, B8, B9, C5, C9, C13, D1, and D8, out of 25 showed statistically significant differential expression patterns between non-malignant and malignant breast tissues and are putative candidates associated with the development and malignant progression of breast cancer. Our data provide a valuable resource for furthering our understanding of HOX gene expression in breast cancer and the possible involvement of HOX genes in tumor progression. PMID:23820980

  4. Expression pattern of BMPs during chick limb development.

    PubMed

    Geetha-Loganathan, P; Nimmagadda, S; Huang, R; Scaal, M; Christ, B

    2006-12-01

    In vertebrates, BMPs (bone morphogenic proteins) play critical roles in establishing the basic embryonic body plan and are involved in the development of a large variety of organs and tissues. Here, we analyzed the expression pattern of various BMPs (2, 4, 5 and 7) by whole mount in situ hybridization during chick limb development. In limb, expression of BMPs suggests evolutionary conserved mechanisms of BMP-dependent differentiation between lower and higher vertebrates. During the early developmental stages, BMP-2 and BMP-7 are expressed in the posterior distal mesenchyme leaving a less prominent expression anteriorly. BMP-4 is initially expressed in the anterior mesenchyme and spreads later to the whole mesenchyme leaving a stronger expression at the anterior side. From HH-stage 25, expression of BMP-4 is observed in the anterior-posterior margins of the limb bud. The BMPs 2, 4 and 7 are expressed strongly in the AER, whereas BMP-5 is expressed as a weak signal in the distal mesoderm during the early stages of limb development. Later from HH-stage 25 onwards, BMP-5 is expressed in the dorsal and ventral muscular mass of the developing limb. As digits become identifiable, expression of BMPs are observed in the interdigital mesenchyme and can also be detected along the contours of the developing phalanges and at the distal tips of the digits. All these BMPs are found to be expressed in the developing feather buds from day 8 onwards. PMID:17024298

  5. Developmental expression profiles of Celsr (Flamingo) genes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tissir, F; De-Backer, O; Goffinet, A M; Lambert de Rouvroit, C

    2002-03-01

    Celsr, also called Flamingo (Fmi) genes encode proteins of the cadherin superfamily. Celsr cadherins are seven-pass transmembrane proteins with nine cadherin repeats in the extracellular domain, and an anonymous intracellular C-terminus. The Drosophila Fmi gene regulates epithelial planar cell polarity and dendritic field deployment. The three Flamingo gene orthologs in man and rodents are named, respectively, CELSR1-3 and Celsr1-3. Celsr1 and 2 are expressed during early development, in the brain and epithelia. In this report, we characterized further Celsr genes in the mouse, and examined their developmental pattern of expression. Each Celsr is expressed prominently in the developing brain following a specific pattern, suggesting that they serve distinct functions. PMID:11850187

  6. Intra- and interspecific variation in primate gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Enard, Wolfgang; Khaitovich, Philipp; Klose, Joachim; Zöllner, Sebastian; Heissig, Florian; Giavalisco, Patrick; Nieselt-Struwe, Kay; Muchmore, Elaine; Varki, Ajit; Ravid, Rivka; Doxiadis, Gaby M; Bontrop, Ronald E; Pääbo, Svante

    2002-04-12

    Although humans and their closest evolutionary relatives, the chimpanzees, are 98.7% identical in their genomic DNA sequences, they differ in many morphological, behavioral, and cognitive aspects. The underlying genetic basis of many of these differences may be altered gene expression. We have compared the transcriptome in blood leukocytes, liver, and brain of humans, chimpanzees, orangutans, and macaques using microarrays, as well as protein expression patterns of humans and chimpanzees using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We also studied three mouse species that are approximately as related to each other as are humans, chimpanzees, and orangutans. We identified species-specific gene expression patterns indicating that changes in protein and gene expression have been particularly pronounced in the human brain. PMID:11951044

  7. Cadherins as regulators of neuronal polarity

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Annette; Fornasiero, Eugenio F; Dotti, Carlos G

    2015-01-01

    A compelling amount of data is accumulating about the polyphonic role of neuronal cadherins during brain development throughout all developmental stages, starting from the involvement of cadherins in the organization of neurulation up to synapse development and plasticity. Recent work has confirmed that specifically N-cadherins play an important role in asymmetrical cellular processes in developing neurons that are at the basis of polarity. In this review we will summarize recent data, which demonstrate how N-cadherin orchestrates distinct processes of polarity establishment in neurons. PMID:25482615

  8. Characterization of GPR101 transcript structure and expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Trivellin, Giampaolo; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Daly, Adrian F; Larco, Darwin O; Palmeira, Leonor; Faucz, Fabio R; Thiry, Albert; Leal, Letícia F; Rostomyan, Liliya; Quezado, Martha; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Janjic, Marija M; Villa, Chiara; Wu, T John; Stojilkovic, Stanko S; Beckers, Albert; Feldman, Benjamin; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-08-01

    We recently showed that Xq26.3 microduplications cause X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG). X-LAG patients mainly present with growth hormone and prolactin-secreting adenomas and share a minimal duplicated region containing at least four genes. GPR101 was the only gene highly expressed in their pituitary lesions, but little is known about its expression patterns. In this work, GPR101 transcripts were characterized in human tissues by 5'-Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) and RNAseq, while the putative promoter was bioinformatically predicted. We investigated GPR101 mRNA and protein expression by RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR), whole-mount in situ hybridization, and immunostaining, in human, rhesus monkey, rat and zebrafish. We identified four GPR101 isoforms characterized by different 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) and a common 6.1kb long 3'UTR. GPR101 expression was very low or absent in almost all adult human tissues examined, except for specific brain regions. Strong GPR101 staining was observed in human fetal pituitary and during adolescence, whereas very weak/absent expression was detected during childhood and adult life. In contrast to humans, adult monkey and rat pituitaries expressed GPR101, but in different cell types. Gpr101 is expressed in the brain and pituitary during rat and zebrafish development; in rat pituitary, Gpr101 is expressed only after birth and shows sexual dimorphism. This study shows that different GPR101 transcripts exist and that the brain is the major site of GPR101 expression across different species, although divergent species- and temporal-specific expression patterns are evident. These findings suggest an important role for GPR101 in brain and pituitary development and likely reflect the very different growth, development and maturation patterns among species. PMID:27282544

  9. Multimodal expression of emotion: affect programs or componential appraisal patterns?

    PubMed

    Scherer, Klaus R; Ellgring, Heiner

    2007-02-01

    In earlier work, the authors analyzed emotion portrayals by professional actors separately for facial expression, vocal expression, gestures, and body movements. In a secondary analysis of the combined data set for all these modalities, the authors now examine to what extent actors use prototypical multimodal configurations of expressive actions to portray different emotions, as predicted by basic emotion theories claiming that expressions are produced by fixed neuromotor affect programs. Although several coherent unimodal clusters are identified, the results show only 3 multimodal clusters: agitation, resignation, and joyful surprise, with only the latter being specific to a particular emotion. Finding variable expressions rather than prototypical patterns seems consistent with the notion that emotional expression is differentially driven by the results of sequential appraisal checks, as postulated by componential appraisal theories. PMID:17352571

  10. RPTPα controls epithelial adherens junctions, linking E-cadherin engagement to c-Src-mediated phosphorylation of cortactin.

    PubMed

    Truffi, Marta; Dubreuil, Véronique; Liang, Xuan; Vacaresse, Nathalie; Nigon, Fabienne; Han, Siew Ping; Yap, Alpha S; Gomez, Guillermo A; Sap, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial junctions are fundamental determinants of tissue organization, subject to regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation. Homophilic binding of E-cadherin activates tyrosine kinases, such as Src, that control junctional integrity. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) also contribute to cadherin-based adhesion and signaling, but little is known about their specific identity or functions at epithelial junctions. Here, we report that the receptor PTP RPTPα (human gene name PTPRA) is recruited to epithelial adherens junctions at the time of cell-cell contact, where it is in molecular proximity to E-cadherin. RPTPα is required for appropriate cadherin-dependent adhesion and for cyst architecture in three-dimensional culture. Loss of RPTPα impairs adherens junction integrity, as manifested by defective E-cadherin accumulation and peri-junctional F-actin density. These effects correlate with a role for RPTPα in cellular (c)-Src activation at sites of E-cadherin engagement. Mechanistically, RPTPα is required for appropriate tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin, a major Src substrate and a cytoskeletal actin organizer. Expression of a phosphomimetic cortactin mutant in RPTPα-depleted cells partially rescues F-actin and E-cadherin accumulation at intercellular contacts. These findings indicate that RPTPα controls cadherin-mediated signaling by linking homophilic E-cadherin engagement to cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation through c-Src. PMID:24652832

  11. From cell membrane to the nucleus: an emerging role of E-cadherin in gene transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjun; Liu, Xi; Fan, Guiling; Zhao, Xingsheng; Sun, Yanying; Wang, Tianzhen; Zhao, Ran; Wang, Guangyu; Zhao, Ci; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Ye, Fei; Jin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin is a well-known mediator of cell–cell adherens junctions. However, many other functions of E-cadherin have been reported. Collectively, the available data suggest that E-cadherin may also act as a gene transcriptional regulator. Here, evidence supporting this claim is reviewed, and possible mechanisms of action are discussed. E-cadherin has been shown to modulate the activity of several notable cell signalling pathways, and given that most of these pathways in turn regulate gene expression, we proposed that E-cadherin may regulate gene transcription by affecting these pathways. Additionally, E-cadherin has been shown to accumulate in the nucleus where documentation of an E-cadherin fragment bound to DNA suggests that E-cadherin may directly regulate gene transcription. In summary, from the cell membrane to the nucleus, a role for E-cadherin in gene transcription may be emerging. Studies specifically focused on this potential role would allow for a more thorough understanding of this transmembrane glycoprotein in mediating intra- and intercellular activities. PMID:25164084

  12. MEPD: medaka expression pattern database, genes and more

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Barba, Juan I.; Rahman, Raza-Ur; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Mateo, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    The Medaka Expression Pattern Database (MEPD; http://mepd.cos.uni-heidelberg.de/) is designed as a repository of medaka expression data for the scientific community. In this update we present two main improvements. First, we have changed the previous clone-centric view for in situ data to a gene-centric view. This is possible because now we have linked all the data present in MEPD to the medaka gene annotation in ENSEMBL. In addition, we have also connected the medaka genes in MEPD to their corresponding orthologous gene in zebrafish, again using the ENSEMBL database. Based on this, we provide a link to the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN) to allow researches to compare expression data between these two fish model organisms. As a second major improvement, we have modified the design of the database to enable it to host regulatory elements, promoters or enhancers, expression patterns in addition to gene expression. The combination of gene expression, by traditional in situ, and regulatory element expression, typically by fluorescence reporter gene, within the same platform assures consistency in terms of annotation. In our opinion, this will allow researchers to uncover new insights between the expression domain of genes and their regulatory landscape. PMID:26450962

  13. Essential cooperation of N-cadherin and neuroligin-1 in the transsynaptic control of vesicle accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stan, A; Pielarski, K N; Brigadski, T; Wittenmayer, N; Fedorchenko, O; Gohla, A; Lessmann, V; Dresbach, T; Gottmann, K

    2010-06-15

    Cell adhesion molecules are key players in transsynaptic communication, precisely coordinating presynaptic differentiation with postsynaptic specialization. At glutamatergic synapses, their retrograde signaling has been proposed to control presynaptic vesicle clustering at active zones. However, how the different types of cell adhesion molecules act together during this decisive step of synapse maturation is largely unexplored. Using a knockout approach, we show that two synaptic adhesion systems, N-cadherin and neuroligin-1, cooperate to control vesicle clustering at nascent synapses. Live cell imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments at individual synaptic boutons revealed a strong impairment of vesicle accumulation in the absence of N-cadherin, whereas the formation of active zones was largely unaffected. Strikingly, also the clustering of synaptic vesicles triggered by neuroligin-1 overexpression required the presence of N-cadherin in cultured neurons. Mechanistically, we found that N-cadherin acts by postsynaptically accumulating neuroligin-1 and activating its function via the scaffolding molecule S-SCAM, leading, in turn, to presynaptic vesicle clustering. A similar cooperation of N-cadherin and neuroligin-1 was observed in immature CA3 pyramidal neurons in an organotypic hippocampal network. Moreover, at mature synapses, N-cadherin was required for the increase in release probability and miniature EPSC frequency induced by expressed neuroligin-1. This cooperation of two cell adhesion systems provides a mechanism for coupling bidirectional synapse maturation mediated by neuroligin-1 to cell type recognition processes mediated by classical cadherins. PMID:20534458

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor regulation of N-cadherin mediates vascular stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Ji-Hye; Skoura, Athanasia; Chae, Sung-Suk; Cowan, Ann E.; Han, David K.; Proia, Richard L.; Hla, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    Vascular stabilization, a process by which nascent vessels are invested with mural cells, is important in angiogenesis. Here we describe the molecular basis of vascular stabilization regulated by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a platelet-derived lipid mediator. S1P1 receptor-dependent cell-surface trafficking and activation of the cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin is essential for interactions between endothelial and mural cells. Endothelial cell S1P1/Gi/Rac pathway induces microtubule polymerization, resulting in trafficking of N-cadherin to polarized plasma membrane domains. S1P treatment modulated the phosphorylation of N-cadherin as well as p120-catenin and induced the formation of cadherin/catenin/actin complexes containing novel regulatory and trafficking factors. The net result of endothelial cell S1P1 receptor activation is the proper trafficking and strengthening of N-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion with mural cells. Perturbation of N-cadherin expression with small interfering RNA profoundly attenuated vascular stabilization in vitro and in vivo. S1P-induced trafficking and activation of N-cadherin provides a novel mechanism for the stabilization of nascent blood vessels by mural cells and may be exploited to control angiogenesis and vascular diseases. PMID:15371328

  15. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a

    PubMed Central

    Palange, Norberto J.; Jia, Ruirui; Ma, Jun; Bah, Fatoumata Binta; Sah, Rajiv Kumar; Li, Dan; Wang, Daji; Bah, Fatoumata Binta Maci; Togo, Jacques; Jin, Honghong; Ban, Luying; Feng, Xuechao; Zheng, Yaowu

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected (disco)-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles. PMID:26605542

  16. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqing; Mabwi, Humphrey A; Palange, Norberto J; Jia, Ruirui; Ma, Jun; Bah, Fatoumata Binta; Sah, Rajiv Kumar; Li, Dan; Wang, Daji; Bah, Fatoumata Binta Maci; Togo, Jacques; Jin, Honghong; Ban, Luying; Feng, Xuechao; Zheng, Yaowu

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected (disco)-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles. PMID:26605542

  17. Myosin X regulates neuronal radial migration through interacting with N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mingming; Guo, Ye; Ma, Jun; Yu, Huali; Zhao, Dongdong; Fan, Wenqiang; Ju, Xingda; Sheikh, Muhammad A.; Malik, Yousra S.; Xiong, Wencheng; Guo, Weixiang; Zhu, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    Proper brain function depends on correct neuronal migration during development, which is known to be regulated by cytoskeletal dynamics and cell-cell adhesion. Myosin X (Myo10), an uncharacteristic member of the myosin family, is an important regulator of cytoskeleton that modulates cell motilities in many different cellular contexts. We previously reported that Myo10 was required for neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex, but the underlying mechanism was still largely unknown. Here, we found that knockdown of Myo10 expression disturbed the adherence of migrating neurons to radial glial fibers through abolishing surface Neuronal cadherin (N-cadherin) expression, thereby impaired neuronal migration in the developmental cortex. Next, we found Myo10 interacted with N-cadherin cellular domain through its FERM domain. Furthermore, we found knockdown of Myo10 disrupted N-cadherin subcellular distribution and led to localization of N-cadherin into Golgi apparatus and endosomal sorting vesicle. Taking together, these results reveal a novel mechanism of Myo10 interacting with N-cadherin and regulating its cell-surface expression, which is required for neuronal adhesion and migration. PMID:26347613

  18. Cadherin-11 Induces Rheumatoid Arthritis Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes to Form Lining Layers in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, Hans P.; Lee, David M.; Agarwal, Sandeep K.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2006-01-01

    The synovial lining of diarthrodial joints is composed of a condensed network of synoviocytes that form an intact layer via cell-to-cell contacts with significant intercellular matrix spaces. However, the molecular basis for synovial lining formation and its structural integrity has not been previously defined. In this study, using a three-dimensional fibroblast-like synoviocyte in vitro organ culture system, we provide evidence that cadherin-11 expressed in fibroblast-like synoviocytes plays a determining role in establishing the synovial lining layer. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes that were grown in three-dimensional matrices demonstrated formation of a lining structure at the interface between the matrix and the fluid phase. Treatment of fibroblast-like synoviocyte organ cultures with a cadherin-11-Fc fusion protein efficiently abrogated lining layer organization. Moreover, because E-cadherin-expressing fibroblasts failed to organize a lining layer structure at the tissue boundary, this effect appears to be a distinct characteristic of fibroblasts expressing cadherin-11. We found that cadherin-11 mediated fibroblast-like synoviocyte cell-to-cell adhesion via formation of adherens junctions that were linked to and remodeled the actin cytoskeleton. Together, these studies implicate cadherin-11 in synovial tissue and lining layer formation and provide an in vitro system to model fibroblast-like synoviocyte behavior and function in organizing the synovial tissue. PMID:16651616

  19. Correlation between methylation of the E-Cadherin gene and malignancy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Q; Zhang, G Q; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignant tumor in males with an unclear pathogenic mechanism. As one epigenetic regulation mechanism, DNA methylation of the whole genome and specific gene(s) plays critical roles in pathogenesis, progression, diagnosis, and treatment of prostate cancer. The E-Cadherin gene is involved in cell metabolism and has been suggested to be related with malignancy of multiple tumors. This study investigated the correlation between E-Cadherin methylation and malignancy of prostate cancer. Gradient concentrations of 5-Aza-CdR (5, 10, and 20 mM) were used to treat the prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP), and mRNA level of E-Cadherin was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A total of 82 prostate cancer patients were recruited to detect the methylation status of the promoter region of the E-Cadherin gene by pyrophosphate sequencing. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was employed to determine mRNA levels of E-Cadherin. Methylation and mRNA levels of E-Cadherin were analyzed by the SPSS software. With elevated concentrations of 5-Aza-CdR, mRNA levels of E-Cadherin gradually increased. DNA methylation levels of tumor tissues were significantly elevated with increased Gleason score (P < 0.05) and tumor-node-metastasis stage (P < 0.05) but were not related to age, smoking habits, or alcohol consumption (P > 0.05). DNA methylation level was negatively correlated with mRNA expression of the E-Cadherin gene. Methylation in tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in tumor adjacent tissues (P < 0.05). DNA methylation level of the E-Cadherin gene could be an important predictive index for malignancy of prostate cancer. PMID:27420993

  20. On Expression Patterns and Developmental Origin of Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Lior; Chechik, Gal

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical substructures of the human brain have characteristic cell-types, connectivity and local circuitry, which are reflected in area-specific transcriptome signatures, but the principles governing area-specific transcription and their relation to brain development are still being studied. In adult rodents, areal transcriptome patterns agree with the embryonic origin of brain regions, but the processes and genes that preserve an embryonic signature in regional expression profiles were not quantified. Furthermore, it is not clear how embryonic-origin signatures of adult-brain expression interplay with changes in expression patterns during development. Here we first quantify which genes have regional expression-patterns related to the developmental origin of brain regions, using genome-wide mRNA expression from post-mortem adult human brains. We find that almost all human genes (92%) exhibit an expression pattern that agrees with developmental brain-region ontology, but that this agreement changes at multiple phases during development. Agreement is particularly strong in neuron-specific genes, but also in genes that are not spatially correlated with neuron-specific or glia-specific markers. Surprisingly, agreement is also stronger in early-evolved genes. We further find that pairs of similar genes having high agreement to developmental region ontology tend to be more strongly correlated or anti-correlated, and that the strength of spatial correlation changes more strongly in gene pairs with stronger embryonic signatures. These results suggest that transcription regulation of most genes in the adult human brain is spatially tuned in a way that changes through life, but in agreement with development-determined brain regions. PMID:27564987

  1. A polynomial time biclustering algorithm for finding approximate expression patterns in gene expression time series

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Sara C; Oliveira, Arlindo L

    2009-01-01

    Background The ability to monitor the change in expression patterns over time, and to observe the emergence of coherent temporal responses using gene expression time series, obtained from microarray experiments, is critical to advance our understanding of complex biological processes. In this context, biclustering algorithms have been recognized as an important tool for the discovery of local expression patterns, which are crucial to unravel potential regulatory mechanisms. Although most formulations of the biclustering problem are NP-hard, when working with time series expression data the interesting biclusters can be restricted to those with contiguous columns. This restriction leads to a tractable problem and enables the design of efficient biclustering algorithms able to identify all maximal contiguous column coherent biclusters. Methods In this work, we propose e-CCC-Biclustering, a biclustering algorithm that finds and reports all maximal contiguous column coherent biclusters with approximate expression patterns in time polynomial in the size of the time series gene expression matrix. This polynomial time complexity is achieved by manipulating a discretized version of the original matrix using efficient string processing techniques. We also propose extensions to deal with missing values, discover anticorrelated and scaled expression patterns, and different ways to compute the errors allowed in the expression patterns. We propose a scoring criterion combining the statistical significance of expression patterns with a similarity measure between overlapping biclusters. Results We present results in real data showing the effectiveness of e-CCC-Biclustering and its relevance in the discovery of regulatory modules describing the transcriptomic expression patterns occurring in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to heat stress. In particular, the results show the advantage of considering approximate patterns when compared to state of the art methods that require

  2. Evolving expression patterns of the homeotic gene Scr in insects.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Karla D; Hrycaj, Steven; Mahfooz, Najmus; Popadic, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    While the mRNA expression patterns of homeotic genes have been examined in numerous arthropod species, data on their protein accumulation is extremely limited. To address this gap, we analyzed the protein expression pattern of the hox gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) in six hemimetabolous insects from four divergent orders (Thysanura, Orthoptera, Dictyoptera and Hemiptera). Our comparative analysis reveals that the original domain of SCR expression was likely confined to the head and then subsequently moved into the prothorax (T1) in winged insect lineages. The data also show a trend toward the posteriorization of the anterior boundary of SCR expression in the head, which starts in the mandibles (Thysanura) and then gradually shifts to the maxillary (Orthoptera) and labial segments (Dictyoptera and Hemiptera), respectively. In Thermobia (firebrat) and Oncopeltus (milkweed bug) we also identify instances where SCR protein is not detected in regions where mRNA is expressed. This finding suggests the presence of a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism of Scr in these species. Finally, we show that SCR expression in insect T1 legs is highly variable and exhibits divergent patterning even among related species. In addition, signal in the prothoracic legs of more basal insect lineages cannot be associated with any T1 specific features, indicating that the acquisition of SCR in this region preceded any apparent gain of function. Overall, our results show that Scr expression has diverged considerably among hemimetabolous lineages and establish a framework for subsequent analyses to determine its role in the evolution of the insect head and prothorax. PMID:20336613

  3. Molecular Mechanics of Tip-Link Cadherins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2011-11-01

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is likely composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their complete molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects remain largely unknown. We present crystal structures of extracellular (EC) tip-link cadherin repeats involved in hereditary deafness and tip link formation. In addition, we show that the deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats EC1 and EC2 of cadherin-23, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca2+ affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tip-link cadherin repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca2+ or mutating Ca2+-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures and simulations also suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  4. VESPUCCI: Exploring Patterns of Gene Expression in Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Moretto, Marco; Sonego, Paolo; Pilati, Stefania; Malacarne, Giulia; Costantini, Laura; Grzeskowiak, Lukasz; Bagagli, Giorgia; Grando, Maria Stella; Moser, Claudio; Engelen, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale transcriptional studies aim to decipher the dynamic cellular responses to a stimulus, like different environmental conditions. In the era of high-throughput omics biology, the most used technologies for these purposes are microarray and RNA-Seq, whose data are usually required to be deposited in public repositories upon publication. Such repositories have the enormous potential to provide a comprehensive view of how different experimental conditions lead to expression changes, by comparing gene expression across all possible measured conditions. Unfortunately, this task is greatly impaired by differences among experimental platforms that make direct comparisons difficult. In this paper, we present the Vitis Expression Studies Platform Using COLOMBOS Compendia Instances (VESPUCCI), a gene expression compendium for grapevine which was built by adapting an approach originally developed for bacteria, and show how it can be used to investigate complex gene expression patterns. We integrated nearly all publicly available microarray and RNA-Seq expression data: 1608 gene expression samples from 10 different technological platforms. Each sample has been manually annotated using a controlled vocabulary developed ad hoc to ensure both human readability and computational tractability. Expression data in the compendium can be visually explored using several tools provided by the web interface or can be programmatically accessed using the REST interface. VESPUCCI is freely accessible at http://vespucci.colombos.fmach.it. PMID:27242836

  5. Mutations of the E-cadherin gene in human gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Risinger, J I; Berchuck, A; Kohler, M F; Boyd, J

    1994-05-01

    Expression of the E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule is reduced in several types of human carcinomas, and the protein serves as an invasion suppressor in vitro. To determine if mutations of the E-cadherin gene (on chromosome 16q22) contribute to epithelial tumorigenesis, 135 carcinomas of the endometrium and ovary were examined for alterations in the E-cadherin coding region. Four mutations were identified: one somatic nonsense and one somatic missense mutation, both with retention of the wild-type alleles, and two missense mutations with somatic loss of heterozygosity in the tumour tissue. These data support the classification of E-cadherin as a human tumour suppressor gene. PMID:8075649

  6. Cloning and characterization of the human invasion suppressor gene E-cadherin (CDH1)

    SciTech Connect

    Berx, G.; Staes, K.; Hengel, J. van

    1995-03-20

    E-cadherin is a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent epithelial cell-cell adhesion molecule. Downregulation of E-cadherin expression often correlates with strong invasive potential and poor prognosis of human carcinomas. By using recombinant {lambda} phage, cosmid, and P1 phage clones, we isolated the full-length human E-cadherin gene (CDH1). The gene spans a region of approximately 100 kb, and its location on chromosome 16q22.1 was confirmed by FISH analysis. Detailed restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis of the gene allowed us to identify 16 exons and a 65-kb-long intron 2. The intron-exon boundaries are highly conserved in comparison with other {open_quotes}classical cadherins.{close_quotes} In intron 1 we identified a high-density CpG island that may be implicated in transcription regulation during embryogenesis and malignancy. 52 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. E-cadherin interactome complexity and robustness resolved by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhenhuan; Neilson, Lisa J; Zhong, Hang; Murray, Paul S; Rao, Megha Vaman; Zanivan, Sara; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and signaling plays an essential role in development and maintenance of healthy epithelial tissues. Adhesiveness is conferred by cadherin extracellular domains, and is regulated by an assembly of adaptors and enzymes associated with the cytoplasmic tail. Here, we employed proximity biotinylation and quantitative proteomics to isolate and identify 612 proteins in the vicinity of E-cadherin’s cytoplasmic tail. We used a structure-informed database of protein-protein interactions to construct the most comprehensive E-cadherin interactome to date, containing 89 known E-cadhesome components and 346 novel proteins. Moreover, through cloning and expression of GFP-tagged fusion proteins we localized 26 of the novel proteins to adherens junctions. Finally, employing calcium depletion and myosin inhibition we show the E-cadherin interactome to be remarkably robust to perturbation and essentially independent of cell-cell junctions or actomyosin contractility. PMID:25468996

  8. Cadherin-Dependent Cell Morphology in an Epithelium: Constructing a Quantitative Dynamical Model

    PubMed Central

    Gemp, Ian M.; Carthew, Richard W.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2011-01-01

    Cells in the Drosophila retina have well-defined morphologies that are attained during tissue morphogenesis. We present a computer simulation of the epithelial tissue in which the global interfacial energy between cells is minimized. Experimental data for both normal cells and mutant cells either lacking or misexpressing the adhesion protein N-cadherin can be explained by a simple model incorporating salient features of morphogenesis that include the timing of N-cadherin expression in cells and its temporal relationship to the remodeling of cell-cell contacts. The simulations reproduce the geometries of wild-type and mutant cells, distinguish features of cadherin dynamics, and emphasize the importance of adhesion protein biogenesis and its timing with respect to cell remodeling. The simulations also indicate that N-cadherin protein is recycled from inactive interfaces to active interfaces, thereby modulating adhesion strengths between cells. PMID:21814505

  9. Cadherin-dependent cell morphology in an epithelium: constructing a quantitative dynamical model.

    PubMed

    Gemp, Ian M; Carthew, Richard W; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2011-07-01

    Cells in the Drosophila retina have well-defined morphologies that are attained during tissue morphogenesis. We present a computer simulation of the epithelial tissue in which the global interfacial energy between cells is minimized. Experimental data for both normal cells and mutant cells either lacking or misexpressing the adhesion protein N-cadherin can be explained by a simple model incorporating salient features of morphogenesis that include the timing of N-cadherin expression in cells and its temporal relationship to the remodeling of cell-cell contacts. The simulations reproduce the geometries of wild-type and mutant cells, distinguish features of cadherin dynamics, and emphasize the importance of adhesion protein biogenesis and its timing with respect to cell remodeling. The simulations also indicate that N-cadherin protein is recycled from inactive interfaces to active interfaces, thereby modulating adhesion strengths between cells. PMID:21814505

  10. Involvement of the MEK/ERK pathway in EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Etsu; Henmi, Shizuka; Odake, Hiroyuki; Ino, Seitaro; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-09-01

    E-cadherin is a major component of the epithelial adherens junction. However, the regulatory mechanism of E-cadherin expression is still poorly understood. In this study, we found that EGF decreased E-cadherin expression at both mRNA and protein levels in colorectal carcinoma LoVo cells. Since E-cadherin down-regulation is a well-known hallmark of the EMT (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition), we investigated whether EGF induced E-cadherin down-regulation during the EMT. EGF was unable to affect the expression of mesenchymal markers (such as N-cadherin, vimentin or fibronectin) or EMT-regulating transcription factors (such as SNAIL, SLUG, ZEB1, ZEB2 or TWIST), suggesting that EGF induced E-cadherin down-regulation via an EMT-independent mechanism. On the other hand, the MEK inhibitor U0126 was found to suppress EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation at the transcriptional level, suggesting that the MEK/ERK pathway is involved in EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation. Moreover, we also found that EGF disrupted cell-cell contact, stimulated cells to form an elongated shape with filamentous protrusions, and induced cell migration in LoVo cells. These effects were suppressed by U0126. Therefore, EGF is suggested to induce E-cadherin down-regulation at the transcriptional level through the MEK/ERK pathway, which might result in, at least in part, the induction of cellular morphological changes and cell migration in LoVo cells. PMID:27369075

