Science.gov

Sample records for cadmium iron manganese

  1. Inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of six elements in a variety of geological materials. Sixteen reference materials are analysed by this technique to demonstrate its use in geochemical exploration. Samples are decomposed with nitric, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and the residue dissolved in hydrochloric acid and diluted to volume. The elements are determined in two groups based on compatibility of instrument operating conditions and consideration of crustal abundance levels. Cadmium, Cu, Pb and Zn are determined as a group in the 50-ml sample solution under one set of instrument conditions with the use of scatter correction. Limitations of the scatter correction technique used with the fluorescence instrument are discussed. Iron and Mn are determined together using another set of instrumental conditions on a 1-50 dilution of the sample solution without the use of scatter correction. The ranges of concentration (??g g-1) of these elements in the sample that can be determined are: Cd, 0.3-500; Cu, 0.4-500; Fe, 85-250 000; Mn, 45-100 000; Pb, 5-10 000; and Zn, 0.4-300. The precision of the method is usually less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD) over a wide concentration range and acceptable accuracy is shown by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference materials.

  2. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    SciTech Connect

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle; Lise Brantsaeter, Anne; Borch-Iohnsen, Berit; Ellingsen, Dag G.; Alexander, Jan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Stigum, Hein; Ydersbond, Trond A.

    2010-07-15

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L) and 84 had iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L and Hb<120 g/L). The low ferritin group had increased blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd but normal concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb. In multiple regression models, ferritin emerged as the main determinant of Mn, Co and Cd (p<0.001), while no significant associations with Cu, Zn and Pb were found. Adjusted r{sup 2} for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110{<=}Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  3. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, calcium, iron, manganese and chromium (VI) levels in Nigeria and United States of America cement dust.

    PubMed

    Ogunbileje, J O; Sadagoparamanujam, V-M; Anetor, J I; Farombi, E O; Akinosun, O M; Okorodudu, A O

    2013-03-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relative abundance of heavy metals in cement dust from different cement dust factories in order to predict their possible roles in the severity of cement dust toxicity. The concentrations of total mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), iron (Fe) and chromium (VI) (Cr (VI)) levels in cement dust and clinker samples from Nigeria and cement dust sample from the United States of America (USA) were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAAS), while Zn and Ca were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS), and Cr (VI) by colorimetric method. Total Cu, Ni and Mn were significantly higher in cement dust sample from USA (p<0.05), also, both total Cr and Cr (VI) were 5.4-26 folds higher in USA cement dust compared with Nigeria cement dust or clinker (p<0.001). Total Cd was higher in both Nigeria cement dust and clinker (p<0.05 and p<0.001), respectively. Mercury was more in both Nigeria cement dust and clinker (p<0.05), while Pb was only significantly higher in clinker from Nigeria (p<0.001). These results show that cement dust contain mixture of metals that are known human carcinogens and also have been implicated in other debilitating health conditions. Additionally, it revealed that metal content concentrations are factory dependent. This study appears to indicate the need for additional human studies relating the toxicity of these metals and their health impacts on cement factory workers. PMID:23261125

  4. Groundwater, iron and manganese an unwelcome trio

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, N. )

    1988-02-01

    Iron and manganese are natural constituents of the earth's crust and both elements create serious aesthetic problems in drinking water supplies. The occurrence of iron and manganese in groundwater, and problems arising from their presence, are reviewed. Four commonly used methods for iron and manganese removal are direct oxidation, addition of oxidation agents, ion exchange, and stabilization. These methods are discussed, as well as factors affecting iron and manganese removal, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, and other ions present. The above factors affect the removal methods differently and for these reasons, laboratory testing and studies should be made to evaluate the treatability of a water supply for iron and manganese removal.

  5. First principle study of manganese doped cadmium sulphide sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-04-24

    First-principle electronic structure calculations for cadmium sulphide (CdS) sheet in hexagonal phase, with Manganese substitution and addition, as well as including the Cd defects, are investigated. The lattice constants calculated for CdS sheet agrees fairly well with results reported for thin films experimentally. The calculations of total spin density of states and partial density of states in different cases shows substantial magnetic dipole moments acquired by the sheet. A magnetic dipole moment 5.00612 μ{sub B} and band gap of the order 1 eV are found when cadmium atom is replaced by Manganese. The magnetism acquired by the sheet makes it functionally important candidate in many applications.

  6. The role of zinc transporters in cadmium and manganese transport in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Himeno, Seiichiro; Yanagiya, Takahiro; Fujishiro, Hitomi

    2009-10-01

    To understand the mechanism of cadmium accumulation, it is important to know the precise mechanisms of transport systems for other metals. Recently, utilization of genomics and metallomics has clarified the involvement of specific metal transporter(s) in cadmium uptake. Studies with metallothionein (MT)-null cadmium-resistant cells have revealed the involvement of the manganese/zinc transport system in cadmium uptake. Genomic studies of strain differences in sensitivity to cadmium-induced testicular hemorrhage revealed that a zinc transporter, Zrt-, Irt-related protein (ZIP) 8 encoded by slc39a8, is responsible for the strain difference. Ectopic expression of ZIP8 in various cells enhanced the uptake of cadmium, manganese, and zinc. ZIP8-transgenic mice showed high expression of ZIP8 in the vasculature of testis and apical membrane of proximal tubules in kidney, and exhibited enhanced cadmium accumulation and toxicity when treated with cadmium. The expression of ZIP8 was found to be down-regulated in MT-null cadmium-resistant cells, in which the uptake rates of both cadmium and manganese were decreased. These data suggest that ZIP8 plays an important role in the uptake of both cadmium and manganese in mammalian cells. The role of ZIP14 in the uptake of cadmium and manganese is also discussed. PMID:19375483

  7. AM1* parameters for manganese and iron.

    PubMed

    Kayi, Hakan; Clark, Timothy

    2010-06-01

    We report the parameterization of AM1* for the elements manganese and iron. The basis sets for both metals contain one set each of s-, p- and d-orbitals. AM1* parameters are now available for H, C, N, O and F (which use the original AM1 parameters), Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Zr, Mo, I and Au. The performance and typical errors of AM1* are discussed for Mn and Fe, and are compared with available NDDO Hamiltonians. PMID:19937261

  8. Structural and mechanical studies of cadmium manganese thiocyanate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; babu, G. Anandha; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) have been synthesized successfully and grown by slow evaporation method. The structural perfection of the grown crystals has been analyzed by High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), which shows the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal is quite good. Optical behavior was assessed by UV-Vis analysis and found that no absorption in the UV visible region and it may be useful for second harmonic applications. The mechanical hardness of the grown crystals was studied and Vicker's microhardness, Stiffness constant was calculated.

  9. Thermochemistry of iron manganese oxide spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Navrotsky, Alexandra . E-mail: anavrotsky@ucdavis.edu; Tailhades, Philippe; Coradin, Herve; Wang Miaojun

    2005-01-15

    Oxide melt solution calorimetry has been performed on iron manganese oxide spinels prepared at high temperature. The enthalpy of formation of (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}){sub 3}O{sub 4} at 298K from the oxides, tetragonal Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} (hausmannite) and cubic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite), is negative from x=0 to x=0.67 and becomes slightly positive for 0.670.6) spinels of intermediate compositions. The enthalpies of formation are discussed in terms of three factors: oxidation-reduction relative to the end-members, cation distribution, and tetragonality. A combination of measured enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of formation in the literature provides entropies of mixing. {delta}S{sub mix}, consistent with a cation distribution in which all trivalent manganese is octahedral and all other ions are randomly distributed for x>0.5, but the entropy of mixing appears to be smaller than these predicted values for x<0.4.

  10. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes. PMID:19443107

  11. A zinc-resistant human epithelial cell line is impaired in cadmium and manganese import

    SciTech Connect

    Rousselet, Estelle |; Richaud, Pierre ||; Douki, Thierry; Chantegrel, Jocelyne Garcia; Favier, Alain |||; Moulis, Jean-Marc ||

    2008-08-01

    A human epithelial cell line (HZR) growing with high zinc concentrations has been analyzed for its ability to sustain high cadmium concentrations. Exposure to up to 200 {mu}M of cadmium acetate for 24 h hardly impacted viability, whereas most of parental HeLa cells were killed by less than 10 {mu}M of cadmium. Upon challenge by 35 fold higher cadmium concentrations than HeLa cells, HZR cells did not display increased DNA damage, increased protein oxidation, or changed intracellular cadmium localization. Rather, the main cause of resistance against cadmium was by avoiding cadmium entry into cells, which differs from that against zinc as the latter accumulates inside cells. The zinc-resistant phenotype of these cells was shown to also impair extracellular manganese uptake. Manganese and cadmium competed for entry into HeLa cells. Probing formerly identified cadmium or manganese transport systems in different animal cells did not evidence any significant change between HeLa and HZR cells. These results reveal zinc adaptation influences manganese and cadmium cellular traffic and they highlight previously unknown connections among homeostasis of divalent metals.

  12. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  13. Simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in fertilizers by microwave acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry detection: single-laboratory validation of a modification and extension of AOAC 2006.03.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sharon; Bartos, James; Boles, Rhonda; Hasty, Elaine; Thuotte, Ethel; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was conducted for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in all major types of commercial fertilizer products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy analysis. This validation study proposes an extension and modification of AOAC 2006.03. The extension is the inclusion of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc, and the modification is incorporation of hydrochloric acid in the digestion system. This dual acid digestion utilizes both hydrochloric and nitric acids in a 3 to 9 mL volume ratio/100 mL. In addition to 15 of the 30 original validation materials used in the 2006.03 collaborative study, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 695 and Magruder 2009-06 were incorporated as accuracy materials. The main benefits of this proposed method are a significant increase in laboratory efficiency when compared to the use of both AOAC Methods 965.09 and 2006.03 to achieve the same objective and an enhanced recovery of several metals. PMID:25051614

  14. Synthesis, growth and characterization of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramasivam, P.; Raja, C. Ramachandra

    2011-09-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate, CdMn(SCN)4 (CMTC) have been successfully synthesized and grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique using water as solvent at room temperature. The crystal was characterized by different techniques for finding its suitability for device fabrications. From the single crystal XRD the crystal system was identified as tetragonal. The functional groups were identified from FTIR analysis. The optical studies have been carried out and found that the tendency of transmission observed from the specimen with respect to the wavelength of light is practically more suitable for the present trends in communication engineering. From the thermal analysis the decomposing temperature of the grown crystal is more significant when compared with the studies performed earlier.

  15. Synthesis, growth and characterization of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) crystal.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, P; Raja, C Ramachandra

    2011-09-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate, CdMn(SCN)4 (CMTC) have been successfully synthesized and grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique using water as solvent at room temperature. The crystal was characterized by different techniques for finding its suitability for device fabrications. From the single crystal XRD the crystal system was identified as tetragonal. The functional groups were identified from FTIR analysis. The optical studies have been carried out and found that the tendency of transmission observed from the specimen with respect to the wavelength of light is practically more suitable for the present trends in communication engineering. From the thermal analysis the decomposing temperature of the grown crystal is more significant when compared with the studies performed earlier. PMID:21640636

  16. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems.

    PubMed

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Grass, Gregor; Rensing, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake systems relevant for growth in defined medium. Based on these results an exit strategy enabling the cell to cope with iron depletion and use of manganese as an alternative for iron could be shown. Such a strategy would also explain why E. coli harbors some iron- or manganese-dependent iso-enzymes such as superoxide dismutases or ribonucleotide reductases. The benefits for gaining a means for survival would be bought with the cost of less efficient metabolism as indicated in our experiments by lower cell densities with manganese than with iron. In addition, this strain was extremely sensitive to the metalloid gallium but this gallium toxicity can be alleviated by low concentrations of manganese. PMID:27003826

  17. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  19. Structural, spectral and mechanical studies of bimetallic crystal: cadmium manganese thiocyanate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Vijaya Prasath, G.; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Mahalingam, T.; Ravi, G.

    2012-09-01

    A nonlinear optical bimetallic thiocyanate complex crystal, cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) has been successfully synthesized. The growth of single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate has been accomplished from aqueous solution using slow evaporation method. The presence of manganese and cadmium in the synthesized material was confirmed through energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analysis. Structural analysis was carried out using powder X-ray diffractometer (PXRD) and crystalline perfection of the grown crystals was ascertained by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum was taken to confirm the functional groups. The transmittance spectrum of the crystal in the UV-visible region has been recorded and the cutoff wavelength has been determined. The dielectric measurements for the crystals were performed for various frequencies and temperatures. The mechanical properties were evaluated by Vickers microhardness testing, which reveals hardness and stiffness constant of the crystals.

  20. Elements of the iron and manganese cycles in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granina, L.Z.; Callender, E.

    2007-01-01

    Using data obtained in recent years, we considered the external mass balance and characteristics of internal iron and manganese cycles in Lake Baikal (biological uptake, remineralization, sedimentary and diffusive fluxes, accumulation in sediments, time of renewal, etc.). Some previous results and common concepts were critically reevaluated. ?? Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2007.

  1. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites

  2. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Kang, J.-K.; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. Iron and manganese deposits occur in five forms: nodules, crusts, cements, mounds and sediment-hosted stratabound layers. Seafloor oxides show a wide range of compositions from nearly pure iron to nearly pure manganese end members. Fe/Mn ratios vary from about 24 000 (up to 58% elemental Fe) for hydrothermal seamount ironstones to about 0.001 (up to 52% Mn) for hydrothermal stratabound manganese oxides from active volcanic arcs. Hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts that occur on most seamounts in the ocean basins have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.7 for open-ocean seamount crusts and 1.2 for continental margin seamount crusts. Fe-Mn nodules of potential economic interest from the Clarion-Clipperton Zone have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.3, whereas the mean ratio for nodules from elsewhere in the Pacific is about 0.7. Crusts are enriched in Co, Ni and Pt and nodules in Cu and Ni, and both have significant concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ba, Mo, V and other elements. In contrast, hydrothermal deposits commonly contain only minor trace metal contents, although there are many exceptions, for example, with Ni contents up to 0.66%, Cr to 1.2%, and Zn to 1.4%. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns generally show a positive Ce anomaly and abundant ??REEs for hydrogenetic and mixed hydrogenetic-diagenetic deposits, whereas the Ce anomaly is negative for hydrothermal deposits and ??REE contents are low. However, the Ce anomaly in crusts may vary from strongly positive in East Pacific crusts to slightly negative in West Pacific crusts, which may reflect

  3. Zinc, iron, manganese, and magnesium accumulation in crayfish populations near copper-nickel smelters at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bagatto, G.; Alikhan, M.A.

    1987-06-01

    The Sudbury basin has been subjected to extreme ecological disturbances from logging, mining and smelting activities. Elevated concentrations of copper, cadmium, and nickel have been reported in crayfish populations close to the Sudbury smelting works. The present study compares concentrations of zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and magnesium (Mg) in freshwater crayfish at selected distances of the habitat from the emission source. These metals were selected since they are known to be emitted in moderately high quantities into the Sudbury environment as byproduct of the smelting process. Various tissue concentrations in crayfish were also examined to determined specific tissue sites for these accumulations.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of divalent metal transporter 1 gene polymorphism on blood iron, lead and cadmium levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kayaaltı, Zeliha Akyüzlü, Dilek Kaya; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2015-02-15

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), a member of the proton-coupled metal ion transporter family, mediates transport of ferrous iron from the lumen of the intestine into the enterocyte and export of iron from endocytic vesicles. It has an affinity not only for iron but also for other divalent cations including manganese, cobalt, nickel, cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc. DMT1 is encoded by the SLC11a2 gene that is located on chromosome 12q13 in humans and express four major mammalian isoforms (1A/+IRE, 1A/-IRE, 2/+IRE and 2/-IRE). Mutations or polymorphisms of DMT1 gene may have an impact on human health by disturbing metal trafficking. To study the possible association of DMT1 gene with the blood levels of some divalent cations such as iron, lead and cadmium, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (IVS4+44C/A) in DMT1 gene was investigated in 486 unrelated and healthy individuals in a Turkish population by method of polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP). The genotype frequencies were found as 49.8% homozygote typical (CC), 38.3% heterozygote (CA) and 11.9% homozygote atypical (AA). Metal levels were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrometer system and the average levels of iron, lead and cadmium in the blood samples were 446.01±81.87 ppm, 35.59±17.72 ppb and 1.25±0.87 ppb, respectively. Individuals with the CC genotype had higher blood iron, lead and cadmium levels than those with AA and CA genotypes. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism in the DMT1 gene and iron and lead levels (p=0.001 and p=0.036, respectively), but no association was found with cadmium level (p=0.344). This study suggested that DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, lead and cadmium levels. - Highlights: • DMT1 IVS4+44 C/A polymorphism is associated with inter-individual variations in blood iron, cadmium and lead levels.

  5. [Influence of manganese on iron accumulation and flavinogenesis in yeast Debaryomyces hansenii].

    PubMed

    Sydorovych, I B; Fedorovych, D V

    2002-01-01

    In response to MnCl2 introduction the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii shows the increase of intracellular iron content and riboflavin biosynthesis level. Under iron deficiency the yeast cells sensitivity to manganese ions increases in spite of redundant synthesis of riboflavin. High concentration of iron in the culture results in the lower toxicity of Mn2+. Iron accumulation favours the cell resistance to manganese. Manganese causes the redundant synthesis of riboflavin as well as iron accumulation in streptonigrin-resistant mutants with a lowered iron content in cells. The Mn(2+)-resistant strains are phenotypically similar to the previously described Rib80(-)-mutants of D. hansenii with high iron content and riboflavin biosynthesis level. This suggests that riboflavin redundant synthesis and iron accumulation in the yeast cells are regulated by a common Mn(2+)-depending factor. A new method for isolation of the Rib80(-)-mutants is described. The method is based on the positive selection of manganese-resistant clones. PMID:12557493

  6. Manganese Doping of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tailoring Surface Reactivity for a Regenerable Heavy Metal Sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Cynthia L.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Mackie, Katherine E.; Neiner, Doinita; Saraf, Laxmikant; Droubay, Timothy C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2012-02-28

    A method for tuning the analyte affinity of magnetic, inorganic nanostructured sorbents for heavy metal contaminants is described. The manganese-doped iron oxide nanoparticle sorbents have a remarkably high affinity compared to the precursor material. Sorbent affinity can be tuned toward an analyte of interest simply by adjustment of the dopant quantity. The results show that following the Mn doping process there is a large increase in affinity and capacity for heavy metals (i.e., Co, Ni, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Tl). Capacity measurements were carried out for the removal of cadmium from river water and showed significantly higher loading than the relevant commercial sorbents tested for comparison. The reduction in Cd concentration from 100 ppb spiked river water to 1 ppb (less than the EPA drinking water limit of 5 ppb for Cd) was achieved following treatment with the Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles. The Mn-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were able to load 1 ppm of Cd followed by complete stripping and recovery of the Cd with a mild acid wash. The Cd loading and stripping is shown to be consistent through multiple cycles with no loss of sorbent performance.

  7. Manganese, iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereux, Richard; Lehrter, John C.; Beddick, David L.; Yates, Diane F.; Jarvis, Brandon M.

    2015-05-01

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cycling in the region. Sedimentary manganese, iron, and sulfur cycling were investigated on the LCS using a combined chemical analysis and sediment diagenesis modeling approach. Three stations situated 320 km across the LCS along the 20 m isobath were sampled up to five times between the spring of 2006 and summer of 2007. Bottom water oxygen levels at the stations ranged from 203 mmol m-3 in spring to 2.5 mmol m-3 in summer. Porewater Mn and Fe2+ concentrations (up to 275 and 300 μmol L-1, respectively), sulfate reduction rates (1.0-8.4 mmol m-2 d-1), and the fraction of total oxalate extracted iron obtained as Fe(II) (0.25-0.52) differed between station and season. Sediments at station Z02 on the eastern LCS, south of Terrebonne Bay, had higher organic matter content and sulfate reduction rates than sediments at Z03, 160 km further west. Sulfate reduction rates were higher in summer than spring at station Z02 but not at Z03 where porewater Mn and Fe concentrations were highest in summer. Porewater Fe2+ concentrations, solid phase oxalate-extractable Fe concentrations, and sediment incubation experiments suggested iron reduction at Z03 may account for 20% or more of organic carbon remineralization. LCS Fe(III) concentrations decreased and sulfate reduction rates increased in model simulations by lowering interfacial dissolved oxygen levels and increasing the rates of organic matter deposited on the sediment surface. Results from this study demonstrate that LCS sedimentary metal oxide cycling may be more important in organic carbon mineralization pathways than previously recognized.

  8. Interactive effects of manganese and/or iron supplementation in adult women

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.D.; Greger, J.L. )

    1991-03-15

    Evaluation of the practical significance of manganese-iron interactions has been hampered by the limited methodologies available to assess manganese status. Manganese status has not been monitored longitudinally in control studies with humans. Forty-eight women were recruited for a double blind 125-day supplementation study. After an initial 5-day baseline period, subjects were assigned to one of four treatments: placebo; 30 mg iron as ferrous fumarate daily; 15 mg manganese as an amino acid chelated manganese supplement daily or both the iron and manganese supplements daily. Dietary information, blood and 3-day urine samples were collected during the baseline period and after 20, 55, 85 and 120 days of consuming the supplements. Urinary manganese excretion ranged from 0.11 to 1.40 {mu}g/day. Serum manganese ranged from 0.16 to 1.92 {mu}g/l. Serum was also analyzed for iron, zinc, copper, ferritin and transferrin concentrations. Lymphocytes were isolated and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase activity was determined as a new method to assess manganese status. Plasma cholesterol ranged from 126 to 229 mg/dl and HDL cholesterol ranged from 31 to 84 mg/dl. Plasma triglycerides were determined and LDL cholesterol was calculated by difference.

  9. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  10. Distribution and chemistry of manganese, iron, and suspended particulates in Orca Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefry, John H.; Presley, Bob J.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy L.; Trocine, Robert P.

    1984-06-01

    The intense halocline and redoxcline in the Orca Basin, northwest Gulf of Mexico, induce dramatic water column profiles for manganese, iron, and suspended particulates. Within a 17 m interval, the salinity of the basin water increases from 66 to ≈260 & permil and dissolved oxygen decreases to zero. Midway through this transition zone, concentrations of suspended matter peak at ≈900 μg/liter. Dissolved iron and manganese concentrations in the anoxic brine increase from oceanic values to maxima of 1.6 and 22 mg/liter, respectively. Upward migration of dissolved manganese from the brine leads to production of manganese-rich particles in the slightly oxygenated overlying water.

  11. Distribution of Cadmium, Iron, and Zinc in Millstreams of Hard Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Guttieri, Mary J; Seabourn, Bradford W; Liu, Caixia; Baenziger, P Stephen; Waters, Brian M

    2015-12-16

    Hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a major crop in the Great Plains of the United States, and our previous work demonstrated that wheat genotypes vary for grain cadmium accumulation with some exceeding the CODEX standard (0.2 mg kg(-1)). Previous reports of cadmium distribution in flour milling fractions have not included high cadmium grain. This study measured the distribution of cadmium, zinc, and iron in flour and bran streams from high cadmium (0.352 mg kg(-1)) grain on a pilot mill that produced 12 flour and four bran streams. Recovery in flour was substantially greater for cadmium (50%) than for zinc (31%) or iron (22%). Cadmium, zinc, and iron in the lowest mineral concentration flour stream, representing the purest endosperm fraction, were 52, 22, and 11%, respectively, of initial grain concentration. Our results indicate that, relative to zinc and iron, a greater proportion of cadmium is stored in the endosperm, the source of white flour. PMID:26568286

  12. Voltammetric determination of arsenic in high iron and manganese groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Gibbon-Walsh, Kristoff; Salaün, Pascal; Uroic, M Kalle; Feldmann, Joerg; McArthur, John M; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2011-09-15

    Determination of the speciation of arsenic in groundwaters, using cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), is severely hampered by high levels of iron and manganese. Experiments showed that the interference is eliminated by addition of EDTA, making it possible to determine the arsenic speciation on-site by CSV. This work presents the CSV method to determine As(III) in high-iron or -manganese groundwaters in the field with only minor sample treatment. The method was field-tested in West-Bengal (India) on a series of groundwater samples. Total arsenic was subsequently determined after acidification to pH 1 by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Comparative measurements by ICP-MS as reference method for total As, and by HPLC for its speciation, were used to corroborate the field data in stored samples. Most of the arsenic (78±0.02%) was found to occur as inorganic As(III) in the freshly collected waters, in accordance with previous studies. The data shows that the modified on-site CSV method for As(III) is a good measure of water contamination with As. The EDTA was also found to be effective in stabilising the arsenic speciation for longterm sample storage at room temperature. Without sample preservation, in water exposed to air and sunlight, the As(III) was found to become oxidised to As(V), and Fe(II) oxidised to Fe(III), removing the As(V) by adsorption on precipitating Fe(III)-hydroxides within a few hours. PMID:21807202

  13. The effect of high dose oral manganese exposure on copper, iron and zinc levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Courtney J; Herrera, Carolina; Pettiglio, Michael A; Foster, Melanie L; Johnson, Laura C; Dorman, David C; Bartnikas, Thomas B

    2016-06-01

    Manganese is an essential dietary nutrient and trace element with important roles in mammalian development, metabolism, and antioxidant defense. In healthy individuals, gastrointestinal absorption and hepatobiliary excretion are tightly regulated to maintain systemic manganese concentrations at physiologic levels. Interactions of manganese with other essential metals following high dose ingestion are incompletely understood. We previously reported that gavage manganese exposure in rats resulted in higher tissue manganese concentrations when compared with equivalent dietary or drinking water manganese exposures. In this study, we performed follow-up evaluations to determine whether oral manganese exposure perturbs iron, copper, or zinc tissue concentrations. Rats were exposed to a control diet with 10 ppm manganese or dietary, drinking water, or gavage exposure to approximately 11.1 mg manganese/kg body weight/day for 7 or 61 exposure days. While manganese exposure affected levels of all metals, particularly in the frontal cortex and liver, copper levels were most prominently affected. This result suggests an under-appreciated effect of manganese exposure on copper homeostasis which may contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology of manganese toxicity. PMID:26988220

  14. Evolution of Microstructures During Austempering of Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The influences of relatively high manganese (0.45 through 1.0 wt pct) and copper (0.56 through 1.13 wt pct) contents on microstructure development and phase transformation in three austempered ductile irons have been studied. The experimental ductile irons alloyed with copper and manganese are found to be practically free from intercellular manganese segregation. This suggests that the positive segregation of manganese is largely neutralized by the negative segregation of copper when these alloying elements are added in appropriate proportions. The drop in unreacted austenite volume (UAV) with increasing austempering temperature and time is quite significant in irons alloyed with copper and manganese. The ausferrite morphology also undergoes a transition from lenticular to feathery appearance of increasing coarseness with the increasing austempering temperature and time. SEM micrographs of the austempered samples from the base alloy containing manganese only, as well as copper plus manganese-alloyed irons, clearly reveal the presence of some martensite along with retained austenite and ferrite. X-ray diffraction analysis also confirms the presence of these phases. SEM examination further reveals the presence of twinned martensite in the copper plus manganese-alloyed samples. The possibility of strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite during austempering heat treatment is suggested.

  15. Formation of Defected Cadmium Ferrite during Hydrothermal Storage of Cadmium-Iron Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolski, W.; Wolska, E.; Kaczmarek, J.

    1994-05-01

    The storage of amorphous coprecipitated Cd(OH) 2 · 2Fe(OH) 3 gel in mother liquor at 150 ± 2°C for 20 hr leads to a crystalline species which, according to X-ray analysis, is composed of cadmium hydroxide nitrate, Cd 3(OH) 5NO 3, cadmium hydroxide, βCd(OH) 2, and a strongly ferrimagnetic spinel phase. The Curie point at 270-280°C was found by thermomagnetic analysis. At that temperature the decomposition of the spinel phase and of the accompanying nonmagnetic phases takes place. IR spectra indicate that during thermomagnetic recording the liberated cadmium oxide and iron oxide form antiferromagnetic cadmium ferrite, with frequencies somewhat displaced in comparison to CdFe 2O 4 annealed at 1000°C. The results indicate that the ferrimagnetic phase (having spinel structure, a unit-cell parameter a of about 8.37 ± 0.01 Å, and a Tc point differing by more than 300°C from that of pure maghemite, γFe 2O 3) is likely to be a defected solid solution of maghemite and cadmium ferrite, of the formula Cd 2+xFe 3+1- x [Fe 3+(5+ x)/3 □ (1- x)/3 ]O 4.

  16. Morphological development of oxide-sulfide scales on iron and iron-manganese alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McAdam, G.; Young, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    Pure iron and alloys containing 2, 15, 25, and 50 wt.% manganese have been reacted at 1073 K in controlled gas atmospheres of SO/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/-CO-N/sub 2/. Equilibrium gas compositions were such that (1) FeS was stable but not FeO, or (2) both FeS and FeO were stable, or (3) FeO was stable but not FeS; in all cases, both MnS and MnO were stable. Under all reaction conditions, pure iron corroded to produce both sulfide and oxide. The resultant scale morphologies were consistent with local solid-gas equilibrium for the case in which both oxide and sulfide were stable but in the other cases indicated that equilibrium was not achieved and that direct reaction with SO/sub 2/(g) was responsible for corrosion. Additions of manganese did not greatly alter the scale morphologies. Under reaction conditions that were oxidizing and sulfidizing, very high levels of manganese were required to reduce the corrosion rate. On the other hand, relatively low levels had a beneficial effect both when FeO but not FeS was thermodynamically stable and similarly when FeS but not FeO was stable.

  17. Blood Metal Concentrations of Manganese, Lead, and Cadmium in Relation to Serum Ferritin Levels in Ohio Residents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to assess fcrritin-specific profiles of blood metal concentrations such as manganese, lead, and cadmium and to evaluate whether ferritin may affect the behavior of the blood metals in relation to menstruation, menopause, or sex in Ohio residents....

  18. [Effect of iron-containing supplements on the level of iron, copper, and manganese in young sportsmen].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, I P

    2010-01-01

    In was defined that 2-week intake by senior school pupils of iron-containing supplements combined with an ascorbic acid was followed by a significant increase of iron concentration in plasma and formal blood elements, hemoglobin and erythrocytes level, increase of vitamin C provision and physical performance efficiency at simultaneous decrease of copper and manganese content in blood plasma. PMID:20968011

  19. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne . E-mail: wessling@hsph.harvard.edu

    2006-01-15

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased {approx}2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, {sup 54}Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. {sup 54}Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected {sup 54}Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration.

  20. Iron, Manganese and Copper Release from Synthetic Hydroxyapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, Douglas W.

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic stir-flow dissolution experiments were performed on iron- (Fe-SHA), manganese- (Mn-SHA), and copper- (Cu-SHA) containing synthetic hydroxyapatites. Solution treatments consisted of de-ionized water, citric acid and DTPA. Initially, Mn concentrations were higher than Cu concentrations and Fe concentrations were the lowest in all treatments. At later times Mn and Cu concentrations dropped in the DTPA treatment while Fe rose to the concentration similar to Mn and Cu. At all times, metal release concentrations in the water and citric acid treatments followed the trend of Mn>Cu>Fe. Rietveld analysis of x-ray diffraction data and ^31P NMR indicated that the metals substituted for Ca in the SHA structure. However, EPR data suggested that a metal (hydr)oxide phase existed either on the SHA surface or between the SHA crystallites. The metal concentration trend of Mn>Cu>Fe suggested that the initial solution metal concentrations are dependent on the dissolution of (hydr)oxides from SHA surfaces or between SHA crystallites. Similar metal concentrations at later times in the DTPA experiments suggests that metal concentrations were controlled by the release of Mn, Cu, or Fe from the SHA structure.

  1. Improved performance of carbon nanotubes—manganese doped cadmium sulfide quantum dot nanocomposite based solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajnish; Priya, Nidhi; Deep, Akash

    2016-01-01

    The nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes with quantum dots (MWCNT-QDS) display the capability of light induced charge dissociation and transport, which make them suitable for photovoltaic applications. The present work reports the coupling of multiwalled CNT (MWCNT) with L-cysteine (2-amino 3-mercaptopropionic acid) capped manganese doped cadmium sulfide QDs (CdS:Mn). The confirmation of the MWCNT-CdS:Mn nanocomposite formation is done with various instrumental techniques. Current-voltage studies of the MWCNT-CdS:Mn thin film indicate their semiconducting behavior. Further, cyclic voltammetry and frequency response analyses of the above MWCNT-CdS:Mn thin film have highlighted their potential application as a photoanode material in dye sanitized solar cells. It has been demonstrated that the use of MWCNT-CdS:Mn nanocomposite as a photoanode material offer better photocurrent characteristics as compared to QDS alone.

  2. Influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in Bangladeshi women

    SciTech Connect

    Kippler, Maria; Ekstroem, Eva-Charlotte; Loennerdal, Bo; Goessler, Walter; Akesson, Agneta; El Arifeen, Shams; Persson, Lars-Ake; Vahter, Marie . E-mail: Marie.Vahter@ki.se

    2007-07-15

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental contaminant present in food. The absorption in the intestine increases in individuals with low iron stores, but the effect of zinc deficiency is not clear. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in pregnant Bangladeshi women. We measured cadmium in urine from 890 women using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Further, we also measured ferritin and zinc in plasma. The median cadmium concentration in urine was 0.59 {mu}g/L (adjusted to mean specific gravity of 1.012 g/mL). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that urinary cadmium was associated with plasma ferritin and plasma zinc via a significant interaction between dichotomized plasma ferritin and plasma zinc. The analysis was adjusted for age and socioeconomic status. Women with low iron stores and adequate zinc status had significantly higher urinary cadmium compared to women with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. There was no difference in urinary cadmium between women with both low iron stores and zinc status compared to those with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. In conclusion, low iron stores were associated with increased cadmium accumulation, but only at adequate zinc status.

  3. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    Manganese is a mineral that is found in several foods including nuts, legumes, seeds, tea, whole grains, and leafy green vegetables. It is ... manganese by mouth along with other vitamins and minerals can promote growth in children who have low ...