  11. Comparison of melanoblast expression patterns identifies distinct classes of genes

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Stacie K.; Baxter, Laura L.; Buac, Kristina; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Larson, Denise M.; Pavan, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A full understanding of transcriptional regulation requires integration of information obtained from multiple experimental datasets. These include datasets annotating gene expression within the context of an entire organism under normal and genetically perturbed conditions. Here we describe an expression dataset annotating pigment cell-expressed genes of the developing melanocyte and RPE lineages. Expression images are annotated and available at http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/manuscripts/Loftus/March2009/. Data is also summarized in a standardized manner using a universal melanoblast scoring scale that accounts for the embryonic location of cells and regional cell density. This approach allowed us to classify 14 pigment genes into 4 groupings classified by cell lineage expression, temporal-spatial context, and differential alteration in response to altered MITF and SOX10 status. Significant differences in regional populations were also observed across inbred strain backgrounds highlighting the value of this approach to identify modifier allele influences on melanoblast number and distributions. This analysis revealed novel features of in vivo expression patterns that are not measurable by in vitro-based assays, providing data that in combination with genomic analyses will allow modeling of pigment cell gene expression in development and disease. PMID:19493314

  12. Identification of E-cadherin signature motifs functioning as cleavage sites for Helicobacter pylori HtrA.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas P; Perna, Anna M; Fugmann, Tim; Böhm, Manja; Jan Hiss; Haller, Sarah; Götz, Camilla; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Hoy, Benjamin; Rau, Tilman T; Neri, Dario; Backert, Steffen; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    The cell adhesion protein and tumour suppressor E-cadherin exhibits important functions in the prevention of gastric cancer. As a class-I carcinogen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has developed a unique strategy to interfere with E-cadherin functions. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that H. pylori secretes the protease high temperature requirement A (HtrA) which cleaves off the E-cadherin ectodomain (NTF) on epithelial cells. This opens cell-to-cell junctions, allowing bacterial transmigration across the polarised epithelium. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the HtrA-E-cadherin interaction and identified E-cadherin cleavage sites for HtrA. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and Edman degradation revealed three signature motifs containing the [VITA]-[VITA]-x-x-D-[DN] sequence pattern, which were preferentially cleaved by HtrA. Based on these sites, we developed a substrate-derived peptide inhibitor that selectively bound and inhibited HtrA, thereby blocking transmigration of H. pylori. The discovery of HtrA-targeted signature sites might further explain why we detected a stable 90 kDa NTF fragment during H. pylori infection, but also additional E-cadherin fragments ranging from 105 kDa to 48 kDa in in vitro cleavage experiments. In conclusion, HtrA targets E-cadherin signature sites that are accessible in in vitro reactions, but might be partially masked on epithelial cells through functional homophilic E-cadherin interactions. PMID:26983597

  13. Identification of E-cadherin signature motifs functioning as cleavage sites for Helicobacter pylori HtrA

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thomas P.; Perna, Anna M.; Fugmann, Tim; Böhm, Manja; Jan Hiss; Haller, Sarah; Götz, Camilla; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Hoy, Benjamin; Rau, Tilman T.; Neri, Dario; Backert, Steffen; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-01-01

    The cell adhesion protein and tumour suppressor E-cadherin exhibits important functions in the prevention of gastric cancer. As a class-I carcinogen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has developed a unique strategy to interfere with E-cadherin functions. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that H. pylori secretes the protease high temperature requirement A (HtrA) which cleaves off the E-cadherin ectodomain (NTF) on epithelial cells. This opens cell-to-cell junctions, allowing bacterial transmigration across the polarised epithelium. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the HtrA-E-cadherin interaction and identified E-cadherin cleavage sites for HtrA. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and Edman degradation revealed three signature motifs containing the [VITA]-[VITA]-x-x-D-[DN] sequence pattern, which were preferentially cleaved by HtrA. Based on these sites, we developed a substrate-derived peptide inhibitor that selectively bound and inhibited HtrA, thereby blocking transmigration of H. pylori. The discovery of HtrA-targeted signature sites might further explain why we detected a stable 90 kDa NTF fragment during H. pylori infection, but also additional E-cadherin fragments ranging from 105 kDa to 48 kDa in in vitro cleavage experiments. In conclusion, HtrA targets E-cadherin signature sites that are accessible in in vitro reactions, but might be partially masked on epithelial cells through functional homophilic E-cadherin interactions. PMID:26983597

  14. E-Cadherin loss associated with EMT promotes radioresistance in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Theys, Jan; Jutten, Barry; Habets, Roger; Paesmans, Kim; Groot, Arjan J.; Lambin, Philippe; Wouters, Brad G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid cancers and associated with metastases and treatment failure. During tumor progression epithelial cells often acquire mesenchymal features, a phenomenon known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Intratumoral hypoxia has been linked to EMT induction. We hypothesized that signals from the tumor microenvironment such as growth factors and tumor oxygenation collaborate to promote EMT and thereby contribute to radioresistance. Materials and methods Gene expression changes under hypoxia were analyzed using microarray and validated by qRT-PCR. Conversion of epithelial phenotype upon hypoxic exposure, TGFβ addition or oncogene activation was investigated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Cell survival following ionizing radiation was assayed using clonogenic survival. Results Upon hypoxia, TGFβ addition or EGFRvIII expression, MCF7, A549 and NMuMG epithelial cells acquired a spindle shape and lost cell–cell contacts. Expression of epithelial markers such as E-cadherin decreased, whereas mesenchymal markers such as vimentin and N-cadherin increased. Combining hypoxia with TGFβ or EGFRvIII expression, lead to more rapid and pronounced EMT-like phenotype. Interestingly, E-cadherin expression and the mesenchymal appearance were reversible upon reoxygenation. Mesenchymal conversion and E-cadherin loss were associated with radioresistance. Conclusions Our findings describe a mechanism by which the tumor microenvironment may contribute to tumor radioresistance via E-cadherin loss and EMT. PMID:21680037

  15. A method for analysis of gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Chalifour, L E; Fahmy, R; Holder, E L; Hutchinson, E W; Osterland, C K; Schipper, H M; Wang, E

    1994-02-01

    mRNA can be copied into cDNA with the use of reverse transcriptase so that the relative abundance of individual mRNAs is reflected in the cDNA product. With further manipulation a replica of the mRNA expression pattern can be duplicated into a radioactive double-stranded DNA probe. DNA from a series of genes inserted into plasmids can be fixed to a membrane using a slot blot manifold and probed with the RNA-derived DNA probe. The intensity of the hybridization signal for a given gene is a result of its relative abundance in the RNA-derived DNA probe. Quantitation can be achieved through the use of housekeeping genes as baseline monitors. Inclusion of vector sequences can negate any spurious hybridization to vector rather than insert sequences. We have successfully used this method to obtain gene expression patterns for RNA isolated from diverse sources including rodent tissues, various cell lines, and Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans samples. Northern blots have verified the results obtained. The pattern of expression of many genes can be determined from as little as 10 micrograms of total RNA, making this method ideally suited for studies in which RNA is rare or in short supply. PMID:7513971

  16. Transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin and oncoprotein E7 by valproic acid in HPV positive cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Faghihloo, Ebrahim; Akbari, Abolfazl; Adjaminezhad-Fard, Fatemeh; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Valproic acid (VPA) has proven to be as one of the most promising useful drug with anticancer properties. In this study, we investigate the VPA effects on E-cadherin expression in HeLa, TC1, MKN45, and HCT116 cell lines. This study assesses the effects of VPA on human papillomavirus E7 expression in HPV positive cell lines. Materials and Methods: Cell lines were treated by 2 mmol/l VPA and expression of E-cadherin and E7 was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Student’s t test and ANOVA were used to determine changes in expression levels. Results: The results revealed that mean of E-cadherin expression is increased by VPA 1.8 times in HCT116 and MKN45 cell lines, also the mean of E-cadherin mRNA levels is up-regulated 2.9 times in HeLa and TC1 cell lines. So, E-cadherin augmentation induced by VPA in HeLa and TC-1, HPV positive cell lines, is higher than HPV negative cell lines MKN45 and HCT116. The mean of HPV E7 expression is decreased by VPA, 4.6 times in in HeLa and TC-1 cell lines. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that re-expression of E-cadherin by VPA in HPV positive cell lines is more than HPV negative cell lines. Whereas, HPV E7 reduces the expression of E-cadherin, reduction of HPV E7 expression by VPA is related to more augmentation of E-cadherin in HPV positive cell lines. So, this study demonstrates that VPA has more anticancer properties in HPV positive cell lines, and could potentially be a promising candidate for cervical cancer treatment. PMID:27482340

  17. Localization of E-cadherin in peripheral glia after nerve injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M; Seto, A; Uchiyama, N; Kida, S; Yamashima, T; Yamashita, J

    1996-04-01

    Peripheral nerve injury results in histological and histochemical changes in neurons and glia. We have recently found that Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin plays an important role in the selective fasciculation of a particular subset of unmyelinated sensory fibers. In the present immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses, the temporal profile of the subcellular expression of this molecule in spinal nerves was examined after crushing, transecting, or ligaturing the sciatic nerve in mice with special attention paid to E-cadherin expression in glial cells. After axotomy of the sciatic nerve, distal axons of the proximal stump and the fibers of the distal stump degenerated, but E-cadherin was still detectable at the outer mesaxons of the myelinated axons as long as they remained morphologically intact. Subsequently, Schwann cells proliferated and migrated to form Schwann cell columns (Büngner's bands) as initial responses to denervation, and expressed E-cadherin at their site of contact with each other and later with sprouting axons. At the initial stage of myelin formation, slender processes of a single Schwann cell interdigitated with an enveloped axons, and expressed E-cadherin at the contact site elaborated by a single Schwann cell. Immunoblot analysis on day 7 revealed that E-cadherin was detected in both the proximal nerve segments and the regenerative distal segments, but was negative in the degenerative distal segments. On the basis of present data, it is suggested that E-cadherin might be involved in the stabilization of the peripheral glial network which provides the guidance of sprouting axons and myelination. PMID:8786402

  18. Rootstock effects on gene expression patterns in apple tree scions.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Philip J; Rytter, Jo; Detwiler, Elizabeth A; Travis, James W; McNellis, Timothy W

    2003-11-01

    Like many fruit trees, apple trees (Malus pumila) do not reproduce true-to-type from seed. Desirable cultivars are clonally propagated by grafting onto rootstocks that can alter the characteristics of the scion. For example, the M.7 EMLA rootstock is semi-dwarfing and reduces the susceptibility of the scion to Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease. In contrast, the M.9 T337 rootstock is dwarfing and does not alter fire blight susceptibility of the scion. This study represents a comprehensive comparison of gene expression patterns in scions of the 'Gala' apple cultivar grafted to either M.7 EMLA or M.9 T337. Expression was determined by cDNA-AFLP coupled with silver staining of the gels. Scions grafted to the M.9 T337 rootstock showed higher expression of a number of photosynthesis-related, transcription/translation-related, and cell division-related genes, while scions grafted to the M.7 EMLA rootstock showed increased stress-related gene expression. The observed differences in gene expression showed a remarkable correlation with physiological differences between the two graft combinations. The roles that the differentially expressed genes might play in tree stature, stress tolerance, photosynthetic activity, fire blight resistance, and other differences conferred by the two rootstocks are discussed. PMID:15010615

  19. Biclustering of linear patterns in gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qinghui; Ho, Christine; Jia, Yingmin; Li, Jingyi Jessica; Huang, Haiyan

    2012-06-01

    Identifying a bicluster, or submatrix of a gene expression dataset wherein the genes express similar behavior over the columns, is useful for discovering novel functional gene interactions. In this article, we introduce a new algorithm for finding biClusters with Linear Patterns (CLiP). Instead of solely maximizing Pearson correlation, we introduce a fitness function that also considers the correlation of complementary genes and conditions. This eliminates the need for a priori determination of the bicluster size. We employ both greedy search and the genetic algorithm in optimization, incorporating resampling for more robust discovery. When applied to both real and simulation datasets, our results show that CLiP is superior to existing methods. In analyzing RNA-seq fly and worm time-course data from modENCODE, we uncover a set of similarly expressed genes suggesting maternal dependence. Supplementary Material is available online (at www.liebertonline.com/cmb). PMID:22697238

  20. Gene expression patterns in glucose-stimulated podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seung Hyeok; Yang, Sanghwa; Jung, Dong Sub; Li, Jin Ji; Kim, Jin Ju; Kwak, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Ki; Moon, Sung Jin; Lee, Jung Eun; Han, Dae-Suk; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2008-06-06

    To explore the mechanisms of podocyte injury under diabetic conditions, we performed an expression profile in glucose-stimulated podocytes. Differential gene expression profiles between conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes cultured in medium containing 5.6 and 30 mM glucose were measured with oligonucleotide microarrays. Of the genes identified, heme oxygenase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, and thrombospondin-1 showed a consistently increased pattern, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 and peroxisomal proliferator activator receptor-{gamma} were down-regulated. These results were validated using real-time PCR and western blotting in podocytes, and with immunohistochemistry on renal tissues from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Not only is this the first report of gene expression profiling of podocyte injury under diabetic conditions, but the identified genes are promising targets for future diabetes research.

  1. Expression pattern of Protein Kinase C ϵ during mouse embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCϵ) belongs to the novel PKC subfamily, which consists of diacylglycerol dependent- and calcium independent-PKCs. Previous studies have shown that PKCϵ is important in different contexts, such as wound healing or cancer. In this study, we contribute to expand the knowledge on PKCϵ by reporting its expression pattern during murine midgestation using the LacZ reporter gene and immunostaining procedures. Results Sites showing highest PKCϵ expression were heart at ealier stages, and ganglia in older embryos. Other stained domains included somites, bone, stomach, kidney, and blood vessels. Conclusions The seemingly strong expression of PKCϵ in heart and ganglia shown in this study suggests a important role of this isoform in the vascular and nervous systems during mouse development. However, functional redundancy with other PKCs during midgestation within these domains and others reported here possibly exists since PKCϵ deficient mice do not display obvious embryonic developmental defects. PMID:23639204

  2. The midgut cadherin-like gene is not associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac in Plutella xylostella (L.).

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-03-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces Cry toxins that have been used to control important agricultural pests. Evolution of resistance in target pests threatens the effectiveness of these toxins when used either in sprayed biopesticides or in Bt transgenic crops. Although alterations of the midgut cadherin-like receptor can lead to Bt Cry toxin resistance in many insects, whether the cadherin gene is involved in Cry1Ac resistance of Plutella xylostella (L.) remains unclear. Here, we present experimental evidence that resistance to Cry1Ac or Bt var. kurstaki (Btk) in P. xylostella is not due to alterations of the cadherin gene. The bona fide P. xylostella cadherin cDNA sequence was cloned and analyzed, and comparisons of the cadherin cDNA sequence among susceptible and resistant P. xylostella strains confirmed that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of mutations in this gene. In addition, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that cadherin transcript levels did not significantly differ among susceptible and resistant P. xylostella strains. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated suppression of cadherin gene expression did not affect larval susceptibility to Cry1Ac toxin. Furthermore, genetic linkage assays using four cadherin gDNA allelic biomarkers confirmed that the cadherin gene is not linked to resistance against Cry1Ac in P. xylostella. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Cry1Ac resistance of P. xylostella is independent of the cadherin gene. PMID:25595643

  3. Intestine-specific transcription factor Cdx2 induces E-cadherin function by enhancing the trafficking of E-cadherin to the cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Funakoshi, Shinsuke; Kong, Jianping; Crissey, Mary Ann; Dang, Long; Dang, Duyen

    2010-01-01

    Cdx2 is an intestine-specific transcription factor required for normal intestinal epithelium development. Cdx2 regulates the expression of intestine-specific genes and induces cell adhesion and columnar morphogenesis. Cdx2 also has tumor-suppressor properties, including the reduction of colon cancer cell proliferation and cell invasion, the latter due to its effects on cell adhesion. E-cadherin is a cell adhesion protein required for adherens junction formation and the establishment of intestinal cell polarity. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which Cdx2 regulates E-cadherin function. Two colon cancer cell lines were identified in which Cdx2 expression was associated with increased cell-cell adhesion and diminished cell migration. In both cell lines, Cdx2 did not directly alter E-cadherin levels but increased its trafficking to the cell membrane compartment. Cdx2 enhanced this trafficking by altering receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity. Cdx2 expression diminished phosphorylated Abl and phosphorylated Rac levels, which are downstream effectors of RTKs. Specific chemical inhibition or short interfering RNA (shRNA) knockdown of c-Abl kinase phenocopied Cdx2's cell-cell adhesion effects. In Colo 205 cells, Cdx2 reduced PDGF receptor and IGF-I receptor activation. This was mediated by caveolin-1, which was induced by Cdx2. Targeted shRNA knockdown of caveolin-1 restored PDGF receptor and reversed E-cadherin membrane trafficking, despite Cdx2 expression. We conclude that Cdx2 regulates E-cadherin function indirectly by disrupting RTK activity and enhancing E-cadherin trafficking to the cell membrane compartment. This novel mechanism advances Cdx2's prodifferentiation and antitumor properties and suggests that Cdx2 may broadly regulate RTK activity in normal intestinal epithelium by modulating membrane trafficking of proteins. PMID:20671195

  4. N-cadherin Determines Individual Variations in the Therapeutic Efficacy of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rat Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Ju; Choi, Eue-Keun; Kang, Soo Kyoung; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Park, Ju Young; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, Keum-Hyun; Kwon, Jin Sook; Lee, Ki Hong; Ahn, Youngkeun; Lee, Ho-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Won Il; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we established and characterized human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) from four different donors. However, the hUCB-MSCs showed remarkable variations in their therapeutic efficacy for repairing rat infarcted myocardium (including the process of angiogenesis) 8 weeks after transplantation. In addition, we observed that the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is correlated with the therapeutic efficacy of the four hUCB-MSCs. Next, to investigate the practical application of hUCB-MSCs, we searched for surface signature molecules that could serve as indicators of therapeutic efficacy. The gene for N-cadherin was the only cell surface gene that was highly expressed in the most effective hUCB-MSCs, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. We observed downregulation and upregulation of VEGF in response to N-cadherin blocking and N-cadherin overexpression, respectively. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but not protein kinase B, was increased when N-cadherin expression was increased, whereas disruption of N-cadherin-mediated cell–cell contact induced suppression of ERK activation and led to VEGF downregulation. Moreover, by investigating hUCB-MSCs overexpressing N-cadherin or N-cadherin knockdown hUCB-MSCs, we confirmed the in vivo function of N-cadherin. In addition, we observed that DiI-labeled hUCB-MSCs express N-cadherin in the peri-infarct area and interact with cardiomyocytes. PMID:22068423

  5. Gene Expression Patterns in Bone Following Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    Mantila Roosa, Sara M; Liu, Yunlong; Turner, Charles H

    2011-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput measurements of gene expression and bioinformatics analysis methods offers new ways to study gene expression patterns. The primary goal of this study was to determine the time sequence for gene expression in a bone subjected to mechanical loading during key periods of the bone-formation process, including expression of matrix-related genes, the appearance of active osteoblasts, and bone desensitization. A standard model for bone loading was employed in which the right forelimb was loaded axially for 3 minutes per day, whereas the left forearm served as a nonloaded contralateral control. We evaluated loading-induced gene expression over a time course of 4 hours to 32 days after the first loading session. Six distinct time-dependent patterns of gene expression were identified over the time course and were categorized into three primary clusters: genes upregulated early in the time course, genes upregulated during matrix formation, and genes downregulated during matrix formation. Genes then were grouped based on function and/or signaling pathways. Many gene groups known to be important in loading-induced bone formation were identified within the clusters, including AP-1-related genes in the early-response cluster, matrix-related genes in the upregulated gene clusters, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway inhibitors in the downregulated gene clusters. Several novel gene groups were identified as well, including chemokine-related genes, which were upregulated early but downregulated later in the time course; solute carrier genes, which were both upregulated and downregulated; and muscle-related genes, which were primarily downregulated. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20658561

  6. Matrilysin (Matrix Metalloproteinase-7) Mediates E-Cadherin Ectodomain Shedding in Injured Lung Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, John K.; Li, Qinglang; Parks, William C.

    2003-01-01

    Matrilysin (matrix metalloproteinase-7) is highly expressed in lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis and other conditions associated with airway and alveolar injury. Although matrilysin is required for closure of epithelial wounds ex vivo, the mechanism of its action in repair is unknown. We demonstrate that matrilysin mediates shedding of E-cadherin ectodomain from injured lung epithelium both in vitro and in vivo. In alveolar-like epithelial cells, transfection of activated matrilysin resulted in shedding of E-cadherin and accelerated cell migration. In vivo, matrilysin co-localized with E-cadherin at the basolateral surfaces of migrating tracheal epithelium, and the reorganization of cell-cell junctions seen in wild-type injured tissue was absent in matrilysin-null samples. E-cadherin ectodomain was shed into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of bleomycin-injured wild-type mice, but was not shed in matrilysin-null mice. These findings identify E-cadherin as a novel substrate for matrilysin and indicate that shedding of E-cadherin ectodomain is required for epithelial repair. PMID:12759241

  7. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, L; Aguilar, L; Diaz, J; Diaz, N; Urra, H; Torres, V; Silva, V; Fitzpatrick, C; Lladser, A; Hoek, K.S.; Leyton, L; Quest, AFG

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis, and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10(cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10(E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10(cav1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity and cell migration observed with B16F10(cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  8. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Aguilar, Lorena; Diaz, Jorge; Diaz, Natalia; Urra, Hery; Torres, Vicente A; Silva, Veronica; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Lladser, Alvaro; Hoek, Keith S; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-07-01

    The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here, we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10 (cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10 (E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10 (cav-1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity, and cell migration observed with B16F10 (cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  9. Expression pattern of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yavropoulou, Maria P; Maladaki, Anna; Topouridou, Konstantina; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Poulios, Chris; Daskalaki, Emily; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Karkavelas, George; Yovos, John G

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of Wnt and Notch signaling in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas, but data are scarce regarding the role of Hedgehog signaling. In this study we investigated the differential expression of gene targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from adult patients who underwent transphenoidal resection and normal human pituitary tissues that were obtained from autopsies were used. Clinical information and data from pre-operative MRI scan (extracellular tumor extension, tumor size, displacement of the optic chiasm) were retrieved from the Hospital's database. We used a customized RT(2) Profiler PCR Array, to investigate the expression of genes related to Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways (PTCH1, PTCH2, GLI1, GLI3, NOTCH3, JAG1, HES1, and HIP). A total of 52 pituitary adenomas (32 non-functioning adenomas, 15 somatotropinomas and 5 prolactinomas) were used in the final analysis. In non-functioning pituitary adenomas there was a significant decrease (approximately 75%) in expression of all Hedgehog related genes that were tested, while Notch3 and Jagged-1 expression was found significantly increased, compared with normal pituitary tissue controls. In contrast, somatotropinomas demonstrated a significant increase in expression of all Hedgehog related genes and a decrease in the expression of Notch3 and Jagged-1. There was no significant difference in the expression of Hedgehog and Notch related genes between prolactinomas and healthy pituitary tissues. Hedgehog signalling appears to be activated in somatotropinomas but not in non-functioning pituitary adenomas in contrast to the expression pattern of Notch signalling pathway. PMID:26620835

  10. N-cadherin regulates primary motor axon growth and branching during zebrafish embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Brusés, Juan L

    2011-06-15

    N-cadherin is a classical type I cadherin that contributes to the formation of neural circuits by regulating growth cone migration and the formation of synaptic contacts. This study analyzed the role of N-cadherin in primary motor axons growth during development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. After exiting the spinal cord, primary motor axons migrate ventrally through a common pathway and form the first neuromuscular junction with the muscle pioneer cells located at the horizontal myoseptum, which serves as a choice point for cell-type-specific pathway selection. Analysis of N-cadherin mutants (cdh2(hi3644Tg) ) and embryos injected with N-cadherin antisense morpholinos showed primary motor axons extending aberrant axonal branches at the choice point in ∼40% of the somitic hemisegments and an ∼150% increase in the number of branches per axon length within the ventral myotome. Analysis of individual axons trajectories showed that the caudal (CaP) and rostral (RoP) motor neurons axons formed aberrant branches at the choice point that abnormally extended in the rostrocaudal axis and ventrally to the horizontal myoseptum. Expression of a dominant-interfering N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain in primary motor neurons caused some axons to stall abnormally at the horizontal myoseptum and to impair their migration into the ventral myotome. However, in N-cadherin-depleted embryos, the majority of primary motor axons innervated their appropriate myotomal territories, indicating that N-cadherin regulates motor axon growth and branching without severely affecting the mechanisms that control axonal target selection. PMID:21452216

  11. N-cadherin regulates primary motor axons growth and branching during zebrafish embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Brusés, Juan L

    2013-01-01

    N-cadherin is a classical type I cadherin that contributes to the formation of neural circuits by regulating growth cone migration and the formation of synaptic contacts. This study analyzed the role of N-cadherin in primary motor axons growth during development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. After exiting the spinal cord, primary motor axons migrate ventrally through a common pathway and form the first neuromuscular junction with the muscle pioneer cells located at the horizontal myoseptum, which serves as a choice point for cell-type specific pathway selection. Analysis of N-cadherin mutants (cdh2hi3644Tg) and embryos injected with N-cadherin antisense morpholinos showed primary motor axons extending aberrant axonal branches at the choice point in ~40% of the somitic hemisegments, and an ~150% increase in the number of branches per axon length within the ventral myotome. Analysis of individual axons trajectories showed that the caudal (CaP) and rostral (RoP) motor neurons axons formed aberrant branches at the choice point which abnormally extended in the rostrocaudal axis and ventrally to the horizontal myoseptum. Expression of a dominant-interfering N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain in primary motor neurons caused some axons to abnormally stall at the horizontal myoseptum and to impair their migration into the ventral myotome. However, in N-cadherin depleted embryos the majority of primary motor axons innervated their appropriate myotomal territories indicating that N-cadherin regulates motor axon growth and branching without severely affecting the mechanisms that control axonal target selection. PMID:21452216

  12. Mammalian cadherins DCHS1-FAT4 affect functional cerebral architecture.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Ocklenburg, Sebastian; von der Hagen, Maja; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2016-06-01

    Cortical development is a complex process where a multitude of factors, including cadherins, plays an important role and where disruptions are known to have far reaching effects in neural development and cortical patterning. Cadherins play a central role in structural left-right differentiation during brain and body development, but their effect on a functional level remains elusive. We addressed this question by examining functional cerebral asymmetries in a patient with Van Maldergem Syndrome (VMS) (MIM#601390), which is caused by mutations in DCHS1-FAT4 cadherins, using a dichotic listening task. Using neurophysiological (EEG) data, we show that when key regulators during mammalian cerebral cortical development are disrupted due to DCHS1-FAT4 mutations, functional cerebral asymmetries are stronger. Basic perceptual processing of biaurally presented auditory stimuli was unaffected. This suggests that the strength and emergence of functional cerebral asymmetries is a direct function of proliferation and differentiation of neuronal stem cells. Moreover, these results support the recent assumption that the molecular mechanisms establishing early left-right differentiation are an important factor in the ontogenesis of functional lateralization. PMID:25930014

  13. Epithelial DLD-1 Cells with Disrupted E-cadherin Gene Retain the Ability to Form Cell Junctions and Apico-basal Polarity.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Miwako; Fujimura, Kihito; Obata, Shuichi; Yanagibashi, Ryo; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Shintaro T

    2015-01-01

    Gene editing methods were applied to the study of E-cadherin function in epithelial cells. The E-cadherin gene in epithelial DLD-1 cells was ablated using TALEN. The resultant cells showed round fibroblast-like morphology and had almost no Ca(2+)-dependent cell aggregation activity. E-cadherin re-expression in the knockout cells restored epithelial cell morphology and strong Ca(2+)-dependent cell-cell adhesion activity, indicating that the knockout cells retained the ability to support cadherin function. The knockout cells showed partial localization of desmoplakin and ZO-1 at intercellular contact sites. The transfectants expressing mutant E-cadherin lacking the cytoplasmic domain showed clear localization of desmoplakin and ZO-1 at cell-cell contact sites, although the cells had only weak Ca(2+)-dependent cell adhesion activity. Electron microscopy revealed the formation of intercellular junctions and apico-basal polarity in these cells. A portion of these cells occasionally formed an epithelial-like structure after prolonged culture. When the cells were treated with blebbistatin, the localization was enhanced. However, the localization was incomplete and contained defects. Double-knockout MDCK cells for the E-cadherin and cadherin-6 genes showed similar results, suggesting that the above properties were general. The present results showed that an epithelial-like structure could be formed without E-cadherin, but that the construction of mature epithelia requires E-cadherin. PMID:26289297

  14. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (Ep-CAM) Modulates Cell–Cell Interactions Mediated by Classic Cadherins

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Sergey V.; Balzar, Maarten; Winter, Manon J.; Bakker, Hellen A.M.; Bruijn, Inge H. Briaire-de; Prins, Frans; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Warnaar, Sven O.

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of noncadherin-type, Ca2+-independent cell–cell adhesion molecules to the organization of epithelial tissues is, as yet, unclear. A homophilic, epithelial Ca2+-independent adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) is expressed in most epithelia, benign or malignant proliferative lesions, or during embryogenesis. Here we demonstrate that ectopic Ep-CAM, when expressed in cells interconnected by classic cadherins (E- or N-cadherin), induces segregation of the transfectants from the parental cell type in coaggregation assays and in cultured mixed aggregates, respectively. In the latter assay, Ep-CAM–positive transfectants behave like cells with a decreased strength of cell–cell adhesion as compared to the parental cells. Using transfectants with an inducible Ep-CAM–cDNA construct, we demonstrate that increasing expression of Ep-CAM in cadherin-positive cells leads to the gradual abrogation of adherens junctions. Overexpression of Ep-CAM has no influence on the total amount of cellular cadherin, but affects the interaction of cadherins with the cytoskeleton since a substantial decrease in the detergent-insoluble fraction of cadherin molecules was observed. Similarly, the detergent-insoluble fractions of α- and β-catenins decreased in cells overexpressing Ep-CAM. While the total β-catenin content remains unchanged, a reduction in total cellular α-catenin is observed as Ep-CAM expression increases. As the cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesions diminish, Ep-CAM–mediated intercellular connections become predominant. An adhesion-defective mutant of Ep-CAM lacking the cytoplasmic domain has no effect on the cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesions. The ability of Ep-CAM to modulate the cadherin-mediated cell–cell interactions, as demonstrated in the present study, suggests a role for this molecule in development of the proliferative, and probably malignant, phenotype of epithelial cells, since an increase of Ep-CAM expression was observed in vivo in

  15. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) modulates cell-cell interactions mediated by classic cadherins.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, S V; Balzar, M; Winter, M J; Bakker, H A; Briaire-de Bruijn, I H; Prins, F; Fleuren, G J; Warnaar, S O

    1997-12-01

    The contribution of noncadherin-type, Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion molecules to the organization of epithelial tissues is, as yet, unclear. A homophilic, epithelial Ca2+-independent adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) is expressed in most epithelia, benign or malignant proliferative lesions, or during embryogenesis. Here we demonstrate that ectopic Ep-CAM, when expressed in cells interconnected by classic cadherins (E- or N-cadherin), induces segregation of the transfectants from the parental cell type in coaggregation assays and in cultured mixed aggregates, respectively. In the latter assay, Ep-CAM-positive transfectants behave like cells with a decreased strength of cell-cell adhesion as compared to the parental cells. Using transfectants with an inducible Ep-CAM-cDNA construct, we demonstrate that increasing expression of Ep-CAM in cadherin-positive cells leads to the gradual abrogation of adherens junctions. Overexpression of Ep-CAM has no influence on the total amount of cellular cadherin, but affects the interaction of cadherins with the cytoskeleton since a substantial decrease in the detergent-insoluble fraction of cadherin molecules was observed. Similarly, the detergent-insoluble fractions of alpha- and beta-catenins decreased in cells overexpressing Ep-CAM. While the total beta-catenin content remains unchanged, a reduction in total cellular alpha-catenin is observed as Ep-CAM expression increases. As the cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions diminish, Ep-CAM-mediated intercellular connections become predominant. An adhesion-defective mutant of Ep-CAM lacking the cytoplasmic domain has no effect on the cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions. The ability of Ep-CAM to modulate the cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions, as demonstrated in the present study, suggests a role for this molecule in development of the proliferative, and probably malignant, phenotype of epithelial cells, since an increase of Ep-CAM expression was observed in vivo in association

  16. Suppression of E-cadherin Mediates Gallotannin Induced Apoptosis in Hep G2 Hepatocelluar Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Hee Young; Sohn, Eun Jung; Ko, Hyunsuk; Kim, Bogeun; Jung, Kwon; Lew, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Though gallotannin was known to have anti-oxidant and antitumor activity, the underlying antitumor mechanism of gallotannin still remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, antitumor mechanism of gallotannin was elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Gallotannin significantly exerted cytotoxicity against Hep G2 and Chang hepatocellular carcinoma cells with the accumulation of the sub-G1 population and increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferasedUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells as an apoptotic feature. Also, gallotannin attenuated the expression of pro-caspase9, pro-caspase3, Bcl2 and integrin β1 and cleaved poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) in Hep G2 and Chang cancer cells. Furthermore, gallotannin suppressed cell repair motility by wound healing assay and also inhibited cell adhesion in Hep G2 cells. Of note, gallotannin attenuated the expression of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) to form cell-cell adhesion from the early stage, and also beta-catenin at late phase in Hep G2 cells. Consistently, Immunofluorescence assay showed that E-cadherin or β-catenin expression was suppressed in a time dependent manner by gallotannin. Furthermore, silencing of E-cadherin by siRNA transfection method enhanced PAPR cleavage, caspase 3 activation and sub G1 population and attenuated the cell adhesion induced by gallotannin in Hep G2 cells. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the disruption of cell adhesion junction by suppression of E-cadherin mediates gallotannin enhanced apoptosis in Hep G2 liver cancer cells. PMID:24795530

  17. Expression patterns of loricrin in various species and tissues.

    PubMed

    Hohl, D; Ruf Olano, B; de Viragh, P A; Huber, M; Detrisac, C J; Schnyder, U W; Roop, D R

    1993-08-01

    In this study we analyzed the expression patterns of loricrin in various species and tissues using immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and Northern blots. Loricrin is a glycine-, serine- and cysteine-rich protein expressed very late in epidermal differentiation in the granular layers of normal mouse and human epidermis. Later on in differentiation, loricrin becomes crosslinked as a major component into the cornified cell envelope by the formation of N epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)lysine isopeptide bonds. This process either occurs directly or by the intermediate accumulation in L-keratohyaline granules of mouse epidermis and human acrosyringia. Loricrin was identified in all mammalian species analyzed by virtue of its highly conserved carboxy-terminal sequences revealing an electric mobility of approximately 60 kDa in rodents, rabbit and cow and of approximately 35 kDa in lamb and human on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Loricrin is expressed in the granular layer of all mammalian orthokeratinizing epithelia tested including oral, esophageal and fore-stomach mucosa of rodents, tracheal squamous metaplasia of vitamin A deficient hamster and estrogen induced squamous vaginal epithelium of ovary ectomized rats. Loricrin is also expressed in a few parakeratinizing epithelia such as BBN [N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine]-induced murine bladder carcinoma and a restricted subset of oral and single vaginal epithelial cells in higher mammals. Our results provide further evidence that the program of squamous differentiation in internal epithelia of the upper alimentary tract in rodents and higher mammals differ remarkably. In addition, we also have noted the distinct distribution patterns of human loricrin and involucrin, another major precursor protein of the cornified cell envelope. PMID:8405772

  18. Expression patterns of protein kinase D 3 during mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Ellwanger, Kornelia; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Lutz, Sylke; Hausser, Angelika

    2008-01-01

    Background The PKD family of serine/threonine kinases comprises a single member in Drosophila (dPKD), two isoforms in C. elegans (DKF-1 and 2) and three members, PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3 in mammals. PKD1 and PKD2 have been the focus of most studies up to date, which implicate these enzymes in very diverse cellular functions, including Golgi organization and plasma membrane directed transport, immune responses, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Concerning PKD3, a role in the formation of vesicular transport carriers at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and in basal glucose transport has been inferred from in vitro studies. So far, however, the physiological functions of the kinase during development remain unknown. Results We have examined the expression pattern of PKD3 during the development of mouse embryos by immunohistochemistry. Using a PKD3 specific antibody we demonstrate that the kinase is differentially expressed during organogenesis. In the developing heart a strong PKD3 expression is constantly detected from E10 to E16.5. From E12.5 on PKD3 is increasingly expressed in neuronal as well as in the supporting connective tissue and in skeletal muscles. Conclusion The data presented support an important role for PKD3 during development of these tissues. PMID:18439271

  19. COUP-TFII controls amygdala patterning by regulating neuropilin expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ke; Rubenstein, John L R; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2012-05-01

    The development of the progenitor zones in the pallium, lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) and medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) in the subpallium has been well studied; however, so far the role of the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), a posterior subpallial domain, in telencephalon patterning remains poorly understood. COUP-TFII, an orphan nuclear receptor, is preferentially expressed in the CGE. We generated COUP-TFII mouse mutants, using Rx-Cre (RxCre;COUP-TFII(F/F)), to study its function in telencephalon development. In these mutants, we found severe defects in the formation of the amygdala complex, including the lateral (LA), basolateral (BLA) and basomedial (BMA) amygdala nuclei. Molecular analysis provided evidence that the migration of CGE-derived Pax6(+) cells failed to settle into the BMA nucleus, owing to reduced expression of neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) and Nrp2, two semaphorin receptors that regulate neuronal cell migration and axon guidance. Our ChIP assays revealed that Nrp1 and Nrp2 genes are the direct targets of COUP-TFII in the telencephalon in vivo. Furthermore, our results showed that the coordinated development between the CGE originated subpallial population (Pax6(+) cells) and pallial populations (Tbr1(+) and Lhx2(+) cells) was essential for patterning the amygdala assembly. Our study presented novel genetic evidence that the caudal ganglionic eminence, a distinct subpallial progenitor zone, contributes cells to the basal telencephalon, such as the BMA nucleus. PMID:22492355

  20. Reconstruction of gene co-expression network from microarray data using local expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological networks connect genes, gene products to one another. A network of co-regulated genes may form gene clusters that can encode proteins and take part in common biological processes. A gene co-expression network describes inter-relationships among genes. Existing techniques generally depend on proximity measures based on global similarity to draw the relationship between genes. It has been observed that expression profiles are sharing local similarity rather than global similarity. We propose an expression pattern based method called GeCON to extract Gene CO-expression Network from microarray data. Pair-wise supports are computed for each pair of genes based on changing tendencies and regulation patterns of the gene expression. Gene pairs showing negative or positive co-regulation under a given number of conditions are used to construct such gene co-expression network. We construct co-expression network with signed edges to reflect up- and down-regulation between pairs of genes. Most existing techniques do not emphasize computational efficiency. We exploit a fast correlogram matrix based technique for capturing the support of each gene pair to construct the network. Results We apply GeCON to both real and synthetic gene expression data. We compare our results using the DREAM (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods) Challenge data with three well known algorithms, viz., ARACNE, CLR and MRNET. Our method outperforms other algorithms based on in silico regulatory network reconstruction. Experimental results show that GeCON can extract functionally enriched network modules from real expression data. Conclusions In view of the results over several in-silico and real expression datasets, the proposed GeCON shows satisfactory performance in predicting co-expression network in a computationally inexpensive way. We further establish that a simple expression pattern matching is helpful in finding biologically relevant gene network. In

  1. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Controls Vascular Integrity by Regulating VE-Cadherin Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Anna E.; Timmerman, Ilse; Kovacevic, Igor; Hordijk, Peter L.; Adriaanse, Luc; Paatero, Ilkka; Belting, Heinz-Georg; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor, is expressed and secreted by endothelial cells. Patients with PAI-1 deficiency show a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis, which has been exclusively ascribed to the function of PAI-1 in down-regulating fibrinolysis. We tested the hypothesis that PAI-1 function plays a direct role in controlling vascular integrity and permeability by keeping endothelial cell-cell junctions intact. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized PAI-039, a specific small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, to investigate the role of PAI-1 in protecting endothelial integrity. In vivo inhibition of PAI-1 resulted in vascular leakage from intersegmental vessels and in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos. In addition PAI-1 inhibition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers leads to a marked decrease of transendothelial resistance and disrupted endothelial junctions. The total level of the endothelial junction regulator VE-cadherin was reduced, whereas surface VE-cadherin expression was unaltered. Moreover, PAI-1 inhibition reduced the shedding of VE-cadherin. Finally, we detected an accumulation of VE-cadherin at the Golgi apparatus. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that PAI-1 function is important for the maintenance of endothelial monolayer and vascular integrity by controlling VE-cadherin trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Our data further suggest that therapies using PAI-1 antagonists like PAI-039 ought to be used with caution to avoid disruption of the vessel wall. PMID:26714278

  2. p120 catenin: an essential regulator of cadherin stability, adhesion-induced signaling, and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Kourtidis, Antonis; Ngok, Siu P.; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.

    2016-01-01

    Summary p120 catenin is the better studied member of a subfamily of proteins that associate with the cadherin juxtamembrane domain to suppress cadherin endocytosis. p120 also recruits the minus ends of microtubules to the cadherin complex leading to junction maturation. In addition, p120 regulates the activity of Rho family GTPases through multiple interactions with Rho GEFs, GAPs, Rho GTPases, and their effectors. Nuclear signaling is affected by the interaction of p120 with Kaiso, which regulates Wnt-responsive genes, as well as transcriptional repression of methylated promoters. Multiple alternative spliced p120 isoforms and complex phosphorylation events affect these p120 functions. In cancer, reduced p120 expression correlates with reduced E-cadherin function and tumor progression. In contrast, in tumor cells that have lost E-cadherin expression p120 promotes cell invasion and anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, p120 is required for Src induced oncogenic transformation and provides a potential target for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:23481205

  3. Disruption of a Cadherin Gene Associated with Resistance to Cry1Ac δ-Endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis in Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinjun; Yu, Liangying; Wu, Yidong

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory strain (GY) of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) was established from surviving larvae collected from transgenic cotton expressing a Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki insecticidal protein (Bt cotton) in Gaoyang County, Hebei Province, People's Republic of China, in 2001. The GYBT strain was derived from the GY strain through 28 generations of selection with activated Cry1Ac delivered by diet surface contamination. When resistance to Cry1Ac in the GYBT strain increased to 564-fold after selection, we detected high levels of cross-resistance to Cry1Aa (103-fold) and Cry1Ab (>46-fold) in the GYBT strain with reference to those in the GY strain. The GYBT strain had a low level of cross-resistance to B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki formulation (Btk) (5-fold) and no cross-resistance to Cry2Aa (1.4-fold). Genetic analysis showed that Cry1Ac resistance in the GYBT strain was controlled by one autosomal and incompletely recessive gene. The cross-resistance pattern and inheritance mode suggest that the Cry1Ac resistance in the GYBT strain of H. armigera belongs to “mode 1,” the most common type of lepidopteran resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins. A cadherin gene was cloned and sequenced from both the GY and GYBT strains. Disruption of the cadherin gene by a premature stop codon was associated with a high level of Cry1Ac resistance in H. armigera. Tight linkage between Cry1Ac resistance and the cadherin locus was observed in a backcross analysis. Together with previous evidence found with Heliothis virescens and Pectinophora gossypiella, our results confirmed that the cadherin gene is a preferred target for developing DNA-based monitoring of B. thuringiensis resistance in field populations of lepidopteran pests. PMID:15691952

  4. Connexins, E-cadherin, Claudin-7 and β-catenin transiently form junctional nexuses during the post-natal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Dianati, Elham; Poiraud, Jérémy; Weber-Ouellette, Anne; Plante, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexins (Cxs) that allow direct communication between adjacent cells. Modulation of Cxs has been associated with abnormal development and function of the mammary gland and breast cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying their expression during normal mammary gland are not yet known. Cxs interact with components of tight and adherens junctions. Thus, we hypothesized that the expression levels of Cxs vary during mammary gland development and are regulated through stage-dependent interactions with members of the tight and adherens junctions. Our specific objectives were to: 1) determine the expression of Cxs and tight and adherens junction proteins throughout development and 2) characterize Cxs interactions with components of tight and adherens junctions. Murine mammary glands were sampled at various developmental stages (pre-pubescent to post-weaning). RT-qPCR and western-blot analyses demonstrated differential expression patterns for all gap (Cx43, Cx32, Cx26, Cx30), tight (Claudin-1, -3, -4, -7) and adherens (β-catenin, E- and P-cadherins) junctions throughout development. Interestingly, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated interactions between these different types of junctions. Cx30 interacted with Cx26 just at the late pregnancy stage. While Cx43 showed a persistent interaction with β-catenin from virginity to post-weaning, its interactions with E-cadherin and Claudin-7 were transient. Cx32 interacted with Cx26, E-cadherin and β-catenin during lactation. Immunofluorescence results confirmed the existence of a junctional nexus that remodeled during mammary gland development. Together, our results confirm that the expression levels of Cxs vary concomitantly and that Cxs form junctional nexuses with tight and adherens junctions, suggesting the existence of common regulatory pathways. PMID:27291930

  5. Depletion of E-Cadherin Disrupts Establishment but Not Maintenance of Cell Junctions in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.

    2007-01-01

    E-cadherin forms calcium-dependent homophilic intercellular adhesions between epithelial cells. These contacts regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, including the organization of intercellular tight junctions (TJs). To distinguish between the roles of E-cadherin in formation versus maintenance of junctions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were depleted of E-cadherin by RNA interference. Surprisingly, reducing E-cadherin expression had little effect on the protein levels or localization of adherens junction (AJ) or TJ markers. The cells underwent morphological changes, as the normally flat apical surface swelled into a dome. However, apical–basal polarity was not compromised, transmembrane resistance was normal, and zonula occludin protein 1 dynamics at the TJs were unchanged. Additionally, an E-cadherin/Cadherin-6 double knockdown also failed to disrupt established TJs, although β-catenin was lost from the cell cortex. Nevertheless, cells depleted of E-cadherin failed to properly reestablish cell polarity after junction disassembly. Recovery of cell–cell adhesion, transepithelial resistance, and the localization of TJ and AJ markers were all delayed. In contrast, depletion of α-catenin caused long-term disruption of junctions. These results indicate that E-cadherin and Cadherin-6 function as a scaffold for the construction of polarized structures, and they become largely dispensable in mature junctions, whereas α-catenin is essential for the maintenance of functional junctions. PMID:17093058

  6. RhoA-JNK Regulates the E-Cadherin Junctions of Human Gingival Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Kim, H J; Kim, H-M

    2016-03-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is unique with regard to its wide intercellular spaces and sparsely developed intercellular junctions. Thus, knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation of the intercellular junctions of the junctional epithelium may be essential to understand the pathophysiology of the JE. HOK-16B cells, a normal human gingival epithelial cell line, were used to identify the molecules involved in the regulation of the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions between human gingival epithelial cells. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) disrupted the intercellular junctions through the dissociation of E-cadherin. The role of JNK in the formation of these E-cadherin junctions was further confirmed by demonstrating that JNK inhibition induced the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions. The upstream signaling of JNK was also examined. Activation of the small GTPase RhoA disrupted the formation of E-cadherin junctions between HOK-16B cells, which was accompanied by JNK activation. Disruption of these intercellular junctions upon RhoA activation was prevented when JNK activity was inhibited. In contrast, RhoA inactivation led to HOK-16B cell aggregation and the formation of intercellular junctions, even under conditions in which the cellular junctions were naturally disrupted by growth on a strongly adhesive surface. Furthermore, the JE of mouse molars had high JNK activity associated with low E-cadherin expression, which was reversed in the other gingival epithelia, including the sulcular epithelium. Interestingly, JNK activity was increased in cells grown on a solid surface, where cells showed higher RhoA activity than those grown on soft surfaces. Together, these results indicate that the decreased formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions within the JE may be coupled to high JNK activity, which is activated by the upregulation of RhoA on solid tooth surfaces. PMID:26635280

  7. Neuroglobin Over Expressing Mice: Expression Pattern and Effect on Brain Ischemic Infarct Size

    PubMed Central

    Raida, Zindy; Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Nyengaard, Jens R.; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of death and severe disability, but effective treatments are limited. Neuroglobin, a neuronal heme-globin, has been advocated as a novel pharmacological target in combating stroke and neurodegenerative disorders based on cytoprotective properties. Using thoroughly validated antibodies and oligos, we give a detailed brain anatomical characterization of transgenic mice over expressing Neuroglobin. Moreover, using permanent middle artery occlusion the effect of elevated levels of Neuroglobin on ischemic damage was studied. Lastly, the impact of mouse strain genetic background on ischemic damage was investigated. Principal Findings A four to five fold increase in Neuroglobin mRNA and protein expression was seen in the brain of transgenic mice. A β-actin promoter was used to drive Neuroglobin over expression, but immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed over expression to be confined to primarily the cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and only in neurons. The level and expression pattern of endogenous Neuroglobin was unaffected by insertion of the over expressing Ngb transgene. Neuroglobin over expression resulted in a significant reduction in infarct volume 24 hours after ischemia. Immunohistochemistry showed no selective sparing of Neuroglobin expressing cells in the ischemic core or penumbra. A significant difference in infarct volume was found between mice of the same strain, but from different colonies. Significance In contrast to some previous reports, Neuroglobin over expression is not global but confined to a few well-defined brain regions, and only in neurons. This study confirms previous reports showing a correlation between reduced infarct volume and elevated Neuroglobin levels, but underlines the need to study the likely contribution from compensatory mechanisms to the phenotype following a genetic perturbation. We also stress, that care should be taken when comparing results where different mouse strains and

  8. Cortactin Is Required for N-cadherin Regulation of Kv1.5 Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lan; Yung, Aaron; Covarrubias, Manuel; Radice, Glenn L.

    2011-01-01

    The intercalated disc serves as an organizing center for various cell surface components at the termini of the cardiomyocyte, thus ensuring proper mechanoelectrical coupling throughout the myocardium. The cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, is an essential component of the intercalated disc. Cardiac-specific deletion of N-cadherin leads to abnormal electrical conduction and sudden arrhythmic death in mice. The mechanisms linking the loss of N-cadherin in the heart and spontaneous malignant ventricular arrhythmias are poorly understood. To investigate whether ion channel remodeling contributes to arrhythmogenesis in N-cadherin conditional knock-out (N-cad CKO) mice, cardiac myocyte excitability and voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv), as well as inwardly rectifying K+ channel remodeling, were investigated in N-cad CKO cardiomyocytes by whole cell patch clamp recordings. Action potential duration was prolonged in N-cad CKO ventricle myocytes compared with wild type. Relative to wild type, IK,slow density was significantly reduced consistent with decreased expression of Kv1.5 and Kv accessory protein, Kcne2, in the N-cad CKO myocytes. The decreased Kv1.5/Kcne2 expression correlated with disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and reduced cortactin at the sarcolemma. Biochemical experiments revealed that cortactin co-immunoprecipitates with Kv1.5. Finally, cortactin was required for N-cadherin-mediated enhancement of Kv1.5 channel activity in a heterologous expression system. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic link among the cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, the actin-binding scaffold protein, cortactin, and Kv channel remodeling in the heart. These data suggest that in addition to gap junction remodeling, aberrant Kv1.5 channel function contributes to the arrhythmogenic phenotype in N-cad CKO mice. PMID:21507952

  9. Spatial and temporal gene expression patterns occur during corm development.

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, L A; Carneiro, M; Neshich, D de C; de Paiva, G R

    1992-01-01

    We investigated gene expression patterns that occur during taro corm development. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified several different prevalent proteins that accumulate during corm development. Microsequencing studies indicated that some of these proteins are related to taste-modifying proteins, such as curculin and miraculin, and proteins found in other storage organs, such as sporamin and the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. A curculin-encoding cDNA clone, designated as TC1, was identified that corresponds to a highly prevalent 1-kb corm mRNA. The TC1 mRNA accumulates during corm development, is more prevalent in corm apical than basal regions, and is either absent, or present at low concentrations, in other vegetative organs such as the leaf and root. In situ hybridization experiments showed that the TC1 mRNA is highly concentrated in corm storage parenchyma cells and is absent, or present in reduced concentrations, in other corm cells and tissues. Our results show that corm development is associated with the differentiation of specialized cells and tissues, and that these differentiation events are coupled with the temporal and spatial expression of corm-specific genes. PMID:1467653

  10. Expression patterns and adaptive functional diversity of vertebrate myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Helbo, Signe; Weber, Roy E; Fago, Angela

    2013-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed a new round of research on one of the most studied proteins - myoglobin (Mb), the oxygen (O2) carrier of skeletal and heart muscle. Two major discoveries have stimulated research in this field: 1) that Mb has additional protecting functions, such as the regulation of in vivo levels of the signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) by scavenging and generating NO during normoxia and hypoxia, respectively; and 2) that Mb in vertebrates (particularly fish) is expressed as tissue-specific isoforms in other tissues than heart and skeletal muscle, such as vessel endothelium, liver and brain, as found in cyprinid fish. Furthermore, Mb has also been found to protect against oxidative stress after hypoxia and reoxygenation and to undergo allosteric, O2-linked S-nitrosation, as in rainbow trout. Overall, the emerging evidence, particularly from fish species, indicates that Mb fulfills a broader array of physiological functions in a wider range of different tissues than hitherto appreciated. This new knowledge helps to better understand how variations in Mb structure and function may correlate with differences in animals' lifestyles and hypoxia-tolerance. This review integrates old and new results on Mb expression patterns and functional properties amongst vertebrates and discusses how these may relate to adaptive variations in different species. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins. PMID:23388387

  11. Spatial and temporal gene expression patterns occur during corm development.

    PubMed

    de Castro, L A; Carneiro, M; Neshich, D de C; de Paiva, G R

    1992-12-01

    We investigated gene expression patterns that occur during taro corm development. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified several different prevalent proteins that accumulate during corm development. Microsequencing studies indicated that some of these proteins are related to taste-modifying proteins, such as curculin and miraculin, and proteins found in other storage organs, such as sporamin and the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. A curculin-encoding cDNA clone, designated as TC1, was identified that corresponds to a highly prevalent 1-kb corm mRNA. The TC1 mRNA accumulates during corm development, is more prevalent in corm apical than basal regions, and is either absent, or present at low concentrations, in other vegetative organs such as the leaf and root. In situ hybridization experiments showed that the TC1 mRNA is highly concentrated in corm storage parenchyma cells and is absent, or present in reduced concentrations, in other corm cells and tissues. Our results show that corm development is associated with the differentiation of specialized cells and tissues, and that these differentiation events are coupled with the temporal and spatial expression of corm-specific genes. PMID:1467653

  12. Expression patterns reveal niche diversification in a marine microbial assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Scott M; Sharma, Shalabh; Booth, Melissa; Moran, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Resolving the ecological niches of coexisting marine microbial taxa is challenging due to the high species richness of microbial communities and the apparent functional redundancy in bacterial genomes and metagenomes. Here, we generated over 11 million Illumina reads of protein-encoding transcripts collected from well-mixed southeastern US coastal waters to characterize gene expression patterns distinguishing the ecological roles of hundreds of microbial taxa sharing the same environment. The taxa with highest in situ growth rates (based on relative abundance of ribosomal protein transcripts) were typically not the greatest contributors to community transcription, suggesting strong top-down ecological control, and their diverse transcriptomes indicated roles as metabolic generalists. The taxa with low in situ growth rates typically had low diversity transcriptomes dominated by specialized metabolisms. By identifying protein-encoding genes with atypically high expression for their level of conservation, unique functional roles of community members emerged related to substrate use (such as complex carbohydrates, fatty acids, methanesulfonate, taurine, tartrate, ectoine), alternative energy-conservation strategies (proteorhodopsin, AAnP, V-type pyrophosphatases, sulfur oxidation, hydrogen oxidation) and mechanisms for negotiating a heterogeneous environment (flagellar motility, gliding motility, adhesion strategies). On average, the heterotrophic bacterioplankton dedicated 7% of their transcriptomes to obtaining energy by non-heterotrophic means. This deep sequencing of a coastal bacterioplankton transcriptome provides the most highly resolved view of bacterioplankton niche dimensions yet available, uncovering a spectrum of unrecognized ecological strategies. PMID:22931830

  13. Histone deacetylase expression patterns in developing murine optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in glial cell development and in disease states within multiple regions of the central nervous system. However, little is known about HDAC expression or function within the optic nerve. As a first step in understanding the role of HDACs in optic nerve, this study examines the spatio-temporal expression patterns of methylated histone 3 (K9), acetylated histone 3 (K18), and HDACs 1–6 and 8–11 in the developing murine optic nerve head. Results Using RT-qPCR, western blot and immunofluorescence, three stages were analyzed: embryonic day 16 (E16), when astrocyte precursors are found in the optic stalk, postnatal day 5 (P5), when immature astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are found throughout the optic nerve, and P30, when optic nerve astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are mature. Acetylated and methylated histone H3 immunoreactivity was co-localized in the nuclei of most SOX2 positive glia within the optic nerve head and adjacent optic nerve at all developmental stages. HDACs 1–11 were expressed in the optic nerve glial cells at all three stages of optic nerve development in the mouse, but showed temporal differences in overall levels and subcellular localization. HDACs 1 and 2 were predominantly nuclear throughout optic nerve development and glial cell maturation. HDACs 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11 were predominantly cytoplasmic, but showed nuclear localization in at least one stage of optic nerve development. HDACs 4, 9 and10 were predominantly cytoplasmic, with little to no nuclear expression at any time during the developmental stages examined. Conclusions Our results showing that HDACs 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, and 11 were each localized to the nuclei of SOX2 positive glia at some stages of optic nerve development and maturation and extend previous reports of HDAC expression in the aging optic nerve. These HDACs are candidates for further research to understand how chromatin remodeling through acetylation, deacetylation

  14. Expression analysis of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologues reveals evolutionary conservation of gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Donizetti, Aldo; Fiengo, Marcella; Iazzetti, Giovanni; del Gaudio, Rosanna; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Pariante, Paolo; Minucci, Sergio; Aniello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptides exert different functions in reproduction and neuroendocrine processes via interaction with two evolutionarily unrelated groups of receptors: RXFP1 and RXFP2 on one hand, RXFP3 and RXFP4 on the other hand. Evolution of receptor genes after splitting of tetrapods and teleost lineage led to a different retention rate between mammals and fish, with the latter having more gene copies compared to the former. In order to improve our knowledge on the evolution of the relaxin ligands/receptors system and have insights on their function in early stages of life, in the present paper we analyzed the expression pattern of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologue genes during embryonic development. In our analysis, we show that only two of the five genes are expressed during embryogenesis and that their transcripts are present in all the developmental stages. Spatial localization analysis of these transcripts revealed that the gene expression is restricted in specific territories starting from early pharyngula stage. Both genes are expressed in the brain but in different cell clusters and in extra-neural territories, one gene in the interrenal gland and the other in the pancreas. These two genes share expression territories with the homologue mammalian counterpart, highlighting a general conservation of gene expression regulatory processes and their putative function during evolution that are established early in vertebrate embryogenesis. PMID:25384467

  15. ADAM13 cleavage of cadherin-11 promotes CNC migration independently of the homophilic binding site.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Becker, Sarah F; Kashef, Jubin; Alfandari, Dominique

    2016-07-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile population of cells that is responsible for forming the face and jaw in all vertebrates and perturbing their migration can lead to craniofacial birth defects. Cell motility requires a dynamic modification of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. In the CNC, cleavage of the cell adhesion molecule cadherin-11 by ADAM13 is essential for cell migration. This cleavage generates a shed extracellular fragment of cadherin-11 (EC1-3) that possesses pro-migratory activity via an unknown mechanism. Cadherin-11 plays an important role in modulating contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) in the CNC to regulate directional cell migration. Here, we show that while the integral cadherin-11 requires the homophilic binding site to promote CNC migration in vivo, the EC1-3 fragment does not. In addition, we show that increased ADAM13 activity or expression of the EC1-3 fragment increases CNC invasiveness in vitro and blocks the repulsive CIL response in colliding cells. This activity requires the presence of an intact homophilic binding site on the EC1-3 suggesting that the cleavage fragment may function as a competitive inhibitor of cadherin-11 adhesion in CIL but not to promote cell migration in vivo. PMID:26206614

  16. The Cadherin Superfamily in Anopheles gambiae: a Comparative Study With Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Sérgio; Moita, Luís F.; Jacinto, António; Fernandes, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The cadherin superfamily is a diverse and multifunctional group of proteins with extensive representation across genomes of phylogenetically distant species that is involved in cell–cell communication and adhesion. The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an emerging model organism for the study of innate immunity and host–pathogen interactions, where the malaria parasite induces a profound rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton at critical stages of infection. We have used bioinformatics tools to retrieve present sequence knowledge about the complete repertoire of cadherins in A. gambiae and compared it to that of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In A. gambiae, we have identified 43 genes coding for cadherin extracellular domains that were re-annotated to 38 genes and represent an expansion of this gene family in comparison to other invertebrate organisms. The majority of Drosophila cadherins show a 1 : 1 Anopheles orthologue, but we have observed a remarkable expansion in some groups in A. gambiae, such as N-cadherins, that were recently shown to have a role in the olfactory system of the fruit fly. In vivo dsRNA silencing of overrepresented genes in A. gambiae and other genes showing expression at critical tissues for parasite infection will likely advance our understanding of the problems of host preference and host–pathogen interactions in this mosquito species. PMID:18629193

  17. ADAM13 cleavage of cadherin-11 promotes CNC migration independently of the homophilic binding site

    PubMed Central

    Kashef, Jubin; Alfandari, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile population of cells that is responsible for forming the face and jaw in all vertebrates and perturbing their migration can lead to craniofacial birth defects. Cell motility requires a dynamic modification of cell–cell and cell-matrix adhesion. In the CNC, cleavage of the cell adhesion molecule cadherin-11 by ADAM13 is essential for cell migration. This cleavage generates a shed extracellular fragment of cadherin-11 (EC1-3) that possesses pro-migratory activity via an unknown mechanism. Cadherin-11 plays an important role in modulating contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) in the CNC to regulate directional cell migration. Here, we show that while the integral cadherin-11 requires the homophilic binding site to promote CNC migration in vivo, the EC1-3 fragment does not. In addition, we show that increased ADAM13 activity or expression of the EC1-3 fragment increases CNC invasiveness in vitro and blocks the repulsive CIL response in colliding cells. This activity requires the presence of an intact homophilic binding site on the EC1-3 suggesting that the cleavage fragment may function as a competitive inhibitor of cadherin-11 adhesion in CIL but not to promote cell migration in vivo. PMID:26206614

  18. Adherens Junction and E-Cadherin complex regulation by epithelial polarity.

    PubMed

    Coopman, Peter; Djiane, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    E-Cadherin-based Adherens Junctions (AJs) are a defining feature of all epithelial sheets. Through the homophilic association of E-Cadherin molecules expressed on neighboring cells, they ensure intercellular adhesion amongst epithelial cells, and regulate many key aspects of epithelial biology. While their adhesive role requires these structures to remain stable, AJs are also extremely plastic. This plasticity allows for the adaptation of the cell to its changing environment: changes in neighbors after cell division, cell death, or cell movement, and changes in cell shape during differentiation. In this review we focus on the recent advances highlighting the critical role of the apico-basal polarity machinery, and in particular of the Par3/Bazooka scaffold, in the regulation and remodeling of AJs. We propose that by regulating key phosphorylation events on the core E-Cadherin complex components, Par3 and epithelial polarity promote meta-stable protein complexes governing the correct formation, localization, and functioning of AJ. PMID:27151512

  19. Soy Components Genistein and Lunasin Regulate E-Cadherin and Wnt Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of tumorigenesis. We previously showed by microarray gene profiling that dietary intake of soy-based AIN-93G diets altered components of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in rat mammary epithelial cells. To furth...