  4. Concentration of Lead, Mercury, Cadmium, Aluminum, Arsenic and Manganese in Umbilical Cord Blood of Jamaican Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen; Dickerson, Aisha S.; Hessabi, Manouchehr; Bressler, Jan; Coore Desai, Charlene; Shakespeare-Pellington, Sydonnie; Reece, Jody-Ann; Morgan, Renee; Loveland, Katherine A.; Grove, Megan L.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the concentrations of lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and manganese in umbilical cord blood of Jamaican newborns and to explore the possible association between concentrations of these elements and certain birth outcomes. Based on data from 100 pregnant mothers and their 100 newborns who were enrolled from Jamaica in 2011, the arithmetic mean (standard deviation) concentrations of cord blood lead, mercury, aluminum, and manganese were 0.8 (1.3 μg/dL), 4.4 (2.4 μg/L), 10.9 (9.2 μg/L), and 43.7 (17.7 μg/L), respectively. In univariable General Linear Models, the geometric mean cord blood aluminum concentration was higher for children whose mothers had completed their education up to high school compared to those whose mothers had any education beyond high school (12.2 μg/L vs. 6.4 μg/L; p < 0.01). After controlling for maternal education level and socio-economic status (through ownership of a family car), the cord blood lead concentration was significantly associated with head circumference (adjusted p < 0.01). Our results not only provide levels of arsenic and the aforementioned metals in cord blood that could serve as a reference for the Jamaican population, but also replicate previously reported significant associations between cord blood lead concentrations and head circumference at birth in other populations. PMID:25915835

  5. Concentration of lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, arsenic and manganese in umbilical cord blood of Jamaican newborns.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Mohammad H; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen; Dickerson, Aisha S; Hessabi, Manouchehr; Bressler, Jan; Desai, Charlene Coore; Shakespeare-Pellington, Sydonnie; Reece, Jody-Ann; Morgan, Renee; Loveland, Katherine A; Grove, Megan L; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the concentrations of lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and manganese in umbilical cord blood of Jamaican newborns and to explore the possible association between concentrations of these elements and certain birth outcomes. Based on data from 100 pregnant mothers and their 100 newborns who were enrolled from Jamaica in 2011, the arithmetic mean (standard deviation) concentrations of cord blood lead, mercury, aluminum, and manganese were 0.8 (1.3 μg/dL), 4.4 (2.4 μg/L), 10.9 (9.2 μg/L), and 43.7 (17.7 μg/L), respectively. In univariable General Linear Models, the geometric mean cord blood aluminum concentration was higher for children whose mothers had completed their education up to high school compared to those whose mothers had any education beyond high school (12.2 μg/L vs. 6.4 μg/L; p < 0.01). After controlling for maternal education level and socio-economic status (through ownership of a family car), the cord blood lead concentration was significantly associated with head circumference (adjusted p < 0.01). Our results not only provide levels of arsenic and the aforementioned metals in cord blood that could serve as a reference for the Jamaican population, but also replicate previously reported significant associations between cord blood lead concentrations and head circumference at birth in other populations. PMID:25915835

  6. Recent research progress on iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials for rechargeable sodium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Komaba, Shinichi

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale high-energy batteries with electrode materials made from the Earth-abundant elements are needed to achieve sustainable energy development. On the basis of material abundance, rechargeable sodium batteries with iron- and manganese-based positive electrode materials are the ideal candidates for large-scale batteries. In this review, iron- and manganese-based electrode materials, oxides, phosphates, fluorides, etc, as positive electrodes for rechargeable sodium batteries are reviewed. Iron and manganese compounds with sodium ions provide high structural flexibility. Two layered polymorphs, O3- and P2-type layered structures, show different electrode performance in Na cells related to the different phase transition and sodium migration processes on sodium extraction/insertion. Similar to layered oxides, iron/manganese phosphates and pyrophosphates also provide the different framework structures, which are used as sodium insertion host materials. Electrode performance and reaction mechanisms of the iron- and manganese-based electrode materials in Na cells are described and the similarities and differences with lithium counterparts are also discussed. Together with these results, the possibility of the high-energy battery system with electrode materials made from only Earth-abundant elements is reviewed.

  7. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    PubMed

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  8. Manganese-mitigation of cadmium toxicity to seedling growth of Phytolacca acinosa Roxb. is controlled by the manganese/cadmium molar ratio under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Yuxiu; Chai, Tuanyao; Tan, Jinjuan; Wang, Jianwu; Feng, Shanshan; Liu, Geyu

    2013-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) can interact with cadmium (Cd) in environments and influence the toxic effect of Cd on plants. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between the Mn/Cd ratio and plant Cd-toxicity along Cd concentrations. In this paper, we studied the effects of external Mn/Cd molar ratios (0, 10, 30, 50 and 60) on Cd toxicity in the Mn hyperaccumulator and Cd tolerant plant, Phytolacca acinosa Roxb., at three Cd levels (50, 100 and 200 μM) under hydroponic conditions. Our result showed that seedling growth (y) under Cd stress was strongly positively related to the solution Mn/Cd molar ratio (SMCR). The relationship between the two variables under solution Cd concentrations was well explained by the linear regression model y=a+b1 (SMCR)+b2 (Solution-Cd). Increasing SMCR significantly reduced the Cd concentration and increased the Mn concentration in plant tissues. However, seedling growth was consistent with the shoot Mn/Cd molar ratio rather than with the Mn or Cd concentrations in plant tissues. At low levels of SMCR (e.g. 0 and 10), elevation of Mn distribution in shoot tissues might be a mechanism in P. acinosa seedlings to defend against Cd-toxicity. In comparison with low levels of SMCR, high levels of SMCR (e.g. 50 and 60) greatly alleviated lipid peroxidation and plant water-loss, and enhanced photosynthesis. However, the alleviated lipid peroxidation in the Mn-mitigation of Cd toxicity was likely to be the secondary effect resulting from the antagonism between Mn and Cd in the plant. PMID:24095921

  9. The scavenging of silver by manganese and iron oxides in stream sediments collected from two drainage areas of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Anderson, B.J.

    1974-01-01

    Stream sediments of two well-weathered and aerated drainage areas of Colorado containing anomalous amounts of silver were allowed to react by shaking with nitric acid of different concentrations (1-10M). Silver, manganese, and iron simultaneously dissolved were determined by atomic absorption. The relationship between silver dissolution and the dissolution of manganese and/or iron was evaluated by linear and multiple regression analyses. The highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.913) between silver and manganese dissolution suggests that manganese oxides are the major control on the scavenging of silver in these stream sediments, whereas iron oxides only play a secondary role in this regard. ?? 1974.

  10. Adsorption of iron cyanide complexes onto clay minerals, manganese oxide, and soil.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Hee; Schwab, A Paul; Johnston, C T; Banks, M Katherine

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption characteristics of an iron cyanide complex, soluble Prussian blue KFe(III)[Fe(II)(CN)(6)], were evaluated for representative soil minerals and soil at pH 3.7, 6.4 and 9.7. Three specimen clay minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite), two synthesized manganese oxides (birnessite and cryptomelane), and a Drummer soil from Indiana were used as the adsorbents. Surface protonation of variable charge sites increased with decreasing pH yielding positively charged sites on crystal edges and enhancing the attractive force between minerals and iron cyanide complexes. Anion adsorption on clays often is correlated to the metal content of the adsorbent, and a positive relationship was observed between iron or aluminum content and Prussian blue adsorption. Illite had high extractable iron and adsorbed more ferro-ferricyande anion, while kaolinite and montmorillonite had lower extractable iron and adsorbed less. However, less pH effect was observed on the adsorption of iron cyanide to manganese oxides. This may due to the manganese oxide mediated oxidation of ferrocyanide [Fe(II)(CN)(6)(4-)], to ferricyanide [Fe(III)(CN)(6)(3-)], which has a low affinity for manganese oxides. PMID:20665323

  11. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in palaeomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a 2 yr long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first-order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multidomain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first-order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  12. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in paleomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a two year long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multi-domain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  13. Iron and cadmium capture gamma-ray photofission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, T.G. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Lamaze, G.P.; Gilliam, D.M.; Eisenhauer, C.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Photofission measurements have been made in {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 237}Np in iron and cadmium capture gamma-ray spectra in cylindrical neutron-driven gamma-ray sources in the thermal column of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Reactor. The gamma-ray source strength was measured with neutron activation foils and by direct counting of activations produced in the metal cylinders. Photofission measurements were made with NBS miniature fission chambers. The integral photofission cross sections were compared with differential measurements by integrating the capture gamma-ray spectra with measured cross-section shapes. The integral cross sections measured in the capture gamma-ray fields are lower than the cross sections calculated from measured differential data.

  14. Liver metal levels and expression of genes related to iron homeostasis in rhesus monkeys after inhalational manganese exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pettiglio, Michael A.; Herrera, Carolina; Foster, Melanie L.; Dorman, David C.; Bartnikas, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present data on liver metal levels and expression of genes related to iron homeostasis in rhesus monkeys after inhalational manganese exposure. Archived liver samples from rhesus monkeys exposed to 0 (n=6), 0.06 (n=6), 0.3 (n=4) and 1.5 (n=4) mg/m3 manganese inhalation for 65 days were obtained from a published study (“Tissue manganese concentrations in young male rhesus monkeys following subchronic manganese sulfate inhalation” [1]). Samples were analyzed by spectroscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative PCR to assess metal levels and gene expression. Liver manganese and iron levels were linearly correlated although only the intermediate manganese exposure level (0.3 mg Mn/m3) led to a statistically significant increase in liver iron levels. PMID:26958631

  15. Liver metal levels and expression of genes related to iron homeostasis in rhesus monkeys after inhalational manganese exposure.

    PubMed

    Pettiglio, Michael A; Herrera, Carolina; Foster, Melanie L; Dorman, David C; Bartnikas, Thomas B

    2016-03-01

    Here we present data on liver metal levels and expression of genes related to iron homeostasis in rhesus monkeys after inhalational manganese exposure. Archived liver samples from rhesus monkeys exposed to 0 (n=6), 0.06 (n=6), 0.3 (n=4) and 1.5 (n=4) mg/m(3) manganese inhalation for 65 days were obtained from a published study ("Tissue manganese concentrations in young male rhesus monkeys following subchronic manganese sulfate inhalation" [1]). Samples were analyzed by spectroscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative PCR to assess metal levels and gene expression. Liver manganese and iron levels were linearly correlated although only the intermediate manganese exposure level (0.3 mg Mn/m(3)) led to a statistically significant increase in liver iron levels. PMID:26958631

  16. Identification of high levels of phytochelatins, glutathione and cadmium in the phloem sap of Brassica napus. A role for thiol-peptides in the long-distance transport of cadmium and the effect of cadmium on iron translocation.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Butko, Emerald; Springer, Franziska; Torpey, Justin W; Komives, Elizabeth A; Kehr, Julia; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-04-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that function in heavy metal detoxification in plants and certain fungi. Recent research in Arabidopsis has shown that PCs undergo long-distance transport between roots and shoots. However, it remains unknown which tissues or vascular systems, xylem or phloem, mediate PC translocation and whether PC transport contributes to physiologically relevant long-distance transport of cadmium (Cd) between shoots and roots. To address these questions, xylem and phloem sap were obtained from Brassica napus to quantitatively analyze which thiol species are present in response to Cd exposure. High levels of PCs were identified in the phloem sap within 24 h of Cd exposure using combined mass spectrometry and fluorescence HPLC analyses. Unexpectedly, the concentration of Cd was more than four-fold higher in phloem sap compared to xylem sap. Cadmium exposure dramatically decreased iron levels in xylem and phloem sap whereas other essential heavy metals such as zinc and manganese remained unchanged. Data suggest that Cd inhibits vascular loading of iron but not nicotianamine. The high ratios [PCs]/[Cd] and [glutathione]/[Cd] in the phloem sap suggest that PCs and glutathione (GSH) can function as long-distance carriers of Cd. In contrast, only traces of PCs were detected in xylem sap. Our results suggest that, in addition to directional xylem Cd transport, the phloem is a major vascular system for long-distance source to sink transport of Cd as PC-Cd and glutathione-Cd complexes. PMID:18208526

  17. Identification of high levels of phytochelatins, glutathione and cadmium in the phloem sap of Brassica napus. A role for thiol-peptides in the long-distance transport of cadmium and the effect of cadmium on iron translocation

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Butko, Emerald; Springer, Franziska; Torpey, Justin W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Kehr, Julia; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that function in heavy metal detoxification in plants and certain fungi. Recent research in Arabidopsis has shown that PCs undergo long-distance transport between roots and shoots. However, it remains unknown which tissues or vascular systems, xylem or phloem, mediate PC translocation and whether PC transport contributes to physiologically relevant long-distance transport of cadmium (Cd) between shoots and roots. To address these questions, xylem and phloem sap were obtained from Brassica napus to quantitatively analyze which thiol species are present in response to Cd exposure. High levels of PCs were identified in the phloem sap within 24 h of Cd exposure using combined mass spectrometry and fluorescence HPLC analyses. Unexpectedly, the concentration of Cd was more than four-fold higher in phloem sap compared to xylem sap. Cadmium exposure dramatically decreased iron levels in xylem and phloem sap whereas other essential heavy metals such as zinc and manganese remained unchanged. Data suggest that Cd inhibits vascular loading of iron but not nicotianamine. The high ratios [PCs]/[Cd] and [glutathione]/[Cd] in the phloem sap suggest that PCs and glutathione (GSH) can function as long-distance carriers of Cd. In contrast, only traces of PCs were detected in xylem sap. Our results suggest that, in addition to directional xylem Cd transport, the phloem is a major vascular system for long-distance source to sink transport of Cd as PC–Cd and glutathione–Cd complexes. PMID:18208526

  18. Maternal Cadmium, Iron and Zinc Levels, DNA Methylation and Birth Weight

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Cadmium (Cd) is a ubiquitous and environmentally persistent toxic metal that has been implicated in neurotoxicity, carcinogenesis and obesity and essential metals including zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) may alter these outcomes. However mechanisms underlying these relationsh...

  19. Magnetic particles extracted from manganese nodules: Suggested origin from stony and iron meteorites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe data, spherical and ellipsoidal particles extracted from manganese nodules were divided into three groups. Group I particles are believed to be derived from iron meteorites, and Group II particles from stony meteorites. Group III particles are believed to be volcanic in origin.

  20. Oxidant Selection for the Treatment of Manganese (II), Iron (II), and Arsenic (III) in Groundwaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to comply with the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA’s) arsenic standard and the manganese and iron secondary maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) in water (10µg/L, 50µg/L, and 300µg/L, respectively), many Midwestern water utilities must add a strong...

  1. Investigations of Cadmium Manganese Telluride Crystals for Room-Temperature Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Carcelen, V.; Gul, R.; James, R.

    2009-10-06

    Cadmium manganese telluride (CMT) has high potential as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors. We investigated indium-doped CMT crystals taken from the stable growth region of the ingot, and compared its characteristics with that from the last-to-freeze region. We employed different techniques, including synchrotron white-beam X-ray topography (SWBXT), current-voltage (I-V) measurements, and low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, and we also assessed their responses as detectors to irradiation exposure. The crystal from the stable growth region proved superior to that from the last-to-freeze region; it is a single-grain crystal, free of twins, and displayed a resistivity higher by two orders-of-magnitude. The segregation of indium dopant in the ingot might be responsible for its better resistivity. Furthermore, we recorded a good response in the detector fabricated from the crystal taken from the stable growth region; its ({mu}{tau}){sub e} value was 2.6 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V, which is acceptable for thin detectors, including for applications in medicine.

  2. Transcriptional and biochemical effects of cadmium and manganese on the defense system of Octopus vulgaris paralarvae.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Aldo; Salamone, Monica; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic activities the relative concentrations of cadmium and manganese have increased in the marine environment. Cephalopods are able to accumulate such metals and, as inhabitant of coastal waters, Octopus vulgaris is continuously exposed to anthropogenic activities. Since no study is available on the effects of heavy metals at molecular level in developing octopuses, herein we exposed 1-day-old paralarvae for 24 h to 10, 100, and 1000 μg/L of CdCl2 or MnCl2. Cd exerted a concentration-dependent inhibition of survival and a reduction in growth rate was shown while Mn exposure did not affect the survival rate even at the highest concentrations. Gene expression profiles of hsp70, sod, cat, and gst genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and defined patterns of transcription were observed. Moreover posttranscriptional analyses were also performed suggesting the impairment of metabolic functions, under strong oxidative conditions (as occurred in paralarvae exposed to Cd) or the complete detoxification events (as occurred in paralarvae exposed to Mn). PMID:25705660

  3. Transcriptional and Biochemical Effects of Cadmium and Manganese on the Defense System of Octopus vulgaris Paralarvae

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Monica; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic activities the relative concentrations of cadmium and manganese have increased in the marine environment. Cephalopods are able to accumulate such metals and, as inhabitant of coastal waters, Octopus vulgaris is continuously exposed to anthropogenic activities. Since no study is available on the effects of heavy metals at molecular level in developing octopuses, herein we exposed 1-day-old paralarvae for 24 h to 10, 100, and 1000 μg/L of CdCl2 or MnCl2. Cd exerted a concentration-dependent inhibition of survival and a reduction in growth rate was shown while Mn exposure did not affect the survival rate even at the highest concentrations. Gene expression profiles of hsp70, sod, cat, and gst genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and defined patterns of transcription were observed. Moreover posttranscriptional analyses were also performed suggesting the impairment of metabolic functions, under strong oxidative conditions (as occurred in paralarvae exposed to Cd) or the complete detoxification events (as occurred in paralarvae exposed to Mn). PMID:25705660

  4. Biosorption of Cadmium and Manganese Using Free Cells of Klebsiella sp. Isolated from Waste Water

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yunnan; Cheng, Keke; Li, Zehua; Ma, Xiaohui; Wei, Yahong; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yao

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated a bacterium that was isolated from waste water for its ability to take up cadmium and manganese. The strain, identified both biochemically and by its 16S rRNA gene sequence as Klebsiella, was named Yangling I2 and was found to be highly resistant to heavy metals. Surface characterization of the bacterium via SEM revealed gross morphological changes, with cells appearing as biconcave discs after metal exposure rather than their typical rod shape. The effects of pH, temperature, heavy metal concentration, agitation and biomass concentration on the uptake of Cd(II) and Mn(II) was measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results showed that the biosorption was most affected by pH and incubation temperature, being maximized at pH 5.0 and 30°C, with absorption capacities of 170.4 and 114.1 mg/g for Cd(II) and Mn(II), respectively. Two models were investigated to compare the cells’ capacity for the biosorption of Cd and Mn, and the Langmuir model based on fuzzy linear regression was found to be close to the observed absorption curves and yield binding constants of 0.98 and 0.86 for Cd and Mn, respectively. This strain of Klebsiella has approximately ten times the absorption capacity reported for other strains and is promising for the removal of heavy metals from waste water. PMID:26505890

  5. Association of arsenic, cadmium and manganese exposure with neurodevelopment and behavioural disorders in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Lacasaña, Marina; Aguilar-Garduño, Clemente; Alguacil, Juan; Gil, Fernando; González-Alzaga, Beatriz; Rojas-García, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the scientific evidence published to date on the potential effects on neurodevelopment and behavioural disorders in children exposed to arsenic, cadmium and manganese and to quantify the magnitude of the effect on neurodevelopment by pooling the results of the different studies. We conducted a systematic review of original articles from January 2000 until March 2012, that evaluate the effects on neurodevelopment and behavioural disorders due to pre or post natal exposure to arsenic, cadmium and manganese in children up to 16 years of age. We also conducted a meta-analysis assessing the effects of exposure to arsenic and manganese on neurodevelopment. Forty-one articles that evaluated the effects of metallic elements on neurodevelopment and behavioural disorders met the inclusion criteria: 18 examined arsenic, 6 cadmium and 17 manganese. Most studies evaluating exposure to arsenic (13 of 18) and manganese (14 of 17) reported a significant negative effect on neurodevelopment and behavioural disorders. Only two studies that evaluated exposure to cadmium found an association with neurodevelopmental or behavioural disorders. The results of our meta-analysis suggest that a 50% increase of arsenic levels in urine would be associated with a 0.4 decrease in the intelligence quotient (IQ) of children aged 5-15 years. Moreover a 50% increase of manganese levels in hair would be associated with a decrease of 0.7 points in the IQ of children aged 6-13 years. There is evidence that relates arsenic and manganese exposure with neurodevelopmental problems in children, but there is little information on cadmium exposure. Few studies have evaluated behavioural disorders due to exposure to these compounds, and manganese is the only one for which there is more evidence of the existence of association with attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. PMID:23570911

  6. The oxidation of iron-chromium-manganese alloys at 900C

    SciTech Connect

    Marasco, A.L.; Young, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    The oxidation of nine ternary iron-chromium-manganese alloys was studied at 900C in an oxygen partial pressure of 26.7 kPa. The manganese concentration was set at 2, 6, and 10 wt.%, and chromium at 5, 12, and 20 wt.%. The scales formed on the low-chromium alloys consisted of (Mn,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. These alloys all exhibited internal oxidation and scale detachment upon cooling. The scales formed on the higher-chromium alloys were complicated by nodule formation. Initially, these scales had an outer layer of MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} underneath, adjacent to the alloy. With the passage of time, however, nodules formed, and the overall reaction rate increased. This tendency was more marked at higher manganese contents. Although these alloys contained a high chromium content, the product chromia scale usually contained manganese. It was concluded that the presence of manganese in iron-chromium alloys had an adverse effect on the oxidation resistance over a wide range of chromium levels.

  7. Evidence of a new structural phase of manganese-iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, B.; Albers, A.; Hearne, G. R.; Le Roux, H.

    1988-02-01

    Coprecipitation of manganese and iron followed by calcination at temperatures below 500°C results in a new structural phase for the Mn-Fe-O system: a non-stoichiometric spinel with, in every three unit cells, one metal atom missing. About 57% of the iron in this spinel has the composition γMnFeO3 which is paramagnetic at room temperature. The remaining 43% of the iron has the composition MnyFe2-yO3 with y˜0.16 which is magnetic at room temperature.

  8. Biomonitoring of arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese and mercury in urine and hair of children living near mining and industrial areas.

    PubMed

    Molina-Villalba, Isabel; Lacasaña, Marina; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Hernández, Antonio F; Gonzalez-Alzaga, Beatriz; Aguilar-Garduño, Clemente; Gil, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Huelva (South West Spain) and its surrounding municipalities represent one of the most polluted estuaries in the world owing to the discharge of mining and industrial related pollutants in their proximity. A biomonitoring study was conducted to assess exposure to arsenic and some trace metals (cadmium, mercury, manganese and lead) in urine and scalp hair from a representative sample of children aged 6-9 years (n=261). This is the only study simultaneously analyzing those five metal elements in children urine and hair. The potential contribution of gender, water consumption, residence area and body mass index on urinary and hair metal concentrations was also studied. Urine levels of cadmium and total mercury in a proportion (25-50%) of our children population living near industrial/mining areas might have an impact on health, likely due to environmental exposure to metal pollution. The only significant correlation between urine and hair levels was found for mercury. Children living near agriculture areas showed increased levels of cadmium and manganese (in urine) and arsenic (in hair). In contrast, decreased urine Hg concentrations were observed in children living near mining areas. Girls exhibited significantly higher trace metal concentrations in hair than boys. The greatest urine arsenic concentrations were found in children drinking well/spring water. Although human hair can be a useful tool for biomonitoring temporal changes in metal concentrations, levels are not correlated with those found in urine except for total mercury, thus providing additional information. PMID:25434277

  9. Manganese oxide-supported iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts: physical and catalytic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitman, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, manganese oxide-supported iron (Fe/MnO) was prepared by impregnation of powdered manganese (II) oxide with aqueous iron(III) nitrate and subjected to various calcination and reduction treatments. It was then employed as a catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) and its steady-state activity and selectivity behavior was observed. The FTS reaction studies were run with nearly equimolal carbon monoxide/hydrogen feed at 515 and 540 K, 7.9 and 14.8 bar pressure. Feed conversion level was kept low in order to avoid transport limitations, and was varied by adjusting space velocity. The FTS reaction rate decreased strongly with increasing conversion. Compared to unpromoted iron catalysts, the Fe/MnO catalysts were more active for the water-gas shift reaction and less selective for methane and alcohols, especially at higher conversion, lower temperature and higher pressure. The olefin selectivity was high and secondary hydrogenation was not apparent. Catalysts calcined at higher temperature exhibited stronger effects of promotion, and yielded unusually high selectivity for C/sub 2/ to C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons at low temperature and high pressure. The general conclusion is that manganese promotion or iron can promote FTS selectivity towards low molecular weight olefins, but at the expense of high carbon dioxide formation. The Fe/MnO was also physically examined using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Iron and manganese were found to interact strongly in the calcined catalyst, though extensive phase separation occurred during reduction. The promoting effects are apparently due to partial surface coverage of iron with MnO, the extent of which is enhanced by wetter reducing conditions.

  10. Role of the node in controlling traffic of cadmium, zinc, and manganese in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Noriko; Ishikawa, Satoru; Abe, Tadashi; Baba, Koji; Terada, Yasuko

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals are transported to rice grains via the phloem. In rice nodes, the diffuse vascular bundles (DVBs), which enclose the enlarged elliptical vascular bundles (EVBs), are connected to the panicle and have a morphological feature that facilitates xylem-to-phloem transfer. To find a mechanism for restricting cadmium (Cd) transport into grains, the distribution of Cd, zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and sulphur (S) around the vascular bundles in node I (the node beneath the panicle) of Oryza sativa ‘Koshihikari’ were compared 1 week after heading. Elemental maps of Cd, Zn, Mn, and S in the vascular bundles of node I were obtained by synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and electron probe microanalysis. In addition, Cd K-edge microfocused X-ray absorption near-edge structure analyses were used to identify the elements co-ordinated with Cd. Both Cd and S were mainly distributed in the xylem of the EVB and in the parenchyma cell bridge (PCB) surrounding the EVB. Zn accumulated in the PCB, and Mn accumulated around the protoxylem of the EVB. Cd was co-ordinated mainly with S in the xylem of the EVB, but with both S and O in the phloem of the EVB and in the PCB. The EVB in the node retarded horizontal transport of Cd toward the DVB. By contrast, Zn was first stored in the PCB and then efficiently transferred toward the DVB. Our results provide evidence that transport of Cd, Zn, and Mn is differentially controlled in rice nodes, where vascular bundles are functionally interconnected. PMID:22291135

  11. Baseline Blood Levels of Manganese, Lead, Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc in Residents of Beijing Suburb

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 μg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μ/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μ/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μ/L; for blood Pb, <100 μ/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μ/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. PMID:25836720

  12. Removal of Arsenic, Iron, Manganese, and Ammonia in Drinking Water: Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series Water Treatment System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nagaoka International Corporation CHEMILES NCL Series system was tested to verify its performance for the reduction of multiple contaminants including: arsenic, ammonia, iron, and manganese. The objectives of this verification, as operated under the conditions at the test si...

  13. Characterization of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe) crystals grown by floating zone method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, A.; Gu, G. D.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Yang, G.; Liu, T.; Zhong, R.; Schneeloch, J.; James, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    Recently, Cadmium Manganese Telluride (CMT) emerged as a promising material for roomtemperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. However, our studies revealed several material defects primarily related to growth processes that are impeding the production of large single crystals with high resistivity and high mobility-lifetime product. In this work, we characterized various defects in materials grown by the floating zone method, including twins, Te inclusions, and dislocations, using our unique facilities. We also fabricated detectors from selected CMT crystals and tested their performance. This paper discusses our detailed findings on the material's properties and the performance of fabricated CMT detectors.

  14. Coprecipitation mechanisms and products in manganese oxidation in the presence of cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.; Lind, Carol J.

    1991-01-01

    Manganese oxidation products were precipitated in an aerated open-aqueous system where a continuous influx of mixed Mn2+ and Cd2+ solution was supplied and pH was maintained with an automated pH-stat adding dilute NaOH. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction identified the solids produced as mixtures of Cd2Mn34+O8, Mn2+2Mn4+3O8, MnO2 (ramsdellite), and CdCO3. Mean oxidation numbers of the total precipitated Mn as great as 3.6 were reached during titrations. During subsequent aging in solution, oxidation numbers between 3.8 and 3.9 were reached in some precipitates in less than 40 days. Conditional oxidation rate constants calculated from a crystal-growth equation applied to titration data showed the overall precipitation rate, without considering manganese oxidation state in the precipitate, was increased by a factor of ~4 to ~7 when the mole ratio (Cd/Mn + Cd) of cadmium in the feed solution was 0.40 compared with rate constants for hausmannite (Mn2+Mn23+O4 precipitation under similar conditions but without accessory metals. Kinetic experiments were made to test effects of various Cd/Mn + Cd mole ratios and rates of addition of the feed solution, different temperatures from 5.0 to 35??C, and pH from 8.0 to 9.0. Oxidation rates were slower when the Cd mole ratio was less than 0.40. The rate increased by a factor of ~10 when pH was raised one-half unit. The effect of temperature on the rate constants was also substantial, but the meaning of this is uncertain because the rate of formation of Mn4+ oxide in the absence of Cd or other accessory metals was too slow to be measurable in titration experiments. The increased rate of Mn4+ oxide formation in the presence of Cd2+ can be ascribed to the formation of a labile adsorbed intermediate, CdMn2O4 Int, an analog of hausmannite, formed on precipitate surfaces at the beginning of the oxidation process. The increased lability of this structure, resulting from coordination-chemical behavior of Cd2+ during the titration

  15. Content of total iron, copper and manganese in liver of animals during hypokinesia, muscle activity and process of recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapovich, G. M.; Taneyeva, G. V.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the content of total iron, copper and manganese in the liver of animals is altered depending on the intensity and duration of their swimming. Hypodynamia for 7 days does not alter the concentration of iron, but sufficiently increases the content of copper and manganese. The barometric factor effectively influences the maintenance of constancy in the content of microelements accumulated in the liver after intensive muscle activity.

  16. Upgrading of Low-Grade Manganese Ore by Selective Reduction of Iron Oxide and Magnetic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yubo; Olivas-Martinez, M.; Sohn, H. Y.; Kim, Hang Goo; Kim, Chan Wook

    2012-12-01

    The utilization of low-grade manganese ores has become necessary due to the intensive mining of high-grade ores for a long time. In this study, calcined ferruginous low-grade manganese ore was selectively reduced by CO, which converted hematite to magnetite, while manganese oxide was reduced to MnO. The iron-rich component was then separated by magnetic separation. The effects of the various reduction parameters such as particle size, reduction time, temperature, and CO content on the efficiency of magnetic separation were studied by single-factor experiments and by a comprehensive full factorial experiment. Under the best experimental conditions tested, the manganese content in the ore increased from around 36 wt pct to more than 44 wt pct, and almost 50 wt pct of iron was removed at a Mn loss of around 5 pct. The results of the full factorial experiments allowed the identification of the significant effects and yielded regression equations for pct Fe removed, Mn/Fe, and pct Mn loss that characterize the efficiency of the upgrading process.

  17. Associations of iron metabolism genes with blood manganese levels: a population-based study with validation data from animal models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Given mounting evidence for adverse effects from excess manganese exposure, it is critical to understand host factors, such as genetics, that affect manganese metabolism. Methods Archived blood samples, collected from 332 Mexican women at delivery, were analyzed for manganese. We evaluated associations of manganese with functional variants in three candidate iron metabolism genes: HFE [hemochromatosis], TF [transferrin], and ALAD [δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase]. We used a knockout mouse model to parallel our significant results as a novel method of validating the observed associations between genotype and blood manganese in our epidemiologic data. Results Percentage of participants carrying at least one copy of HFE C282Y, HFE H63D, TF P570S, and ALAD K59N variant alleles was 2.4%, 17.7%, 20.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Percentage carrying at least one copy of either C282Y or H63D allele in HFE gene was 19.6%. Geometric mean (geometric standard deviation) manganese concentrations were 17.0 (1.5) μg/l. Women with any HFE variant allele had 12% lower blood manganese concentrations than women with no variant alleles (β = -0.12 [95% CI = -0.23 to -0.01]). TF and ALAD variants were not significant predictors of blood manganese. In animal models, Hfe-/- mice displayed a significant reduction in blood manganese compared with Hfe+/+ mice, replicating the altered manganese metabolism found in our human research. Conclusions Our study suggests that genetic variants in iron metabolism genes may contribute to variability in manganese exposure by affecting manganese absorption, distribution, or excretion. Genetic background may be critical to consider in studies that rely on environmental manganese measurements. PMID:22074419

  18. OPT3 is a phloem-specific iron transporter that is essential for systemic iron signaling and redistribution of iron and cadmium in arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is essential for both plant growth and human health and nutrition. Cadmium, on the other hand, is a non-essential and highly toxic element that competes with iron for uptake and partitioning in plant tissues, posing a threat to crop productivity and human health. Knowledge of signaling mechanis...

  19. Modified clinoptilolite in the removal of iron and manganese from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barloková, D.; Ilavský, J.

    2012-11-01

    It is necessary to treat water intended for drinking purposes in many cases to meet the requirements of the Regulation of the Government of the Slovak Republic No. 496/2010 on Drinking Water. There is a tendency to look for technology with new, more efficient and cost-effective materials and technologies. The goal of this study is to compare activated natural zeolite known as clinoptilolite (rich deposits of clinoptilolite were found in the region of East Slovakia Region in the 1980s) with the imported Greensand and Cullsorb materials in the removal of iron and manganese from water. The results obtained from experiments carried out at WTP Kúty prove that Klinopur-Mn is suitable for the removal of iron and manganese from water and is comparable with the imported materials.

  20. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  1. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    ... no RDAs for a nutrient, the Adequate Intake (AI) is used as a guide. The AI is the estimated amount of the nutrient that ... assumed to be adequate. The daily Adequate Intake (AI) levels for manganese are: infants birth to 6 ...

  2. Manganese-oxide-supported iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts: physical and catalytic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitman, K.M.; Baerns, M.; Butt, J.B.

    1987-06-01

    It has been claimed that catalysts containing iron and manganese are especially selective for production of low molecular weight olefins in the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. In this study a new system, manganese-oxide-supported iron, Fe/MnO, was prepared, subjected to various calcination and reduction treatments, and then employed as a FT catalyst. Reaction studies were run with approximately 1/1: CO/H/sub 2/ feed at 515 and 540 K and 7.8 and 14.8 bar pressure. Although low conversions were employed, the synthesis rate decreased strongly with increasing conversion. Compared to conventional Fe catalysts, the Fe/MnO was more active for water-gas shift and less selective for methane and alcohols, especially at higher conversions, lower temperature, and higher pressure. Olefin selectivity was high, hydrogen chemisorption was depressed, and secondary hydrogenation was not apparent. In general it is concluded that the manganese-supported iron does promote FT selectivity for low molecular weight olefins, but at the expense of high CO/sub 2/ formation.