  20. Intramembrane binding of VE-cadherin to VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 assembles the endothelial mechanosensory complex

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Brian G.; Baeyens, Nicolas; Han, Jinah; Budatha, Madhusudhan; Ross, Tyler D.; Fang, Jennifer S.; Yun, Sanguk; Thomas, Jeon-Leon

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial responses to fluid shear stress are essential for vascular development and physiology, and determine the formation of atherosclerotic plaques at regions of disturbed flow. Previous work identified VE-cadherin as an essential component, along with PECAM-1 and VEGFR2, of a complex that mediates flow signaling. However, VE-cadherin’s precise role is poorly understood. We now show that the transmembrane domain of VE-cadherin mediates an essential adapter function by binding directly to the transmembrane domain of VEGFR2, as well as VEGFR3, which we now identify as another component of the junctional mechanosensory complex. VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 signal redundantly downstream of VE-cadherin. Furthermore, VEGFR3 expression is observed in the aortic endothelium, where it contributes to flow responses in vivo. In summary, this study identifies a novel adapter function for VE-cadherin mediated by transmembrane domain association with VEGFRs. PMID:25800053

  1. LINC00507 Is Specifically Expressed in the Primate Cortex and Has Age-Dependent Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Mills, James D; Ward, Melanie; Chen, Bei Jun; Iyer, Anand M; Aronica, Eleonora; Janitz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade, there has been an increase in the appreciation of the role of non-coding RNA in the development of organism phenotype. It is possible to divide the non-coding elements of the transcriptome into three categories: short non-coding RNAs, circular RNAs and long non-coding RNAs. Long non-coding RNAs are those transcripts that are greater than 200 nts in length and lack any significant open reading frames that produce proteins greater then 100 amino acids. Long intervening non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a subclass of long non-coding RNAs. In contrast to protein coding RNAs, lincRNAs are expressed in a more tissue- and species-specific manner. In particular, many lincRNAs are only conserved amongst higher primates. This coupled with the propensity of many lincRNAs to be expressed in the brain, suggests that they are in fact one of the major drivers of organism complexity. We analysed 39 lincRNAs that are expressed in the frontal cortex and identified LINC00507 as being expressed in a cortex-specific manner in non-human primates and humans. The expression patterns of LINC00507 appear to be age-dependent, suggesting it may be involved in brain development of higher primates. Moreover, the analysis of LINC00507 potential to bind ribosomes revealed that this previously identified non-coding transcript may harbour a micropeptide. PMID:27059230

  2. Interaction of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and depsipeptide on antineoplastic activity and activation of 14-3-3sigma, E-cadherin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 expression in human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Jacynthe; Shaker, Sepideh; Primeau, Mélanie; Hurtubise, Annie; Momparler, Richard L

    2003-03-01

    Genes that suppress tumorigenesis can be silenced by epigenetic events, such as aberrant DNA methylation and modification of chromatin structure. Inhibitors of DNA methylase and histone deacetylase (HDAC) can potentially reverse these events. The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antineoplastic activity of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA-CdR), a potent inhibitor of DNA methylase, in combination with depsipeptide (depsi), an inhibitor of HDAC, on human breast carcinoma cells. We observed a synergistic antineoplastic interaction between 5-AZA-CdR and depsi in their capacity to inhibit colony formation of Hs578T and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of this interaction, we investigated the effect of these drugs on the activation of the 14-3-3sigma, E-cadherin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) cancer-related genes, which were reported to be silenced by aberrant methylation in many breast tumor cell lines. 14-3-3sigma was reported to produce G cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. E-cadherin and TIMP3 function as suppressors of tumor metastasis. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the effect of the co-administration of 5-AZA-CdR and depsi on four breast carcinoma cell lines for the reactivation of these genes. We observed a synergistic activation of E-cadherin by the combination in Hs578T, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 tumor cells. For 14-3-3sigma, we demonstrated an additive to synergistic activation by the combination for Hs578T and MDA-MB-435 tumor cells, respectively. In the MCF-7 tumor cells, the drug combination produced a synergistic activation of TIMP3. The association between the synergistic antineoplastic activity and the synergistic activation of the target genes in this study suggests that the mechanism of anticancer activity of 5-AZA-CdR, in combination with depsi, is probably related to their enhanced activation of different types of tumor suppressor genes that have been

  3. Girdin-mediated interactions between cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton are required for epithelial morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Houssin, Elise; Tepass, Ulrich; Laprise, Patrick

    2015-05-15

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is fundamental for epithelial tissue morphogenesis, physiology and repair. E-cadherin is a core transmembrane constituent of the zonula adherens (ZA), a belt-like adherens junction located at the apicolateral border in epithelial cells. The anchorage of ZA components to cortical actin filaments strengthens cell-cell cohesion and allows for junction contractility, which shapes epithelial tissues during development. Here, we report that the cytoskeletal adaptor protein Girdin physically and functionally interacts with components of the cadherin-catenin complex during Drosophila embryogenesis. Fly Girdin is broadly expressed throughout embryonic development and enriched at the ZA in epithelial tissues. Girdin associates with the cytoskeleton and co-precipitates with the cadherin-catenin complex protein α-Catenin (α-Cat). Girdin mutations strongly enhance adhesion defects associated with reduced DE-cadherin (DE-Cad) expression. Moreover, the fraction of DE-Cad molecules associated with the cytoskeleton decreases in the absence of Girdin, thereby identifying Girdin as a positive regulator of adherens junction function. Girdin mutant embryos display isolated epithelial cell cysts and rupture of the ventral midline, consistent with defects in cell-cell cohesion. In addition, loss of Girdin impairs the collective migration of epithelial cells, resulting in dorsal closure defects. We propose that Girdin stabilizes epithelial cell adhesion and promotes morphogenesis by regulating the linkage of the cadherin-catenin complex to the cytoskeleton. PMID:25968313

  4. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    }E4, these kinases regulate one of the E1{sup ∧}E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. - Highlights: • E4 gene products have a modular structure, and are expressed from the E1{sup ∧}E4 spliced mRNA. • E4 proteins are modified during epithelial differentiation by phosphorylation and proteolysis. • The E4 proteins contribute to genome amplification-efficiency and virus synthesis. • E4 proteins are abundantly expressed and may facilitate efficient virus release and transmission. • High-risk E4 proteins are deposited as amyloid fibres and can be used as infection biomarkers.

  5. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding Clostridium paraputrificum chitinase ChiB and analysis of the functions of novel cadherin-like domains and a chitin-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, K; Karita, S; Kimura, T; Sakka, K; Ohmiya, K

    1997-01-01

    The Clostridium paraputrificum chiB gene, encoding chitinase B (ChiB), consists of an open reading frame of 2,493 nucleotides and encodes 831 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 90,020. The deduced ChiB is a modular enzyme composed of a family 18 catalytic domain responsible for chitinase activity, two reiterated domains of unknown function, and a chitin-binding domain (CBD). The reiterated domains are similar to the repeating units of cadherin proteins but not to fibronectin type III domains, and therefore they are referred to as cadherin-like domains. ChiB was purified from the periplasm fraction of Escherichia coli harboring the chiB gene. The molecular weight of the purified ChiB (87,000) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis, was in good agreement with the value (86,578) calculated from the deduced amino acid sequence excluding the signal peptide. ChiB was active toward chitin from crab shells, colloidal chitin, glycol chitin, and 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-N,N'-diacetylchitobioside [4-MU-(GlcNAc)2]. The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme were 6.0 and 45 degrees C, respectively. The Km and Vmax values for 4-MU-(GlcNAc)2 were estimated to be 6.3 microM and 46 micromol/min/mg, respectively. SDS-PAGE, zymogram, and Western blot analyses using antiserum raised against purified ChiB suggested that ChiB was one of the major chitinase species in the culture supernatant of C. paraputrificum. Deletion analysis showed clearly that the CBD of ChiB plays an important role in hydrolysis of native chitin but not processed chitin such as colloidal chitin. PMID:9393694

  6. Protein expression patterns of the yeast mating response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haiyu; Zhang, Rongfei; Shao, Bin; Wang, Xuan; Ouyang, Qi; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2016-06-13

    Microfluidics, in combination with time-lapse microscopy, is a transformative technology that significantly enhances our ability to monitor and probe biological processes in living cells. However, high-throughput microfluidic devices mostly require sophisticated preparatory and setup work and are thus hard to adopt by non-experts. In this work, we designed an easy-to-use microfluidic chip, which enables tracking of 48 GFP-tagged yeast strains, with each strain under two different stimulus conditions, in a single experiment. We used this technology to investigate the dynamic pattern of protein expression during the yeast mating differentiation response. High doses of pheromone induce cell cycle arrest and the shmoo morphology, whereas low doses of pheromone lead to elongation and chemotrophic growth. By systematically analyzing the protein dynamics of 156 pheromone-regulated genes, we identified groups of genes that are preferentially induced in response to low-dose pheromone (elongation during growth) or high-dose pheromone (shmoo formation and cell cycle arrest). The protein dynamics of these genes may provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the differentiation switch induced by different doses of pheromone. PMID:27177258

  7. Anatomic patterning in the expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.; McAllen, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes (VSR) is related to a nerve's anatomic location rather than its target organ, we compared VSR recorded from the same type of postganglionic fiber [muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC)] located at three different rostrocaudal levels: hindlimb, forelimb, and face. Experiments were performed on chloralose-anesthetized cats, and vestibular afferents were stimulated electrically. Single MVC unit activity was extracted by spike shape analysis of few-fiber recordings, and unit discrimination was confirmed by autocorrelation. Poststimulus time histogram analysis revealed that about half of the neurons were initially inhibited by vestibular stimulation (type 1 response), whereas the other MVC fibers were initially strongly excited (type 2 response). MVC units with types 1 and 2 responses were present in the same nerve fascicle. Barosensitivity was equivalent in the two groups, but fibers showing type 1 responses fired significantly faster than those giving type 2 responses (0.29 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.20 +/- 0.02 Hz). Nerve fibers with type 1 responses were most common in the hindlimb (21 of 29 units) and least common in the face (2 of 11 units), the difference in relative proportion being significant (P < 0.05, chi(2) test). These results support the hypothesis that VSR are anatomically patterned.

  8. Snail controls proliferation of Drosophila ovarian epithelial follicle stem cells, independently of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2016-06-15

    Epithelial stem cells undergo constant self-renewal and differentiation to maintain the homeostasis of epithelial tissues that undergo rapid turnover. Recent studies have shown that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is primarily mediated by Snail via the suppression of E-cadherin, is able to generate cells with stem cell properties. However, the role of Snail in epithelial stem cells remains unclear. Here, we report that Snail directly controls proliferation of follicle stem cells (FSCs) in Drosophila females. Disruption of Snail expression in FSCs compromises their proliferation, but not their maintenance. Conversely, FSCs with excessive Snail expression display increased proliferation and lifespan, which is accompanied by a moderate decrease in the expression of E-cadherin (required for adhesion of FSCs to their niche) at the junction between their adjacent cells, indicating a conserved role of Snail in E-cadherin inhibition, which promote epithelial cell proliferation. Interestingly, a decrease in E-cadherin in snail-knock down FSCs does not restore the decreased proliferation of snail-knock down FSCs, suggesting that adhesion strength of FSCs to their niche is dispensable for Snail-mediated FSC division. Our results demonstrate that Snail controls epithelial stem cell division independently of its known role in the EMT, which contributes to induction of cancer stem cells. PMID:27141871

  9. Ph+/VE-cadherin+ identifies a stem cell like population of acute lymphoblastic leukemia sustained by bone marrow niche cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; O'Leary, Heather; Fortney, James; Gibson, Laura F

    2007-11-01

    Although leukemic stem cells (LSCs) show a symbiotic relationship with bone marrow microenvironmental niches, the mechanism by which the marrow microenvironment contributes to self-renewal and proliferation of LSCs remains elusive. In the present study, we identified a unique subpopulation of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells coexpressing markers of endothelial cells (including VE-cadherin, PECAM-1, and Flk-1) and committed B-lineage progenitors. After long-term coculture with bone marrow stromal cells, tumor cells formed hematopoietic colonies and cords, expressed early stem- cell markers, and showed endothelial sprouting. Gene expression profiles of LSCs were altered in the presence of stromal cell contact. Stromal cell contact promoted leukemic cell VE-cadherin expression, stabilized beta-catenin, and up-regulated Bcr-abl fusion gene expression. Our study indicates that these specific tumor cells are uniquely positioned to respond to microenvironment-derived self-renewing and proliferative cues. Ph(+)/VE-cadherin(+) tumor subpopulation circumvents the requirement of exogenous Wnt signaling for self-renewal through stromal cell support of leukemic cell VE-cadherin expression and up-regulated Bcr-abl tyrosine kinase activity. These data suggest that strategies targeting signals in the marrow microenvironment that amplify the Bcr-abl/VE-cadherin/beta-catenin axis may have utility in sensitizing drug-resistant leukemic stem cells. PMID:17638851

  10. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  11. p120 Catenin-Mediated Stabilization of E-Cadherin Is Essential for Primitive Endoderm Specification

    PubMed Central

    Haenebalcke, Lieven; Stryjewska, Agata; De Rycke, Riet; Lemeire, Kelly; Huylebroeck, Danny; Stemmler, Marc P.; Wirth, Dagmar; Haigh, Jody J.; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is critical for naive pluripotency of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). E-cadherin-depleted mESC fail to downregulate their pluripotency program and are unable to initiate lineage commitment. To further explore the roles of cell adhesion molecules during mESC differentiation, we focused on p120 catenin (p120ctn). Although one key function of p120ctn is to stabilize and regulate cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, it has many additional functions, including regulation of transcription and Rho GTPase activity. Here, we investigated the role of mouse p120ctn in early embryogenesis, mESC pluripotency and early fate determination. In contrast to the E-cadherin-null phenotype, p120ctn-null mESCs remained pluripotent, but their in vitro differentiation was incomplete. In particular, they failed to form cystic embryoid bodies and showed defects in primitive endoderm formation. To pinpoint the underlying mechanism, we undertook a structure-function approach. Rescue of p120ctn-null mESCs with different p120ctn wild-type and mutant expression constructs revealed that the long N-terminal domain of p120ctn and its regulatory domain for RhoA were dispensable, whereas its armadillo domain and interaction with E-cadherin were crucial for primitive endoderm formation. We conclude that p120ctn is not only an adaptor and regulator of E-cadherin, but is also indispensable for proper lineage commitment. PMID:27556156

  12. p120 Catenin-Mediated Stabilization of E-Cadherin Is Essential for Primitive Endoderm Specification.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Tim; Goossens, Steven; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Andries, Vanessa; Stryjewska, Agata; De Rycke, Riet; Lemeire, Kelly; Hochepied, Tino; Huylebroeck, Danny; Berx, Geert; Stemmler, Marc P; Wirth, Dagmar; Haigh, Jody J; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2016-08-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is critical for naive pluripotency of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). E-cadherin-depleted mESC fail to downregulate their pluripotency program and are unable to initiate lineage commitment. To further explore the roles of cell adhesion molecules during mESC differentiation, we focused on p120 catenin (p120ctn). Although one key function of p120ctn is to stabilize and regulate cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, it has many additional functions, including regulation of transcription and Rho GTPase activity. Here, we investigated the role of mouse p120ctn in early embryogenesis, mESC pluripotency and early fate determination. In contrast to the E-cadherin-null phenotype, p120ctn-null mESCs remained pluripotent, but their in vitro differentiation was incomplete. In particular, they failed to form cystic embryoid bodies and showed defects in primitive endoderm formation. To pinpoint the underlying mechanism, we undertook a structure-function approach. Rescue of p120ctn-null mESCs with different p120ctn wild-type and mutant expression constructs revealed that the long N-terminal domain of p120ctn and its regulatory domain for RhoA were dispensable, whereas its armadillo domain and interaction with E-cadherin were crucial for primitive endoderm formation. We conclude that p120ctn is not only an adaptor and regulator of E-cadherin, but is also indispensable for proper lineage commitment. PMID:27556156

  13. ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells through upregulation of E-cadherin in a Id1-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan; Ming, Jia; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • Expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin in breast cancer cell. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. - Abstract: ERβ1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. It plays an important role in regulating the progression of breast cancer. However, the mechanisms of ERβ1 in tumorigenesis, metastasis and prognosis are still not fully clear. In this study, we showed that the expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. In addition, we found that ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we also found that ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and upregulated E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. Taken together, our study provides further understanding of the molecular mechanism of ERβ1 in tumor metastasis and suggests the feasibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches to target Id1 to inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

  14. Evidence for Post-Translational Processing of Vascular Endothelial (VE)-Cadherin in Brain Tumors: Towards a Candidate Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Vilgrain, Isabelle; Sidibé, Adama; Polena, Helena; Cand, Francine; Mannic, Tiphaine; Arboleas, Mélanie; Boccard, Sandra; Baudet, Antoine; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle; Bouillet, Laurence; Quesada, Jean-Louis; Mendoza, Christophe; Lebas, Jean-François; Pelletier, Laurent; Berger, François

    2013-01-01

    Vessel abnormalities are among the most important features in malignant glioma. Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is of major importance for vascular integrity. Upon cytokine challenge, VE-cadherin structural modifications have been described including tyrosine phosphorylation and cleavage. The goal of this study was to examine whether these events occurred in human glioma vessels. We demonstrated that VE-cadherin is highly expressed in human glioma tissue and tyrosine phosphorylated at site Y685, a site previously found phosphorylated upon VEGF challenge, via Src activation. In vitro experiments showed that VEGF-induced VE-cadherin phosphorylation, preceded the cleavage of its extracellular adhesive domain (sVE, 90 kDa). Interestingly, metalloproteases (MMPs) secreted by glioma cell lines were responsible for sVE release. Because VEGF and MMPs are important components of tumor microenvironment, we hypothesized that VE-cadherin proteolysis might occur in human brain tumors. Analysis of glioma patient sera prior treatment confirmed the presence of sVE in bloodstream. Furthermore, sVE levels studied in a cohort of 53 glioma patients were significantly predictive of the overall survival at three years (HR 0.13 [0.04; 0.40] p≤0.001), irrespective to histopathological grade of tumors. Altogether, these results suggest that VE-cadherin structural modifications should be examined as candidate biomarkers of tumor vessel abnormalities, with promising applications in oncology. PMID:24358106

  15. Restraining FOXO3-dependent transcriptional BMF activation underpins tumour growth and metastasis of E-cadherin-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hornsveld, M; Tenhagen, M; van de Ven, R A; Smits, A M M; van Triest, M H; van Amersfoort, M; Kloet, D E A; Dansen, T B; Burgering, B M; Derksen, P W B

    2016-09-01

    Loss of cellular adhesion leads to the progression of breast cancer through acquisition of anchorage independence, also known as resistance to anoikis. Although inactivation of E-cadherin is essential for acquisition of anoikis resistance, it has remained unclear how metastatic breast cancer cells counterbalance the induction of apoptosis without E-cadherin-dependent cellular adhesion. We report here that E-cadherin inactivation in breast cancer cells induces PI3K/AKT-dependent FOXO3 inhibition and identify FOXO3 as a novel and direct transcriptional activator of the pro-apoptotic protein BMF. As a result, E-cadherin-negative breast fail to upregulate BMF upon transfer to anchorage independence, leading to anoikis resistance. Conversely, expression of BMF in E-cadherin-negative metastatic breast cancer cells is sufficient to inhibit tumour growth and dissemination in mice. In conclusion, we have identified repression of BMF as a major cue that underpins anoikis resistance and tumour dissemination in E-cadherin-deficient metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27035620

  16. The atypical cadherin Celsr3 regulates the development of the axonal blueprint.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libing; Tissir, Fadel; Goffinet, André M

    2007-01-01

    Celsr3, the murine orthologue of Drosophila Flamingo/Starry night, is a brain-specific, atypical sevenpass cadherin that plays a key role during brain development. Celsr3 mutant mice die at birth of central hypoventilation. They have major anomalies of major tracts, particularly absence of anterior commissure and of all components of the internal capsule. In addition, the medial lemniscus and several longitudinal bundles in the brainstem and spinal cord are defective. This phenotype is similar to that generated by inactivation of Frizzled3 (Fzd3). As both Flamingo and Frizzled are two core planar cell polarity (PCP) genes in flies, our results indicate that Celsr3 and Fzd3 are part of a genetic network with similarity to the PCP network. We studied by in situ hybridization the expression patterns of other murine PCP genes Dyl1-3, Vangl1,2 and Prickle1,2. Together with data from the literature, results suggest a mechanism whereby Celsr1-3, Fzd3 and 6, and Vangl2 may interact to control neural tube closure and axonal development. In order to study this mechanism further, we generated a conditional Celsr3 mutant mouse that allows inactivation of Celsr3 in the forebrain and cerebral cortex, by crossing with mice that express Cre under the Foxg1 and Emx1 promoters, respectively. PMID:18494256

  17. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of anterior Hox genes during Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Lyon, R Stewart; Davis, Adam; Scemama, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that function to pattern regional tissue identities along the anterior-posterior axis during animal embryonic development. Divergent nested Hox gene expression patterns within the posterior pharyngeal arches may play an important role in patterning morphological variation in the pharyngeal jaw apparatus (PJA) between evolutionarily divergent teleost fishes. Recent gene expression studies have shown the expression patterns from all Hox paralog group (PG) 2-6 genes in the posterior pharyngeal arches (PAs) for the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and from most genes of these PGs for the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). While several orthologous Hox genes exhibit divergent spatial and temporal expression patterns between these two teleost species in the posterior PAs, several tilapia Hox gene expression patterns from PG3-6 must be documented for a full comparative study. Here we present the spatio-temporal expression patterns of hoxb3b, c3a, b4a, a5a, b5a, b5b, b6a and b6b in the neural tube and posterior PAs of the Nile tilapia. We show that several of these tilapia Hox genes exhibit divergent expression patterns in the posterior PAs from their medaka orthologs. We also compare these gene expression patterns to orthologs in other gnathostome vertebrates, including the dogfish shark. PMID:23376031

  18. Deletion of the E-cadherin gene in hepatitis B virus-positive Chinese hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Slagle, B L; Zhou, Y Z; Birchmeier, W; Scorsone, K A

    1993-10-01

    Frequent allele loss from chromosome 16q was recently described for human tumors of the breast, prostate gland and liver, indicating the possible presence of a tumor-suppressor gene on that chromosome arm. In this study, the chromosome 16 allele status of 38 hepatocellular carcinomas in Chinese patients was determined with restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis. Tumor-specific allele loss was detected in 14 (74%) of 19 patients informative for 16p markers and in 22 (85%) of 26 patients informative for 16q markers. Quantitative densitometric analysis revealed reduction to hemizygosity of the E-cadherin cell adhesion gene (localized to 16q22.1) in 18 (64%) of the 28 patients for whom quantitative data were available. Reduced expression of E-cadherin has been associated with invasion and metastasis in several human cell lines and primary tumors, and our results suggest that one mechanism of reduced E-cadherin expression is the loss of one copy of the E-cadherin gene. PMID:8104855

  19. A digital atlas of ion channel expression patterns in the two-week-old rat brain.

    PubMed

    Shcherbatyy, Volodymyr; Carson, James; Yaylaoglu, Murat; Jäckle, Katharina; Grabbe, Frauke; Brockmeyer, Maren; Yavuz, Halenur; Eichele, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The approximately 350 ion channels encoded by the mammalian genome are a main pillar of the nervous system. We have determined the expression pattern of 320 channels in the two-week-old (P14) rat brain by means of non-radioactive robotic in situ hybridization. Optimized methods were developed and implemented to generate stringently coronal brain sections. The use of standardized methods permits a direct comparison of expression patterns across the entire ion channel expression pattern data set and facilitates recognizing ion channel co-expression. All expression data are made publically available at the Genepaint.org database. Inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir, encoded by the Kcnj genes) regulate a broad spectrum of physiological processes. Kcnj channel expression patterns generated in the present study were fitted with a deformable subdivision mesh atlas produced for the P14 rat brain. This co-registration, when combined with numerical quantification of expression strengths, allowed for semi-quantitative automated annotation of expression patterns as well as comparisons among and between Kcnj subfamilies. The expression patterns of Kcnj channel were also cross validated against previously published expression patterns of Kcnj channel genes. PMID:25284011

  20. The P2Y2 Receptor Interacts with VE-Cadherin and VEGF Receptor-2 to Regulate Rac1 Activity in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhongji; Cao, Chen; Wang, Jianjie; Huxley, Virginia H.; Baker, Olga; Weisman, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) mediates homophylic adhesion between endothelial cells and is an important regulator of angiogenesis, blood vessel permeability and leukocyte trafficking. Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, controls VE-cadherin adhesion by acting downstream of several growth factors, including angiopoietin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Here we show that UTP-induced activation of the Gq protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) activated Rac1 and caused a transient complex to form between P2Y2R, VE-cadherin and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Knockdown of VE-cadherin expression with siRNA did not affect UTP-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) but led to a loss of UTP-induced Rac1 activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin, a cytoplasmic protein known to interact with VE-cadherin. Activation of the P2Y2R by UTP also caused a prolonged interaction between p120 catenin and vav2 (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac) that correlated with the kinetics of UTP-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin and VE-cadherin. Inhibitors of VEGFR-2 (SU1498) or Src (PP2) significantly diminished UTP-induced Rac1 activation, tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin and VE-cadherin, and association of the P2Y2R with VE-cadherin and p120 catenin with vav2. These findings suggest that the P2Y2R uses Src and VEGFR-2 to mediate association of the P2Y2R with VE-cadherin complexes in endothelial adherens junctions to activate Rac1. PMID:25657827

  1. Minimal 16q genomic loss implicates cadherin-11 in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Marchong, Mellone N; Chen, Danian; Corson, Timothy W; Lee, Cheong; Harmandayan, Maria; Bowles, Ella; Chen, Ning; Gallie, Brenda L

    2004-09-01

    Retinoblastoma is initiated by loss of both RB1 alleles. Previous studies have shown that retinoblastoma tumors also show further genomic gains and losses. We now define a 2.62 Mbp minimal region of genomic loss of chromosome 16q22, which is likely to contain tumor suppressor gene(s), in 76 retinoblastoma tumors, using loss of heterozygosity (30 of 76 tumors) and quantitative multiplex PCR (71 of 76 tumors). The sequence-tagged site WI-5835 within intron 2 of the cadherin-11 (CDH11) gene showed the highest frequency of loss (54%, 22 of 41 samples tested). A second hotspot for loss (39%, 9 of 23 samples tested) was detected within intron 2 of the cadherin-13 (CDH13) gene. Furthermore, deletion of the exons of CDH11 and/or WI-5835 was shown by quantitative multiplex PCR in 17 of 30 (57%) of previously untested tumors. Immunoblot analyses revealed that 91% (20 of 22) retinoblastoma exhibited either a complete loss or a decrease of the intact form of CDH11 and 8 of 13 showed a prevalent band suggestive of the variant form. Copy number of WI-5835 for these samples correlated with CDH11 protein expression. CDH11 staining was evident in the inner nuclear layer in early mouse retinal development and in small transgenic murine SV40 large T antigen-induced retinoblastoma tumors, but advanced tumors frequently showed loss of CDH11 expression by reverse transcription-PCR, suggestive of a role for CDH11 in tumor progression or metastasis. CDH13 protein and mRNA were consistently expressed in all human and murine retinoblastoma compared with normal adult human retina. Our analyses implicate CDH11, but not CDH13, as a potential tumor suppressor gene in retinoblastoma. PMID:15383628

  2. Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin pathway in metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Qi; Zhang, Wu; Lui, Eric L H; Zhu, Yongqiang; Lu, Ping; Yu, Xiaoming; Sun, Jisan; Yang, Sitian; Poon, Ronnie T P; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2012-08-01

    Notch signaling, a critical pathway for tissue development, also contributes to tumorigenesis in many cancers, but its pathological function in liver cancer is not well defined. In our study, Notch1 expression and its clinicopathological parameters were evaluated in 82 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Plasmid-based siNotch1 shRNA was transiently or stably transfected into metastatic HCC cells and subsequently evaluated for the effects on orthotopic liver tumor metastasis in a mouse model as well as the effects on downstream pathways. Aberrant high expression of Notch1 was significantly associated with metastatic disease parameters in HCC patients, such as tumor-node-metastasis Stages III-IV and tumor venous invasion. Knocking-down Notch1 reduced cell motility in vitro and orthotopic tumor metastasis from the liver to the lung in vivo in a mouse model. In metastatic HCC cells, abnormal expression of Notch1 was associated with increased expression of Snail1 and repressed expression of E-cadherin; the Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin association can also be found in HCC patient tumors. Inhibition of Notch1 by shRNA abolished Snail1 expression, which further resulted in the re-establishment of repressed E-cadherin in metastatic HCC cells. Thus, abnormal Notch1 expression was strongly associated with HCC metastatic disease, which might be mediated through the Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin pathway. Knock-down of Notch1 reversed HCC tumor metastasis in a mouse model. Therefore, these data suggest that effective targeting of Notch signaling might also inhibit tumor metastasis. PMID:22052196

  3. Glioma stem cell invasion through regulation of the interconnected ERK, integrin α6 and N-cadherin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Rehman, Azeem A; Chelluboina, Bharath; Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Gondi, Christopher S; Rao, Jasti S; Veeravalli, Krishna Kumar

    2012-11-01

    The recent characterization of glioma stem cells (GSCs) prompts a necessary examination of the signaling pathways that facilitate invasiveness. Molecular crosstalk between expression mechanisms has been identified in a range of cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme. However, hardly any literature exists that addresses whether cancer stem cells utilize these same interconnected pathways. Protein factors commonly implicated in malignant tumors include extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), N-cadherin, and integrin α6. Although studies have reported the molecular crosstalk involved among these proteins, the present study illustrates the importance of the ERK transduction pathway in N-cadherin and integrin α6 regulated invasion in GSCs. Conversely, the data also suggests that GSCs rely on N-cadherin and integrin α6 interaction to regulate ERK signaling. Moreover, confocal visualization revealed the co-localization of N-cadherin and integrin α6 in GSCs and clinical surgical biopsies extracted from glioma patients. Interestingly, ERK knockdown reduced this co-localization. Upon co-culturing GSCs with human umbilical cord blood stem cells (hUCBSCs), we observed a subsequent decrease in pERK, N-cadherin and integrin α6 expression. In addition, co-culturing hUCBSCs with GSCs decreased co-localization of N-cadherin and integrin α6 in GSCs. Our results demonstrate the dynamic interplay among ERK, N-cadherin and integrin α6 in GSC invasion and also reveal the therapeutic potential of hUCBSCs in treating the molecular crosstalk observed in GSC-regulated invasion. PMID:22789454

  4. Coupled Positive and Negative Feedbacks Produce Diverse Gene Expression Patterns in Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Mitarai, Namiko; Jensen, Mogens Høgh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of multicellular organism as well as of microbial communities. To investigate the formation of gene expression patterns in colonies, we build a mathematical model of two-dimensional colony growth, where cells carry a coupled positive-and-negative-feedback circuit. We demonstrate that the model can produce sectored, target (concentric), uniform, and scattered expression patterns of regulators, depending on gene expression dynamics and nutrient diffusion. We reconstructed the same regulatory structure in Escherichia coli cells and found gene expression patterns on the surface of colonies similar to the ones produced by the computer simulations. By comparing computer simulations and experimental results, we observed that very simple rules of gene expression can yield a spectrum of well-defined patterns in a growing colony. Our results suggest that variations of the protein content among cells lead to a high level of heterogeneity in colonies. Importance Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of microbial communities. In this work, we show that a simple genetic circuit composed of a positive-feedback loop and a negative-feedback loop can produce diverse expression patterns in colonies. We obtained similar sets of gene expression patterns in the simulations and in the experiments. Because the combination of positive feedback and negative feedback is common in intracellular molecular networks, our results suggest that the protein content of cells is highly diversified in colonies. PMID:25852158

  5. Select Rab GTPases Regulate the Pulmonary Endothelium via Endosomal Trafficking of Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin.

    PubMed

    Chichger, Havovi; Braza, Julie; Duong, Huetran; Boni, Geraldine; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary edema occurs in settings of acute lung injury, in diseases, such as pneumonia, and in acute respiratory distress syndrome. The lung interendothelial junctions are maintained in part by vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an adherens junction protein, and its surface expression is regulated by endocytic trafficking. The Rab family of small GTPases are regulators of endocytic trafficking. The key trafficking pathways are regulated by Rab4, -7, and -9. Rab4 regulates the recycling of endosomes to the cell surface through a rapid-shuttle process, whereas Rab7 and -9 regulate trafficking to the late endosome/lysosome for degradation or from the trans-Golgi network to the late endosome, respectively. We recently demonstrated a role for the endosomal adaptor protein, p18, in regulation of the pulmonary endothelium through enhanced recycling of VE-cadherin to adherens junction. Thus, we hypothesized that Rab4, -7, and -9 regulate pulmonary endothelial barrier function through modulating trafficking of VE-cadherin-positive endosomes. We used Rab mutants with varying activities and associations to the endosome to study endothelial barrier function in vitro and in vivo. Our study demonstrates a key role for Rab4 activation and Rab9 inhibition in regulation of vascular permeability through enhanced VE-cadherin expression at the interendothelial junction. We further showed that endothelial barrier function mediated through Rab4 is dependent on extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and activity. Thus, we demonstrate that Rab4 and -9 regulate VE-cadherin levels at the cell surface to modulate the pulmonary endothelium through extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent and -independent pathways, respectively. We propose that regulating select Rab GTPases represents novel therapeutic strategies for patients suffering with acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:26551054

  6. Variability in the cadherin gene in an Ostrinia nubilalis strain selected for Cry1Ab resistance.

    PubMed

    Bel, Yolanda; Siqueira, Herbert A A; Siegfried, Blair D; Ferré, Juan; Escriche, Baltasar

    2009-03-01

    Transgenic corn expressing Cry1Ab (a Bacillus thuringiensis toxin) is highly effective in the control of Ostrinia nubilalis. For its toxic action, Cry1Ab has to bind to specific insect midgut proteins. To date, in three Lepidoptera species resistance to a Cry1A toxin has been conferred by mutations in cadherin, a protein of the Lepidoptera midgut membrane. The implication of cadherin in the resistance of an Ostrinia nubilalis colony (Europe-R) selected with Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protoxin was investigated. Several major mutations in the cadherin (cdh) gene were found, which introduced premature termination codons and/or large deletions (ranging from 1383 to 1701bp). The contribution of these major mutations to the resistance was analyzed in resistant individuals that survived exposure to a high concentration of Cry1Ab protoxin. The results indicated that the presence of major mutations was drastically reduced in individuals that survived exposure. Previous inheritance experiments with the Europe-R strain indicated the involvement of more than one genetic locus and reduced amounts of the cadherin receptor. The results of the present work support a polygenic inheritance of resistance in the Europe-R strain, in which mutations in the cdh gene would contribute to resistance by means of an additive effect. PMID:19114103

  7. p120-catenin regulates microtubule dynamics and cell migration in a cadherin-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Ichii, Tetsuo; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2007-07-01

    p120-catenin (p120) has been shown to be essential for cadherin stability. Here, we show that p120 is capable of regulating microtubule (MT) dynamics in a cadherin-independent manner. When p120 was depleted in cadherin-deficient Neuro-2a (N2a) cells, MT stability was reduced, as assessed by the nocodazole sensitivity of MTs. On the contrary, over-expression of p120 caused MTs to become resistant to nocodazole. Time-lapse recording of GFP-tagged EB1, a protein which binds the growing plus-ends of MTs, introduced into these cells demonstrated that the plus ends underwent more frequent catastrophe in p120-depleted cells. In addition, p120 knockdown up-regulated the motility of isolated cells, whereas it down-regulated the directional migration of cells from wound edges; and these migratory behaviors of cells were mimicked by nocodazole-induced MT depolymerization. These results suggest that p120 has the ability to regulate MT dynamics and that this activity, in turn, affects cell motility independently of the cadherin adhesion system. PMID:17584295

  8. Gender and Age Patterns in Emotional Expression, Body Image, and Self-Esteem: A Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polce-Lynch, Mary; Myers, Barbara J.; Kilmartin, Christopher T.; Forssmann-Falck, Renate; Kliewer, Wendy

    1998-01-01

    Used written narratives to examine gender and age patterns in body image, emotional expression, and self-esteem for 209 students in grades 5, 8, and 12. Results indicate that boys restrict emotional expression in adolescence, whereas girls increase emotional expression in the same period. Girls also are more influenced by body image. (SLD)

  9. TCL1 expression patterns in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Lemal, Richard; Bard-Sorel, Sandrine; Montrieul, Laura; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Ravinet, Aurélie; Ledoux-Pilon, Albane; Cagnard, Nicolas; Bailly, Sébastien; Morel, Pierre; Charlotte, Frédéric; Leleu, Xavier; Poulain, Stéphanie; Déchelotte, Pierre J; Hermine, Olivier; Leblond, Véronique; Tournilhac, Olivier; Guièze, Romain

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of TCL1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is well established in transgenic mice. TCL1 expression in other B-cell malignancies has been also described: post-germinal center-derived malignancies, such as multiple myeloma, classically do not express TCL1. Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a post-germinal center malignancy that is known to be similar to chronic lymphocytic leukemia in terms of its gene expression profile. TCL1 expression has not been so far assessed in Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Transcriptomic explorations show that TCL1A expression is linked to signaling pathways and biological functions that are known to be involved in Waldenström macroglobulinemia as well as to gene signatures of interest in B-cell malignancies. We investigated TCL1 expression at the protein level in the bone marrow of a series of 59 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia: 76% of patients expressed TCL1, which appeared to be associated with a pejorative prognostic impact. TCL1 could have an oncogenic role in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and deserves further exploration. PMID:26493619

  10. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-11-09

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis.

  11. Interaction of E-cadherin and PTEN regulates morphogenesis and growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Fata, Jimmie E.; Martin, Katherine J.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    PTEN is a dual function phosphatase with tumor suppressor function compromised in a wide spectrum of cancers. Because tissue polarity and architecture are crucial modulators of normal and malignant behavior, we postulated that PTEN may play a role in maintenance of tissue integrity. We used two non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMECs) that form polarized, growth-arrested structures (acini) when cultured in 3-dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels (3D lrECM). As acini begin to form, PTEN accumulates in both the cytoplasm, and at cell-cell contacts where it colocalizes with E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex. Reduction of PTEN levels by shRNA in lrECM prevents formation of organized breast acini and disrupts growth arrest. Importantly, disruption of acinar polarity and cell-cell contact by E-cadherin function-blocking antibodies reduces endogenous PTEN protein levels and inhibits its accumulation at cell-cell contacts. Conversely, in SKBR3 breast cancer cells lacking endogenous E-cadherin expression, exogenous introduction of E-cadherin gene causes induction of PTEN expression and its accumulation at sites of cell interactions. These studies provide evidence that E-cadherin regulates both the PTEN protein levels and its recruitment to cell-cell junctions in 3D lrECM indicating a dynamic reciprocity between architectural integrity and the levels and localization of PTEN. This interaction thus appears to be a critical integrator of proliferative and morphogenetic signaling in breast epithelial cells.

  12. Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell motility in Drosophila trachea regulated by the transcription factor Escargot.

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Matakatsu, M; Uemura, T; Oda, H; Takeichi, M; Hayashi, S

    1996-12-01

    Coordination of cell motility and adhesion is essential for concerted movement of tissues during animal morphogenesis. The Drosophila tracheal network is formed by branching, migration and fusion of tubular ectodermal epithelia. Tracheal tip cells, located at the end of each branch that is going to fuse, extend filopodia to search for targets and later change their cell shape to a seamless ring to allow passage of lumen. The cell adhesion molecule DE-cadherin accumulates at the site of contact to form a ring that marks the site of lumen entry and is essential for the fusion. DE-cadherin expression in tip cells of a subset of branches is dependent on escargot, a zinc finger gene expressed in all tip cells. Such escargot mutant tip cells failed to adhere to each other and continued to search for alternative targets by extending long filopodia. We present evidence indicating escargot positively regulates transcription of the DE-cadherin gene, shotgun. Overexpression of DE-cadherin rescued the defect in one of the fusion points in escargot mutants, demonstrating an essential role of DE-cadherin in target recognition and identifying escargot as a key regulator of cell adhesion and motility in tracheal morphogenesis. PMID:9012491

  13. VE-cadherin is a critical molecule for trophoblast-endothelial cell interaction in decidual spiral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bulla, Roberta; Villa, Antonello; Bossi, Fleur; Cassetti, Arianna; Radillo, Oriano; Spessotto, Paola; De Seta, Francesco; Guaschino, Secondo; Tedesco, Francesco . E-mail: tedesco@univ.trieste.it

    2005-02-01

    Fetal cytotrophoblasts colonize the decidual spiral arteries during pregnancy and partially replace the endothelium by an as yet unknown mechanism. To clarify this issue, we cocultured trophoblast cells (TCs) and decidual endothelial cells (DECs) isolated from first trimester placentae and found by electron microscopic analysis that TCs adhered to DECs and migrated through the interendothelial junctions within 24 h. Since extravillous TCs were shown by FACS analysis to express vascular-endothelial (VE)-cadherin and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM)-1, we investigated the role of these junctional molecules in TC adhesion to DECs and transendothelial migration of cytotrophoblasts. Both VE-cadherin and PECAM-1 were present at the contact sites between TCs and DECs in decidual sections. TC adhesion and migration were markedly inhibited by mAbs to VE-cadherin and marginally by mAb to PECAM-1. Increased expression of VE-cadherin was observed at the contact areas between TCs and DECs, whereas PECAM-1 was found to be redistributed from intercellular junctions. The induction of apoptosis of DECs by TCs, as the mechanism responsible for their replacement, was ruled out by the negative staining with TUNEL of DECs cocultured with TCs and the absence of DNA fragmentation. In conclusion, VE-cadherin is involved in transendothelial migration of TCs, and replacement of DECs by TCs is not the result of apoptosis.

  14. Network Security via Biometric Recognition of Patterns of Gene Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular biology provides the ability to implement forms of information and network security completely outside the bounds of legacy security protocols and algorithms. This paper addresses an approach which instantiates the power of gene expression for security. Molecular biology provides a rich source of gene expression and regulation mechanisms, which can be adopted to use in the information and electronic communication domains. Conventional security protocols are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to more intensive, highly capable attacks on the underlying mathematics of cryptography. Security protocols are being undermined by social engineering and substandard implementations by IT organizations. Molecular biology can provide countermeasures to these weak points with the current security approaches. Future advances in instruments for analyzing assays will also enable this protocol to advance from one of cryptographic algorithms to an integrated system of cryptographic algorithms and real-time expression and assay of gene expression products.

  15. The inhibition of cell proliferation using silencing of N-cadherin gene by siRNA process in human melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ciołczyk-Wierzbicka, D; Gil, D; Laidler, P

    2012-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a disease with high mortality rate caused by rapid metastasis. Cell motility is physically and biochemically restricted by cadherin-mediated cell interactions and signalling pathways, and alterations in cadherin expression strongly correlate with E to N-cadherin switch as well as the metastasis and progression of tumours. Contrary to E-cadherin, N-cadherin plays an important role in stimulating processes of cell division, migration, differentiation and death. In this study we investigated the role of N-cadherin in proliferation and AKT, ERK, beta-catenin signalling pathway in human melanoma cells: WM793(VGP), WM115(VGP) from the primary tumor site, as well as Lu1205(lung) and WM266-4(skin) from metastatic sites. N-cadherin, pAKT(S473), β-catenin, pERK1/2(T202/Y204), cyclin D1, cyclin D3, cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4, CDK6, and p15, p16, p21, p27 inhibitors expression was determined by western blot analysis. The study on proliferation of cells was performed with the use of BrdU incorporation and crystal violet staining assays. Knock-out of N-cadherin gene expression by siRNA process reduced the expression of: pAKT(S473), pERK1/2(T202/Y204), betacatenin, cyclin D1, cyclin D3, cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4, CDK6 while increasing expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27, and significantly decreased cell proliferation (50-70%). The collected data indicate that N-cadherin mediates the effect of cell cycle in G1 phase by AKT, β-catenin, and ERK signalling pathway. These results suggest that increased expression of N-cadherin significantly contributes to the increased invasive potential of melanoma cells. Silencing of N-cadherin arrests cell growth at G1 phase and inhibits the entry into S-phase which is of great importance as to its possible future use in cancer treatment. PMID:22300088

  16. Patterns of MiRNA Expression in Arctic Charr Development

    PubMed Central

    Kapralova, Kalina H.; Franzdóttir, Sigrídur Rut; Jónsson, Hákon; Snorrason, Sigurður S.; Jónsson, Zophonías O.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as a major class of developmental regulators. Sequences of many miRNAs are highly conserved, yet they often exhibit temporal and spatial heterogeneity in expression among species and have been proposed as an important reservoir for adaptive evolution and divergence. With this in mind we studied miRNA expression during embryonic development of offspring from two contrasting morphs of the highly polymorphic salmonid Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a small benthic morph from Lake Thingvallavatn (SB) and an aquaculture stock (AC). These morphs differ extensively in morphology and adult body size. We established offspring groups of the two morphs and sampled at several time points during development. Four time points (3 embryonic and one just before first feeding) were selected for high-throughput small-RNA sequencing. We identified a total of 326 conserved and 427 novel miRNA candidates in Arctic charr, of which 51 conserved and 6 novel miRNA candidates were differentially expressed among developmental stages. Furthermore, 53 known and 19 novel miRNAs showed significantly different levels of expression in the two contrasting morphs. Hierarchical clustering of the 53 conserved miRNAs revealed that the expression differences are confined to the embryonic stages, where miRNAs such as sal-miR-130, 30, 451, 133, 26 and 199a were highly expressed in AC, whereas sal-miR-146, 183, 206 and 196a were highly expressed in SB embryos. The majority of these miRNAs have previously been found to be involved in key developmental processes in other species such as development of brain and sensory epithelia, skeletogenesis and myogenesis. Four of the novel miRNA candidates were only detected in either AC or SB. miRNA candidates identified in this study will be combined with available mRNA expression data to identify potential targets and involvement in developmental regulation. PMID:25170615

  17. EPO-R expression patterns in resected gastric adenocarcinoma followed by adjuvant chemoradiation treatment.

    PubMed

    Sereno, Maria; De Castro, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Garcia-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Cejas, Paloma; Casado, Enrique; Barriuso, Jorge; Feliu, Jaime; Larrauri, Javier

    2009-03-01

    The primary aim was to determine whether Epo-R immunohistochemical expression is related to disease free survival (DFS) in specimens of GC from patients who underwent adjuvant chemoradiation. Specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas obtained from 44 patients who had undergone curative gastrectomy and adjuvant treatment were investigated immunohistochemically expression of Epo-R. Three patterns for Epo-R staining were defined: Pattern A (secretory cells-like staining), Pattern B (parietal-like staining) and Pattern C (chief-like staining). Median DFS was 38 months (CI 95%: 33-43) and 15 months (IC 95%: 3-27) in the pattern B and C, respectively, but it was not reached in the pattern A (p = 0.06). Our findings suggest that there may be a relationship between Epo-R expression and DFS in the patients with GC resected. PMID:19002606

  18. T-cadherin promotes vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation via a GSK3β-inactivation dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Frismantiene, Agne; Dasen, Boris; Pfaff, Dennis; Erne, Paul; Resink, Therese J; Philippova, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Participation of the cadherin superfamily of adhesion molecules in smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype modulation is poorly understood. Immunohistochemical analyses of arterial lesions indirectly suggest upregulated expression of atypical glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored T-cadherin on vascular SMCs as a molecular indicator of the dedifferentiated/proliferative phenotype. This study investigated the role of T-cadherin in SMC phenotypic modulation. Morphological, molecular and functional SMC-signature characteristics of rat, porcine and human arterial SMCs stably transduced with respect to T-cadherin upregulation (Tcad+) or T-cadherin-deficiency (shTcad) were compared with their respective control transductants (E-SMCs or shC-SMCs). Tcad+-SMCs displayed several characteristics of the dedifferentiated phenotype including loss of spindle morphology, reduced/disorganized stress fiber formation, decay of SMC-differentiation markers (smooth muscle α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, h-caldesmon), gain of SMC-dedifferentiation marker calmodulin, reduced levels of myocardin, nuclear-to-cytoplasmic redistribution of the myocardin related transcription factors MRTFA/B and increased proliferative and migratory capacities. T-cadherin depletion enforced features of the differentiated SMC phenotype. PI3K/Akt is a major signal pathway utilized by T-cadherin in SMCs and we investigated mTORC1/S6K1 and GSK3β axes as mediators of T-cadherin-induced dedifferentiation. Inhibition of mTORC1/S6K1 signalling by rapamycin suppressed proliferation in both E-SMCs and Tcad+-SMCs but failed to restore expression of contractile protein markers in Tcad+-SMCs. Ectopic adenoviral-mediated co-expression of constitutively active GSK3β mutant S9A in Tcad+-SMCs restored the morphological and molecular marker characteristics of differentiated SMCs and normalized rate of proliferation to that in control SMCs. In conclusion our study demonstrates that T-cadherin promotes acquisition of the

  19. Atypical cadherins Celsr1-3 differentially regulate migration of facial branchiomotor neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yibo; Glasco, Derrick M; Zhou, Libing; Sawant, Anagha; Ravni, Aurélia; Fritzsch, Bernd; Damrau, Christine; Murdoch, Jennifer N; Evans, Sylvia; Pfaff, Samuel L; Formstone, Caroline; Goffinet, André M; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Tissir, Fadel

    2010-07-14

    During hindbrain development, facial branchiomotor neurons (FBM neurons) migrate from medial rhombomere (r) 4 to lateral r6. In zebrafish, mutations in planar cell polarity genes celsr2 and frizzled3a block caudal migration of FBM neurons. Here, we investigated the role of cadherins Celsr1-3, and Fzd3 in FBM neuron migration in mice. In Celsr1 mutants (knock-out and Crash alleles), caudal migration was compromised and neurons often migrated rostrally into r2 and r3, as well as laterally. These phenotypes were not caused by defects in hindbrain patterning or neuronal specification. Celsr1 is expressed in FBM neuron precursors and the floor plate, but not in FBM neurons. Consistent with this, conditional inactivation showed that the function of Celsr1 in FBM neuron migration was non-cell autonomous. In Celsr2 mutants, FBM neurons initiated caudal migration but moved prematurely into lateral r4 and r5. This phenotype was enhanced by inactivation of Celsr3 in FBM neurons and mimicked by inactivation of Fzd3. Furthermore, Celsr2 was epistatic to Celsr1. These data indicate that Celsr1-3 differentially regulate FBM neuron migration. Celsr1 helps to specify the direction of FBM neuron migration, whereas Celsr2 and 3 control its ability to migrate. PMID:20631168

  20. Cadherin 6 promotes neural crest cell detachment via F-actin regulation and influences active Rho distribution during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Matthew R.; Halloran, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex change in cell phenotype that is important for cell migration, morphogenesis and carcinoma metastasis. Loss of epithelial cell adhesion and tight regulation of cadherin adhesion proteins are crucial for EMT. Cells undergoing EMT often display cadherin switching, where they downregulate one cadherin and induce expression of another. However, the functions of the upregulated cadherins and their effects on cell motility are poorly understood. Neural crest cells (NCCs), which undergo EMT during development, lose N-cadherin and upregulate Cadherin 6 (Cdh6) prior to EMT. Cdh6 has been suggested to suppress EMT via cell adhesion, but also to promote EMT by mediating pro-EMT signals. Here, we determine novel roles for Cdh6 in generating cell motility during EMT. We use live imaging of NCC behavior in vivo to show that Cdh6 promotes detachment of apical NCC tails, an important early step of EMT. Furthermore, we show that Cdh6 affects spatiotemporal dynamics of F-actin and active Rho GTPase, and that Cdh6 is required for accumulation of F-actin in apical NCC tails during detachment. Moreover, Cdh6 knockdown alters the subcellular distribution of active Rho, which is known to promote localized actomyosin contraction that is crucial for apical NCC detachment. Together, these data suggest that Cdh6 is an important determinant of where subcellular actomyosin forces are generated during EMT. Our results also identify mechanisms by which an upregulated cadherin can generate cell motility during EMT. PMID:24917505

  1. Visualization and analysis of 3D gene expression patterns in zebrafish using web services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potikanond, D.; Verbeek, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of patterns of gene expression patterns analysis plays an important role in developmental biology and molecular genetics. Visualizing both quantitative and spatio-temporal aspects of gene expression patterns together with referenced anatomical structures of a model-organism in 3D can help identifying how a group of genes are expressed at a certain location at a particular developmental stage of an organism. In this paper, we present an approach to provide an online visualization of gene expression data in zebrafish (Danio rerio) within 3D reconstruction model of zebrafish in different developmental stages. We developed web services that provide programmable access to the 3D reconstruction data and spatial-temporal gene expression data maintained in our local repositories. To demonstrate this work, we develop a web application that uses these web services to retrieve data from our local information systems. The web application also retrieve relevant analysis of microarray gene expression data from an external community resource; i.e. the ArrayExpress Atlas. All the relevant gene expression patterns data are subsequently integrated with the reconstruction data of the zebrafish atlas using ontology based mapping. The resulting visualization provides quantitative and spatial information on patterns of gene expression in a 3D graphical representation of the zebrafish atlas in a certain developmental stage. To deliver the visualization to the user, we developed a Java based 3D viewer client that can be integrated in a web interface allowing the user to visualize the integrated information over the Internet.

  2. Prognostic implications of epithelial to mesenchymal transition related proteins (E-cadherin, Snail) and hypoxia inducible factor 1α in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abouhashem, Nehal S; Ibrahim, Doaa Abdelaziz; Mohamed, Abdel Motaleb

    2016-06-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important step in the invasion and metastasis of cancer. E-cadherin downregulation, which is essentially controlled by EMT-mediated proteins such as Snail, is a main molecular feature of this process. Tumor hypoxia is one of the essential biological phenomena that are associated with the development and progression of various solid tumors. Recently, hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling pathway were identified to have an essential role in the regulation of EMT phenotype. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of EMT-related proteins (E-cadherin, Snail) and HIF-1α in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC) among Egyptian women. Immunohistochemical evaluation of E-cadherin, Snail, and HIF-1α expression was performed using 50 cases of EEC. The relationship between protein expression and clinicopathological features was investigated. The frequency of immunopositivity for E-cadherin, Snail, and HIF-1α in our cases of EEC was 82%, 28%, and 66%, respectively. Reduced E-cadherin and increased nuclear expression of Snail as well as HIF-1α were significantly associated with histopathologic grade, clinical stage myometrial invasion, and lymph node involvement. Statistical analysis showed a positive correlation between HIF-1α overexpression and Snail upregulation (τ= +0.252, P= .025); however, E-cadherin expression level was inversely correlated with enhanced Snail expression (τ= -0.450, P< .001) as well as with HIF-1α overexpression (τ= -0.439, P< .001). The overall survival and progression-free survival were inversely related to Snail immunoreactivity and positively related to E-cadherin expression. E-cadherin and Snail have a predictive value in EEC. In conclusion, the current study reveals that both Snail and HIF-1α expressions are significantly associated with poor prognosis in EEC; however, E-cadherin expression is considered a marker of good prognosis. E-cadherin and

  3. Network Security via Biometric Recognition of Patterns of Gene Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular biology provides the ability to implement forms of information and network security completely outside the bounds of legacy security protocols and algorithms. This paper addresses an approach which instantiates the power of gene expression for security. Molecular biology provides a rich source of gene expression and regulation mechanisms, which can be adopted to use in the information and electronic communication domains. Conventional security protocols are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to more intensive, highly capable attacks on the underlying mathematics of cryptography. Security protocols are being undermined by social engineering and substandard implementations by IT (Information Technology) organizations. Molecular biology can provide countermeasures to these weak points with the current security approaches. Future advances in instruments for analyzing assays will also enable this protocol to advance from one of cryptographic algorithms to an integrated system of cryptographic algorithms and real-time assays of gene expression products.

  4. Binary gene expression patterning of the molt cycle: the case of chitin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abehsera, Shai; Glazer, Lilah; Tynyakov, Jenny; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Khalaila, Isam; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Sagi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes. PMID:25919476

  5. Binary Gene Expression Patterning of the Molt Cycle: The Case of Chitin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Abehsera, Shai; Glazer, Lilah; Tynyakov, Jenny; Plaschkes, Inbar; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Khalaila, Isam; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Sagi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    In crustaceans, like all arthropods, growth is accompanied by a molting cycle. This cycle comprises major physiological events in which mineralized chitinous structures are built and degraded. These events are in turn governed by genes whose patterns of expression are presumably linked to the molting cycle. To study these genes we performed next generation sequencing and constructed a molt-related transcriptomic library from two exoskeletal-forming tissues of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, namely the gastrolith and the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium. To simplify the study of such a complex process as molting, a novel approach, binary patterning of gene expression, was employed. This approach revealed that key genes involved in the synthesis and breakdown of chitin exhibit a molt-related pattern in the gastrolith-forming epithelium. On the other hand, the same genes in the mandible cuticle-forming epithelium showed a molt-independent pattern of expression. Genes related to the metabolism of glucosamine-6-phosphate, a chitin precursor synthesized from simple sugars, showed a molt-related pattern of expression in both tissues. The binary patterning approach unfolds typical patterns of gene expression during the molt cycle of a crustacean. The use of such a simplifying integrative tool for assessing gene patterning seems appropriate for the study of complex biological processes. PMID:25919476

  6. E-cadherin mediates contact inhibition of proliferation through Hippo signaling-pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Gyun; Koh, Eunjin; Chen, Xiao; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    Contact inhibition of cell growth is essential for embryonic development and maintenance of tissue architecture in adult organisms, and the growth of tumors is characterized by a loss of contact inhibition of proliferation. The recently identified Hippo signaling pathway has been implicated in contact inhibition of proliferation as well as organ size control. The modulation of the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of Yes-associated protein (YAP) by the highly conserved kinase cascade of the Hippo signaling pathway has been intensively studied. However, cell-surface receptors regulating the Hippo signaling pathway in mammals are not well understood. In this study, we show that Hippo signaling pathway components are required for E-cadherin–dependent contact inhibition of proliferation. Knockdown of the Hippo signaling components or overexpression of YAP inhibits the decrease in cell proliferation caused by E-cadherin homophilic binding at the cell surface, independent of other cell–cell interactions. We also demonstrate that the E-cadherin/catenin complex functions as an upstream regulator of the Hippo signaling pathway in mammalian cells. Expression of E-cadherin in MDA-MB-231 cells restores the density-dependent regulation of YAP nuclear exclusion. Knockdown of β-catenin in densely cultured MCF10A cells, which mainly depletes E-cadherin–bound β-catenin, induces a decrease in the phosphorylation of S127 residue of YAP and its nuclear accumulation. Moreover, E-cadherin homophilic binding independent of other cell interactions is sufficient to control the subcellular localization of YAP. Therefore, Our results indicate that, in addition to its role in cell–cell adhesion, E-cadherin-mediated cell–cell contact directly regulates the Hippo signaling pathway to control cell proliferation. PMID:21730131

  7. Gene expression patterns during intramuscular fat development in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y H; Bower, N I; Reverter, A; Tan, S H; De Jager, N; Wang, R; McWilliam, S M; Cafe, L M; Greenwood, P L; Lehnert, S A

    2009-01-01

    Deposition of intramuscular fat, or "marbling," in beef cattle contributes significantly to meat quality variables, including juiciness, flavor, and tenderness. The accumulation of intramuscular fat is largely influenced by the genetic background of cattle, as well as their age and nutrition. To identify genes that can be used as early biomarkers for the prediction of marbling capacity, we studied the muscle transcriptome of 2 cattle crossbreeds with contrasting intramuscular fat content. The transcriptomes of marbling LM tissue of heifers from Wagyu x Hereford (WxH; n = 6) and Piedmontese x Hereford (PxH; n = 7) crosses were profiled by using a combination of complementary DNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Five biopsies of LM were taken from each animal at approximately 3, 7, 12, 20, and 25 mo from birth. Tissue was also collected from the LM of each animal at slaughter (approximately 30 mo). Microarray experiments, conducted on the first 3 biopsies of 2 animals from each crossbreed, identified 97 differentially expressed genes. The gene expression results indicated that the LM transcriptome of animals with high marbling potential (WxH) could be reliably distinguished from less marbled animals (PxH) when the animals were as young as 7 mo of age. At this early age, one cannot reliably determine meaningful differences in intramuscular fat deposition. We observed greater expression of a set of adipogenesis- and lipogenesis-related genes in the LM of young WxH animals compared with their PxH contemporaries. In contrast, genes highly expressed in PxH animals were associated with mitochondrial oxidative activity. Further quantitative reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that the messenger RNA of 6 of the lipogenesis-related genes also peaked at the age of 20 to 25 mo in WxH animals. The messenger RNA expression of ADIPOQ, SCD, and THRSP was highly correlated with intramuscular fat content of an individual in WxH animals. Our study