  3. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  4. Abu Zenima synthetic zeolite for removing iron and manganese from Assiut governorate groundwater, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrag, Abd El Hay Ali; Abdel Moghny, Th.; Mohamed, Atef Mohamed Gad; Saleem, Saleem Sayed; Fathy, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater in Upper Egypt especially in Assiut Governorate is considered the second source of fresh water and used for drinking, agriculture, domestic and industrial purposes. Unfortunately, it is characterized by high concentrations of iron and manganese ions. The study aimed at synthesizing zeolite-4A from kaolinite for removing the excess iron and manganese ions from Assiut Governorate groundwater wells. Therefor, the kaolinite was hydrothermally treated through the metakaolinization and zeolitization processes to produce crystalline zeolite-4A. The chemical composition of crystalline zeolite-4A and its morphology were then characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then the column experiments were conducted to study the performance of crystalline salt-4A as ion exchange and investigate their operating parameters and regeneration conditions. Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to predict adsorption capacity and the time required for 50 % breakthrough curves. The effects of initial concentrations of 600 and 1000 mg L-1 for Fe2+ and Mn2+, feed flow rate of 10-30 ml/min, and height range of 0.4-1.5 cm on the breakthrough behavior of the adsorption system were determined. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized zeolite-A4 can remove iron and manganese ions from groundwater to the permissible limit according to the standards drinking water law.

  5. Iron Acquisition by Phytosiderophores Contributes to Cadmium Tolerance1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Anderson R.; Scheuermann, Enrico B.; Prechsl, Ulrich E.; Erenoglu, Bülent; Schaaf, Gabriel; Hayen, Heiko; Weber, Günther; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2007-01-01

    Based on the ability of phytosiderophores to chelate other heavy metals besides iron (Fe), phytosiderophores were suggested to prevent graminaceous plants from cadmium (Cd) toxicity. To assess interactions between Cd and phytosiderophore-mediated Fe acquisition, maize (Zea mays) plants were grown hydroponically under limiting Fe supply. Exposure to Cd decreased uptake rates of 59Fe(III)-phytosiderophores and enhanced the expression of the Fe-phytosiderophore transporter gene ZmYS1 in roots as well as the release of the phytosiderophore 2′-deoxymugineic acid (DMA) from roots under Fe deficiency. However, DMA hardly mobilized Cd from soil or from a Cd-loaded resin in comparison to the synthetic chelators diaminetriaminepentaacetic acid and HEDTA. While nano-electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry revealed the formation of an intact Cd(II)-DMA complex in aqueous solutions, competition studies with Fe(III) and zinc(II) showed that the formed Cd(II)-DMA complex was weak. Unlike HEDTA, DMA did not protect yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells from Cd toxicity but improved yeast growth in the presence of Cd when yeast cells expressed ZmYS1. When supplied with Fe-DMA as a Fe source, transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S-ZmYS1 gene construct showed less growth depression than wild-type plants in response to Cd. These results indicate that inhibition of ZmYS1-mediated Fe-DMA transport by Cd is not related to Cd-DMA complex formation and that Cd-induced phytosiderophore release cannot protect maize plants from Cd toxicity. Instead, phytosiderophore-mediated Fe acquisition can improve Fe uptake in the presence of Cd and thereby provides an advantage under Cd stress relative to Fe acquisition via ferrous Fe. PMID:17337530

  6. Iron acquisition by phytosiderophores contributes to cadmium tolerance.

    PubMed

    Meda, Anderson R; Scheuermann, Enrico B; Prechsl, Ulrich E; Erenoglu, Bülent; Schaaf, Gabriel; Hayen, Heiko; Weber, Günther; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2007-04-01

    Based on the ability of phytosiderophores to chelate other heavy metals besides iron (Fe), phytosiderophores were suggested to prevent graminaceous plants from cadmium (Cd) toxicity. To assess interactions between Cd and phytosiderophore-mediated Fe acquisition, maize (Zea mays) plants were grown hydroponically under limiting Fe supply. Exposure to Cd decreased uptake rates of 59Fe(III)-phytosiderophores and enhanced the expression of the Fe-phytosiderophore transporter gene ZmYS1 in roots as well as the release of the phytosiderophore 2'-deoxymugineic acid (DMA) from roots under Fe deficiency. However, DMA hardly mobilized Cd from soil or from a Cd-loaded resin in comparison to the synthetic chelators diaminetriaminepentaacetic acid and HEDTA. While nano-electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry revealed the formation of an intact Cd(II)-DMA complex in aqueous solutions, competition studies with Fe(III) and zinc(II) showed that the formed Cd(II)-DMA complex was weak. Unlike HEDTA, DMA did not protect yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells from Cd toxicity but improved yeast growth in the presence of Cd when yeast cells expressed ZmYS1. When supplied with Fe-DMA as a Fe source, transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S-ZmYS1 gene construct showed less growth depression than wild-type plants in response to Cd. These results indicate that inhibition of ZmYS1-mediated Fe-DMA transport by Cd is not related to Cd-DMA complex formation and that Cd-induced phytosiderophore release cannot protect maize plants from Cd toxicity. Instead, phytosiderophore-mediated Fe acquisition can improve Fe uptake in the presence of Cd and thereby provides an advantage under Cd stress relative to Fe acquisition via ferrous Fe. PMID:17337530

  7. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  8. Maternal Exposure to Cadmium and Manganese Impairs Reproduction and Progeny Fitness in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Metal contamination represents one of the major sources of pollution in marine environments. In this study we investigated the short-term effects of ecologically relevant cadmium and manganese concentrations (10(-6) and 3.6 x 10(-5) M, respectively) on females of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and their progeny, reared in the absence or presence of the metal. Cadmium is a well-known heavy metal, whereas manganese represents a potential emerging contaminant, resulting from an increased production of manganese-containing compounds. The effects of these agents were examined on both P. lividus adults and their offspring following reproductive state, morphology of embryos, nitric oxide (NO) production and differential gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that both metals differentially impaired the fertilization processes of the treated female sea urchins, causing modifications in the reproductive state and also affecting NO production in the ovaries. A detailed analysis of the progeny showed a high percentage of abnormal embryos, associated to an increase in the endogenous NO levels and variations in the transcriptional expression of several genes involved in stress response, skeletogenesis, detoxification, multi drug efflux processes and NO production. Moreover, we found significant differences in the progeny from females exposed to metals and reared in metal-containing sea water compared to embryos reared in non-contaminated sea water. Overall, these results greatly expanded previous studies on the toxic effects of metals on P. lividus and provided new insights into the molecular events induced in the progeny of sea urchins exposed to metals. PMID:26125595

  9. Maternal Exposure to Cadmium and Manganese Impairs Reproduction and Progeny Fitness in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Metal contamination represents one of the major sources of pollution in marine environments. In this study we investigated the short-term effects of ecologically relevant cadmium and manganese concentrations (10-6 and 3.6 x 10-5 M, respectively) on females of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and their progeny, reared in the absence or presence of the metal. Cadmium is a well-known heavy metal, whereas manganese represents a potential emerging contaminant, resulting from an increased production of manganese-containing compounds. The effects of these agents were examined on both P. lividus adults and their offspring following reproductive state, morphology of embryos, nitric oxide (NO) production and differential gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that both metals differentially impaired the fertilization processes of the treated female sea urchins, causing modifications in the reproductive state and also affecting NO production in the ovaries. A detailed analysis of the progeny showed a high percentage of abnormal embryos, associated to an increase in the endogenous NO levels and variations in the transcriptional expression of several genes involved in stress response, skeletogenesis, detoxification, multi drug efflux processes and NO production. Moreover, we found significant differences in the progeny from females exposed to metals and reared in metal-containing sea water compared to embryos reared in non-contaminated sea water. Overall, these results greatly expanded previous studies on the toxic effects of metals on P. lividus and provided new insights into the molecular events induced in the progeny of sea urchins exposed to metals. PMID:26125595

  10. Baseline blood levels of manganese, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in residents of Beijing suburb

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long-Lian; Lu, Ling; Pan, Ya-Juan; Ding, Chun-Guang; Xu, Da-Yong; Huang, Chuan-Feng; Pan, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Baseline blood concentrations of metals are important references for monitoring metal exposure in environmental and occupational settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the blood levels of manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) among the residents (aged 12–60 years old) living in the suburb southwest of Beijing in China and to compare the outcomes with reported values in various developed countries. Blood samples were collected from 648 subjects from March 2009 to February 2010. Metal concentrations in the whole blood were determined by ICP-MS. The geometric means of blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were 11.4, 802.4, 4665, 42.6, and 0.68 µg/L, respectively. Male subjects had higher blood Pb than the females, while the females had higher blood Mn and Cu than the males. There was no gender difference for blood Cd and Zn. Smokers had higher blood Cu, Zn, and Cd than nonsmokers. There were significant age-related differences in blood levels of all metals studied; subjects in the 17–30 age group had higher blood levels of Mn, Pb, Cu, and Zn, while those in the 46–60 age group had higher Cd than the other age groups. A remarkably lower blood level of Cu and Zn in this population as compared with residents of other developed countries was noticed. Based on the current study, the normal reference ranges for the blood Mn were estimated to be 5.80–25.2 μg/L; for blood Cu, 541–1475 μg/L; for blood Zn, 2349–9492 μg/L; for blood Pb, <100 μg/L; and for blood Cd, <5.30 μg/L in the general population living in Beijing suburbs. - Highlights: • Baseline blood levels of metals in residents of Beijing suburb are investigated. • BMn and BPb in this cohort are higher than those in other developed countries. • Remarkably lower blood levels of Cu and Zn in this Chinese cohort are noticed. • The reference values for blood levels of Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd are established.

  11. Expanding the menu for carnivorous plants: uptake of potassium, iron and manganese by carnivorous pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Steinhauser, Georg; Peroutka, Marianne; Musilek, Andreas; Sterba, Johannes H; Lichtscheidl, Irene K; Bichler, Max

    2009-12-01

    Carnivorous plants use animals as fertiliser substitutes which allow them to survive on nutrient deficient soils. Most research concentrated on the uptake of the prey's nitrogen and phosphorus; only little is known on the utilisation of other elements. We studied the uptake of three essential nutrients, potassium, iron and manganese, in three species of carnivorous pitcher plants (Cephalotus follicularis LaBilladiere, Sarracenia purpureaL., Heliamphora nutans Bentham). Using relatively short-lived and gamma-emitting radiotracers, we significantly improved the sensitivity compared to conventional protocols and gained the following results. We demonstrated the uptake of trace elements like iron and manganese. In addition, we found direct evidence for the uptake of potassium into the pitcher tissue. Potassium and manganese were absorbed to virtually 100% if offered in physiological concentrations or below in Cephalotus. Analysis of pitcher fluid collected in the natural habitat showed that uptake was performed here as efficiently as in the laboratory. The absorption of nutrients is an active process depending on living glandular cells in the pitcher epidermis and can be inhibited by azide. Unphysiologically high amounts of nutrients were taken up for a short time, but after a few hours the absorbing cells were damaged, and uptake stopped. Absorption rates of pitcher leaves from plants under controlled conditions varied highly, indicating that each trap is functionally independent. The comparison of minerals in typical prey with the plants' tissues showed that a complete coverage of the plants' needs by prey capture is improbable. PMID:19428263

  12. The photochemistry of manganese and the origin of banded iron formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Holland, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of the deposition of superior-type Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs) is investigated in experiments where the effect of UV radiation on dissolved manganese was studied to determine if the commonly accepted photochemical model for BIF formation is consistent with the distribution of Mn in BIFs. Solutions containing 0.56 M NaCl and about 180 microM MnCl2, with or without 3 to 200 microM FeCl2 were irradiated with filtered and unfiltered UV light for up to 8 hrs; the solutions were deaerated and buffered to a pH of 7, and the experiments were conducted under oxygen-free atmosphere. Data on the rate of manganese photooxidation confirmed that a photochemical model for the origin of oxide facies BIFs is consistent with field observations.

  13. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of biosorption of iron and manganese from aqueous medium using rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekola, F. A.; Hodonou, D. S. S.; Adegoke, H. I.

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption behavior of rice husk ash with respect to manganese and iron has been studied by batch methods to consider its application for water and waste water treatment. The optimum conditions of adsorption were determined by investigating the effect of initial metal ion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose, pH value of aqueous solution and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium time was observed at 120 min. The adsorption efficiencies were found to be pH dependent. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data were found to fit the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms for iron, but fitted only Langmuir isotherm for manganese. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to describe the manganese and iron kinetics more effectively. The thermodynamic experiment revealed that the adsorption processes involving both metals were exothermic. The adsorbent was finally applied to typical raw water with initial manganese and iron concentrations of 3.38 mg/l for Fe and 6.28 mg/l, respectively, and the removal efficiency was 100 % for Mn and 70 % for Fe. The metal ions were desorbed from the adsorbent using 0.01 M HCl, it was found to quantitatively remove 67 and 86 % of Mn and Fe, respectively, within 2 h. The results revealed that manganese and iron are considerably adsorbed on the adsorbent and could be an economic method for the removal of these metals from aqueous solutions.

  14. Low iron diet and parenteral cadmium exposure in pregnant rats: the effects on trace elements and fetal viability.

    PubMed

    Piasek, Martina; Blanusa, Maja; Kostial, Krista; Laskey, John W

    2004-02-01

    The effects of latent iron deficiency combined with parenteral subchronic or acute cadmium exposure during pregnancy on maternal and fetal tissue distribution of cadmium, iron and zinc, and on fetal viability were evaluated. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed on semisynthetic test diets with either high iron (240 mg kg) or low iron (10 mg kg), and concomitantly exposed to 0, 3 or 5 mg cadmium (as anhydrous CdCl2) per kilogram body weight. Animals were exposed to cadmium from gestation day 1 through 19 by subcutaneously implanted mini pumps (Subchronic exposure) or on gestation day 15 by a single subcutaneous injection (Acute exposure). All rats were killed on gestation day 19. Blood samples, selected organs and fetuses were removed and prepared for element analyses by atomic absorption spectrometry. Low iron diet caused decreases in maternal body weight, maternal and fetal liver weights, placental weights and tissue iron concentrations. By cadmium exposure, both subchronic and acute, tissue cadmium concentrations were increased and the increase was dose-related, maternal liver and kidney zinc concentrations were increased, and fetal zinc concentration was decreased. Cadmium concentration in maternal liver was additionally increased by low iron diet. Acute cadmium exposure caused lower maternal body and organ weights, high fetal mortality, and decreased fetal weights of survivors. In conclusion, parenteral cadmium exposure during pregnancy causes perturbations in essential elements in maternal and fetal compartments. Acute cadmium exposure in the last trimester of gestation poses a risk for fetal viability especially when combined with low iron in maternal diet. PMID:14977357

  15. The photochemistry of manganese and the origin of Banded Iron Formations.

    PubMed

    Anbar, A D; Holland, H D

    1992-07-01

    The photochemical oxidation of Fe(2+) -hydroxide complexes dissolved in anoxic Precambrian oceans has been suggested as a mechanism to explain the deposition of Banded Iron Formations (BIFs). Photochemical studies have not yet addressed the low levels of manganese in many of these deposits, which probably precipitated from solutions bearing similar concentrations of Fe2+ and Mn2+. Depositional models must also explain the stratigraphic separation of iron and manganese ores in manganiferous BIFs. In this study, solutions containing 0.56 M NaCl and approximately 180 micromoles MnCl2 with or without 3 to 200 micromoles FeCl2 were irradiated with filtered and unfiltered UV light from a medium-pressure mercury-vapor lamp for up to 8 hours. The solutions were deaerated and buffered to pH approximately 7, and all experiments were conducted under O2-free (< 1 ppm) atmospheres. In experiments with NaCl + MnCl2, approximately 20% of the Mn2+ was oxidized and precipitated as birnessite in 8 hours. Manganese precipitation was only observed when light with lambda < 240 nm was used. In experiments with NaCl + MnCl2 + FeCl2, little manganese was lost from solution, while Fe2+ was rapidly oxidized to Fe3+ and precipitated as gamma-FeOOH or as amorphous ferric hydroxide. The Mn:Fe ratio of these precipitates was approximately 1:50, similar to the ratios observed in BIFs. A strong upper limit on the rate of manganese photo-oxidation during the Precambrian is estimated to be 0.1 mg cm-2 yr-1, a factor of 10(3) slower than the rate of iron photo-oxidation considered reasonable in BIF depositional basins. Thus, a photochemical model for the origin of oxide facies BIFs is consistent with field observations, although models that invoke molecular O2 as the oxidant of Fe2+ and Mn2+ are not precluded. Apparently, oxide facies BIFs could have formed under anoxic, as well as under mildly oxygenated atmospheres. PMID:11537803

  16. Preparation of polyacrylnitrile (PAN)/ Manganese oxide based activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) for adsorption of Cadmium (II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, N.; Yusof, N.; Jaafar, J.; Ismail, AF; Che Othman, F. E.; Hasbullah, H.; Salleh, W. N. W.; Misdan, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) from precursor polyacrylnitrile (PAN) and manganese oxide (MnO2) were prepared via electrospinning process. The electrospun PAN/MnO2-based ACNFs were characterised in term of its morphological structure and specific surface area using SEM and BET analysis respectively. The comparative adsorption study of cadmium (II) ions from aqueous solution between the neat ACNFs, composite ACNFs and commercial granular activated carbon was also conducted. SEM analysis illustrated that composite ACNFs have more compact fibers with presence of MnO2 beads with smaller fiber diameter of 437.2 nm as compared to the neat ACNFs which is 575.5 nm. BET analysis elucidated specific surface area of ACNFs/MnO2 to be 67 m2/g. Under adsorption study, it was found out that Cd (II) removal by ACNFs/MnO2 was the highest (97%) followed by neat ACNFs (96%) and GAC (74%).

  17. Effect of austempering time on mechanical properties of a low manganese austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Putatunda, S.K.; Gadicherla, P.K.

    2000-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of austempering time on the resultant microstructure and the room-temperature mechanical properties of an unalloyed and low manganese ductile cast iron with initially ferritic as-cast structure. The effect of austempering time on the plane strain fracture toughness of this material was also studied. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from unalloyed ductile cast iron with low manganese content and with a ferritic as-cast (solidified) structure. These specimens were then austempered in the upper (371 C) and lower (260 C) bainitic temperature ranges for different time periods, ranging from 30 min. to 3 h. Microstructural features such as type of bainite and the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite and its carbon content were evaluated by X-ray diffraction to examine the influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of this material. The results of the present investigation indicate that for this low manganese austempered ductile iron (ADI), upper ausferritic microstructures exhibit higher fracture toughness than lower ausferritic microstructures. Yield and tensile strength of the material was found to increase with an increase in austempering time in a lower bainitic temperature range, whereas in the upper bainitic temperature range, time has no significant effect on the mechanical properties. A retained austenite content between 30 to 35% was found to provide optimum fracture toughness. Fracture toughness was found to increase with the parameter (X{gamma}C{gamma}/d){sup 1/2}, where X{gamma} is the volume fraction of austenite, C{gamma} is the carbon content of the austenite, and d is the mean free path of dislocation motion in ferrite.

  18. Growth and Dissolution of Iron and Manganese Oxide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Scot T. Martin

    2008-12-22

    Growth and dissolution of Fe and Mn oxide films are key regulators of the fate and transport of heavy metals in the environment, especially during changing seasonal conditions of pH and dissolved oxygen. The Fe and Mn are present at much higher concentrations than the heavy metals, and, when Fe and Mn precipitate as oxide films, heavy metals surface adsorb or co-precipitate and are thus essentially immobilized. Conversely, when the Fe and Mn oxide films dissolve, the heavy metals are released to aqueous solution and are thus mobilized for transport. Therefore, understanding the dynamics and properties of Fe and Mn oxide films and thus on the uptake and release of heavy metals is critically important to any attempt to develop mechanistic, quantitative models of the fate, transport, and bioavailablity of heavy metals. A primary capability developed in our earlier work was the ability to grow manganese oxide (MnO{sub x}) films on rhodochrosite (MnCO{sub 3}) substrate in presence of dissolved oxygen under mild alkaline conditions. The morphology of the films was characterized using contact-mode atomic force microscopy. The initial growth began by heteroepitaxial nucleation. The resulting films had maximum heights of 1.5 to 2 nm as a result of thermodynamic constraints. Over the three past years, we have investigated the effects of MnO{sub x} growth on the interactions of MnCO{sub 3} with charged ions and microorganisms, as regulated by the surface electrical properties of the mineral. In 2006, we demonstrated that MnO{sub x} growth could induce interfacial repulsion and surface adhesion on the otherwise neutral MnCO{sub 3} substrate under environmental conditions. Using force-volume microscopy (FVM), we measured the interfacial and adhesive forces on a MnO{sub x}/MnCO{sub 3} surface with a negatively charged silicon nitride tip in a 10-mM NaNO3 solution at pH 7.4. The interfacial force and surface adhesion of MnOx were approximately 40 pN and 600 pN, respectively

  19. Interplay between Manganese and Iron in Pneumococcal Pathogenesis: Role of the Orphan Response Regulator RitR

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Potter, Adam J.; Trappetti, Claudia; Walker, Mark J.; Jennings, Michael P.; Paton, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen that is carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx by up to 70% of the human population. Translocation of the bacteria into internal sites can cause a range of diseases, such as pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis, and bacteremia. This transition from nasopharynx to growth at systemic sites means that the pneumococcus needs to adjust to a variety of environmental conditions, including transition metal ion availability. Although it is an important nutrient, iron potentiates oxidative stress, and it is established that in S. pneumoniae, expression of iron transport systems and proteins that protect against oxidative stress are regulated by an orphan response regulator, RitR. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron and manganese ion availability on the growth of a ritR mutant. Deletion of ritR led to impaired growth of bacteria in high-iron medium, but this phenotype could be suppressed with the addition of manganese. Measurement of metal ion accumulation indicated that manganese prevents iron accumulation. Furthermore, the addition of manganese also led to a reduction in the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced by bacterial cells. Studies of virulence in a murine model of infection indicated that RitR was not essential for pneumococcal survival and suggested that derepression of iron uptake systems may enhance the survival of pneumococci in some niches. PMID:23184523

  20. Structural studies of iron and manganese in photosynthetic reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, A.E.

    1987-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to characterize components involved in the light reactions of photosynthetic reaction centers from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp.: center X, the low electron potential acceptor in Photosystem I (PS I) and the Mn complex involved in water oxidation and oxygen evolution. The dependence of its EPR amplitude on microwave power and temperature indicate an Orbach spin relaxation mechanism involving an excited state at 40 cm/sup -1/. This low energy contributes to its unusually anisotropic g-tensor. XAS of iron in PS I preparations containing ferredoxins A, B and X are consistent with a model with (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins, which are presumably centers A and B and (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins, which would be X. Illumination of dark-adapted Synechococcus PS II samples at 220 to 240 K results in the formation of the multiline EPR signal previously assigned as a Mn S/sub 2/ species, and g = 1.8 and 1.9 signals of Fe/sup 2 +/ Q/sub A//sup -/. In contrast to spinach, illumination at 110 to 160 K produces only a new EPR signal at g = 1.6 which we assign to another configuration of Fe/sup 2+ - Q/sup -/. Following illumination of a S/sub 1/ sample at 140 K or 215 K, the Mn x-ray absorption edge inflection energy changes from 6550 eV to 6551 eV, indicating an oxidation of Mn, and average valences greater than Mn(II). Concomitant changes in the shape of the pre-edge spectrum indicate oxidation of Mn(III) to Mn(IV). The Mn EXAFS spectrum of PS II from Synechococcus is similar in the S/sub 1/ and S/sub 2/ states, indicating O or N ligands at 1.75 +- 0.05 A, transition metal neighbor(s) at 2.75 +- 0.05 A, and N and O ligands at 2.2 A with heterogeneous bond lengths; these data demonstrate the presence of a di-..mu..-oxo bridged Mn structure. 202 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Effects of Exogenous Gibberellic Acid3 on Iron and Manganese Plaque Amounts and Iron and Manganese Uptake in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue; Zhu, Changhua; Gan, Lijun; Ng, Denny; Xia, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) regulate various components of plant development. Iron and Mn plaque result from oxiding and hydroxiding Fe and Mn, respectively, on the roots of aquatic plant species such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we found that exogenous gibberellic acid3 (GA3) spray decreased Fe plaque, but increased Mn plaque, with applications of Kimura B nutrient solution. Similar effects from GA3, leading to reduced Fe plaque and increased Mn plaque, were also found by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometric microanalysis. Reduced Fe plaque was observed after applying GA3 to the groups containing added Fe2+ (17 and 42 mg•L-1) and an increasing trend was detected in Mn plaques of the Mn2+ (34 and 84 mg•L-1) added treatments. In contrast, an inhibitor of GA3, uniconazole, reversed the effects of GA3. The uptake of Fe or Mn in rice plants was enhanced after GA3 application and Fe or Mn plaque production. Strong synergetic effects of GA3 application on Fe plaque production were detected. However, no synergetic effects on Mn plaque production were detected. PMID:25710173

  2. Effects of exogenous gibberellic acid3 on iron and manganese plaque amounts and iron and manganese uptake in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue; Zhu, Changhua; Gan, Lijun; Ng, Denny; Xia, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) regulate various components of plant development. Iron and Mn plaque result from oxiding and hydroxiding Fe and Mn, respectively, on the roots of aquatic plant species such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we found that exogenous gibberellic acid3 (GA3) spray decreased Fe plaque, but increased Mn plaque, with applications of Kimura B nutrient solution. Similar effects from GA3, leading to reduced Fe plaque and increased Mn plaque, were also found by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometric microanalysis. Reduced Fe plaque was observed after applying GA3 to the groups containing added Fe2+ (17 and 42 mg•L(-1)) and an increasing trend was detected in Mn plaques of the Mn2+ (34 and 84 mg•L(-1)) added treatments. In contrast, an inhibitor of GA3, uniconazole, reversed the effects of GA3. The uptake of Fe or Mn in rice plants was enhanced after GA3 application and Fe or Mn plaque production. Strong synergetic effects of GA3 application on Fe plaque production were detected. However, no synergetic effects on Mn plaque production were detected. PMID:25710173

  3. Assessment of metals in down feathers of female common eiders and their eggs from the Aleutians: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Snigaroff, Daniel; Snigaroff, Ronald; Stamm, Timothy; Volz, Conrad

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium were examined in the down feathers and eggs of female common eiders (Somateria mollissima) from Amchitka and Kiska Islands in the Aleutian Chain of Alaska to determine whether there were (1) differences between levels in feathers and eggs, (2) differences between the two islands, (3) positive correlations between metal levels in females and their eggs, and (4) whether there was more variation within or among clutches. Mean levels in eggs (dry weight) were as follows: arsenic (769 ppb, ng/g), cadmium (1.49 ppb), chromium (414 ppb), lead (306 ppb), manganese (1,470 ppb), mercury (431 ppb) and selenium (1,730 ppb). Levels of arsenic were higher in eggs, while chromium, lead, manganese, and mercury were higher in feathers; there were no differences for selenium. There were no significant interisland differences in female feather levels, except for manganese (eider feathers from Amchitka were four times higher than feathers from Kiska). Levels of manganese in eggs were also higher from Amchitka than Kiska, and eider eggs from Kiska had significantly higher levels of arsenic, but lower levels of selenium. There were no significant correlations between the levels of any metals in down feathers of females and in their eggs. The levels of mercury in eggs were below ecological benchmark levels, and were below human health risk levels. However, Aleuts can seasonally consume several meals of bird eggs a week, suggesting cause for concern for sensitive (pregnant) women. PMID:17934788

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of As-Cast Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar; Ganguli, Ashis Chandra

    2012-08-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the effect of manganese and copper addition, singly as well as in combination, on the microstructure, micro-segregation, and mechanical properties of ductile irons. Alloy A (3.18C, 2.64Si, 0.45Mn), alloy B (3.35C, 2.51Si, 0.82Mn), alloy C (3.16C, 2.80Si, 1.08Mn, 0.56Cu), and alloy D (3.18C, 3.00Si, 1.04Mn, 1.13Cu) were melted and cast in the form of Y-block test pieces. The cast microstructures varied from ferrito-pearlitic in alloys A, B, and C to pearlitic in alloy D. However, on XRD analysis and SEM examination, the presence of martensite patches was also detected. There was a marginal decrease in nodule count in alloy B. In alloys C and D, nodule counts were higher, but the proportion of ferrite decreased drastically. Alloy D was found to be the strongest (UTS ≈ 800 MPa, El = 5%) with alloys A and C coming next in strength; while alloy B was weakest of the four. The presence of martensite patches in association with pearlite appears to be responsible for low toughness of these alloys. Microprobe analysis shows some silicon segregation near the graphite nodules and practically little segregation of manganese. Elemental mapping by FE-SEM does not indicate any manganese segregation.

  5. The influence of curcumin and manganese complex of curcumin on cadmium-induced oxidative damage and trace elements status in tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Eybl, Vladislav; Kotyzová, Dana; Lesetický, Ladislav; Bludovská, Monika; Koutenský, Jaroslav

    2006-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuoyl methane) from turmeric is a well-known biologically active compound. It has been shown to ameliorate oxidative stress and it is considered to be a potent cancer chemopreventive agent. In our previous study the antioxidative effects of curcumin in cadmium exposed animals were demonstrated. Also manganese exerts protective effects in experimental cadmium intoxication. The present study examined the ability of the manganese complex of curcumin (Mn-curcumin) and curcumin to protect against oxidative damage and changes in trace element status in cadmium-intoxicated male mice. Curcumin or Mn-curcumin were administered at equimolar doses (0.14 mmol/kg b.w.) for 3 days, by gastric gavages, dispersed in methylcellulose. One hour after the last dose of antioxidants, cadmium chloride (33 micromol/kg) was administered subcutaneously. Both curcumin and Mn-curcumin prevented the increase of hepatic lipid peroxidation -- expressed as MDA level, induced by cadmium intoxication and attenuated the Cd-induced decrease of hepatic GSH level. No change in hepatic glutathione peroxidase or catalase activities was found in Cd-exposed mice. A decreased GSH-Px activity was measured in curcumin and Mn-curcumin alone treated mice. Neither curcumin nor Mn-curcumin treatment influenced cadmium distribution in the tissues and did not correct the changes in the balance of essential elements caused by Cd-treatment. The treatment with Mn-curcumin increased the Fe and Mn content in the kidneys of both control and Cd-treated mice and Fe and Cu content in the brain of control mice. In conclusion, regarding the antioxidative action, introducing manganese into the curcumin molecule does not potentiate the studied effects of curcumin. PMID:16345010

  6. Investigation of the influence of cadmium processing on zinc gallium oxide:manganese thin films for photoluminescent and thin film electroluminescent applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Michael John

    Cadmium processing of ZnGa2O4 films provides a new fabrication route for phosphor powders and thin films. It relies on the enhanced diffusion due to the large vacancy concentration left by the sublimation of cadmium. Photoluminescent powders can be made with a single high temperature firing. Thin film devices can be processed at a significantly lower temperature, expanding the range of available substrates. Powders and thin films of ZnGa2O4:Mn were fabricated using starting materials in which between 0% and 50% of the ZnO was substituted by CdO. It was found that the emission spectra of the various compositions was unaffected by the change in composition, peaking at 504 nm, with the colour coordinates x = 0.08 and y = 0.69. The invariance of the emission spectrum is due to the spinel crystal structure exhibited by the compound. However, the maximum PL brightness was obtained from powders in which 10% of the ZnO had been substituted by CdO in the starting materials. The improved brightness is the result of better manganese incorporation which resulted from CdO sublimation during processing. This left a large vacancy concentration which enhanced the diffusion, and hence the manganese incorporation. In the case of thin films sputtered from cadmium processed targets, the composition of the films as deposited closely mirrored that of the target starting materials. The as deposited films were not luminescent and had to be annealed in vacuum in order to activate the manganese. EDX of these films showed that all of the cadmium had sublimed during the anneal. Very long anneal times also resulted in the loss of zinc. The decomposition products were amorphous or nanocrystalline. These films had an identical PL emission to the powders. The loss of cadmium correlated with the onset of bright 254 nm photoluminescence in the films, indicating that cadmium loss aided in the activation of the manganese. This was the result of the enhanced diffusion due to the large vacancy

  7. Mobilisation processes responsible for iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Central Adriatic Italy.

    PubMed

    Palmucci, William; Rusi, Sergio; Di Curzio, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Iron and manganese are two of the most common contaminants that exceed the threshold imposed by international and national legislation. When these contamination occurs in groundwater, the use of the water resource is forbidden for any purposes. Several studies investigated these two metals in groundwater, but research focused in the Central Adriatic area are still lacking. Thus, the objective of this study is to identify the origin of Fe and Mn contamination in groundwater and the hydrogeochemical processes that can enrich aquifers with these metals. This work is based on hydrogeochemical and multivariate statistical analysis of analytical results undertaken on soils and groundwater. Fe and Mn contamination are widespread in the alluvial aquifers, and their distribution is regulated by local conditions (i.e. long residence time, presence of peat or organic-rich fine sediments or anthropic pollution) that control redox processes in the aquifers and favour the mobilisation of these two metals in groundwater. The concentration of iron and manganese identified within soil indicates that the latter are a concrete source of the two metals. Anthropic impact on Fe and Mn contamination of groundwater is not related to agricultural activities, but on the contrary, the contribution of hydrocarbons (e.g. spills) is evident. PMID:26948970

  8. Treponema denticola TroR is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Fenno, J Christopher; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-01-01

    Treponema denticola harbours a genetic locus with significant homology to most of the previously characterized Treponema pallidum tro operon. Within this locus are five genes (troABCDR) encoding for the components of an ATP-binding cassette cation-transport system (troABCD) and a DtxR-like transcriptional regulator (troR). In addition, a σ70-like promoter and an 18 bp region of dyad symmetry were identified upstream of the troA start codon. This putative operator sequence demonstrated similarity to the T. pallidum TroR (TroRTp) binding sequence; however, the position of this motif with respect to the predicted tro promoters differed. Interestingly, unlike the T. pallidum orthologue, T. denticola TroR (TroRTd) possesses a C-terminal Src homology 3-like domain commonly associated with DtxR family members. In the present study, we show that TroRTd is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor using Escherichia coli reporter constructs and in T. denticola. In addition, we demonstrate that although TroRTd possessing various C-terminal deletions maintain metal-sensing capacities, these truncated proteins exhibit reduced repressor activities in comparison with full-length TroRTd. Based upon these findings, we propose that TroRTd represents a novel member of the DtxR family of transcriptional regulators and is likely to play an important role in regulating both manganese and iron homeostases in this spirochaete. PMID:18761626