  8. Plasmodium falciparum Variant Surface Antigen Expression Patterns during Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The variant surface antigens expressed on Plasmodium falciparum–infected erythrocytes are potentially important targets of immunity to malaria and are encoded, at least in part, by a family of var genes, about 60 of which are present within every parasite genome. Here we use semi-conserved regions within short var gene sequence “tags” to make direct comparisons of var gene expression in 12 clinical parasite isolates from Kenyan children. A total of 1,746 var clones were sequenced from genomic and cDNA and assigned to one of six sequence groups using specific sequence features. The results show the following. (1) The relative numbers of genomic clones falling in each of the sequence groups was similar between parasite isolates and corresponded well with the numbers of genes found in the genome of a single, fully sequenced parasite isolate. In contrast, the relative numbers of cDNA clones falling in each group varied considerably between isolates. (2) Expression of sequences belonging to a relatively conserved group was negatively associated with the repertoire of variant surface antigen antibodies carried by the infected child at the time of disease, whereas expression of sequences belonging to another group was associated with the parasite “rosetting” phenotype, a well established virulence determinant. Our results suggest that information on the state of the host–parasite relationship in vivo can be provided by measurements of the differential expression of different var groups, and need only be defined by short stretches of sequence data. PMID:16304608

  9. Spatio-Temporal Expression Pattern of Frizzled Receptors after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Ernest; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Wnt proteins are a large family of molecules that are critically involved in multiple central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes. Experimental evidences suggest a role for this family of proteins in many CNS disorders, including spinal cord injury (SCI), which is a major neuropathology owing to its high prevalence and chronic sensorimotor functional sequelae. Interestingly, most Wnt proteins and their inhibitors are expressed in the uninjured spinal cord, and their temporal expression patterns are dramatically altered after injury. However, little is known regarding the expression of their better-known receptors, the Frizzled family, after SCI. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of Frizzled receptors in the damaged spinal cord. Findings Based on the evidence that Wnts are expressed in the spinal cord and are transcriptionally regulated by SCI in adulthood, we analysed the spatio-temporal mRNA and protein expression patterns of Frizzled receptors after contusive SCI using quantitative RT-PCR and single and double immunohistochemistry, respectively. Our results show that almost all of the 10 known Frizzled receptors were expressed in specific spatial patterns in the uninjured spinal cords. Moreover, the Frizzled mRNAs and proteins were expressed after SCI, although their expression patterns were altered during the temporal progression of SCI. Finally, analysis of cellular Frizzled 5 expression pattern by double immunohistochemistry showed that, in the uninjured spinal cord, this receptor was expressed in neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia and NG2+ glial precursors. After injury, Frizzled 5 was not only still expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and NG2+ glial precursors but also in axons at all evaluated time points. Moreover, Frizzled 5 was expressed in reactive microglia/macrophages from 3 to 14 days post-injury. Conclusions Our data suggest the involvement of Frizzled receptors in physiological

  10. α-Catulin downregulates E-cadherin and promotes melanoma progression and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kreiseder, Birgit; Orel, Lukas; Bujnow, Constantin; Buschek, Stefan; Pflueger, Maren; Schuett, Wolfgang; Hundsberger, Harald; de Martin, Rainer; Wiesner, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Metastasis is associated with poor prognosis for melanoma responsible for about 90% of skin cancer-related mortality. To metastasize, melanoma cells must escape keratinocyte control, invade across the basement membrane and survive in the dermis by resisting apoptosis before they can intravasate into the circulation. α-Catulin (CTNNAL1) is a cytoplasmic molecule that integrates the crosstalk between nuclear factor-kappa B and Rho signaling pathways, binds to β-catenin and increases the level of both α-catenin and β-catenin and therefore has potential effects on inflammation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization. Here, we show that α-catulin is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Expression of α-catulin promoted melanoma progression and occurred concomitantly with the downregulation of E-cadherin and the upregulation of expression of mesenchymal genes such as N-cadherin, Snail/Slug and the matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. Knockdown of α-catulin promoted adhesion to and inhibited migration away from keratinocytes in an E-cadherin-dependent manner and decreased the transmigration through a keratinocyte monolayer, as well as in Transwell assays using collagens, laminin and fibronectin coating. Moreover, knockdown promoted homotypic spheroid formation and concomitantly increased E-cadherin expression along with downregulation of transcription factors implicated in its repression (Snail/Slug, Twist and ZEB). Consistent with the molecular changes, α-catulin provoked invasion of melanoma cells in a three-dimensional culture assay by the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 and the activation of ROCK/Rho. As such, α-catulin may represent a key driver of the metastatic process, implicating potential for therapeutic interference. PMID:22733455

  11. Cortical interneurons migrating on a pure substrate of N-cadherin exhibit fast synchronous centrosomal and nuclear movements and reduced ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luccardini, Camilla; Leclech, Claire; Viou, Lucie; Rio, Jean-Paul; Métin, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the cortex involves a phase of long distance migration of interneurons born in the basal telencephalon. Interneurons first migrate tangentially and then reorient their trajectories radially to enter the developing cortex. We have shown that migrating interneurons can assemble a primary cilium, which maintains the centrosome to the plasma membrane and processes signals to control interneuron trajectory (Baudoin et al., 2012). In the developing cortex, N-cadherin is expressed by migrating interneurons and by cells in their migratory pathway. N-cadherin promotes the motility and maintains the polarity of tangentially migrating interneurons (Luccardini et al., 2013). Because N-cadherin is an important factor that regulates the migration of medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) cells in vivo, we further characterized the motility and polarity of MGE cells on a substrate that only comprises this protein. MGE cells migrating on a N-cadherin substrate were seven times faster than on a laminin substrate and two times faster than on a substrate of cortical cells. A primary cilium was much less frequently observed on MGE cells migrating on N-cadherin than on laminin. Nevertheless, the mature centriole (MC) frequently docked to the plasma membrane in MGE cells migrating on N-cadherin, suggesting that plasma membrane docking is a basic feature of the centrosome in migrating MGE cells. On the N-cadherin substrate, centrosomal and nuclear movements were remarkably synchronous and the centrosome remained near the nucleus. Interestingly, MGE cells with cadherin invalidation presented centrosomal movements no longer coordinated with nuclear movements. In summary, MGE cells migrating on a pure substrate of N-cadherin show fast, coordinated nuclear and centrosomal movements, and rarely present a primary cilium. PMID:26283922

  12. α3 Integrin of Cell-Cell Contact Mediates Kidney Fibrosis by Integrin-Linked Kinase in Proximal Tubular E-Cadherin Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoping; Zhang, Jianlin; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Hailong; Pang, Min; Qiao, Xi; Lee, So R; Hsu, Tzu-Ting; Tan, Thian K; Lyons, J Guy; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Xinrui; Loebel, David A F; Rubera, Isabella; Tauc, Michel; Wang, Ya; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Yuan M; Cao, Qi; Wang, Changqi; Lee, Vincent W S; Alexander, Stephen I; Tam, Patrick P L; Harris, David C H

    2016-07-01

    Loss of E-cadherin marks a defect in epithelial integrity and polarity during tissue injury and fibrosis. Whether loss of E-cadherin plays a causal role in fibrosis is uncertain. α3β1 Integrin has been identified to complex with E-cadherin in cell-cell adhesion, but little is known about the details of their cross talk. Herein, E-cadherin gene (Cdh1) was selectively deleted from proximal tubules of murine kidney by Sglt2Cre. Ablation of E-cadherin up-regulated α3β1 integrin at cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin-deficient proximal tubular epithelial cell displayed enhanced transforming growth factor-β1-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin expression, which was suppressed by siRNA silencing of α3 integrin, but not β1 integrin. Up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β1-induced α-SMA was mediated by an α3 integrin-dependent increase in integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Src phosphorylation of β-catenin and consequent p-β-catenin-Y654/p-Smad2 transcriptional complex underlies the transcriptional up-regulation of ILK. Kidney fibrosis after unilateral ureteric obstruction or ischemia reperfusion was increased in proximal tubule E-cadherin-deficient mice in comparison to that of E-cadherin intact control mice. The exacerbation of fibrosis was explained by the α3 integrin-dependent increase of ILK, β-catenin nuclear translocation, and α-SMA/proximal tubular-specific Cre double positive staining in proximal tubular epithelial cell. These studies delineate a nonconventional integrin/ILK signaling by α3 integrin-dependent Src/p-β-catenin-Y654/p-Smad2-mediated up-regulation of ILK through which loss of E-cadherin leads to kidney fibrosis. PMID:27182643

  13. Loss of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion due to mutation of the beta-catenin gene in a human cancer cell line, HSC-39.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, J; Kato, J; Sasaki, K; Fujii, S; Watanabe, N; Niitsu, Y

    1995-01-01

    Detachment of cell-cell adhesion is indispensable for the first step of invasion and metastasis of cancer. This mechanism is frequently associated with the impairment of either E-cadherin expression or function. However, mechanisms of such abnormalities have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that the function of E-cadherin was completely abolished in the human gastric cancer cell line HSC-39, despite the high expression of E-cadherin, because of mutations in one of the E-cadherin-associated cytoplasmic proteins, beta-catenin. Although immunofluorescence staining of HSC-39 cells by using an anti-E-cadherin antibody (HECD-1) revealed the strong and uniform expression of E-cadherin on the cell surface, cell compaction and cell aggregation were not observed in this cell. Western blotting (immunoblotting) using HECD-1 exhibited a 120-kDa band which is equivalent to normal E-cadherin. Northern (RNA) blotting demonstrated a 4.7-kb band, the same as mature E-cadherin mRNA. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled proteins with HECD-1 revealed three bands corresponding to E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and gamma-catenin and a 79-kDa band which was apparently smaller than that of normal beta-catenin, indicating truncated beta-catenin. The 79-kDa band was immunologically identified as beta-catenin by using immunoblotting with anti-beta-catenin antibodies. Examination of beta-catenin mRNA by the reverse transcriptase-PCR method revealed a transcript which was shorter than that of normal beta-catenin. The sequencing of PCR product for beta-catenin confirmed deletion in 321 bases from nucleotides +82 to +402. Southern blotting of beta-catenin DNA disclosed mutation at the genomic level. Expression vectors of Beta-catenin were introduced into HSC-39 cells by transfection. In the obtained transfectants, E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesiveness was recovered, as revealed by cell compaction, cell aggregation, and immunoflourescence staining. From these

  14. Spatiotemporal patterns of Musashi1 expression during inner ear development.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Yaoi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Hisa, Yasuo; Fushiki, Shinji

    2004-04-29

    Musashi1 (Msi 1) is an RNA binding protein associated with asymmetric cell divisions in neural progenitor cells. To investigate the involvement of Msi1 in the inner ear development, we studied the expression of Msi1 in mouse inner ears with RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Msi1 was expressed in all otocyst cells at embryonic day (E) 10 and 12. Msi1 immunoreactivity became lost in hair cells after E14 in vestibule and after E16 in cochlea, whereas it persisted in supporting cells until adulthood. The subcellular localization of Msi1 changed from "cytoplasmic predominance" to "nuclear predominance" during the first 2 weeks after birth. The present data suggested that Msi may play a role in inner ear development. PMID:15076722

  15. Temporal patterns of gene expression during calyx of held development.

    PubMed

    Kolson, Douglas R; Wan, Jun; Wu, Jonathan; Dehoff, Marlin; Brandebura, Ashley N; Qian, Jiang; Mathers, Peter H; Spirou, George A

    2016-02-01

    Relating changes in gene expression to discrete developmental events remains an elusive challenge in neuroscience, in part because most neural territories are comprised of multiple cell types that mature over extended periods of time. The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is an attractive vertebrate model system that contains a nearly homogeneous population of neurons, which are innervated by large glutamatergic nerve terminals called calyces of Held (CH). Key steps in maturation of CHs and MNTB neurons, including CH growth and competition, occur very quickly for most cells between postnatal days (P)2 and P6. Therefore, we characterized genome-wide changes in this system, with dense temporal sampling during the first postnatal week. We identified 541 genes whose expression changed significantly between P0-6 and clustered them into eight groups based on temporal expression profiles. Candidate genes from each of the eight profile groups were validated in separate samples by qPCR. Our tissue sample permitted comparison of known glial and neuronal transcripts and revealed that monotonically increasing or decreasing expression profiles tended to be associated with glia and neurons, respectively. Gene ontology revealed enrichment of genes involved in axon pathfinding, cell differentiation, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix. The latter category included elements of perineuronal nets, a prominent feature of MNTB neurons that is morphologically distinct by P6, when CH growth and competition are resolved onto nearly all MNTB neurons. These results provide a genetic framework for investigation of general mechanisms responsible for nerve terminal growth and maturation. PMID:26014473

  16. EZH2 promotes cell migration and invasion but not alters cell proliferation by suppressing E-cadherin, partly through association with MALAT-1 in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ting; Jiao, Feng; Hu, Hai; Yuan, Cuncun; Wang, Lei; Jin, Zi-Liang; Song, Wei-feng; Wang, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is an essential component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which is required for epigenetic silencing of target genes, including those affecting cancer progression. Its role in pancreatic cancer remains to be clarified; therefore, we investigated the effects of aberrantly expressed EZH2 on pancreatic cancer. We found that EZH2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis and advanced clinical stage in pancreatic cancer patients. EZH2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines inhibited cell migration and invasion, but did not alter cell proliferation. Silencing of EZH2 also increased E-cadherin expression in vitro, and E-cadherin expression was inversely correlated with EZH2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissue samples. Patients with high EZH2 and low E-cadherin expression had the worst prognosis. RIP and ChIP assays suggest that EZH2 is recruited to the E-cadherin promoter by the long non-coding RNA, MALAT-1 (metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), where it represses E-cadherin expression. Our results show that EZH2-based therapies may be an option for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26848980

  17. Developmental methylation pattern regulates porcine GPR120 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, H M; Ma, J D; Jin, L; Liu, Y H; Che, T D; Li, M Z; Li, X W

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important component of the epigenetic machinery and plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation. It mostly occurs in CpG abundant regions, known as CpG islands (CGIs). G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) functions as an omega-3 fatty acid receptor and is involved in multiple-biological processes, including lipogenesis. Herein, we show that GPR120 is highly expressed in porcine mature adipose tissue and is positively associated with adipose tissue development (r = 0.86, P < 0.01). We also predicted 5 CGIs across the GPR120 genomic sequence and investigated their methylation status using the MassArray approach. Our results show that these CGIs exhibit significantly different methylation states (PCGI < 0.01), and that the DNA methylation of GPR120 5ꞌ-untranslated and first exon regions can negatively regulate its expression levels. This study will aid further investigations on the epigenetic mechanism regulating GPR120 expression. PMID:26909944

  18. Loss of functional E-cadherin renders cells more resistant to the apoptotic agent taxol in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Paulo; Oliveira, Maria Jose; Beraldi, Eliana; Mateus, Ana Rita; Nakajima, Takashi; Gleave, Martin; Yokota, Jun; Carneiro, Fatima; Huntsman, David; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo . E-mail: gsuriano@ipatimup.pt

    2005-10-15

    Experimental evidence supports a role for E-cadherin in suppressing invasion, metastasis, and proliferation. Germline mutations of the E-cadherin represent the genetic cause of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this type of tumor, isolated cancer cells permeate the basal membrane and paradoxically survive in the gastric wall in the absence of contact with neighbor epithelial cells or with the extracellular matrix. This suggests that upon E-cadherin deregulation, cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. To test this hypothesis, CHO cells stably expressing either wild-type E-cadherin or the HDGC-related germline mutations T340A and V832M were seeded either on a thin layer of collagen type I or on plastic and then subjected to the apoptotic agent taxol. We found that in vitro functional E-cadherin renders cells more sensitive to the effect of taxol. Our results also indicate that this effect is associated to decreased level of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 protein.

  19. Distinct Expression Pattern of a Deafness Gene, KIAA1199, in a Primate Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Hosoya, Makoto; Okano, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Deafness is one of the most common types of congenital impairments, and at least half of the cases are caused by hereditary mutations. Mutations of the gene KIAA1199 are associated with progressive hearing loss. Its expression is abundant in human cochlea, but interestingly the spatial expression patterns are different between mouse and rat cochleae; the pattern in humans has not been fully investigated. We performed immunohistochemical analysis of a nonhuman primate, common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), cochlea with a KIAA1199-specific antibody. In the common marmoset cochlea, KIAA1199 protein expression was more widespread than in rodents, with all epithelial cells, including hair cells, expressing KIAA1199. Our results suggest that the primate pattern of KIAA1199 expression is wider in comparison with rodents and may play an essential role in the maintenance of cochlear epithelial cells. PMID:27403418

  20. Structural Determinants of Cadherin-23 Function in Hearing and Deafness

    SciTech Connect

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2010-06-21

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects are unknown. We present crystal structures of the first and second extracellular cadherin repeats of cadherin-23. Overall, structures show typical cadherin folds, but reveal an elongated N terminus that precludes classical cadherin interactions and contributes to an N-terminal Ca{sup 2+}-binding site. The deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca{sup 2+} affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that cadherin-23 repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca{sup 2+} or mutating Ca{sup 2+}-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures define an uncharacterized cadherin family and, with simulations, suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with itself and with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  1. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  2. BEST: a novel computational approach for comparing gene expression patterns from early stages of Drosophila melanogaster development.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Jayaraman, Karthik; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Gurunathan, Rajalakshmi; Marti-Subirana, Ana; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2002-01-01

    Embryonic gene expression patterns are an indispensable part of modern developmental biology. Currently, investigators must visually inspect numerous images containing embryonic expression patterns to identify spatially similar patterns for inferring potential genetic interactions. The lack of a computational approach to identify pattern similarities is an impediment to advancement in developmental biology research because of the rapidly increasing amount of available embryonic gene expression data. Therefore, we have developed computational approaches to automate the comparison of gene expression patterns contained in images of early stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos (prior to the beginning of germ-band elongation); similarities and differences in gene expression patterns in these early stages have extensive developmental effects. Here we describe a basic expression search tool (BEST) to retrieve best matching expression patterns for a given query expression pattern and a computational device for gene interaction inference using gene expression pattern images and information on the associated genotypes and probes. Analysis of a prototype collection of Drosophila gene expression pattern images is presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods in identifying biologically meaningful matches and inferring gene interactions by direct image content analysis. In particular, the use of BEST searches for gene expression patterns is akin to that of BLAST searches for finding similar sequences. These computational developmental biology methodologies are likely to make the great wealth of embryonic gene expression pattern data easily accessible and to accelerate the discovery of developmental networks. PMID:12524369

  3. Slit1b-Robo3 signaling and N-cadherin regulate apical process retraction in developing retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Grace K W; Baudet, Marie-Laure; Norden, Caren; Leung, Louis; Harris, William A

    2012-01-01

    When neurons exit the cell cycle after their terminal mitosis, they detach from the apical surface of the neuroepithelium. Despite the fact that this detachment is crucial for further neurogenesis and neuronal migration, the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. Here, taking advantage of the genetics and imaging possibilities of the zebrafish retina as a model system, we show by knockdown experiments that the guidance molecule Slit1b and its receptor Robo3 are required for apical retraction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In contrast, N-cadherin seems to be responsible for maintenance of apical attachment, as expression of dominant-negative N-cadherin causes RGCs to lose apical attachments prematurely and rescues retraction in slit1b morphants. These results suggest that Slit-Robo signaling downregulates N-cadherin activity to allow apical retraction in newly generated RGCs. PMID:22219284

  4. Slit1b-Robo3 signaling and N-cadherin regulate apical process retraction in developing retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Grace K W; Baudet, Marie-Laure; Norden, Caren; Leung, Louis; Harris, William A.

    2012-01-01

    When neurons exit the cell cycle after their terminal mitosis, they detach from the apical surface of the neuroepithelium. Despite the fact that this detachment is crucial for further neurogenesis and neuronal migration, the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. Here, taking advantage of the genetics and imaging possibilities of the zebrafish retina as a model system, we show by knock down experiments that the guidance molecule Slit1b as well as its receptor Robo3 are required for apical retraction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In contrast, N-cadherin seems to be responsible for maintenance of apical attachment as expression of dominant-negative N-cadherin causes RGCs to lose apical attachments prematurely and rescues retraction in slit1b morphants. These results suggest that Slit-Robo signaling downregulates N-cadherin activity to allow apical retraction in newly generated RGCs. PMID:22219284

  5. Correlating Histone Modification Patterns with Gene Expression Data During Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gangqing; Zhao, Keji

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in mammals are an ideal system to study differentiation. While transcription factors (TFs) control the differentiation of HSCs to distinctive terminal blood cells, accumulating evidence suggests that chromatin structure and modifications constitute another critical layer of gene regulation. Recent genome-wide studies based on next-generation sequencing reveal that histone modifications are linked to gene expression and contribute to hematopoiesis. Here, we briefl y review the bioinformatics aspects for ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq data analysis with applications to the epigenetic studies of hematopoiesis and provide a practical guide to several basic data analysis methods. PMID:24743998

  6. Corneodesmosomal cadherins are preferential targets of stratum corneum trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like hyperactivity in Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Descargues, Pascal; Deraison, Céline; Prost, Catherine; Fraitag, Sylvie; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; D'Alessio, Marina; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Bodemer, Christine; Zambruno, Giovanna; Hovnanian, Alain

    2006-07-01

    SPINK5 (serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5), encoding the protease inhibitor LEKTI (lympho-epithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor), is the defective gene in Netherton syndrome (NS), a severe inherited keratinizing disorder. We have recently demonstrated epidermal protease hyperactivity in Spink5(-/-) mice resulting in desmosomal protein degradation. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the epidermal defect in 15 patients with NS. We demonstrated that, in a majority of patients, desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) and desmocollin 1 (Dsc1) were dramatically reduced in the upper most living layers of the epidermis. These defects were associated with premature degradation of corneodesmosomes. Stratum corneum tryptic enzyme (SCTE)-like and stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme (SCCE)-like activities were increased, suggesting that these proteases participate in the premature degradation of corneodesmosomal cadherins. SCTE and SCCE expression was extended to the cell layers where Dsg1 and Dsc1 immunostaining was reduced. In contrast, a subset of six patients with normal epidermal protease activity or residual LEKTI expression displayed apparently normal cadherin expression and less severe disease manifestations. This suggests a degree of correlation between cadherin degradation and clinical severity. This work further supports the implication of premature corneodesmosomal cadherin degradation in the pathogenesis of NS and provides evidence for additional factors playing a role in disease expression. PMID:16628198

  7. Genome-wide analysis of spatiotemporal gene expression patterns during early embryogenesis in rice.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Yutaka; Sato, Yutaka; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Shimizu-Sato, Sae; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Takehisa, Hinako; Sanguinet, Karen A; Namiki, Nobukazu; Nagamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-04-01

    Embryogenesis in rice is different from that of most dicotolydonous plants in that it shows a non-stereotypic cell division pattern, formation of dorsal-ventral polarity, and endogenous initiation of the radicle. To reveal the transcriptional features associated with developmental events during rice early embryogenesis, we used microarray analysis coupled with laser microdissection to obtain both spatial and temporal transcription profiles. Our results allowed us to determine spatial expression foci for each expressed gene in the globular embryo, which revealed the importance of phytohormone-related genes and a suite of transcription factors to early embryogenesis. Our analysis showed the polarized expression of a small number of genes along the apical-basal and dorsal-ventral axes in the globular embryo, which tended to fluctuate in later developmental stages. We also analyzed gene expression patterns in the early globular embryo and how this relates to expression in embryonic organs at later stages. We confirmed the accuracy of the expression patterns found by microarray analysis of embryo subdomains usingin situhybridization. Our study identified homologous genes fromArabidopsis thalianawith known functions in embryogenesis in addition to unique and uncharacterized genes that show polarized expression patterns during embryogenesis. The results of this study are presented in a database to provide a framework for spatiotemporal gene expression during rice embryogenesis, to serve as a resource for future functional analysis of genes, and as a basis for comparative studies of plant embryogenesis. PMID:26903508

  8. Dissecting sources of quantitative gene expression pattern divergence between Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D; Eckenrode, Kelly B; Lydiard-Martin, Tara; Pearl-Waserman, Sivanne; DePace, Angela H

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression patterns can diverge between species due to changes in a gene's regulatory DNA or changes in the proteins, e.g., transcription factors (TFs), that regulate the gene. We developed a modeling framework to uncover the sources of expression differences in blastoderm embryos of three Drosophila species, focusing on the regulatory circuit controlling expression of the hunchback (hb) posterior stripe. Using this framework and cellular-resolution expression measurements of hb and its regulating TFs, we found that changes in the expression patterns of hb's TFs account for much of the expression divergence. We confirmed our predictions using transgenic D. melanogaster lines, which demonstrate that this set of orthologous cis-regulatory elements (CREs) direct similar, but not identical, expression patterns. We related expression pattern differences to sequence changes in the CRE using a calculation of the CRE's TF binding site content. By applying this calculation in both the transgenic and endogenous contexts, we found that changes in binding site content affect sensitivity to regulating TFs and that compensatory evolution may occur in circuit components other than the CRE. PMID:22893002

  9. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  10. Recombinant fragilysin isoforms cause E-cadherin cleavage of intact cells and do not cleave isolated E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kharlampieva, Daria; Manuvera, Valentin; Podgorny, Oleg; Grafskaia, Ekaterina; Kovalchuk, Sergey; Pobeguts, Olga; Altukhov, Ilya; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2015-01-01

    The fragilysin (BFT) is a protein secreted by enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis strains. BFT contains zinc-binding motif which was found in the metzincins family of metalloproteinases. In this study, we generated three known recombinant isoforms of BFT using Escherichia coli, tested their activity and examined whether E-cadherin is a substrate for BFTs. BFT treatment of HT-29 cells induced endogenous E-cadherin cleavage, and this BFT activity requires the native structure of zinc-binding motif. At the same time recombinant BFTs did not cleave recombinant E-cadherin or E-cadherin in isolated cell fractions. It indicates that E-cadherin may be not direct substrate for BFT. We also detected and identified proteins released into the cultural medium after HT-29 cells treatment with BFT. The role of these proteins in pathogenesis and cell response to BFT remains to be determined. PMID:25998017

  11. E-cadherin inhibits cell surface localization of the pro-migratory 5T4 oncofetal antigen in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Helen L; Eastham, Angela M; Merry, Catherine L R; Southgate, Thomas D; Perez-Campo, Flor; Soncin, Francesca; Ritson, Sarah; Kemler, Rolf; Stern, Peter L; Ward, Christopher M

    2007-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) events occur during embryonic development and are important for the metastatic spread of epithelial tumors. We show here that spontaneous differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is associated with an E- to N-cadherin switch, up-regulation of E-cadherin repressor molecules (Snail and Slug proteins), gelatinase activity (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-2 and -9), and increased cellular motility, all characteristic EMT events. The 5T4 oncofetal antigen, previously shown to be associated with very early ES cell differentiation and altered motility, is also a part of this coordinated process. E- and N-cadherin and 5T4 proteins are independently regulated during ES cell differentiation and are not required for induction of EMT-associated transcripts and proteins, as judged from the study of the respective knockout ES cells. Further, abrogation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contact in undifferentiated ES cells using neutralizing antibody results in a reversible mesenchymal phenotype and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement that is concomitant with translocation of the 5T4 antigen from the cytoplasm to the cell surface in an energy-dependent manner. E-cadherin null ES cells are constitutively cell surface 5T4 positive, and although forced expression of E-cadherin cDNA in these cells is sufficient to restore cell-cell contact, cell surface expression of 5T4 antigen is unchanged. 5T4 and N-cadherin knockout ES cells exhibit significantly decreased motility during EMT, demonstrating a functional role for these proteins in this process. We conclude that E-cadherin protein stabilizes cortical actin cytoskeletal arrangement in ES cells, and this can prevent cell surface localization of the promigratory 5T4 antigen. PMID:17507657

  12. Systematic variation in gene expression patterns in human cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Douglas T.; Scherf, Uwe; Eisen, Michael B.; Perou, Charles M.; Rees, Christian; Spellman, Paul; Iyer, Vishwanath; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Van de Rijn, Matt; Waltham, Mark; Pergamenschikov, Alexander; Lee, Jeffrey C.F.; Lashkari, Deval; Shalon, Dari; Myers, Timothy G.; Weinstein, John N.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2000-01-01

    We used cDNA micro arrays to explore the variation in expression of approximately 8,000 unique genes among the 60 cell lines used in the National Cancer Institute s screen for anti-cancer drugs. Classification of the cell lines based solely on the observed patterns of gene expression revealed a correspondence to the ostensible origins of the tumors from which the cell lines were derived. The consistent relationship between the gene expression patterns and the tissue of origin allowed us to recognize outliers whose previous classification appeared incorrect. Specific features of the gene expression patterns appeared to be related to physiological properties of the cell lines, such as their doubling time in culture, drug metabolism or the interferon response. Comparison of gene expression patterns in the cell lines to those observed in normal breast tissue or in breast tumor specimens revealed features of the expression patterns in the tumors that had recognizable counterparts in specific cell lines, reflecting the tumor, stromal and inflammatory components of the tumor tissue. These results provided a novel molecular characterization of this important group of human cell lines and their relationships to tumors in vivo.

  13. Stochastic gene expression: Density of defects frozen into permanent Turing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziarmaga, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    We estimate density of defects frozen into a biological Turing pattern which was turned on at a finite rate. Self-locking of gene expression in individual cells, which makes the Turing transition discontinuous, stabilizes the pattern together with its defects. Defects frozen into the pattern are a permanent record of the transition-they give an animal its own characteristic lifelong ``fingerprints'' or, as for vital organ formation, they can be fatal. Density of defects scales like the fourth root of the transition rate. This dependence is so weak that there is not enough time during morphogenesis to get rid of defects simply by slowing down the rate. A defect-free pattern can be obtained by spatially inhomogeneous activation of the genes. If the supercritical density of activator spreads slower than certain threshold velocity, then the Turing pattern is expressed without any defects.

  14. CRH suppressed TGFβ1-induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition via induction of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lai; Chen, Jiandong; Li, Li; Li, Chuanhua; Chen, Cheng; Li, Shengnan

    2014-04-01

    Since its discovery in biopsies from breast cancer patients, the effect of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on carcinoma progression is still unclear. Transforming growth factorβ1 (TGFβ1) promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and induces Snail1 and Twist1 expressions. Loss of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mainly repressed by Snail1 and Twist1, has been considered as hallmark of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were used to investigate the effect of CRH on TGFβ1-induced EMT by transwell chamber. And HEK293 cells were transiently transfected with CRHR1 or CRHR2 to explore the definite effects of CRH receptor. We reported that CRH inhibited migration of human breast cancer cells through downregulation of Snail1 and Twist1, and subsequent upregulation of E-cadherin. CRH inhibited TGFβ1-mediated migration of MCF-7 via both CRHR1 and CRHR2 while this inhibition in MDA-MB-231 was mainly via CRHR2. Ectopic re-expression of CRHR1 or CRHR2 respectively in HEK293 cells increased E-cadherin expression after CRH stimulation. Furthermore, CRH repressed expression of mesenchymal marker, N-cadherin and induced expression of Occludin, inhibiting EMT in MCF-7 & MDA-MB-231. Our results suggest that CRH may function as a tumor suppressor, at least partly by regulating TGFβ1-mediated EMT. These results may contribute to uncovering the effect of CRH in breast tumorigenesis and progression. PMID:24412750

  15. Aberrant Methylation of the E-Cadherin Gene Promoter Region in the Endometrium of Women With Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ran, Ran; Guan, Yingxia; Zhu, Xiaoxiong; Kang, Shan

    2016-08-01

    A uterine fibroid is a leiomyoma that originates from the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. A variety of endometrial abnormalities are associated with uterine fibroids. This study aims to investigate the methylation status of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter region in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids. The methylation of CDH1 was studied using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in the endometrial tissue of 102 patients with uterine fibroids and 50 control patients. The E-cadherin expression was examined by flow cytometry. The methylation rate of CDH1 promoter region was 33.3% in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids and 8% in the endometrium of women without fibroids. The frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation in the endometrium of patients with fibroids was significantly higher than that in the endometrium of women without fibroids (P = .001). Furthermore, the E-cadherin expression level in methylation-positive tissues was significantly lower than that in methylation-negative tissues (P = .017). These results suggest that epigenetic aberration of CDH1 may occur in the endometrium of patients with fibroids, which may be associated with E-cadherin protein expression in endometrial tissue. PMID:26880767

  16. Gene Expression Patterns Associated With Histopathology in Toxic Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Danielle L; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Tawa, Gregory J; Baer, Christine E; Permenter, Matthew G; McDyre, Bonna C; Dennis, William E; Boyle, Molly H; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Streicker, Michael A; Snowden, Bobbi S; Lewis, John A; Wallqvist, Anders; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Toxic industrial chemicals induce liver injury, which is difficult to diagnose without invasive procedures. Identifying indicators of end organ injury can complement exposure-based assays and improve predictive power. A multiplexed approach was used to experimentally evaluate a panel of 67 genes predicted to be associated with the fibrosis pathology by computationally mining DrugMatrix, a publicly available repository of gene microarray data. Five-day oral gavage studies in male Sprague Dawley rats dosed with varying concentrations of 3 fibrogenic compounds (allyl alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, and 4,4'-methylenedianiline) and 2 nonfibrogenic compounds (bromobenzene and dexamethasone) were conducted. Fibrosis was definitively diagnosed by histopathology. The 67-plex gene panel accurately diagnosed fibrosis in both microarray and multiplexed-gene expression assays. Necrosis and inflammatory infiltration were comorbid with fibrosis. ANOVA with contrasts identified that 51 of the 67 predicted genes were significantly associated with the fibrosis phenotype, with 24 of these specific to fibrosis alone. The protein product of the gene most strongly correlated with the fibrosis phenotype PCOLCE (Procollagen C-Endopeptidase Enhancer) was dose-dependently elevated in plasma from animals administered fibrogenic chemicals (P < .05). Semiquantitative global mass spectrometry analysis of the plasma identified an additional 5 protein products of the gene panel which increased after fibrogenic toxicant administration: fibronectin, ceruloplasmin, vitronectin, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, and α2-macroglobulin. These results support the data mining approach for identifying gene and/or protein panels for assessing liver injury and may suggest bridging biomarkers for molecular mediators linked to histopathology. PMID:26396155

  17. Expression patterns of conserved microRNAs in the male gametophyte of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    PubMed

    Quinn, Christina R; Iriyama, Rie; Fernando, Danilo D

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate genes involved in various aspects of plant development, but their presence and expression patterns in the male gametophytes of gymnosperms have not yet been established. Therefore, this study identified and compared the expression patterns of conserved miRNAs from two stages of the male gametophyte of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), which are the mature (ungerminated) and germinated pollen. Microarray was used to identify conserved miRNAs that varied in expression between these two stages of the loblolly pine male gametophyte. Forty-seven conserved miRNAs showed significantly different expression levels between mature and germinated loblolly pine pollen. In particular, miRNAs representing 14 and 8 families were up- and down-regulated in germinated loblolly pine pollen, respectively. qRT-PCR was used to validate their expression patterns using representative miRNAs. Target genes and proteins were identified using psRNATarget program. Predicted targets of the 22 miRNA families belong mostly to classes of genes involved in defense/stress response, metabolism, regulation, and signaling. qRT-PCR was also used to validate the expression patterns of representative target genes. This study shows that conserved miRNAs are expressed in mature and germinated loblolly pine pollen. Many of these miRNAs are differentially expressed, which indicates that the two stages of the male gametophyte examined are regulated at the miRNA level. This study also expands our knowledge of the male gametophytes of seed plants by providing insights on some similarities and differences in the types and expression patterns of conserved miRNAs between loblolly pine with those of rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:24664256

  18. Distinct patterns of endosulfatase gene expression during Xenopus laevis limb development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi‐Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The heparan sulfate 6‐O‐endosulfatases sulf1 and sulf2 regulate multiple cellular processes and organ development. Sulfs modulate a range of heparan‐sulfate‐dependent extracellular pathways, including the fibroblast growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, and wingless/wnt signaling pathways. Known patterns of sulf transcript expression together with functional experiments have implicated the sulfs in chondrogenesis and muscle regeneration in mammals. Here, we describe the expression patterns of Xenopus laevis sulf1 and sulf2 in developing forelimbs and hindlimbs and demonstrate novel expression of the sulf transcripts in the regenerating hindlimbs, with prominent sulf2 expression in the proliferating blastema and transient expression of sulf1 in the redeveloping apical epidermal ridge. These findings further suggest involvement of the sulfs in successful limb regeneration in amphibians.

  19. Single-cell transcriptome analysis reveals coordinated ectopic gene expression patterns in medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Brennecke, Philip; Reyes, Alejandro; Pinto, Sheena; Rattay, Kristin; Nguyen, Michelle; Küchler, Rita; Huber, Wolfgang; Kyewski, Bruno; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of tissue-restricted self-antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is essential for self-tolerance induction and prevents autoimmunity, with each TRA being expressed in only a few mTECs. How this process is regulated in single mTECs and coordinated at the population level, such that the varied single-cell patterns add up to faithfully represent TRAs, is poorly understood. Here we used single-cell RNA-sequencing and provide evidence for numerous recurring TRA co-expression patterns, each present in only a subset of mTECs. Co-expressed genes clustered in the genome and showed enhanced chromatin accessibility. Our findings characterize TRA expression in mTECs as a coordinated process, which might involve local re-modeling of chromatin and thus ensures a comprehensive representation of the immunological self. PMID:26237553

  20. Computational gene expression profiling under salt stress reveals patterns of co-expression.

    PubMed

    Sanchita; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    Plants respond differently to environmental conditions. Among various abiotic stresses, salt stress is a condition where excess salt in soil causes inhibition of plant growth. To understand the response of plants to the stress conditions, identification of the responsible genes is required. Clustering is a data mining technique used to group the genes with similar expression. The genes of a cluster show similar expression and function. We applied clustering algorithms on gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum showing differential expression in Capsicum annuum under salt stress. The clusters, which were common in multiple algorithms were taken further for analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) further validated the findings of other cluster algorithms by visualizing their clusters in three-dimensional space. Functional annotation results revealed that most of the genes were involved in stress related responses. Our findings suggest that these algorithms may be helpful in the prediction of the function of co-expressed genes. PMID:26981411

  1. Spatial Analysis of Expression Patterns Predicts Genetic Interactions at the Mid-Hindbrain Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Dominik M.; Blöchl, Florian; Trümbach, Dietrich; Wurst, Wolfgang; Prakash, Nilima; Theis, Fabian J.

    2009-01-01

    The isthmic organizer mediating differentiation of mid- and hindbrain during vertebrate development is characterized by a well-defined pattern of locally restricted gene expression domains around the mid-hindbrain boundary (MHB). This pattern is established and maintained by a regulatory network between several transcription and secreted factors that is not yet understood in full detail. In this contribution we show that a Boolean analysis of the characteristic spatial gene expression patterns at the murine MHB reveals key regulatory interactions in this network. Our analysis employs techniques from computational logic for the minimization of Boolean functions. This approach allows us to predict also the interplay of the various regulatory interactions. In particular, we predict a maintaining, rather than inducing, effect of Fgf8 on Wnt1 expression, an issue that remained unclear from published data. Using mouse anterior neural plate/tube explant cultures, we provide experimental evidence that Fgf8 in fact only maintains but does not induce ectopic Wnt1 expression in these explants. In combination with previously validated interactions, this finding allows for the construction of a regulatory network between key transcription and secreted factors at the MHB. Analyses of Boolean, differential equation and reaction-diffusion models of this network confirm that it is indeed able to explain the stable maintenance of the MHB as well as time-courses of expression patterns both under wild-type and various knock-out conditions. In conclusion, we demonstrate that similar to temporal also spatial expression patterns can be used to gain information about the structure of regulatory networks. We show, in particular, that the spatial gene expression patterns around the MHB help us to understand the maintenance of this boundary on a systems level. PMID:19936059

  2. Significance of Heterogeneous Twist2 Expression in Human Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yubin; Zhang, Nini; Xu, Jinfei; Ding, Zhijie; Zong, Rongrong; Liu, Zuguo

    2012-01-01

    Background Twist2 (Dermo1) has been shown to mediate the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to promote tumor invasion and even metastasis. However, the involvement of EMT in breast cancer progression is highly debated, partially due to clinical observations showing that the majority of human breast carcinoma metastases express E-cadherin and maintain their epithelial morphology. The molecular mechanism by which Twist2 participates in EMT of breast cancer in vivo remains poorly understood. Methods We examined Twist2 expression pattern in human breast carcinomas by western blot and tissue microarray, and analyzed Twist2 cellular localization by confocal microscopy, cell fractionation and other approaches. Results Twist2 expression was significantly increased in breast cancer. Cytoplasmic Twist2 positive cancer cells expressing E-cadherin on the cellular membrane were mainly located at tumor center of primary carcinomas and lymph metastases, while cancer cells with nuclear Twist2 clearly showed loss of E-cadherin and were detected at the invasive front in ductal breast carcinomas. In addition, ectopically stable-expressed Twist2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Collectively, these data indicate that upregulation of cytoplasmic Twist2 is correlated with tumor histological type and tumor metastasis in human breast cancers. Conclusion The differential cellular distribution of Twist2 may be associated with tumor progression. The cytoplasmic Twist2 in cancer cells at tumor center of primary carcinomas and lymph metastases contributes to the maintenance of epithelial cancer characteristics expressing E-cadherin in a noninvasive state, while the nuclear Twist2 at the cancer invasion front activates EMT to deprive epithelial property of neoplastic cells, thus facilitating invasion and metastasis. These findings suggest that heterogeneous expression of Twist2 in tumors may have a functional link to tumor progression. PMID:23133563

  3. Modulation of integrin and E-cadherin-mediated adhesions to spatially control heterogeneity in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Toh, Yi-Chin; Xing, Jiangwa; Yu, Hanry

    2015-05-01

    Heterogeneity in human pluripotent stem cell (PSC) fates is partially caused by mechanical asymmetry arising from spatial polarization of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. Independent studies have shown that integrin and E-cadherin adhesions promote opposing differentiation and pluripotent fates respectively although their crosstalk mechanism in modulating cell fate heterogeneity remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that spatial polarization of integrin and E-cadherin adhesions in a human PSC colony compete to recruit Rho-ROCK activated myosin II to different localities to pattern pluripotent-differentiation decisions, resulting in spatially heterogeneous colonies. Cell micropatterning was used to modulate the spatial polarization of cell adhesions, which enabled us to prospectively determine localization patterns of activated myosin II and mesoendoderm differentiation. Direct inhibition of Rho-ROCK-myosin II activation phenocopied E-cadherin rather than integrin inhibition to form uniformly differentiated colonies. This indicated that E-cadherin was the primary gatekeeper to differentiation progression. This insight allows for biomaterials to be tailored for human PSC maintenance or differentiation with minimal heterogeneity. PMID:25736499

  4. Morphological restriction of human coronary artery endothelial cells substantially impacts global gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Jessica M; Pham, Robert; Rowntree, Rebecca K; Amaya, Clarissa; Battiste, James; Boucheron, Laura E; Mitchell, Dianne C; Bryan, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in cell shape have been shown to modulate chromatin condensation and cell lineage specification; however, the mechanisms controlling these processes are largely unknown. Because endothelial cells experience cyclic mechanical changes from blood flow during normal physiological processes and disrupted mechanical changes as a result of abnormal blood flow, cell shape deformation and loss of polarization during coronary artery disease, we aimed to determine how morphological restriction affects global gene expression patterns. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were cultured on spatially defined adhesive micropatterns, forcing them to conform to unique cellular morphologies differing in cellular polarization and angularity. We utilized pattern recognition algorithms and statistical analysis to validate the cytoskeletal pattern reproducibility and uniqueness of each micropattern, and performed microarray analysis on normal-shaped and micropatterned HCAECs to determine how constrained cellular morphology affects gene expression patterns. Analysis of the data revealed that forcing HCAECs to conform to geometrically-defined shapes significantly affects their global transcription patterns compared to nonrestricted shapes. Interestingly, gene expression patterns were altered in response to morphological restriction in general, although they were consistent regardless of the particular shape the cells conformed to. These data suggest that the ability of HCAECs to spread, although not necessarily their particular morphology, dictates their genomics patterns. PMID:23802622

  5. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling cascade during T-cell activation: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Piyali; Chowdhury, Saikat; Bhowmick, Rupa; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2015-10-01

    Various T-cell co-receptor molecules and calcium channel CRAC play a pivotal role in the maintenance of cell's functional responses by regulating the production of effector molecules (mostly cytokines) that aids in immune clearance and also maintaining the cell in a functionally active state. Any defect in these co-receptor signalling pathways may lead to an altered expression pattern of the effector molecules. To study the propagation of such defects with time and their effect on the intracellular protein expression patterns, a comprehensive and largest pathway map of T-cell activation network is reconstructed manually. The entire pathway reactions are then translated using logical equations and simulated using the published time series microarray expression data as inputs. After validating the model, the effect of in silico knock down of co-receptor molecules on the expression patterns of their downstream proteins is studied and simultaneously the changes in the phenotypic behaviours of the T-cell population are predicted, which shows significant variations among the proteins expression and the signalling routes through which the response is propagated in the cytoplasm. This integrative computational approach serves as a valuable technique to study the changes in protein expression patterns and helps to predict variations in the cellular behaviour. PMID:26564978

  6. Non-Recessive Bt Toxin Resistance Conferred by an Intracellular Cadherin Mutation in Field-Selected Populations of Cotton Bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haonan; Wu, Shuwen; Yang, Yihua; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Wu, Yidong

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins. PMID:23285292

  7. Vascular endothelial-cadherin downregulation as a feature of endothelial transdifferentiation in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Maltabe, Violetta; Manitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Karras, Panagiotis; Kouklis, Panos; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Maniatis, Nikolaos A

    2016-08-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary hypertension (PH) is caused by vasoconstriction and obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by proliferating vascular cells. In analogy to cancer, subsets of proliferating cells may be derived from endothelial cells transitioning into a mesenchymal phenotype. To understand phenotypic shifts transpiring within endothelial cells in PH, we injected rats with alkaloid monocrotaline to induce PH and measured lung tissue levels of endothelial-specific protein and critical differentiation marker vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. VE-cadherin expression by immonoblotting declined significantly 24 h and 15 days postinjection to rebound to baseline at 30 days. There was a concomitant increase in transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug, along with a reduction in VE-cadherin mRNA. Mesenchymal markers α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin were upregulated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, and α-smooth muscle actin was colocalized with endothelial marker platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 by confocal microscopy. Apoptosis was limited in this model, especially in the 24-h time point. In addition, monocrotaline resulted in activation of protein kinase B/Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and increased lung tissue nitrotyrosine staining. To understand the etiological relationship between nitrosative stress and VE-cadherin suppression, we incubated cultured rat lung endothelial cells with endothelin-1, a vasoconstrictor and pro-proliferative agent in pulmonary arterial hypertension. This resulted in activation of eNOS, NF-κB, and Akt, in addition to induction of Snail, downregulation of VE-cadherin, and synthesis of vimentin. These effects were blocked by eNOS inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. We propose that transcriptional repression of VE-cadherin by nitrosative stress is involved in endothelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation in experimental PH. PMID

  8. Ordered expression pattern of Hox and ParaHox genes along the alimentary canal in the ascidian juvenile.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Satoshi; Satou, Kunihiro; Orito, Wataru; Ogasawara, Michio

    2016-07-01

    The Hox and ParaHox genes of bilateria share a similar expression pattern along the body axis and are known to be associated with anterior-posterior patterning. In vertebrates, the Hox genes are also expressed in presomitic mesoderm and gut endoderm and the ParaHox genes show a restricted expression pattern in the gut-related derivatives. Regional expression patterns in the embryonic central nervous system of the basal chordates amphioxus and ascidian have been reported; however, little is known about their endodermal expression in the alimentary canal. We focus on the Hox and ParaHox genes in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis and investigate the gene expression patterns in the juvenile, which shows morphological regionality in the alimentary canal. Gene expression analyses by using whole-mount in situ hybridization reveal that all Hox genes have a regional expression pattern along the alimentary canal. Expression of Hox1 to Hox4 is restricted to the posterior region of pharyngeal derivatives. Hox5 to Hox13 show an ordered expression pattern correlated with each Hox gene number along the postpharyngeal digestive tract. This expression pattern along the anterior-posterior axis has also been observed in Ciona ParaHox genes. Our observations suggest that ascidian Hox and ParaHox clusters are dispersed; however, the ordered expression patterns along the alimentary canal appear to be conserved among chordates. PMID:26837224

  9. Disruption of E-Cadherin by Matrix Metalloproteinase Directly Mediates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Downstream of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoping; Lyons, James Guy; Tan, Thian Kui; Wang, Yiping; Hsu, Tzu-Ting; Min, Danqing; Succar, Lena; Rangan, Gopala K.; Hu, Min; Henderson, Beric R.; Alexander, Stephen I.; Harris, David C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in organ fibrosis, including that of the kidney. Loss of E-cadherin expression is a hallmark of EMT; however, whether the loss of E-cadherin is a consequence or a cause of EMT remains unknown, especially in the renal system. In this study, we show that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced EMT in renal tubular epithelial cells is dependent on proteolysis. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediated E-cadherin disruption led directly to tubular epithelial cell EMT via Slug. TGF-β1 induced the proteolytic shedding of E-cadherin, which caused the nuclear translocation of β-catenin, the transcriptional induction of Slug, and the repression of E-cadherin transcription in tubular epithelial cells. These findings reveal a direct role for E-cadherin and for matrix metalloproteinases in causing EMT downstream of TGF-β1 in fibrotic disease. Specific inhibition rather than activation of matrix metalloproteinases may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic disease. PMID:19590041

  10. A colorectal cell line with alterations in E-cadherin and epithelial biology may be an in vitro model of colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, I; Hardy, R; Jones, T; Jankowski, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been shown previously in ulcerative colitis tissue that E-cadherin can occasionally be mutated in the extracellular domain early in neoplastic progression. E-cadherin is known to maintain differentiation and inhibits invasion in vivo. AIMS: To assess the mechanisms by which such dysfunction occurs. METHODS: Four human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCA-7 colonies 1, 3, 6, and 30, derived from a single heterogeneous colorectal cancer were studied. The HCA-7 cell line has p53 mutations and a random errors of replication "positive" phenotype, as is seen in early colitis associated cancers or hereditary nonpolyposis coli cancer (HNPCC). RESULTS: Cell lines 6 and 30 expressed E-cadherin abundantly and this correlated positively with their degree of differentiation and organisation; however, both cell lines had loss of heterozygosity of E-cadherin. Interestingly, E-cadherin production was downregulated in the poorly differentiated cell line 1, and this was associated with major chromosomal rearrangements of 16q. This cell line also had a mutation in the homophilic binding domain of exon 4, which was associated with disaggregation by low titres of a function blocking antibody, and an invasive phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: These multiple biological alterations further characterise the complex association that E-cadherin has with tumour heterogeneity and suggest that this series of cell lines may be a useful model of colitis associated or HNPCC associated tumorigenesis. PMID:10694944

  11. Small molecule/ML327 mediated transcriptional de-repression of E-cadherin and inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    An, Hanbing; Stoops, Sydney L.; Deane, Natasha G.; Zhu, Jing; Zi, Jinghuan; Weaver, Connie; Waterson, Alex G.; Zijlstra, Andries; Lindsley, Craig W.; Beauchamp, Robert Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional repression of E-cadherin is a hallmark of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and is associated with cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying E-cadherin repression during EMT may provide insights into the development of novel targeted therapeutics for cancer. Here, we report on the chemical probe, ML327, which de-represses E-cadherin transcription, partially reverses EMT, and inhibits cancer cell invasiveness and tumor cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Induction of E-cadherin mRNA expression by ML327 treatment does not require de novo protein synthesis. RNA sequencing analysis revealed that ML327 treatment significantly alters expression of over 2,500 genes within three hours in the presence of the translational inhibitor, cycloheximide. Network analysis reveals Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) as the most significant upstream transcriptional regulator of multiple genes whose expressions were altered by ML327 treatment. Further, small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of HNF4α markedly attenuates the E-cadherin expression response to ML327. In summary, ML327 represents a valuable tool to understand mechanisms of EMT and may provide the basis for a novel targeted therapeutic strategy for carcinomas. PMID:26082441

  12. Expression patterns of SH3BGR family members in zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fang; Zhang, Mingming; Guo, Xiaoling; Shi, Hongshun; Li, Li; Guan, Wen; Wang, Haihe; Yang, Shulan

    2016-07-01

    SH3 domain-binding glutamic acid-rich (SH3BGR) gene family is composed of SH3BGR, SH3BGRL, SH3BGRL2, and SH3BGRL3 which encodes a cluster of small thioredoxin-like proteins and shares a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. However, biological functions of SH3BGR family members are largely elusive. Given that zebrafish (Danio rerio) sh3bgrl, sh3bgrl2, sh3bgrl3, and sh3bgr are evolutionally identical to their corresponding human orthologues, we analyzed the spatiotemporal expression of SH3BGR family members in zebrafish embryonic development stages by in situ hybridization. Our results revealed that except sh3bgrl, other members are all maternally expressed, especially for sh3bgrl3 that is strongly expressed from one-cell stage to juvenile fishes. In situ expression patterns of SH3BGR members are similar in the very early developmental stages, including with commonly strong expression in intestines, olfactory bulbs, and neuromasts for neural system building up. Organ-specific expressions are also demonstrated, of which sh3bgr is uniquely expressed in sarcomere, and sh3bgrl3 in liver. sh3bgrl and sh3bgrl2 are similarly expressed in intestines, notochords, and neuromasts after 12-h post-fertilization of embryos. Eventually, messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of all sh3bgr members are mainly constrained into intestines of juvenile fishes. Collectively, our study clarified the expression patterns of sh3bgr family members in diverse organogenesis in embryonic development and indicates that SH3BGR members may play predominant roles in neural system development and in maintenance of normal function of digestive organs, especially for intestine homeostasis. However, their expression patterns are varied with the development stages and organ types, suggesting that the aberrant expression of these members would result in multiple diseases. PMID:27233781

  13. Adaptation of video game UVW mapping to 3D visualization of gene expression patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vize, Peter D.; Gerth, Victor E.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of gene expression patterns within an organism plays a critical role in associating genes with biological processes in both health and disease. During embryonic development the analysis and comparison of different gene expression patterns allows biologists to identify candidate genes that may regulate the formation of normal tissues and organs and to search for genes associated with congenital diseases. No two individual embryos, or organs, are exactly the same shape or size so comparing spatial gene expression in one embryo to that in another is difficult. We will present our efforts in comparing gene expression data collected using both volumetric and projection approaches. Volumetric data is highly accurate but difficult to process and compare. Projection methods use UV mapping to align texture maps to standardized spatial frameworks. This approach is less accurate but is very rapid and requires very little processing. We have built a database of over 180 3D models depicting gene expression patterns mapped onto the surface of spline based embryo models. Gene expression data in different models can easily be compared to determine common regions of activity. Visualization software, both Java and OpenGL optimized for viewing 3D gene expression data will also be demonstrated.

  14. Geometric Morphometrics on Gene Expression Patterns Within Phenotypes: A Case Example on Limb Development.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Mateu, Roger; Niksic, Martina; Russo, Lucia; Sharpe, James

    2016-03-01

    How the genotype translates into the phenotype through development is critical to fully understand the evolution of phenotypes. We propose a novel approach to directly assess how changes in gene expression patterns are associated with changes in morphology using the limb as a case example. Our method combines molecular biology techniques, such as whole-mount in situ hybridization, with image and shape analysis, extending the use of Geometric Morphometrics to the analysis of nonanatomical shapes, such as gene expression domains. Elliptical Fourier and Procrustes-based semilandmark analyses were used to analyze the variation and covariation patterns of the limb bud shape with the expression patterns of two relevant genes for limb morphogenesis, Hoxa11 and Hoxa13. We devised a multiple thresholding method to semiautomatically segment gene domains at several expression levels in large samples of limb buds from C57Bl6 mouse embryos between 10 and 12 postfertilization days. Besides providing an accurate phenotyping tool to quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics of gene expression patterns within developing structures, our morphometric analyses revealed high, non-random, and gene-specific variation undergoing canalization during limb development. Our results demonstrate that Hoxa11 and Hoxa13, despite being paralogs with analogous functions in limb patterning, show clearly distinct dynamic patterns, both in shape and size, and are associated differently with the limb bud shape. The correspondence between our results and already well-established molecular processes underlying limb development confirms that this morphometric approach is a powerful tool to extract features of development regulating morphogenesis. Such multilevel analyses are promising in systems where not so much molecular information is available and will advance our understanding of the genotype-phenotype map. In systematics, this knowledge will increase our ability to infer how evolution modified a common

  15. Geometric Morphometrics on Gene Expression Patterns Within Phenotypes: A Case Example on Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Mateu, Roger; Niksic, Martina; Russo, Lucia; Sharpe, James

    2016-01-01

    How the genotype translates into the phenotype through development is critical to fully understand the evolution of phenotypes. We propose a novel approach to directly assess how changes in gene expression patterns are associated with changes in morphology using the limb as a case example. Our method combines molecular biology techniques, such as whole-mount in situ hybridization, with image and shape analysis, extending the use of Geometric Morphometrics to the analysis of nonanatomical shapes, such as gene expression domains. Elliptical Fourier and Procrustes-based semilandmark analyses were used to analyze the variation and covariation patterns of the limb bud shape with the expression patterns of two relevant genes for limb morphogenesis, Hoxa11 and Hoxa13. We devised a multiple thresholding method to semiautomatically segment gene domains at several expression levels in large samples of limb buds from C57Bl6 mouse embryos between 10 and 12 postfertilization days. Besides providing an accurate phenotyping tool to quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics of gene expression patterns within developing structures, our morphometric analyses revealed high, non-random, and gene-specific variation undergoing canalization during limb development. Our results demonstrate that Hoxa11 and Hoxa13, despite being paralogs with analogous functions in limb patterning, show clearly distinct dynamic patterns, both in shape and size, and are associated differently with the limb bud shape. The correspondence between our results and already well-established molecular processes underlying limb development confirms that this morphometric approach is a powerful tool to extract features of development regulating morphogenesis. Such multilevel analyses are promising in systems where not so much molecular information is available and will advance our understanding of the genotype–phenotype map. In systematics, this knowledge will increase our ability to infer how evolution modified a common

  16. Interactive Exploration of Microarray Gene Expression Patterns in a Reduced Dimensional Space

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Jatin; Schmitt, William; Hwang, Daehee; Hsiao, Li-Li; Gullans, Steve; Stephanopoulos, George; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    The very high dimensional space of gene expression measurements obtained by DNA microarrays impedes the detection of underlying patterns in gene expression data and the identification of discriminatory genes. In this paper we show the use of projection methods such as principal components analysis (PCA) to obtain a direct link between patterns in the genes and patterns in samples. This feature is useful in the initial interactive pattern exploration of gene expression data and data-driven learning of the nature and types of samples. Using oligonucleotide microarray measurements of 40 samples from different normal human tissues, we show that distinct patterns are obtained when the genes are projected on a two-dimensional plane spanned by the loadings of the two major principal components. These patterns define the particular genes associated with a sample class (i.e., tissue). When used separately from the other genes, these class-specific (i.e., tissue-specific) genes in turn define distinct tissue patterns in the projection space spanned by the scores of the two major principal components. In this study, PCA projection facilitated discriminatory gene selection for different tissues and identified tissue-specific gene expression signatures for liver, skeletal muscle, and brain samples. Furthermore, it allowed the classification of nine new samples belonging to these three types using the linear combination of the expression levels of the tissue-specific genes determined from the first set of samples. The application of the technique to other published data sets is also discussed. [Online supplementary material available at www.genome.org.] PMID:12097349

  17. Identification of new human cadherin genes using a combination of protein motif search and gene finding methods.

    PubMed

    Hoeng, Julia C; Höng, Julia C; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Hodor, Paul; Xia, Menghang; Wei, Nan; Blevins, Richard; Gerhold, David; Borodovsky, Mark; Liu, Yuan

    2004-03-19

    We have combined protein motif search and gene finding methods to identify genes encoding proteins containing specific domains. Particularly, we have focused on finding new human genes of the cadherin superfamily proteins, which represent a major group of cell-cell adhesion receptors contributing to embryonic neuronal morphogenesis. Models for three cadherin protein motifs were generated from over 100 already annotated cadherin domains and used to search the complete translated human genome. The genomic sequence regions containing motif "hits" were analyzed by eukaryotic GeneMark.hmm to identify the exon-intron structure of new genes. Three new genes CDH-J, PCDH-J and FAT-J were found. The predicted proteins PCDH-J and FAT-J were classified into protocadherin and FAT-like subfamilies, respectively, based on the number and organization of cadherin domains and presence of subfamily-specific conserved amino acid residues. Expression of FAT-J was shown in almost all tested tissues. The exon-intron organization of CDH-J was experimentally verified by PCR with specifically designed primers and its tissue-specific expression was demonstrated. The described methodology can be applied to discover new genes encoding proteins from families with well-characterized structural and functional domains. PMID:15003449

  18. PTK6 Inhibition Suppresses Metastases of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer via SNAIL-Dependent E-Cadherin Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Park, Sun Hee; Nayak, Anupma; Byerly, Jessica H; Irie, Hanna Y

    2016-08-01

    Patients with triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are at high risk for recurrent or metastatic disease despite standard treatment, underscoring the need for novel therapeutic targets and strategies. Here we report that protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) is expressed in approximately 70% of TNBCs where it acts to promote survival and metastatic lung colonization. PTK6 downregulation in mesenchymal TNBC cells suppressed migration and three-dimensional culture growth, and enhanced anoikis, resistance to which is considered a prerequisite for metastasis. PTK6 downregulation restored E-cadherin levels via proteasome-dependent degradation of the E-cadherin repressor SNAIL. Beyond being functionally required in TNBC cells, kinase-active PTK6 also suppressed E-cadherin expression, promoted cell migration, and increased levels of mesenchymal markers in nontransformed MCF10A breast epithelial cells, consistent with a role in promoting an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). SNAIL downregulation and E-cadherin upregulation mediated by PTK6 inhibition induced anoikis, leading to impaired metastatic lung colonization in vivo Finally, effects of PTK6 downregulation were phenocopied by treatment with a recently developed PTK6 kinase inhibitor, further implicating kinase activity in regulation of EMT and metastases. Our findings illustrate the clinical potential for PTK6 inhibition to improve treatment of patients with high-risk TNBC. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4406-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27302163

  19. BCL6 induces EMT by promoting the ZEB1-mediated transcription repression of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Mei; Sun, Wei; Hua, Fang; Xie, Jing; Lin, Heng; Zhou, Dan-Dan; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2015-09-01

    B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (BCL6), a transcriptional repressor, is involved in the development and progression of breast cancers with uncertain mechanism. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential effect and mechanism of BCL6 in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a critical cellular process for controlling the development and progression of breast cancers. We found that BCL6 promoted invasion, migration and growth by stimulating EMT in breast cancer cells. BCL6 induced EMT by enhancing the expression of transcriptional repressor ZEB1 which bound to the E-cadherin promoter and repressing the E-cadherin transcription. Deletion of ZEB1 protected against the pro-EMT roles of BCL6 by restoring the expression of E-cadherin in these cells. Moreover, inhibition of BCL6 with BCL6 inhibitor 79-6 suppressed these functions of BCL6 in breast cancer cells. These findings indicate that BCL6 promotes EMT via enhancing the ZEB1-mediated transcriptional repression of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells. Targeting BCL6 has therapeutic potential against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:26049022

  20. Gene expression pattern recognition algorithm inferences to classify samples exposed to chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushel, Pierre R.; Bennett, Lee; Hamadeh, Hisham; Green, James; Ableson, Alan; Misener, Steve; Paules, Richard; Afshari, Cynthia

    2002-06-01

    We present an analysis of pattern recognition procedures used to predict the classes of samples exposed to pharmacologic agents by comparing gene expression patterns from samples treated with two classes of compounds. Rat liver mRNA samples following exposure for 24 hours with phenobarbital or peroxisome proliferators were analyzed using a 1700 rat cDNA microarray platform. Sets of genes that were consistently differentially expressed in the rat liver samples following treatment were stored in the MicroArray Project System (MAPS) database. MAPS identified 238 genes in common that possessed a low probability (P < 0.01) of being randomly detected as differentially expressed at the 95% confidence level. Hierarchical cluster analysis on the 238 genes clustered specific gene expression profiles that separated samples based on exposure to a particular class of compound.