  9. The Proteome of Copper, Iron, Zinc, and Manganese Micronutrient Deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott I.; Castruita, Madeli; Malasarn, Davin; Urzica, Eugen; Erde, Jonathan; Page, M. Dudley; Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Trace metals such as copper, iron, zinc, and manganese play important roles in several biochemical processes, including respiration and photosynthesis. Using a label-free, quantitative proteomics strategy (MSE), we examined the effect of deficiencies in these micronutrients on the soluble proteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We quantified >103 proteins with abundances within a dynamic range of 3 to 4 orders of magnitude and demonstrated statistically significant changes in ∼200 proteins in each metal-deficient growth condition relative to nutrient-replete media. Through analysis of Pearson's coefficient, we also examined the correlation between protein abundance and transcript abundance (as determined via RNA-Seq analysis) and found moderate correlations under all nutritional states. Interestingly, in a subset of transcripts known to significantly change in abundance in metal-replete and metal-deficient conditions, the correlation to protein abundance is much stronger. Examples of new discoveries highlighted in this work include the accumulation of O2 labile, anaerobiosis-related enzymes (Hyd1, Pfr1, and Hcp2) in copper-deficient cells; co-variation of Cgl78/Ycf54 and coprogen oxidase; the loss of various stromal and lumenal photosynthesis-related proteins, including plastocyanin, in iron-limited cells; a large accumulation (from undetectable amounts to over 1,000 zmol/cell) of two COG0523 domain-containing proteins in zinc-deficient cells; and the preservation of photosynthesis proteins in manganese-deficient cells despite known losses in photosynthetic function in this condition. PMID:23065468

  10. Intestinal absorption of dietary cadmium in women depends on body iron stores and fiber intake.

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, M; Akesson, A; Nermell, B; Vahter, M

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of intake and uptake of cadmium in relation to diet composition were carried out in 57 nonsmoking women, 20-50 years of age. A vegetarian/high-fiber diet and a mixed-diet group were constructed based on results from a food frequency questionnaire. Duplicate diets and the corresponding feces were collected during 4 consecutive days in parallel with dietary recording of type and amount of food ingested for determination of the dietary intake of cadmium and various nutrients. Blood and 24-hr urine samples were collected for determination of cadmium, hemoglobin, ferritin, and zinc. There were no differences in the intake of nutrients between the mixed-diet and the high-fiber diet groups, except for a significantly higher intake of fiber (p < 0.001) and cadmium (p < 0.002) in the high-fiber group. Fecal cadmium corresponded to 98% in the mixed-diet group and 100% in the high-fiber diet group. No differences in blood cadmium (BCd) or urinary cadmium (UCd) between groups could be detected. There was a tendency toward higher BCd and UCd concentrations with increasing fiber intake; however, the concentrations were not statistically significant at the 5% level, indicating an inhibitory effect of fiber on the gastrointestinal absorption of cadmium. Sixty-seven percent of the women had serum ferritin < 30 micrograms/l, indicating reduced body iron stores, which were highly associated with higher BCd (irrespective of fiber intake). BCd was mainly correlated with UCd, serum ferritin, age, anf fibre intake. UCd and serum ferritin explained almost 60% of the variation in BCd.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7713018

  11. Iron depletion increases manganese uptake and potentiates apoptosis through ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Ah; Li, Yuan; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a risk factor for manganese (Mn) accumulation. Excess Mn promotes neurotoxicity but the mechanisms involved and whether iron depletion might affect these pathways is unknown. To study Mn intoxication in vivo, iron deficient and control rats were intranasally instilled with 60 mg MnCl2/kg over 3 weeks. TUNEL staining of olfactory tissue revealed that Mn exposure induced apoptosis and that iron deficiency potentiated this effect. In vitro studies using the dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cell line confirmed that Mn-induced apoptosis was enhanced by iron depletion using the iron chelator desferrioxamine. Mn has been reported to induce apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress. In SH-SY5Y cells, Mn exposure induced the ER stress genes glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Increased phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (phospho-eIF2α) was also observed. These effects were accompanied by the activation of ER resident enzyme caspase-12, and the downstream apoptotic effector caspase-3 was also activated. All of the Mn-induced responses were enhanced by DFO treatment. Inhibitors of ER stress and caspases significantly blocked Mn-induced apoptosis and its potentiation by DFO, indicating that ER stress and subsequent caspase activation underlie cell death. Taken together, these data reveal that Mn induces neuronal cell death through ER stress and the UPR response pathway and that this apoptotic effect is potentiated by iron deficiency most likely through upregulation of DMT1. PMID:23764342

  12. Zinc, cadmium and manganese uptake by soybean from two zinc- and cadmium-amended Coastal Plain soils

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.C.; Chaney, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    Two Coastal Plain soils were used to evaluate the effects of organic matter and Fe and Mn hydrous oxides on Zn phytotoxicity, and on Zn, Cd, and Mn uptake by soybean seedlings. Fertilized Pocomoke sl and Sassafras sl were limed to pH 5.5 and 6.3 with CaCO/sub 3/ when adding Zn (six levens between 1.3 and 196 mg/kg at pH 5.5; seven levels between 1.3 and 524 mg/kg at pH 6.3). Cadmium was added at 1% of the added Zn. Beeson soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) was grown 4 weeks, and the trifoliolate leaves evaluated for dry weight yield and for their Zn, Cd, and Mn concentrations. The higher organic matter Pocomoke soil was more effective than the Sassafras soil in reducing metal uptake, and Zn phytoxicity. Foliar Zn levels associated with yield reduction of soybean grown on Pocomoke differed with soil pH. Cadmium uptake was significantly lower on the Pocomoke soil. Foliar Mn increased to reported phytotoxic levels (> 500 mg/kg) with increased added Zn only on the Sassafras soil at pH 6.3. DTPA-extractable Zn and Cd were linear functions of added Zn and Cd for both soils; 0.01M CaCl/sub 2/-extractable Zn and Cd were curvilinear (increasing slope) functions for the Sassafras and linear for the Pocomoke soil. Thus, soil type can strongly influence Zn, Cd, and Mn uptake as well as Zn phytotoxicity to soybean. Soil organic matter appears to be more important than hydrous oxides of Fe and Mn in moderating the effects of excessive soil Zn and limiting Zn and Cd uptake. Induced metal toxicities (Mn) may depend on many factors, and should be considered an integral part of any characterization of specific metal phytotoxicities (e.g. Zn).

  13. Shellac-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for removal of cadmium(II) ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jilai; Chen, Long; Zeng, Guangming; Long, Fei; Deng, Jiuhua; Niu, Qiuya; He, Xun

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a new effective adsorbent for cadmium removal from aqueous solution synthesized by coating a shellac layer, a natural biodegradable and renewable resin with abundant hydroxyl and carboxylic groups, on the surface of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) imaging showed shellac-coated magnetic nanoparticle (SCMN) adsorbents had a core-shell structure with a core of 20 nm and shell of 5 nm. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic analysis suggested the occurrence of reaction between carboxyl groups on the SCMN adsorbent surface and cadmium ions in aqueous solution. Kinetic data were well described by pseudo second-order model and adsorption isotherms were fitted with both Langmuir and Freundlich models with maximum adsorption capacity of 18.80 mg/g. SCMN adsorbents provided a favorable adsorption capacity under high salinity conditions, and cadmium could easily be desorbed using mild organic acid solutions at low concentration. PMID:23513435

  14. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Coupled to Chemical Reduction of Iron or Manganese

    PubMed Central

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    A new chemolithotrophic bacterial metabolism was discovered in anaerobic marine enrichment cultures. Cultures in defined medium with elemental sulfur (S0) and amorphous ferric hydroxide (FeOOH) as sole substrates showed intense formation of sulfate. Furthermore, precipitation of ferrous sulfide and pyrite was observed. The transformations were accompanied by growth of slightly curved, rod-shaped bacteria. The quantification of the products revealed that S0 was microbially disproportionated to sulfate and sulfide, as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O → SO42- + 3H2S + 2H+. Subsequent chemical reactions between the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO3. Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO2, instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant reduction of MnO2 to Mn2+. Growth of small rod-shaped bacteria was observed. When incubated without MnO2, the culture did not grow but produced small amounts of SO42- and H2S at a ratio of 1:3, indicating again a disproportionation of S0. The observed microbial disproportionation of S0 only proceeds significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S0 disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO2 was high, > 104 cm-3 in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic sulfide oxidation to sulfate in anoxic sediments. PMID:16348835

  15. Arsenic, Iron, Lead, Manganese and Uranium Concentrations in Private Bedrock Wells in Southeastern New Hampshire, 2012-2013

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace metals, such as arsenic, iron, lead, manganese, and uranium, in groundwater used for drinking have long been a concern because of the potential adverse effects on human health and the aesthetic or nuisance problems that some present. Moderate to high concentrations of the t...

  16. Role of iron in the intestinal uptake of cadmium in the newborn rat

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, L.

    1983-01-01

    There is evidence that suckling rats have a greater capacity for intestinal transport of heavy metals than do mature animals. It has been suggested that iron transport mechanisms provide a way for non-essential metals like Cd to be absorbed. The effect of iron on intestinal uptake of cadmium (/sup 109/Cd) was investigated in suckling (14 day old), adolescent (28 day old) and young adult rats (42 day old) using an in situ incubation technique. In the presence of 0.4 and 2.0 mM Fe SO/sub 4/, intestinal uptake of Cd was significantly decreased in 14 day old pups. When dams and pups were placed on an iron deficient diet (ID) tissue iron levels decreased in 28 and 42 day old rats but not in 14 day old rats. The results of the present studies suggest that intestinal cadmium transport in the suckling, adolescent and young adult rat is mediated, at least in part, by iron transport pathways.

  17. Validation of In-Situ Iron-Manganese Oxide Coated Stream Pebbles as Sensors for Arsenic Source Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, J.; Peters, S. C.; Casteel, A.

    2013-12-01

    Locating nonpoint source contaminant fluxes can be challenging due to the inherent heterogeneity of source and of the subsurface. Contaminants such as arsenic are a concern for drinking water quality and ecosystem health. Arsenic contamination can be the result of several natural and anthropogenic sources, and therefore it can be difficult to trace and identify major areas of arsenic in natural systems. Identifying a useful source indicator for arsenic is a crucial step for environmental remediation efforts. Previous studies have found iron-manganese oxide coated streambed pebbles as useful source indicators due to their high attraction for heavy metals in water. In this study, pebbles, surface water at baseflow and nearby rocks were sampled from the Pennypack Creek and its tributaries, in southwestern Pennsylvania, to test the ability of coated streambed pebbles as environmental source indicators for arsenic. Quartz pebbles, 5-7 cm in diameter, were sampled to minimize elemental contamination from rock chemistry. In addition, quartz provides an excellent substrate for iron and manganese coatings to form. These coatings were leached from pebbles using 4M nitric acid with 0.1% concentrated hydrochloric acid. Following sample processing, analyses were performed using an ICP-MS and the resulting data were spatially organized using ArcGIS software. Arsenic, iron and manganese concentrations in the leachate are normalized to pebble surface area and each location is reported as a ratio of arsenic to iron and manganese. Results suggest that iron-manganese coated stream pebbles are useful indicators of arsenic location within a watershed.

  18. The possible crucial role of iron accumulation combined with low tryptophan, zinc and manganese in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2001-11-01

    Iron can react with citric acid, interfering with the Krebs cycle, hence with oxidative phosphorylation. Free iron (Fe) can cause considerable oxidative damage both through Fenton reactions and by activating xanthine oxidase, which produces both superoxide (O(2-)) and uric acid (abundant in many cancers). It can also react with lactic acid, reducing its elimination and increasing the acidity of the cytoplasm. Fe can also wreak havoc by reacting with tryptophan, the least abundant and most delicate essential amino acid, which is necessary for the production of serotonin and other substances required by the immune system to fight cancer. On the other hand, in the presence of iron, the tryptophan metabolite quinolinate causes intense lipid peroxidation. Similarly, several other carcinogenic metabolites of tryptophan are particularly dangerous in the presence of Fe. Excess Fe may also interfere with manganese superoxide dismutase and impair the initiation of apoptosis by the mitochondrion, rendering the cells impervious to all the signals to undergo apoptosis from without and from within the cell. Moreover, Fe may also play a crucial role on telomere repair, by activating telomerase. Therefore, by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing chromosome repair, Fe may bestow immortality upon the cancer cell. Furthermore, Fe is one of the triggers for mitosis. Therefore, increased Fe levels may be essential for the rapid growth characteristic of many malignancies. In turn, the rapid growth further depletes resources from the healthy tissues, exacerbating the deficiencies of the other elements and reducing the ability to fight the malignancy. PMID:11735307

  19. Manganese exposure among smelting workers: relationship between blood manganese-iron ratio and early onset neurobehavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Dallas M; Zheng, Wei; Zou, Yan; Shi, Xiujuan; Chen, Jian; Rosenthal, Frank S; Fan, Qiyuan

    2009-11-01

    A biomarker for detection of early onset neurobehavioral alterations in manganism remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to use a neurobehavioral test battery to identify subtle changes in Mn-induced motor and memory dysfunction and to relate the quantifiable neurological dysfunction to an established Mn-exposure index such as blood manganese-iron ratio (MIR). A total of 323 subjects were recruited to control (n=106), low-exposure (122), and high-exposure (95) groups. The test battery consisted of standard testing procedures including the nine-hole and groove-type steadiness tester, Benton visual retention test, and Purdue pegboard coordination test. No significant health problems or clinically diagnosed neurological dysfunctions were observed. Benton test did not reveal any abnormal memory deficits among Mn-exposed smelters, nor did the groove and nine-hole tests detect any abnormality in dynamic and static steadiness in tested subjects. Purdue pegboard test showed a remarkable age-related decline in fine movement coordination among all study participants regardless of the Mn-exposure condition. Mn exposure significantly exacerbated this age-related deterioration. Statistical modeling revealed that the plasma and erythrocyte MIR (i.e., pMIR and eMIR, respectively) were associated with Purdue pegboard scores. Among all subjects whose MIR were above the cut-off value (COV), pMIR was significantly correlated with pegboard scores (r=-0.261, p=0.002), whereas for those subjects over the age of 40, the eMIR, but not pMIR, was associated with declined pegboard performance (r=-0.219, p=0.069). When both factors were taken into account (i.e., age>40 and MIR>the COV), only pMIR was inversely associated with pegboard scores. Combining their usefulness in Mn-exposure assessment, we recommend that the blood Mn-Fe ratio may serve as a reasonable biomarker not only for assessment of Mn exposure but also for health risk assessment. PMID:19963104

  20. Diffusion zone between high-chromium cast iron and high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, V.P.; Shvartser, A.Y.; Stroganova, G.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigate extending the service lives of components by the method of electric-slag facing of working surfaces. Steel 45 was used in the annealed state. Electric-slag remelting was the method used to determine the bending strength. Metallographic examinations were conducted under an MIM-8m microscope, while x-ray analysis of the built-up and base metals were performed on a DRON-2 diffractometer. BAsic alloying elements, chromium and manganese were studied on a ''Cameca MS-46'' microanalyzer. During the electri-slag facing of a high-chromium cast iron containing 8% of Mn on high-manganese steel 11OG13L diffusion equalization of the manganese content occurs in the fusion zone. Diffusion displacement of carbon, chromium, and manganese from high-chromium cast iron into the high-manganese steel during electric-slag facing gies rise to a smooth change in the structure of the metal in the fusion zone, and to increased strength of the joint between the unlike materials investigated.

  1. Oxidation of manganese and iron by Leptothrix discophora: Use of N,N,N prime ,N prime -tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine as an indicator of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    de Vrind-de Jong, E.W.; Corstjens, P.L.A.M.; Kempers, E.S.; Westbroek, P.; de Vrind, J.P.M. )

    1990-11-01

    A new method for the quantification and characterization of manganese-oxidizing activity by spent culture medium of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 was developed. It is based on the formation of the dye Wurster blue from N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by oxidized manganese generated in the spent medium. The kinetic parameters thus obtained agreed well with data obtained with other methods. It was also possible to demonstrate iron oxidation by spent culture medium. The kinetics of the process and inhibition by enzyme poisons suggest that iron oxidation is enzymatically catalyzed. Probably two different factors are involved in manganese and iron oxidation.

  2. Oxidation of Manganese and Iron by Leptothrix discophora: Use of N,N,N',N'-Tetramethyl-p-Phenylenediamine as an Indicator of Metal Oxidation.

    PubMed

    de Vrind-de Jong, E W; Corstjens, P L; Kempers, E S; Westbroek, P; de Vrind, J P

    1990-11-01

    A new method for the quantification and characterization of manganese-oxidizing activity by spent culture medium of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 was developed. It is based on the formation of the dye Wurster blue from N,N,N',N'-Tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by oxidized manganese generated in the spent medium. The kinetic parameters thus obtained agreed well with data obtained with other methods. It was also possible to demonstrate iron oxidation by spent culture medium. The kinetics of the process and inhibition by enzyme poisons suggest that iron oxidation is enzymatically catalyzed. Probably two different factors are involved in manganese and iron oxidation. PMID:16348351

  3. Role of nickel and manganese in recovery of resistivity in iron-based alloys after low-temperature proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, K.; Iwai, T.; Abe, H.; Sekimura, N.; Katano, Y.; Iwata, T.; Onitsuka, T.

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the recovery of electric resistivity in pure iron, Fe-0.6Ni and Fe-1.5Mn as related to isochronal annealing following 1 MeV proton irradiation at lower temperature than 70 K, focusing on the relationship between solute atoms and irradiation defects. Both nickel and manganese prevent stage ID recovery, which corresponds to correlated recombination. Stage II recovery is also changed by the addition of a solute, which corresponds to the migration of small interstitial clusters. In both pure iron and Fe-0.6Ni, no evident difference was observed in the stage III region, which corresponds to the migration of vacancies. In contrast, two substages appeared in the Fe-1.5Mn at a higher temperature than stage IIIB appeared in pure iron. These substages are considered to represent the release of irradiation-induced defects, which was trapped by manganese.

  4. Disease-toxicant screen reveals a neuroprotective interaction between Huntington’s disease and manganese exposure

    PubMed Central

    Williams, B. Blairanne; Li, Daphne; Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Vadodaria, Bhavin K.; Anderson, Joel G.; Kwakye, Gunnar F.; Aschner, Michael; Erikson, Keith M.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the similarities between Huntington’s disease pathophysiology and the neurotoxicology of various metals, we hypothesized that they may exhibit disease-toxicant interactions revealing cellular pathways underlying neurodegeneration. Here we utilize metals and the STHdh mouse striatal cell line model of Huntington’s disease to perform a gene-environment interaction screen. We report that striatal cells expressing mutant Huntingtin exhibit elevated sensitivity to cadmium toxicity and resistance to manganese toxicity. This neuroprotective gene-environment interaction with manganese is highly specific, as it does not occur with iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, cadmium, lead, or nickel ions. Analysis of the Akt cell-stress signaling pathway showed diminished activation with manganese exposure and elevated activation after cadmium exposure in the mutant cells. Direct examination of intracellular manganese levels found that mutant cells have a significant impairment in manganese accumulation. Furthermore, YAC128Q mice, a Huntington’s disease model, showed decreased total striatal manganese levels following manganese exposure relative to wild-type mice. Thus, this disease-toxicant interaction screen has revealed that expression of mutant Huntingtin results in heightened sensitivity to cadmium neurotoxicity and a selective impairment of manganese accumulation. PMID:19845833

  5. Single pot synthesis of pyridine-N-oxide based polymeric complexes of cadmium and manganese: Crystal structure and luminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sandip; Guha, Averi; Suresh, Eringathodi; Jana, Atish Dipankar; Banerjee, Arpita

    2012-12-01

    Two new polymeric complexes of cadmium(II) and manganese(II) with Pyridine-N-oxide (pyo) mediated by thiocyanate and dicyanamide (dca) anions have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray single crystal structure analysis. The structural analyses reveal that complexes [Cd(pyo)2(SCN)2]n (1) and [Mn(pyo)2(dca)2]n (2) [where, pyo = pyridine-N-oxide; dca = dicyanamide] are 2D coordination polymers. In complex 1 hexa-coordinated Cd(II) centers posses distorted octahedral coordination environments. Each Cd(II) is coordinated by four SCN- in end to end fashion forming a zigzag chain and two pyo monodentate ligands bridge two adjacent Cd(II) centers leading to a two-dimensional sheet structure. In complex 2 hexa-coordinated Mn(II) centers posses octahedral coordination environments. The coordination polymer constitute a 2D polymeric sheet and has a (4, 4) grid network architecture Successive stacking of coordination polymeric sheets are enforced by inter layer OH⋯O and OH⋯N hydrogen bonding. The luminescence properties of these two polynuclear complexes in solid state were studied and complex 1 exhibits higher luminescence intensity than 2.

  6. Cadmium and manganese accumulation in Phytolacca americana L. and the roles of non-protein thiols and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lu; Peng, Kejian; Xia, Yan; Wang, Guiping; Niu, Liyuan; Lian, Chunlan; Shen, Zhenguo

    2013-01-01

    Phytolacca americana L. can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in its aerial tissues, especially cadmium (Cd) and manganese (Mn). It has great potential for use in phytoextraction of metals from multi-metal-contaminated soils. This study was conducted to further investigate the Cd- and Mn-tolerance strategies of this plant. Concentrations of non-protein thiols (NPTs) and phytochelatins (PCs) in leaves and roots increased significantly as the concentration of Cd in solution increased. The molar ratios of PCs:soluble Cd ranged from 1.8 to 3.6 in roots and 8.1 to 31.6 in leaves, suggesting that the cellular response involving PC synthesis was sufficient to complex Cd ions in the cytosol, especially that of leaves. In contrast, excess Mn treatments did not result in a significant increase in NPT or PC concentrations in leaves or roots. Oxalic acid concentrations in leaves of plants exposed to 2 or 20 mM Mn reached 69.4 to 89.3 mg (0.771 to 0.992 mmol) g(-1) dry weight, respectively, which was approximately 3.7- to 8.6-fold higher than the Mn level in the 0.6 M HCl extract. Thus, oxalic acid may play an important role in the detoxification of Mn. PMID:23487997

  7. Levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese and zinc in biological samples of paralysed steel mill workers with related to controls.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Atif G; Shah, Faheem; Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Kolachi, Nida Fatima; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kazi, Naveed

    2011-12-01

    The determination of essential trace and toxic elements in the biological samples of human beings is an important clinical screening procedure. This study aimed to assess the possible effects of environmental exposure on paralysed male workers (n = 75) belonging to the production and quality control departments of a steel mill. In this investigation, the concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese and zinc were determined in biological samples (blood, urine and scalp hair samples) of exposed paralysis and non-paralysed steel mill workers. For comparative purposes, unexposed healthy subjects of same age group were selected as referents. The elements in the biological samples were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity of the methodology was checked by the biological certified reference materials. The results indicate that the level understudy elements in all three biological samples were significantly higher in paralysed workers of both groups (quality control and production) as compared to referents (p < 0.01). The possible connection of these elements with the aetiology of disease is discussed. The results also show the need for immediate improvements of workplace ventilation and industrial hygiene practices. PMID:21547399

  8. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  9. The relationship between body iron stores and blood and urine cadmium concentrations in US never-smoking, non-pregnant women aged 20-49 years

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2011-07-15

    Background: Cadmium is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant associated with increased risk of leading causes of mortality and morbidity in women, including breast cancer and osteoporosis. Iron deficiency increases absorption of dietary cadmium, rendering women, who tend to have lower iron stores than men, more susceptible to cadmium uptake. We used body iron, a measure that incorporates both serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, as recommended by the World Health Organization, to evaluate the relationships between iron status and urine and blood cadmium. Methods: Serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, urine and blood cadmium values in never-smoking, non-pregnant, non-lactating, non-menopausal women aged 20-49 years (n=599) were obtained from the 2003-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, and iron deficiency defined as body iron <0 mg/kg. Robust linear regression was used to evaluate the relationships between body iron and blood and urine cadmium, adjusted for age, race, poverty, body mass index, and parity. Results: Per incremental (mg/kg) increase in body iron, urine cadmium decreased by 0.003 {mu}g/g creatinine and blood cadmium decreased by 0.014 {mu}g/L. Iron deficiency was associated with 0.044 {mu}g/g creatinine greater urine cadmium (95% CI=0.020, 0.069) and 0.162 {mu}g/L greater blood cadmium (95% CI=0.132, 0.193). Conclusions: Iron deficiency is a risk factor for increased blood and urine cadmium among never-smoking, pre-menopausal, non-pregnant US women, independent of age, race, poverty, body mass index and parity. Expanding programs to detect and correct iron deficiency among non-pregnant women merits consideration as a potential means to reduce the risk of cadmium associated diseases. - Highlights: {yields} Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor. {yields} Body iron was inversely associated with blood

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of the Iron and Manganese Reconstituted Tyrosyl Radical in Bacillus Cereus Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tomter, Ane B.; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Bell, Caleb B.; Barra, Anne-Laure; Andersen, Niels H.; Solomon, Edward I.; Andersson, K. Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the rate limiting step in DNA synthesis where ribonucleotides are reduced to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Class Ib RNRs consist of two homodimeric subunits: R1E, which houses the active site; and R2F, which contains a metallo cofactor and a tyrosyl radical that initiates the ribonucleotide reduction reaction. We studied the R2F subunit of B. cereus reconstituted with iron or alternatively with manganese ions, then subsequently reacted with molecular oxygen to generate two tyrosyl-radicals. The two similar X-band EPR spectra did not change significantly over 4 to 50 K. From the 285 GHz EPR spectrum of the iron form, a g1-value of 2.0090 for the tyrosyl radical was extracted. This g1-value is similar to that observed in class Ia E. coli R2 and class Ib R2Fs with iron-oxygen cluster, suggesting the absence of hydrogen bond to the phenoxyl group. This was confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy, where the stretching vibration associated to the radical (C-O, ν7a = 1500 cm−1) was found to be insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange. Additionally, the 18O-sensitive Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretching (483 cm−1) of the metallo-cofactor was also insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange indicating no hydrogen bonding to the di-iron-oxygen cluster, and thus, different from mouse R2 with a hydrogen bonded cluster. The HF-EPR spectrum of the manganese reconstituted RNR R2F gave a g1-value of ∼2.0094. The tyrosyl radical microwave power saturation behavior of the iron-oxygen cluster form was as observed in class Ia R2, with diamagnetic di-ferric cluster ground state, while the properties of the manganese reconstituted form indicated a magnetic ground state of the manganese-cluster. The recent activity measurements (Crona et al., (2011) J Biol Chem 286: 33053–33060) indicates that both the manganese and iron reconstituted RNR R2F could be functional. The manganese form might be very important, as it has 8 times higher

  11. Fluorescence quenching and bonding properties of some hydroxamic acid derivatives by iron(III) and manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Senthilnithy, R; De Costa, M D P; Gunawardhana, H D

    2009-01-01

    Spectrophotometric investigations of highly fluorescent metal chelating molecules are of relevance due to their potential application in novel, selective fluorescence-based sensors. Benzene and naphthalene chromophores are highly fluorescent while hydroxamic acids are widely used as ligands for complexation of transition metals. In order to develop fluorescence probes, several phenyl derivatives of N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid and an aminodihydroxamic acid linked with a naphthalene chromophore were synthesized and their selective ionophoric properties towards iron(III) and manganese(II) ions were investigated using fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. Both methods confirm the formation of 1:1 and 1:2 complexes for iron(III) and a 1:1 complex for manganese(II). The complex that is formed depends on the concentration of the ligand and pH of the medium. The amino dihydroxamic acid exhibits a prominent selectivity towards iron(III) with a two-step 1:1 and 1:2 quenching mechanism at pH 3 and towards manganese(II) with a 1:1 quenching mechanism at a probe concentration of 1 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3) at pH 9.5 The logarithm of overall formation constants of 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of iron(III) were estimated as 3.30 and 9.05, respectively. PMID:18800360

  12. Metals, Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration: A focus on Iron, Manganese and Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Marcelo; Avila, Daiana Silva; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Essential metals are crucial for the maintenance of cell homeostasis. Among the 23 elements that have known physiological functions in humans, 12 are metals, including iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn). Nevertheless, excessive exposure to these metals may lead to pathological conditions, including neurodegeneration. Similarly, exposure to metals that do not have known biological functions, such as mercury (Hg), also present great health concerns. This reviews focuses on the neurodegenerative mechanisms and effects of Fe, Mn and Hg. Oxidative stress (OS), particularly in mitochondria, is a common feature of Fe, Mn and Hg toxicity. However, the primary molecular targets triggering OS are distinct. Free cationic iron is a potent pro-oxidant and can initiate a set of reactions that form extremely reactive products, such as OH•. Mn can oxidize dopamine (DA), generating reactive species and also affect mitochondrial function, leading to accumulation of metabolites and culminating with OS. Cationic Hg forms have strong affinity for nucleophiles, such as –SH and –SeH. Therefore, they target critical thiol- and selenol-molecules with antioxidant properties. Finally, we address the main sources of exposure to these metals, their transport mechanisms into the brain, and therapeutic modalities to mitigate their neurotoxic effects. PMID:23266600

  13. Effect of acute administration of cadmium on the disposition of copper, zinc, and iron in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.L.; King, L.J.; Parke, D.V.W.

    1980-02-01

    Acute administration of subcutaneous doses of cadmium (0.1 to 1.5 mg/kg) to male rats results in high plasma concentrations of copper 24 hr after treatment. In contrast, plasma zinc and iron levels were markedly reduced. The magnitude and significance of the changes in plasma metal ion concentrations were dependent upon the dose of cadmium administered. Liver copper levels were slightly but not significantly increased, but circulating ceruloplasmin levels increased as the total plasma copper increased. Biliary excretion of copper was markedly inhibited after cadmium administration (subcutaneous and oral) and the degree of inhibition was directly related to the dose. Simultaneous parenteral administration of zinc did not counteract this effect. These results suggest that cadmium blocks the excretion of copper into the bile leading to an accumulation of copper in the liver, which in turn, stimulates the synthesis of ceruloplasmin. The mechanisms by which cadmium may inhibit biliary copper excretion are discussed.

  14. Levels and predictors of airborne and internal exposure to manganese and iron among welders.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Weiss, Tobias; Kendzia, Benjamin; Henry, Jana; Lehnert, Martin; Lotz, Anne; Heinze, Evelyn; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Van Gelder, Rainer; Berges, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Mattenklott, Markus; Punkenburg, Ewald; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated airborne and internal exposure to manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) among welders. Personal sampling of welding fumes was carried out in 241 welders during a shift. Metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Mn in blood (MnB) was analyzed by graphite furnace atom absorption spectrometry. Determinants of exposure levels were estimated with multiple regression models. Respirable Mn was measured with a median of 62 (inter-quartile range (IQR) 8.4-320) μg/m(3) and correlated with Fe (r=0.92, 95% CI 0.90-0.94). Inhalable Mn was measured with similar concentrations (IQR 10-340 μg/m(3)). About 70% of the variance of Mn and Fe could be explained, mainly by the welding process. Ventilation decreased exposure to Fe and Mn significantly. Median concentrations of MnB and serum ferritin (SF) were 10.30 μg/l (IQR 8.33-13.15 μg/l) and 131 μg/l (IQR 76-240 μg/l), respectively. Few welders were presented with low iron stores, and MnB and SF were not correlated (r=0.07, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.20). Regression models revealed a significant association of the parent metal with MnB and SF, but a low fraction of variance was explained by exposure-related factors. Mn is mainly respirable in welding fumes. Airborne Mn and Fe influenced MnB and SF, respectively, in welders. This indicates an effect on the biological regulation of both metals. Mn and Fe were strongly correlated, whereas MnB and SF were not, likely due to higher iron stores among welders. PMID:22377681

  15. Assimilation of zinc, cadmium, lead, copper, and iron by the spider Dysdera crocata, a predator of woodlice

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkin, S.P.; Martin, M.H.

    1985-02-01

    In this paper, an experiment is described on the assimilation of zinc, cadmium, lead, copper and iron by Dysdera crocata collected from a site in central Bristol. The spiders were fed on woodlice from their own site, and on woodlice from a site contaminated by a smelting works which contained much higher levels of zinc, cadmium and lead than the spiders would have been used to in their normal diet.

  16. Activation and promotion studies in a mixed slurry reactor with an iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W.; Zarochak, M.F.; Stencel, J.M.; Diehl, J.R.

    1987-03-01

    Synthesis gas was reacted over a coprecipitated iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalyst in a slurry reactor. The effect of various activation parameters - temperature, pressure, and gas composition - on subsequent catalyst activity and product selectivity was investigated. The gas composition had the most dramatic effect on the catalyst activation and the ensuing synthesis gas conversion. The effect of potassium promotion on catalyst activity and product selectivity was also studied in slurry reactor tests.