  1. Nucleolar protein 4-like has a complex expression pattern in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Borah, Supriya; Barrodia, Praveen; Swain, Rajeeb K

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolar protein 4-like (NOL4L) gene is present on chromosome 20 (20q11.21) in humans. Parts of this gene have been shown to fuse with RUNX1 and PAX5 in acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, respectively. The normal function of NOL4L in humans and other organisms is not well understood. The expression patterns and functions of NOL4L homologs during vertebrate development have not been reported. We sought to address these questions by studying the expression pattern of zebrafish nol4l during embryogenesis. Our data show that Znol4l mRNA is expressed in multiple organs in zebrafish embryos. The sites of expression include parts of the brain, spinal cord, pronephros, hematopoietic cells and gut. PMID:26934290

  2. Myocardial connexin-43 and N-Cadherin decrease during vanadium inhalation.

    PubMed

    Fortoul, Teresa I; Soto-Mota, Adrian; Rojas-Lemus, Marcela; Rodriguez-Lara, Vianey; Gonzalez-Villalva, Adriana; Montaño, Luis F; Paez, Araceli; Colin-Barenque, Laura; López-Valdez, Nelly; Cano-Gutiérrez, Gumaro; Bizarro-Nevares, Patricia; Ustarroz-Cano, Martha

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter air pollution has considerably increased during the last decades; vanadium is a transition element adhered to this particulate matter, and the combustion of fossil fuels is the main source in the atmosphere. It has been reported that air pollution and specifically vanadium exposure increases the probability of suffering arrhythmias; however the biological mechanism of such a relationship remains unknown. It has been established that a diminished presence of N-Cadherin alters the Connexin-43 arrangement, and the consequent altered presence of these proteins predisposes to ventricular heart rate problems. We analyzed myocardial histology and the expression of N-Cadherin and Connexin-43 by immunohistochemistry in mouse that inhaled vanadium. Our results showed a significant and progressive reduction in both N-Cadherin and Connexin-43, as well as the presence of meganucleus; myofibrils disruption, and clumping in the exposed groups were also observed. Our findings add more information about a possible explanation for the arrythmogenic effect observed in dwellers of cities with high particulate matter atmospheric pollution. PMID:26568576

  3. Letter to the Editor: Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Release Oncogenic Soluble E-Cadherin.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Since their discovery, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Despite intensive research and remarkable progress, it is becoming increasingly acknowledged that their yet incomplete, biological characterisation represents one of the major drawbacks to their successful translation into the clinics. The expression of the transmembrane protein E-cadherin in hPSCs is well defined to be pivotal to the maintenance of the pluripotent state by mediating intercellular adhesion and intracellular signaling. Next to these canonical functions, were here report for the first time that hPSCs are subject to matrix metalloproteinase-dependent E-cadherin ectodomain shedding. This generates a ∼80-kD, soluble E-cadherin fragment which is released into the extracellular space, and which is well described to exert paracrine signaling activity and classified as being oncogenic. Collectively, this finding does not only improve our knowledge on the signaling crosstalk between hPSCs and their cellular environment and the type and nature of the paracrine signals produced by these cells, but also has clear implications for the development of efficient and safe stem cell-based therapies. Stem Cells 2016;34:2443-2446. PMID:27399873

  4. Biclustering for the comprehensive search of correlated gene expression patterns using clustered seed expansion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In a functional analysis of gene expression data, biclustering method can give crucial information by showing correlated gene expression patterns under a subset of conditions. However, conventional biclustering algorithms still have some limitations to show comprehensive and stable outputs. Results We propose a novel biclustering approach called “BIclustering by Correlated and Large number of Individual Clustered seeds (BICLIC)” to find comprehensive sets of correlated expression patterns in biclusters using clustered seeds and their expansion with correlation of gene expression. BICLIC outperformed competing biclustering algorithms by completely recovering implanted biclusters in simulated datasets with various types of correlated patterns: shifting, scaling, and shifting-scaling. Furthermore, in a real yeast microarray dataset and a lung cancer microarray dataset, BICLIC found more comprehensive sets of biclusters that are significantly enriched to more diverse sets of biological terms than those of other competing biclustering algorithms. Conclusions BICLIC provides significant benefits in finding comprehensive sets of correlated patterns and their functional implications from a gene expression dataset. PMID:23496895

  5. Hepatopancreatic multi-transcript expression patterns in the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus during the moult cycle.

    PubMed

    Yudkovski, Y; Shechter, A; Chalifa-Caspi, V; Auslander, M; Ophir, R; Dauphin-Villemant, C; Waterman, M; Sagi, A; Tom, M

    2007-12-01

    Alterations of hepatopancreatic multi-transcript expression patterns, related to induced moult cycle, were identified in male Cherax quadricarinatus through cDNA microarray hybridizations of hepatopancreatic transcript populations. Moult was induced by X-organ sinus gland extirpation or by repeated injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone. Manipulated males were sacrificed at premoult or early postmoult, and a reference population was sacrificed at intermoult. Differentially expressed genes among the four combinations of two induction methods and two moult stages were identified. Biologically interesting clusters revealing concurrently changing transcript expressions across treatments were selected, characterized by a general shift of expression throughout premoult and early postmoult vs. intermoult, or by different premoult vs. postmoult expressions. A number of genes were differentially expressed in 20-hydroxyecdysone-injected crayfish vs. X-organ sinus gland extirpated males. PMID:18092996

  6. Differential Expression Patterns and Developmental Roles of Duplicated Scinderin-Like Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Sujuan; Nakaya, Naoki; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2011-01-01

    Scinderin, the closest homologue of the actin-severing protein, gelsolin, has two similar paralogs (Scinla and Scinlb) in zebrafish. Scinla is abundant in the adult cornea; Scinlb comprises considerably less corneal protein. Here we show that scinla is expressed in the nose, lens, brain, cornea and annular ligament of the iridocorneal angle; by contrast, scinlb is expressed in the hatching gland, floor plate, notochord, otic vesicle, brain, pharynx, cartilage, swim bladder and cornea. Activity of scinla and scinlb promoter fragments driving the EGFP reporter gene in transgenic zebrafish resembled scinla or scinlb expression. Previously, we showed that reduction of scinla by injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides ventralized embryos; here specific reduction of scinlb expression led to subtle brain abnormalities associated with increased cell death, decreased shhb expression in the floor plate, and slightly reduced eye distance. Thus, scinla and scinlb have different expression patterns and developmental roles during zebrafish development. PMID:19681161

  7. Characterizing the initial encounter complex in cadherin adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Zhang, Yunxiang; Nelson, W. James; Chu, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cadherins are Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion proteins with an extracellular region of five domains (EC1 to EC5). Adhesion is mediated by “strand-swapping” of a conserved tryptophan residue in position 2 between EC1 domains of opposing cadherins, but the formation of this structure is not well understood. Using single molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and single molecule force measurements with the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), we demonstrate that cadherins initially interact via EC1 domains without swapping tryptophan-2 to form a weak Ca2+ dependent initial encounter complex that has 25% of the bond strength of a strand-swapped dimer. We suggest that cadherin dimerization proceeds via an induced fit mechanism where the monomers first form a tryptophan-2 independent initial encounter complex and then undergo subsequent conformational changes to form the final strand-swapped dimer. PMID:19646884

  8. E-Cadherin Facilitates Protein Kinase D1 Activation and Subcellular Localization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Zhang, Chuanyou; Chen, Li; Li, Guosheng; Qu, Ling; Balaji, K C; Du, Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Protein kinase D 1 (PKD1) is a serine/threonine kinase implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular functions including cell growth, differentiation, adhesion and motility. The current model for PKD1 activation involves diacylglycerol (DAG) binding to the C1 domain of PKD1 which results in the translocation of PKD1 to subcellular membranes where PKD1 is phosphorylated and activated by protein kinase C (PKC). In this study, we have identified a novel regulation of PKD1 activation. The epithelial cell membrane protein E-cadherin physically binds to PKD1 which leads to a subcellular redistribution of PKD1. Furthermore, artificial targeting of PKD1 to the membrane leads to PKD1 activation in a PKC-independent manner, indicating that membrane attachment is sufficient enough to activate PKD1. The presence of E-cadherin dynamically regulates PKD1 activation by Bryostatin 1, a potent activator of PKD1, and its substrate phosphorylation specificity, implying a loss of E-cadherin during cancer metastasis could cause the re-distribution PKD1 and re-wiring of PKD1 signaling for distinct functions. The knocking down of PKD1 in lung epithelial cell line A549 results in an epithelial to mesenchymal transition with changes in biomarker expression, cell migration and drug resistance. These results extend our previous understanding of PKD1 regulation and E-cadherin signaling functions and may help to explain the diversified functions of PKD1 in various cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2741-2748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991955

  9. Hox and ParaHox gene expression in early body plan patterning of polyplacophoran mollusks

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Martin; Wollesen, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molecular developmental studies of various bilaterians have shown that the identity of the anteroposterior body axis is controlled by Hox and ParaHox genes. Detailed Hox and ParaHox gene expression data are available for conchiferan mollusks, such as gastropods (snails and slugs) and cephalopods (squids and octopuses), whereas information on the putative conchiferan sister group, Aculifera, is still scarce (but see Fritsch et al., 2015 on Hox gene expression in the polyplacophoran Acanthochitona crinita). In contrast to gastropods and cephalopods, the Hox genes in polyplacophorans are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence similar to the condition in annelids and other bilaterians. Here, we present the expression patterns of the Hox genes Lox5, Lox4, and Lox2, together with the ParaHox gene caudal (Cdx) in the polyplacophoran A. crinita. To localize Hox and ParaHox gene transcription products, we also investigated the expression patterns of the genes FMRF and Elav, and the development of the nervous system. Similar to the other Hox genes, all three Acr‐Lox genes are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence. Transcripts of Acr‐Cdx are seemingly present in the forming hindgut at the posterior end. The expression patterns of both the central class Acr‐Lox genes and the Acr‐Cdx gene are strikingly similar to those in annelids and nemerteans. In Polyplacophora, the expression patterns of the Hox and ParaHox genes seem to be evolutionarily highly conserved, while in conchiferan mollusks these genes are co‐opted into novel functions that might have led to evolutionary novelties, at least in gastropods and cephalopods. PMID:27098677

  10. Hox and ParaHox gene expression in early body plan patterning of polyplacophoran mollusks.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Martin; Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Molecular developmental studies of various bilaterians have shown that the identity of the anteroposterior body axis is controlled by Hox and ParaHox genes. Detailed Hox and ParaHox gene expression data are available for conchiferan mollusks, such as gastropods (snails and slugs) and cephalopods (squids and octopuses), whereas information on the putative conchiferan sister group, Aculifera, is still scarce (but see Fritsch et al., 2015 on Hox gene expression in the polyplacophoran Acanthochitona crinita). In contrast to gastropods and cephalopods, the Hox genes in polyplacophorans are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence similar to the condition in annelids and other bilaterians. Here, we present the expression patterns of the Hox genes Lox5, Lox4, and Lox2, together with the ParaHox gene caudal (Cdx) in the polyplacophoran A. crinita. To localize Hox and ParaHox gene transcription products, we also investigated the expression patterns of the genes FMRF and Elav, and the development of the nervous system. Similar to the other Hox genes, all three Acr-Lox genes are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence. Transcripts of Acr-Cdx are seemingly present in the forming hindgut at the posterior end. The expression patterns of both the central class Acr-Lox genes and the Acr-Cdx gene are strikingly similar to those in annelids and nemerteans. In Polyplacophora, the expression patterns of the Hox and ParaHox genes seem to be evolutionarily highly conserved, while in conchiferan mollusks these genes are co-opted into novel functions that might have led to evolutionary novelties, at least in gastropods and cephalopods. PMID:27098677

  11. Gene expression pattern of glucose transporters in the skeletal muscles of newly hatched chicks.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Saki; Ijiri, Daichi; Kawaguchi, Mana; Nakashima, Kazuki; Ohtsuka, Akira

    2016-07-01

    The gene expression pattern of the glucose transporters (GLUT1, GLUT3, GLUT8, and GLUT12) among pectoralis major and minor, biceps femoris, and sartorius muscles from newly hatched chicks was examined. GLUT1 mRNA level was higher in pectoralis major muscle than in the other muscles. Phosphorylated AKT level was also high in the same muscle, suggesting a relationship between AKT and GLUT1 expression. PMID:27008100

  12. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system. PMID:25527350

  13. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Neonatal Tracheal Aspirates Demonstrate a Pattern of Lung-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bozyk, Paul D.; Popova, Antonia P.; Bentley, John Kelley; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Linn, Marisa J.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously isolated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the tracheal aspirates of premature neonates with respiratory distress. Although isolation of MSCs correlates with the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, the physiologic role of these cells remains unclear. To address this, we further characterized the cells, focusing on the issues of gene expression, origin, and cytokine expression. Microarray comparison of early passage neonatal lung MSC gene expression to cord blood MSCs and human fetal and neonatal lung fibroblast lines demonstrated that the neonatal lung MSCs differentially expressed 971 gene probes compared with cord blood MSCs, including the transcription factors Tbx2, Tbx3, Wnt5a, FoxF1, and Gli2, each of which has been associated with lung development. Compared with lung fibroblasts, 710 gene probe transcripts were differentially expressed by the lung MSCs, including IL-6 and IL-8/CXCL8. Differential chemokine expression was confirmed by protein analysis. Further, neonatal lung MSCs exhibited a pattern of Hox gene expression distinct from cord blood MSCs but similar to human fetal lung fibroblasts, consistent with a lung origin. On the other hand, limiting dilution analysis showed that fetal lung fibroblasts form colonies at a significantly lower rate than MSCs, and fibroblasts failed to undergo differentiation along adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. In conclusion, MSCs isolated from neonatal tracheal aspirates demonstrate a pattern of lung-specific gene expression, are distinct from lung fibroblasts, and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:21341990

  14. Differential and overlapping expression pattern of SOX2 and SOX9 in inner ear development

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Angel C.Y.; Szeto, Irene Y.Y.; Fritzsch, Bernd; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.

    2011-01-01

    The development of the inner ear involves complex processes of morphological changes, patterning and cell fate specification that are under strict molecular control. SOX2 and SOX9 are SOX family transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of one or more of these processes. Previous findings have shown early expression of SOX9 in the otic placode and vesicle at E8.5–E9.5. Here we describe in detail, the expression pattern of SOX9 in the developing mouse inner ear beyond the otocyst stage and compare it with that of SOX2 from E9.5 to E18.5 using double fluorescence immunohistochemistry. We found that SOX9 was widely expressed in the otic epithelium, periotic mesenchyme and cartilaginous otic capsule. SOX2 persistently marked the prosensory and sensory epithelia. During the development of the sensory epithelia, SOX2 was initially expressed in all prosensory regions and later in both the supporting and hair cells up to E15.5, when its expression in hair cells gradually diminished. SOX9 expression overlapped with that of SOX2 in the prosensory and sensory region until E14.5 when its expression was restricted to supporting cells. This initial overlap but subsequent differential expression of SOX2 and SOX9 in the sensory epithelia, suggest that SOX2 and SOX9 may have distinct roles in molecular pathways that direct cells towards different cell fates. PMID:19427409

  15. An efficient promoter trap for detection of patterned gene expression and subsequent functional analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Camilla; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Hartenstein, Volker; Alexandre, Cyrille; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    Transposable elements have been used in Drosophila to detect gene expression, inactivate gene function, and induce ectopic expression or overexpression. We have combined all of these features in a single construct. A promoterless GAL4 cDNA is expressed when the construct inserts within a transcriptional unit, and GAL4 activates a GFP-encoding gene present in the same transposon. In a primary screen, patterned gene expression is detected as GFP fluorescence in the live progeny of dysgenic males. Many animals expressing GFP in distinct patterns can be recovered with relatively little effort. As expected, many insertions cause loss of function. After insertion at a genomic location, specific parts of the transposon can be excised by FLP recombinase, thus allowing it to induce conditional misexpression of the tagged gene. Therefore, both gain- and loss-of-function studies can be carried out with a single insertion in a gene identified by virtue of its expression pattern. Using this promoter trap approach, we have identified a group of cells that innervate the calyx of the mushroom body and could thus define a previously unrecognized memory circuit. PMID:17093046

  16. Elevated Src family kinase activity stabilizes E-cadherin-based junctions and collective movement of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Veracini, Laurence; Grall, Dominique; Schaub, Sébastien; Divonne, Stéphanie Beghelli-de la Forest; Etienne-Grimaldi, Marie-Christine; Milano, Gérard; Bozec, Alexandre; Babin, Emmanuel; Sudaka, Anne; Thariat, Juliette; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    EGF receptor (EGFR) overexpression is thought to drive head and neck carcinogenesis however clinical responses to EGFR-targeting agents have been modest and alternate targets are actively sought to improve results. Src family kinases (SFKs), reported to act downstream of EGFR are among the alternative targets for which increased expression or activity in epithelial tumors is commonly associated to the dissolution of E-cadherin-based junctions and acquisition of a mesenchymal-like phenotype. Robust expression of total and activated Src was observed in advanced stage head and neck tumors (N=60) and in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines. In cultured cancer cells Src co-localized with E-cadherin in cell-cell junctions and its phosphorylation on Y419 was both constitutive and independent of EGFR activation. Selective inhibition of SFKs with SU6656 delocalized E-cadherin and disrupted cellular junctions without affecting E-cadherin expression and this effect was phenocopied by knockdown of Src or Yes. These findings reveal an EGFR-independent role for SFKs in the maintenance of intercellular junctions, which likely contributes to the cohesive invasion E-cadherin-positive cells in advanced tumors. Further, they highlight the need for a deeper comprehension of molecular pathways that drive collective cell invasion, in absence of mesenchymal transition, in order to combat tumor spread. PMID:25779657

  17. Elevated Src family kinase activity stabilizes E-cadherin-based junctions and collective movement of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Veracini, Laurence; Grall, Dominique; Schaub, Sébastien; Beghelli-de la Forest Divonne, Stéphanie; Etienne-Grimaldi, Marie-Christine; Milano, Gérard; Bozec, Alexandre; Babin, Emmanuel; Sudaka, Anne; Thariat, Juliette; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen

    2015-04-10

    EGF receptor (EGFR) overexpression is thought to drive head and neck carcinogenesis however clinical responses to EGFR-targeting agents have been modest and alternate targets are actively sought to improve results. Src family kinases (SFKs), reported to act downstream of EGFR are among the alternative targets for which increased expression or activity in epithelial tumors is commonly associated to the dissolution of E-cadherin-based junctions and acquisition of a mesenchymal-like phenotype. Robust expression of total and activated Src was observed in advanced stage head and neck tumors (N=60) and in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines. In cultured cancer cells Src co-localized with E-cadherin in cell-cell junctions and its phosphorylation on Y419 was both constitutive and independent of EGFR activation. Selective inhibition of SFKs with SU6656 delocalized E-cadherin and disrupted cellular junctions without affecting E-cadherin expression and this effect was phenocopied by knockdown of Src or Yes. These findings reveal an EGFR-independent role for SFKs in the maintenance of intercellular junctions, which likely contributes to the cohesive invasion E-cadherin-positive cells in advanced tumors. Further, they highlight the need for a deeper comprehension of molecular pathways that drive collective cell invasion, in absence of mesenchymal transition, in order to combat tumor spread. PMID:25779657

  18. Vangl2 Regulates E-Cadherin in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Begum, Khadiza; hafiz, Khandakar musabbir bin; Kishi, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin belongs to the classic cadherin subfamily of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules and is crucial for the formation and function of epithelial adherens junctions. In this study, we demonstrate that Vangl2, a vertebrate regulator of planar cell polarity (PCP), controls E-cadherin in epithelial cells. E-cadherin co-immunoprecipitates with Vangl2 from embryonic kidney extracts, and this association is also observed in transfected fibroblasts. Vangl2 enhances the internalization of E-cadherin when overexpressed. Conversely, the quantitative ratio of E-cadherin exposed to the cell surface is increased in cultured renal epithelial cells derived from Vangl2Lpt/+ mutant mice. Interestingly, Vangl2 is also internalized through protein traffic involving Rab5- and Dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Taken together with recent reports regarding the transport of Frizzled3, MMP14 and nephrin, these results suggest that one of the molecular functions of Vangl2 is to enhance the internalization of specific plasma membrane proteins with broad selectivity. This function may be involved in the control of intercellular PCP signalling or in the PCP-related rearrangement of cell adhesions. PMID:25373475

  19. Inhibition of E-cadherin/catenin complex formation by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase is partially independent of its catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Yuchao; Qi, Jieqiong; Han, Cuifang; Zhang, Xinling; Bi, Chuanlin; Yu, Wengong

    2016-02-01

    p120-catenin (p120) contains a large central armadillo repeat domain, via which it binds to E‑cadherin to stabilize the latter, thereby regulating cell‑to‑cell adhesion. A previous study by our group demonstrated that O‑linked N‑acetylglucosamine (O‑GlcNAc) is involved in the regulation of the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. As O‑GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is able to directly bind to the majority of its target proteins, the present study hypothesized that OGT may additionally regulate the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. To verify this hypothesis, a catalytically inactive OGT mutant was expressed in H1299 cells, and its effects on the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex were assessed. A cytoskeleton‑binding protein extraction assay confirmed that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. In addition, co‑immunoprecipitation and pull‑down assays were used to evaluate the interaction between OGT and p120. Immunoblotting indicated that OGT was able to directly bind to p120. To determine the domain of p120 involved in binding to OGT, a series of deletion mutants of p120 were constructed and subjected to protein binding assays by pull‑down assays. Immunoblotting showed that OGT bound to the regulatory and armadillo domains of p120, which might interfere with the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. Finally, OGT, p120 and E‑cadherin cytoplasmic domains (ECD) were recombinantly expressed in BL21 (DE3) recombinant E. coli cells, and a glutathione S‑transferase (GST) pull‑down assay was performed to assess the interactions among the purified recombinant proteins. Immunoblotting indicated that maltose‑binding protein (MBP)‑OGT inhibited the binding of His‑p120 to GST‑ECD in a dose‑dependent manner. All of these results suggested that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex

  20. Regulatory Divergence between Parental Alleles Determines Gene Expression Patterns in Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Hueber, Yann; Dereeper, Alexis; Rialle, Stéphanie; Herrera, Juan-Carlos; Lashermes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Both hybridization and allopolyploidization generate novel phenotypes by conciliating divergent genomes and regulatory networks in the same cellular context. To understand the rewiring of gene expression in hybrids, the total expression of 21,025 genes and the allele-specific expression of over 11,000 genes were quantified in interspecific hybrids and their parental species, Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides using RNA-seq technology. Between parental species, cis- and trans-regulatory divergences affected around 32% and 35% of analyzed genes, respectively, with nearly 17% of them showing both. The relative importance of trans-regulatory divergences between both species could be related to their low genetic divergence and perennial habit. In hybrids, among divergently expressed genes between parental species and hybrids, 77% was expressed like one parent (expression level dominance), including 65% like C. eugenioides. Gene expression was shown to result from the expression of both alleles affected by intertwined parental trans-regulatory factors. A strong impact of C. eugenioides trans-regulatory factors on the upregulation of C. canephora alleles was revealed. The gene expression patterns appeared determined by complex combinations of cis- and trans-regulatory divergences. In particular, the observed biased expression level dominance seemed to be derived from the asymmetric effects of trans-regulatory parental factors on regulation of alleles. More generally, this study illustrates the effects of divergent trans-regulatory parental factors on the gene expression pattern in hybrids. The characteristics of the transcriptional response to hybridization appear to be determined by the compatibility of gene regulatory networks and therefore depend on genetic divergences between the parental species and their evolutionary history. PMID:25819221

  1. Ionizing radiation mediates expression of cell adhesion molecules in distinct histological patterns within the lung.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S

    1997-06-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration of the lung is a predominant histopathological change that occurs during radiation pneumonitis. Emigration of inflammatory cells from the circulation requires the interaction between cell adhesion molecules on the vascular endothelium and molecules on the surface of leukocytes. We studied the immunohistochemical pattern of expression of cell adhesion molecules in lungs from mice treated with thoracic irradiation. After X-irradiation, the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1; E-selectin) was primarily expressed in the pulmonary endothelium of larger vessels and minimally in the microvascular endothelium. Conversely, the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) was expressed in the pulmonary capillary endothelium and minimally in the endothelium of larger vessels. Radiation-mediated E-selectin expression was first observed at 6 h, whereas ICAM-1 expression initially increased at 24 h after irradiation. ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression persisted for several days. P-selectin is constitutively expressed in Weibel-Palade bodies in the endothelium, which moved to the vascular lumen within 30 min after irradiation. P-selectin was not detected in the pulmonary endothelium at 6 h after irradiation. The radiation dose required for increased cell adhesion molecule expression within the pulmonary vascular endothelium was 2 Gy, and expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression is increased in the pulmonary endothelium following thoracic irradiation. The pattern of expression of E-selectin, P-selectin, and ICAM-1 is distinct from one another. PMID:9187101

  2. Flamingo cadherin: a putative host receptor for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Blau, Karin; Portnoi, Maxim; Shagan, Marilou; Kaganovich, Antonina; Rom, Slava; Kafka, Daniel; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Porgador, Angel; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Dagan, Ron; Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa

    2007-06-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) is a cell wall-localized lectin. We demonstrate that recombinant (r) FBA and anti-rFBA antibodies inhibit encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae serotype 3 adherence to A549 type II lung carcinoma epithelial cells. A random combinatorial peptide library expressed by filamentous phage was screened with rFBA. Eleven of 30 rFBA-binding phages inhibited 90% of S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptide sequence of 9 of these phages matched the Flamingo cadherin receptor (FCR) when aligned against the human genome. A peptide comprising a putative FBA-binding region of FCR (FCRP) inhibited 2 genetically and capsularly unrelated pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains from binding to A549 cells. Moreover, FCRP inhibited S. pneumoniae nasopharyngeal and lung colonization and, possibly, pneumonia development in the mouse intranasal inoculation model system. These data indicate that FBA is an S. pneumoniae adhesin and that FCR is its host receptor. PMID:17492599

  3. Crossroads of integrins and cadherins in epithelia and stroma remodeling.

    PubMed

    Epifano, Carolina; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion events mediated by cadherin and integrin adhesion receptors have fundamental roles in the maintenance of the physiological balance of epithelial tissues, and it is well established that perturbations in their normal functional activity and/or changes in their expression are associated with tumorigenesis. Over the last decades, increasing evidence of a dynamic collaborative interaction between these complexes through their shared interactions with cytoskeletal proteins and common signaling pathways has emerged not only as an important regulator of several aspects of epithelial cell behavior, but also as a coordinated adhesion module that senses and transmits signals from and to the epithelia surrounding microenvironment. The tight regulation of their crosstalk is particularly important during epithelial remodeling events that normally take place during morphogenesis and tissue repair, and when defective it leads to cell transformation and aggravated responses of the tumor microenvironment that contribute to tumorigenesis. In this review we highlight some of the interactions that regulate their crosstalk and how this could be implicated in regulating signals across epithelial tissues to sustain homeostasis. PMID:22568988

  4. Molecular characterization and different expression patterns of the FABP gene family during goat skeletal muscle development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhong, Tao; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    The FABP (adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein) genes play an important role in intracellular fatty acid transport and considered to be candidate genes for fatness traits in domestic animal. In this study, we cloned the cDNA sequences of goat FABP family genes and their expression patterns were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR. Expression analysis showed that goat FABP1 gene was predominantly expressed in liver, kidney and large intestine. While FABP4 was widely expressed in many tissues with a high expression level was observed in the fat, skeletal muscle, stomach and lung. Notably, FABP2 gene was expressed specifically in small intestine. Moreover, goat FABP3 was expressed at 60 day with the highest level, then significantly (p < 0.01) decreased at the 90 day. No significant expression differences were observed in longissimus dorsi muscles among 3 day, 30 day and 60 day. Goat FABP4 was expressed at 3 day with the lowest level, then significantly (p < 0.01) increased to a peak at the 60 day. In addition, a significant relationship between FABP3 mRNA expression levels and intramuscular fat (IMF) content was observed. These results suggest that the FABP3 and FABP4 may be important genes for meat quality and provides useful information for further studies on their roles in skeletal muscle IMF deposit. PMID:25245957

  5. Novel expression patterns of carotenoid pathway-related gene in citrus leaves and maturing fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carotenoids are abundant in citrus fruits and vary among cultivars and species. In the present study, HPLC and real-time PCR were used to investigate the expression patterns of 23 carotenoid biosynthesis gene family members and their possible relation with carotenoid accumulation in flavedo, juice s...

  6. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula defensin-like genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genomes typically contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short proteins resembling defensins, which are antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns of DEFL genes because most were recently discovered and many are not well represented on sta...

  7. GENOMIC ORGANIZATION OF THE SP22 GENE AND A UNIQUE PATTERN OF EXPRESSION IN SPERMATOGENIC CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENOMIC ORGANIZATION OF THE SP22 GENE AND A UNIQUE PATTERN OF EXPRESSION IN SPERMATOGENIC CELLS.
    JE Welch*, RR Barbee*, JD Suarez*, NL Roberts*, and GR Klinefelter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Our laboratory has rep...

  8. GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS OF CD-1 DAY-8 EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLORO ACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression patterns of CD-1 day-8 embryo cultures exposed to bromochloro acetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductiv...

    </