  17. Evaluation of iron and manganese-coated pumice application for the removal of as(v) from aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of water has been recognized as a serious environmental issue and there are reports on its epidemiological problems to human health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice as the adsorbents for removing arsenate from aqueous solutions. The effect of various parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH and initial concentration on removal efficiency of arsenate were evaluated in batch mode. The data obtained from the kinetic studies were analyzed using kinetic models of pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. In addition, two isotherm models of Freundlich and Langmuir were used to fit the experimental data. The results showed that the optimum dosage of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice for arsenate removal were 40 and 80 g/L whereas the adsorption process reached equilibrium after 80 and 100 min, respectively. The maximum removal efficiency of arsenate using the two adsorbents were both recorded in pH=3 as the removal efficiency gradually declined following every increase in pH values of the solution. Iron-coated pumice also showed to have high removal efficiency when the initial concentration of arsenate was high while the low concentration of arsenate was efficiently removed by manganese-coated pumice. Moreover, it was depicted that the adsorption kinetics by both adsorbents followed pseudo-second order equation and the uptake data of arsenate were well fitted with Langmuir isotherm model. Therefore, it could be concluded that iron and manganese-coated pumice could be considered as suitable adsorbents for arsenate removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:23369510

  18. Evaluation of iron and manganese-coated pumice application for the removal of as(v) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Far, Leila Babaie; Souri, Bubak; Heidari, Masoumeh; Khoshnavazi, Roshan

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of water has been recognized as a serious environmental issue and there are reports on its epidemiological problems to human health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performances of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice as the adsorbents for removing arsenate from aqueous solutions. The effect of various parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH and initial concentration on removal efficiency of arsenate were evaluated in batch mode. The data obtained from the kinetic studies were analyzed using kinetic models of pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. In addition, two isotherm models of Freundlich and Langmuir were used to fit the experimental data. The results showed that the optimum dosage of iron-coated pumice and manganese-coated pumice for arsenate removal were 40 and 80 g/L whereas the adsorption process reached equilibrium after 80 and 100 min, respectively. The maximum removal efficiency of arsenate using the two adsorbents were both recorded in pH=3 as the removal efficiency gradually declined following every increase in pH values of the solution. Iron-coated pumice also showed to have high removal efficiency when the initial concentration of arsenate was high while the low concentration of arsenate was efficiently removed by manganese-coated pumice. Moreover, it was depicted that the adsorption kinetics by both adsorbents followed pseudo-second order equation and the uptake data of arsenate were well fitted with Langmuir isotherm model. Therefore, it could be concluded that iron and manganese-coated pumice could be considered as suitable adsorbents for arsenate removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:23369510

  19. Concentrations of strontium, barium, cadmium, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, antimony, selenium and lead in the equine liver and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Mainzer, Barbara; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Schafft, Helmut; Palavinskas, Richard; Breithaupt, Angele; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of specific elements in the equine liver and kidneys are of practical relevance since horses are not only food-producing animals, but also partially serve as an indicator for the environmental pollution, as the basic feed includes plants like grass, grain and fruits. In this study, the concentrations of strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se) and lead (Pb) were measured in the liver, renal cortex and renal medulla of 21 horses (8 male; 13 female; aged between 5 months-28 years), using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Comparable Cu and Zn concentrations were detected in the liver and renal cortex, while approximately 50% lower concentrations were measured in the renal medulla. The lowest Sr, Cd and Se, but the highest Mn, Sb and Pb concentrations were measured in the liver. The Ba concentrations were comparable in the renal cortex and medulla, but lower in the liver of the horses. Gender-related differences were observed for Cd, Mn and Cr, with higher Cd concentrations in the liver, but lower Mn concentrations in the renal cortex and lower Cr concentrations in the renal medulla of female horses. Age-related differences were detected for most measured elements, however, the animal number per age-group was only low. In conclusion, the present study provides important reference data for the storage of Sr, Ba, Cd, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Sb, Se and Pb in the liver and kidneys of horses, which are of practical relevance for an evaluation of the exposure of horses to these elements, either via feed or the environment. PMID:25061551

  20. Liver and kidney concentrations of strontium, barium, cadmium, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, antimony, selenium and lead in cats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to provide new knowledge on the storage of strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), selenium (Se) and lead (Pb) in the feline organism, we measured the concentrations of these elements in the liver, renal cortex and renal medulla, evaluating also the impact of age, sex or the occurrence of a chronic kidney disease (CKD). The element concentrations in the tissues of 47 cats (22 male; 25 female; aged between 2 months and 18 years) were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results Cu, Zn and Mn were the highest in the liver, followed by the renal cortex and the renal medulla. The Cd concentrations were lower in the renal medulla compared to the renal cortex and the liver, and Sr was higher in the renal medulla compared to the liver. The Se concentrations in the cortex of the kidneys were higher than in the medulla of the kidneys and in the liver. Higher Cd concentrations were measured in the renal cortex of female cats, while no further gender-related differences were observed. Except for Cr, Sb and Se, age-dependencies were detected for the storage of all elements. The occurrence of a CKD also affected the storage of the elements, with lower concentrations of Ba (renal medulla), Zn (renal cortex; renal medulla) and Mn (liver; renal medulla), but higher Cd concentrations (liver; renal cortex) in diseased cats. Conclusions In conclusion, the present results provide new information on the accumulation of specific elements in the feline liver and kidneys, demonstrating a dependency on age and an impaired kidney function, but not on the sex of the animals. PMID:25030305

  1. Effect of oxide formation mechanisms on lead adsorption by biogenic manganese (hydr)oxides, iron (hydr)oxides, and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Yarrow M; Lion, Leonard W; Shuler, Michael L; Ghiorse, William C

    2002-02-01

    The effects of iron and manganese (hydr)oxide formation processes on the trace metal adsorption properties of these metal (hydr)oxides and their mixtures was investigated by measuring lead adsorption by iron and manganese (hydr)oxides prepared by a variety of methods. Amorphous iron (hydr)oxide formed by fast precipitation at pH 7.5 exhibited greater Pb adsorption (gamma(max) = 50 mmol of Pb/mol of Fe at pH 6.0) than iron (hydr)oxide formed by slow, diffusion-controlled oxidation of Fe(II) at pH 4.5-7.0 or goethite. Biogenic manganese(III/IV) (hydr)oxide prepared by enzymatic oxidation of Mn(II) by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 adsorbed five times more Pb (per mole of Mn) than an abiotic manganese (hydr)oxide prepared by oxidation of Mn(II) with permanganate, and 500-5000 times more Pb than pyrolusite oxides (betaMnO2). X-ray crystallography indicated that biogenic manganese (hydr)oxide and iron (hydr)oxide were predominantly amorphous or poorly crystalline and their X-ray diffraction patterns were not significantly affected by the presence of the other (hydr)oxide during formation. When iron and manganese (hydr)oxides were mixed after formation, or for Mn biologically oxidized with iron(III) (hydr)oxide present, observed Pb adsorption was similar to that expected for the mixture based on Langmuir parameters for the individual (hydr)oxides. These results indicate that interactions in iron/manganese (hydr)oxide mixtures related to the formation process and sequence of formation such as site masking, alterations in specific surface area, or changes in crystalline structure either did not occur or had a negligible effect on Pb adsorption by the mixtures. PMID:11871557

  2. Geochemistry and Microbial Communities in Iron- and Manganese-Enriched Cold Groundwater Biofiltration Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Dangeti, S.; Roshani, B.; McBeth, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring how to enhance the microbially mediated oxidization of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in natural and engineered environments in cold climates requires an understanding of the interactive relationships between the geochemistry of cold groundwater and Fe- and Mn-oxidizing bacteria. This study precisely measured geochemical and microbial communities in a scaled-up biofiltration system using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) analyses coupled with next-generation sequencing (Illumina Miseq). Two pilot-scale biofiltration columns for Fe (Filter 1) and Mn (Filter 2) were connected in series and installed at the Langham Water Treatment Plant in Saskatoon, Canada. The groundwater temperature ranged from 4 to 8 °C. The pilot-scale study showed that successful treatment (99% removal) of both Fe and Mn was achieved in the biofilters. However, the Mn removal was significantly retarded for four months, likely due to the slow growth of Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MnOB) in Filter 2. The removal of Mn was accelerated once the redox potential in Filter 2 exceeded +300 mV. At that point, the XANES analyses showed that the oxidization states of Mn in Filter 2 were mainly +3 and +4, confirming that Mn oxidization had occurred. Geochemical analyses (PHREEQCi) also indicated changed geochemical conditions that favoured the formation of Mn-oxides during biofiltration. Next-generation sequencing analyses indicated the enrichment of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), including Gallionella sp. and Sideroxydans sp., in Filter 1. There were high read numbers for MnOB relatives, including Pseudomonas sp., Hydrogenophaga sp., Bdellovibrio sp., and Leptothrix sp., in Filter 2. Furthermore, the addition of anthracite (coal-based filter media) positively affected the growth MnOB and enhanced Mn oxidization. The evidence obtained in this study provides insight into how Mn oxidization can be accelerated in cold groundwater treatment systems.

  3. Theoretical technique for predicting the cumulative impact of iron and manganese oxidation in streams receiving discharge from coal mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bobay, Keith E.

    1986-01-01

    Two U.S. Geological Survey computer programs are modified and linked to predict the cumulative impact of iron and manganese oxidation in coal-mine discharge water on the dissolved chemical quality of a receiving stream. The coupled programs calculate the changes in dissolved iron, dissolved manganese, and dissolved oxygen concentrations; alkalinity; and, pH of surface water downstream from the point of discharge. First, the one-dimensional, stead-state stream, water quality program uses a dissolved oxygen model to calculate the changes in concentration of elements as a function of the chemical reaction rates and time-of-travel. Second, a program (PHREEQE) combining pH, reduction-oxidation potential, and equilibrium equations uses an aqueous-ion association model to determine the saturation indices and to calculate pH; it then mixes the discharge with a receiving stream. The kinetic processes of the first program dominate the system, whereas the equilibrium thermodynamics of the second define the limits of the reactions. A comprehensive test of the technique was not possible because a complete set of data was unavailable. However, the cumulative impact of representative discharges from several coal mines on stream quality in a small watershed in southwestern Indiana was simulated to illustrate the operation of the technique and to determine its sensitivity to changes in physical, chemical, and kinetic parameters. Mine discharges averaged 2 cu ft/sec, with a pH of 6.0, and concentrations of 7.0 mg/L dissolved iron, 4.0 mg/L dissolved manganese, and 8.08 mg/L dissolved oxygen. The receiving stream discharge was 2 cu ft/sec, with a pH of 7.0, and concentrations of 0.1 mg/L dissolved iron, 0.1 mg/L dissolved manganese, and 8.70 mg/L dissolved oxygen. Results of the simulations indicated the following cumulative impact on the receiving stream from five discharges as compared with the effect from one discharge: 0.30 unit decrease in pH, 1.82 mg/L increase in dissolved

  4. Variations in structure and electrochemistry of iron- and titanium-doped lithium nickel manganese oxyfluoride spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höweling, Andres; Stenzel, David; Gesswein, Holger; Kaus, Maximilian; Indris, Sylvio; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Binder, Joachim R.

    2016-05-01

    Doping of cathode materials can considerably improve electrochemical performance and stability. Here, the high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel is used as a candidate material. It is high-voltage cycling at a potential of approximately 4.7 V and the ability to host 2 eq. Li, thus leading to a theoretical capacity of 294 mAh g-1, that makes this material interesting. In order to improve stability and electronic conductivity, the spinel is doped with titanium and iron. Cycling in a voltage range of 2.0-5.0 V leads to a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion accompanied by a phase transformation from cubic to tetragonal symmetry. This causes a severe capacity fade. To improve capacity retention, the as-prepared spinel is post-doped with fluorine. Influence of different fluorine amounts in LiNi0.5Mn1.4Fe0.1Ti0.027O4-xFx (x = 0-0.3) on the capacity and stability is analyzed. The initial capacities decrease with increasing fluorine content but the low voltage capacity is stabilized. Best electrochemical results are obtained with a fluorine content of x = 0.15. Furthermore, an additional redox couple is found. The intensity of this depends on the fluorine content. It is assumed that manganese, either in the tetrahedral sites or in octahedral sites, bound to fluorine lead to a higher voltage.

  5. Role of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kazantzis, G

    1981-01-01

    The possible carcinogenicity of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium is reviewed, taking into account epidemiological data, the results of animal experimental studies, data on mutagenic effects and on other in vitro test systems. Of the great variety of occupations where exposure to one of these metals may occur, only haematite mining has been clearly shown to involve an increased human cancer risk. While the possibility that haematite might in some way act as a carcinogen has to be taken into consideration it is more likely that other carcinogens are responsible. Certain platinum coordination complexes are used in cancer chemotherapy, are mutagenic, and likely to be carcinogenic. Cobalt, its oxide and sulfide, certain lead salts, one organomanganese, and one organotitanium compound have been shown to have a limited carcinogenic effect in experimental animal studies, and except for titanium appear to be mutagenic. Certain mercury compounds are mutagenic but none have been shown to be carcinogenic. The presently available data are inadequate to assess the possible carcinogenicity of selenium compounds, but a few observations suggest that selenium may suppress the effect of other carcinogens administered to experimental animals and may even be associated with lower cancer mortality rates in man. Epidemiological observations are essential for the assessment of a human cancer risk, but the difficulty in collecting past exposure data in occupational groups and the complexity of multiple occupational exposures with changes over time, limits the usefulness of retrospective epidemiological studies. PMID:7023929

  6. Tritium purification via zirconium-manganese-iron alloy getter st 909 in flow processes

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.D.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Pawelko, R. J.; Anderl, R.A. |; Tuggle, D.G.

    1995-03-01

    A zirconium-manganese-iron alloy, St 909, was evaluated as a purifier in tritium handling, transport, and storage applications. High efficiency removal of CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and O{sub 2} was observed at concentrations of 0.1 to 1% in helium. Gas streams at 100 to 5000 sccm were passed through getters operated at 500-800{degree}C. On-getter residence times of two seconds were required to achieve > 99% removal of these reactive impurities. At this removal efficiency level, the individual impurity capacity of 100 g of St 909 purifier at 800{degree}C was 0.59, 0.28, 0.19, 0.14 and 0.12 moles of CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, respectively. Hydrogen containing gases, CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, were cracked on the purifier and the resultant elemental hydrogen was released. Only 8{+-}2 scc of H{sub 2} were retained on 100 g of St 909 at 800{degree}C. These features suggest that this alloy can be employed as an efficient purifier for hydrogen isotopes in inert gas, nitrogen, or perhaps even H, D, or T streams. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Manganese doped iron oxide theranostic nanoparticles for combined T1 magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxin; Cao, Yuhua; Wang, Lina; Ma, Yufei; Tu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-03-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a noninvasive and convenient way to ablate tumor tissues. Integrating PTT with imaging technique could precisely identify the location and the size of tumor regions, thereby significantly improving the therapeutic efficacy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in clinical diagnosis due to its superb spatial resolution and real-time monitoring feature. In our work, we developed a theranostic nanoplatform based on manganese doped iron oxide (MnIO) nanoparticles modified with denatured bovine serum albumin (MnIO-dBSA). The in vitro experiment revealed that the MnIO nanoparticles exhibited T1-weighted MRI capability (r1 = 8.24 mM(-1) s(-1), r2/r1 = 2.18) and good photothermal effect under near-infrared laser irradiation (808 nm). Using 4T1 tumor-bearing mice as an animal model, we further demonstrated that the MnIO-dBSA composites could significantly increase T1 MRI signal intensity at the tumor site (about two times) and effectively ablate tumor tissues with photoirradiation. Taken together, this work demonstrates the great potential of the MnIO nanoparticles as an ideal theranostic platform for efficient tumor MR imaging and photothermal therapy. PMID:25672225

  8. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., G. E.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-10-31

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals.

  9. Chromium Mobilization by Microbially-Driven Iron and Manganese Redox Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Arredondo, M.; Hausladen, D.; Ying, S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium, a naturally occurring contaminant, poses a significant threat to California groundwater quality when ultramafic rocks weather leaving Cr-enriched serpentine soils. Benign and of limited solubility, Cr(III) can oxidize into soluble and carcinogenic Cr(VI). Under most environmental conditions, Mn-oxides are the principal oxidant of Cr(III). Here we investigate Cr(III) oxidation by both abiotically synthesized birnessite and biogenically produced Mn-oxides. Further, we explore chromium dynamics within artificial soil aggregates composed of Cr(OH)3- and Cr0.25Fe0.75(OH)3-coated quartz grains surrounded by aerated solute flow. Abiotic aggregates contained synthetic birnessite, while biotic aggregates were inoculated with Leptothrix cholodnii, a manganese-oxidizing bacterium, and Shewanella putrefaciens, an iron-reducing bacterium. Results show aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations scaling with Cr-mineral solubility. When Leptothrix sp.-inoculated Cr(III),Fe(III)-aggregates are supplied with aqueous Mn(II), Mn-oxides precipitate in the aerobic aggregate. Cr(VI) production occurs similar to that via synthetic birnessite. With the addition of Shewanella sp., coupled biotic and abiotic processes occur causing the reduction, and subsequent immobilization, of chromium by microbial metabolites (e.g., Fe(II)). This study shows the importance of microbial community composition on chromium dynamics within diffusion-limited zones, and suggests the potential for biological immobilization of Cr even in the presence of Mn-oxidizing bacteria.

  10. Cadmium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cadmium ; CASRN 7440 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  11. THE COMPARATIVE EXCLUSION OF ZINC AND IRON FROM RICE GRAIN IN RELATION TO RICE GRAIN CADMIUM: IMPLICATIONS FOR HUMAN HEALTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice grain samples collected from within an isolated and geo-physically unique Zinc/Cadmium (Zn/Cd) co-contaminated area in Thailand suggests that the rice plant effectively controls grain Zn and Iron (Fe) uptake even though concurrent aqua regia digested soil Zn and Fe concentrations ranged from 25...

  12. Cadmium Manganese Telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe): A potential material for room-temperature radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, A.; Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Yang, G.; Kim, K-H.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Li, L.; Mycielski, A.; and James, R.B.

    2010-07-11

    Cadmium Manganese Telluride (CdMnTe) recently emerged as a promising material for room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. It offers several potential advantages over CdZnTe. Among them is its optimal tunable band gap ranging from 1.7-2.2 eV, and its relatively low (< 50%) content of Mn compared to that of Zn in CdZnTe that assures this favorable band-gap range. Another important asset is the segregation coefficient of Mn in CdTe that is approximately unity compared to 1.35 for Zn in CdZnTe, so ensuring the homogenous distribution of Mn throughout the ingot; hence, a large-volume stoichiometric yield is attained. However, some materials issues primarily related to the growth process impede the production of large, defect-free single crystals. The high bond-ionicity of CdMnTe entails a higher propensity to crystallize into a hexagonal structure rather than to adopt the expected zinc-blend structure, which is likely to generate twins in the crystals. In addition, bulk defects generate in the as-grown crystals due to the dearth of high-purity Mn, which yields a low-resistivity material. In this presentation, we report on our observations of such material defects in current CdMnTe materials, and our evaluation of its potential as an alternative detector material to the well-known CdZnTe detectors. We characterized the bulk defects of several indium- and vanadium-doped Cd1-xMnxTe crystals by using several advanced techniques, viz., micro-scale mapping, white-beam x-ray diffraction/reflection topography, and chemical etching. Thereafter, we fabricated some detectors from selected CdMnTe crystals, characterized their electrical properties, and tested their performance as room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. Our experimental results indicate that CdMnTe materials could well prove to become a viable alternative in the near future.

  13. Iron and manganese speciation and cycling in glacially influenced high-latitude fjord sediments (West Spitsbergen, Svalbard): Evidence for a benthic recycling-transport mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmann, Laura M.; Formolo, Michael J.; Owens, Jeremy D.; Raiswell, Robert; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Riedinger, Natascha; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-09-01

    Glacial environments may provide an important but poorly constrained source of potentially bioavailable iron and manganese phases to the coastal ocean in high-latitude regions. Little is known about the fate and biogeochemical cycling of glacially derived iron and manganese in the coastal marine realm. Sediment and porewater samples were collected along transects from the fjord mouths to the tidewater glaciers at the fjord heads in Smeerenburgfjorden, Kongsfjorden, and Van Keulenfjorden along Western Svalbard. Solid-phase iron and manganese speciation, determined by sequential chemical extraction, could be linked to the compositions of the local bedrock and hydrological/weathering conditions below the local glaciers. The concentration and sulfur isotope composition of chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) in Kongs- and Van Keulenfjorden sediments largely reflect the delivery rate and isotope composition of detrital pyrite originating from adjacent glaciers. The varying input of reducible iron and manganese oxide phases and the input of organic matter of varying reactivity control the pathways of organic carbon mineralization in the sediments of the three fjords. High reducible iron and manganese oxide concentrations and elevated metal accumulation rates coupled to low input of “fresh” organic matter lead to a strong expression of dissimilatory metal oxide reduction evidenced in very high porewater iron (up to 800 μM) and manganese (up to 210 μM) concentrations in Kongsfjorden and Van Keulenfjorden. Sediment reworking by the benthic macrofauna and physical sediment resuspension via iceberg calving may be additional factors that promote extensive benthic iron and manganese cycling in these fjords. On-going benthic recycling of glacially derived dissolved iron into overlying seawater, where partial re-oxidation and deposition occurs, facilitates the transport of iron across the fjords and potentially into adjacent continental shelf waters. Such iron-dominated fjord

  14. Calcium carbonate-based permeable reactive barriers for iron and manganese groundwater remediation at landfills.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Pleasant, Saraya; Jain, Pradeep; Powell, Jon; Townsend, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    High concentrations of iron (Fe(II)) and manganese (Mn(II)) reductively dissolved from soil minerals have been detected in groundwater monitoring wells near many municipal solid waste landfills. Two in situ permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), comprised of limestone and crushed concrete, were installed downgradient of a closed, unlined landfill in Florida, USA, to remediate groundwater containing high concentrations of these metals. Influent groundwater to the PRBs contained mean Fe and Mn concentrations of approximately 30mg/L and 1.62mg/L, respectively. PRBs were constructed in the shallow aquifer (maximum depth 4.6m below land surface) and groundwater was sampled from a network of nearby monitoring wells to evaluate barrier performance in removing these metals. PRBs significantly (p<0.05) removed dissolved Fe and Mn from influent groundwater; Fe was removed from influent water at average rates of 91% and 95% (by mass) for the limestone and crushed concrete PRBs, respectively, during the first year of the study. The performance of the PRBs declined after 3years of operation, with Fe removal efficiency decreasing to 64% and 61% for limestone and concrete PRBs, respectively. A comparison of water quality in shallow and deep monitoring wells showed a more dramatic performance reduction in the deeper section of the concrete PRB, which was attributed to an influx of sediment into the barrier and settling of particulates from the upper portions of the PRBs. Although removal of Fe and Mn from redox impacts was achieved with the PRBs, the short time frame of effectiveness relative to the duration of a full-scale remediation effort may limit the applicability of these systems at some landfills because of the construction costs required. PMID:26992666

  15. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Seckin; Meier, Bastian; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  16. Changes in Dietary Iron Exacerbate Regional Brain Manganese Accumulation as Determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Zhang, Na; Avison, Malcolm J.; Erikson, Keith M.; Gore, John C.; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal required for normal homeostasis. Humans chronically exposed to high Mn levels, however, may exhibit psychomotor signs secondary to increased brain Mn. As Mn and iron (Fe) share several cellular membrane transporters, decreased Fe levels resulting from Fe deficiency or anemia lead to increased brain Mn deposition. Conversely, decreased Mn levels are associated with abnormal brain Fe accumulation. To reduce potential Mn toxicity resulting from brain Mn accumulation, we proposed that increased dietary Fe would attenuate brain Mn deposition. To test this hypothesis, three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were injected weekly (14 weeks) with Mn (3 mg/kg) and fed normal Fe (TX), Fe-supplemented (FeS), or Fe-deficient (FeD) chow. Control (CN) rats received normal dietary Fe and saline injections. Using magnetic resonance imaging, rats were imaged biweekly for 14 weeks to qualitatively monitor brain Mn and Fe accumulation. Both FeS and FeD had greater brain Mn deposition than TX rats. By week 3, R1 values, which correlate with Mn deposition, were statistically significantly increased (p < 0.05) in brain stem, cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, and striatum compared with CN or TX animals. By week 14, R1 values for all brain regions in FeS and FeD animals were statistically significantly increased (p < 0.05). By the end of the study, similar results were obtained for R2 values, a marker of Fe accumulation. These data suggest that Fe supplementation does not effectively protect and may even exacerbate brain Mn accumulation in mammals subchronically exposed to Mn. PMID:21177776

  17. Phytoavailability and fractions of iron and manganese in calcareous soil amended with composted urban wastes.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Lara, Francisco; Azcón, Mariano; Polo, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of applying composted urban wastes on the phytoavailability and distribution of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) among chemical fractions in soil. In order to study this concern several experiments in pots containing calcareous soil were carried out. The received treatments by adding separately two rates (20 and 80 Mg ha-1) of municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and/or municipal solid waste and sewage sludge (MSW-SS) co-compost. The cropping sequence was a lettuce crop followed by a barley crop. It was observed that treatments amended with composted urban wastes tended to promote slight increases in lettuce yield compared to the control. The highest Fe levels in lettuce were found when higher rates of MSW-SS co-compost were applied; these values were significant compared to those obtained in the other treatments. In all cases, the application of organic materials increased the concentration and uptake of Mn in lettuce compared to the control; however, these increases were significant only when higher rates of MSW compost were applied. The organic amendments had beneficial delayed effects on barley yields, showing, in most cases, significant increases compared to the control. In this context, treatments with MSW compost were found to be more effective than the equivalent treatments amended with MSW-SS co-compost. Compared to the control, composted urban wastes increased Fe concentration in straw and rachis, and decreased Fe concentration in barley grain. Similarly, a decreased concentration of Mn in the dry matter of barley crop grown in soils treated with composted urban wastes was observed. PMID:16923600

  18. Stability Behavior and Thermodynamic States of Iron and Manganese in Sandy Soil Aquifer, Manukan Island, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chin Yik; Abdullah, Mohd. Harun; Musta, Baba; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2011-03-15

    A total of 20 soil samples were collected from 10 boreholes constructed in the low lying area, which included ancillary samples taken from the high elevation area. Redox processes were investigated in the soil as well as groundwater in the shallow groundwater aquifer of Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. Groundwater samples (n = 10) from each boreholes were also collected in the low lying area to understand the concentrations and behaviors of Fe and Mn in the dissolved state. This study strives to obtain a general understanding of the stability behaviors on Fe and Mn at the upper unsaturated and the lower-saturated soil horizons in the low lying area of Manukan Island as these elements usually play a major role in the redox chemistry of the shallow groundwater. Thermodynamic calculations using PHREEQC showed that the groundwater samples in the study area are oversaturated with respect to goethite, hematite, Fe(OH){sub 3} and undersaturated with respect to manganite and pyrochroite. Low concentrations of Fe and Mn in the groundwater might be probably due to the lack of minerals of iron and manganese oxides, which exist in the sandy aquifer. In fact, high organic matters that present in the unsaturated horizon are believed to be responsible for the high Mn content in the soil. It was observed that the soil samples collected from high elevation area (BK) comprises considerable amount of Fe in both unsaturated (6675.87 mg/kg) and saturated horizons (31440.49 mg/kg) compared to the low Fe content in the low lying area. Based on the stability diagram, the groundwater composition lies within the stability field for Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+} under suboxic condition and very close to the FeS/Fe{sup 2+} stability boundary. This study also shows that both pH and Eh values comprise a strong negative value thus suggesting that the redox potential is inversely dependent on the changes of pH.

  19. Developmental manganese exposure in combination with developmental stress and iron deficiency: Effects on behavior and monoamines.

    PubMed

    Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Davenport, Laurie L; Gutierrez, Arnold; Hufgard, Jillian R; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element but neurotoxic at higher exposures, however, Mn exposure seldom occurs in isolation. It often co-occurs in populations with inadequate dietary iron (Fe) and limited resources that result in stress. Subclinical FeD affects up to 15% of U.S. children and exacerbates Mn toxicity by increasing Mn bioavailability. Therefore, we investigated Mn overexposure (MnOE) in rats in combination with Fe deficiency (FeD) and developmental stress, for which we used barren cage rearing. For barren cage rearing (BAR), rats were housed in cages with a wire grid floor or standard bedding material (STD) from embryonic day (E)7 through postnatal day (P)28. For FeD, dams were fed a 90% Fe-deficient NIH-07 diet from E15 through P28. Within each litter, different offspring were treated with 100mg/kg Mn (MnOE) or vehicle (VEH) by gavage every other day from P4-28. Behavior was assessed at two ages and consisted of: open-field, anxiety tests, acoustic startle response (ASR) with prepulse inhibition (PPI), sociability, sucrose preference, tapered beam crossing, and the Porsolt's forced swim test. MnOE had main effects of decreasing activity, ASR, social preference, and social novelty. BAR and FeD transiently modified MnOE effects. BAR groups weighed less and showed decreased anxiety in the elevated zero maze, had increased ASR and decreased PPI, and exhibited reduced sucrose preference compared with the STD groups. FeD animals also weighed less and had increased slips on the tapered beam. Most of the monoamine effects were dopaminergic and occurred in the MnOE groups. The results showed that Mn is a pervasive developmental neurotoxin, the effects of which are modulated by FeD and/or BAR cage rearing. PMID:27302314

  20. Influence of organic matter on the uptake of cadmium, zinc, copper and iron by sorghum plants.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A P; Mota, A M; de Varennes, A; Pinto, F C

    2004-06-29

    This article describes an experiment, carried out under controlled environment conditions, to investigate the effects of a fulvic acid fraction of soil organic matter on growth, cadmium (Cd) uptake and redistribution by sorghum. In addition the uptake of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) was also determined. Sorghum was grown in nutrient solutions with 0, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg Cd dm(-3), in the absence and presence of organic matter (32 mg C dm(-3)), for various periods up to 20 days. A decrease in sorghum biomass due to Cd toxicity was observed at 10 mg Cd dm(-3), but for concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mg Cd dm(-3) the biomass was increased compared with control, without visual toxicity symptoms. The presence of organic matter (OM) further increased biomass production. Cadmium was mainly retained in sorghum roots, as usually found in tolerant plants, but Cd accumulation in sorghum was greater than in other Gramineae, or even more tolerant plants such as lettuce. The presence of OM decreased the bioavailability of Cd that was partially retained in solution by the OM ligands. However, OM promoted the translocation of Cd to shoots, an effect that may pose a risk to public health because plant-animal transfer of Cd could be enhanced. The presence of OM decreased the uptake of Cu, Zn and Fe. The presence (vs. absence) of 0.1 mg Cd dm(-3) enhanced the uptake of Fe, both in the absence and presence of OM. PMID:15142779

  1. Correlations between lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and iron concentrations in frozen tuna fish

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, L.; Hardisson, A.; Montelongo, F.G.

    1986-04-01

    The presence of metallic pollutants in marine ecosystems has promoted wide research plans in order to evaluate pollution levels in marine organisms. However, little is known concerning environmental and physiological processes that regulate the concentration of trace metals in marine organisms. Even though the toxicity of lead and cadmium is well established, copper, zinc and iron are considered as essential elements for mammals. Little is known about heavy metals, other than mercury, concentrations in fresh and frozen tuna fish. Fifty samples obtained at the entrance of a canning factory in Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Canary Islands), were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results were treated by applying the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences compiled and linked in the software of a Digital VAX/VMS 11/780 computer.

  2. Microwave digestion techniques in the sequential extraction of calcium, iron, chromium, manganese, lead, and zinc in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, K.I.; Foderaro, T.A.; Garza, T.L.; Martinez, R.M.; Maroney, G.A.; Trivisonno, M.R.; Willging, E.M.

    1987-04-01

    The sequential extraction scheme of Tessier partitions metals in sediments into exchangeable, carbonate bound iron-manganese oxide bound, organic bound, and residual binding fractions. Extraction rate experiments using conventional and microwave heating showed that microwave heating produces results comparable to the conventional procedure. Sequential microwave extraction procedures were established from the results of the extraction rate experiments. Recoveries of total metals from NBS SRM 1645 ranged from 76% to 120% for the conventional procedure and 62% to 120% for the microwave procedure. Recoveries of total metals using the microwave and conventional techniques were reasonably comparable except for iron (62% by microwave vs. 76% by conventional). Substitution of an aqua regia/HF extraction for total/residual metals results in essentially complete recovery of metals. Precision obtained from 31 replicate samples of the California Gulch, Colorado, sediment yielded about an average 11% relative standard deviation excluding the exchangeable fraction which was more variable.

  3. Effects of sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron applications on sunflower yield and plant nutrient concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, B.R.; Zubriski, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron application did not affect the seed yield or oil percentage of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on both dryland and irrigated soils in North Dakota in 1981. Field averages indicated significant Zn, Mn, and B uptake by sunflower at the 12-leaf stage as a result of fertilization with these elements. Increased Zn uptake was also observed in the uppermost mature leaf at anthesis from zinc fertilization. Although sunflower yield from boron fertilization was not significantly different from the check, a trend was observed in which boron fertilization seemed to decrease sunflower yield. Sunflower yields from the boron treatment were the lowest out of seven treatments in three out of four fields. Also, sunflower yield from the boron treatment was significantly lower than both iron and sulfur treatments when all fields were combined.

  4. Material and detector properties of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe) crystals grown by the modified floating-zone method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, A.; Gu, G. D.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Roy, U. N.; Yang, G.; Liu, T.; Zhong, R.; Schneeloch, J.; James, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrated the material- and radiation-detection properties of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe; x=0.06), a wide-band-gap semiconductor crystal grown by the modified floating-zone method. We investigated the presence of various bulk defects, such as Te inclusions, twins, and dislocations of several as-grown indium-doped Cd1-xMnxTe crystals using different techniques, viz., IR transmission microscopy, and chemical etching. We then fabricated four planar detectors from selected CdMnTe crystals, characterized their electrical properties, and tested their performance as room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. Our experimental results show that CMT crystals grown by the modified floating zone method apparently are free from Te inclusions. However, we still need to optimize our growth parameters to attain high-resistivity, large-volume single-crystal CdMnTe.

  5. Material and detector properties of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe) crystals grown by the modified floating-zone method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hossain, A.; Gu, G. D.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Roy, U. N.; Yang, G.; Liu, T.; Zhong, R.; Schneelock, J.; et al

    2014-12-24

    We demonstrated the material- and radiation-detection properties of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe; x=0.06), a wide-band-gap semiconductor crystal grown by the modified floating-zone method. We investigated the presence of various bulk defects, such as Te inclusions, twins, and dislocations of several as-grown indium-doped Cd1-xMnxTe crystals using different techniques, viz., IR transmission microscopy, and chemical etching. We then fabricated four planar detectors from selected CdMnTe crystals, characterized their electrical properties, and tested their performance as room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. Thus, our experimental results show that CMT crystals grown by the modified floating zone method apparently are free from Te inclusions. However,more » we still need to optimize our growth parameters to attain high-resistivity, large-volume single-crystal CdMnTe.« less

  6. Preconcentration and separation of iron, zinc, cadmium and mercury, from waste water using Nile blue a grafted polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    El-shahat, M F; Moawed, E A; Zaid, M A A

    2003-04-10

    The present work describes a novel method for the incorporation of Nile blue A into polyurethane foam matrix. This foam material was found to be very suitable for the extraction of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The characterization of Nile blue A grafted foam and the effect of halide concentration, pH, shaking time, extraction isotherm and capacity have been investigated. This foam material was found to be suitable for the separation and preconcentration of iron (III), zinc (II), cadmium (II) and mercury (II) from waste water. The extraction was accomplished in (15-20) minutes. Iron was separated from acid medium (2-4 M HCl), zinc from (3-5 M HCl), cadmium from (4-6 M HCl) as thiocyanate complexes and mercury was separated from (1-2 M HCl) as chloride. PMID:18968973

  7. Iron, copper, and manganese complexes with in vitro superoxide dismutase and/or catalase activities that keep Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells alive under severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thales P; Fernandes, Christiane; Melo, Karen V; Ferreira, Sarah S; Lessa, Josane A; Franco, Roberto W A; Schenk, Gerhard; Pereira, Marcos D; Horn, Adolfo

    2015-03-01

    Due to their aerobic lifestyle, eukaryotic organisms have evolved different strategies to overcome oxidative stress. The recruitment of some specific metalloenzymes such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs) is of great importance for eliminating harmful reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion). Using the ligand HPClNOL {1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol}, we have synthesized three coordination compounds containing iron(III), copper(II), and manganese(II) ions, which are also present in the active site of the above-noted metalloenzymes. These compounds were evaluated as SOD and CAT mimetics. The manganese and iron compounds showed both SOD and CAT activities, while copper showed only SOD activity. The copper and manganese in vitro SOD activities are very similar (IC50~0.4 μmol dm(-3)) and about 70-fold higher than those of iron. The manganese compound showed CAT activity higher than that of the iron species. Analyzing their capacity to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress (H2O2 and the O2(•-) radical), we observed that all compounds act as antioxidants, increasing the resistance of yeast cells mainly due to a reduction of lipid oxidation. Especially for the iron compound, the data indicate complete protection when wild-type cells were exposed to H2O2 or O2(•-) species. Interestingly, these compounds also compensate for both superoxide dismutase and catalase deficiencies; their antioxidant activity is metal ion dependent, in the order iron(III)>copper(II)>manganese(II). The protection mechanism employed by the complexes proved to be independent of the activation of transcription factors (such as Yap1, Hsf1, Msn2/Msn4) and protein synthesis. There is no direct relation between the in vitro and the in vivo antioxidant activities. PMID:25511255

  8. Tunable T1 and T2 contrast abilities of manganese-engineered iron oxide nanoparticles through size control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoming; Li, Hui; Chen, Jiahe; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Yang, Lijiao; Chi, Xiaoqin; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Jinhao

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the tunable T1 and T2 contrast abilities of engineered iron oxide nanoparticles with high performance for liver contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mice. To enhance the diagnostic accuracy of MRI, large numbers of contrast agents with T1 or T2 contrast ability have been widely explored. The comprehensive investigation of high-performance MRI contrast agents with controllable T1 and T2 contrast abilities is of high importance in the field of molecular imaging. In this study, we synthesized uniform manganese-doped iron oxide (MnIO) nanoparticles with controllable size from 5 to 12 nm and comprehensively investigated their MRI contrast abilities. We revealed that the MRI contrast effects of MnIO nanoparticles are highly size-dependent. By controlling the size of MnIO nanoparticles, we can achieve T1-dominated, T2-dominated, and T1-T2 dual-mode MRI contrast agents with much higher contrast enhancement than the corresponding conventional iron oxide nanoparticles.In this paper, we demonstrate the tunable T1 and T2 contrast abilities of engineered iron oxide nanoparticles with high performance for liver contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mice. To enhance the diagnostic accuracy of MRI, large numbers of contrast agents with T1 or T2 contrast ability have been widely explored. The comprehensive investigation of high-performance MRI contrast agents with controllable T1 and T2 contrast abilities is of high importance in the field of molecular imaging. In this study, we synthesized uniform manganese-doped iron oxide (MnIO) nanoparticles with controllable size from 5 to 12 nm and comprehensively investigated their MRI contrast abilities. We revealed that the MRI contrast effects of MnIO nanoparticles are highly size-dependent. By controlling the size of MnIO nanoparticles, we can achieve T1-dominated, T2-dominated, and T1-T2 dual-mode MRI contrast agents with much higher contrast enhancement than the

  9. An improved impaction-graphite furnace system for the direct and near real-time determination of cadmium, chromium, lead and manganese in aerosols and cigarette smoke by simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Ill; Smith, Mark V.; Indurthy, Suneetha; Deval, Anupama; Sneddon, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    The design, operating characteristics, and preliminary evaluation of an improved impaction-graphite furnace system, based on a theoretical study of particle size collected, are presented. After direct collection, the graphite furnace from the system is inserted in an atomic absorption spectrometer for analysis by simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry. This system has the potential for the direct and near real-time (few minutes) determination of metals in aerosols. The system has been preliminarily evaluated using aqueous solutions of chromium, and has then been applied to the determination of cadmium, chromium, lead, and manganese in cigarette smoke. Results show an increase ranging from almost five (lead) to sixteen (cadmium) over background levels.

  10. Iron mitigates DMT1-mediated manganese cytotoxicity via the ASK1-JNK signaling axis: Implications of iron supplementation for manganese toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Yee Kit; Chew, Katherine C. M.; Tan, Bryce W. Q.; Lim, Kah-Leong; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn2+) neurotoxicity from occupational exposure is well documented to result in a Parkinson-like syndrome. Although the understanding of Mn2+ cytotoxicity is still incomplete, both Mn2+ and Fe2+ can be transported via the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), suggesting that competitive uptake might disrupt Fe2+ homeostasis. Here, we found that DMT1 overexpression significantly enhanced Mn2+ cytoplasmic accumulation and JNK phosphorylation, leading to a reduction in cell viability. Although a robust activation of autophagy was observed alongside these changes, it did not trigger autophagic cell death, but was instead shown to be essential for the degradation of ferritin, which normally sequesters labile Fe2+. Inhibition of ferritin degradation through the neutralization of lysosomal pH resulted in increased ferritin and enhanced cytoplasmic Fe2+ depletion. Similarly, direct Fe2+ chelation also resulted in aggravated Mn2+-mediated JNK phosphorylation, while Fe2+ repletion protected cells, and this occurs via the ASK1-thioredoxin pathway. Taken together, our study presents the novel findings that Mn2+ cytotoxicity involves the depletion of the cytoplasmic Fe2+ pool, and the increase in autophagy-lysosome activity is important to maintain Fe2+ homeostasis. Thus, Fe2+ supplementation could have potential applications in the prevention and treatment of Mn2+-mediated toxicity. PMID:26878799

  11. Iron mitigates DMT1-mediated manganese cytotoxicity via the ASK1-JNK signaling axis: Implications of iron supplementation for manganese toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yee Kit; Chew, Katherine C M; Tan, Bryce W Q; Lim, Kah-Leong; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn(2+)) neurotoxicity from occupational exposure is well documented to result in a Parkinson-like syndrome. Although the understanding of Mn(2+) cytotoxicity is still incomplete, both Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) can be transported via the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), suggesting that competitive uptake might disrupt Fe(2+) homeostasis. Here, we found that DMT1 overexpression significantly enhanced Mn(2+) cytoplasmic accumulation and JNK phosphorylation, leading to a reduction in cell viability. Although a robust activation of autophagy was observed alongside these changes, it did not trigger autophagic cell death, but was instead shown to be essential for the degradation of ferritin, which normally sequesters labile Fe(2+). Inhibition of ferritin degradation through the neutralization of lysosomal pH resulted in increased ferritin and enhanced cytoplasmic Fe(2+) depletion. Similarly, direct Fe(2+) chelation also resulted in aggravated Mn(2+)-mediated JNK phosphorylation, while Fe(2+) repletion protected cells, and this occurs via the ASK1-thioredoxin pathway. Taken together, our study presents the novel findings that Mn(2+) cytotoxicity involves the depletion of the cytoplasmic Fe(2+) pool, and the increase in autophagy-lysosome activity is important to maintain Fe(2+) homeostasis. Thus, Fe(2+) supplementation could have potential applications in the prevention and treatment of Mn(2+)-mediated toxicity. PMID:26878799

  12. Simultaneous determination of cadmium, iron and tin in canned foods using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leao, Danilo J; Junior, Mario M S; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-06-01

    A method was established to simultaneously determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned-food samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). The quantification step has been performed using the primary line (228.802nm) for cadmium and the adjacent secondary lines (228.725nm and 228.668nm) for iron and tin, respectively. The selected chemical modifier was an acid solution that contained a mixture of 0.1% (w/v) Pd and 0.05% (w/v) Mg. The absorbance signals were measured based on the peak area using 3 pixels for cadmium and 5 pixels for iron and tin. Under these conditions, cadmium, iron and tin have been determined in canned-food samples using the external calibration technique based on aqueous standards, where the limits of quantification were 2.10ngg(-1) for cadmium, 1.95mgkg(-1) for iron and 3.00mgkg(-1) for tin, and the characteristic masses were 1.0pg for cadmium, 0.9ng for iron and 1.1ng for tin. The precision was evaluated using two solutions of each metal ion, and the results, which were expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), were 3.4-6.8%. The method accuracy for cadmium and iron was confirmed by analyzing a certified reference material of apple leaves (NIST 1515), which was supplied by NIST. However, for tin, the accuracy was confirmed by comparing the results of the proposed method and another analytical technique (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry). The proposed procedure was applied to determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned samples of peeled tomato and sardine. Eleven samples were analyzed, and the analyte concentrations were 3.57-62.9ngg(-1), 2.68-31.48mgkg(-1) and 4.06-122.0mgkg(-1) for cadmium, iron and tin, respectively. In all analyzed samples, the cadmium and tin contents were lower than the permissible maximum levels for these metals in canned foods in the Brazilian legislation. PMID:27130088

  13. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  14. Iron transport in the kidney: implications for physiology and cadmium nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thévenod, Frank; Wolff, Natascha A

    2016-01-01

    The kidney has recently emerged as an organ with a significant role in systemic iron (Fe) homeostasis. Substantial amounts of Fe are filtered by the kidney, which have to be reabsorbed to prevent Fe deficiency. Accordingly Fe transporters and receptors for protein-bound Fe are expressed in the nephron that may also function as entry pathways for toxic metals, such as cadmium (Cd), by way of "ionic and molecular mimicry". Similarities, but also differences in handling of Cd by these transport routes offer rationales for the propensity of the kidney to develop Cd toxicity. This critical review provides a comprehensive update on Fe transport by the kidney and its relevance for physiology and Cd nephrotoxicity. Based on quantitative considerations, we have also estimated the in vivo relevance of the described transport pathways for physiology and toxicology. Under physiological conditions all segments of the kidney tubules are likely to utilize Fe for cellular Fe requiring processes for metabolic purposes and also to contribute to reabsorption of free and bound forms of Fe into the circulation. But Cd entering tubule cells disrupts metabolic pathways and is unable to exit. Furthermore, our quantitative analyses contest established models linking chronic Cd nephrotoxicity to proximal tubular uptake of metallothionein-bound Cd. Hence, Fe transport by the kidney may be beneficial by preventing losses from the body. But increased uptake of Fe or Cd that cannot exit tubule cells may lead to kidney injury, and Fe deficiency may facilitate renal Cd uptake. PMID:26485516

  15. Iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood cadmium in the Korean general population: Analysis of 2008-2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Kook; Kim, Yangho

    2012-01-15

    Introduction: We present data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2009 on the distribution of blood cadmium levels and their association with iron deficiency in a representative sample of the adult Korean population. Methods: Serum ferritin was categorized into three levels: low (serum ferritin <15.0 {mu}g/L), low normal (15.0-30.0 {mu}g/L for women and 15.0-50.0 for men), and normal ({>=}30.0 {mu}g/L for women and {>=}50.0 for men), and its association with blood cadmium level was assessed after adjustment for various demographic and lifestyle factors. Results: Geometric means of blood cadmium in the low serum ferritin group in women, men, and all participants were significantly higher than in the normal group. Additionally, multiple regression analysis after adjusting for various covariates showed that blood cadmium was significantly higher in the low-ferritin group in women, men, and all participants compared with the normal group. We also found an association between serum ferritin and blood cadmium among never-smoking participants. Discussion: We found, similar to other recent population-based studies, an association between iron deficiency and increased blood cadmium in men and women, independent of smoking status. The results of the present study show that iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood cadmium in the general population.

  16. Calculation of binodals and spinodals in multicomponent alloys by different statistical methods with application to iron-copper-manganese alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vaks, V. G. Zhuravlev, I. A.; Khromov, K. Yu.

    2010-11-15

    A generalization of the pair-cluster (PC) approximation in the theory of disordered systems to multicomponent alloys is proposed. It is shown that phase equilibrium boundaries (binodals) calculated in the mean-field (MF) approximation, which is used in standard calculations of phase diagrams by the CALPHAD method, coincide with the results of rigorous calculations for dilute alloys; however, the application of these methods to calculating the boundaries of the stability region with respect to the decomposition of an alloy (spinodals) leads to large errors. At the same time, in the PC approximation, the description of all statistical properties, including binodals and spinodals, turns out to be exact for dilute alloys. The methods developed are illustrated by an example of iron-copper-manganese ternary alloys.

  17. Deoxidation Equilibria of Manganese, Silicon, and Aluminum in Iron-Nickel-Chromium Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashevskii, Viktor; Aleksandrov, Aleksandr; Kanevskii, Akim; Leont'ev, Leopold

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen solution in Fe-Ni-Cr melts containing manganese, silicon, and aluminum has been thermodynamically analyzed and experimentally studied at 1873 K (1600 °C). The Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr and Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr compositions were studied as examples of the most frequently used alloys. Manganese is not a deoxidizer in these alloys, since manganese and chromium have similar affinities for oxygen. At low contents, silicon is also not a deoxidizer. However, above 0.358 pct for the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and 0.261 pct for the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy, silicon decreases the oxygen concentration in the melts. Aluminum is an effective deoxidizer in the Fe-Ni-Cr melts. It decreases the oxygen concentration when its content is higher than 2.914 × 10-4 pct in the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and 2.109 × 10-3 pct in the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy. Minimum oxygen concentrations are observed at aluminum contents of about 0.24 pct in the Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr alloy and at about 0.23 pct in the Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloy. The combined deoxidation of Fe-10 pctNi-20 pctCr and Fe-40 pctNi-15 pctCr alloys with silicon and manganese and also with aluminum and silicon was studied. The lower oxygen concentrations were reached as a result of complex deoxidation in comparison with the cases when deoxidized separately by each element at the same concentration levels.

  18. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramics of trivalent oxides of iron and manganese

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2002-01-01

    A new method for combining elemental iron and other metals to form an inexpensive ceramic to stabilize arsenic, alkaline red mud wastes, swarfs, and other iron or metal-based additives, to create products and waste forms which can be poured or dye cast.

  19. Concentration of lead, cadmium, and iron in sediment dust and total suspended particles before and after initialisation of integral production in iron and steel work plant Zenica.

    PubMed

    Prcanović, Halim; Duraković, Mirnes; Beganović, Sanela

    2012-06-01

    Poor air quality is a common fact for all areas with base industry. The city of Zenica was once the metallurgical centre of Ex-Yugoslavia and is therefore highly polluted at present. Air pollution peaked in 1987 when average concentration of pollutants was extremely high (daily average concentration of SO(2) was 1800 μg m(-3)). With the beginning of the war in 1992, integral production in the steel work plant was shut down, to be re-launched in 2008. Limit values for iron do not exist, but iron has been monitored in Zenica for the past 28 years because of the presence of steel works. Concentrations of cadmium and lead have also been measured because they are very much present in polluted areas with steel works. The concentration of mentioned elements in air deposit and total suspended particles before and after integral production in the steel work plant was re-launched is the subject of this paper. Total suspended particles were measured in two locations using German standard VDI 2463 Blatt 4. Sediment dust was measured in nine locations using Bergerhoff method. The concentration of iron, lead, and cadmium was performed in the chemical laboratory of the Metallurgical Institute "Kemal Kapetanović" Zenica using standard methods. Higher concentrations of these parameters during the period of integral production clearly point to the impact of steel works on Zenica valley. PMID:22728800

  20. Characterization of vanadium, manganese and iron model clusters by vibrational and optical spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin

    1999-12-01

    The active ferryl intermediates in the catalytic cycles of heme proteins are subject to interactions from the proximal and distal amino acid residues which control their activities and affect the ν(FeIVO) frequency. The effects of sixth axial ligation, hydrogen bonding, and solvent induced polarization on the resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferryl porphyrin analogs, vanadyl (VIVO) porphyrins and their π-cation radicals, are characterized. ν(VIVO) stretching bands for (VO)TMPyP and (VO)PPIX are observed to be sensitive to the pH value of the aqueous solutions, and reveal a number of coexisting 5-coordinate (c) and 6- c vanadyl porphyrins in solution. Moreover, the ν(VIVO) bands for (VO)TMP and (VO)TPP porphyrins upshift to higher frequencies with the formation of their π-cation radicals, in agreement with that of the (VO)OEP radical. For both a1u (OEP) and a2u (TPP, TMP) type radicals, an increased positive charge on the porphyrin reduces the porphyrin --> vanadium electron donation, but enhances the oxo --> V donation. The UV-Vis absorption and RR spectroscopic studies on a series of oxo-bridged vanadium(III) and manganese (III, IV) complexes established spectrostructural correlations that are useful as monitors of the structure of vanadium(III) and manganese(III, IV) centers in biological systems. The linear and bent V-O-V dimers display distinctive RR and absorption spectra. The linear V-O-V bridge displays an intense μ-O --> V charge transfer (CT) absorption band and a strongly enhanced symmetric (νs) or antisymmetric (νas) V-O-V stretching band in RR spectra, depending upon terminal ligands. In contrast, the bent bridge shows two μ-O --> V CT bands and both νs and νas V- O-V stretches are observed in RR spectra. These νs and νas vibrations are used to indicate that the vanadium(III) oxo-bridged dimer intercalates with DNA. The Mn-O-Mn vibrational frequencies in the 400-700 cm -1 region of the oxo-bridged manganese(III, IV) dimers, trimers, and

  1. Iron and copper accumulation in the brain of coxsackievirus-infected mice exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Ilbaeck, N.-G. . E-mail: nils-gunnar.ilback@slv.se; Lindh, U.; Minqin, R.; Friman, G.; Watt, F.

    2006-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a potentially toxic metal widely distributed in the environment and known to cause adverse health effects in humans. During coxsackievirus infection, the concentrations of essential and nonessential trace elements (e.g., iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and Cd) change in different target organs of the infection. Fe and Cu are recognized cofactors in host defence reactions, and Fe is known to be associated with certain pathological conditions of the brain. However, whether nonessential trace elements could influence the balance of essential trace elements in the brain is unknown. In this study the brain Fe, Cu, and Cd contents were measured through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and their distributions determined by nuclear microscopy in the early phase (day 3) of coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) infection in nonexposed and in Cd-exposed female Balb/c mice. In CB3 infection the brain is a well-known target that has not been studied with regard to trace element balance. The brain concentration of Cu compared with that of noninfected control mice was increased by 9% (P<0.05) in infected mice not exposed to Cd and by 10% (not significant) in infected Cd-exposed mice. A similar response was seen for Fe, which in infected Cd-exposed mice, compared to noninfected control mice, tended to increase by 16%. Cu showed an even tissue distribution, whereas Fe was distributed in focal deposits. Changes in Cd concentration in the brain of infected mice were less consistent but evenly distributed. Further studies are needed to define whether the accumulation and distribution of trace elements in the brain have an impact on brain function.

  2. Distribution of cadmium, iron and zinc in millstreams of hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a major crop in the Great Plains of the United 14 States, and our previous work demonstrated that wheat genotypes vary for grain cadmium 15 accumulation, with some exceeding the CODEX standard (0.2 mg kg-1). Previous reports of 16 cadmium distribution in ...

  3. Evaluation of cadmium, copper, zinc, and iron concentrations and tissue distributions in the benthic crab, Dorippe granulata (De Haan, 1841) from Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Depledge, M H; Forbes, T L; Forbes, V E

    1993-01-01

    The distributions of copper, zinc, iron, and cadmium among the tissues of Dorippe granulata were determined. The highest copper concentrations were found in the haemolymph (c. 53 microg ml(-1)) while the highest iron concentrations occurred in the gills (c. 720 microg g(-1) dry weight) and the highest zinc concentrations in the exoskeleton (c. 200 microg g(-1) dry weight). By comparison, concentrations of the non-essential metal, cadmium, were low in all tissues (mean = 10 microg g(-1) dry weight). The highest value was recorded from the midgut gland of a female crab (18.5 microg Cd g(-1) dry weight). Concentrations of copper, zinc, and iron were positively correlated with tissue-hydration levels. Such a relationship was not found for cadmium. The findings are discussed with regard to trace-metal levels found in temperate and tropical brachyurans from clean and polluted localities. PMID:15091832

  4. Perinatal and Childhood Exposure to Cadmium, Manganese, and Metal Mixtures and Effects on Cognition and Behavior: A Review of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Alison P.; Henn, Birgit Claus; Wright, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) neurotoxicity is well established. In recent years, a growing body of evidence suggests that environmental exposure to other metals including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), and their mixtures also pose public health threats. In this paper we summarize the recent literature examining the relationship of prenatal and childhood environmental metal exposures with cognitive and behavioral outcomes in children. We conducted a literature search to identify epidemiologic studies that examined the relationship of Cd, Mn, and metal mixtures with children’s neurodevelopmental/cognitive and behavioral outcomes. We restricted the search to peer-reviewed studies published in English between January 2009 and March 2015. We identified a total of 31 articles of which 16, 17, and 16 studies examined the effects of Cd, Mn, or metal mixtures, respectively. Based on our review, there is suggestive evidence that prenatal/childhood Cd exposure may be associated with poorer cognition, but additional research is clearly needed. We found little evidence of behavioral effects of early life Cd exposure, and no studies found a significant relationship with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Studies of early life Mn exposure consistently reported negative impacts on both cognition and behavior. There is also growing evidence that co-exposure to multiple metals can result in increased neurotoxicity compared to single metal exposures, in particular during early life. Few studies have evaluated behavioral effects related to metal co-exposures. PMID:26231505

  5. Arsenic, cadmium, and manganese levels in shellfish from Map Ta Phut, an industrial area in Thailand, and the potential toxic effects on human cells.

    PubMed

    Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Siripriwon, Pantaree; Nookabkaew, Sumontha; Suriyo, Tawit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-01-01

    Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate is a major industrial area in Thailand for both petrochemical and heavy industries. The release of hazardous wastes and other pollutants from these industries increases the potential for contamination in foods in the surrounding area, especially farmed shellfish. This study determined the arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and manganese (Mn) concentrations in the edible flesh of farmed shellfish, including Perna viridis, Meretrix meretrix, and Scapharca inaequivalvis, around the Map Ta Phut area using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results showed that shellfish samples contained high levels of total As [1.84-6.42 mg kg(-1) wet weight (ww)]. High Mn concentrations were found in P. viridis and M. meretrix, whereas S. inaequivalis contained the highest Cd. Arsenobetaine (AsB) was found to be the major As species in shellfish (>45% of total As). The in vitro cytotoxicity of these elements was evaluated using human cancer cells (T47D, A549, and Jurkat cells). An observed decrease in cell viability in T47D and Jurkat cells was mainly caused by exposure to inorganic As (iAs) or Mn but not to AsB or Cd. The combined elements (AsB+Mn+Cd) at concentrations predicted to result from the estimated daily intake of shellfish flesh by the local people showed significant cytotoxicity in T47D and Jurkat cells. PMID:24986306

  6. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium in feathers of Black-legged Kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) and Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) from Prince William Sound, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Sullivan, Kelsey; Irons, David; McKnight, Aly

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium were analyzed in the feathers of Black-legged Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) from Shoup Bay in Prince William Sound, Alaska to determine if there were age-related differences in metal levels, and in Black Oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmani)) from the same region to determine if there were differences in oiled and unoiled birds. Except for mercury, there were no age-related differences in metals levels in the feathers of kittiwakes. Kittiwakes over 13 years of age had the highest levels of mercury. There were no differences in levels of metals in the feathers of oystercatchers from oiled and unoiled regions of Prince William Sound. Except for mercury, the feathers of oystercatchers had significantly higher levels of all metals than those of kittiwakes. Levels of mercury in kittiwake feathers (mean of 2910 ng/g [ppb]) were within the range of many species of seabirds reported for other studies, and were generally below adverse effects levels. PMID:18440597

  7. Perinatal and Childhood Exposure to Cadmium, Manganese, and Metal Mixtures and Effects on Cognition and Behavior: A Review of Recent Literature.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Alison P; Claus Henn, Birgit; Wright, Robert O

    2015-09-01

    Lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) neurotoxicity is well established. In recent years, a growing body of evidence suggests that environmental exposure to other metals including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and manganese (Mn) and their mixtures also poses public health threats. In this paper, we summarize the recent literature examining the relationship of prenatal and childhood environmental metal exposures with cognitive and behavioral outcomes in children. We conducted a literature search to identify epidemiologic studies that examined the relationship of Cd, Mn, and metal mixtures with children's neurodevelopmental/cognitive and behavioral outcomes. We restricted the search to peer-reviewed studies published in English between January 2009 and March 2015. We identified a total of 31 articles of which 16, 17, and 16 studies examined the effects of Cd, Mn, or metal mixtures, respectively. Based on our review, there is suggestive evidence that prenatal/childhood Cd exposure may be associated with poorer cognition, but additional research is clearly needed. We found little evidence of behavioral effects of early life Cd exposure, and no studies found a significant relationship with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Studies of early life Mn exposure consistently reported negative impacts on both cognition and behavior. There is also growing evidence that co-exposure to multiple metals can result in increased neurotoxicity compared to single-metal exposure, in particular during early life. Few studies have evaluated behavioral effects related to metal co-exposure. PMID:26231505

  8. Lead, cadmium, iron, copper and zinc in fresh milk from the selected areas of the Cracow region.

    PubMed

    Krełowska-Kułas, M

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the experiments was to determine some metals in fresh milk. The content of lead and cadmium in cow's milk from 4 dairy centres situated in various distances from the iron and steel works "Lenin" in Nowa Huta, a part of Cracow, was about ten times bigger than in milk from the control region (an agricultural area far from industrial influences). In many cases milk contains the upper admissible limit of lead and is questionable from the point of view of toxicology. PMID:2381461

  9. Influence of the substitution of the manganese for iron in the Fe sub 4 N lattice on particle formation and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Siberchicot, B.; Matar, S.F.; Fournes, L.; Demazeau, G.; Hagenmuller, P. )

    1990-01-01

    Moessbauer resonance studies on Mn-substituted Fe{sub 4}N show that manganese occupies statistically both iron sites in the lattice. Replacement of Fe by Mn modifies the crystal growth process of Fe{sub 4}N magnetic particles and leads to improvement of the extrinsic magnetic properties, i.e., H{sub c} and {sigma}{sub r}/{sigma}{sub s}, required for magnetic recording applications.

  10. Iron and manganese in oxide minerals and in glasses: preliminary consideration of Eh buffering potential at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Caporuscio, F.A.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1985-04-01

    The tuffs of Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation as a possible deep burial site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. One of the main concerns is the effect of oxidizing groundwater on the transport of radionuclides. Rock components that may affect the oxygen content of groundwater include Fe-Ti oxides, Mn oxides, and glasses that contain ferrous iron. Some phenocryst Fe-Ti oxides at Yucca Mountain are in reduced states, whereas groundmass Fe-Ti oxides have been oxidized to hematite, rutile, and pseudobrookite (Fe{sup 3+}-bearing phases) exclusively. Estimates of Fe{sup 2+}-bearing oxides indicate that less than 0.33 vol% phenocrysts is available to act as solid buffering agents of Eh. Of this percentage, significant amounts of Fe-Ti oxides are isolated from effective interaction with groundwater because they occur in densely welded, devitrified tuffs that have low interstitial permeability. Manganese oxides occur primarily along fractures in the ash-flow tuffs. Because the Mn oxides are concentrated along the same pathways (fractures) where transport has occurred in the past, these small volume percentages could act as buffers. However, the oxidation states of actual Mn-oxide phases are high (Mn{sup 4+}), and these minerals have virtually no potential for reducing groundwater Eh. Manganese oxides may even act as oxidizing agents. However, regardless of their poor capabilities as reducing agents, the Mn oxides could be important as sorbents of heavy metals at Yucca Mountain. The lack of accessible, pristine Fe-Ti oxides and the generally high oxidation states of Mn oxides seem to rule out these oxides as Eh buffers of the Yucca Mountain groundwater system. Reduction of ferrous iron within glassy tuffs may have some effect on Eh, but further study is needed. At present it is prudent to assume that minerals and glasses have little or no capacity for reducing oxygen-rich groundwater at Yucca Mountain. 25 refs., 3 figs., 12

  11. Impact of orchard and tillage management practices on soil leaching of atrazine, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, ammonium, nitrates and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajdak, L.; Lipiec, J.; Siczek, A.; Kotowska, U.; Nosalewicz, A.

    2009-04-01

    The experiments were carried out on an Orthic Luvisol developed from loess, over limestone, at the experimental field of Lublin Agricultural University in Felin (51o15'N, 22o35'E), Poland. The investigation deals with the problems of leaching's rate of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,2,3-triazine), potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, ammonium, nitrates and phosphates from two management systems of soil: (i) conventionally tilled field with main tillage operations including stubble cultivator (10 cm) + harrowing followed by mouldboard ploughing to 20 cm depth, and crop rotation including selected cereals, root crops and papillionaceous crops, (ii) 35-year-old apple orchard field (100x200m) with a permanent sward that was mown in the inter-rows during the growing season. The conventionally tilled plot was under the current management practice for approximately 30 years. Field sites were close to each other (about 150 m). Core samples of 100 cm3 volume and 5 cm diameter were taken from two depths 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm, and were used to determine the soil water characteristic curve. It was observed that management practices impacted on the physic-chemical properties of soils. pH (in H2O) in tilled soil ranged from 5.80 to 5.91. However soil of orchard soil revealed higher values of pH than tilled soil and ranged from 6.36 to 6.40. The content of organic carbon for tilled soil ranged from 1.13 to 1.17%, but in orchard soil from 1.59 to 1.77%. Tillled soil showed broader range of bulk density 1.38-1.62 mg m-3, than orchard soil 1.33-134 mg m-3. The first-order kinetic reaction model was fitted to the experimental atrazine, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, nitrates, ammonium and phosphates leaching vs. time data. The concentrations of leached chemical compounds revealed linear curves. The correlation coefficients ranged from -0.873 to -0.993. The first-order reaction constants measured for the orchard soils were from 3.8 to 19 times higher than

  12. Fast ultrasound-assisted extraction of copper, iron, manganese and zinc from human hair samples prior to flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Yebra-Biurrun, M C; Cespón-Romero, R M

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure utilizing diluted nitric acid was developed for the determination of copper, iron, manganese and zinc in human hair taken from workers in permanent contact with a polluted environment. The extraction unit of the dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction system contains a minicolumn into which a specified amount of hair (5-50 mg) is placed. Once inserted into the continuous manifold, trace metals were extracted at 3 mL min(-1) with 3 mol L(-1) nitric acid under the action of ultrasound for 2 min for zinc and 3 min for copper, iron and manganese determination, and using an ultrasonic water-bath temperature of 70 degrees C for zinc and 80 degrees C for copper, iron and manganese determination. The system permits the direct analysis of hair and yields concentrations with relative standard deviations of <3% (n = 11). The applicability of the procedure was verified by analysing human hair samples from workers exposed to welding fumes, and its accuracy was assessed through comparison with a conventional sample dissolution procedure and the use of a certified reference material (BCR 397, human hair). PMID:17404713

  13. Iron, cadmium, and chromium in seagrass (Thalassia testudinum) from a coastal nature reserve in karstic Yucatán.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Mayra; Bonilla-Heredia, Blanca; Merino-Ibarra, Martín; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A; Ramirez, Javier; Rosas, Humberto; Valdespino, Job; Carricart-Ganivet, Juan P; Martínez, Ana

    2013-09-01

    The management of protected areas in karstic regions is a challenge because flooded cave systems form there and provide underground hydrological conducts that may link different zones. As a consequence, affectations to the protected areas can possibly occur as a consequence of human activities in remote areas and may therefore pass undetected. Thus, the monitoring of possible contaminants in these regions is becoming imperative. In this work, we analyze the concentration of essential (iron) and non-essential metals (cadmium and chromium) in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum that grows in Yalahau Lagoon, located in a near-to-pristine protected area of the Yucatán Peninsula, close to the rapidly developing touristic belt of the Mexican Caribbean. Salinity and silicate patterns show that Yalahau is an evaporation lagoon, where groundwater discharge is important. High iron (> 400 μg/g), cadmium (>4 μg/g), and chromium (≈ 1 μg/g) concentrations were found in the area of highest groundwater input of the lagoon. High levels (5.1 μg/g) were also found near the town dump. In the rest of the sampling sites, metal concentrations remained near to background levels as estimated from other works. Temporal changes of concentrations in the seagrass tissues show also a local input and an input from the groundwater that could provoke an environmental problem in the Yalahau Lagoon in the near future. PMID:23404548

  14. Distribution of iron, manganese, zinc and atrazine in groundwater in parts of Palar and Cheyyar river basins, South India.

    PubMed

    Rajmohan, N; Elango, L

    2005-08-01

    A study was carried out in a part of Palar and Cheyyar river basin to evaluate the current status of iron, manganese, zinc and atrazine concentrations, their origin and distribution in groundwater. Groundwater samples were collected during post-monsoon (March 1998 and February 1999) and pre-monsoon (June 1999) periods from 41 sampling wells distributed throughout the study area. The groundwater samples were analyzed for trace metals using AAS and atrazine using HPLC. The concentration of the trace elements in groundwater is predominant during pre-monsoon period. Distribution pattern indicates that the concentration of these elements increases from west to northeast and towards Palar river. Lower concentrations in the central part may be due to recharge of fresh water from the lakes located here. During most of the months, as there is no flow in Palar river, the concentrations of trace elements in groundwater are high. Drinking water standards indicate that Mn and Zn cross the permissible limit recommended by EPA during the pre-monsoon period. A comparison of groundwater data with trace element chemistry of rock samples shows the abundance of trace elements both in the rock and water in the order of Fe > Mn > Zn and Fe > Zn > Mn. This indicates that iron in groundwater is derived from lithogenic origin. Further, Fe, Mn and Zn have good correlation in rock samples, while it is reverse in the case of water samples, indicating the non-lithogenic origin of Mn and Zn. Atrazine (a herbicide) was not detected in any of the groundwater samples in the study area, perhaps due to low-application rate and adsorption in the soil materials. PMID:16418908

  15. Shelf-to-basin shuttling of iron and manganese as a driver of phosphorus burial in the Landsort Deep during past periods of hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Nikki; Slomp, Caroline P.; Ash, Jeanine; Bauersachs, Thorsten; Hardisty, Dalton; Martin, Ellen; Riedinger, Natascha

    2015-04-01

    Bottom water hypoxia (i.e. low oxygen conditions) in coastal systems is an increasing world-wide problem. Enhanced external phosphorus inputs may contribute to the development of hypoxia by increasing primary production in the water column. The associated elevated flux of organic matter to the seafloor may then result in an oxygen demand in bottom waters that outpaces supply. The mechanisms leading to removal of phosphorus from the Baltic Sea system through burial in the sediment are still incompletely understood. The Baltic Sea is currently hypoxic and has experienced two earlier periods of hypoxia during the Holocene. These are the Holocene Thermal Maximum (ca 8000-4000 yrs ago) and the Medieval Climate Anomaly (ca 700-1000 yrs ago) (Zillen et al., 2008). Based on sediment records for the Gotland Deep area, Jilbert and Slomp (2013) suggest that particle shuttles of iron and manganese oxides from the shelves act as drivers for authigenesis of phosphorus-bearing minerals in the deep euxinic basins. Here, we present geochemical results for a long sediment record (0 - 90 mbsf) from the deepest basin in the Baltic Sea (Landsort Deep, 451 m, Site M0063), which was retrieved during the International Ocean Discovery Programme (IODP) Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment Expedition 347 in 2013. Bulk sediment and pore water geochemical analyses, results of sequential extractions for phosphorus, iron and sulfur, and various micro-analyses are combined to assess whether shelf-to-basin shuttling of manganese and iron affects the long-term burial of phosphorus in the Landsort Deep. We find that highly organic-rich sediments were deposited in the Landsort Deep following the transition from a lacustrine to a brackish/marine environment. This is reflected, for example, in the organic carbon content and pore water geochemistry. Elevated molybdenum and organic carbon/phosphorus ratios in the sediment allow the two major hypoxic periods during the early and mid-Holocene to be identified. All

  16. Spatio-temporal Distribution and Chemical Speciation of Iron and Manganese in Sediments from Lake Aha, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Hu, Jiwei; Qin, Fanxin; Jiang, Cuihong; Huang, Xianfei; Deng, Jiajun; Li, Cunxiong

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports an investigation on pollution and potential risk on elements of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in sediments from Lake Aha, which is a drinking-water source for Guiyang City, the capital of Guizhou Province in southwestern China. In the present research, chemical speciation of Fe and Mn in sediments from the lake was studied based on the sequential extraction procedure developed by Tessier et al.. The results obtained from the study are as follows. The average values of total Fe were 47617 mg/kg and 70325 mg/kg in sediments from the lake in summer and winter respectively, and its speciation consisted mainly of residual and Fe-Mn oxides fractions. The amounts of total Fe and the distribution of its speciation in the sediments should be affected by effluents from a large quantity of deserted coal mines in the lake basin in summer and winter. The average values of total Mn were 7996 mg/kg and 1753 mg/kg in summer and winter respectively, and its speciation is primarily comprised of carbonate and Fe-Mn oxides fractions. The amounts of total Mn and its distribution in different fractions in the sediments were believed to be primarily influenced by effluents from those deserted coal mines in summer and by the condition of redox interface in winter.

  17. Intracellular localization and subsequent redistribution of metal transporters in a rat choroid plexus model following exposure to manganese or iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xueqian; Miller, David S.

    2008-07-15

    Confocal microscopy was used to investigate the effects of manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) exposure on the subcellular distribution of metal transporting proteins, i.e., divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), metal transporter protein 1 (MTP1), and transferrin receptor (TfR), in the rat intact choroid plexus which comprises the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In control tissue, DMT1 was concentrated below the apical epithelial membrane, MTP1 was diffuse within the cytosol, and TfR was distributed in vesicles around nuclei. Following Mn or Fe treatment (1 and 10 {mu}M), the distribution of DMT1 was not affected. However, MTP1 and TfR moved markedly toward the apical pole of the cells. These shifts were abolished when microtubules were disrupted. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed a significant increase in mRNA and protein levels of TfR but not DMT1 and MTP1 after Mn exposure. These results suggest that early events in the tissue response to Mn or Fe exposure involve microtubule-dependent, intracellular trafficking of MTP1 and TfR. The intracellular trafficking of metal transporters in the choroid plexus following Mn exposure may partially contribute to Mn-induced disruption in Fe homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following Mn exposure.

  18. Iron and manganese-related magnetic centers in hexagonal silicon carbide: A possible roadmap for spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, W. V. M.; Assali, L. V. C.; Justo, J. F.

    2015-07-28

    The electronic and magnetic properties of manganese- and iron-doped 4H-SiC were investigated by first-principles calculations, using an all electron methodology. The results on stability, spin configurations, formation and transition energies, local magnetic moments, and hyperfine parameters were compared to available theoretical and experimental data. The results indicated that transition metal impurities are energetically more favorable in lattice sites with carbon atoms as their first nearest neighbors, in both substitutional and interstitial configurations, which results from the larger electronegativity of carbon with respect to that of silicon. The analysis of the electronic properties of those impurity centers showed that they could stay in several stable charge states, depending on the Fermi energy level position within the host SiC bandgap. Additionally, by computing the p-d exchange coupling constant, which is related to a spin polarization in the SiC valence band top, we explored the possibility of achieving macroscopic magnetism in SiC. The results indicated that some centers, in both substitutional and interstitial configurations, present reasonably strong magnetic couplings to mediate macroscopic magnetism at high temperatures, which may generate spin polarized currents, leading to applications in spintronic devices.

  19. The concentration of manganese, iron, and strontium in hip joint bone obtained from patients undergoing hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Budis, Halina; Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Lanocha, Natalia; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Sokolowski, Sebastian; Dobiecki, Konrad; Kolodziej, Lukasz; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and strontium (Sr) in the cartilage with adjacent compact bone and spongy bone collected from patients after total hip replacement surgery. In addition, we examined relations between the concentrations of the metals in the bone and selected environmental factors. The concentration of Fe was the highest while Mn concentration was the lowest. The concentrations of Fe in the spongy bone in patients from larger cities were higher than in those living in smaller towns and villages. Significant correlations were found between Fe and Mn concentrations in the cartilage with adjacent compact bone and in the spongy bone, and between Mn and Sr in the spongy bone. In general, Mn, Fe and Sr concentrations in the bones of patients from NW Poland were lower than in other Polish regions and Europe, especially in industrialized countries. In conclusion, it seems that in addition to routine monitoring of the abiotic environment, it is essential to monitor concentrations of heavy metals having a long-term impact in humans. PMID:24074650

  20. Dynamic Coupling of Iron, Manganese, and Phosphorus Behavior in Water and Sediment of Shallow Ice-Covered Eutrophic Lakes.

    PubMed

    Schroth, Andrew W; Giles, Courtney D; Isles, Peter D F; Xu, Yaoyang; Perzan, Zachary; Druschel, Gregory K

    2015-08-18

    Decreasing duration and occurrence of northern hemisphere ice cover due to recent climate warming is well-documented; however, biogeochemical dynamics underneath the ice are poorly understood. We couple time-series analyses of water column and sediment water interface (SWI) geochemistry with hydrodynamic data to develop a holistic model of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and phosphorus (P) behavior underneath the ice of a shallow eutrophic freshwater bay. During periods of persistent subfreezing temperatures, a highly reactive pool of dissolved and colloidal Fe, Mn, and P develops over time in surface sediments and bottom waters due to reductive dissolution of Fe/Mn(oxy)hydroxides below the SWI. Redox dynamics are driven by benthic O2 consumption, limited air-water exchange of oxygen due to ice cover, and minimal circulation. During thaw events, the concentration, distribution and size partitioning of all species changes, with the highest concentrations of P and "truly dissolved" Fe near the water column surface, and a relatively well-mixed "truly dissolved" Mn and "colloidal" Fe profile due to the influx of geochemically distinct river water and increased circulation. The partitioning and flux of trace metals and phosphorus beneath the ice is dynamic, and heavily influenced by climate-dependent physical processes that vary in both time and space. PMID:26206098

  1. [Colloid effects on temporal-spatial variability of iron and manganese in shallow groundwater of garbage contaminated sites].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Li, Hai-Ming; Gu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Yun

    2011-03-01

    Simulation tank experiment was conducted to elucidate the temporal-spatial variability of Iron and Manganese in leachate pollution plumes of water-bearing media. Colloid effects on transport and transformation of Fe and Mn in water-bearing media were determined emphatically. Moreover, the mechanism of Fe and Mn transport and transformation were discussed by the convection-dispersion, dissolution and transport-deposition of colloid. The results show that the total Fe and Mn in leachate pollution plume was 2.82 times and 7.51 times of infiltration leachate due to the dissolution of water-bearing medium. Along the flow direction, Fe and Mn pollution plumes spread, and the central region of plumes gradually widened by the convection-dispersion and dissolution. In the presence of colloid, the average transport velocity of Fe and Mn plumes central axis from 1.17 cm/d and 1.75 cm/d increased to 1.83 cm/d and 2.5 cm/d respectively, colloid had obvious facilitation to the migration of Fe and Mn. PMID:21634196

  2. Intracellular Localization and Subsequent Redistribution of Metal Transporters in a Rat Choroid Plexus Model Following Exposure to Manganese or Iron

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqian; Miller, David S.; Zheng, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Confocal microscopy was used to investigate the effects of manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) exposure on the subcellular distribution of metal transporting proteins, i.e., divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), metal transporter protein 1 (MTP1), and transferrin receptor (TfR), in the rat intact choroid plexus which comprises the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In control tissue, DMT1 was concentrated below the apical epithelial membrane, MTP1 was diffuse within the cytosol, and TfR was distributed in vesicles around nuclei. Following Mn or Fe treatment (1 and 10 µM), the distribution of DMT1 was not affected. However, MTP1 and TfR moved markedly toward the apical pole of the cells. These shifts were abolished when microtubules were disrupted. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed a significant increase in mRNA and protein levels of TfR but not DMT1 and MTP1 after Mn exposure. These results suggest that early events in the tissue response to Mn or Fe exposure involve microtubule-dependent, intracellular trafficking of MTP1 and TfR. The intracellular trafficking of metal transporters in the choroid plexus following Mn exposure may partially contribute to Mn-induced disruption in Fe homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following Mn exposure. PMID:18420243

  3. Effect of aeration of sediment on cadmium binding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Y.; Allen, H.E.; Fu, G. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    Acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) has been shown to be the dominant phase reacting with metals in anoxic sediments. The AVS in sediment decreases upon resuspension due to storm and dredging, and in winter when the rate of aeration processes exceeds that of the formation of sulfide. The authors conducted a series of lab aeration experiments in batch reactors to investigate the effects of aeration of sediment on the sulfide content of sediment and on the partitioning of cadmium, a model toxic metal, to the sediment. Aeration of sediment results in rapid decrease of the AVS. The authors studied the sediment characteristics for aeration periods of approximately a month. During this time, the concentrations of dissolved metals increased by 200 to 400% or more, relative to the concentrations present at the beginning of the test. The concentration of metal associated with AVS and with pyrite decreased. During the aeration, there are increases in the concentrations of hydrous iron and manganese oxides, and these materials become increasingly more important in the binding of cadmium. Following the aeration, > 50% of the cadmium was associated with the extractable iron and manganese components of the sediment. Overall, the binding capacity of the sediments for cadmium decreased after aeration.

  4. Relationship of manganese-iron oxides and associated heavy metals to grain size in stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution of ammonium citrate-leachable lead, zinc and cadmium among size fractions in stream sediments is strongly influenced by the presence of hydrous Mn-Fe oxides in the form of coatings on sediment grains. Distribution curves showing leachable metals as a function of particle size are given for eight samples from streams in New York State. These show certain features in common; in particular two concentrations of metals, one in the finest fractions, and a second peak in the coarse sand and gravel fraction. The latter can be explained as a result of the increasing prevalence and thickness of oxide coatings with increasing particle size, with the oxides serving as collectors for the heavy metals. The distribution of Zn and Cd in most of the samples closely parallels that of Mn; the distribution of Pb is less regular and appears to be related to Fe in some samples and Mn in others. The concentration of metals in the coarse fractions due to oxide coatings, combined with the common occurrence of oxide deposition in streams of glaciated regions, raises the possibility of using coarse materials for geochemical surveys and environmental heavy-metal studies. ?? 1975.

  5. Reference values of cadmium, arsenic and manganese in blood and factors associated with exposure levels among adult population of Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Freire, Carmen; Koifman, Rosalina Jorge; Fujimoto, Denys; de Oliveira Souza, Vanessa Cristina; Barbosa, Fernando; Koifman, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the distribution and factors influencing blood levels of Cadmium (Cd), Arsenic (As), and Manganese (Mn), and to determine their reference values in a sample of blood donors residing in Rio Branco, capital city of Acre State, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from all blood donors attending the Central Hemotherapic Unit in Rio Branco between 2010 and 2011. Among these, 1183 donors (98.9%) answered to a questionnaire on sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. Blood metal concentrations were determined by atomic spectrometry. Association between Cd, As and Mn levels and donors' characteristics was examined by linear regression analysis. Reference values were estimated as the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval of the 95th percentile of metal levels. References values were 0.87 μg L(-1) for Cd, 9.87 μg L(-1) for As, and 29.32 μg L(-1) for Mn. Reference values of Cd and As in smokers were 2.66 and 10.86 μg L(-1), respectively. Factors contributing to increase Cd levels were smoking, ethnicity (non-white), and lower education, whereas drinking tea and non-bottled water were associated with lower Cd. Lower levels of As were associated with higher household income, living near industrial facilities, working in a glass factory, a compost plant or in metal mining activities. Risk factors for Mn exposure were not identified. In general, blood Cd concentrations were in the range of exposure levels reported for other people from the general population, whereas levels of As and Mn were higher than in other non-occupationally exposed populations elsewhere. PMID:25655821

  6. [The favorable effect of humic acid based complex micro-element preparations in cadmium exposure].

    PubMed

    Hudák, A; Náray, M; Nagy, I; Molnár, M; Gömöry, I; Ungváry, G

    1997-06-01

    The authors have studied the effect of consumption of a humic acid based complex microelement preparation (potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, copper, vanadium, cobalt, molibden, selenium bound to humic acids) for six weeks (10 ml daily) on the biological exposure indices (blood and urine cadmium levels) and clinical laboratory parameters (liver and kidney tests, blood picture) of men (n = 18; 39.7 +/- 10.4 years of age;) working in cadmium exposure for 8.3 +/- 5.0 years. The initial mean blood and urine cadmium levels of the non-smoking subjects was twice higher than that of the non-smoking male controls living in the same urban area (n = 35), and significantly correlated with the length of exposure. Their mean serum alanin-aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl-transferase, creatinine, uric acid and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase levels were significantly higher than that of the controls. After the six-week treatment blood cadmium level, activity of serum alanin-aminotransferase, serum uric acid and urinary protein concentrations decreased significantly, the abnormal serum iron levels normalized. According to this results, the absorption of cadmium decreased on the effect of the complex microelement supplementation and the adverse laboratory changes attributable partly to cadmium exposure improved. Therefore humic acid based complex microelement supplementation is recommended as an effective tool for prevention and health protection in occupational cadmium exposure as well as for smokers known to be considerably burdened by cadmium. PMID:9254361

  7. Differential effects of salen and manganese-salen complex (EUK-8) on the regulation of cellular cadmium uptake and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2005-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes cell damage. We investigated here the feasibility of using a cell permeable superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic, EUK-8, to reduce the Cd-induced ROS and cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells. EUK-8 reduces the ROS level caused by Cd treatment. EUK-8 also curtails propidium iodide (PI) influx and increases the viability of Cd-treated cells. The efficacy of EUK-8 as a Cd antidote diminishes gradually when added at a later stage of Cd treatment. EUK-8 blocks Cd transport into cells. It is ineffective in accelerating the efflux of metals from the cells. EUK-8 is a Mn-salen complex. Mn decreases the uptake and cytotoxicity of Cd, while salen perturbs the membrane integrity and increases the uptake and cytotoxicity of Cd. Salen is able to bind Cd, and the Cd-salen complex formed does not perturb the integrity of cell membranes and thus the influx of metal is not enhanced. Our results reveal a differential effect of salen and Mn-salen complex on the transport of Cd with subsequent different levels of cell damage. PMID:15689422

  8. Characterization of iron- and manganese-cemented redoximorphic aggregates in wetland soils contaminated with mine wastes.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Patrick J; McDaniel, Paul A; Strawn, Daniel G

    2008-01-01

    In wetlands, translocation of Fe and Mn from reducing to oxidizing zones creates localized enrichments and depletions of oxide minerals. In zones of enrichment, oxides cement matrix particles together into aggregates. In this paper, we describe the various Fe- and Mn-cemented features present in the 1 to 2-mm size fraction of mine-waste contaminated wetland soils of the Coeur d'Alene (CDA) River Basin in northern Idaho. These aggregates are categorized based on color and morphology. Total Fe and Mn concentrations are also reported. Distribution of the aggregates in soil profiles along an elevation transect with varying water table heights was investigated. Six distinct categories of aggregates were characterized in the 1 to 2-mm size fraction. The two most predominant categories were aggregates cemented by only Fe oxides and aggregates cemented by a mixture of Fe and Mn oxides. Iron-depleted aggregates, Fe and Mn-cemented sand aggregates, and root channel linings were also identified. The remaining aggregates were categorized into a catch-all category that consisted of primarily charcoal particles. The highest Fe content was in the root channel linings, and the highest Mn content was in the Fe/Mn cemented particles. Iron-cemented aggregates were most common in surface horizons at all sites, and root channels were most common in the 30 to 45-cm core at the lowland point, reflecting the presence of deep rooting vegetation at this site. Spatial distributions of other aggregates at the site were not significant. PMID:18948492

  9. Iron as a possible aggravating factor for osteopathy in itai-itai disease, a disease associated with chronic cadmium intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, M.; Yasuda, M.; Kitagawa, M. )

    1991-03-01

    Itai-itai disease is thought to be the result of chronic cadmium (Cd) intoxication. We examined 23 autopsy cases of itai-itai disease and 18 cases of sudden death as controls. Urine and blood samples from 10 patients were collected before they died and revealed the presence of severe anemia and renal tubular injuries. Undecalcified sections of iliac bone were stained with Aluminon reagent, and ammonium salt of aurintricarboxylic acid, and Prussian blue reagent in all cases of itai-itai disease. These two reagents reacted at the same mineralization fronts. X-ray microanalysis revealed the presence of iron at mineralization fronts in itai-itai disease. Five patients showed evidence of hemosiderosis in the liver, spleen, and pancreas, probably as a result of post transfusion iron overload. Renal calculi and calcified aortic walls were also stained with Prussian blue reagent in several patients. Neither ferritin nor transferrin were visualized at mineralization fronts in itai-itai disease by immunohistochemical staining. These results suggest that iron is bound to calcium or to calcium phosphate by a physicochemical reaction. A marked osteomalacia was observed in 10 cases of itai-itai disease by histomorphometry. Regression analyses of data from cases of itai-itai disease suggested that an Aluminon-positive metal inhibited mineralization and that renal tubules were injured. Since bone Cd levels were increased in itai-itai disease, it is likely that renal tubules were injured by exposure to Cd. Therefore, stainable bone iron is another possible aggravating factor for osteopathy in itai-itai disease, and a synergistic effect between iron and Cd on mineralization is proposed.

  10. The Abundance of Iron-Peak Elements and the Dust Composition in eta Carinae: Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Melendez, M.; Hartman, H.; Gull, T. R.; Lodders, K.

    2010-01-01

    We study the chemical abundances of the Strontium Filament found in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae. In particular, we derive the abundances of iron-peak elements front spectra of their singly ionized ions present in the optical/IR spectra. In this paper we analyze the spectrum of Mn II using a new non-LTE model for this system. In constructing this models we carried out theoretical calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. We find that relative to Ni the gas phase abundance ratio of Mn is roughly solar, similar to the Cr abundance but in contrast to the large enhancements in the abundances of Sc and Ti. NVe interpret this result as an indication of non-equilibrium condensation in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae.

  11. IRON NUTRITION INFLUENCE ON CADMIUM ACCUMULATION BY ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA (L.) HEYNH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to determine whether Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh, a putative Fe-efficient species, accumulated higher concentrations of Cd from a sparingly soluble Cd source (cadmium dihydrogen phosphate) when growing in Fe-deficient rather than in Fe-su...

  12. Arsenic, iron, lead, manganese, and uranium concentrations in private bedrock wells in southeastern New Hampshire, 2012-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanagan, Sarah M.; Belaval, Marcel; Ayotte, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Trace metals, such as arsenic, iron, lead, manganese, and uranium, in groundwater used for drinking have long been a concern because of the potential adverse effects on human health and the aesthetic or nuisance problems that some present. Moderate to high concentrations of the trace metal arsenic have been identified in drinking water from groundwater sources in southeastern New Hampshire, a rapidly growing region of the State (Montgomery and others, 2003). During the past decade (2000–10), southeastern New Hampshire, which is composed of Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Strafford Counties, has grown in population by nearly 48,700 (or 6.4 percent) to 819,100. These three counties contain 62 percent of the State’s population but encompass only about 22 percent of the land area (New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning, 2011). According to a 2005 water-use study (Hayes and Horn, 2009), about 39 percent of the population in these three counties in southeastern New Hampshire uses private wells as sources of drinking water, and these wells are not required by the State to be routinely tested for trace metals or other contaminants. Some trace metals have associated human-health benchmarks or nonhealth guidelines that have been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate public water supplies. The EPA has established a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L) for arsenic (As) and a MCL of 30 μg/L for uranium (U) because of associated health risks (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012). Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) are essential for human health, but Mn at high doses may have adverse cognitive effects in children (Bouchard and others, 2011; Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 2012); therefore, the EPA has issued a lifetime health advisory (LHA) of 300 μg/L for Mn. Recommended secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCLs) for Fe (300 μg/L) and Mn (50 μg/L) were established primarily as

  13. Novel mode of microbial energy metabolism: organic carbon oxidation coupled to dissimilatory reduction of iron or manganese.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1988-06-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. The isolate, designated GS-15, grew in defined anaerobic medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. GS-15 oxidized acetate to carbon dioxide with the concomitant reduction of amorphic Fe(III) oxide to magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). When Fe(III) citrate replaced amorphic Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, GS-15 grew faster and reduced all of the added Fe(III) to Fe(II). GS-15 reduced a natural amorphic Fe(III) oxide but did not significantly reduce highly crystalline Fe(III) forms. Fe(III) was reduced optimally at pH 6.7 to 7 and at 30 to 35 degrees C. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate could also serve as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. A variety of other organic compounds and hydrogen could not. MnO(2) was completely reduced to Mn(II), which precipitated as rhodochrosite (MnCO(3)). Nitrate was reduced to ammonia. Oxygen could not serve as an electron acceptor, and it inhibited growth with the other electron acceptors. This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth. GS-15 provides a model for how enzymatically catalyzed reactions can be quantitatively significant mechanisms for the reduction of iron and manganese in anaerobic environments. PMID:16347658

  14. Zinc, iron, manganese and copper uptake requirement in response to nitrogen supply and the increased grain yield of summer maize.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yanfang; Yue, Shanchao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Dunyi; Cui, Zhenling; Chen, Xinping; Ye, Youliang; Zou, Chunqin

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between grain yields and whole-plant accumulation of micronutrients such as zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and copper (Cu) in maize (Zea mays L.) were investigated by studying their reciprocal internal efficiencies (RIEs, g of micronutrient requirement in plant dry matter per Mg of grain). Field experiments were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in North China to evaluate RIEs and shoot micronutrient accumulation dynamics during different growth stages under different yield and nitrogen (N) levels. Fe, Mn and Cu RIEs (average 64.4, 18.1 and 5.3 g, respectively) were less affected by the yield and N levels. ZnRIE increased by 15% with an increased N supply but decreased from 36.3 to 18.0 g with increasing yield. The effect of cultivars on ZnRIE was similar to that of yield ranges. The substantial decrease in ZnRIE may be attributed to an increased Zn harvest index (from 41% to 60%) and decreased Zn concentrations in straw (a 56% decrease) and grain (decreased from 16.9 to 12.2 mg kg-1) rather than greater shoot Zn accumulation. Shoot Fe, Mn and Cu accumulation at maturity tended to increase but the proportions of pre-silking shoot Fe, Cu and Zn accumulation consistently decreased (from 95% to 59%, 90% to 71% and 91% to 66%, respectively). The decrease indicated the high reproductive-stage demands for Fe, Zn and Cu with the increasing yields. Optimized N supply achieved the highest yield and tended to increase grain concentrations of micronutrients compared to no or lower N supply. Excessive N supply did not result in any increases in yield or micronutrient nutrition for shoot or grain. These results indicate that optimized N management may be an economical method of improving micronutrient concentrations in maize grain with higher grain yield. PMID:24705926

  15. Low-temperature superacid catalysis: Reactions of n - butane and propane catalyzed by iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Tsz-Keung, Cheung; d`Itri, J.L.; Lange, F.C.; Gates, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate the potential value of solid superacid catalysts of the sulfated zirconia type for light hydrocarbon conversion. The key experiments catalytic testing of the performance of such catalysts in a flow reactor fed with streams containing, for example, n-butane or propane. Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia was used to catalyze the conversion of n-butane at atmospheric pressure, 225-450{degrees}C, and n-butane partial pressures in the range of 0.0025-0.01 atm. At temperatures <225{degrees}C, these reactions were accompanied by cracking; at temperatures >350{degrees}C, cracking and isomerization occurred. Catalyst deactivation, resulting at least in part from coke formation, was rapid. The primary cracking products were methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene. The observation of these products along with an ethane/ethylene molar ratio of nearly 1 at 450{degrees}C is consistent with cracking occurring, at least in part, by the Haag-Dessau mechanism, whereby the strongly acidic catalyst protonates n-butane to give carbonium ions. The rate of methane formation from n-butane cracking catalyzed by Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia at 450{degrees}C was about 3 x 10{sup -8} mol/(g of catalyst {center_dot}s). The observation of butanes, pentanes, and methane as products is consistent with Olah superacid chemistry, whereby propane is first protonated by a very strong acid to form a carbonium ion. The carbonium ion then decomposes into methane and an ethyl cation which undergoes oligocondensation reactions with propane to form higher molecular weight alkanes. The results are consistent with the identification of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia as a superacid.

  16. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. PMID:26668333

  17. Prevalence and Relationships of Iron Deficiency Anemia with Blood Cadmium and Vitamin D Levels in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency (ID), and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are common disorders. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anemia, ID, and IDA in Korean females. We examined the associations between IDA, heavy metals in blood, vitamin D level and nutritional intakes. The study was performed using on data collected from 10,169 women (aged ≥10 yr), including 1,232 with anemia, 2,030 with ID, and 690 with IDA during the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V; 2010-2012). Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and path analysis was performed to identify a multivariate regression model incorporating IDA, heavy metals in blood, vitamin D level, and nutritional intakes. The overall prevalence of anemia, ID and IDA was 12.4%, 23.11%, and 7.7%, respectively. ID and IDA were more prevalent among adolescents (aged 15-18 yr; 36.5% for ID; 10.7% for IDA) and women aged 19-49 yr (32.7% for ID; 11.3% for IDA). The proposed path model showed that IDA was associated with an elevated cadmium level after adjusting for age and body mass index (β=0.46, P<0.001). Vitamin D levels were found to affect IDA negatively (β=-0.002, P<0.001). This study shows that the prevalence of anemia, ID, and IDA are relatively high in late adolescents and women of reproductive age. Path analysis showed that depressed vitamin D levels increase the risk of IDA, and that IDA increases cadmium concentrations in blood. Our findings indicate that systematic health surveillance systems including educational campaigns and well-balanced nutrition are needed to control anemia, ID, and IDA. PMID:26770034

  18. Prevalence and Relationships of Iron Deficiency Anemia with Blood Cadmium and Vitamin D Levels in Korean Women.

    PubMed

    Suh, Young Ju; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Dae Hyung; Yi, Hyeon Gyu; Lee, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul Soo; Nah, Jeung Weon; Kim, Soon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency (ID), and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are common disorders. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anemia, ID, and IDA in Korean females. We examined the associations between IDA, heavy metals in blood, vitamin D level and nutritional intakes. The study was performed using on data collected from 10,169 women (aged ≥ 10 yr), including 1,232 with anemia, 2,030 with ID, and 690 with IDA during the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V; 2010-2012). Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and path analysis was performed to identify a multivariate regression model incorporating IDA, heavy metals in blood, vitamin D level, and nutritional intakes. The overall prevalence of anemia, ID and IDA was 12.4%, 23.11%, and 7.7%, respectively. ID and IDA were more prevalent among adolescents (aged 15-18 yr; 36.5% for ID; 10.7% for IDA) and women aged 19-49 yr (32.7% for ID; 11.3% for IDA). The proposed path model showed that IDA was associated with an elevated cadmium level after adjusting for age and body mass index (β=0.46, P<0.001). Vitamin D levels were found to affect IDA negatively (β=-0.002, P<0.001). This study shows that the prevalence of anemia, ID, and IDA are relatively high in late adolescents and women of reproductive age. Path analysis showed that depressed vitamin D levels increase the risk of IDA, and that IDA increases cadmium concentrations in blood. Our findings indicate that systematic health surveillance systems including educational campaigns and well-balanced nutrition are needed to control anemia, ID, and IDA. PMID:26770034

  19. Electrochemical cell with a cadmium patch electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.E.; Bloom, S.M.; Hoffman, A.; Norland, K.

    1980-01-22

    A cadmium patch laminar electrode, comprising a dispersion of particulate cadmium in a binder matrix on a conductive plastic substrate is prepared by contacting a zinc patch electrode comprising a dispersion of particulate zinc in a binder matrix on a conductive plastic substrate with an aqueous solution of a cadmium salt. The cadmium patch electrode can be used in a primary electrochemical cell such as that employing a manganese dioxide cathode and a cadmium chloride electrolyte.

  20. Iron and Manganese Pyrophosphates as Cathodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hui; Upreti, Shailesh; Chernova, Natasha A.; Hautier, Geoffroy; Ceder, Gerbrand; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2015-10-15

    The mixed-metal phases, (Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, 0 {le} y {le} 1), were synthesized using a 'wet method', and found to form a solid solution in the P2{sub 1}/a space group. Both thermogravimetric analysis and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the 2+ oxidation state for both the Mn and Fe. The electrochemical capacity improves as the Fe concentration increases, as do the intensities of the redox peaks of the cyclic voltammogram, indicating higher lithium-ion diffusivity in the iron phase. The two Li{sup +} ions in the three-dimensional tunnel structure of the pyrophosphate phase allows for the cycling of more than one lithium per redox center. Cyclic voltammograms show a second oxidation peak at 5 V and 5.3 V, indicative of the extraction of the second lithium ion, in agreement with ab initio computation predictions. Thus, electrochemical capacities exceeding 200 Ah/kg may be achieved if a stable electrolyte is found.

  1. X-ray fluorescence analysis of iron and manganese distribution in primary dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dučić, Tanja; Barski, Elisabeth; Salome, Murielle; Koch, Jan C; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals have been suggested to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. X-ray microscopy combined with a cryogenic setup is a powerful method for elemental imaging in low concentrations and high resolution in intact cells, eliminating the need for fixation and sectioning of the specimen. Here, we performed an elemental distribution analysis in cultured primary midbrain neurons with a step size in the order of 300 nm and ∼ 0.1 ppm sensitivity under cryo conditions by using X-ray fluorescence microscopy. We report the elemental mappings on the subcellular level in primary mouse dopaminergic (DAergic) and non-DAergic neurons after treatment with transition metals. Application of Fe2+ resulted in largely extracellular accumulation of iron without preference for the neuronal transmitter subtype. A quantification of different Fe oxidation states was performed using X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis. After treatment with Mn2+, a cytoplasmic/paranuclear localization of Mn was observed preferentially in DAergic neurons, while no prominent signal was detectable after Mn3+ treatment. Immunocytochemical analysis correlated the preferential Mn uptake to increased expression of voltage-gated calcium channels in DAergic neurons. We discuss the implications of this differential elemental distribution for the selective vulnerability of DAergic neurons and Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. PMID:23106162

  2. Bioaccumulation of iron, zinc, cadmium and chromium by juvenile snail Limicolaria aurora J., fed edible mushroom Pleurotus spp from Niger Delta, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ebenso, I E; Solomon, I P; Akoje, C C; Akpan, I P; Eko, P M; Akpan, E A; Omole, A J

    2013-03-01

    The effects of uptake of metals (iron, zinc, cadmium and chromium) by juvenile snail Limicolaria aurora fed edible mushroom Pleurotus spp from 3 contaminated farm sites and a laboratory grown species (control) respectively were investigated. The 120 snails were fed in plastic snaileries for 4 weeks in the laboratory. Control site was risk free. Metal uptake was low and bioaccumulation in L. aurora tissue was below FAO/WHO standard of 1 mg/kg for chromium and cadmium. Snails were considered safe for consumption. PMID:23229305

  3. Development and application of 16S rRNA-targeted probes for detection of iron- and manganese-oxidizing sheathed bacteria in environmental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1997-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes from several Leptothrix and Sphaerotilus strains led to the design of an oligonucleotide probe (PS-1) based on a sequence within the hypervariable region 1 specific for four Leptothrix strains and for one of the four Sphaerotilus natans strains examined. Another probe (PSP-6) was based on a sequence within the hypervariable region 2. PSP-6 was specific for one of the two evolutionary lineages previously described for Leptothrix spp. (P. L. Siering and W. C. Ghiorse, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 46:173-182, 1996). Fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotide probes were synthesized, and their specificity for fluorescence in situ hybridization identification was confirmed by a laser scanning microscopy technique (W. C. Ghiorse, D. N. Miller, R. L. Sandoli, and P. L. Siering, Microsc. Res. Tech. 33:73-86, 1996) to compare whole-cell hybridizations of closely related bacteria. Probe specificity was also tested in dot blot against total RNA isolated from four Leptothrix strains, four Sphaerotilus strains, and 15 other members of the class Proteobacteria. When the probes were tested on samples from the Sapsucker Woods wetland habitat where Leptothrix spp. are thought to play a role in manganese and iron oxidation, positive signals were obtained from several sheathed filamentous bacteria including some that were morphologically similar to previously isolated strains of "Leptothrix discophora." Other unknown filamentous sheathed bacteria also gave strong positive signals. This work provides a foundation for future studies correlating the presence of members of the Leptothrix-Sphaerotilus group of sheathed bacteria with manganese and iron oxidation activity in habitats where biological iron and manganese oxidation are important environmental processes. PMID:9023942

  4. Development and application of 16S rRNA-targeted probes for detection of iron- and manganese-oxidizing sheathed bacteria in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1997-02-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes from several Leptothrix and Sphaerotilus strains led to the design of an oligonucleotide probe (PS-1) based on a sequence within the hypervariable region 1 specific for four Leptothrix strains and for one of the four Sphaerotilus natans strains examined. Another probe (PSP-6) was based on a sequence within the hypervariable region 2. PSP-6 was specific for one of the two evolutionary lineages previously described for Leptothrix spp. (P. L. Siering and W. C. Ghiorse, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 46:173-182, 1996). Fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotide probes were synthesized, and their specificity for fluorescence in situ hybridization identification was confirmed by a laser scanning microscopy technique (W. C. Ghiorse, D. N. Miller, R. L. Sandoli, and P. L. Siering, Microsc. Res. Tech. 33:73-86, 1996) to compare whole-cell hybridizations of closely related bacteria. Probe specificity was also tested in dot blot against total RNA isolated from four Leptothrix strains, four Sphaerotilus strains, and 15 other members of the class Proteobacteria. When the probes were tested on samples from the Sapsucker Woods wetland habitat where Leptothrix spp. are thought to play a role in manganese and iron oxidation, positive signals were obtained from several sheathed filamentous bacteria including some that were morphologically similar to previously isolated strains of "Leptothrix discophora." Other unknown filamentous sheathed bacteria also gave strong positive signals. This work provides a foundation for future studies correlating the presence of members of the Leptothrix-Sphaerotilus group of sheathed bacteria with manganese and iron oxidation activity in habitats where biological iron and manganese oxidation are important environmental processes. PMID:9023942

  5. Thermochemistry of perovskites in the lanthanum-strontium-manganese-iron oxide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, Cornelia; Vradman, Leonid; Tanasescu, Speranta; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-10-01

    The enthalpies of formation from binary oxides of perovskites (ABO3) based on lanthanum strontium manganite La(Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and lanthanum strontium ferrite La(Sr)FeO3 (LSF) and mixed lanthanum strontium manganite ferrite La(Sr)Mn(Fe)O3 (LSMF) were measured by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. Using iodometric titration, the oxygen content was derived. The perovskites with A-site cation deficiency have greater oxygen deficiency than the corresponding A-site stoichiometric series. Stability of LSMF decreases with increasing iron content. Increasing oxygen deficiency clearly destabilizes the perovskites. The results suggest an enthalpy of oxygen incorporation that is approximately independent of composition. 0.35La2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+Mn2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+0.3SrO (xl, 25 °C)+Fe2O3 (xl, 25 °C)+O2 (g, 25 °C)→La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ (xl, 25 °C). (b) ∆ Hf,ox* (La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ) .0.35 La2O3 (xl, 25 ººC) + (0.7-y+ 2δ)/2 Mn2O3 (xl, 25 ºC) + 0.3 SrO (xl, 25 ºC) + y/2Fe2O3 (xl, 25 ºC) + (0.3-2δ) MnO2 (xl, 25 ºC)→La0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yFeyO3-δ (xl, 25 ºC).

  6. Solid state 31phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Taylor, R. E.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for Lunar or Martian outposts. Solid state 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was utilized to examine the paramagnetic effects of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ to determine if they were incorporated into the SHA structure. Separate Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ containing SHA materials along with a transition metal free SHA (pure-SHA) were synthesized using a precipitation method. The proximity (<1 nm) of the transition metals to the 31P nuclei of SHA were apparent when comparing the integrated 31P signal intensities of the pure-SHA (87 arbitrary units g-1) with the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials (37-71 arbitrary units g-1). The lower integrated 31P signal intensities of the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials relative to the pure-SHA suggested that Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ were incorporated in the SHA structure. Further support for Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ incorporation was demonstrated by the reduced spin-lattice relaxation constants of the Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials (T'=0.075-0.434s) relative to pure-SHA (T1=58.4s). Inversion recovery spectra indicated that Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ were not homogeneously distributed about the 31P nuclei in the SHA structure. Extraction with diethylene-triamine-penta-acetic acid (DTPA) suggested that between 50 and 80% of the total starting metal concentrations were incorporated in the SHA structure. Iron-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu in the ALS cropping system.

  7. A simple method based on ICP-MS for estimation of background levels of arsenic, cadmium, copper, manganese, nickel, lead, and selenium in blood of the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Juliana A; Batista, Bruno L; Rodrigues, Jairo L; Caldas, Naise M; Neto, Jose A G; Barbosa, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the world, biomonitoring has become the standard for assessing exposure of individuals to toxic elements as well as for responding to serious environmental public health problems. However, extensive biomonitoring surveys require rapid and simple analytical methods. Thus, a simple and high-throughput method is proposed for the determination of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and selenium (Se) in blood samples by using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Prior to analysis, 200 microl of blood samples was mixed with 500 microl of 10% v/v tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution, incubated for 10 min, and subsequently diluted to 10 ml with a solution containing 0.05% w/v ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) + 0.005% v/v Triton X-100. After that, samples were directly analyzed by ICP-MS (ELAN DRC II). Rhodium was selected as an internal standard with matrix-matching calibration. Method detection limits were 0.08, 0.04, 0.5, 0.09, 0.12, 0.04, and 0.1 microg//L for As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Se, respectively. Validation data are provided based on the analysis of blood samples from the trace elements inter-\\comparison program operated by the Institut National de Sante Publique du Quebec, Canada. Additional validation was provided by the analysis of human blood samples by the proposed method and by using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The method was subsequently applied for the estimation of background metal blood values in the Brazilian population. In general, the mean concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Se in blood were 1.1, 0.4, 890, 9.6, 2.1, 65.4, and 89.3 microg/L, respectively, and are in agreement with other global populations. Influences of age, gender, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, and geographical variation on the values were also considered. Smoking habits influenced the levels of Cd in blood. The levels of Cu, Mn, and Pb were

  8. A photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H 2O 2 for decomposition of wine samples — Determination of iron and manganese content by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Walter N. L.; Brandão, Geovani C.; Portugal, Lindomar A.; David, Jorge M.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper proposes the use of photo-oxidation with UV radiation/H 2O 2 as sample pretreatment for the determination of iron and manganese in wines by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The optimization involved the study of the following variables: pH and concentration of buffer solution, concentrated hydrogen peroxide volume and irradiation time. The evaluation of sample degradation was monitored by measuring the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of red wine (530 nm). Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (irradiation time of 30 min, oxidant volume of 2.5 mL, pH 10, and a buffer concentration of 0.15 mol L - 1 ), this procedure allows the determination of iron and manganese with limits of detection of 30 and 22 μg L - 1 , respectively, for a 5 mL volume of digested sample. The precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), were 2.8% and 0.65% for iron and 2.7% and 0.54% for manganese for concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 mg L - 1 , respectively. Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the ranges of 90%-111% and 95%-107% for iron and manganese, respectively. This digestion procedure has been applied for the determination of iron and manganese in six wine samples. The concentrations varied from 1.58 to 2.77 mg L - 1 for iron and from 1.30 to 1.91 mg L - 1 for manganese. The results were compared with those obtained by an acid digestion procedure and determination of the elements by FAAS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a paired t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  9. Comparison of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and comparison with common eider (Somateria mollissima), glaucous-winged gull (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba), and tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata) from the Aleutian Chain of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2009-05-01

    There is an abundance of field data for levels of metals from a range of places, but relatively few from the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers from common eiders (Somateria mollissima), glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba), tufted puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from the Aleutian Chain of Alaska. Our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that there are no trophic levels relationships for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium among these five species of birds breeding in the marine environment of the Aleutians. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels. As predicted bald eagles had the highest levels of arsenic, chromium, lead, and manganese, but puffins had the highest levels of selenium, and pigeon guillemot had higher levels of mercury than eagles (although the differences were not significant). Common eiders, at the lowest trophic level had the lowest levels of some metals (chromium, mercury and selenium). However, eiders had higher levels than all other species (except eagles) for arsenic, cadmium, lead, and manganese. Levels of lead were higher in breast than in wing feathers of bald eagles. Except for lead, there were no significant differences in metal levels in feathers of bald eagles nesting on Adak and Amchitka Island; lead was higher on Adak than Amchitka. Eagle chicks tended to have lower levels of manganese than older eagles. PMID:18521716

  10. Comparison of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and comparison with common eider (Somateria mollissima), glaucous-winged gull (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba), and tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata) from the Aleutian Chain of Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    There is an abundance of field data for levels of metals from a range of places, but relatively few from the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers from common eiders (Somateria mollissima), glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba), tufted puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from the Aleutian Chain of Alaska. Our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that there are no trophic levels relationships for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium among these five species of birds breeding in the marine environment of the Aleutians. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels. As predicted bald eagles had the highest levels of arsenic, chromium, lead, and manganese, but puffins had the highest levels of selenium, and pigeon guillemot had higher levels of mercury than eagles (although the differences were not significant). Common eiders, at the lowest trophic level had the lowest levels of some metals (chromium, mercury and selenium). However, eiders had higher levels than all other species (except eagles) for arsenic, cadmium, lead, and manganese. Levels of lead were higher in breast than in wing feathers of bald eagles. Except for lead, there were no significant differences in metal levels in feathers of bald eagles nesting on Adak and Amchitka Island; lead was higher on Adak than Amchitka. Eagle chicks tended to have lower levels of manganese than older eagles. PMID:18521716

  11. The precipitation of aluminum, iron and manganese at the junction of Deer Creek with the Snake River in Summit County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theobald, P.K., Jr.; Lakin, H.W.; Hawkins, D.B.

    1963-01-01

    The oxidation of disseminated pyrite in relatively acid schists and gneisses of the Snake River drainage basin provides abundant iron sulfate and sulfuric acid to ground and surface water. This acid water dissolves large quantities of many elements, particularly aluminum and surprisingly large quantities of elements, such as magnesium and zinc, not expected to be abundant in the drainage basin. The adjoining drainage to the west, Deer Creek, is underlain by basic rocks, from which the water inherits a high pH. Despite the presence of base- and precious- metal veins in the drainage basin of Deer Creek, it carries less metal than the Snake River. The principal precipitate on the bed of the Snake River is hydrated iron oxide with small quantities of the other metals. In Deer Creek manganese oxide is precipitated with iron oxide and large quantities of other metals are carried down with this precipitate. Below the junction of these streams the pH stabilizes at a near-neutral value. Iron is removed from the Snake River water at the junction, and aluminum is precipitated for some distance downstream. The aluminum precipitate carries down other metals in concentrations slightly less than that in the manganese precipitate on Deer Creek. The natural processes observed in this junction if carried to a larger scale could provide the mechanism described by Ansheles (1927) for the formation of bauxite. In the environment described, geochemical exploration by either water or stream sediment techniques is difficult because of (1) the extreme pH differential between the streams above their junction and (2) the difference in the precipitates formed on the streambeds. ?? 1963.

  12. Design and application of rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for the dissimilatory iron- and manganese-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    DiChristina, T J; DeLong, E F

    1993-01-01

    A 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe specific for the iron (Fe3+)- and manganese (Mn4+)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens was constructed and tested in both laboratory- and field-based hybridization experiments. The radioactively labeled probe was used to detect S. putrefaciens in field samples collected from the water column and sediments of Oneida Lake in New York and its major southern tributary, Chittenango Creek. S. putrefaciens was quantified by (i) hybridization of the probe to bulk RNA extracted from field samples and normalization of the S. putrefaciens-specific rRNA to total eubacterial rRNA, (ii) a colony-based probe hybridization assay, and (iii) a colony-based biochemical assay which detected the formation of iron sulfide precipitates on triple-sugar iron agar. The results of field applications indicated that the three detection methods were comparable in sensitivity for detecting S. putrefaciens in water column and sediment samples. S. putrefaciens rRNA was detected in the surficial layers of the lake and creek sediments, but the levels of S. putrefaciens rRNA were below the detection limits in the lake and creek water samples. The highest concentrations of S. putrefaciens rRNA, corresponding to approximately 2% of the total eubacterial rRNA, were detected in the surficial sediments of Chittenango Creek and at a midlake site where the Oneida Lake floor is covered by a high concentration of ferromanganese nodules. This finding supports the hypothesis that metal-reducing bacteria such as S. putrefaciens are important components in the overall biogeochemical cycling of iron, manganese and other elements in seasonally anoxic freshwater basins. Images PMID:7506899

  13. Reactive iron and manganese in estuarine sediments of the Baltic Sea: Impacts of flocculation and redox shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilbert, Tom; Tiihonen, Rosa; Myllykangas, Jukka-Pekka; Asmala, Eero; Hietanen, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) play important roles in sedimentary carbon cycling in both freshwater and marine systems. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe and Mn oxides is known to be a major pathway of suboxic organic matter remineralization in surface sediments, while recent studies have shown that Fe and Mn oxides may be involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane deeper in the sediment column (e.g., Egger et al., 2015). Estuaries are transitional environments, characterized by gradients of salinity and redox conditions which impact on the mobility of Fe and Mn. In turn, the distribution of Fe and Mn in estuarine sediments, and the role of the two metals in carbon cycling, is expected to be spatially heterogeneous. However, few studies have attempted to describe the sedimentary distribution of Fe and Mn in the context of processes occurring in the estuarine water column. In particular, salinity-driven flocculation and redox shuttling are two key processes whose relative impacts on sedimentary Fe and Mn have not been clearly demonstrated. In this study we investigated the coupled water column and sedimentary cycling of Fe and Mn along a 60km non-tidal estuarine transect in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. We show that riverine Fe entering the estuary as colloidal oxides associated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) is quickly flocculated and sedimented within 5 km of the river mouth, despite the shallow lateral salinity gradient. Sediments within this range are enriched in Fe (up to twice the regional average), principally in the form of crystalline Fe oxides as determined by sequential extractions. The high crystallinity implies relative maturity of the oxide mineralogy, likely due to sustained oxic conditions and long residence time in the river catchment. Despite the reducing conditions below the sediment-water interface, Fe is largely retained in the sediments close to the river mouth. In contrast, sedimentary Mn concentrations are highest in a deep silled

  14. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of a nanofluid containing manganese iron oxide nanoparticles produced by a mechanochemical process.

    PubMed

    Bellusci, Mariangela; La Barbera, Aurelio; Padella, Franco; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquo, Alessandra; Grollino, Maria Giuseppa; Leter, Giorgio; Nardi, Elisa; Cremisini, Carlo; Giardullo, Paola; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are candidate contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. Biodistribution and toxicity assessment are critical for the development of nanoparticle-based drugs, because of nanoparticle-enhanced biological reactivity. Here, we investigated the uptake, in vivo biodistribution, and in vitro and in vivo potential toxicity of manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles, synthesized by an original high-yield, low-cost mechanochemical process. Cultures of murine Balb/3T3 fibroblasts were exposed for 24, 48, or 72 hours to increasing ferrofluid concentrations. Nanoparticle cellular uptake was assessed by flow-cytometry scatter-light measurements and microscopy imaging after Prussian blue staining; cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony-forming assays. After a single intravenous injection, in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution and clearance were evaluated in mice by Mn spectrophotometric determination and Prussian blue staining in the liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain at different posttreatment times up to 21 days. The same organs were analyzed for any possible histopathological change. The in vitro study demonstrated dose-dependent nanoparticle uptake and statistically significant cytotoxic effects from a concentration of 50 μg/mL for the MTT assay and 20 μg/mL for the colony-forming assay. Significant increases in Mn concentrations were detected in all analyzed organs, peaking at 6 hours after injection and then gradually declining. Clearance appeared complete at 7 days in the kidneys, spleen, and brain, whereas in the liver Mn levels remained statistically higher than in vehicle-treated mice up to 3 weeks postinjection. No evidence of irreversible histopathological damage to any of the tested organs was observed. A comparison of the lowest in vitro toxic concentration with the intravenously injected dose and the administered dose of

  15. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of a nanofluid containing manganese iron oxide nanoparticles produced by a mechanochemical process

    PubMed Central

    Bellusci, Mariangela; La Barbera, Aurelio; Padella, Franco; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pasquo, Alessandra; Grollino, Maria Giuseppa; Leter, Giorgio; Nardi, Elisa; Cremisini, Carlo; Giardullo, Paola; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are candidate contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. Biodistribution and toxicity assessment are critical for the development of nanoparticle-based drugs, because of nanoparticle-enhanced biological reactivity. Here, we investigated the uptake, in vivo biodistribution, and in vitro and in vivo potential toxicity of manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles, synthesized by an original high-yield, low-cost mechanochemical process. Cultures of murine Balb/3T3 fibroblasts were exposed for 24, 48, or 72 hours to increasing ferrofluid concentrations. Nanoparticle cellular uptake was assessed by flow-cytometry scatter-light measurements and microscopy imaging after Prussian blue staining; cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony-forming assays. After a single intravenous injection, in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution and clearance were evaluated in mice by Mn spectrophotometric determination and Prussian blue staining in the liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain at different posttreatment times up to 21 days. The same organs were analyzed for any possible histopathological change. The in vitro study demonstrated dose-dependent nanoparticle uptake and statistically significant cytotoxic effects from a concentration of 50 μg/mL for the MTT assay and 20 μg/mL for the colony-forming assay. Significant increases in Mn concentrations were detected in all analyzed organs, peaking at 6 hours after injection and then gradually declining. Clearance appeared complete at 7 days in the kidneys, spleen, and brain, whereas in the liver Mn levels remained statistically higher than in vehicle-treated mice up to 3 weeks postinjection. No evidence of irreversible histopathological damage to any of the tested organs was observed. A comparison of the lowest in vitro toxic concentration with the intravenously injected dose and the administered dose of

  16. Bacillus subterraneus sp. nov., an iron- and manganese-reducing bacterium from a deep subsurface Australian thermal aquifer.

    PubMed

    Kanso, Sungwan; Greene, Anthony C; Patel, Bharat K C

    2002-05-01

    A facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain COOI3B(T) (= ATCC BAA 136T = DSM 13966T), was isolated from the waters emitted by a bore well tapping the deep subterranean thermal waters of the Great Artesian Basin of Australia. The cells were straight to slightly curved rods (0.5-0.8 x 2-25 microm) that occurred singly and rarely in pairs or in chains. Strain COOI3B(T) was motile by peritrichous flagella. It stained gram-negative, but electron micrographs showed a gram-positive-type cell wall. Spores were never observed and cells were heat-sensitive. Yeast extract at 0.02% (w/v) was required for growth and could also be used as a sole carbon and energy source at concentrations higher than 0.1% (w/v). The strain utilized amorphous iron(III), manganese(IV), nitrate, nitrite and fumarate as electron acceptors in the presence of yeast extract, glucose, sucrose, fructose, maltose, xylose, starch, glycerol, ethanol or lactate. Electron acceptors were not obligately required and growth was better in the presence of nitrate than in its absence. Acid was not produced from growth on carbohydrates. Tryptophan deaminase, H2S, arginine dihydrolase, lysine decarboxylase, beta-galactosidase, arabinosidase, glucuronidase, glucosaminidase, nitroanilidase, xylosidase and ornithine decarboxylase were not produced. Starch and gelatin, but not casein, were hydrolysed. Aesculin and catalase, but not oxidase and urease, were produced. Strain COOI3B(T) grew optimally at temperatures between 37 and 40 degrees C (the temperature growth range was 25-45 degrees C) and at pH 7.0-9.0 (the pH growth range was 6.0 to 9.5) with 5% (w/v) NaCl (the NaCl concentration growth range was 0.9%, w/v). The DNA base composition was 43 +/- 1 mol % G+C. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that it was a member of the family Bacillaceae, Bacillus infernus and Bacillus firmus being the closest phylogenetic neighbours (having a mean similarity value of 96%); hence, strain COOI3B(T) is designated as a novel

  17. Effect of manganese and iron at a neutral and acidic pH on the hematology of the banded Tilapia (Tilapia sparrmanii)

    SciTech Connect

    Wepener, V.; Van Vuren, J.H.J.; Du Preez, H.H.

    1992-10-01

    The pollution of natural water bodies is a common phenomenon in developing countries. Increases in population densities lead to increased mining and industrial activities in the area. With the establishment of gold and coal mines in South Africa, several industrial zones were created to support the mining industry. Many of these industries consist of heavy metal processing factories. Over the years pollution from the mines has led to acidification of the streams and lakes in the Transvaal. It was also found that high concentrations of heavy metals occurred in the water, sediments, plants and fish tissue in the affected water systems. Of all the heavy metals, iron and manganese were found in the highest concentrations. In order to determine the subtle, non-lethal effects induced by sublethal concentrations of heavy metals on the physiology of fish, it is necessary to monitor certain clinical parameters. The use of hematological methods as indicators of sublethal stress can supply valuable information concerning the physiological reactions of fish in a changing environment. The reason for this is the close association between the circulatory system of the fish and the external environment. The objective of the present paper was to evaluate the effects of manganese and iron at a neutral and acidic pH on the hematology of Tilapia sparrmanii. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on the metabolism of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in an animal model of alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bogden, J.D.; Al-Rabiai, S.; Gilani, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (AC) is one of the diseases caused by alcohol abuse, and there has been considerable debate about the possibility that nutritional factors may be important in the etiology of AC. In addition, there is evidence that ethanol may affect the metabolism of trace elements. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if chronic ethanol administration produces changes in the metabolism of the essential metals copper, iron, manganese, zinc, and selenium using an animal model of AC. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; an ad libitum control group (AL), a pair-fed control group (PF), and an ethanol-dosed group (ETOH). The latter group received gradually increasing concentrations (5-25%) of ethanol in the drinking water for 15 wk. Food intake was monitored and urine and feces collected for a 4-d period during the study to determine ethanol effects on trace-element balance. Growth of both the PF and ETOH animals was inhibited. Ethanol produced substantial increases in liver manganese and decreases in liver copper and zinc. Metal concentrations in heart and concentrations in other tissues studied (spleen, testes, brain, bone, kidney, and muscle) did not differ significantly among the groups, except for testes selenium and kidney zinc. Reduced food intake and ethanol ingestion were associated with a reduced percentage of ingested selenium excreted in the urine. Deficiencies of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in myocardial tissue are not likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of AC in the rat. 38 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  19. Influence of copper and iron on subacute cadmium intoxication in protein-malnourished rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, P.C.; Kachru, D.N.; Tandon, S.K.

    1986-10-01

    Male albino rats maintained on low-protein (9%) diets were dosed intraperitoneally with 0.75 mg Cd/kg, as cadmium chloride, for 20 days. Groups of these animals were provided with diets supplemented with 40 ppm Cu, 400 ppm Fe or a combination of both during the exposure period. Hepatic and renal distribution of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Fe along with activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases and ribonuclease and glutathione content were studied. Uptake of Cd both in liver and in kidney was significant and was accompanied by increased Zn and depletion of Fe concentration. The Cu level remained unaltered. Dietary supplementation of Cu or Fe interacted effectively and influenced the metal distribution. Acid and alkaline phosphatases in both liver and kidney were inhibited by Cd exposure. However, Cu and/or Fe supplements could to a varying degree offset the Cd-induced inhibition. Cadmium exposure did not, however, elicit any effect on hepatic and renal ribonuclease activity of low-protein-fed animals. The glutathione concentration registered profound increase on Cd exposure, possibly to act as a defense mechanism.

  20. Field-induced enhancement of voltage-controlled diffractive properties in paraelectric iron and manganese co-doped potassium-tantalate-niobate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Tian, Hao; Meng, Xiangda; Chen, Huishun; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Shen, Yanqing

    2014-11-01

    High voltage-controlled diffraction efficiency of 78.3% was obtained in paraelectric potassium-tantalate-niobate crystal co-doped with iron and manganese. It was found that the recording time required to achieve maximum diffraction efficiency can be significantly reduced through the application of an external electric field on the crystal during writing. More importantly, the maximum diffraction efficiency maintained a considerably high value under a low external field at different writing angles. The external-field-enhanced space-charge fields were also calculated to interpret the important role of the enhancement effect. The results show that employing an enhanced electric field is of great significance for electroholography device applications.

  1. A binary AxB1-x ionic alkaline pseudocapacitor system involving manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel: formation of electroactive colloids via in situ electric field assisted coprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kunfeng; Yin, Shu; Xue, Dongfeng

    2014-12-01

    A new ``combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitor'' was demonstrated by designing combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitors with binary AxB1-x salt electrodes involving manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel cations in an alkaline aqueous electrolyte. Binary multi-valence cations were crystallized in the colloidal state through an in situ coprecipitation under an electric field. These electroactive colloids absorbed by carbon black and the PVDF matrix are highly redox-reactive with high specific capacitance values, where the specific electrode configuration can create short ion diffusion paths to enable fast and reversible Faradaic reactions. This work shows huge promise for developing high-performance electrical energy storage systems via designing the colloidal state of electroactive cations. Multiple redox cations in the colloidal state can show high redox activities, making them more suitable for potential application in pseudocapacitor systems.A new ``combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitor'' was demonstrated by designing combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitors with binary AxB1-x salt electrodes involving manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel cations in an alkaline aqueous electrolyte. Binary multi-valence cations were crystallized in the colloidal state through an in situ coprecipitation under an electric field. These electroactive colloids absorbed by carbon black and the PVDF matrix are highly redox-reactive with high specific capacitance values, where the specific electrode configuration can create short ion diffusion paths to enable fast and reversible Faradaic reactions. This work shows huge promise for developing high-performance electrical energy storage systems via designing the colloidal state of electroactive cations. Multiple redox cations in the colloidal state can show high redox activities, making them more suitable for potential application in pseudocapacitor systems. Electronic supplementary

  2. Manganese recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the flow and processing of manganese within the U.S. economy in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which manganese is recycled. Manganese was used mostly as an alloying agent in alloys in which it was a minor component. Manganese was recycled mostly within scrap of iron and steel. A small amount was recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Very little manganese was recycled from materials being recovered specifically for their manganese content. For the United States in 1998, 218,000 metric tons of manganese was estimated to have been recycled from old scrap, of which 96% was from iron and steel scrap. Efficiency of recycling was estimated as 53% and recycling rate as 37%. Metallurgical loss of manganese was estimated to be about 1.7 times that recycled. This loss was mostly into slags from iron and steel production, from which recovery of manganese has yet to be shown economically feasible.

  3. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  4. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  5. Repeated surveillance of exposure to cadmium, manganese, and arsenic in school-age children living in rural, urban, and nonferrous smelter areas in Belgium

    SciTech Connect

    Buchet, J.P.; Roels, H.; Lauwerys, R.; Bruaux, P.; Claeys-Thoreau, F.; Lafontaine, A.; Verduyn, G.

    1980-06-01

    The intensity of exposure to Cd, As, Mn in groups of school-age children living around a lead smelter was assessed. By comparison, groups of children living in an urban and a rural area were also examined. The metal content of blood, urine, hand-rinsing, air, dust, and dirt collected in the school-playground was compared. The urinary excretion of cadmium in children living around the lead smelter is greater than in those living in the urban and in the rural area. In the latter there seems to exist a time-dependent trend in the renal accumulation of cadmium. This suggests that the overall pollution of the environment by cadmium in Belgium is progressively increasing. In the smelter area, both the oral and pulmonary routes play a role in the children's exposure to cadmium. Their relative contribution to the amount of cadmium absorbed appears similar. The concentration of arsenic in urine of children living around the smelter is significantly higher than that of rural children. Speciation of the chemical forms of arsenic in urine indicates that the difference is not due to different dietary habits of the children examined but to different intensity of exposure to inorganic arsenic. The amount of arsenic on the hand of children living at less than 1 km from the smelter (anti X = 17.6 ..mu..g As/hand) was more than 10 times that found in children living at 2.5 km from the plant (anti X = 1.5 ..mu..g As/hand) whereas that found in children living in urban and rural areas was below 0.2 ..mu..g As/hand. The arsenic concentration of dust and dirt collected in the school-playground in the different areas follows the same trend.

  6. Detection of copper, lead, cadmium and iron in wine using electronic tongue sensor system.

    PubMed

    Simões da Costa, A M; Delgadillo, I; Rudnitskaya, A

    2014-11-01

    An array of 10 potentiometric chemical sensors has been applied to the detection of total Fe, Cu, Pb and Cd content in digested wine. As digestion of organic matter of wine is necessary prior to the trace metal detection using potentiometric sensors, sample preparation procedures have been optimized. Different variants of wet and microwave digestion and dry ashing, 14 conditions in total, have been tested. Decomposition of organic matter was assessed using Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy and total phenolic content. Dry ashing was found to be the most effective method of wine digestion. Measurements with sensors in individual solutions of Fe(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) prepared on different backgrounds have shown that their detection limits were below typical concentration levels of these metals in wines and, in the case of Cu, Pb and Cd below maximum allowed concentrations. Detection of Fe in digested wine samples was possible using discrete iron-sensitive sensors with chalcogenide glass membranes with RMSEP of 0.05 mmol L(-1) in the concentration range from 0.0786 to 0.472 mmol L(-1). Low concentration levels of Cu, Pb and Cd in wine and cross-sensitivity of respective sensors resulted in the non-linearity of their responses, requiring back-propagation neural network for the calibration. Calibration models have been calculated using measurements in the model mixed solutions containing all three metals and a set of digested wine sample. RMSEP values for Cu, Pb and Cd were 3.9, 39 and 1.2 μmol L(-1) in model solutions and 2, 150 and 1 μmol L(-1) in digested wine samples. PMID:25127565

  7. Cobalt, manganese, and iron near the Hawaiian Islands: A potential concentrating mechanism for cobalt within a cyclonic eddy and implications for the hybrid-type trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Abigail E.; Saito, Mak A.; Maiti, Kanchan; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2008-05-01

    The vertical distributions of cobalt, iron, and manganese in the water column were studied during the E-Flux Program (E-Flux II and III), which focused on the biogeochemistry of cold-core cyclonic eddies that form in the lee of the Hawaiian Islands. During E-Flux II (January 2005) and E-Flux III (March 2005), 17 stations were sampled for cobalt ( n=147), all of which demonstrated nutrient-like depletion in surface waters. During E-Flux III, two depth profiles collected from within a mesoscale cold-core eddy, Cyclone Opal, revealed small distinct maxima in cobalt at ˜100 m depth and a larger inventory of cobalt within the eddy. We hypothesize that this was due to a cobalt concentrating effect within the eddy, where upwelled cobalt was subsequently associated with sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) via biological activity and was released at a depth coincident with nearly complete POC remineralization [Benitez-Nelson, C., Bidigare, R.R., Dickey, T.D., Landry, M.R., Leonard, C.L., Brown, S.L., Nencioli, F., Rii, Y.M., Maiti, K., Becker, J.W., Bibby, T.S., Black, W., Cai, W.J., Carlson, C.A., Chen, F., Kuwahara, V.S., Mahaffey, C., McAndrew, P.M., Quay, P.D., Rappe, M.S., Selph, K.E., Simmons, M.P., Yang, E.J., 2007. Mesoscale eddies drive increased silica export in the subtropical Pacific Ocean. Science 316, 1017-1020]. There is also evidence for the formation of a correlation between cobalt and soluble reactive phosphorus during E-Flux III relative to the E-Flux II cruise that we suggest is due to increased productivity, implying a minimum threshold of primary production below which cobalt-phosphate coupling does not occur. Dissolved iron was measured in E-Flux II and found in somewhat elevated concentrations (˜0.5 nM) in surface waters relative to the iron depleted waters of the surrounding Pacific [Fitzwater, S.E., Coale, K.H., Gordon, M.R., Johnson, K.S., Ondrusek, M.E., 1996. Iron deficiency and phytoplankton growth in the equatorial Pacific. Deep

  8. Sedimentary profiles and sediment-water solute exchange of iron and manganese in reef- and river-dominated shelf regions of the Coral Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, Daniel M.; Tirendi, Frank; Christoffersen, Paul

    1993-02-01

    Vertical profiles and sediment-water solute exchange of iron and manganese were measured in reef- (central Great Barrier Reef Lagoon) and river-dominated (Fly Delta-Gulf of Papua) shelf regions of the Coral Sea. Solid-phase iron and manganese concentrations were greater in the Papuan deposits (Fe range: 42.8-98.3 mg g -1 sediment DW; Mn range: 423-2500 μg g -1 DW) than in the central GBR lagoon (Fe range: 4.0-40.0 mg g -1 DW; Mn range: 99-496 μg g -1 DW), reflecting generally smaller grain size and higher rates of terrigenous runoff from the Fly River and associated river systems onto the adjacent Papuan shelf as well as dilution by calcium carbonate and a decline in terrestrial input across the GBR shelf. Dissolved metal concentrations in the porewaters were usually very low (Fe range: 0.1-28.0 μM; Mn range: 0.1-97.0 μM) and not significantly different between shelves. Vertical profiles of dissolved and solid-phase Fe and Mn either did not vary with sediment depth or were irregular at most stations. The dissolved Mn/Fe (molar) ratio varied greatly among stations, but was generally higher in the Papuan sediments (range: 1.2-46.4) than in the GBR deposits (range: 0.3-18.1). The solid-phase Mn/Fe (molar) ratio varied little among stations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.03. Solid-phase metal concentrations correlated negatively with calcium carbonate content. When this relationship was held constant (partial correlation analysis), solid-phase Fe and Mn correlated negatively with grain size and positively with total N (Fe only) and P. Metal solutes in the porewater correlated negatively with redox potential and grain size (Mn only) and positively with porewater NH 4+ (Mn only). Rates of Fe and Mn solute flux across the sediment-water interface were, at most stations, undetectable. Measurable fluxes ranged from -609 to +125 μmol m -2 day -1 for iron and from -218 to +400 μmol m -2 day -1 for manganese. The distribution and diagenesis of Fe and Mn in these tropical shelf

  9. Study on determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water by solid-phase extraction and RP-HPLC with 2-(2-quinolinylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol as precolumn derivatizing reagent.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiufen; Yang, Guanyu; Yang, Jihong; Yin, Jiayuan

    2002-12-01

    A new method for the determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water by the reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with 2-(2-quinolinylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (QADEAP) as precolumn derivatizing reagent was studied in this paper. The iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, and manganese ions react with QADEAP to form color chelates in the presence of cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and acetic acid-sodium acetic buffer solution medium of pH 4.0. These chelates were enriched by solid-phase extraction with a Waters Nova-Pak C18 cartridge and eluted the retained chelates from the cartridge with tetrahydrofuran (THF). The enrichment factor of 100 was achieved. Then the chelates were separated on a Waters Nova-Pak C18 column (3.9 x 150 mm, 5 microm) by gradient elution with methanol (containing 0.2% of acetic acid and 0.1% of CTMAB) and 0.05 mol L(-1) acetic acid-sodium acetic buffer solution (containing 0.1% of CTMAB) (pH 4.0) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 ml min(-1), and monitored with a photodiode array detector from 450 approximately 700 nm. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese are 0.8, 1.1, 0.9, 1.1, 1.5 and 2.0 ng L(-1), respectively, in the original sample. This method can be applied to determination at the microg L(-1) level of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc and manganese in drinking water with good results. PMID:12509050

  10. Manganese doped-iron oxide nanoparticle clusters and their potential as agents for magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Casula, Maria F; Conca, Erika; Bakaimi, Ioanna; Sathya, Ayyappan; Materia, Maria Elena; Casu, Alberto; Falqui, Andrea; Sogne, Elisa; Pellegrino, Teresa; Kanaras, Antonios G

    2016-06-22

    A simple, one pot method to synthesize water-dispersible Mn doped iron oxide colloidal clusters constructed of nanoparticles arranged into secondary flower-like structures was developed. This method allows the successful incorporation and homogeneous distribution of Mn within the nanoparticle iron oxide clusters. The formed clusters retain the desired morphological and structural features observed for pure iron oxide clusters, but possess intrinsic magnetic properties that arise from Mn doping. They show distinct performance as imaging contrast agents and excellent characteristics as heating mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. It is expected that the outcomes of this study will open up new avenues for the exploitation of doped magnetic nanoparticle assemblies in biomedicine. PMID:27282828